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Sample records for human gut flora

  1. Geographic differences in digoxin inactivation, a metabolic activity of the human anaerobic gut flora.

    PubMed Central

    Mathan, V I; Wiederman, J; Dobkin, J F; Lindenbaum, J

    1989-01-01

    The inactivation of digoxin by conversion to reduced metabolites (digoxin reduction products, or DRP), a function of the anaerobic gut flora, was studied in normal volunteers from southern India and the United States. Digoxin was metabolised to DRP by 28 (13.7%) of 204 healthy south Indians in contrast to 67 (36.0%) of 186 New Yorkers (p less than 1 X 10(-6)). Only 1.0% of Indians compared with 14.0% of Americans excreted large amounts of metabolites (greater than 40% DRP) in the urine (p less than 1 X 10(-5)). Of 104 urban Indians, 23 (22.1%) were metabolisers, in contrast with five of 100 rural villagers (p less than 0.001). Within the urban group, digoxin metabolism correlated with education, frequency of animal protein intake, and most significantly, personal income. Organisms capable of reducing digoxin in vitro were found with similar frequencies in stool cultures from Indians and Americans. In the cultures of some subjects, DRP production was inhibited at lower dilutions but expressed at higher dilutions. We conclude that variations in drug metabolism between population groups may result from differences in the metabolic activity of the anaerobic gut flora probably mediated by environmentally determined factors. PMID:2759492

  2. [Multiple Sclerosis and Commensal Gut Flora].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Although a symbiotic relationship between commensal gut microbiota and host is widely appreciated, recent works have indicated that normal gut flora functions to prevent inflammatory bowel diseases and obesity in the host, indicating a more mutualistic relationship. Dysbiosis of the commensal flora may lead to development of these disorders. Studies using experimental auto immune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS), revealed that onset of MS may be triggered by dysbiosis in the gut. We recently revealed a significant reduction in certain clostridia strains, which probably function to induce regulatory T cells, in the gut microbiota of patients with MS. Results from this study should be consideved when designing strategies for the prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:27279159

  3. Resistant starch modifies gut microflora and microbial metabolism in human flora-associated rats inoculated with faeces from Italian and UK donors.

    PubMed

    Silvi, S; Rumney, C J; Cresci, A; Rowland, I R

    1999-03-01

    The effect of sucrose and resistant starch ('CrystaLean'--a retrograded, amylose starch) on human gut microflora and associated parameters was studied in human flora-associated (HFA) rats, colonized with microfloras from UK or Italian subjects, to determine whether such floras were affected differently by dietary carbohydrates. Consumption of the resistant starch diet resulted in significant changes in four of the seven main groups of bacteria enumerated. In both the UK and Italian flora-associated rats, numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were increased 10-100-fold, and there was a concomitant decrease in enterobacteria when compared with sucrose-fed rats. The induced changes in caecal microflora of both HFA rat groups were reflected in changes in bacterial enzyme activities and caecal ammonia concentration. Although it had little effect on caecal short-chain fatty acid concentration, CrystaLean markedly increased the proportion of n-butyric acid in both rat groups and was associated with a significant increase in cell proliferation in the proximal colon of the Italian flora-associated rats. CrystaLean appeared to play a protective role in the colon environment, lowering caecal ammonia concentration, caecal pH and beta-glucuronidase activity. PMID:10196757

  4. The gut flora as a forgotten organ

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Ann M; Shanahan, Fergus

    2006-01-01

    The intestinal microflora is a positive health asset that crucially influences the normal structural and functional development of the mucosal immune system. Mucosal immune responses to resident intestinal microflora require precise control and an immunosensory capacity for distinguishing commensal from pathogenic bacteria. In genetically susceptible individuals, some components of the flora can become a liability and contribute to the pathogenesis of various intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases. It follows that manipulation of the flora to enhance the beneficial components represents a promising therapeutic strategy. The flora has a collective metabolic activity equal to a virtual organ within an organ, and the mechanisms underlying the conditioning influence of the bacteria on mucosal homeostasis and immune responses are beginning to be unravelled. An improved understanding of this hidden organ will reveal secrets that are relevant to human health and to several infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disease processes. PMID:16819463

  5. Products formed during fermentation of the prebiotic inulin with human gut flora enhance expression of biotransformation genes in human primary colon cells.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Julia; Richter, Konrad Klaus; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice Louise

    2007-05-01

    Inulin-type fructans are fermented by gut bacteria to yield SCFA, including butyrate which is trophic for colonocytes and induces glutathione S-transferases (GST) that detoxify carcinogens. Since little is known on similar effects by complex fermentation samples, we studied related products in non-transformed human colonocytes. Inulin enriched with oligofructose (1:1, Synergy1) was fermented with human gut flora. SCFA were quantified and a SCFA mixture was prepared accordingly. Colonocytes were incubated (4-12 h) with the Synergy1 fermentation supernatant (SFS), faeces control, a mixture of the three major SCFA (each 0-15 %, v/v) or butyrate (0-50 mM). Metabolic activity was determined to assess trophic effects and cytotoxicity. Expression of ninety-six genes related to biotransformation was studied using cDNA macroarrays. Results on modulated GST were reassessed with real-time PCR and GST activity was measured. Fermentation of inulin resulted in 2-3-fold increases of SCFA. The samples were non-cytotoxic. SFS increased metabolic activity, pointing to trophic effects. The samples modulated gene expression with different response patterns. Key results were that GSTM2 (2.0-fold) and GSTM5 (2.2-fold) were enhanced by SFS, whereas the SCFA mixture reduced expression. The faeces control enhanced GSTA4 (2.0-fold), but reduced GSTM2 (0.2-fold) and GSTM5 (0.2-fold). Realtime qPCR confirmed the induction of GSTM2 and GSTM5 by SFS and of GSTA4 and GSTT2 by butyrate. Activity of GST was not modulated. High concentrations of fermentation products were well tolerated by primary colonocytes, pointing to trophic effects. The induction of GST by the SFS may protect the cells from carcinogenic compounds. PMID:17381985

  6. Both wheat (Triticum aestivum) bran arabinoxylans and gut flora-mediated fermentation products protect human colon cells from genotoxic activities of 4-hydroxynonenal and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Glei, Michael; Hofmann, Thomas; Küster, Katrin; Hollmann, Jürgen; Lindhauer, Meinolf G; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L

    2006-03-22

    Dietary fibers are fermented by the gut flora to yield short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which inhibit the growth of tumor cells, induce glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and protect cells from the genotoxic activity of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). Here, we investigated effects of wheat bran-derived arabinoxylans and fermentation products on these parameters of chemoprevention. Newly isolated water extractable (WeAx) and alkali extractable arabinoxylans (AeAx) were fermented under anaerobic conditions with human feces. Resulting fermentation supernatants (FSs) were analyzed for SCFAs and used to treat HT29 colon cancer cells. Cell growth, cytotoxicity, antigenotoxicity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or HNE, and GST activity were determined. Nonfermented WeAx decreased H2O2-induced DNA damage by 64%, thus demonstrating chemoprotective properties by this nonfermented wheat bran fiber. The fermentation of WeAx and AeAx resulted in 3-fold increases of SCFA, but all FSs (including the control without arabinoxylans) inhibited the growth of the HT29 cells, reduced the genotoxicity of HNE, and enhanced the activity of GSTs (FS WeAx, 2-fold; FS AeAx, 1.7-fold; and control FS, 1.4-fold), which detoxify HNE. Thus, increases in SCFAs were not reflected by enhanced functional effects. The conclusion is that fermentation mixtures contain modulatory compounds that arise from the feces and might add to the effectiveness of SCFAs. PMID:16536580

  7. Human gut flora-fermented nondigestible fraction from cooked bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) modifies protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation in human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Campos-Vega, Rocio; García-Gasca, Teresa; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramón; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva; Oomah, B Dave; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2012-12-26

    Metabolism of the nondigested fraction (NDF) from common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by the human gut flora (hgf) produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that may benefit cancer by reducing colorectal tumor risks. This paper reports the effect of fermentation products (FP) by hgf (FP-hgf) from NDF of cooked beans on survival and protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation in human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells. FP-hgf was the only inoculum eliciting butyrate production after 24 h of NDF fermentation using different bacterial sources. FP-hgf inhibited HT-29 cell growth and modulated protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation, as well as morphological changes linked to apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL and hematoxylin and eosin stains, confirming previous results on gene expression. The current results suggest that fermentation of NDF from common beans can elicit beneficial chemoprotective effects in colon cancer by modulating protein expression in HT-29 cells. PMID:23194196

  8. Gut flora metabolism of phosphatidylcholine promotes cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeneng; Klipfell, Elizabeth; Bennett, Brian J.; Koeth, Robert; Levison, Bruce S.; DuGar, Brandon; Feldstein, Ariel E.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Chung, Yoon-Mi; Wu, Yuping; Schauer, Phil; Smith, Jonathan D.; Allayee, Hooman; Tang, W. H. Wilson; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics studies hold promise for discovery of pathways linked to disease processes. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide. A metabolomics approach was used to generate unbiased small molecule metabolic profiles in plasma that predict risk for CVD. Three metabolites of the dietary lipid phosphatidylcholine, namely choline, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), and betaine, were identified and then shown to predict risk for CVD in an independent large clinical cohort. Dietary supplementation of mice with choline, TMAO or betaine promoted up-regulation of multiple macrophage scavenger receptors linked to atherosclerosis, and supplementation with choline or TMAO promoted atherosclerosis. Studies using germ-free mice confirmed a critical role for dietary choline and gut flora in TMAO production, augmented macrophage cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation. Suppression of intestinal microflora in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibited dietary choline-enhanced atherosclerosis. Genetic variations controlling expression of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), an enzymatic source of TMAO, segregated with atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. Discovery of a relationship between gut flora-dependent metabolism of dietary phosphatidylcholine and CVD pathogenesis provides opportunities for development of both novel diagnostic tests and therapeutic approaches for atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:21475195

  9. Healthy human gut phageome.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M; Young, Mark J

    2016-09-13

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20-50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  10. Modulating the gut flora alters amino acid metabolism in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal microbes consume and produce amino acids (AA). This may impact intestinal threonine (THR) metabolism necessary for adequate gut function. We hypothesized that modulating the gut flora results in an alteration of intestinal THR utilization and hence whole body AA metabolism. Neonatal pigs ...

  11. The Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Hermie J M; de Goffau, Marcus C

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota in our gut performs many different essential functions that help us to stay healthy. These functions include vitamin production, regulation of lipid metabolism and short chain fatty acid production as fuel for epithelial cells and regulation of gene expression. There is a very numerous and diverse microbial community present in the gut, especially in the colon, with reported numbers of species that vary between 400 and 1500, for some those we even do not yet have culture representatives.A healthy gut microbiota is important for maintaining a healthy host. An aberrant microbiota can cause diseases of different nature and at different ages ranging from allergies at early age to IBD in young adults. This shows that our gut microbiota needs to be treated well to stay healthy. In this chapter we describe what we consider a healthy microbiota and discuss what the role of the microbiota is in various diseases. Research into these described dysbiosis conditions could lead to new strategies for treatment and/or management of our microbiota to improve health. PMID:27161353

  12. Malnutrition and Gut Flora Dysbiosis: Specific Therapies for Emerging Comorbidities in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pasini, Evasio; Aquilani, Roberto; Corsetti, Giovanni; Dioguardi, Francesco S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is a complicated multifactorial disease with wide-spread social-economic consequences. In spite of the recent development of new drugs and therapeutic strategies, CHF-related mortality and morbidity remain high. Recent evidence suggests that changes in organs such as skeletal muscle and gut flora may play an important and independent role in CHF prognosis. This paper illustrates these phenomena, proposing how to identify them and presenting current therapies which treat organs all too often underestimated but which have a fundamental role in worsening CHF. PMID:26491666

  13. Real-time analysis of gut flora in Entamoeba histolytica infected patients of Northern India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Amebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and the ingestion of quadrinucleate cyst of E. histolytica from fecally contaminated food or water initiates infection. Excystation occurs in the lumen of small intestine, where motile and potentially invasive trophozoites germinate from cysts. The ability of trophozoites to interact and digest gut bacteria is apparently important for multiplication of the parasite and its pathogenicity; however the contribution of resident bacterial flora is not well understood. We quantified the population of Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Clostridium coccoides subgroup, Eubacterium, Campylobacter, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Sulphur reducing bacteria using genus specific primers in healthy (N = 22) vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive, N = 17) stool samples by Real-time PCR. Results Absolute quantification of Bacteroides (p = .001), Closrtridium coccoides subgroup (p = 0.002), Clostridium leptum subgroup (p = 0.0001), Lactobacillus (p = 0.037), Campylobacter (p = 0.0014) and Eubacterium (p = 0.038) show significant drop in their population however, significant increase in Bifdobacterium (p = 0.009) was observed where as the population of Ruminococcus (p = 0.33) remained unaltered in healthy vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive). We also report high prevalence of nimE gene in stool samples of both healthy volunteers and amebic patients. No significant decrease in nimE gene copy number was observed before and after the treatment with antiamebic drug. Conclusions Our results show significant alteration in predominant gut bacteria in E. histolytica infected individuals. The frequent episodes of intestinal amoebic dysentery thus result in depletion of few predominant genera in gut that may lead to poor digestion and absorption of food in intestine. It further disturbs the homeostasis

  14. Rapid changes in the gut microbiome during human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Andrew H.; Li, Yingying; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Pusey, Anne E.; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ochman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Humans are ecosystems containing trillions of microorganisms, but the evolutionary history of this microbiome is obscured by a lack of knowledge about microbiomes of African apes. We sequenced the gut communities of hundreds of chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas and developed a phylogenetic approach to reconstruct how present-day human microbiomes have diverged from those of ancestral populations. Compositional change in the microbiome was slow and clock-like during African ape diversification, but human microbiomes have deviated from the ancestral state at an accelerated rate. Relative to the microbiomes of wild apes, human microbiomes have lost ancestral microbial diversity while becoming specialized for animal-based diets. Individual wild apes cultivate more phyla, classes, orders, families, genera, and species of bacteria than do individual humans across a range of societies. These results indicate that humanity has experienced a depletion of the gut flora since diverging from Pan. PMID:25368157

  15. Rapid changes in the gut microbiome during human evolution.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Andrew H; Li, Yingying; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Pusey, Anne E; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2014-11-18

    Humans are ecosystems containing trillions of microorganisms, but the evolutionary history of this microbiome is obscured by a lack of knowledge about microbiomes of African apes. We sequenced the gut communities of hundreds of chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas and developed a phylogenetic approach to reconstruct how present-day human microbiomes have diverged from those of ancestral populations. Compositional change in the microbiome was slow and clock-like during African ape diversification, but human microbiomes have deviated from the ancestral state at an accelerated rate. Relative to the microbiomes of wild apes, human microbiomes have lost ancestral microbial diversity while becoming specialized for animal-based diets. Individual wild apes cultivate more phyla, classes, orders, families, genera, and species of bacteria than do individual humans across a range of societies. These results indicate that humanity has experienced a depletion of the gut flora since diverging from Pan. PMID:25368157

  16. Naturally Occurring Culturable Aerobic Gut Flora of Adult Phlebotomus papatasi, Vector of Leishmania major in the Old World

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Jaba; Braig, Henk R.; Rowton, Edgar D.; Ghosh, Kashinath

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected, vector-borne parasitic disease and is responsible for persistent, often disfiguring lesions and other associated complications. Leishmania, causing zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the Old World are mainly transmitted by the predominant sand fly vector, Phlebotomus papatasi. To date, there is no efficient control measure or vaccine available for this widespread insect-borne infectious disease. Methodology/Principal Findings A survey was carried out to study the abundance of different natural gut flora in P. papatasi, with the long-term goal of generating a paratransgenic sand fly that can potentially block the development of Leishmania in the sand fly gut, thereby preventing transmission of leishmania in endemic disease foci. Sand flies, in particular, P. papatasi were captured from different habitats of various parts of the world. Gut microbes were cultured and identified using 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. We found variation in the species and abundance of gut flora in flies collected from different habitats. However, a few Gram-positive, nonpathogenic bacteria including Bacillus flexus and B. pumilus were common in most of the sites examined. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that there is a wide range of variation of aerobic gut flora inhabiting sand fly guts, which possibly reflect the ecological condition of the habitat where the fly breeds. Also, some species of bacteria (B. pumilus, and B. flexus) were found from most of the habitats. Important from an applied perspective of dissemination, our results support a link between oviposition induction and adult gut flora. PMID:22629302

  17. An in vitro metabolic system of gut flora and the metabolism of ginsenoside Rg3 and cholic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunyan; Sun, Runbin; Cao, Bei; Gu, Shenghua; Zhao, Jieyu; Liu, Linsheng; Wang, Xinwen; Zha, Weibin; Yu, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Wenjing; Mao, Yong; Ge, Chun; Ju, Jiaqi; Aa, Lixiang; Fei, Fei; Ding, Yi; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2014-06-01

    For orally administered drugs, the metabolism of a drug by the gut flora plays an important role in the bioavailability, activation and disposition of the drug in vivo. However, no in vitro system is currently available to evaluate the metabolism of a drug by the gut flora before the drug is absorbed into the body. This paper presents an in vitro metabolic system in an anaerobic environment that could be used to evaluate the metabolism of an endogenous compound, cholic acid, and a xenobiotic compound, ginsenoside Rg3. We showed that the proliferation of the anaerobic bacteria of the gut content of hamsters produced a similar composition of gut flora in a culture medium for yeast to that in vivo. Incubation of ginsenoside Rg3 and cholic acid in the anaerobic in vitro system efficiently produced the metabolites Rh2 and deoxycholic acid, respectively, similar to those seen in the gut content in vivo. In comparison with in vivo analysis, this anaerobic in vitro metabolic system is convenient, reproducible, economic and animal saving, and can easily be applied to assess the transformation and disposition of a drug before it enters into the circulatory system. PMID:23749587

  18. FLORA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-04-01

    FLORA solves, in a 2D domain for the linearized stability of a long-thin (paraxial)axisymmetric equilibrium. This is of interest for determining the magnetohydrodynamic stability of a magnetic mirror plasma confinement system including finite-Larmor radius and rotation effects. An axisymmetric plasma equilibrium is specified by providing pressure profiles, the plasma mass density, the vacuum magnetic fields, and plasma electric potential as functions of (?).

  19. Ecological consequences of ingestion of Bacillus cereus on Bacillus thuringiensis infections and on the gut flora of a lepidopteran host.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Ben; Lijek, Rebeccah S; Griffiths, Robert I; Bonsall, Michael B

    2008-09-01

    The Bacillus cereus group comprises a diverse array of non-pathogenic bacteria as well as pathogens such as Bacillus thuringiensis. Their spores are found together in soil and leaves and are therefore likely to commonly interact within hosts. Mixed infections of pathogenic B. thuringiensis and non-pathogenic strains have been little studied, despite their potential impact on biological control and the evolutionary ecology of virulence. Antibiotic secreting strains of B. cereus have been shown to be able to synergize B. thuringiensis (Bt) infections. We explored the ecology of these mixed infections more broadly in the diamondback moth (DBM). We tested whether antibiotic-expressing B. cereus can synergize Bt infections initiated with spores, investigated whether ingestion of antibiotic-expressing B. cereus had any consequences for the larval gut flora and whether synergistic interactions with B. cereus increase Bt reproduction. Ingestion of high-antibiotic secreting B. cereus synergized infections of B. thuringiensis in diamondback moth larvae, but at a lower level than previously reported. Coinfection also increased slightly the number of Bt spores found in cadavers. Culture independent analysis of gut homogenates indicated that ingestion of an antibiotic-expressing strain of B. cereus reduced the abundance of the gut flora and led to gut communities being dominated bacteria with DGGE profiles very similar to pure B. cereus cultures. Ingestion of B. cereus, regardless of genotype, reduced densities of an enteric isolate of Enterobacter sp. These findings support the hypothesis that antibiotic secretion in the gut synergizes B. thuringiensis infections by reducing the abundance of the commensal gut flora and facilitating invasion by bacteria in the B. cereus group. PMID:18533180

  20. Antibiotic residues and drug resistance in human intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, D E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of residual levels of ampicillin on the drug resistance of fecal flora was studied in human volunteers given 1.5 mg of ampicillin orally per day for 21 days. This treatment failed to have any significant reproducible effect on the number of resistant Escherichia coli in their feces. The effect of continuous administration of small doses of ampicillin, chlortetracycline, or streptomycin in the drinking water was studied in gnotobiotic mice inoculated with a human fecal flora. In this animal model, which is free of many interfering factors, an increase in the fecal concentration of resistant E. coli was observed when the mice were given 0.5 microgram of ampicillin or chlortetracycline per ml of water. This model is therefore a sensitive system for testing the effect of antimicrobial drugs on the resistance characteristics of the intestinal flora. PMID:3300533

  1. Seasonal Variation in Human Gut Microbiome Composition

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Mizrahi-Man, Orna; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiome is influenced by many environmental factors. Diet is thought to be one of the most important determinants, though we have limited understanding of the extent to which dietary fluctuations alter variation in the gut microbiome between individuals. In this study, we examined variation in gut microbiome composition between winter and summer over the course of one year in 60 members of a founder population, the Hutterites. Because of their communal lifestyle, Hutterite diets are similar across individuals and remarkably stable throughout the year, with the exception that fresh produce is primarily served during the summer and autumn months. Our data indicate that despite overall gut microbiome stability within individuals over time, there are consistent and significant population-wide shifts in microbiome composition across seasons. We found seasonal differences in both (i) the abundance of particular taxa (false discovery rate <0.05), including highly abundant phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and (ii) overall gut microbiome diversity (by Shannon diversity; P = 0.001). It is likely that the dietary fluctuations between seasons with respect to produce availability explain, at least in part, these differences in microbiome composition. For example, high levels of produce containing complex carbohydrates consumed during the summer months might explain increased abundance of Bacteroidetes, which contain complex carbohydrate digesters, and decreased levels of Actinobacteria, which have been negatively correlated to fiber content in food questionnaires. Our observations demonstrate the plastic nature of the human gut microbiome in response to variation in diet. PMID:24618913

  2. Insights from Characterizing Extinct Human Gut Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Tito, Raul Y.; Knights, Dan; Metcalf, Jessica; Obregon-Tito, Alexandra J.; Cleeland, Lauren; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Reinhard, Karl; Sobolik, Kristin; Belknap, Samuel; Foster, Morris; Spicer, Paul; Knight, Rob; Lewis, Cecil M.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the ancestral state of the human distal gut microbiome, we examine feces retrieved from archaeological contexts (coprolites). To accomplish this, we pyrosequenced the 16S rDNA V3 region from duplicate coprolite samples recovered from three archaeological sites, each representing a different depositional environment: Hinds Cave (∼8000 years B.P.) in the southern United States, Caserones (1600 years B.P.) in northern Chile, and Rio Zape in northern Mexico (1400 years B.P.). Clustering algorithms grouped samples from the same site. Phyletic representation was more similar within sites than between them. A Bayesian approach to source-tracking was used to compare the coprolite data to published data from known sources that include, soil, compost, human gut from rural African children, human gut, oral and skin from US cosmopolitan adults and non-human primate gut. The data from the Hinds Cave samples largely represented unknown sources. The Caserones samples, retrieved directly from natural mummies, matched compost in high proportion. A substantial and robust proportion of Rio Zape data was predicted to match the gut microbiome found in traditional rural communities, with more minor matches to other sources. One of the Rio Zape samples had taxonomic representation consistent with a child. To provide an idealized scenario for sample preservation, we also applied source tracking to previously published data for Ötzi the Iceman and a soldier frozen for 93 years on a glacier. Overall these studies reveal that human microbiome data has been preserved in some coprolites, and these preserved human microbiomes match more closely to those from the rural communities than to those from cosmopolitan communities. These results suggest that the modern cosmopolitan lifestyle resulted in a dramatic change to the human gut microbiome. PMID:23251439

  3. Insights from characterizing extinct human gut microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Tito, Raul Y; Knights, Dan; Metcalf, Jessica; Obregon-Tito, Alexandra J; Cleeland, Lauren; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Reinhard, Karl; Sobolik, Kristin; Belknap, Samuel; Foster, Morris; Spicer, Paul; Knight, Rob; Lewis, Cecil M

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the ancestral state of the human distal gut microbiome, we examine feces retrieved from archaeological contexts (coprolites). To accomplish this, we pyrosequenced the 16S rDNA V3 region from duplicate coprolite samples recovered from three archaeological sites, each representing a different depositional environment: Hinds Cave (~8000 years B.P.) in the southern United States, Caserones (1600 years B.P.) in northern Chile, and Rio Zape in northern Mexico (1400 years B.P.). Clustering algorithms grouped samples from the same site. Phyletic representation was more similar within sites than between them. A Bayesian approach to source-tracking was used to compare the coprolite data to published data from known sources that include, soil, compost, human gut from rural African children, human gut, oral and skin from US cosmopolitan adults and non-human primate gut. The data from the Hinds Cave samples largely represented unknown sources. The Caserones samples, retrieved directly from natural mummies, matched compost in high proportion. A substantial and robust proportion of Rio Zape data was predicted to match the gut microbiome found in traditional rural communities, with more minor matches to other sources. One of the Rio Zape samples had taxonomic representation consistent with a child. To provide an idealized scenario for sample preservation, we also applied source tracking to previously published data for Ötzi the Iceman and a soldier frozen for 93 years on a glacier. Overall these studies reveal that human microbiome data has been preserved in some coprolites, and these preserved human microbiomes match more closely to those from the rural communities than to those from cosmopolitan communities. These results suggest that the modern cosmopolitan lifestyle resulted in a dramatic change to the human gut microbiome. PMID:23251439

  4. Alteration in Bacillus thuringiensis toxicity by curing gut flora: novel approach for mosquito resistance management.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2013-09-01

    Mosquitoes are known for acquiring resistance against insecticides in many ways, namely target side mutation, enzyme modification, sequestration, quick elimination, etc. But, the role of microflora present in abundance in the larval midgut is less explored with respect to their role in insecticide resistance. During the course of their development, mosquitoes are continuously exposed to microbes and have naturally acquired midgut microbial flora. This midgut flora can modulate the mosquito's susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) infection by degrading toxic Bt protein forms through an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that microbe-free aseptic mosquito larvae displayed an increased susceptibility to Bt toxicity compared to larvae harboring natural microbial flora. Fourth instar larvae of Anopheles stephensi were treated separately with penicillin, streptomycin, erythromycin (100 μg/ml), and mixtures of all three antibiotics and then analyzed for Bt toxicity. We have also examined the influence of the mosquito's midgut microbial flora under microaerophilic condition on the Bt protein degradation through plate, broth, TLC, and UV-vis spectrophotometric assay. A better understanding of the roles of microbiota in preventing Bt toxicity to mosquitoes could potentially lead to the development of new sustainable mosquito control strategies. PMID:23820604

  5. Human genetics shape the gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Julia K.; Waters, Jillian L.; Poole, Angela C.; Sutter, Jessica L.; Koren, Omry; Blekhman, Ran; Beaumont, Michelle; Van Treuren, William; Knight, Rob; Bell, Jordana T.; Spector, Timothy D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Ley, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Host genetics and the gut microbiome can both influence metabolic phenotypes. However, whether host genetic variation shapes the gut microbiome and interacts with it to affect host phenotype is unclear. Here, we compared microbiotas across > 1,000 fecal samples obtained from the TwinsUK population, including 416 twin-pairs. We identified many microbial taxa whose abundances were influenced by host genetics. The most heritable taxon, the family Christensenellaceae, formed a cooccurrence network with other heritable Bacteria and with methanogenic Archaea. Furthermore, Christensenellaceae and its partners were enriched in individuals with low body mass index (BMI). An obese-associated microbiome was amended with Christensenella minuta, a cultured member of the Christensenellaceae, and transplanted to germfree mice. C. minuta amendment reduced weight gain and altered the microbiome of recipient mice. Our findings indicate that host genetics influence the composition of the human gut microbiome and can do so in ways that impact host metabolism. PMID:25417156

  6. The human gut virome: a multifaceted majority

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Jones, Brian V.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we outline our current understanding of the human gut virome, in particular the phage component of this ecosystem, highlighting progress, and challenges in viral discovery in this arena. We reveal how developments in high-throughput sequencing technologies and associated data analysis methodologies are helping to illuminate this abundant ‘biological dark matter.’ Current evidence suggests that the human gut virome is a highly individual but temporally stable collective, dominated by phages exhibiting a temperate lifestyle. This viral community also appears to encode a surprisingly rich functional repertoire that confers a range of attributes to their bacterial hosts, ranging from bacterial virulence and pathogenesis to maintaining host–microbiome stability and community resilience. Despite the significant advances in our understanding of the gut virome in recent years, it is clear that we remain in a period of discovery and revelation, as new methods and technologies begin to provide deeper understanding of the inherent ecological characteristics of this viral ecosystem. As our understanding increases, the nature of the multi-partite interactions occurring between host and microbiome will become clearer, helping us to more rationally define the concepts and principles that will underpin approaches to using human gut virome components for medical or biotechnological applications. PMID:26441861

  7. Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Protect Mice from Experimental Colitis by Promoting Normal Gut Flora and Preventing Induction of Interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sukumar; Jing, Xuefang; Park, Shin Yong; Wang, Shiyong; Li, Xinna; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY There are multiple mechanisms of maintaining tolerance in the gut that protect the intestine from excessive inflammatory response to intestinal microorganisms. We report here that all four mammalian Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs or Pglyrps) protect the host from colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Pglyrp1−/−, Pglyrp2−/−, Pglyrp3−/−, and Pglyrp4−/− mice are all more sensitive than wild type (WT) mice to DSS-induced colitis due to changes to more inflammatory gut microflora, higher production of interferon-γ and interferon-inducible genes, and increase in NK cells in the colon upon initial exposure to DSS, which leads to severe hyperplasia of the lamina propria, loss of epithelial cells, and ulceration in the colon. Thus in WT mice PGRPs protect the colon from early inflammatory response and loss of the barrier function of intestinal epithelium by promoting normal bacterial flora and by preventing damaging production of interferon-γ by NK cells in response to injury. PMID:20709292

  8. Commensal gut flora and brain autoimmunity: a love or hate affair?

    PubMed

    Berer, Kerstin; Krishnamoorthy, Gurumoorthy

    2012-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and other chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases represent major public health challenges in industrialised Western society. MS results from an autoimmune attack against myelin structures by self-reactive lymphocytes, which are normal components of the healthy immune repertoire. The nature of the triggers that convert the innocuous self-reactive lymphocytes into an autoaggressive phenotype is poorly understood. In the past, it was primarily suspected that pathogenic infections trigger MS. However, so far, none of the incriminated pathogenic microbes were firmly associated with the disease. A growing body of evidence in animal models of MS implicates the gut microbiota in the induction of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity. The mammalian gut harbors a diverse population of microbial organisms which are essential for our well being. There is an increasing understanding that the gut microbiota not only modulates the local immune functions but also affects the systemic immune system. We are only just beginning to understand the nature of the interactions of the gut microbiota with the host's immune system especially in the context of autoimmune diseases. This review will address the influence of intestinal microbiota on immune homeostasis and on the development of autoimmune responses at sites distal to the intestine with a particular emphasis placed on a discussion about CNS autoimmunity. PMID:22322994

  9. Rapid evolution of the human gut virome.

    PubMed

    Minot, Samuel; Bryson, Alexandra; Chehoud, Christel; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2013-07-23

    Humans are colonized by immense populations of viruses, which metagenomic analysis shows are mostly unique to each individual. To investigate the origin and evolution of the human gut virome, we analyzed the viral community of one adult individual over 2.5 y by extremely deep metagenomic sequencing (56 billion bases of purified viral sequence from 24 longitudinal fecal samples). After assembly, 478 well-determined contigs could be identified, which are inferred to correspond mostly to previously unstudied bacteriophage genomes. Fully 80% of these types persisted throughout the duration of the 2.5-y study, indicating long-term global stability. Mechanisms of base substitution, rates of accumulation, and the amount of variation varied among viral types. Temperate phages showed relatively lower mutation rates, consistent with replication by accurate bacterial DNA polymerases in the integrated prophage state. In contrast, Microviridae, which are lytic bacteriophages with single-stranded circular DNA genomes, showed high substitution rates (>10(-5) per nucleotide each day), so that sequence divergence over the 2.5-y period studied approached values sufficient to distinguish new viral species. Longitudinal changes also were associated with diversity-generating retroelements and virus-encoded Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats arrays. We infer that the extreme interpersonal diversity of human gut viruses derives from two sources, persistence of a small portion of the global virome within the gut of each individual and rapid evolution of some long-term virome members. PMID:23836644

  10. Human Gut Microbiota: Repertoire and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Million, Matthieu; Hugon, Perrine; Armougom, Fabrice; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The composition of human gut microbiota and their relationship with the host and, consequently, with human health and disease, presents several challenges to microbiologists. Originally dominated by culture-dependent methods for exploring this ecosystem, the advent of molecular tools has revolutionized our ability to investigate these relationships. However, many biases that have led to contradictory results have been identified. Microbial culturomics, a recent concept based on a use of several culture conditions with identification by MALDI-TOF followed by the genome sequencing of the new species cultured had allowed a complementarity with metagenomics. Culturomics allowed to isolate 31 new bacterial species, the largest human virus, the largest bacteria, and the largest Archaea from human. Moreover, some members of this ecosystem, such as Eukaryotes, giant viruses, Archaea, and Planctomycetes, have been neglected by the majority of studies. In addition, numerous factors, such as age, geographic provenance, dietary habits, antibiotics, or probiotics, can influence the composition of the microbiota. Finally, in addition to the countless biases associated with the study techniques, a considerable limitation to the interpretation of studies of human gut microbiota is associated with funding sources and transparency disclosures. In the future, studies independent of food industry funding and using complementary methods from a broad range of both culture-based and molecular tools will increase our knowledge of the repertoire of this complex ecosystem and host-microbiota mutualism. PMID:23130351

  11. Human gut microbiota: does diet matter?

    PubMed

    Maukonen, Johanna; Saarela, Maria

    2015-02-01

    The human oro-gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex system, consisting of oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum and anus, which all together with the accessory digestive organs constitute the digestive system. The function of the digestive system is to break down dietary constituents into small molecules and then absorb these for subsequent distribution throughout the body. Besides digestion and carbohydrate metabolism, the indigenous microbiota has an important influence on host physiological, nutritional and immunological processes, and commensal bacteria are able to modulate the expression of host genes that regulate diverse and fundamental physiological functions. The main external factors that can affect the composition of the microbial community in generally healthy adults include major dietary changes and antibiotic therapy. Changes in some selected bacterial groups have been observed due to controlled changes to the normal diet e.g. high-protein diet, high-fat diet, prebiotics, probiotics and polyphenols. More specifically, changes in the type and quantity of non-digestible carbohydrates in the human diet influence both the metabolic products formed in the lower regions of the GI tract and the bacterial populations detected in faeces. The interactions between dietary factors, gut microbiota and host metabolism are increasingly demonstrated to be important for maintaining homeostasis and health. Therefore the aim of this review is to summarise the effect of diet, and especially dietary interventions, on the human gut microbiota. Furthermore, the most important confounding factors (methodologies used and intrinsic human factors) in relation to gut microbiota analyses are elucidated. PMID:25156389

  12. Assessing the Human Gut Microbiota in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Tremaroli, Valentina; Nielsen, Jens; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that the gut microbiome complements our human genome with at least 100-fold more genes. In contrast to our Homo sapiens–derived genes, the microbiome is much more plastic, and its composition changes with age and diet, among other factors. An altered gut microbiota has been associated with several diseases, including obesity and diabetes, but the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we discuss factors that affect the gut microbiome, how the gut microbiome may contribute to metabolic diseases, and how to study the gut microbiome. Next-generation sequencing and development of software packages have led to the development of large-scale sequencing efforts to catalog the human microbiome. Furthermore, the use of genetically engineered gnotobiotic mouse models may increase our understanding of mechanisms by which the gut microbiome modulates host metabolism. A combination of classical microbiology, sequencing, and animal experiments may provide further insights into how the gut microbiota affect host metabolism and physiology. PMID:24065795

  13. Impacts of gut bacteria on human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Li, Sha; Gan, Ren-You; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases. PMID:25849657

  14. Impacts of Gut Bacteria on Human Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Li, Sha; Gan, Ren-You; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases. PMID:25849657

  15. Human gut microbiome viewed across age and geography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut microbial communities represent one source of human genetic and metabolic diversity. To examine how gut microbiomes differ among human populations, we characterized bacterial species in fecal samples from 531 individuals, plus the gene content of 110 of them. The cohort encompassed healthy child...

  16. Collective unconscious: how gut microbes shape human behavior.

    PubMed

    Dinan, Timothy G; Stilling, Roman M; Stanton, Catherine; Cryan, John F

    2015-04-01

    The human gut harbors a dynamic and complex microbial ecosystem, consisting of approximately 1 kg of bacteria in the average adult, approximately the weight of the human brain. The evolutionary formation of a complex gut microbiota in mammals has played an important role in enabling brain development and perhaps sophisticated social interaction. Genes within the human gut microbiota, termed the microbiome, significantly outnumber human genes in the body, and are capable of producing a myriad of neuroactive compounds. Gut microbes are part of the unconscious system regulating behavior. Recent investigations indicate that these microbes majorly impact on cognitive function and fundamental behavior patterns, such as social interaction and stress management. In the absence of microbes, underlying neurochemistry is profoundly altered. Studies of gut microbes may play an important role in advancing understanding of disorders of cognitive functioning and social interaction, such as autism. PMID:25772005

  17. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  18. Challenges of metabolomics in human gut microbiota research.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Kirill S; Maier, Tanja V; Walker, Alesia; Heinzmann, Silke S; Forcisi, Sara; Martinez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The review highlights the role of metabolomics in studying human gut microbial metabolism. Microbial communities in our gut exert a multitude of functions with huge impact on human health and disease. Within the meta-omics discipline, gut microbiome is studied by (meta)genomics, (meta)transcriptomics, (meta)proteomics and metabolomics. The goal of metabolomics research applied to fecal samples is to perform their metabolic profiling, to quantify compounds and classes of interest, to characterize small molecules produced by gut microbes. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are main technologies that are applied in fecal metabolomics. Metabolomics studies have been increasingly used in gut microbiota related research regarding health and disease with main focus on understanding inflammatory bowel diseases. The elucidated metabolites in this field are summarized in this review. We also addressed the main challenges of metabolomics in current and future gut microbiota research. The first challenge reflects the need of adequate analytical tools and pipelines, including sample handling, selection of appropriate equipment, and statistical evaluation to enable meaningful biological interpretation. The second challenge is related to the choice of the right animal model for studies on gut microbiota. We exemplified this using NMR spectroscopy for the investigation of cross-species comparison of fecal metabolite profiles. Finally, we present the problem of variability of human gut microbiota and metabolome that has important consequences on the concepts of personalized nutrition and medicine. PMID:27012595

  19. Gut Inflammation and Immunity: What Is the Role of the Human Gut Virome?

    PubMed Central

    Focà, Alfredo; Quirino, Angela; Marascio, Nadia; Zicca, Emilia; Pavia, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    The human virome comprises viruses that infect host cells, virus-derived elements in our chromosomes, and viruses that infect other organisms, including bacteriophages and plant viruses. The development of high-throughput sequencing techniques has shown that the human gut microbiome is a complex community in which the virome plays a crucial role into regulation of intestinal immunity and homeostasis. Nevertheless, the size of the human virome is still poorly understood. Indeed the enteric virome is in a continuous and dynamic equilibrium with other components of the gut microbiome and the gut immune system, an interaction that may influence the health and disease of the host. We review recent evidence on the viruses found in the gastrointestinal tract, discussing their interactions with the resident bacterial microbiota and the host immune system, in order to explore the potential impact of the virome on human health. PMID:25944980

  20. Obesity changes the human gut mycobiome

    PubMed Central

    Mar Rodríguez, M.; Pérez, Daniel; Javier Chaves, Felipe; Esteve, Eduardo; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Xifra, Gemma; Vendrell, Joan; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Chacón, Matilde R.; Fernández Real, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The human intestine is home to a diverse range of bacterial and fungal species, forming an ecological community that contributes to normal physiology and disease susceptibility. Here, the fungal microbiota (mycobiome) in obese and non-obese subjects was characterized using Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS)-based sequencing. The results demonstrate that obese patients could be discriminated by their specific fungal composition, which also distinguished metabolically “healthy” from “unhealthy” obesity. Clusters according to genus abundance co-segregated with body fatness, fasting triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. A preliminary link to metabolites such as hexadecanedioic acid, caproic acid and N-acetyl-L-glutamic acid was also found. Mucor racemosus and M. fuscus were the species more represented in non-obese subjects compared to obese counterparts. Interestingly, the decreased relative abundance of the Mucor genus in obese subjects was reversible upon weight loss. Collectively, these findings suggest that manipulation of gut mycobiome communities might be a novel target in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26455903

  1. Obesity changes the human gut mycobiome.

    PubMed

    Mar Rodríguez, M; Pérez, Daniel; Javier Chaves, Felipe; Esteve, Eduardo; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Xifra, Gemma; Vendrell, Joan; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Chacón, Matilde R; Fernández Real, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The human intestine is home to a diverse range of bacterial and fungal species, forming an ecological community that contributes to normal physiology and disease susceptibility. Here, the fungal microbiota (mycobiome) in obese and non-obese subjects was characterized using Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS)-based sequencing. The results demonstrate that obese patients could be discriminated by their specific fungal composition, which also distinguished metabolically "healthy" from "unhealthy" obesity. Clusters according to genus abundance co-segregated with body fatness, fasting triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. A preliminary link to metabolites such as hexadecanedioic acid, caproic acid and N-acetyl-L-glutamic acid was also found. Mucor racemosus and M. fuscus were the species more represented in non-obese subjects compared to obese counterparts. Interestingly, the decreased relative abundance of the Mucor genus in obese subjects was reversible upon weight loss. Collectively, these findings suggest that manipulation of gut mycobiome communities might be a novel target in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26455903

  2. Gene expression profiling gut microbiota in different races of humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome is shaped and modified by the polymorphisms of microorganisms in the intestinal tract. Its composition shows strong individual specificity and may play a crucial role in the human digestive system and metabolism. Several factors can affect the composition of the gut microbiome, such as eating habits, living environment, and antibiotic usage. Thus, various races are characterized by different gut microbiome characteristics. In this present study, we studied the gut microbiomes of three different races, including individuals of Asian, European and American races. The gut microbiome and the expression levels of gut microbiome genes were analyzed in these individuals. Advanced feature selection methods (minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection) and four machine-learning algorithms (random forest, nearest neighbor algorithm, sequential minimal optimization, Dagging) were employed to capture key differentially expressed genes. As a result, sequential minimal optimization was found to yield the best performance using the 454 genes, which could effectively distinguish the gut microbiomes of different races. Our analyses of extracted genes support the widely accepted hypotheses that eating habits, living environments and metabolic levels in different races can influence the characteristics of the gut microbiome. PMID:26975620

  3. Gene expression profiling gut microbiota in different races of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiome is shaped and modified by the polymorphisms of microorganisms in the intestinal tract. Its composition shows strong individual specificity and may play a crucial role in the human digestive system and metabolism. Several factors can affect the composition of the gut microbiome, such as eating habits, living environment, and antibiotic usage. Thus, various races are characterized by different gut microbiome characteristics. In this present study, we studied the gut microbiomes of three different races, including individuals of Asian, European and American races. The gut microbiome and the expression levels of gut microbiome genes were analyzed in these individuals. Advanced feature selection methods (minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection) and four machine-learning algorithms (random forest, nearest neighbor algorithm, sequential minimal optimization, Dagging) were employed to capture key differentially expressed genes. As a result, sequential minimal optimization was found to yield the best performance using the 454 genes, which could effectively distinguish the gut microbiomes of different races. Our analyses of extracted genes support the widely accepted hypotheses that eating habits, living environments and metabolic levels in different races can influence the characteristics of the gut microbiome.

  4. Gene expression profiling gut microbiota in different races of humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome is shaped and modified by the polymorphisms of microorganisms in the intestinal tract. Its composition shows strong individual specificity and may play a crucial role in the human digestive system and metabolism. Several factors can affect the composition of the gut microbiome, such as eating habits, living environment, and antibiotic usage. Thus, various races are characterized by different gut microbiome characteristics. In this present study, we studied the gut microbiomes of three different races, including individuals of Asian, European and American races. The gut microbiome and the expression levels of gut microbiome genes were analyzed in these individuals. Advanced feature selection methods (minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection) and four machine-learning algorithms (random forest, nearest neighbor algorithm, sequential minimal optimization, Dagging) were employed to capture key differentially expressed genes. As a result, sequential minimal optimization was found to yield the best performance using the 454 genes, which could effectively distinguish the gut microbiomes of different races. Our analyses of extracted genes support the widely accepted hypotheses that eating habits, living environments and metabolic levels in different races can influence the characteristics of the gut microbiome. PMID:26975620

  5. Detection of carboxylesterase and esterase activity in culturable gut bacterial flora isolated from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), from India and its possible role in indoxacarb degradation.

    PubMed

    Ramya, Shanivarsanthe Leelesh; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Srinivasa Murthy, Kottilingam; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Verghese, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), is a notorious pest of brassica crops worldwide and is resistant to all groups of insecticides. The insect system harbors diverse groups of microbiota, which in turn helps in enzymatic degradation of xenobiotic-like insecticides. The present study aimed to determine the diversity of gut microflora in DBM, quantify esterase activity and elucidate their possible role in degradation of indoxacarb. We screened 11 geographic populations of DBM in India and analyzed them for bacterial diversity. The culturable gut bacterial flora underwent molecular characterization with 16S rRNA. We obtained 25 bacterial isolates from larvae (n=13) and adults (n=12) of DBM. In larval gut isolates, gammaproteobacteria was the most abundant (76%), followed by bacilli (15.4%). Molecular characterization placed adult gut bacterial strains into three major classes based on abundance: gammaproteobacteria (66%), bacilli (16.7%) and flavobacteria (16.7%). Esterase activity from 19 gut bacterial isolates ranged from 0.072 to 2.32μmol/min/mg protein. Esterase bands were observed in 15 bacterial strains and the banding pattern differed in Bacillus cereus - KC985225 and Pantoea agglomerans - KC985229. The bands were characterized as carboxylesterase with profenofos used as an inhibitor. Minimal media study showed that B. cereus degraded indoxacarb up to 20%, so it could use indoxacarb for metabolism and growth. Furthermore, esterase activity was greater with minimal media than control media: 1.87 versus 0.26μmol/min/mg protein. Apart from the insect esterases, bacterial carboxylesterase may aid in the degradation of insecticides in DBM. PMID:26991291

  6. Some Changes in Gut Bacterial Flora of Field-Grown Peridroma saucia (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) When Brought into the Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lighthart, B

    1988-07-01

    Removal of Peridroma saucia from the field to the laboratory caused little change in the quantity of facultative and aerobic bacteria in the gut but produced significant qualitative and quantitative changes in distinguishable groups of the family Enterobacteriaceae in the gut. PMID:16347703

  7. Some Changes in Gut Bacterial Flora of Field-Grown Peridroma saucia (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) When Brought into the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Lighthart, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Removal of Peridroma saucia from the field to the laboratory caused little change in the quantity of facultative and aerobic bacteria in the gut but produced significant qualitative and quantitative changes in distinguishable groups of the family Enterobacteriaceae in the gut. PMID:16347703

  8. Diversity, stability and resilience of the human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lozupone, Catherine A.; Stombaugh, Jesse I.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Jansson, Janet K.; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Preface The gut microbiota, the trillions of microbes inhabiting the human intestine, is a complex ecological community that through its collective metabolic activities and host interactions, influences both normal physiology and disease susceptibilities. Understanding factors underlying compositional and functional changes will aid in designing therapies that target the gut microbiota. This goal is formidable because of the immense diversity of the microbiota, interpersonal variation and temporal fluctuations in composition, especially during disease and early development. Here, we describe recent advances in understanding gut microbiota from an ecological perspective, and discuss how these insights might promote health by guiding therapeutic strategy development. PMID:22972295

  9. How informative is the mouse for human gut microbiota research?

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Loan Anh; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Liston, Adrian; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota of the human gut is gaining broad attention owing to its association with a wide range of diseases, ranging from metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity and type 2 diabetes) to autoimmune diseases (such as inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes), cancer and even neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). Having been increasingly used in biomedical research, mice have become the model of choice for most studies in this emerging field. Mouse models allow perturbations in gut microbiota to be studied in a controlled experimental setup, and thus help in assessing causality of the complex host-microbiota interactions and in developing mechanistic hypotheses. However, pitfalls should be considered when translating gut microbiome research results from mouse models to humans. In this Special Article, we discuss the intrinsic similarities and differences that exist between the two systems, and compare the human and murine core gut microbiota based on a meta-analysis of currently available datasets. Finally, we discuss the external factors that influence the capability of mouse models to recapitulate the gut microbiota shifts associated with human diseases, and investigate which alternative model systems exist for gut microbiota research. PMID:25561744

  10. Human oral, gut, and plaque microbiota in patients with atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Omry; Spor, Aymé; Felin, Jenny; Fåk, Frida; Stombaugh, Jesse; Tremaroli, Valentina; Behre, Carl Johan; Knight, Rob; Fagerberg, Björn; Ley, Ruth E.; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with atherosclerosis, suggesting that bacteria from the oral cavity may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, the gut microbiota may affect obesity, which is associated with atherosclerosis. Using qPCR, we show that bacterial DNA was present in the atherosclerotic plaque and that the amount of DNA correlated with the amount of leukocytes in the atherosclerotic plaque. To investigate the microbial composition of atherosclerotic plaques and test the hypothesis that the oral or gut microbiota may contribute to atherosclerosis in humans, we used 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to survey the bacterial diversity of atherosclerotic plaque, oral, and gut samples of 15 patients with atherosclerosis, and oral and gut samples of healthy controls. We identified Chryseomonas in all atherosclerotic plaque samples, and Veillonella and Streptococcus in the majority. Interestingly, the combined abundances of Veillonella and Streptococcus in atherosclerotic plaques correlated with their abundance in the oral cavity. Moreover, several additional bacterial phylotypes were common to the atherosclerotic plaque and oral or gut samples within the same individual. Interestingly, several bacterial taxa in the oral cavity and the gut correlated with plasma cholesterol levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that bacteria from the oral cavity, and perhaps even the gut, may correlate with disease markers of atherosclerosis. PMID:20937873

  11. Mining the human gut microbiome for novel stress resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Culligan, Eamonn P.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technologies in recent years, the human genome is now considered incomplete without the complementing microbiome, which outnumbers human genes by a factor of one hundred. The human microbiome, and more specifically the gut microbiome, has received considerable attention and research efforts over the past decade. Many studies have identified and quantified “who is there?,” while others have determined some of their functional capacity, or “what are they doing?” In a recent study, we identified novel salt-tolerance loci from the human gut microbiome using combined functional metagenomic and bioinformatics based approaches. Herein, we discuss the identified loci, their role in salt-tolerance and their importance in the context of the gut environment. We also consider the utility and power of functional metagenomics for mining such environments for novel genes and proteins, as well as the implications and possible applications for future research. PMID:22688726

  12. Part 1: The Human Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Matthew J.; Plummer, Nigel T.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial cells harbored within the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) outnumber the host’s cells by a factor of 10 and the genes encoded by the bacteria resident within the GIT outnumber their host’s genes by more than 100 times. These human digestive-tract associated microbes are referred to as the gut microbiome. The human gut microbiome and its role in both health and disease has been the subject of extensive research, establishing its involvement in human metabolism, nutrition, physiology, and immune function. Imbalance of the normal gut microbiota have been linked with gastrointestinal conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and wider systemic manifestations of disease such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atopy. In the first part of this review, we evaluate our evolving knowledge of the development, complexity, and functionality of the healthy gut microbiota, and the ways in which the microbial community is perturbed in dysbiotic disease states; the second part of this review covers the role of interventions that have been shown to modulate and stabilize the gut microbiota and also to restore it to its healthy composition from the dysbiotic states seen in IBS, IBD, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atopy. PMID:26770121

  13. Human gut microbiome viewed across age and geography.

    PubMed

    Yatsunenko, Tanya; Rey, Federico E; Manary, Mark J; Trehan, Indi; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Contreras, Monica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Baldassano, Robert N; Anokhin, Andrey P; Heath, Andrew C; Warner, Barbara; Reeder, Jens; Kuczynski, Justin; Caporaso, J Gregory; Lozupone, Catherine A; Lauber, Christian; Clemente, Jose Carlos; Knights, Dan; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2012-06-14

    Gut microbial communities represent one source of human genetic and metabolic diversity. To examine how gut microbiomes differ among human populations, here we characterize bacterial species in fecal samples from 531 individuals, plus the gene content of 110 of them. The cohort encompassed healthy children and adults from the Amazonas of Venezuela, rural Malawi and US metropolitan areas and included mono- and dizygotic twins. Shared features of the functional maturation of the gut microbiome were identified during the first three years of life in all three populations, including age-associated changes in the genes involved in vitamin biosynthesis and metabolism. Pronounced differences in bacterial assemblages and functional gene repertoires were noted between US residents and those in the other two countries. These distinctive features are evident in early infancy as well as adulthood. Our findings underscore the need to consider the microbiome when evaluating human development, nutritional needs, physiological variations and the impact of westernization. PMID:22699611

  14. Country-specific antibiotic use practices impact the human gut resistome

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Kultima, Jens Roat; Mende, Daniel R.; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Typas, Athanasios; Bork, Peer

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing concerns over inappropriate use of antibiotics in medicine and food production, population-level resistance transfer into the human gut microbiota has not been demonstrated beyond individual case studies. To determine the “antibiotic resistance potential” for entire microbial communities, we employ metagenomic data and quantify the totality of known resistance genes in each community (its resistome) for 68 classes and subclasses of antibiotics. In 252 fecal metagenomes from three countries, we show that the most abundant resistance determinants are those for antibiotics also used in animals and for antibiotics that have been available longer. Resistance genes are also more abundant in samples from Spain, Italy, and France than from Denmark, the United States, or Japan. Where comparable country-level data on antibiotic use in both humans and animals are available, differences in these statistics match the observed resistance potential differences. The results are robust over time as the antibiotic resistance determinants of individuals persist in the human gut flora for at least a year. PMID:23568836

  15. Characterization of the human gut microbiome during travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Youmans, Bonnie P; Ajami, Nadim J; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Campbell, Frederick; Wadsworth, W Duncan; Petrosino, Joseph F; DuPont, Herbert L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota are correlated with ailments such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and diarrhea. Up to 60% of individuals traveling from industrialized to developing countries acquire a form of secretory diarrhea known as travelers' diarrhea (TD), and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and norovirus (NoV) are the leading causative pathogens. Presumably, TD alters the gut microbiome, however the effect of TD on gut communities has not been studied. We report the first analysis of bacterial gut populations associated with TD. We examined and compared the gut microbiomes of individuals who developed TD associated with ETEC, NoV, or mixed pathogens, and TD with no pathogen identified, to healthy travelers. We observed a signature dysbiotic gut microbiome profile of high Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratios in the travelers who developed diarrhea, regardless of etiologic agent or presence of a pathogen. There was no significant difference in α-diversity among travelers. The bacterial composition of the microbiota of the healthy travelers was similar to the diarrheal groups, however the β-diversity of the healthy travelers was significantly different than any pathogen-associated TD group. Further comparison of the healthy traveler microbiota to those from healthy subjects who were part of the Human Microbiome Project also revealed a significantly higher Firmicutes:Bacteriodetes ratio in the healthy travelers and significantly different β-diversity. Thus, the composition of the gut microbiome in healthy, diarrhea-free travelers has characteristics of a dysbiotic gut, suggesting that these alterations could be associated with factors such as travel. PMID:25695334

  16. Characterization of the human gut microbiome during travelers' diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Youmans, Bonnie P; Ajami, Nadim J; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Campbell, Frederick; Wadsworth, W Duncan; Petrosino, Joseph F; DuPont, Herbert L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota are correlated with ailments such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and diarrhea. Up to 60% of individuals traveling from industrialized to developing countries acquire a form of secretory diarrhea known as travelers' diarrhea (TD), and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and norovirus (NoV) are the leading causative pathogens. Presumably, TD alters the gut microbiome, however the effect of TD on gut communities has not been studied. We report the first analysis of bacterial gut populations associated with TD. We examined and compared the gut microbiomes of individuals who developed TD associated with ETEC, NoV, or mixed pathogens, and TD with no pathogen identified, to healthy travelers. We observed a signature dysbiotic gut microbiome profile of high Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratios in the travelers who developed diarrhea, regardless of etiologic agent or presence of a pathogen. There was no significant difference in α-diversity among travelers. The bacterial composition of the microbiota of the healthy travelers was similar to the diarrheal groups, however the β-diversity of the healthy travelers was significantly different than any pathogen-associated TD group. Further comparison of the healthy traveler microbiota to those from healthy subjects who were part of the Human Microbiome Project also revealed a significantly higher Firmicutes:Bacteriodetes ratio in the healthy travelers and significantly different β-diversity. Thus, the composition of the gut microbiome in healthy, diarrhea-free travelers has characteristics of a dysbiotic gut, suggesting that these alterations could be associated with factors such as travel. PMID:25695334

  17. The emerging medical ecology of the human gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Pepper, John W; Rosenfeld, Simon

    2012-07-01

    It is increasingly clear that the human gut microbiome has great medical importance, and researchers are beginning to investigate its basic biology and to appreciate the challenges that it presents to medical science. Several striking new empirical results in this area are perplexing within the standard conceptual framework of biomedicine, and this highlights the need for new perspectives from ecology and from dynamical systems theory. Here, we discuss recent results concerning sources of individual variation, temporal variation within individuals, long-term changes after transient perturbations and individualized responses to perturbation within the human gut microbiome. PMID:22537667

  18. Global Profiling of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZyme) families, encoded by human gut microflora, play a crucial role in breakdown of complex dietary carbohydrates into components that can be absorbed by our intestinal epithelium. Since nutritional wellbeing of an individual is dependent on the nutrient harvesting capability of the gut microbiome, it is important to understand how CAZyme repertoire in the gut is influenced by factors like age, geography and food habits. Results This study reports a comprehensive in-silico analysis of CAZyme profiles in the gut microbiomes of 448 individuals belonging to different geographies, using similarity searches of the corresponding gut metagenomic contigs against the carbohydrate active enzymes database. The study identifies a core group of 89 CAZyme families that are present across 85% of the gut microbiomes. The study detects several geography/age-specific trends in gut CAZyme repertoires of the individuals. Notably, a group of CAZymes having a positive correlation with BMI has been identified. Further this group of BMI-associated CAZymes is observed to be specifically abundant in the Firmicutes phyla. One of the major findings from this study is identification of three distinct groups of individuals, referred to as 'CAZotypes', having similar CAZyme profiles. Distinct taxonomic drivers for these CAZotypes as well as the probable dietary basis for such trends have also been elucidated. The results of this study provide a global view of CAZyme profiles across individuals of various geographies and age-groups. These results re-iterate the need of a more precise understanding of the role of carbohydrate active enzymes in human nutrition. PMID:26544883

  19. Comparative Analysis of Korean Human Gut Microbiota by Barcoded Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young-Do; Jung, Mi-Ja; Roh, Seong Woon; Kim, Min-Soo; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Human gut microbiota plays important roles in harvesting energy from the diet, stimulating the proliferation of the intestinal epithelium, developing the immune system, and regulating fat storage in the host. Characterization of gut microbiota, however, has been limited to western people and is not sufficiently extensive to fully describe microbial communities. In this study, we investigated the overall composition of the gut microbiota and its host specificity and temporal stability in 20 Koreans using 454-pyrosequencing with barcoded primers targeting the V1 to V3 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. A total of 303,402 high quality reads covered each sample and 8,427 reads were analyzed on average. The results were compared with those of individuals from the USA, China and Japan. In general, microbial communities were dominated by five previously identified phyla: Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, and Proteobacteria. UPGMA cluster analysis showed that the species composition of gut microbiota was host-specific and stable over the duration of the test period, but the relative abundance of each member fluctuated. 43 core Korean gut microbiota were identified by comparison of sequences from each individual, of which 15 species level phylotypes were related to previously-reported butyrate-producing bacteria. UniFrac analysis revealed that human gut microbiota differed between countries: Korea, USA, Japan and China, but tended to vary less between individual Koreans, suggesting that gut microbial composition is related to internal and external characteristics of each country member such as host genetics and diet styles. PMID:21829445

  20. Shotgun metaproteomics of the human distal gut microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Russell, A.L.; Shah, M.; Godzik, A.; Rosenquist, M.; Halfvarsson, J.; Lefsrud, M.G.; Apajalahti, J.; Tysk, C.; Hettich, R.L.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2008-10-15

    The human gut contains a dense, complex and diverse microbial community, comprising the gut microbiome. Metagenomics has recently revealed the composition of genes in the gut microbiome, but provides no direct information about which genes are expressed or functioning. Therefore, our goal was to develop a novel approach to directly identify microbial proteins in fecal samples to gain information about the genes expressed and about key microbial functions in the human gut. We used a non-targeted, shotgun mass spectrometry-based whole community proteomics, or metaproteomics, approach for the first deep proteome measurements of thousands of proteins in human fecal samples, thus demonstrating this approach on the most complex sample type to date. The resulting metaproteomes had a skewed distribution relative to the metagenome, with more proteins for translation, energy production and carbohydrate metabolism when compared to what was earlier predicted from metagenomics. Human proteins, including antimicrobial peptides, were also identified, providing a non-targeted glimpse of the host response to the microbiota. Several unknown proteins represented previously undescribed microbial pathways or host immune responses, revealing a novel complex interplay between the human host and its associated microbes.

  1. Application of metagenomics in the human gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Xu, Shao-Yan; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-21

    There are more than 1000 microbial species living in the complex human intestine. The gut microbial community plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogenic microbes, modulating immunity, regulating metabolic processes, and is even regarded as an endocrine organ. However, traditional culture methods are very limited for identifying microbes. With the application of molecular biologic technology in the field of the intestinal microbiome, especially metagenomic sequencing of the next-generation sequencing technology, progress has been made in the study of the human intestinal microbiome. Metagenomics can be used to study intestinal microbiome diversity and dysbiosis, as well as its relationship to health and disease. Moreover, functional metagenomics can identify novel functional genes, microbial pathways, antibiotic resistance genes, functional dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome, and determine interactions and co-evolution between microbiota and host, though there are still some limitations. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics represent enormous complements to the understanding of the human gut microbiome. This review aims to demonstrate that metagenomics can be a powerful tool in studying the human gut microbiome with encouraging prospects. The limitations of metagenomics to be overcome are also discussed. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics in relation to the study of the human gut microbiome are also briefly discussed. PMID:25624713

  2. Shotgun Metaproteomics of the Human Distal Gut Microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Erickson, Alison L; Shah, Manesh B; Godzik, A; Rosenquist, M; Halfvarsson, J; Lefsrud, Mark G; Apajalahti, J.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Jansson, J

    2009-01-01

    The human gut contains a dense, complex, and diverse microbial community, comprising the gut microbiome. Metagenomics has recently revealed the composition of genes in the gut microbiome, but provides no direct information about which genes are expressed or functioning. Therefore, our goal was to develop a novel approach to directly identify microbial proteins in fecal samples to gain information about what genes were expressed and about key microbial functions in the human gut. We used a non-targeted, shotgun mass spectrometry-based whole community proteomics, or metaproteomics, approach for the first deep proteome measurements of thousands of proteins in human fecal samples, thus demonstrating this approach on the most complex sample type to date. The resulting metaproteomes had a skewed distribution relative to the metagenome, with more proteins for translation, energy production, and carbohydrate metabolism compared to what was earlier predicted from metagenomics. Human proteins, including antimicrobial peptides, were also identified, providing a non-targeted glimpse of the host response to the microbiota. Several unknown proteins represented previously undescribed microbial pathways or host immune responses, revealing a novel complex interplay between the human host and its associated microbes.

  3. From lifetime to evolution: timescales of human gut microbiota adaptation.

    PubMed

    Quercia, Sara; Candela, Marco; Giuliani, Cristina; Turroni, Silvia; Luiselli, Donata; Rampelli, Simone; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Human beings harbor gut microbial communities that are essential to preserve human health. Molded by the human genome, the gut microbiota (GM) is an adaptive component of the human superorganisms that allows host adaptation at different timescales, optimizing host physiology from daily life to lifespan scales and human evolutionary history. The GM continuously changes from birth up to the most extreme limits of human life, reconfiguring its metagenomic layout in response to daily variations in diet or specific host physiological and immunological needs at different ages. On the other hand, the microbiota plasticity was strategic to face changes in lifestyle and dietary habits along the course of the recent evolutionary history, that has driven the passage from Paleolithic hunter-gathering societies to Neolithic agricultural farmers to modern Westernized societies. PMID:25408692

  4. From lifetime to evolution: timescales of human gut microbiota adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Quercia, Sara; Candela, Marco; Giuliani, Cristina; Turroni, Silvia; Luiselli, Donata; Rampelli, Simone; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Human beings harbor gut microbial communities that are essential to preserve human health. Molded by the human genome, the gut microbiota (GM) is an adaptive component of the human superorganisms that allows host adaptation at different timescales, optimizing host physiology from daily life to lifespan scales and human evolutionary history. The GM continuously changes from birth up to the most extreme limits of human life, reconfiguring its metagenomic layout in response to daily variations in diet or specific host physiological and immunological needs at different ages. On the other hand, the microbiota plasticity was strategic to face changes in lifestyle and dietary habits along the course of the recent evolutionary history, that has driven the passage from Paleolithic hunter-gathering societies to Neolithic agricultural farmers to modern Westernized societies. PMID:25408692

  5. Antivirulence Activity of the Human Gut Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, L. Caetano M.; McDonald, Julie A. K.; Schroeter, Kathleen; Carlucci, Christian; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Wang, Melody; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Hira, Gill; Jacobson, Kevan; Davies, Julian; Allen-Vercoe, Emma

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mammalian gut contains a complex assembly of commensal microbes termed microbiota. Although much has been learned about the role of these microbes in health, the mechanisms underlying these functions are ill defined. We have recently shown that the mammalian gut contains thousands of small molecules, most of which are currently unidentified. Therefore, we hypothesized that these molecules function as chemical cues used by hosts and microbes during their interactions in health and disease. Thus, a search was initiated to identify molecules produced by the microbiota that are sensed by pathogens. We found that a secreted molecule produced by clostridia acts as a strong repressor of Salmonella virulence, obliterating expression of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 as well as host cell invasion. It has been known for decades that the microbiota protects its hosts from invading pathogens, and these data suggest that chemical sensing may be involved in this phenomenon. Further investigations should reveal the exact biological role of this molecule as well as its therapeutic potential. PMID:25073640

  6. In vitro fermentation of fructooligosaccharides with human gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mao, Bingyong; Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaoming; Gu, Zhennan; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) are one of the most studied prebiotics, selectively stimulating the growth of health-promoting bacteria in the host. However, there is increasing evidence that commensal gut bacteria, such as Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium butyricum, Enterobacter cloacae, and even the pathogenic Escherichia coli BEN2908, are also able to metabolize FOS in vitro, and in some cases, FOS displayed adverse effects. Therefore, it is necessary to identify FOS-metabolizing species that are present in the gut. Unlike previous studies focusing on individual strains, this study used the traditional culture method combined with an alignment search on the gut bacteria database established from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP). The alignment results showed that homologous proteins for FOS transporters and glycosidases were distributed in 237 of the 453 strains of gut bacteria. La506 msmK encoding the ATP-binding protein and Aec45 fosGH1 encoding glycoside hydrolase were most widely distributed, in 155 and 55 strains, respectively. Seven of eight strains with both transporters and glycosidases were proven to be capable of metabolizing FOS, while five strains without either transporters or glycosidases were not. Fifteen species isolated from human feces and 11 species from the alignment search were identified to be FOS-metabolizing, of which Cronobacter sakazakii, Marvinbryantia formatexigens, Ruminococcus gnavus, and Weissella paramesenteroides are reported here for the first time. Thus, alignment search combined with the culture method is an effective method for obtaining a global view of the FOS-metabolizing bacteria in the gut and will be helpful in further investigating the relationship between FOS and human gut bacteria. PMID:25653214

  7. Gut Microbial Succession Follows Acute Secretory Diarrhea in Humans

    PubMed Central

    David, Lawrence A.; Weil, Ana; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Harris, Jason B.; Chowdhury, Fahima; Begum, Yasmin; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disability after childhood diarrhea is an important burden on global productivity. Recent studies suggest that gut bacterial communities influence how humans recover from infectious diarrhea, but we still lack extensive data and mechanistic hypotheses for how these bacterial communities respond to diarrheal disease and its treatment. Here, we report that after Vibrio cholerae infection, the human gut microbiota undergoes an orderly and reproducible succession that features transient reversals in relative levels of enteric Bacteroides and Prevotella. Elements of this succession may be a common feature in microbiota recovery from acute secretory diarrhea, as we observed similar successional dynamics after enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection. Our metagenomic analyses suggest that multiple mechanisms drive microbial succession after cholera, including bacterial dispersal properties, changing enteric oxygen and carbohydrate levels, and phage dynamics. Thus, gut microbiota recovery after cholera may be predictable at the level of community structure but is driven by a complex set of temporally varying ecological processes. Our findings suggest opportunities for diagnostics and therapies targeting the gut microbiota in humans recovering from infectious diarrhea. PMID:25991682

  8. Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    David, Lawrence A.; Maurice, Corinne F.; Carmody, Rachel N.; Gootenberg, David B.; Button, Julie E.; Wolfe, Benjamin E.; Ling, Alisha V.; Devlin, A. Sloan; Varma, Yug; Fischbach, Michael A.; Biddinger, Sudha B.; Dutton, Rachel J.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term diet influences the structure and activity of the trillions of microorganisms residing in the human gut1–5, but it remains unclear how rapidly and reproducibly the human gut microbiome responds to short-term macronutrient change. Here, we show that the short-term consumption of diets composed entirely of animal or plant products alters microbial community structure and overwhelms inter-individual differences in microbial gene expression. The animal-based diet increased the abundance of bile-tolerant microorganisms (Alistipes, Bilophila, and Bacteroides) and decreased the levels of Firmicutes that metabolize dietary plant polysaccharides (Roseburia, Eubacterium rectale, and Ruminococcus bromii). Microbial activity mirrored differences between herbivorous and carnivorous mammals2, reflecting trade-offs between carbohydrate and protein fermentation. Foodborne microbes from both diets transiently colonized the gut, including bacteria, fungi, and even viruses. Finally, increases in the abundance and activity of Bilophila wadsworthia on the animal-based diet support a link between dietary fat, bile acids, and the outgrowth of microorganisms capable of triggering inflammatory bowel disease6. In concert, these results demonstrate that the gut microbiome can rapidly respond to altered diet, potentially facilitating the diversity of human dietary lifestyles. PMID:24336217

  9. Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    David, Lawrence A; Maurice, Corinne F; Carmody, Rachel N; Gootenberg, David B; Button, Julie E; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Ling, Alisha V; Devlin, A Sloan; Varma, Yug; Fischbach, Michael A; Biddinger, Sudha B; Dutton, Rachel J; Turnbaugh, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Long-term dietary intake influences the structure and activity of the trillions of microorganisms residing in the human gut, but it remains unclear how rapidly and reproducibly the human gut microbiome responds to short-term macronutrient change. Here we show that the short-term consumption of diets composed entirely of animal or plant products alters microbial community structure and overwhelms inter-individual differences in microbial gene expression. The animal-based diet increased the abundance of bile-tolerant microorganisms (Alistipes, Bilophila and Bacteroides) and decreased the levels of Firmicutes that metabolize dietary plant polysaccharides (Roseburia, Eubacterium rectale and Ruminococcus bromii). Microbial activity mirrored differences between herbivorous and carnivorous mammals, reflecting trade-offs between carbohydrate and protein fermentation. Foodborne microbes from both diets transiently colonized the gut, including bacteria, fungi and even viruses. Finally, increases in the abundance and activity of Bilophila wadsworthia on the animal-based diet support a link between dietary fat, bile acids and the outgrowth of microorganisms capable of triggering inflammatory bowel disease. In concert, these results demonstrate that the gut microbiome can rapidly respond to altered diet, potentially facilitating the diversity of human dietary lifestyles. PMID:24336217

  10. Role of the normal gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jandhyala, Sai Manasa; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Subramanyam, Chivkula; Vuyyuru, Harish; Sasikala, Mitnala; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2015-08-01

    Relation between the gut microbiota and human health is being increasingly recognised. It is now well established that a healthy gut flora is largely responsible for overall health of the host. The normal human gut microbiota comprises of two major phyla, namely Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Though the gut microbiota in an infant appears haphazard, it starts resembling the adult flora by the age of 3 years. Nevertheless, there exist temporal and spatial variations in the microbial distribution from esophagus to the rectum all along the individual's life span. Developments in genome sequencing technologies and bioinformatics have now enabled scientists to study these microorganisms and their function and microbe-host interactions in an elaborate manner both in health and disease. The normal gut microbiota imparts specific function in host nutrient metabolism, xenobiotic and drug metabolism, maintenance of structural integrity of the gut mucosal barrier, immunomodulation, and protection against pathogens. Several factors play a role in shaping the normal gut microbiota. They include (1) the mode of delivery (vaginal or caesarean); (2) diet during infancy (breast milk or formula feeds) and adulthood (vegan based or meat based); and (3) use of antibiotics or antibiotic like molecules that are derived from the environment or the gut commensal community. A major concern of antibiotic use is the long-term alteration of the normal healthy gut microbiota and horizontal transfer of resistance genes that could result in reservoir of organisms with a multidrug resistant gene pool. PMID:26269668

  11. Role of the normal gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Jandhyala, Sai Manasa; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Subramanyam, Chivkula; Vuyyuru, Harish; Sasikala, Mitnala; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2015-01-01

    Relation between the gut microbiota and human health is being increasingly recognised. It is now well established that a healthy gut flora is largely responsible for overall health of the host. The normal human gut microbiota comprises of two major phyla, namely Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Though the gut microbiota in an infant appears haphazard, it starts resembling the adult flora by the age of 3 years. Nevertheless, there exist temporal and spatial variations in the microbial distribution from esophagus to the rectum all along the individual’s life span. Developments in genome sequencing technologies and bioinformatics have now enabled scientists to study these microorganisms and their function and microbe-host interactions in an elaborate manner both in health and disease. The normal gut microbiota imparts specific function in host nutrient metabolism, xenobiotic and drug metabolism, maintenance of structural integrity of the gut mucosal barrier, immunomodulation, and protection against pathogens. Several factors play a role in shaping the normal gut microbiota. They include (1) the mode of delivery (vaginal or caesarean); (2) diet during infancy (breast milk or formula feeds) and adulthood (vegan based or meat based); and (3) use of antibiotics or antibiotic like molecules that are derived from the environment or the gut commensal community. A major concern of antibiotic use is the long-term alteration of the normal healthy gut microbiota and horizontal transfer of resistance genes that could result in reservoir of organisms with a multidrug resistant gene pool. PMID:26269668

  12. Human gut microbes use multiple transporters to distinguish vitamin B12 analogs and compete in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Degnan, Patrick H.; Barry, Natasha A.; Mok, Kenny C.; Taga, Michiko E.; Goodman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Genomic and metagenomic sequencing efforts, including human microbiome projects, reveal that microbes often encode multiple systems that appear to accomplish the same task. Whether these predictions reflect actual functional redundancies is unclear. We report that the prominent human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron employs three functional, homologous vitamin B12 transporters that in at least two cases confer a competitive advantage in the presence of distinct B12 analogs (corrinoids). In the mammalian gut, microbial fitness can be determined by the presence or absence of a single transporter. The total number of distinct corrinoid transporter families in the human gut microbiome likely exceeds those observed in B. thetaiotaomicron by an order of magnitude. These results demonstrate that human gut microbes use elaborate mechanisms to capture and differentiate corrinoids in vivo and that apparent redundancies observed in these genomes can instead reflect hidden specificities that determine whether a microbe will colonize its host. PMID:24439897

  13. Dysbiotic Events in Gut Microbiota: Impact on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Schippa, Serena; Conte, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a large number of microbes coexisting peacefully with their host. The most colonized site is the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). More than 70% of all the microbes in the human body are in the colon. The microorganism population is 10 times larger of the total number of our somatic and germ cells. Two bacterial phyla, accounting for more than 90% of the bacterial cells, dominate the healthy adult intestine: Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Considerable variability in the microbiota compositions between people is found when we look at the taxonomic level of species, and strains within species. It is possible to assert that the human microbiota could be compared to a fingerprint. The microbiota acts as a barrier from pathogens, exerts important metabolic functions, and regulates inflammatory response by stimulating the immune system. Gut microbial imbalance (dysbiosis), has been linked to important human diseases such as inflammation related disorders. The present review summarizes our knowledge on the gut microbiota in a healthy context, and examines intestinal dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients; the most frequently reported disease proven to be associated with changes in the gut microbiota. PMID:25514560

  14. Application of the Human Intestinal Tract Chip to the non-human primate gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bello González, T D J; van Passel, M W J; Tims, S; Fuentes, S; De Vos, W M; Smidt, H; Belzer, C

    2015-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is responsible for various health-related functions, and its diversity can be readily mapped with the 16S ribosomal RNA targeting Human Intestinal Tract (HIT) Chip. Here we characterise distal gut samples from chimpanzees, gorillas and marmosets, and compare them with human gut samples. Our results indicated applicability of the HITChip platform can be extended to chimpanzee and gorilla faecal samples for analysis of microbiota composition and enterotypes, but not to the evolutionary more distant marmosets. PMID:25519524

  15. Associations of gut-flora-dependent metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide, betaine and choline with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-ming; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Rui-fen; Chen, Xiao-ling; Wang, Cheng; Tan, Xu-ying; Wang, Li-jun; Zheng, Rui-dan; Zhang, Hong-wei; Ling, Wen-hua; Zhu, Hui-lian

    2016-01-01

    Many studies suggest that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a gut-flora-dependent metabolite of choline, contributes to the risk of cardiovascular diseases, but little is known for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We examined the association of circulating TMAO, choline and betaine with the presence and severity of NAFLD in Chinese adults. We performed a hospital-based case-control study (CCS) and a cross-sectional study (CSS). In the CCS, we recruited 60 biopsy-proven NAFLD cases and 35 controls (18–60 years) and determined serum concentrations of TMAO, choline and betaine by HPLC-MS/MS. For the CSS, 1,628 community-based adults (40-75 years) completed the blood tests and ultrasonographic NAFLD evaluation. In the CCS, analyses of covariance showed adverse associations of ln-transformed serum levels of TMAO, choline and betaine/choline ratio with the scores of steatosis and total NAFLD activity (NAS) (all P-trend <0.05). The CSS revealed that a greater severity of NAFLD was independently correlated with higher TMAO but lower betaine and betaine/choline ratio (all P-trend <0.05). No significant choline-NAFLD association was observed. Our findings showed adverse associations between the circulating TMAO level and the presence and severity of NAFLD in hospital- and community-based Chinese adults, and a favorable betaine-NAFLD relationship in the community-based participants. PMID:26743949

  16. Human gut microbiome viewed across age and geography

    PubMed Central

    Yatsunenko, Tanya; Rey, Federico E.; Manary, Mark J.; Trehan, Indi; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Contreras, Monica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Baldassano, Robert N.; Anokhin, Andrey P.; Heath, Andrew C.; Warner, Barbara; Reeder, Jens; Kuczynski, Justin; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Lauber, Christian; Clemente, Jose Carlos; Knights, Dan; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    Gut microbial communities represent one source of human genetic and metabolic diversity. To examine how gut microbiomes differ between human populations when viewed from the perspective of component microbial lineages, encoded metabolic functions, stage of postnatal development, and environmental exposures, we characterized bacterial species present in fecal samples obtained from 531 individuals representing healthy Amerindians from the Amazonas of Venezuela, residents of rural Malawian communities, and inhabitants of USA metropolitan areas, as well as the gene content of 110 of their microbiomes. This cohort encompassed infants, children, teenagers and adults, parents and offspring, and included mono- and dizygotic twins. Shared features of the functional maturation of the gut microbiome were identified during the first three years of life in all three populations, including age-associated changes in the representation of genes involved in vitamin biosynthesis and metabolism. Pronounced differences in bacterial species assemblages and functional gene repertoires were noted between individuals residing in the USA compared to the other two countries. These distinctive features are evident in early infancy as well as adulthood. In addition, the similarity of fecal microbiomes among family members extends across cultures. These findings underscore the need to consider the microbiome when evaluating human development, nutritional needs, physiological variations, and the impact of Westernization. PMID:22699611

  17. Gut Microbiota, Probiotics, and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    SUVOROV, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The review is devoted to the problems of microbiota and the ways of it correction employing beneficial life bacteria- probiotics. It covers the issues related to the functioning of human microbiota and its importance for the health, individual variability of microbial content, functioning of the probiotics in the human organism and the history of probiotic studies with particular focus on the microbiological investigations in the USSR. The article discusses the safety issues related to probiotics and the problems with probiotic therapy, trying to explain the reasons for the side effects caused by probiotics. The necessity of personified selection of the probiotic strain or individual microbial therapy autoprobiotics is also discussed. PMID:24936366

  18. Recent advances and remaining gaps in our knowledge of associations between gut microbiota and human health.

    PubMed

    Mai, Volker; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    The complex gut microbial flora harbored by individuals (microbiota) has long been proposed to contribute to intestinal health as well as disease. Pre- and probiotic products aimed at improving health by modifying microbiota composition have already become widely available and acceptance of these products appears to be on the rise. However, although required for the development of effective microbiota based interventions, our basic understanding of microbiota variation on a population level and its dynamics within individuals is still rudimentary. Powerful new parallel sequence technologies combined with other efficient molecular microbiota analysis methods now allow for comprehensive analysis of microbiota composition in large human populations. Recent findings in the field strongly suggest that microbiota contributes to the development of obesity, atopic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal cancers. Through the ongoing National Institutes of Health Roadmap 'Human Microbiome Project' and similar projects in other parts of the world, a large coordinated effort is currently underway to study how microbiota can impact human health. Translating findings from these studies into effective interventions that can improve health, possibly personalized based on an individuals existing microbiota, will be the task for the next decade(s). PMID:19115471

  19. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Hyotylainen, Tuulia; Nielsen, Trine; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Prifti, Edi; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Mattila, Ismo; Plichta, Damian R; Pöhö, Päivi; Hellgren, Lars I; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Jørgensen, Torben; Holm, Jacob Bak; Trošt, Kajetan; Kristiansen, Karsten; Brix, Susanne; Raes, Jeroen; Wang, Jun; Hansen, Torben; Bork, Peer; Brunak, Søren; Oresic, Matej; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Pedersen, Oluf

    2016-07-21

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus are identified as the main species driving the association between biosynthesis of BCAAs and insulin resistance, and in mice we demonstrate that P. copri can induce insulin resistance, aggravate glucose intolerance and augment circulating levels of BCAAs. Our findings suggest that microbial targets may have the potential to diminish insulin resistance and reduce the incidence of common metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27409811

  20. How glycan metabolism shapes the human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Symbiotic microorganisms that reside in the human intestine are adept at foraging glycans and polysaccharides, including those in dietary plants (starch, hemicellulose, pectin), animal-derived cartilage and tissue (glycosaminoglycans and N-linked glycans), and endogenous glycans from host mucus (O-linked glycans). Fluctuations in the abundance of dietary and endogenous glycans, combined with the immense chemical variation among these molecules, create a dynamic and heterogeneous environment in which gut microorganisms proliferate. In this review, we describe how glycans shape the composition of the gut microbiota over various lengths of time, the mechanisms by which individual microorganisms degrade these glycans, and potential opportunities to intentionally influence this ecosystem for better health and nutrition. PMID:22491358

  1. Glucosinolate and Desulfo-glucosinolate Metabolism by a Selection of Human Gut Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Luang-In, Vijitra; Albaser, Abdulhadi Ali; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Bennett, Mark H; Narbad, Arjan; Rossiter, John T

    2016-09-01

    Glucosinolate (GSL) hydrolysis is mediated by the enzyme myrosinase which together with specifier proteins can give rise to isothiocyanates (ITCs), thiocyanates, and nitriles (NITs) in cruciferous plants. However, little is known about the metabolism of GSLs by the human gut flora. The aim of the work was to investigate the metabolic fates of sinigrin (SNG), glucotropaeolin (GTP), gluconasturtiin (GNT), and their corresponding desulfo-GSLs (DS-GSLs). Three human gut bacterial strains, Enterococcus casseliflavus CP1, Lactobacillus agilis R16, and Escherichia coli VL8, were chosen for this study. GNT was metabolized to completion within 24 h to phenethyl ITC and phenethyl NIT (PNIT) by all bacteria, except for L. agilis R16 which produced only PNIT. At least 80 % of GTP and SNG were metabolized by all bacteria within 24 h to the corresponding ITCs and NITs. The pH of media over time gradually became acidic for both L. agilis R16 and E. coli VL8, while for E. casseliflavus CP1 the media became slightly alkaline with NIT and ITC production occurring between pH 3.0 and 7.5. ITC production peaked between 4 and 10 h in most cases and gradually declined while NIT production increased and remained relatively constant over time. The total percentage products accounted for 3-53 % of the initial GSL. NITs were produced from DS-GSLs suggesting an alternative metabolism via desulfation for the food based GSLs. The metal ion dependency for NIT production for GNT and its DS form was investigated where it was shown that Fe(2+) increased NIT production, while Mg(2+) stimulated the formation of ITC. PMID:27301252

  2. Evaluation of an Oral Subchronic Exposure of Deoxynivalenol on the Composition of Human Gut Microbiota in a Model of Human Microbiota-Associated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Cyr, Manuel J.; Perrin-Guyomard, Agnès; Houée, Paméla; Rolland, Jean-Guy; Laurentie, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, is one of the most prevalent mycotoxins present in cereal crops worldwide. Due to its toxic properties, high stability and prevalence, the presence of DON in the food chain represents a health risk for both humans and animals. The gastrointestinal microbiota represents potentially the first target for these food contaminants. Thus, the effects of mycotoxins on the human gut microbiota is clearly an issue that needs to be addressed in further detail. Using a human microbiota-associated rat model, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a chronic exposure of DON on the composition of human gut microbiota. Methodology/Principal Findings Four groups of 5 germ free male rats each, housed in 4 sterile isolators, were inoculated with a different fresh human fecal flora. Rats were then fed daily by gavage with a solution of DON at 100 µg/kg bw for 4 weeks. Fecal samples were collected at day 0 before the beginning of the treatment; days 7, 16, 21, and 27 during the treatment; and 10 days after the end of the treatment at day 37. DON effect was assessed by real-time PCR quantification of dominant and subdominant bacterial groups in feces. Despite a different intestinal microbiota in each isolator, similar trends were generally observed. During oral DON exposure, a significant increase of 0.5 log10 was observed for the Bacteroides/Prevotella group during the first 3 weeks of administration. Concentration levels for Escherichia coli decreased at day 27. This significant decrease (0.9 log10 CFU/g) remained stable until the end of the experiment. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated an impact of oral DON exposure on the human gut microbiota composition. These findings can serve as a template for risk assessment studies of food contaminants on the human gut microbiota. PMID:24260424

  3. In vitro fermentation of lactulose by human gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mao, Bingyong; Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaoming; Gu, Zhennan; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-12

    Lactulose has been known as a prebiotic that can selectively stimulate the growth of beneficial bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Recent studies have indicated that Streptococcus mutans, Clostridium perfringens, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii are also able to utilize lactulose. However, the previous studies mainly focused on the utilization of lactulose by individual strains, and few studies were designed to identify the species that could utilize lactulose among gut microbiota. This study aimed to identify lactulose-metabolizing bacteria in the human gut, using in silico and traditional culture methods. The prediction results suggested that genes for the transporters and glycosidases of lactulose are well distributed in the genomes of 222 of 453 strains of gastrointestinal-tract bacteria. The screening assays identified 35 species with the ability to utilize lactulose, of which Cronobacter sakazakii, Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas putida were reported for the first time to be capable of utilizing lactulose. In addition, significant correlations between lactulose and galactooligosaccharide metabolism were found. Thus, more attention should be paid to bacteria besides bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to further investigate the relationship between functional oligosaccharides and gut bacteria. PMID:25340538

  4. Estimating Time Since Death from Postmortem Human Gut Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Hauther, Kathleen A; Cobaugh, Kelly L; Jantz, Lee Meadows; Sparer, Tim E; DeBruyn, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Postmortem succession of human-associated microbial communities ("human microbiome") has been suggested as a possible method for estimating postmortem interval (PMI) for forensic analyses. Here we evaluate human gut bacterial populations to determine quantifiable, time-dependent changes postmortem. Gut microflora were repeatedly sampled from the proximal large intestine of 12 deceased human individuals as they decayed under environmental conditions. Three intestinal bacterial genera were quantified by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using group-specific primers targeting 16S rRNA genes. Bacteroides and Lactobacillus relative abundances declined exponentially with increasing PMI at rates of Nt=0.977e(-0.0144t) (r2=0.537, p<0.001) and Nt=0.019e(-0.0087t) (r2=0.396, p<0.001), respectively, where Nt is relative abundance at time (t) in cumulative degree hours. Bifidobacterium relative abundances did not change significantly: Nt=0.003e(-0.002t) (r2=0.033, p=0.284). Therefore, Bacteroides and Lactobacillus abundances could be used as quantitative indicators of PMI. PMID:26096156

  5. Superresolution Imaging Captures Carbohydrate Utilization Dynamics in Human Gut Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Eric C.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gut microbes play a key role in human health and nutrition by catabolizing a wide variety of glycans via enzymatic activities that are not encoded in the human genome. The ability to recognize and process carbohydrates strongly influences the structure of the gut microbial community. While the effects of diet on the microbiota are well documented, little is known about the molecular processes driving metabolism. To provide mechanistic insight into carbohydrate catabolism in gut symbionts, we studied starch processing in real time in the model Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) by single-molecule fluorescence. Although previous studies have explored Sus protein structure and function, the transient interactions, assembly, and collaboration of these outer membrane proteins have not yet been elucidated in live cells. Our live-cell superresolution imaging reveals that the polymeric starch substrate dynamically recruits Sus proteins, serving as an external scaffold for bacterial membrane assembly of the Sus complex, which may promote efficient capturing and degradation of starch. Furthermore, by simultaneously localizing multiple Sus outer membrane proteins on the B. thetaiotaomicron cell surface, we have characterized the dynamics and stoichiometry of starch-induced Sus complex assembly on the molecular scale. Finally, based on Sus protein knockout strains, we have discerned the mechanism of starch-induced Sus complex assembly in live anaerobic cells with nanometer-scale resolution. Our insights into the starch-induced outer membrane protein assembly central to this conserved nutrient uptake mechanism pave the way for the development of dietary or pharmaceutical therapies to control Bacteroidetes in the intestinal tract to enhance human health and treat disease. PMID:25389179

  6. Iron supplementation promotes gut microbiota metabolic activity but not colitis markers in human gut microbiota-associated rats.

    PubMed

    Dostal, Alexandra; Lacroix, Christophe; Pham, Van T; Zimmermann, Michael B; Del'homme, Christophe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Chassard, Christophe

    2014-06-28

    The global prevalence of Fe deficiency is high and a common corrective strategy is oral Fe supplementation, which may affect the commensal gut microbiota and gastrointestinal health. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of different dietary Fe concentrations on the gut microbiota and gut health of rats inoculated with human faecal microbiota. Rats (8 weeks old, n 40) were divided into five (n 8 each) groups and fed diets differing only in Fe concentration during an Fe-depletion period (12 weeks) and an Fe-repletion period (4 weeks) as follows: (1) Fe-sufficient diet throughout the study period; (2) Fe-sufficient diet followed by 70 mg Fe/kg diet; (3) Fe-depleted diet throughout the study period; (4) Fe-depleted diet followed by 35 mg Fe/kg diet; (5) Fe-depleted diet followed by 70 mg Fe/kg diet. Faecal and caecal samples were analysed for gut microbiota composition (quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing) and bacterial metabolites (HPLC), and intestinal tissue samples were investigated histologically. Fe depletion did not significantly alter dominant populations of the gut microbiota and did not induce Fe-deficiency anaemia in the studied rats. Provision of the 35 mg Fe/kg diet after feeding an Fe-deficient diet significantly increased the abundance of dominant bacterial groups such as Bacteroides spp. and Clostridium cluster IV members compared with that of an Fe-deficient diet. Fe supplementation increased gut microbial butyrate concentration 6-fold compared with Fe depletion and did not affect histological colitis scores. The present results suggest that Fe supplementation enhances the concentration of beneficial gut microbiota metabolites and thus may contribute to gut health. PMID:24555487

  7. The human neonatal gut microbiome: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Gritz, Emily C; Bhandari, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    The field of genomics has expanded into subspecialties such as metagenomics over the course of the last decade and a half. The development of massively parallel sequencing capabilities has allowed for increasingly detailed study of the genome of the human microbiome, the microbial super organ that resides symbiotically within the mucosal tissues and integumentary system of the human host. The gut microbiome, and particularly the study of its origins in neonates, has become subtopics of great interest within the field of genomics. This brief review seeks to summarize recent literature regarding the origins and establishment of the neonatal gut microbiome, beginning in utero, and how it is affected by neonatal nutritional status (breastfed versus formula fed) and gestational age (term versus preterm). We also explore the role of dysbiosis, a perturbation within the fragile ecosystem of the microbiome, and its role in the origin of select pathologic states, specifically, obesity and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants. We discuss the evidence supporting enteral pre- and pro-biotic supplementation of commensal organisms such as Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in the neonatal period, and their role in the prevention and amelioration of NEC in premature infants. Finally, we review directions to consider for further research to promote human health within this field. PMID:25798435

  8. The Human Neonatal Gut Microbiome: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Gritz, Emily C.; Bhandari, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    The field of genomics has expanded into subspecialties such as metagenomics over the course of the last decade and a half. The development of massively parallel sequencing capabilities has allowed for increasingly detailed study of the genome of the human microbiome, the microbial super organ that resides symbiotically within the mucosal tissues and integumentary system of the human host. The gut microbiome, and particularly the study of its origins in neonates, has become subtopics of great interest within the field of genomics. This brief review seeks to summarize recent literature regarding the origins and establishment of the neonatal gut microbiome, beginning in utero, and how it is affected by neonatal nutritional status (breastfed versus formula fed) and gestational age (term versus preterm). We also explore the role of dysbiosis, a perturbation within the fragile ecosystem of the microbiome, and its role in the origin of select pathologic states, specifically, obesity and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants. We discuss the evidence supporting enteral pre- and pro-biotic supplementation of commensal organisms such as Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in the neonatal period, and their role in the prevention and amelioration of NEC in premature infants. Finally, we review directions to consider for further research to promote human health within this field. PMID:25798435

  9. Low calorie sweeteners: Evidence remains lacking for effects on human gut function.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Charlotte; Mclaughlin, John

    2016-10-01

    The importance of nutrient induced gut-brain signalling in the regulation of human food intake has become an increasing focus of research. Much of the caloric excess consumed comes from dietary sugars, but our knowledge about the mechanisms mediating the physiological and appetitive effects of sweet tastants in the human gut and gut-brain axis is far from complete. The comparative effects of natural sugars vs low calorie sweeteners are also poorly understood. Research in animal and cellular models has suggested a key functional role in gut endocrine cells for the sweet taste receptors previously well described in oral taste. However human studies to date have very consistently failed to show that activation of the sweet taste receptor by low calorie sweeteners placed in the human gut fails to replicate any of the effects on gastric motility, gut hormones or appetitive responses evoked by caloric sugars. PMID:27133729

  10. Identifying genetic determinants needed to establish a human gut symbiont in its habitat

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Andrew L.; McNulty, Nathan P.; Zhao, Yue; Leip, Douglas; Mitra, Robi D.; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The human gut microbiota is a metabolic organ whose cellular composition is determined by a dynamic process of selection and competition. To identify microbial genes required for establishment of human symbionts in the gut, we developed an approach (insertion-sequencing, or INSeq) based on a mutagenic transposon that allows capture of adjacent chromosomal DNA to define its genomic location. We used massively parallel sequencing to monitor the relative abundance of tens of thousands of transposon mutants of a saccharolytic human gut bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, as they established themselves in wild-type and immunodeficient gnotobiotic mice, in the presence or absence of other human gut commensals. In vivo selection transforms this population, revealing functions necessary for survival in the gut: we show how this selection is influenced by community composition and competition for nutrients (vitamin B12). INSeq provides a broadly applicable platform to explore microbial adaptation to the gut and other ecosystems. PMID:19748469

  11. Transformation of trollioside and isoquercetin by human intestinal flora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Shi, Duo-Zhi; Wang, Teng-Yu; Zheng, Shi-Qi; Liu, Li-Jia; Sun, Zhen-Xiao; Wang, Ru-Feng; Ding, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to determine the intestinal bacterial metabolites of trollioside and isoquercetin and their antibacterial activities. A systematic in vitro biotransformation investigation on trollioside and isoquercetin, including metabolite identification, metabolic pathway deduction, and time course, was accomplished using a human intestinal bacterial model. The metabolites were analyzed and identified by HPLC and HPLC-MS. The antibacterial activities of trollioside, isoquercetin, and their metabolites were evaluated using the broth microdilution method with berberine as a positive control, and their potency was measured as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). Our results indicated that trollioside and isoquercetin were metabolized by human intestinal flora through O-deglycosylation, yielding aglycones proglobeflowery acid and quercetin, respectively The antibacterial activities of both metabolites were more potent than that of their parent compounds. In conclusion, trollioside and isoquercetin are totally and rapidly transformed by human intestinal bacteria in vitro and the transformation favors the improvement of the antibacterial activities of the parent compounds. PMID:27025369

  12. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent onmore » its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.« less

  13. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent on its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Gut Bifidobacteria Populations in Human Health and Aging.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Silvia; Watkins, Claire; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has increasingly been shown to have a vital role in various aspects of human health. Indeed, several studies have linked alterations in the gut microbiota with the development of different diseases. Among the vast gut bacterial community, Bifidobacterium is a genus which dominates the intestine of healthy breast-fed infants whereas in adulthood the levels are lower but relatively stable. The presence of different species of bifidobacteria changes with age, from childhood to old age. Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, and B. bifidum are generally dominant in infants, whereas B. catenulatum, B. adolescentis and, as well as B. longum are more prevalent in adults. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating which shows beneficial effects of supplementation with bifidobacteria for the improvement of human health conditions ranging from protection against infection to different extra- and intra-intestinal positive effects. Moreover, bifidobacteria have been associated with the production of a number of potentially health promoting metabolites including short chain fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and bacteriocins. The aim of this mini-review is to describe the bifidobacteria compositional changes associated with different stages in life, highlighting their beneficial role, as well as their presence or absence in many disease states. PMID:27594848

  15. Human Colon-Derived Soluble Factors Modulate Gut Microbiota Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A.; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune – IL-15- and microbiota – LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition. PMID:25918688

  16. Human colon-derived soluble factors modulate gut microbiota composition.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting conditions and after immune - IL-15- and microbiota - LPS-in vitro challenges) were used to condition a stable fecal population. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based analyses were performed to study the effect induced by the host on the microbiota composition and function. Non-supervised principal component analysis (PCA) showed that all microbiotas, which had been conditioned with colonic microenvironments clustered together in terms of relative microbial composition, suggesting that soluble factors were modulating a stable fecal population independently from the treatment or the origin. Our findings confirmed that the host intestinal microenvironment has the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota composition via yet unidentified soluble factors. These findings indicate that an appropriate understanding of the factors of the host mucosal microenvironment affecting microbiota composition and function could improve therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota composition. PMID:25918688

  17. Gut Bifidobacteria Populations in Human Health and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Watkins, Claire; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has increasingly been shown to have a vital role in various aspects of human health. Indeed, several studies have linked alterations in the gut microbiota with the development of different diseases. Among the vast gut bacterial community, Bifidobacterium is a genus which dominates the intestine of healthy breast-fed infants whereas in adulthood the levels are lower but relatively stable. The presence of different species of bifidobacteria changes with age, from childhood to old age. Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, and B. bifidum are generally dominant in infants, whereas B. catenulatum, B. adolescentis and, as well as B. longum are more prevalent in adults. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating which shows beneficial effects of supplementation with bifidobacteria for the improvement of human health conditions ranging from protection against infection to different extra- and intra-intestinal positive effects. Moreover, bifidobacteria have been associated with the production of a number of potentially health promoting metabolites including short chain fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and bacteriocins. The aim of this mini-review is to describe the bifidobacteria compositional changes associated with different stages in life, highlighting their beneficial role, as well as their presence or absence in many disease states. PMID:27594848

  18. Impact of experimental hookworm infection on the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cantacessi, Cinzia; Giacomin, Paul; Croese, John; Zakrzewski, Martha; Sotillo, Javier; McCann, Leisa; Nolan, Matthew J; Mitreva, Makedonka; Krause, Lutz; Loukas, Alex

    2014-11-01

    The interactions between gastrointestinal parasitic helminths and commensal bacteria are likely to play a pivotal role in the establishment of host-parasite cross-talk, ultimately shaping the development of the intestinal immune system. However, little information is available on the impact of infections by gastrointestinal helminths on the bacterial communities inhabiting the human gut. We used 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing to characterize, for the first time to our knowledge, the differences in composition and relative abundance of fecal microbial communities in human subjects prior to and following experimental infection with the blood-feeding intestinal hookworm, Necator americanus. Our data show that, although hookworm infection leads to a minor increase in microbial species richness, no detectable effect is observed on community structure, diversity or relative abundance of individual bacterial species. PMID:24795483

  19. Impact of Experimental Hookworm Infection on the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cantacessi, Cinzia; Giacomin, Paul; Croese, John; Zakrzewski, Martha; Sotillo, Javier; McCann, Leisa; Nolan, Matthew J.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Krause, Lutz; Loukas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between gastrointestinal parasitic helminths and commensal bacteria are likely to play a pivotal role in the establishment of host-parasite cross-talk, ultimately shaping the development of the intestinal immune system. However, little information is available on the impact of infections by gastrointestinal helminths on the bacterial communities inhabiting the human gut. We used 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing to characterize, for the first time to our knowledge, the differences in composition and relative abundance of fecal microbial communities in human subjects prior to and following experimental infection with the blood-feeding intestinal hookworm, Necator americanus. Our data show that, although hookworm infection leads to a minor increase in microbial species richness, no detectable effect is observed on community structure, diversity or relative abundance of individual bacterial species. PMID:24795483

  20. Human gut microbiota and its relationship to health and disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Taylor C; Guarner, Francisco; Madsen, Karen; Cabana, Michael D; Gibson, Glenn; Hentges, Eric; Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2011-07-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer a health benefit on the host when administered in appropriate amounts. Over 700 randomized, controlled, human studies have been conducted with probiotics thus far, with the results providing strong support for the use of probiotics in the clinical prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders and metabolic syndrome. The present review is based on webinar presentations that were developed by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) in partnership with the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and the North American branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI North America). The presentations provided gastroenterologists and researchers with fundamental and current scientific information on the influence of gut microbiota on human health and disease, as well as clinical intervention strategies and practical guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:21729093

  1. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Emily R; Cusanovich, Darren A; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10-7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  2. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  3. Gut microbiota: next frontier in understanding human health and development of biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Rodes, Laetitia; Coussa-Charley, Michael; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The gut microbiota is a remarkable asset for human health. As a key element in the development and prevention of specific diseases, its study has yielded a new field of promising biotherapeutics. This review provides comprehensive and updated knowledge of the human gut microbiota, its implications in health and disease, and the potentials and limitations of its modification by currently available biotherapeutics to treat, prevent and/or restore human health, and future directions. Homeostasis of the gut microbiota maintains various functions which are vital to the maintenance of human health. Disruption of the intestinal ecosystem equilibrium (gut dysbiosis) is associated with a plethora of human diseases, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, colorectal cancer, metabolic diseases, and bacterial infections. Relevant underlying mechanisms by which specific intestinal bacteria populations might trigger the development of disease in susceptible hosts are being explored across the globe. Beneficial modulation of the gut microbiota using biotherapeutics, such as prebiotics, probiotics, and antibiotics, may favor health-promoting populations of bacteria and can be exploited in development of biotherapeutics. Other technologies, such as development of human gut models, bacterial screening, and delivery formulations eg, microencapsulated probiotics, may contribute significantly in the near future. Therefore, the human gut microbiota is a legitimate therapeutic target to treat and/or prevent various diseases. Development of a clear understanding of the technologies needed to exploit the gut microbiota is urgently required. PMID:21847343

  4. Antibacterial potential and genetic profile of Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from human normal flora.

    PubMed

    Karimaei, Samira; Sadeghi, Javad; Asadian, Mahla; Esghaei, Maryam; Pourshafie, Mohammad Reza; Talebi, Malihe

    2016-07-01

    Enterococci have a widespread attendance in the circumference and belongs to the enteric commensal microbiota. Most of them produce the antimicrobial compounds and have an inhibition effect on pathogenic microorganisms. The objective of this study was to characterize the enterococcal strains isolated from human normal flora and assess their antibacterial activity. Enterococcal isolates were obtained from the feces of eighteen healthy humans. All enterococcal species were identified by biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isolates were investigated further to examine their ability to inhibit growth of Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri and Escherichia coli by well diffusion assay. Furthermore, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed and genetic relatedness of all isolates was evaluated by Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). In all, 432 isolates were obtained from fecal samples. All of the isolates identified as Enterococcus faecium by biochemical and molecular (PCR) methods. Using repetitive element palindromic (REP)-PCR method 54 patterns have been obtained and were selected for further evaluation. The results indicated that 66%, 38% and 24% of our isolates had antimicrobial effect against S. typhi, S flexneri and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), respectively. On the other hand, there was no significant inhibition effect against enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. On the other hand, the resistance rates for erythromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were 20%, 22%, and 1.8% respectively. In addition, the analysis of PFGE showed forty patterns with eight (40.7%) common types (CT) and thirty two (59.2%) single types (ST). Among eight common types, only one common type (CT5) had similar antimicrobial effect. These results suggested that enterococcal isolates obtained from

  5. Evolutionary, ecological and biotechnological perspectives on plasmids resident in the human gut mobile metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Firouzmand, Sepinoud; Jones, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous mobile genetic elements (MGE) are associated with the human gut microbiota and collectively referred to as the gut mobile metagenome. The role of this flexible gene pool in development and functioning of the gut microbial community remains largely unexplored, yet recent evidence suggests that at least some MGE comprising this fraction of the gut microbiome reflect the co-evolution of host and microbe in the gastro-intestinal tract. In conjunction, the high level of novel gene content typical of MGE coupled with their predicted high diversity, suggests that the mobile metagenome constitutes an immense and largely unexplored gene-space likely to encode many novel activities with potential biotechnological or pharmaceutical value, as well as being important to the development and functioning of the gut microbiota. Of the various types of MGE that comprise the gut mobile metagenome, plasmids are of particular importance since these elements are often capable of autonomous transfer between disparate bacterial species, and are known to encode accessory functions that increase bacterial fitness in a given environment facilitating bacterial adaptation. In this article current knowledge regarding plasmids resident in the human gut mobile metagenome is reviewed, and available strategies to access and characterize this portion of the gut microbiome are described. The relative merits of these methods and their present as well as prospective impact on our understanding of the human gut microbiota is discussed. PMID:22126801

  6. The influence of various factors on the human resident skin flora.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A A

    1990-12-01

    Various factors, e.g. prolonged occlusion, skin disinfectants, systemic antimicrobials, can have an impact on the ecosystem of the normal human skin flora for a short time. These impacts are of clinical importance in the treatment of some skin diseases, where members of the normal human skin flora are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, e.g. Propionibacterium acnes in acne vulgaris, Corynebacterium species in erythrasma, trichomycosis palmellina and pitted keratolysis, Pityrosporum orbiculare/ovale in Pityriasis versicolor, Pityrosporum folliculitis and others. Using the standardized forehead skin test, SFST, proposed by us, antibacterial short-term effects including the action degree profile, the action time profile, and the depth penetration profile of a topically applied antibacterial agent can be measured. Testing 60 v/v% isopropanol, 60 v/v% n-propanol, povidone iodine (aques solution), 3 w/v% salicylic acid in 50 v/v% isopropanol and 1 v/v% phenoli liquefacti in 50 v/v% isopropanol, salicylic acid showed equivalent reduction factors as 60 v/v% n-propanol immediately after the application. With the modified SFST, salicyclic acid tincture produced a 50-fold higher bacterial density reduction 12 hours after the fourth application and a 100-fold reduction 12 hours after the eighth application in comparison with 60 v/v% isopropanol. Salicylic acid, mainly used in dermatotherapy as a keratolytic agent, fulfills all these above mentioned requirements including a well antimicrobial efficacy. Since Salicyclic acid is also effective against yeast and dermatophytes, the substance has some advantages over other antimicrobials used in the dermatotherapy. PMID:2285575

  7. Consumption of Human Milk Oligosaccharides by Gut-related Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Barboza, Mariana; Froehlich, John W.; Block, David E.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Human milk contains large amounts of complex oligosaccharides that putatively modulate the intestinal microbiota of breast-fed infants by acting as decoy binding sites for pathogens and as prebiotics for enrichment of beneficial bacteria. Several bifidobacterial species have been shown to grow well on human milk oligosaccharides. However, little data exists on other bacterial species. In this work we examined 16 bacterial strains belonging to 10 different genera for growth on human milk oligosaccharides. For this propose, we used a chemically-defined medium, ZMB1, which allows vigorous growth of a number gut–related microorganisms in a fashion similar to complex media. Interestingly, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides vulgatus strains were able to metabolize milk oligosaccharides with high efficiency, while Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Eubacterium, Clostridium, and Escherichia coli strains grew less well or not at all. Mass spectrometry-based glycoprofiling of the oligosaccharide consumption behavior revealed a specific preference for fucosylated oligosaccharides by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bacteroides vulgatus. This work expands the current knowledge of human milk oligosaccharides consumption by gut microbes, revealing bacteroides as avid consumer of this substrate. These results provide insight on how human milk oligosaccharides shape the infant intestinal microbiota. PMID:20394371

  8. Functional Comparison of Bacteria from the Human Gut and Closely Related Non-Gut Bacteria Reveals the Importance of Conjugation and a Paucity of Motility and Chemotaxis Functions in the Gut Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dobrijevic, Dragana; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Jamet, Alexandre; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The human GI tract is a complex and still poorly understood environment, inhabited by one of the densest microbial communities on earth. The gut microbiota is shaped by millennia of evolution to co-exist with the host in commensal or symbiotic relationships. Members of the gut microbiota perform specific molecular functions important in the human gut environment. This can be illustrated by the presence of a highly expanded repertoire of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, in phase with the large diversity of polysaccharides originating from the diet or from the host itself that can be encountered in this environment. In order to identify other bacterial functions that are important in the human gut environment, we investigated the distribution of functional groups of proteins in a group of human gut bacteria and their close non-gut relatives. Complementary to earlier global comparisons between different ecosystems, this approach should allow a closer focus on a group of functions directly related to the gut environment while avoiding functions related to taxonomically divergent microbiota composition, which may or may not be relevant for gut homeostasis. We identified several functions that are overrepresented in the human gut bacteria which had not been recognized in a global approach. The observed under-representation of certain other functions may be equally important for gut homeostasis. Together, these analyses provide us with new information about this environment so critical to our health and well-being. PMID:27416027

  9. Functional Comparison of Bacteria from the Human Gut and Closely Related Non-Gut Bacteria Reveals the Importance of Conjugation and a Paucity of Motility and Chemotaxis Functions in the Gut Environment.

    PubMed

    Dobrijevic, Dragana; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Jamet, Alexandre; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The human GI tract is a complex and still poorly understood environment, inhabited by one of the densest microbial communities on earth. The gut microbiota is shaped by millennia of evolution to co-exist with the host in commensal or symbiotic relationships. Members of the gut microbiota perform specific molecular functions important in the human gut environment. This can be illustrated by the presence of a highly expanded repertoire of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, in phase with the large diversity of polysaccharides originating from the diet or from the host itself that can be encountered in this environment. In order to identify other bacterial functions that are important in the human gut environment, we investigated the distribution of functional groups of proteins in a group of human gut bacteria and their close non-gut relatives. Complementary to earlier global comparisons between different ecosystems, this approach should allow a closer focus on a group of functions directly related to the gut environment while avoiding functions related to taxonomically divergent microbiota composition, which may or may not be relevant for gut homeostasis. We identified several functions that are overrepresented in the human gut bacteria which had not been recognized in a global approach. The observed under-representation of certain other functions may be equally important for gut homeostasis. Together, these analyses provide us with new information about this environment so critical to our health and well-being. PMID:27416027

  10. The human gut microbiome impacts health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiome can now be characterized in unprecedented detail by an approach based on high-throughput sequencing of total stool DNA, that we name quantitative metagenomics. Central to the approach is a catalog that lists all the genes of intestinal microbes that are known - 9.9 millions, identified by the analysis of 1267 stool samples. Beyond the gene list, genetic units that carry them begun to be known; many of these correspond to bacterial species that were never isolated and cultured yet. Quantitative metagenomics allows developing powerful algorithms to diagnose a disease, monitor patients and identify individuals at risk to progress towards a disease. This lays ground for developing new approaches to better restore and even preserve the health by modulation of the altered microbiome, which contributes to promote or aggravate a disease. PMID:27236827

  11. Fusobacterium nucleatum, inflammation, and immunity: the fire within human gut.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Miskeen, Abid Yousuf; Hazari, Younis Mohammad; Asrafuzzaman, Syed; Fazili, Khalid Majid

    2016-03-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an identified proinflammatory autochthonous bacterium implicated in human colorectal cancer. It is also abundantly found in patients suffering from chronic gut inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease), consequently contributing to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Majority of the studies have reported that colorectal tumors/colorectal adenocarcinomas are highly enriched with F. nucleatum compared to noninvolved adjacent colonic tissue. During the course of multistep development of colorectal cancer, tumors have evolved many mechanisms to resist the antitumor immune response. One of such favorite ploy is providing access to pathogenic bacteria, especially F. nucleatum in the colorectal tumor microenvironment, wherein both (colorectal tumors and F. nucleatum) exert profound effect on each other, consequently attracting tumor-permissive myeloid-derived suppressor cells, suppressing cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and inhibiting NK cell-mediated cancer cell killing. In this review, we have primarily focused on how this bug modulates the immune response, consequently rendering the antitumor immune cells inactive. PMID:26718210

  12. Human symbionts inject and neutralize antibacterial toxins to persist in the gut.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Aaron G; Bao, Yiqiao; Whitney, John C; Bobay, Louis-Marie; Xavier, Joao B; Schofield, Whitman B; Barry, Natasha A; Russell, Alistair B; Tran, Bao Q; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R; Ochman, Howard; Mougous, Joseph D; Goodman, Andrew L

    2016-03-29

    The human gut microbiome is a dynamic and densely populated microbial community that can provide important benefits to its host. Cooperation and competition for nutrients among its constituents only partially explain community composition and interpersonal variation. Notably, certain human-associated Bacteroidetes--one of two major phyla in the gut--also encode machinery for contact-dependent interbacterial antagonism, but its impact within gut microbial communities remains unknown. Here we report that prominent human gut symbionts persist in the gut through continuous attack on their immediate neighbors. Our analysis of just one of the hundreds of species in these communities reveals 12 candidate antibacterial effector loci that can exist in 32 combinations. Through the use of secretome studies, in vitro bacterial interaction assays and multiple mouse models, we uncover strain-specific effector/immunity repertoires that can predict interbacterial interactions in vitro and in vivo, and find that some of these strains avoid contact-dependent killing by accumulating immunity genes to effectors that they do not encode. Effector transmission rates in live animals can exceed 1 billion events per minute per gram of colonic contents, and multiphylum communities of human gut commensals can partially protect sensitive strains from these attacks. Together, these results suggest that gut microbes can determine their interactions through direct contact. An understanding of the strategies human gut symbionts have evolved to target other members of this community may provide new approaches for microbiome manipulation. PMID:26957597

  13. Complex Glycan Catabolism by the Human Gut Microbiota: The Bacteroidetes Sus-like Paradigm*

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Eric C.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Trillions of microbes inhabit the distal gut of adult humans. They have evolved to compete efficiently for nutrients, including a wide array of chemically diverse, complex glycans present in our diets, secreted by our intestinal mucosa, and displayed on the surfaces of other gut microbes. Here, we review how members of the Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant gut-associated bacterial phyla, process complex glycans using a series of similarly patterned, cell envelope-associated multiprotein systems. These systems provide insights into how gut, as well as terrestrial and aquatic, Bacteroidetes survive in highly competitive ecosystems. PMID:19553672

  14. [Why could gut microbiota become a medication?].

    PubMed

    Bourlioux, P; Megerlin, F; Corthier, G; Gobert, J-G; Butel, M-J

    2014-09-01

    The gut microbiota (or gut flora) is a set of bacteria living in symbiosis with the host. Strictly associated with the intestinal tract and interacting with it, the gut microbiota is not a tissue nor an organ, but a supra-organism. A disruption of dialogue between bacteria and human cells is a risk factor or a possible cause of various diseases. The restoration of this dialogue, thanks to the transfer of the gut microbiota of a healthy individual to a patient whose balance of gut flora has been broken, is a new therapeutic approach. If its exact effect still eludes scientific understanding, its clinical benefit is well established for an indication, and is recently being tested for many others. The proven contribution of gut microbiota in the human physiological balance calls for intensifying research throughout the world about the state of knowledge and technologies, as well as on the legal and ethical dimension of fecal microbiota transfer. This didactic paper updates the questions in relation with this therapeutic act. PMID:25220228

  15. The human gut microbiome and its dysfunctions through the meta-omics prism.

    PubMed

    Mondot, Stanislas; Lepage, Patricia

    2016-05-01

    The microorganisms inhabiting the human gut are abundant (10(14) cells) and diverse (approximately 500 species per individual). It is now acknowledged that the microbiota has coevolved with its host to achieve a symbiotic relationship, leading to physiological homeostasis. The gut microbiota ensures vital functions, such as food digestibility, maturation of the host immune system, and protection against pathogens. Over the last few decades, the gut microbiota has also been associated with numerous diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, and metabolic diseases. In most of these pathologies, a microbial dysbiosis has been found, indicating shifts in the taxonomic composition of the gut microbiota and changes in its functionality. Our understanding of the influence of the gut microbiota on human health is still growing. Working with microorganisms residing in the gut is challenging since most of them are anaerobic and a vast majority (approximately 75%) are uncultivable to date. Recently, a wide range of new approaches (meta-omics) has been developed to bypass the uncultivability and reveal the intricate mechanisms that sustain gut microbial homeostasis. After a brief description of these approaches (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics, and metabolomics), this review will discuss the importance of considering the gut microbiome as a structured ecosystem and the use of meta-omics to decipher dysfunctions of the gut microbiome in diseases. PMID:26945826

  16. Aerobic bacterial oral flora of garter snakes: development of normal flora and pathogenic potential for snakes and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Agyare, E O; Vagvolgyi, A E; Halpern, M

    1981-01-01

    Garter snakes that are used for scientific laboratory studies or kept as exotic pets often become ill and die early in captivity. They may also act as reservoirs of potential human pathogens or transmit infection to man. A total of 126 strains of aerobic and facultative bacteria, most potential human and snake pathogens, were isolated from 82 garter snake oropharyngeal cultures. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were the most common species isolated. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var. anitratus, Hafnia alvei, Arizona hinshawii, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were among the potential pathogens isolated. The spectrum of bacteria with potential for causing oral and pulmonary infections in garter snakes is greater than has been previously appreciated. Garter snakes should also be considered reservoirs of human pathogens, and appropriate precautions should be taken by laboratory personnel and pet owners. PMID:7240404

  17. Mucin glycan foraging in the human gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Tailford, Louise E; Crost, Emmanuelle H; Kavanaugh, Devon; Juge, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The availability of host and dietary carbohydrates in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a key role in shaping the structure-function of the microbiota. In particular, some gut bacteria have the ability to forage on glycans provided by the mucus layer covering the GI tract. The O-glycan structures present in mucin are diverse and complex, consisting predominantly of core 1-4 mucin-type O-glycans containing α- and β- linked N-acetyl-galactosamine, galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine. These core structures are further elongated and frequently modified by fucose and sialic acid sugar residues via α1,2/3/4 and α2,3/6 linkages, respectively. The ability to metabolize these mucin O-linked oligosaccharides is likely to be a key factor in determining which bacterial species colonize the mucosal surface. Due to their proximity to the immune system, mucin-degrading bacteria are in a prime location to influence the host response. However, despite the growing number of bacterial genome sequences available from mucin degraders, our knowledge on the structural requirements for mucin degradation by gut bacteria remains fragmented. This is largely due to the limited number of functionally characterized enzymes and the lack of studies correlating the specificity of these enzymes with the ability of the strain to degrade and utilize mucin and mucin glycans. This review focuses on recent findings unraveling the molecular strategies used by mucin-degrading bacteria to utilize host glycans, adapt to the mucosal environment, and influence human health. PMID:25852737

  18. Mucin glycan foraging in the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Tailford, Louise E.; Crost, Emmanuelle H.; Kavanaugh, Devon; Juge, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The availability of host and dietary carbohydrates in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a key role in shaping the structure-function of the microbiota. In particular, some gut bacteria have the ability to forage on glycans provided by the mucus layer covering the GI tract. The O-glycan structures present in mucin are diverse and complex, consisting predominantly of core 1-4 mucin-type O-glycans containing α- and β- linked N-acetyl-galactosamine, galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine. These core structures are further elongated and frequently modified by fucose and sialic acid sugar residues via α1,2/3/4 and α2,3/6 linkages, respectively. The ability to metabolize these mucin O-linked oligosaccharides is likely to be a key factor in determining which bacterial species colonize the mucosal surface. Due to their proximity to the immune system, mucin-degrading bacteria are in a prime location to influence the host response. However, despite the growing number of bacterial genome sequences available from mucin degraders, our knowledge on the structural requirements for mucin degradation by gut bacteria remains fragmented. This is largely due to the limited number of functionally characterized enzymes and the lack of studies correlating the specificity of these enzymes with the ability of the strain to degrade and utilize mucin and mucin glycans. This review focuses on recent findings unraveling the molecular strategies used by mucin-degrading bacteria to utilize host glycans, adapt to the mucosal environment, and influence human health. PMID:25852737

  19. [The gut microbiota in sickness and health].

    PubMed

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Nieuwdorp, Max; de Vos, Willem M; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2014-01-01

    The human gut microbiota, formerly known as 'gut flora', may be regarded as an external organ with many physiological functions in metabolism, development of the immune system and defense against pathogens. The adult gut microbiota consist of 1013-1014 micro-organisms. The aggregate genome of these, known as the microbiome, is 100 times larger than the human genome. The gut microbiotica may be involved in the pathogenesis of a range of syndromes, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus and atopic disorders. It should be noted that until now most of the studies conducted have been association studies, without proof of causality. This increasing insight has led to identification of new therapeutic strategies, which are currently being investigated in clinical studies. Although the implications of this knowledge for individual patients have yet to become clear, various interventions are conceivable, such as supplementation of nutritional elements, prebiotics or probiotics and feces transplantation. PMID:24780568

  20. Effect of Raw-Milk Cheese Consumption on the Enterococcal Flora of Human Feces

    PubMed Central

    Gelsomino, Roberto; Vancanneyt, Marc; Cogan, Timothy M.; Swings, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the major facultative anaerobic bacterial groups that reside in the human gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the composition of the enterococcal fecal flora in three healthy humans was analyzed before, during, and after the daily consumption of ∼125 g of a raw-milk Cheddar-type cheese containing 3.2 × 104 enterococci/g of cheese. Enterococcal counts ranged between 1.4 × 102 and 2.5 × 108 CFU/g of feces and differed from subject to subject and from week to week. The cheese contained mainly Enterococcus casseliflavus and a small population of Enterococcus faecalis. Clonal relationships were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Before and after consumption of the cheese, samples from humans contained mainly Enterococcus faecium, with some of the clones being resident. During consumption of the cheese, one particular transient clone of E. faecalis, clone Fs2, which was present in small numbers in the cheese, largely dominated the feces. Two clones of E. casseliflavus from the cheese were also found in the feces of one of the subjects during cheese consumption. These results suggest that a clone need not be present in a food in high numbers to establish itself in the intestine. PMID:12514010

  1. Human symbionts inject and neutralize antibacterial toxins to persist in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Aaron G.; Bao, Yiqiao; Whitney, John C.; Bobay, Louis-Marie; Xavier, Joao B.; Schofield, Whitman B.; Barry, Natasha A.; Russell, Alistair B.; Tran, Bao Q.; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R.; Ochman, Howard; Mougous, Joseph D.; Goodman, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is a dynamic and densely populated microbial community that can provide important benefits to its host. Cooperation and competition for nutrients among its constituents only partially explain community composition and interpersonal variation. Notably, certain human-associated Bacteroidetes—one of two major phyla in the gut—also encode machinery for contact-dependent interbacterial antagonism, but its impact within gut microbial communities remains unknown. Here we report that prominent human gut symbionts persist in the gut through continuous attack on their immediate neighbors. Our analysis of just one of the hundreds of species in these communities reveals 12 candidate antibacterial effector loci that can exist in 32 combinations. Through the use of secretome studies, in vitro bacterial interaction assays and multiple mouse models, we uncover strain-specific effector/immunity repertoires that can predict interbacterial interactions in vitro and in vivo, and find that some of these strains avoid contact-dependent killing by accumulating immunity genes to effectors that they do not encode. Effector transmission rates in live animals can exceed 1 billion events per minute per gram of colonic contents, and multiphylum communities of human gut commensals can partially protect sensitive strains from these attacks. Together, these results suggest that gut microbes can determine their interactions through direct contact. An understanding of the strategies human gut symbionts have evolved to target other members of this community may provide new approaches for microbiome manipulation. PMID:26957597

  2. The Active Human Gut Microbiota Differs from the Total Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Latorre, Amparo; Artacho, Alejandro; Moya, Andrés; D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is considered one of the most fascinating reservoirs of microbial diversity hosting between 400 to 1000 bacterial species distributed among nine phyla with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria representing around of the diversity. One of the most intriguing issues relates to understanding which microbial groups are active players in the maintenance of the microbiota homeostasis. Here, we describe the diversity of active microbial fractions compared with the whole community from raw human fecal samples. We studied four healthy volunteers by 16S rDNA gene pyrosequencing. The fractions were obtained by cell sorting based on bacterial RNA concentration. Bacterial families were observed to appear or disappear on applying a cell sorting method in which flow cytometry was used to evaluate the active cells by pyronin-Y staining of RNA. This method was able to detect active bacteria, indicating that the active players differed from that observed in raw fecal material. Generally, observations showed that in the active fractions, the number of reads related to Bacteroidetes decreased whereas several families from Clostridiales (Firmicutes) were more highly represented. Moreover, a huge number of families appeared as part of the active fraction when cell sorting was applied, indicating reads that are simply statistically hidden by the total reads. PMID:21829462

  3. The Effect of Diet on the Human Gut Microbiome: A Metagenomic Analysis in Humanized Gnotobiotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Rey, Federico E.; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2010-01-01

    Diet and nutritional status are among the most important, modifiable determinants of human health. The nutritional value of food is influenced in part by a person’s gut microbial community (microbiota) and its component genes (microbiome). Unraveling the interrelationships between diet, the structure and operations of the gut microbiota, and nutrient and energy harvest is confounded by variations in human environmental exposures, microbial ecology and genotype. To help overcome these problems, we created a well-defined, representative animal model of the human gut ecosystem by transplanting fresh or frozen adult human fecal microbial communities into germ-free C57BL/6J mice. Culture-independent, metagenomic analysis of the temporal, spatial and intergenerational patterns of bacterial colonization showed that these humanized mice were stably and heritably colonized, and reproduced much of the bacterial diversity of the donor’s microbiota. Switching from a low-fat, plant polysaccharide-rich diet to a high-fat/high-sugar “Western” diet shifted the structure of the microbiota within a single day, changed the representation of metabolic pathways in the microbiome, and altered microbiome gene expression. Reciprocal transplants involving various combinations of donor and recipient diets revealed that colonization history influences the initial structure of the microbial community, but that these effects can be rapidly altered by diet. Humanized mice fed the Western diet have increased adiposity; this trait is transmissible via microbiota transplantation. Humanized gnotobiotic mice will be useful for conducting proof-of-principle “clinical trials” that test the effects of environmental and genetic factors on the gut microbiota and host physiology. PMID:20368178

  4. Disentangling type 2 diabetes and metformin treatment signatures in the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Nielsen, Trine; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Prifti, Edi; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Krogh Pedersen, Helle; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Kristiansen, Karsten; Voigt, Anita Yvonne; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hercog, Rajna; Igor Costea, Paul; Kultima, Jens Roat; Li, Junhua; Jørgensen, Torben; Levenez, Florence; Dore, Joël; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Brunak, Søren; Raes, Jeroen; Hansen, Torben; Wang, Jun; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Bork, Peer; Pedersen, Oluf

    2015-12-10

    In recent years, several associations between common chronic human disorders and altered gut microbiome composition and function have been reported. In most of these reports, treatment regimens were not controlled for and conclusions could thus be confounded by the effects of various drugs on the microbiota, which may obscure microbial causes, protective factors or diagnostically relevant signals. Our study addresses disease and drug signatures in the human gut microbiome of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Two previous quantitative gut metagenomics studies of T2D patients that were unstratified for treatment yielded divergent conclusions regarding its associated gut microbial dysbiosis. Here we show, using 784 available human gut metagenomes, how antidiabetic medication confounds these results, and analyse in detail the effects of the most widely used antidiabetic drug metformin. We provide support for microbial mediation of the therapeutic effects of metformin through short-chain fatty acid production, as well as for potential microbiota-mediated mechanisms behind known intestinal adverse effects in the form of a relative increase in abundance of Escherichia species. Controlling for metformin treatment, we report a unified signature of gut microbiome shifts in T2D with a depletion of butyrate-producing taxa. These in turn cause functional microbiome shifts, in part alleviated by metformin-induced changes. Overall, the present study emphasizes the need to disentangle gut microbiota signatures of specific human diseases from those of medication. PMID:26633628

  5. Effect of dextransucrase cellobiose acceptor products on the growth of human gut bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective fermentation by human gut bacteria of gluco-oligosaccharides obtained from the reaction between the glucosyl group of sucrose and cellobiose, catalyzed by dextransucrases from Leuconostoc mesenteroides, has been evaluated. Oligosaccharides were fractionated according to their molecula...

  6. Neonatal Gut Microbiota and Human Milk Glycans Cooperate to Attenuate Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; He, Yingying

    2015-12-01

    Glycans of the intestinal mucosa and oligosaccharides of human milk influence the early colonization of the infant gut and establishment of mucosal homeostasis, and differences in colonization of the gut influence the ontogeny of glycans on the surface of the intestinal mucosa, proinflammatory signaling, homeostasis, and resilience to insult. This interkingdom reciprocal interaction is typical of a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. The period in which the infant gut most needs protection from hypersensitive inflammation overlaps with the recommended period of exclusive nursing; electively substituting artificial formula that lacks human milk protective glycans seems ill advised, especially for premature infants. PMID:26457857

  7. Microbial community proteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E.; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    We found that the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome component is not insignificant, but rather provides important functions that are absolutely critical to many aspects of human health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial community proteomics (sometimes referred to as metaproteomics) provides a powerful approach to measure the range and details of human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities, revealing information about microbiome development and stability especially with regard to human health vs. disease states. In most cases, both microbial and human proteins are extracted from fecal samples and then measured by the high performance MS-based proteomics technology. We review the field of human gut microbiome community proteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems that range from low complexity defined model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the simple gut microbiota in the GI tract of newborn infants, and finally to the complex gut microbiota in adults. Moreover, the current state-of-the-art in experimental and bioinformatics capabilities for community proteomics enable a detailed measurement of the gut microbiota, yielding valuable insights into the broad functional profiles of even complex microbiota. Future developments are likely to expand into improved analysis throughput and coverage depth, as well as post-translational modification characterizations.

  8. Microbial community proteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E.; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    We found that the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome component is not insignificant, but rather provides important functions that are absolutely critical to many aspects of human health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial community proteomics (sometimes referred to as metaproteomics) provides a powerful approach to measure the range and details of human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities, revealing information about microbiome development and stability especially with regard to human health vs.more » disease states. In most cases, both microbial and human proteins are extracted from fecal samples and then measured by the high performance MS-based proteomics technology. We review the field of human gut microbiome community proteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems that range from low complexity defined model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the simple gut microbiota in the GI tract of newborn infants, and finally to the complex gut microbiota in adults. Moreover, the current state-of-the-art in experimental and bioinformatics capabilities for community proteomics enable a detailed measurement of the gut microbiota, yielding valuable insights into the broad functional profiles of even complex microbiota. Future developments are likely to expand into improved analysis throughput and coverage depth, as well as post-translational modification characterizations.« less

  9. Human gut microbiota community structures in urban and rural populations in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Tyakht, Alexander V.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Popenko, Anna S.; Belenikin, Maxim S.; Pavlenko, Alexander V.; Larin, Andrey K.; Karpova, Irina Y.; Selezneva, Oksana V.; Semashko, Tatyana A.; Ospanova, Elena A.; Babenko, Vladislav V.; Maev, Igor V.; Cheremushkin, Sergey V.; Kucheryavyy, Yuriy A.; Shcherbakov, Petr L.; Grinevich, Vladimir B.; Efimov, Oleg I.; Sas, Evgenii I.; Abdulkhakov, Rustam A.; Abdulkhakov, Sayar R.; Lyalyukova, Elena A.; Livzan, Maria A.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Tsukanov, Vladislav V.; Osipenko, Marina F.; Kozlova, Irina V.; Tkachev, Alexander V.; Sergienko, Valery I.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2013-01-01

    The microbial community of the human gut has a crucial role in sustaining host homeostasis. High-throughput DNA sequencing has delineated the structural and functional configurations of gut metagenomes in world populations. The microbiota of the Russian population is of particular interest to researchers, because Russia encompasses a uniquely wide range of environmental conditions and ethnogeographical cohorts. Here we conduct a shotgun metagenomic analysis of gut microbiota samples from 96 healthy Russian adult subjects, which reveals novel microbial community structures. The communities from several rural regions display similarities within each region and are dominated by the bacterial taxa associated with the healthy gut. Functional analysis shows that the metabolic pathways exhibiting differential abundance in the novel types are primarily associated with the trade-off between the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla. The specific signatures of the Russian gut microbiota are likely linked to the host diet, cultural habits and socioeconomic status. PMID:24036685

  10. The gut microbiome in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Zmora, Niv; Itav, Shlomik; Bashiardes, Stavros; Elinav, Hila; Elinav, Eran

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS causes severe dysfunction of the immune system through CD4+ T cell depletion, leading to dysregulation of both the adaptive and innate immune arms. A primary target for viral infection is the gastrointestinal tract, which is a reservoir of CD4+ T cells. In addition to being a major immune hub, the human gastrointestinal tract harbors trillions of commensal microorganisms, the microbiota, which have recently been shown to play critical roles in health. Alterations in the composition and function of microbiota have been implicated in a variety of 'multi-factorial' disorders, including infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and neoplastic disorders. It is widely accepted that, in addition to its direct role in altering the gastrointestinal CD4+ T cell compartment, HIV infection is characterized by gut microbiota compositional and functional changes. Herein, we review such alterations and discuss their potential local and systemic effects on the HIV-positive host, as well as potential roles of novel microbiota-targeting treatments in modulating HIV progression and associated adverse systemic manifestations. PMID:27256449

  11. Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jangi, Sushrut; Gandhi, Roopali; Cox, Laura M; Li, Ning; von Glehn, Felipe; Yan, Raymond; Patel, Bonny; Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Liu, Shirong; Glanz, Bonnie L; Cook, Sandra; Tankou, Stephanie; Stuart, Fiona; Melo, Kirsy; Nejad, Parham; Smith, Kathleen; Topçuolu, Begüm D; Holden, James; Kivisäkk, Pia; Chitnis, Tanuja; De Jager, Philip L; Quintana, Francisco J; Gerber, Georg K; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in immune function and has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. Here we use 16S rRNA sequencing to investigate the gut microbiome in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS, n=60) and healthy controls (n=43). Microbiome alterations in MS include increases in Methanobrevibacter and Akkermansia and decreases in Butyricimonas, and correlate with variations in the expression of genes involved in dendritic cell maturation, interferon signalling and NF-kB signalling pathways in circulating T cells and monocytes. Patients on disease-modifying treatment show increased abundances of Prevotella and Sutterella, and decreased Sarcina, compared with untreated patients. MS patients of a second cohort show elevated breath methane compared with controls, consistent with our observation of increased gut Methanobrevibacter in MS in the first cohort. Further study is required to assess whether the observed alterations in the gut microbiome play a role in, or are a consequence of, MS pathogenesis. PMID:27352007

  12. Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jangi, Sushrut; Gandhi, Roopali; Cox, Laura M.; Li, Ning; von Glehn, Felipe; Yan, Raymond; Patel, Bonny; Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Liu, Shirong; Glanz, Bonnie L.; Cook, Sandra; Tankou, Stephanie; Stuart, Fiona; Melo, Kirsy; Nejad, Parham; Smith, Kathleen; Topçuolu, Begüm D.; Holden, James; Kivisäkk, Pia; Chitnis, Tanuja; De Jager, Philip L.; Quintana, Francisco J.; Gerber, Georg K.; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in immune function and has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. Here we use 16S rRNA sequencing to investigate the gut microbiome in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS, n=60) and healthy controls (n=43). Microbiome alterations in MS include increases in Methanobrevibacter and Akkermansia and decreases in Butyricimonas, and correlate with variations in the expression of genes involved in dendritic cell maturation, interferon signalling and NF-kB signalling pathways in circulating T cells and monocytes. Patients on disease-modifying treatment show increased abundances of Prevotella and Sutterella, and decreased Sarcina, compared with untreated patients. MS patients of a second cohort show elevated breath methane compared with controls, consistent with our observation of increased gut Methanobrevibacter in MS in the first cohort. Further study is required to assess whether the observed alterations in the gut microbiome play a role in, or are a consequence of, MS pathogenesis. PMID:27352007

  13. Formation of short chain fatty acids by the gut microbiota and their impact on human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The formation of SCFA is the result of a complex interplay between diet and the gut microbiota within the gut lumen environment. The discovery of receptors, across a range of cell and tissue types for which short chain fatty acids SCFA appear to be the natural ligands, has led to increased interest in SCFA as signaling molecules between the gut microbiota and the host. SCFA represent the major carbon flux from the diet through the gut microbiota to the host and evidence is emerging for a regulatory role of SCFA in local, intermediary and peripheral metabolism. However, a lack of well-designed and controlled human studies has hampered our understanding of the significance of SCFA in human metabolic health. This review aims to pull together recent findings on the role of SCFA in human metabolism to highlight the multi-faceted role of SCFA on different metabolic systems. PMID:26963409

  14. Biodiversity of Active and Inactive Bacteria in the Gut Flora of Wood-Feeding Huhu Beetle Larvae (Prionoplus reticularis)▿†

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Nicola M.; Addison, Sarah L.; Macdonald, Lucy J.; Lloyd-Jones, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Huhu grubs (Prionoplus reticularis) are wood-feeding beetle larvae endemic to New Zealand and belonging to the family Cerambycidae. Compared to the wood-feeding lower termites, very little is known about the diversity and activity of microorganisms associated with xylophagous cerambycid larvae. To address this, we used pyrosequencing to evaluate the diversity of metabolically active and inactive bacteria in the huhu larval gut. Our estimate, that the gut harbors at least 1,800 phylotypes, is based on 33,420 sequences amplified from genomic DNA and reverse-transcribed RNA. Analysis of genomic DNA- and RNA-derived data sets revealed that 71% of all phylotypes (representing 95% of all sequences) were metabolically active. Rare phylotypes contributed considerably to the richness of the community and were also largely metabolically active, indicating their participation in digestive processes in the gut. The dominant families in the active community (RNA data set) included Acidobacteriaceae (24.3%), Xanthomonadaceae (16.7%), Acetobacteraceae (15.8%), Burkholderiaceae (8.7%), and Enterobacteriaceae (4.1%). The most abundant phylotype comprised 14% of the active community and affiliated with Dyella ginsengisoli (Gammaproteobacteria), suggesting that a Dyella-related organism is a likely symbiont. This study provides new information on the diversity and activity of gut-associated microorganisms that are essential for the digestion of the nutritionally poor diet consumed by wood-feeding larvae. Many huhu gut phylotypes affiliated with insect symbionts or with bacteria present in acidic environments or associated with fungi. PMID:21841025

  15. Chronic mTOR inhibition in mice with rapamycin alters T, B, myeloid, and innate lymphoid cells and gut flora and prolongs life of immune-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hurez, Vincent; Dao, Vinh; Liu, Aijie; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Gelfond, Jonathan; Sun, Lishi; Bergman, Molly; Orihuela, Carlos J; Galvan, Veronica; Padrón, Álvaro; Drerup, Justin; Liu, Yang; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave; Curiel, Tyler J

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates critical immune processes that remain incompletely defined. Interest in mTOR inhibitor drugs is heightened by recent demonstrations that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin extends lifespan and healthspan in mice. Rapamycin or related analogues (rapalogues) also mitigate age-related debilities including increasing antigen-specific immunity, improving vaccine responses in elderly humans, and treating cancers and autoimmunity, suggesting important new clinical applications. Nonetheless, immune toxicity concerns for long-term mTOR inhibition, particularly immunosuppression, persist. Although mTOR is pivotal to fundamental, important immune pathways, little is reported on immune effects of mTOR inhibition in lifespan or healthspan extension, or with chronic mTOR inhibitor use. We comprehensively analyzed immune effects of rapamycin as used in lifespan extension studies. Gene expression profiling found many and novel changes in genes affecting differentiation, function, homeostasis, exhaustion, cell death, and inflammation in distinct T- and B-lymphocyte and myeloid cell subpopulations. Immune functions relevant to aging and inflammation, and to cancer and infections, and innate lymphoid cell effects were validated in vitro and in vivo. Rapamycin markedly prolonged lifespan and healthspan in cancer- and infection-prone mice supporting disease mitigation as a mechanism for mTOR suppression-mediated longevity extension. It modestly altered gut metagenomes, and some metagenomic effects were linked to immune outcomes. Our data show novel mTOR inhibitor immune effects meriting further studies in relation to longevity and healthspan extension. PMID:26315673

  16. Xenobiotics shape the physiology and gene expression of the active human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Corinne Ferrier; Haiser, Henry Joseph; Turnbaugh, Peter James

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The human gut contains trillions of microorganisms that influence our health by metabolizing xenobiotics, including host-targeted drugs and antibiotics. Recent efforts have characterized the diversity of this host-associated community, but it remains unclear which microorganisms are active and what perturbations influence this activity. Here, we combine flow cytometry, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and metatranscriptomics to demonstrate that the gut contains a distinctive set of active microorganisms, primarily Firmicutes. Short-term exposure to a panel of xenobiotics significantly affected the physiology, structure, and gene expression of this active gut microbiome. Xenobiotic-responsive genes were found across multiple bacterial phyla, encoding antibiotic resistance, drug metabolism, and stress response pathways. These results demonstrate the power of moving beyond surveys of microbial diversity to better understand metabolic activity, highlight the unintended consequences of xenobiotics, and suggest that attempts at personalized medicine should consider inter-individual variations in the active human gut microbiome. PMID:23332745

  17. Dynamics and Stabilization of the Human Gut Microbiome during the First Year of Life.

    PubMed

    Bäckhed, Fredrik; Roswall, Josefine; Peng, Yangqing; Feng, Qiang; Jia, Huijue; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Li, Yin; Xia, Yan; Xie, Hailiang; Zhong, Huanzi; Khan, Muhammad Tanweer; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Junhua; Xiao, Liang; Al-Aama, Jumana; Zhang, Dongya; Lee, Ying Shiuan; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Tremaroli, Valentina; Yin, Ye; Bergman, Stefan; Xu, Xun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Dahlgren, Jovanna; Wang, Jun; Jun, Wang

    2015-05-13

    The gut microbiota is central to human health, but its establishment in early life has not been quantitatively and functionally examined. Applying metagenomic analysis on fecal samples from a large cohort of Swedish infants and their mothers, we characterized the gut microbiome during the first year of life and assessed the impact of mode of delivery and feeding on its establishment. In contrast to vaginally delivered infants, the gut microbiota of infants delivered by C-section showed significantly less resemblance to their mothers. Nutrition had a major impact on early microbiota composition and function, with cessation of breast-feeding, rather than introduction of solid food, being required for maturation into an adult-like microbiota. Microbiota composition and ecological network had distinctive features at each sampled stage, in accordance with functional maturation of the microbiome. Our findings establish a framework for understanding the interplay between the gut microbiome and the human body in early life. PMID:25974306

  18. Agent Based Modeling of Human Gut Microbiome Interactions and Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Shashkova, Tatiana; Popenko, Anna; Tyakht, Alexander; Peskov, Kirill; Kosinsky, Yuri; Bogolubsky, Lev; Raigorodskii, Andrei; Ischenko, Dmitry; Alexeev, Dmitry; Govorun, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the human health. It is involved in the digestion and protects the host against external pathogens. Examination of the intestinal microbiome interactions is required for understanding of the community influence on host health. Studies of the microbiome can provide insight on methods of improving health, including specific clinical procedures for individual microbial community composition modification and microbiota correction by colonizing with new bacterial species or dietary changes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report an agent-based model of interactions between two bacterial species and between species and the gut. The model is based on reactions describing bacterial fermentation of polysaccharides to acetate and propionate and fermentation of acetate to butyrate. Antibiotic treatment was chosen as disturbance factor and used to investigate stability of the system. System recovery after antibiotic treatment was analyzed as dependence on quantity of feedback interactions inside the community, therapy duration and amount of antibiotics. Bacterial species are known to mutate and acquire resistance to the antibiotics. The ability to mutate was considered to be a stochastic process, under this suggestion ratio of sensitive to resistant bacteria was calculated during antibiotic therapy and recovery. Conclusion/Significance The model confirms a hypothesis of feedbacks mechanisms necessity for providing functionality and stability of the system after disturbance. High fraction of bacterial community was shown to mutate during antibiotic treatment, though sensitive strains could become dominating after recovery. The recovery of sensitive strains is explained by fitness cost of the resistance. The model demonstrates not only quantitative dynamics of bacterial species, but also gives an ability to observe the emergent spatial structure and its alteration, depending on various feedback mechanisms

  19. Comparative evaluation of establishing a human gut microbial community within rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Bleich, André; Oxley, Andrew P.A.; Kahl, Silke; Janus, Lydia M.; Smoczek, Anna; Nahrstedt, Hannes; Pils, Marina C.; Taudien, Stefan; Platzer, Matthias; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Medina, Eva; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbial community is determined by host genetics and environmental factors, where alterations in its structure have been associated with the onset of different diseases. Establishing a defined human gut microbial community within inbred rodent models provides a means to study microbial-related pathologies, however, an in-depth comparison of the established human gut microbiota in the different models is lacking. We compared the efficiency of establishing the bacterial component of a defined human microbial community within germ-free (GF) rats, GF mice and antibiotic-treated specific pathogen-free mice. Remarkable differences were observed between the different rodent models. While the majority of abundant human-donor bacterial phylotypes were established in the GF rats, only a subset was present in the GF mice. Despite the fact that members of the phylum Bacteriodetes were well established in all rodent models, mice enriched for phylotypes related to species of Bacteroides. In contrary to the efficiency of Clostridiales to populate the GF rat in relative proportions to that of the human-donor, members of Clostridia cluster IV only poorly colonize the mouse gut. Thus, the genetic background of the different recipient rodent systems (that is, rats and mice) strongly influences the nature of the populating human gut microbiota, determining each model’s biological suitability. PMID:22572831

  20. Sex, Body Mass Index, and Dietary Fiber Intake Influence the Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dominianni, Christine; Sinha, Rashmi; Goedert, James J.; Pei, Zhiheng; Yang, Liying; Hayes, Richard B.; Ahn, Jiyoung

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the composition of the human gut microbiome is important in the etiology of human diseases; however, the personal factors that influence the gut microbiome composition are poorly characterized. Animal models point to sex hormone-related differentials in microbiome composition. In this study, we investigated the relationship of sex, body mass index (BMI) and dietary fiber intake with the gut microbiome in 82 humans. We sequenced fecal 16S rRNA genes by 454 FLX technology, then clustered and classified the reads to microbial genomes using the QIIME pipeline. Relationships of sex, BMI, and fiber intake with overall gut microbiome composition and specific taxon abundances were assessed by permutational MANOVA and multivariate logistic regression, respectively. We found that sex was associated with the gut microbiome composition overall (p=0.001). The gut microbiome in women was characterized by a lower abundance of Bacteroidetes (p=0.03). BMI (>25 kg/m2 vs. <25 kg/m2) was associated with the gut microbiome composition overall (p=0.05), and this relationship was strong in women (p=0.03) but not in men (p=0.29). Fiber from beans and from fruits and vegetables were associated, respectively, with greater abundance of Actinobacteria (p=0.006 and false discovery rate adjusted q=0.05) and Clostridia (p=0.009 and false discovery rate adjusted q=0.09). Our findings suggest that sex, BMI, and dietary fiber contribute to shaping the gut microbiome in humans. Better understanding of these relationships may have significant implications for gastrointestinal health and disease prevention. PMID:25874569

  1. The human gut mycobiome: pitfalls and potentials--a mycologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2015-01-01

    We have entered the Age of the Microbiome, with new studies appearing constantly and whole journals devoted to the human microbiome. While bacteria outnumber other gut microbes by orders of magnitude, eukaryotes are consistently found in the human gut and are represented primarily by the fungi. Compiling 36 studies 1917-2015 we found at least 267 distinct fungal taxa have been reported from the human gut, and seemingly every new study includes one or more fungi not previously described from this niche. This diversity, while impressive, is illusory. If we examine gut fungi, we will quickly observe a division between a small number of commonly detected species (Candida yeasts, Saccharomyces and yeasts in the Dipodascaceae, and Malassezia species) and a long tail of taxa that have been reported only once. Furthermore, an investigation into the ecology of these rare species reveals that many of them are incapable of colonization or long-term persistence in the gut. This paper examines what we know and have yet to learn about the fungal component of the gut microbiome, or "mycobiome", and an overview of methods. We address the potential of the field while introducing some caveats and argue for the necessity of including mycologists in mycobiome studies. PMID:26354806

  2. Gut microbiota and its pathophysiology in disease paradigms.

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Birtolo, Chiara; Marzi, Luca; Montrone, Lucia; Scaioli, Eleonora; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Colecchia, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The gut flora carries out important functions for human health, although most of them are still unknown, and an alteration of any of them, due to a condition of dysbiosis, can lead to relevant pathological implications. Commensal bacteria in the gut are essential for the preservation of the integrity of the mucosal barrier function and an alteration in the anatomic functional integrity of this barrier has been implicated in the pathophysiologic process of different diseases. The gut microflora plays a role in modulating the intestinal immune system; in fact, it is essential for the maturation of gut-associated lymphatic tissue, the secretion of IgA and the production of antimicrobial peptides. The enteric flora represents a potent bioreactor which controls several metabolic functions, even if most of them are still unknown. The main metabolic functions are represented by the fermentation of indigestible food substances into simple sugars, absorbable nutrients, and short-chain fatty acids. Furthermore, the gut microbiota exerts important trophic and developmental functions on the intestinal mucosa. This overview focuses briefly on the physiological role of the gut microbiota in maintaining a healthy state and the potential role played by disturbances of both the function and composition of the gut microbiota in determining important pathological conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and cancer. PMID:22179206

  3. Evaluation of genetic diversity among strains of the human gut commensal Bifidobacterium adolescentis

    PubMed Central

    Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Ferrario, Chiara; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are members of the human gut microbiota, being numerically dominant in the colon of infants, while also being prevalent in the large intestine of adults. In this study, we determined and analyzed the pan-genome of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, which is one of many bacteria found in the human adult gut microbiota. In silico analysis of the genome sequences of eighteen B. adolescentis strains isolated from various environments, such as human milk, human feces and bovine rumen, revealed a high level of genetic variability, resulting in an open pan-genome. Compared to other bifidobacterial taxa such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve, the more extensive B. adolescentis pan-genome supports the hypothesis that the genetic arsenal of this taxon expanded so as to become more adaptable to the variable and changing ecological niche of the gut. These increased genetic capabilities are particularly evident for genes required for dietary glycan-breakdown. PMID:27035119

  4. Evaluation of genetic diversity among strains of the human gut commensal Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Ferrario, Chiara; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are members of the human gut microbiota, being numerically dominant in the colon of infants, while also being prevalent in the large intestine of adults. In this study, we determined and analyzed the pan-genome of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, which is one of many bacteria found in the human adult gut microbiota. In silico analysis of the genome sequences of eighteen B. adolescentis strains isolated from various environments, such as human milk, human feces and bovine rumen, revealed a high level of genetic variability, resulting in an open pan-genome. Compared to other bifidobacterial taxa such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve, the more extensive B. adolescentis pan-genome supports the hypothesis that the genetic arsenal of this taxon expanded so as to become more adaptable to the variable and changing ecological niche of the gut. These increased genetic capabilities are particularly evident for genes required for dietary glycan-breakdown. PMID:27035119

  5. The Gut Microbiota and Immune System Relationship in Human Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Laterza, Lucrezia; Rizzatti, Gianenrico; Gaetani, Eleonora; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota has gained increasing interest in the pathogenesis of immune-related diseases. In this context, graft-versus-host disease is a condition characterized by an immune response which frequently complicates and limits the outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. Past studies, carried mostly in animals, already supported a relationship between gut microbiota and graft-versus-host disease. However, the possible mechanisms underlying this connection remain elusory. Moreover, strategies to prevent graft-versus-host disease are of great interest as well as the potential role of gut microbiota modulation. We reviewed the role of gut microbiota in the development of immune system and its involvement in the graft-versus-host disease, focusing on data available on humans. PMID:27158438

  6. Mucosal Glycan Foraging Enhances Fitness and Transmission of a Saccharolytic Human Gut Bacterial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Eric C.; Chiang, Herbert C.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The distal human gut is a microbial bioreactor that digests complex carbohydrates. The strategies evolved by gut microbes to sense and process diverse glycans have important implications for the assembly and operations of this ecosystem. The human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron forages on host and dietary glycans. Its ability to target these substrates resides in 88 polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs), encompassing 18% of its genome. In this report, whole-genome transcriptional profiling and genetic tests are used to define the mechanisms underlying host glycan foraging in vivo and in vitro. PULs that target all major classes of host glycans were identified. Mucin O-glycans are the principal substrate foraged in vivo. Simultaneous deletion of five ECF-σ transcription factors that activate mucin O-glycan utilization produces defects in bacterial persistence in the gut and in mother-to-offspring transmission. Thus, PUL-mediated glycan catabolism is an important factor in gut colonization and likely impacts gut ecology. PMID:18996345

  7. Strain-level dissection of the contribution of the gut microbiome to human metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenhong; Zhao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked with metabolic diseases in humans, but demonstration of causality remains a challenge. The gut microbiota, as a complex microbial ecosystem, consists of hundreds of individual bacterial species, each of which contains many strains with high genetic diversity. Recent advances in genomic and metabolomic technologies are facilitating strain-level dissection of the contribution of the gut microbiome to metabolic diseases. Interventional studies and correlation analysis between variations in the microbiome and metabolome, captured by longitudinal sampling, can lead to the identification of specific bacterial strains that may contribute to human metabolic diseases via the production of bioactive metabolites. For example, high-quality draft genomes of prevalent gut bacterial strains can be assembled directly from metagenomic datasets using a canopy-based algorithm. Specific metabolites associated with a disease phenotype can be identified by nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics of urine and other samples. Such multi-omics approaches can be employed to identify specific gut bacterial genomes that are not only correlated with detected metabolites but also encode the genes required for producing the precursors of those metabolites in the gut. Here, we argue that if a causative role can be demonstrated in follow-up mechanistic studies--for example, using gnotobiotic models--such functional strains have the potential to become biomarkers for diagnostics and targets for therapeutics. PMID:27098841

  8. Taxonomic and predicted metabolic profiles of the human gut microbiome in pre-Columbian mummies.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2016-11-01

    Characterization of naturally mummified human gut remains could potentially provide insights into the preservation and evolution of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms, and metabolic profiles. We characterized the gut microbiome of two pre-Columbian Andean mummies dating to the 10-15th centuries using 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics, and compared them to a previously characterized gut microbiome of an 11th century AD pre-Columbian Andean mummy. Our previous study showed that the Clostridiales represented the majority of the bacterial communities in the mummified gut remains, but that other microbial communities were also preserved during the process of natural mummification, as shown with the metagenomics analyses. The gut microbiome of the other two mummies were mainly comprised by Clostridiales or Bacillales, as demonstrated with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, many of which are facultative anaerobes, possibly consistent with the process of natural mummification requiring low oxygen levels. Metagenome analyses showed the presence of other microbial groups that were positively or negatively correlated with specific metabolic profiles. The presence of sequences similar to both Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani could suggest that these pathogens were prevalent in pre-Columbian individuals. Taxonomic and functional profiling of mummified human gut remains will aid in the understanding of the microbial ecology of the process of natural mummification. PMID:27559027

  9. An integrated catalog of reference genes in the human gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Cai, Xianghang; Zhong, Huanzi; Feng, Qiang; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Kultima, Jens Roat; Prifti, Edi; Nielsen, Trine; Juncker, Agnieszka Sierakowska; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Wenwei; Levenez, Florence; Wang, Juan; Xu, Xun; Xiao, Liang; Liang, Suisha; Zhang, Dongya; Zhang, Zhaoxi; Chen, Weineng; Zhao, Hailong; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Edris, Sherif; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Hansen, Torben; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Brunak, Søren; Kristiansen, Karsten; Guarner, Francisco; Pedersen, Oluf; Doré, Joel; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Bork, Peer; Wang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Many analyses of the human gut microbiome depend on a catalog of reference genes. Existing catalogs for the human gut microbiome are based on samples from single cohorts or on reference genomes or protein sequences, which limits coverage of global microbiome diversity. Here we combined 249 newly sequenced samples of the Metagenomics of the Human Intestinal Tract (MetaHit) project with 1,018 previously sequenced samples to create a cohort from three continents that is at least threefold larger than cohorts used for previous gene catalogs. From this we established the integrated gene catalog (IGC) comprising 9,879,896 genes. The catalog includes close-to-complete sets of genes for most gut microbes, which are also of considerably higher quality than in previous catalogs. Analyses of a group of samples from Chinese and Danish individuals using the catalog revealed country-specific gut microbial signatures. This expanded catalog should facilitate quantitative characterization of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic data from the gut microbiome to understand its variation across populations in human health and disease. PMID:24997786

  10. Human gut Bacteroidetes can utilize yeast mannan through a selfish mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The architecture of the human distal gut microbiota (microbiota) is sculpted by the complex carbohydrates delivered in the diet. Yeasts, which are among the earliest domesticated microorganisms and have been a component of the human diet for at least 7000 years, possess an elaborate cell wall alpha-...

  11. The Fiber Gap and the Disappearing Gut Microbiome: Implications for Human Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Deehan, Edward C; Walter, Jens

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that modern lifestyle, and specifically a Western diet, has led to a substantial depletion of the human gut microbiome. This loss is implicated in the rampant increase of chronic diseases, providing an incentive to fundamentally transform human nutrition towards being more holistic and microbiome-focused. PMID:27079516

  12. The Human Gut Microbiome and Body Metabolism: Implications for Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Hemarajata, Peera; Versalovic, James

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes are major public health challenges. Recently, interest has surged regarding the possible role of the intestinal microbiota as potential novel contributors to the increased prevalence of these 3 disorders. CONTENT Recent advances in microbial DNA sequencing technologies have resulted in the widespread application of whole-genome sequencing technologies for metagenomic DNA analysis of complex ecosystems such as the human gut. Current evidence suggests that the gut microbiota affect nutrient acquisition, energy harvest, and a myriad of host metabolic pathways. CONCLUSION Advances in the Human Microbiome Project and human metagenomics research will lead the way toward a greater understanding of the importance and role of the gut microbiome in metabolic disorders such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. PMID:23401286

  13. Genetic determinants of in vivo fitness and diet responsiveness in multiple human gut Bacteroides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Khoroshkin, Matvei S; Griffin, Nicholas W; Cheng, Jiye; Latreille, Phil; Kerstetter, Randall A; Terrapon, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Osterman, Andrei L; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-10-01

    Libraries of tens of thousands of transposon mutants generated from each of four human gut Bacteroides strains, two representing the same species, were introduced simultaneously into gnotobiotic mice together with 11 other wild-type strains to generate a 15-member artificial human gut microbiota. Mice received one of two distinct diets monotonously, or both in different ordered sequences. Quantifying the abundance of mutants in different diet contexts allowed gene-level characterization of fitness determinants, niche, stability, and resilience and yielded a prebiotic (arabinoxylan) that allowed targeted manipulation of the community. The approach described is generalizable and should be useful for defining mechanisms critical for sustaining and/or approaches for deliberately reconfiguring the highly adaptive and durable relationship between the human gut microbiota and host in ways that promote wellness. PMID:26430127

  14. Genetic determinants of in vivo fitness and diet responsiveness in multiple human gut Bacteroides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Griffin, Nicholas W.; Cheng, Jiye; Latreille, Phil; Kerstetter, Randall A.; Terrapon, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of tens of thousands of transposon mutants generated from each of four human gut Bacteroides strains, two representing the same species, were introduced simultaneously into gnotobiotic mice together with 11 other wild-type strains to generate a 15-member artificial human gut microbiota. Mice received one of two distinct diets monotonously, or both in ordered sequence. Quantifying the abundance of mutants in different diet contexts allowed gene-level characterization of fitness determinants, niche, stability and resilience, and yielded a prebiotic (arabinoxylan) that allowed targeted manipulation of the community. The approach described is generalizable and should be useful for defining mechanisms critical for sustaining and/or approaches for deliberately reconfiguring the highly adaptive and durable relationship between the human gut microbiota and host in ways that promote wellness. PMID:26430127

  15. Quantifying Diet-Induced Metabolic Changes of the Human Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Shoaie, Saeed; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sen, Partho; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; de Wouters, Tomas; Juste, Catherine; Rizkalla, Salwa; Chilloux, Julien; Hoyles, Lesley; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Dore, Joel; Dumas, Marc E; Clement, Karine; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-01

    The human gut microbiome is known to be associated with various human disorders, but a major challenge is to go beyond association studies and elucidate causalities. Mathematical modeling of the human gut microbiome at a genome scale is a useful tool to decipher microbe-microbe, diet-microbe and microbe-host interactions. Here, we describe the CASINO (Community And Systems-level INteractive Optimization) toolbox, a comprehensive computational platform for analysis of microbial communities through metabolic modeling. We first validated the toolbox by simulating and testing the performance of single bacteria and whole communities in vitro. Focusing on metabolic interactions between the diet, gut microbiota, and host metabolism, we demonstrated the predictive power of the toolbox in a diet-intervention study of 45 obese and overweight individuals and validated our predictions by fecal and blood metabolomics data. Thus, modeling could quantitatively describe altered fecal and serum amino acid levels in response to diet intervention. PMID:26244934

  16. Human Milk Glycomics and Gut Microbial Genomics in Infant Feces Show a Correlation between Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Gut Microbiota: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) play a key role in shaping and maintaining a healthy infant gut microbiota. This article demonstrates the potential of combining recent advances in glycomics and genomics to correlate abundances of fecal microbes and fecal HMOs. Serial fecal specimens from two healthy breast-fed infants were analyzed by bacterial DNA sequencing to characterize the microbiota and by mass spectrometry to determine abundances of specific HMOs that passed through the intestinal tract without being consumed by the luminal bacteria. In both infants, the fecal bacterial population shifted from non-HMO-consuming microbes to HMO-consuming bacteria during the first few weeks of life. An initial rise in fecal HMOs corresponded with bacterial populations composed primarily of non-HMO-consuming Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaeae. This was followed by decreases in fecal HMOs as the proportion of HMO-consuming Bacteroidaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Analysis of HMO structures with isomer differentiation revealed that HMO consumption is highly structure-specific, with unique isomers being consumed and others passing through the gut unaltered. These results represent a proof-of-concept and are consistent with the highly selective, prebiotic effect of HMOs in shaping the gut microbiota in the first weeks of life. The analysis of selective fecal bacterial substrates as a measure of alterations in the gut microbiota may be a potential marker of dysbiosis. PMID:25300177

  17. Probiotics and virulent human rotavirus modulate the transplanted human gut microbiota in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We generated a neonatal pig model with human infant gut microbiota (HGM) to study the effect of a probiotic on the composition of the transplanted microbiota following rotavirus vaccination and challenge. All the HGM-transplanted pigs received two doses of an oral attenuated rotavirus vaccine. The gut microbiota of vaccinated pigs were investigated for effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplement and homotypic virulent human rotavirus (HRV) challenge. High-throughput sequencing of V4 region of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that HGM-transplanted pigs carried microbiota similar to that of the C-section delivered baby. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented over 98% of total bacteria in the human donor and the recipient pigs. HRV challenge caused a phylum-level shift from Firmicutes to Proteobacteria. LGG supplement prevented the changes in microbial communities caused by HRV challenge. In particular, members of Enterococcus in LGG-supplemented pigs were kept at the baseline level, while they were enriched in HRV challenged pigs. Taken together, our results suggested that HGM pigs are valuable for testing the microbiota’s response to probiotic interventions for treating infantile HRV infection. PMID:25349634

  18. Fate, activity, and impact of ingested bacteria within the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Muriel; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T

    2015-06-01

    The human gut contains a highly diverse microbial community that is essentially an open ecosystem, despite being deeply embedded within the human body. Food-associated fermentative bacteria, including probiotics, are major sources of ingested bacteria that may temporarily complement resident microbial communities, thus forming part of our transient microbiome. Here, we review data on the fate and activity of ingested bacteria and, in particular, lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and their impact on the composition and metabolism of the gut microbiome with a focus on data from clinical studies. In addition, we discuss the mechanisms involved and the potential impact on the host's health. PMID:25840765

  19. Bifidobacterium bifidum as an example of a specialized human gut commensal

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Bottacini, Francesca; Guglielmetti, Simone; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered dominant and for this reason key members of the human gut microbiota, particularly during the first one to two years following birth. A substantial proportion of the bifidobacterial population in the intestine of infants belong to the Bifidobacterium bifidum taxon, whose members have been shown to display remarkable physiological and genetic features involving adhesion to epithelia, as well as utilization of host-derived glycans. Here, we reviewed the current knowledge on the genetic features and associated adaptations of B. bifidum to the human gut. PMID:25191315

  20. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-11-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 10(9) bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  1. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L.; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 109 bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  2. The Yin and Yang of Bacterial Resilience in the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Molly K.; Pesesky, Mitchell W.; Dantas, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is home to trillions of microbes that form a symbiotic relationship with the human host. During health, the intestinal microbiota provides many benefits to the host and is generally resistant to colonization by new species; however, disruption of this complex community can lead to pathogen invasion, inflammation, and disease. Restoration and maintenance of a healthy gut microbiota composition requires effective therapies to reduce and prevent colonization of harmful bacteria (pathogens) while simultaneously promoting growth of beneficial bacteria (probiotics). Here we review the mechanisms by which the host modulates the gut community composition during health and disease, and discuss prospects for antibiotic and probiotic therapy for restoration of a healthy intestinal community following disruption. PMID:24911583

  3. Starch Catabolism by a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont Is Directed by the Recognition of Amylose Helices

    SciTech Connect

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Martens, Eric C.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-01-12

    The human gut microbiota performs functions that are not encoded in our Homo sapiens genome, including the processing of otherwise undigestible dietary polysaccharides. Defining the structures of proteins involved in the import and degradation of specific glycans by saccharolytic bacteria complements genomic analysis of the nutrient-processing capabilities of gut communities. Here, we describe the atomic structure of one such protein, SusD, required for starch binding and utilization by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a prominent adaptive forager of glycans in the distal human gut microbiota. The binding pocket of this unique {alpha}-helical protein contains an arc of aromatic residues that complements the natural helical structure of starch and imposes this conformation on bound maltoheptaose. Furthermore, SusD binds cyclic oligosaccharides with higher affinity than linear forms. The structures of several SusD/oligosaccharide complexes reveal an inherent ligand recognition plasticity dominated by the three-dimensional conformation of the oligosaccharides rather than specific interactions with the composite sugars.

  4. Prebiotics as gut microflora management tools.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Glenn R

    2008-07-01

    Functional foods is an often-used term applied to dietary ingredients that serve to improve consumer health. Over the last few decades, these foods have gained in popularity with sales continuing to increase rapidly. Recent scientific, and some lay, reports have shown the popularity of both probiotics and prebiotics. These serve to elicit changes in the gut microbiota composition that increase populations of purported beneficial gut bacterial genera, for example, lactobacilli or bifidobacteria. Probiotics use live microbial feed additions, whereas prebiotics target indigenous flora components. As gastrointestinal disorders are prevalent in terms of human health, both probiotics and prebiotics serve an important role in the prophylactic management of various acute and chronic gut derived conditions. Examples include protection from gastroenteritis and some inflammatory conditions. PMID:18542038

  5. Nitrogen fixation and nifH diversity in human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Igai, Katsura; Itakura, Manabu; Nishijima, Suguru; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Suda, Wataru; Tsutaya, Takumi; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Tadokoro, Kiyoshi; Baba, Jun; Odani, Shingo; Natsuhara, Kazumi; Morita, Ayako; Yoneda, Minoru; Greenhill, Andrew R; Horwood, Paul F; Inoue, Jun-Ichi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hongoh, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Taro; Siba, Peter M; Hattori, Masahira; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Umezaki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that nitrogen fixation occurs in the human gut. However, whether the gut microbiota truly has this potential remains unclear. We investigated the nitrogen-fixing activity and diversity of the nitrogenase reductase (NifH) genes in the faecal microbiota of humans, focusing on Papua New Guinean and Japanese individuals with low to high habitual nitrogen intake. A (15)N2 incorporation assay showed significant enrichment of (15)N in all faecal samples, irrespective of the host nitrogen intake, which was also supported by an acetylene reduction assay. The fixed nitrogen corresponded to 0.01% of the standard nitrogen requirement for humans, although our data implied that the contribution in the gut in vivo might be higher than this value. The nifH genes recovered in cloning and metagenomic analyses were classified in two clusters: one comprising sequences almost identical to Klebsiella sequences and the other related to sequences of Clostridiales members. These results are consistent with an analysis of databases of faecal metagenomes from other human populations. Collectively, the human gut microbiota has a potential for nitrogen fixation, which may be attributable to Klebsiella and Clostridiales strains, although no evidence was found that the nitrogen-fixing activity substantially contributes to the host nitrogen balance. PMID:27554344

  6. Contribution of diet to the composition of the human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Daniela; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Fåk, Frida; Flint, Harry J.; Nyman, Margareta; Saarela, Maria; Watzl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In the human gut, millions of bacteria contribute to the microbiota, whose composition is specific for every individual. Although we are just at the very beginning of understanding the microbiota concept, we already know that the composition of the microbiota has a profound impact on human health. A key factor in determining gut microbiota composition is diet. Preliminary evidence suggests that dietary patterns are associated with distinct combinations of bacteria in the intestine, also called enterotypes. Western diets result in significantly different microbiota compositions than traditional diets. It is currently unknown which food constituents specifically promote growth and functionality of beneficial bacteria in the intestine. The aim of this review is to summarize the recently published evidence from human in vivo studies on the gut microbiota-modulating effects of diet. It includes sections on dietary patterns (e.g. Western diet), whole foods, food constituents, as wells as food-associated microbes and their influence on the composition of human gut microbiota. The conclusions highlight the problems faced by scientists in this fast-developing field of research, and the need for high-quality, large-scale human dietary intervention studies. PMID:25656825

  7. Nitrogen fixation and nifH diversity in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Igai, Katsura; Itakura, Manabu; Nishijima, Suguru; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Suda, Wataru; Tsutaya, Takumi; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Tadokoro, Kiyoshi; Baba, Jun; Odani, Shingo; Natsuhara, Kazumi; Morita, Ayako; Yoneda, Minoru; Greenhill, Andrew R.; Horwood, Paul F.; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hongoh, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Taro; Siba, Peter M.; Hattori, Masahira; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Umezaki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that nitrogen fixation occurs in the human gut. However, whether the gut microbiota truly has this potential remains unclear. We investigated the nitrogen-fixing activity and diversity of the nitrogenase reductase (NifH) genes in the faecal microbiota of humans, focusing on Papua New Guinean and Japanese individuals with low to high habitual nitrogen intake. A 15N2 incorporation assay showed significant enrichment of 15N in all faecal samples, irrespective of the host nitrogen intake, which was also supported by an acetylene reduction assay. The fixed nitrogen corresponded to 0.01% of the standard nitrogen requirement for humans, although our data implied that the contribution in the gut in vivo might be higher than this value. The nifH genes recovered in cloning and metagenomic analyses were classified in two clusters: one comprising sequences almost identical to Klebsiella sequences and the other related to sequences of Clostridiales members. These results are consistent with an analysis of databases of faecal metagenomes from other human populations. Collectively, the human gut microbiota has a potential for nitrogen fixation, which may be attributable to Klebsiella and Clostridiales strains, although no evidence was found that the nitrogen-fixing activity substantially contributes to the host nitrogen balance. PMID:27554344

  8. Characterizing a model human gut microbiota composed of members of its two dominant bacterial phyla

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Michael; Rey, Frederico E.; Seedorf, Henning; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wollam, Aye; Shah, Neha; Wang, Chunyan; Magrini, Vincent; Wilson, Richard K.; Cantarel, Brandi L.; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Crock, Lara W.; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Erickson, Alison L; Gordon, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The adult human distal gut microbial community is typically dominated by 2 bacterial phyla (divisions), the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes. Little is known about the factors that govern the interactions between their members. Here, we examine the niches of representatives of both phyla in vivo. Finished genome sequences were generated from Eubacterium rectale and E. eligens, which belong to Clostridium Cluster XIVa, one of the most common gut Firmicute clades. Comparison of these and 25 other gut Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes indicated that the Firmicutes possess smaller genomes and a disproportionately smaller number of glycan-degrading enzymes. Germ-free mice were then colonized with E. rectale and/or a prominent human gut Bacteroidetes, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, followed by whole-genome transcriptional profiling, high-resolution proteomic analysis, and biochemical assays of microbial microbial and microbial host interactions. B. thetaiotaomicron adapts to E. rectale by up-regulating expression of a variety of polysaccharide utilization loci encoding numerous glycoside hydrolases, and by signaling the host to produce mucosal glycans that it, but not E. rectale, can access. E. rectale adapts to B. thetaiotaomicron by decreasing production of its glycan-degrading enzymes, increasing expression of selected amino acid and sugar transporters, and facilitating glycolysis by reducing levels of NADH, in part via generation of butyrate from acetate, which in turn is used by the gut epithelium. This simplified model of the human gut microbiota illustrates niche specialization and functional redundancy within members of its major bacterial phyla, and the importance of host glycans as a nutrient foundation that ensures ecosystem stability.

  9. Relationship between Human Gut Microbiota and Interleukin 6 Levels in Overweight and Obese Adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Gut microbial diversity and abundance can profoundly impact human health. Research has shown that obese individuals are likely to have altered microbiota compared to lean individuals. Obesity is often considered a pro-inflammatory state, however the relationship between microbiota and i...

  10. In vitro fermentation patterns of rice bran components by human gut microbiota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice bran is a rich source of bioactive components that can promote gastrointestinal health. However, bran is removed during polishing. Among those, feruloylated arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (FAXO) and rice bran polyphenolics (RBPP) are hypothesized to have positive impacts on human gut microbiota ...

  11. Gut Microbiota: Impact of probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, pharmabiotics and postbiotics on human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multidisciplinary approaches enabled a better understanding of the connection between human gut microbes and health. This knowledge is rapidly changing how we think about probiotics and related –biotics (prebiotics, synbiotics, pharmabiotics and postbiotics). Functional –omics approaches are very im...

  12. The long-term stability of the human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Faith, Jeremiah J.; Guruge, Janaki L.; Charbonneau, Mark; Subramanian, Sathish; Seedorf, Henning; Goodman, Andrew L.; Clemente, Jose C.; Knight, Rob; Heath, Andrew C.; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Rosenbaum, Michael; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    A low-error 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing method (LEA-Seq) plus whole genome sequencing of >500 cultured isolates were used to characterize bacterial strain composition in the fecal microbiota of 37 USA adults sampled for up to five years. Microbiota stability follows a power law function which, when extrapolated, suggests that most strains in an individual are residents for decades. Shared strains were recovered from family members, but not from unrelated individuals. Sampling individuals for up to 32 weeks while consuming a monotonous liquid diet indicated that changes in weight are more predictive of changes in strain composition than sampling interval. This combination of stability and responsiveness to physiologic change confirms the potential of the gut microbiota as a diagnostic tool and therapeutic target. PMID:23828941

  13. Towards predictive models of the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is an ecosystem susceptible to external perturbations such as dietary changes and antibiotic therapies. Mathematical models of microbial communities could be of great value in the rational design of microbiota-tailoring diets and therapies. Here, we discuss how advances in another field, engineering of microbial communities for wastewater treatment bioreactors, could inspire development of mechanistic mathematical models of the gut microbiota. We review the current state-of-the-art in bioreactor modeling and current efforts in modeling the intestinal microbiota. Mathematical modeling could benefit greatly from the deluge of data emerging from metagenomic studies, but data-driven approaches such as network inference that aim to predict microbiome dynamics without explicit mechanistic knowledge seem better suited to model these data. Finally, we discuss how the integration of microbiome shotgun sequencing and metabolic modeling approaches such as flux balance analysis may fulfill the promise of a mechanistic model of the intestinal microbiota. PMID:24727124

  14. Chronic arthritis induced in rats by cell wall fragments of Eubacterium species from the human intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Severijnen, A J; van Kleef, R; Hazenberg, M P; van de Merwe, J P

    1990-01-01

    To investigate arthritis-inducing properties of Eubacterium species, which are major residents of the human intestinal flora, cell wall fragments (CWF) of several Eubacterium strains were prepared and tested in an animal model. After a single intraperitoneal injection in the rat, CWF of E. aerofaciens, E. contortum, and E. lentum induced a chronic polyarthritis. E. limosum and E. tortuosum CWF induced an acute self-limiting joint inflammation, whereas E. rectale CWF failed to do so. The rhamnose contents of the isolated CWF were not related to their arthritis-inducing properties. Paradoxically, the sensitivity of CWF to lysozyme digestion, which is regarded as a parameter for the clearance of CWF in tissues, appeared to be positively correlated with the ability of Eubacterium CWF to induce chronic joint inflammation. Our findings show the diversity in arthritis-inducing properties among different species of the anaerobic genus Eubacterium and underline the importance of the anaerobic intestinal flora in the induction of joint inflammation. Images PMID:2298490

  15. The Effect of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Byproducts and Ellagitannins on the Growth of Human Gut Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The consumption of pomegranate products leads to a significant accumulation of ellagitannins in the large intestines, where they interact with complex gut microflora. This study investigated the effect of pomegranate tannin constituents on the growth of various species of human gut bacteria. Our r...

  16. The gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Actis, Giovanni C

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery and use of the microscope in the 17(th) century, we know that we host trillions of micro-organisms mostly in the form of bacteria indwelling the "barrier organs" skin, gut, and airways. They exert regulatory functions, are in a continuous dialogue with the intestinal epithelia, influence energy handling, produce nutrients, and may cause diabetes and obesity. The human microbiome has developed by modulating or avoiding inflammatory responses; the host senses bacterial presence through cell surface sensors (the Toll-like receptors) as well as by refining mucous barriers as passive defense mechanisms. The cell density and composition of the microbiome are variable and multifactored. The way of delivery establishes the type of initial flora; use of antibiotics is another factor; diet composition after weaning will shape the adult's microbiome composition, depending on the subject's life-style. Short-chain fatty acids participate in the favoring action exerted by microbiome in the pathogenesis of type-2 diabetes and obesity. Clinical observation has pinpointed a sharp rise of various dysimmune conditions in the last decades, including IBD and rheumatoid arthritis, changes that outweigh the input of simple heritability. It is nowadays proposed that the microbiome, incapable to keep up with the changes of our life-style and feeding sources in the past few decades might have contributed to these immune imbalances, finding itself inadequate to handle the changed gut environment. Another pathway to pathology is the rise of directly pathogenic phyla within a given microbiome: growth of adherent E. coli, of C. concisus, and of C. jejuni, might be examples of causes of local enteropathy, whereas the genus Prevotella copri is now suspected to be linked to rise of arthritic disorders. Inflammasomes are required to shape a non colitogenic flora. Treatment of IBD and infectious enteritides by the use of fecal transplant is warranted by this knowledge. PMID

  17. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Safadi, Dima El; Certad, Gabriela; Delhaes, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frédéric; Morelle, Christelle; Bastien, Patrick; Lachaud, Laurence; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Botterel, Françoise; Candolfi, Ermanno; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Morio, Florent; Pomares, Christelle; Rabodonirina, Meja; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  18. Coordinate Regulation of Glycan Degradation and Polysaccharide Capsule Biosynthesis by a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont*

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Eric C.; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria in the distal human gut have evolved diverse abilities to metabolize complex glycans, including the capacity to degrade these compounds as nutrients and to assemble their component sugars into new polymers such as extracellular capsules. The human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is well endowed with the ability to metabolize both host- and diet-derived glycans. Its genome contains 88 different polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) for complex glycan catabolism and eight different gene clusters for capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. Here, we investigate one of the prominent mechanisms by which this gut symbiont regulates many PULs involved in host mucin O-glycan degradation; namely, transcriptional regulation via the concerted interactions of cell-envelope-localized TonB-dependent transporters, extra-cytoplasmic function σ factors and anti-σ factors, which participate together in a regulatory pathway termed trans-envelope signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that several different trans-envelope signaling switches involved in PUL-mediated O-glycan degradation also modulate capsular polysaccharide synthesis. A novel regulatory pathway, which is dependent on expression of O-glycan-targeting outer membrane proteins, governs this coordinated regulation of glycan catabolism and capsule synthesis. This latter finding provides a new link in the dynamic interplay between complex glycan metabolism, microbial physiology, and host responses that occurs during colonization of the gut. PMID:19403529

  19. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota.

    PubMed

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  20. Development of the preterm infant gut microbiome: A research priority

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, Maureen W.; Luciano, Angel A.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Ashmeade, Terri L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-10-13

    The very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is at great risk for marked dysbiosis of the gut microbiome due to multiple factors, including physiological immaturity and prenatal/postnatal influences that disrupt the development of a normal gut flora. However, little is known about the developmental succession of the microbiota in preterm infants as they grow and mature. This review provides a synthesis of our understanding of the normal development of the infant gut microbiome and contrasts this with dysbiotic development in the VLBW infant. The role of human milk in normal gut microbial development is emphasized, along with the role of the gut microbiome in immune development and gastroenteric health. Current research provides evidence that the gut microbiome interacts extensively with many physiological systems and metabolic processes in the developing infant. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies prospectively mapping the gut microbiome of VLBW infants through early childhood. This knowledge gap must be filled to inform a healthcare system that can provide for the growth, health, and development of VLBW infants. In conclusion, the study speculates about how the VLBW infants’ gut microbiome might function through host-microbe interactions to contribute to the sequelae of preterm birth, including its influence on growth, development, and general health of the infant host.

  1. Development of the preterm infant gut microbiome: A research priority

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Groer, Maureen W.; Luciano, Angel A.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Ashmeade, Terri L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-10-13

    The very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is at great risk for marked dysbiosis of the gut microbiome due to multiple factors, including physiological immaturity and prenatal/postnatal influences that disrupt the development of a normal gut flora. However, little is known about the developmental succession of the microbiota in preterm infants as they grow and mature. This review provides a synthesis of our understanding of the normal development of the infant gut microbiome and contrasts this with dysbiotic development in the VLBW infant. The role of human milk in normal gut microbial development is emphasized, along with the role ofmore » the gut microbiome in immune development and gastroenteric health. Current research provides evidence that the gut microbiome interacts extensively with many physiological systems and metabolic processes in the developing infant. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies prospectively mapping the gut microbiome of VLBW infants through early childhood. This knowledge gap must be filled to inform a healthcare system that can provide for the growth, health, and development of VLBW infants. In conclusion, the study speculates about how the VLBW infants’ gut microbiome might function through host-microbe interactions to contribute to the sequelae of preterm birth, including its influence on growth, development, and general health of the infant host.« less

  2. Application of a hierarchical enzyme classification method reveals the role of gut microbiome in human metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Enzymes are known as the molecular machines that drive the metabolism of an organism; hence identification of the full enzyme complement of an organism is essential to build the metabolic blueprint of that species as well as to understand the interplay of multiple species in an ecosystem. Experimental characterization of the enzymatic reactions of all enzymes in a genome is a tedious and expensive task. The problem is more pronounced in the metagenomic samples where even the species are not adequately cultured or characterized. Enzymes encoded by the gut microbiota play an essential role in the host metabolism; thus, warranting the need to accurately identify and annotate the full enzyme complements of species in the genomic and metagenomic projects. To fulfill this need, we develop and apply a method called ECemble, an ensemble approach to identify enzymes and enzyme classes and study the human gut metabolic pathways. Results ECemble method uses an ensemble of machine-learning methods to accurately model and predict enzymes from protein sequences and also identifies the enzyme classes and subclasses at the finest resolution. A tenfold cross-validation result shows accuracy between 97 and 99% at different levels in the hierarchy of enzyme classification, which is superior to comparable methods. We applied ECemble to predict the entire complements of enzymes from ten sequenced proteomes including the human proteome. We also applied this method to predict enzymes encoded by the human gut microbiome from gut metagenomic samples, and to study the role played by the microbe-derived enzymes in the human metabolism. After mapping the known and predicted enzymes to canonical human pathways, we identified 48 pathways that have at least one bacteria-encoded enzyme, which demonstrates the complementary role of gut microbiome in human gut metabolism. These pathways are primarily involved in metabolizing dietary nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids

  3. Recognition and Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides by Two Human Gut Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Herbert; Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Abbott, D. Wade; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for catabolism of many complex carbohydrates. However, the role of these systems in degrading the chemically diverse repertoire of plant cell wall glycans remains unknown. Here we show that two closely related human gut Bacteroides, B. thetaiotaomicron and B. ovatus, are capable of utilizing nearly all of the major plant and host glycans, including rhamnogalacturonan II, a highly complex polymer thought to be recalcitrant to microbial degradation. Transcriptional profiling and gene inactivation experiments revealed the identity and specificity of the polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) that encode individual Sus-like systems that target various plant polysaccharides. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that B. ovatus possesses several unique PULs that enable degradation of hemicellulosic polysaccharides, a phenotype absent from B. thetaiotaomicron. In contrast, the B. thetaiotaomicron genome has been shaped by increased numbers of PULs involved in metabolism of host mucin O-glycans, a phenotype that is undetectable in B. ovatus. Binding studies of the purified sensor domains of PUL-associated hybrid two-component systems in conjunction with transcriptional analyses demonstrate that complex oligosaccharides provide the regulatory cues that induce PUL activation and that each PUL is highly specific for a defined cell wall polymer. These results provide a view of how these species have diverged into different carbohydrate niches by evolving genes that target unique suites of

  4. Gut Microbiota Diversity and Human Diseases: Should We Reintroduce Key Predators in Our Ecosystem?

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Alexis; Leclerc, Marion; Hugot, Jean P.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the Human diseases affecting westernized countries are associated with dysbiosis and loss of microbial diversity in the gut microbiota. The Western way of life, with a wide use of antibiotics and other environmental triggers, may reduce the number of bacterial predators leading to a decrease in microbial diversity of the Human gut. We argue that this phenomenon is similar to the process of ecosystem impoverishment in macro ecology where human activity decreases ecological niches, the size of predator populations, and finally the biodiversity. Such pauperization is fundamental since it reverses the evolution processes, drives life backward into diminished complexity, stability, and adaptability. A simple therapeutic approach could thus be to reintroduce bacterial predators and restore a bacterial diversity of the host microbiota. PMID:27065999

  5. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome : substrate specificities and their switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Tesar, C.; Wilton, R.; Keigher, L.; Babnigg, G.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a large number of microbes forming a complex microbial community that greatly affects the physiology and pathology of the host. In the human gut microbiome, the enrichment in certain protein gene families appears to be widespread. They include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as glucoside hydrolases of dietary polysaccharides and glycoconjugates. We report the crystal structures (wild type, 2 mutants, and a mutant/substrate complex) and the enzymatic activity of a recombinant {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut bacterium Ruminococcus obeum. The first ever protein structures from this bacterium reveal a structural homologue to human intestinal maltase-glucoamylase with a highly conserved catalytic domain and reduced auxiliary domains. The {alpha}-glucosidase, a member of GH31 family, shows substrate preference for {alpha}(1-6) over {alpha}(1-4) glycosidic linkages and produces glucose from isomaltose as well as maltose. The preference can be switched by a single mutation at its active site, suggestive of widespread adaptation to utilization of a variety of polysaccharides by intestinal micro-organisms as energy resources. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome: substrate specificities and their switch.

  6. Relations between transit time, fermentation products, and hydrogen consuming flora in healthy humans.

    PubMed Central

    El Oufir, L; Flourié, B; Bruley des Varannes, S; Barry, J L; Cloarec, D; Bornet, F; Galmiche, J P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To investigate whether transit time could influence H2 consuming flora and certain indices of colonic bacterial fermentation. METHODS: Eight healthy volunteers (four methane excretors and four non-methane excretors) were studied for three, three week periods during which they received a controlled diet alone (control period), and then the same diet with cisapride or loperamide. At the end of each period, mean transit time (MTT) was estimated, an H2 lactulose breath test was performed, and stools were analysed. RESULTS: In the control period, transit time was inversely related to faecal weight, sulphate reducing bacteria counts, concentrations of total short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), propionic and butyric acids, and H2 excreted in breath after lactulose ingestion. Conversely, transit time was positively related to faecal pH and tended to be related to methanogen counts. Methanogenic bacteria counts were inversely related to those of sulphate reducing bacteria and methane excretors had slower MTT and lower sulphate reducing bacteria counts than non-methane excretors. Compared with the control period, MTT was significantly shortened (p < 0.05) by cisapride and prolonged (p < 0.05) by loperamide (73 (11) hours, 47 (5) hours and 147 (12) hours for control, cisapride, and loperamide, respectively, mean (SD)). Cisapride reduced transit time was associated with (a) a significant rise in faecal weight, sulphate reducing bacteria, concentrations of total SCFAs, and propionic and butyric acids and breath H2 as well as (b) a significant fall in faecal pH and breath CH4 excretion, and (c) a non-significant decrease in the counts of methanogenic bacteria. Reverse relations were roughly the same during the loperamide period including a significant rise in the counts of methanogenic bacteria and a significant fall in those of sulphate reducing bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: Transit time differences between healthy volunteers are associated with differences in H2

  7. The chemical interactome space between the human host and the genetically defined gut metabotypes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Hildebrand, Falk; Raes, Jeroen; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    The bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of mammals represent a highly selected microbiome that has a profound influence on human physiology by shaping the host's metabolic and immune system activity. Despite the recent advances on the biological principles that underlie microbial symbiosis in the gut of mammals, mechanistic understanding of the contributions of the gut microbiome and how variations in the metabotypes are linked to the host health are obscure. Here, we mapped the entire metabolic potential of the gut microbiome based solely on metagenomics sequencing data derived from fecal samples of 124 Europeans (healthy, obese and with inflammatory bowel disease). Interestingly, three distinct clusters of individuals with high, medium and low metabolic potential were observed. By illustrating these results in the context of bacterial population, we concluded that the abundance of the Prevotella genera is a key factor indicating a low metabolic potential. These metagenome-based metabolic signatures were used to study the interaction networks between bacteria-specific metabolites and human proteins. We found that thirty-three such metabolites interact with disease-relevant protein complexes several of which are highly expressed in cells and tissues involved in the signaling and shaping of the adaptive immune system and associated with squamous cell carcinoma and bladder cancer. From this set of metabolites, eighteen are present in DrugBank providing evidence that we carry a natural pharmacy in our guts. Furthermore, we established connections between the systemic effects of non-antibiotic drugs and the gut microbiome of relevance to drug side effects and health-care solutions. PMID:23178670

  8. Gut microbiota of humans, dogs and cats: current knowledge and future opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ping; Swanson, Kelly S

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing techniques allow for the identification and characterisation of microbes and their genes (microbiome). Using these new techniques, microbial populations in several niches of the human body, including the oral and nasal cavities, skin, urogenital tract and gastrointestinal tract, have been described recently. Very little data on the microbiome of companion animals exist, and most of the data have been derived from the analysis of the faeces of healthy laboratory animals. High-throughput assays provide opportunities to study the complex and dense populations of the gut microbiota, including bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our laboratory and others have recently described the predominant microbial taxa and genes of healthy dogs and cats and how these respond to dietary interventions. In general, faecal microbial phylogeny (e.g. predominance of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) and functional capacity (e.g. major functional groups related to carbohydrate, protein, DNA and vitamin metabolism; virulence factors; and cell wall and capsule) of the canine and feline gut are similar to those of the human gut. Initial sequencing projects have provided a glimpse of the microbial super-organism that exists within the canine and feline gut, but leaves much to be explored and discovered. As DNA provides information only about potential functions, studies that focus on the microbial transcriptome, metabolite profiles, and how microbiome changes affect host physiology and health are clearly required. Future studies must determine how diet composition, antibiotics and other drug therapies, breed and disease affect or are affected by the gut microbiome and how this information may be used to improve diets, identify disease biomarkers and develop targeted disease therapies. PMID:25414978

  9. MALINA: a web service for visual analytics of human gut microbiota whole-genome metagenomic reads

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    MALINA is a web service for bioinformatic analysis of whole-genome metagenomic data obtained from human gut microbiota sequencing. As input data, it accepts metagenomic reads of various sequencing technologies, including long reads (such as Sanger and 454 sequencing) and next-generation (including SOLiD and Illumina). It is the first metagenomic web service that is capable of processing SOLiD color-space reads, to authors’ knowledge. The web service allows phylogenetic and functional profiling of metagenomic samples using coverage depth resulting from the alignment of the reads to the catalogue of reference sequences which are built into the pipeline and contain prevalent microbial genomes and genes of human gut microbiota. The obtained metagenomic composition vectors are processed by the statistical analysis and visualization module containing methods for clustering, dimension reduction and group comparison. Additionally, the MALINA database includes vectors of bacterial and functional composition for human gut microbiota samples from a large number of existing studies allowing their comparative analysis together with user samples, namely datasets from Russian Metagenome project, MetaHIT and Human Microbiome Project (downloaded from http://hmpdacc.org). MALINA is made freely available on the web at http://malina.metagenome.ru. The website is implemented in JavaScript (using Ext JS), Microsoft .NET Framework, MS SQL, Python, with all major browsers supported. PMID:23216677

  10. Dissecting the in Vivo Metabolic Potential of Two Human Gut Acetogens*

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Federico E.; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Bain, James; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Stevens, Robert D.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2010-01-01

    Fermenting microbial communities generate hydrogen; its removal through the production of acetate, methane, or hydrogen sulfide modulates the efficiency of energy extraction from available nutrients in many ecosystems. We noted that pathway components for acetogenesis are more abundantly and consistently represented in the gut microbiomes of monozygotic twins and their mothers than components for methanogenesis or sulfate reduction and subsequently analyzed the metabolic potential of two sequenced human gut acetogens, Blautia hydrogenotrophica and Marvinbryantia formatexigens in vitro and in the intestines of gnotobiotic mice harboring a prominent saccharolytic bacterium. To do so, we developed a generally applicable method for multiplex sequencing of expressed microbial mRNAs (microbial RNA-Seq) and, together with mass spectrometry of metabolites, showed that these organisms have distinct patterns of substrate utilization. B. hydrogenotrophica targets aliphatic and aromatic amino acids. It increases the efficiency of fermentation by consuming reducing equivalents, thereby maintaining a high NAD+/NADH ratio and boosting acetate production. In contrast, M. formatexigens consumes oligosaccharides, does not impact the redox state of the gut, and boosts the yield of succinate. These findings have strategic implications for those who wish to manipulate the hydrogen economy of gut microbial communities in ways that modulate energy harvest. PMID:20444704

  11. Impact of dietary resistant starch type 4 on human gut microbiota and immunometabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Bijaya; McCormack, Lacey; Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Juenemann, Robert; Nichenametla, Sailendra; Clapper, Jeffrey; Specker, Bonny; Dey, Moul

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modulation of the gut microbiota impacts human health. Here we investigated the hitherto unknown effects of resistant starch type 4 (RS4) enriched diet on gut microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in parallel with host immunometabolic functions in twenty individuals with signs of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Cholesterols, fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, and proinflammatory markers in the blood as well as waist circumference and % body fat were lower post intervention in the RS4 group compared with the control group. 16S-rRNA gene sequencing revealed a differential abundance of 71 bacterial operational taxonomic units, including the enrichment of three Bacteroides species and one each of Parabacteroides, Oscillospira, Blautia, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, and Christensenella species in the RS4 group. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed higher faecal SCFAs, including butyrate, propionate, valerate, isovalerate, and hexanoate after RS4-intake. Bivariate analyses showed RS4-specific associations of the gut microbiota with the host metabolic functions and SCFA levels. Here we show that dietary RS4 induced changes in the gut microbiota are linked to its biological activity in individuals with signs of MetS. These findings have potential implications for dietary guidelines in metabolic health management. PMID:27356770

  12. Impact of dietary resistant starch type 4 on human gut microbiota and immunometabolic functions

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Bijaya; McCormack, Lacey; Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Juenemann, Robert; Nichenametla, Sailendra; Clapper, Jeffrey; Specker, Bonny; Dey, Moul

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modulation of the gut microbiota impacts human health. Here we investigated the hitherto unknown effects of resistant starch type 4 (RS4) enriched diet on gut microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in parallel with host immunometabolic functions in twenty individuals with signs of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Cholesterols, fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, and proinflammatory markers in the blood as well as waist circumference and % body fat were lower post intervention in the RS4 group compared with the control group. 16S-rRNA gene sequencing revealed a differential abundance of 71 bacterial operational taxonomic units, including the enrichment of three Bacteroides species and one each of Parabacteroides, Oscillospira, Blautia, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, and Christensenella species in the RS4 group. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry revealed higher faecal SCFAs, including butyrate, propionate, valerate, isovalerate, and hexanoate after RS4-intake. Bivariate analyses showed RS4-specific associations of the gut microbiota with the host metabolic functions and SCFA levels. Here we show that dietary RS4 induced changes in the gut microbiota are linked to its biological activity in individuals with signs of MetS. These findings have potential implications for dietary guidelines in metabolic health management. PMID:27356770

  13. Variation of glucoraphanin metabolism in vivo and ex vivo by human gut bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Hullar, Meredith AJ; Beresford, Shirley AA; Lampe, Johanna W

    2011-01-01

    Glucosinolates, phytochemicals found in cruciferous vegetables, are metabolized to bioactive isothiocyanates (ITC) by certain bacteria in the human gut. Substantial individual variation in urinary ITC excretion has been observed in previous cruciferous-vegetable feeding studies. We hypothesized that individual differences in gut microbial community contribute to the observed variation in glucosinolate metabolism, i.e., gut microbiota composition between high- and low-ITC excreters differ. We recruited 23 healthy individuals and fed them a standardized meal containing 200 g cooked broccoli. 24-h urinary ITC excretion was measured after the meal. Study participants with the highest (n=5) and the lowest (n=5) ITC excretion provided fecal samples for ex vivo bacterial cultivation with 50 μM glucoraphanin, the major glucosinolate found in broccoli. When grown ex vivo, fecal bacteria from the selected high ITC excreters were able to degrade more glucoraphanin than those from the low excreters (P=0.05). However, bacterial fingerprints of fecal and ex vivo culture microbiota revealed no statistically significant differences between the high and low ITC excreters in terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. In conclusion, glucosinolate degradation by fecal bacteria ex vivo may be associated with in vivo bacterial glucosinolate metabolism capacity but no direct link to specific bacterial species could be established, possibly due to the complexity and functional redundancy of the gut microbiota. PMID:21342607

  14. Gut Microbiota Profiling: Metabolomics Based Approach to Unravel Compounds Affecting Human Health.

    PubMed

    Vernocchi, Pamela; Del Chierico, Federica; Putignani, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is composed of a huge number of different bacteria, that produce a large amount of compounds playing a key role in microbe selection and in the construction of a metabolic signaling network. The microbial activities are affected by environmental stimuli leading to the generation of a wide number of compounds, that influence the host metabolome and human health. Indeed, metabolite profiles related to the gut microbiota can offer deep insights on the impact of lifestyle and dietary factors on chronic and acute diseases. Metagenomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics are some of the meta-omics approaches to study the modulation of the gut microbiota. Metabolomic research applied to biofluids allows to: define the metabolic profile; identify and quantify classes and compounds of interest; characterize small molecules produced by intestinal microbes; and define the biochemical pathways of metabolites. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are the principal technologies applied to metabolomics in terms of coverage, sensitivity and quantification. Moreover, the use of biostatistics and mathematical approaches coupled with metabolomics play a key role in the extraction of biologically meaningful information from wide datasets. Metabolomic studies in gut microbiota-related research have increased, focusing on the generation of novel biomarkers, which could lead to the development of mechanistic hypotheses potentially applicable to the development of nutritional and personalized therapies. PMID:27507964

  15. Gut Microbiota Profiling: Metabolomics Based Approach to Unravel Compounds Affecting Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Vernocchi, Pamela; Del Chierico, Federica; Putignani, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is composed of a huge number of different bacteria, that produce a large amount of compounds playing a key role in microbe selection and in the construction of a metabolic signaling network. The microbial activities are affected by environmental stimuli leading to the generation of a wide number of compounds, that influence the host metabolome and human health. Indeed, metabolite profiles related to the gut microbiota can offer deep insights on the impact of lifestyle and dietary factors on chronic and acute diseases. Metagenomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics are some of the meta-omics approaches to study the modulation of the gut microbiota. Metabolomic research applied to biofluids allows to: define the metabolic profile; identify and quantify classes and compounds of interest; characterize small molecules produced by intestinal microbes; and define the biochemical pathways of metabolites. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are the principal technologies applied to metabolomics in terms of coverage, sensitivity and quantification. Moreover, the use of biostatistics and mathematical approaches coupled with metabolomics play a key role in the extraction of biologically meaningful information from wide datasets. Metabolomic studies in gut microbiota-related research have increased, focusing on the generation of novel biomarkers, which could lead to the development of mechanistic hypotheses potentially applicable to the development of nutritional and personalized therapies. PMID:27507964

  16. Effects of resistant starch type III polymorphs on human colon microbiota and short chain fatty acids in human gut models.

    PubMed

    Lesmes, Uri; Beards, Emma J; Gibson, Glenn R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Shimoni, Eyal

    2008-07-01

    This study probed the possible effects of type III resistant starch (RS) crystalline polymorphism on RS fermentability by human gut microbiota and the short chain fatty acids production in vitro. Human fecal pH-controlled batch cultures showed RS induces an ecological shift in the colonic microbiota with polymorph B inducing Bifidobacterium spp. and polymorph A inducing Atopobium spp. Interestingly, polymorph B also induced higher butyrate production to levels of 0.79 mM. In addition, human gut simulation demonstrated that polymorph B promotes the growth of bifidobacteria in the proximal part of the colon and double their relative proportion in the microbiota in the distal colon. These findings suggest that RS polymorph B may promote large bowel health. While the findings are limited by study constraints, they do raise the possibility of using different thermal processing to delineate differences in the prebiotic capabilities of RS, especially its butryrogenicity in the human colon. PMID:18543927

  17. Romboutsia timonensis, a new species isolated from human gut.

    PubMed

    Ricaboni, D; Mailhe, M; Khelaifia, S; Raoult, D; Million, M

    2016-07-01

    The exploration of the human microbiome was recently revolutionized by microbial culturomics and taxonogenomics. Thanks to this approach, we report here the main characteristics of Romboutsia timonensis strain Marseille-P326, a new bacterium isolated from the right human colon by colonoscopy in a 63-year-old French man with severe anaemia with melaena. PMID:27200178

  18. Direct Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA from Complex Communities Reveals Many Novel Molecular Species within the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Suau, Antonia; Bonnet, Régis; Sutren, Malène; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Gibson, Glenn R.; Collins, Matthew D.; Doré, Joel

    1999-01-01

    The human intestinal tract harbors a complex microbial ecosystem which plays a key role in nutrition and health. Although this microbiota has been studied in great detail by culture techniques, microscopic counts on human feces suggest that 60 to 80% of the observable bacteria cannot be cultivated. Using comparative analysis of cloned 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequences, we have investigated the bacterial diversity (both cultivated and noncultivated bacteria) within an adult-male fecal sample. The 284 clones obtained from 10-cycle PCR were classified into 82 molecular species (at least 98% similarity). Three phylogenetic groups contained 95% of the clones: the Bacteroides group, the Clostridium coccoides group, and the Clostridium leptum subgroup. The remaining clones were distributed among a variety of phylogenetic clusters. Only 24% of the molecular species recovered corresponded to described organisms (those whose sequences were available in public databases), and all of these were established members of the dominant human fecal flora (e.g., Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Fusobacterium prausnitzii, and Eubacterium rectale). However, the majority of generated rDNA sequences (76%) did not correspond to known organisms and clearly derived from hitherto unknown species within this human gut microflora. PMID:10543789

  19. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tillisch, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The role of the gastrointestinal microbiota in human brain development and function is an area of increasing interest and research. Preclinical models suggest a role for the microbiota in broad aspects of human health, including mood, cognition, and chronic pain. Early human studies suggest that altering the microbiota with beneficial bacteria, or probiotics, can lead to changes in brain function, as well as subjective reports of mood. As the mechanisms of bidirectional communication between the brain and microbiota are better understood, it is expected that these pathways will be harnessed to provide novel methods to enhance health and treat disease. PMID:24838095

  20. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans.

    PubMed

    Tillisch, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The role of the gastrointestinal microbiota in human brain development and function is an area of increasing interest and research. Preclinical models suggest a role for the microbiota in broad aspects of human health, including mood, cognition, and chronic pain. Early human studies suggest that altering the microbiota with beneficial bacteria, or probiotics, can lead to changes in brain function, as well as subjective reports of mood. As the mechanisms of bidirectional communication between the brain and microbiota are better understood, it is expected that these pathways will be harnessed to provide novel methods to enhance health and treat disease. PMID:24838095

  1. Linking Gut Microbiota and Inflammation to Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Saad, M J A; Santos, A; Prada, P O

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are the major predisposing factors to comorbidities, such as Type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and several types of cancer. The prevalence of obesity is still increasing worldwide and now affects a large number of individuals. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance/obesity. The human intestine is colonized by ∼100 trillion bacteria, which constitute the gut microbiota. Studies have shown that lean and overweight rodents and humans may present differences in the composition of their intestinal flora. Over the past 10 years, data from different sources have established a causal link between the intestinal microbiota and obesity/insulin resistance. It is important to emphasize that diet-induced obesity promotes insulin resistance by mechanisms independent and dependent on gut microbiota. In this review, we present several mechanisms that contribute to explaining the link between intestinal flora and insulin resistance/obesity. The LPS from intestinal flora bacteria can induce a chronic subclinical inflammatory process and obesity, leading to insulin resistance through activation of TLR4. The reduction in circulating SCFA may also have an essential role in the installation of reduced insulin sensitivity and obesity. Other mechanisms include effects of bile acids, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), and some other lesser-known factors. In the near future, this area should open new therapeutic avenues for obesity/insulin resistance and its comorbidities. PMID:27252163

  2. Metagenomic Analysis of the Human Distal Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Steven R.; Pop, Mihai; DeBoy, Robert T.; Eckburg, Paul B.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Samuel, Buck S.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Relman, David A.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Nelson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is composed of 1013 to 1014 microorganisms whose collective genome (“microbiome”) contains at least 100 times as many genes as our own genome. We analyzed ~78 million base pairs of unique DNA sequence and 2062 polymerase chain reaction–amplified 16S ribosomal DNA sequences obtained from the fecal DNAs of two healthy adults. Using metabolic function analyses of identified genes, we compared our human genome with the average content of previously sequenced microbial genomes. Our microbiome has significantly enriched metabolism of glycans, amino acids, and xenobiotics; methanogenesis; and 2-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway–mediated biosynthesis of vitamins and isoprenoids. Thus, humans are superorganisms whose metabolism represents an amalgamation of microbial and human attributes. PMID:16741115

  3. Genome signature-based dissection of human gut metagenomes to extract subliminal viral sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Bowler, Lucas D.; Caplin, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Diston, David; Cheek, Elizabeth; Taylor, Huw; Ebdon, James E.; Jones, Brian V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) have a key role in shaping the development and functional outputs of host microbiomes. Although metagenomic approaches have greatly expanded our understanding of the prokaryotic virosphere, additional tools are required for the phage-oriented dissection of metagenomic data sets, and host-range affiliation of recovered sequences. Here we demonstrate the application of a genome signature-based approach to interrogate conventional whole-community metagenomes and access subliminal, phylogenetically targeted, phage sequences present within. We describe a portion of the biological dark matter extant in the human gut virome, and bring to light a population of potentially gut-specific Bacteroidales-like phage, poorly represented in existing virus like particle-derived viral metagenomes. These predominantly temperate phage were shown to encode functions of direct relevance to human health in the form of antibiotic resistance genes, and provided evidence for the existence of putative ‘viral-enterotypes’ among this fraction of the human gut virome. PMID:24036533

  4. Molecular details of a starch utilization pathway in the human gut symbiont Eubacterium rectale

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Darrell W.; Orlovsky, Nicole I.; Foley, Matthew H.; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J.; Bahr, Constance M.; Maynard, Mallory; Demeler, Borries; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Eubacterium rectale is a prominent human gut symbiont yet little is known about the molecular strategies this bacterium has developed to acquire nutrients within the competitive gut ecosystem. Starch is one of the most abundant glycans in the human diet, and E. rectale increases in vivo when the host consumes a diet rich in resistant starch, although it is not a primary degrader of this glycan. Here we present the results of a quantitative proteomics study in which we identify two glycoside hydrolase 13 family enzymes, and three ABC transporter solute-binding proteins that are abundant during growth on starch and, we hypothesize, work together at the cell surface to degrade starch and capture the released maltooligosaccharides. EUR_21100 is a multidomain cell wall anchored amylase that preferentially targets starch polysaccharides, liberating maltotetraose, while the membrane associated maltogenic amylase EUR_01860 breaks down maltooligosaccharides longer than maltotriose. The three solute-binding proteins display a range of glycan-binding specificities that ensure the capture of glucose through maltoheptaose and some α1,6-branched glycans. Taken together, we describe a pathway for starch utilization by E. rectale DSM 17629 that may be conserved among other starch-degrading Clostridium cluster XIVa organisms in the human gut. PMID:25388295

  5. Glycoantigens Induce Human Peripheral Tr1 Cell Differentiation with Gut-homing Specialization*

    PubMed Central

    Kreisman, Lori S. C.; Cobb, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The carbohydrate antigen (glycoantigen) PSA from an intestinal commensal bacteria is able to down-regulate inflammatory bowel disease in model mice, suggesting that stimulation with PSA results in regulatory T cell (Treg) generation. However, mechanisms of how peripheral human T cells respond and home in response to commensal antigens are still not understood. Here, we demonstrate that a single exposure to PSA induces differentiation of human peripheral CD4+ T cells into type-Tr1 Tregs. This is in contrast to mouse models where PSA induced the production of Foxp3+ iTregs. The human PSA-induced Tr1 cells are profoundly anergic and exhibit nonspecific bystander suppression mediated by IL-10 secretion. Most surprisingly, glycoantigen exposure provoked expression of gut homing receptors on their surface. These findings reveal a mechanism for immune homeostasis in the gut whereby exposure to commensal glycoantigens provides the requisite information to responding T cells for proper tissue localization (gut) and function (anti-inflammatory/regulatory). PMID:21228275

  6. Two new xylanases with different substrate specificities from the human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393.

    PubMed

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Iakiviak, Michael; Dodd, Dylan; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2014-04-01

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut. PMID:24463968

  7. Archaea and the human gut: new beginning of an old story.

    PubMed

    Gaci, Nadia; Borrel, Guillaume; Tottey, William; O'Toole, Paul William; Brugère, Jean-François

    2014-11-21

    Methanogenic archaea are known as human gut inhabitants since more than 30 years ago through the detection of methane in the breath and isolation of two methanogenic species belonging to the order Methanobacteriales, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Methanosphaera stadtmanae. During the last decade, diversity of archaea encountered in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been extended by sequence identification and culturing of new strains. Here we provide an updated census of the archaeal diversity associated with the human GIT and their possible role in the gut physiology and health. We particularly focus on the still poorly characterized 7th order of methanogens, the Methanomassiliicoccales, associated to aged population. While also largely distributed in non-GIT environments, our actual knowledge on this novel order of methanogens has been mainly revealed through GIT inhabitants. They enlarge the number of final electron acceptors of the gut metabolites to mono- di- and trimethylamine. Trimethylamine is exclusively a microbiota-derived product of nutrients (lecithin, choline, TMAO, L-carnitine) from normal diet, from which seems originate two diseases, trimethylaminuria (or Fish-Odor Syndrome) and cardiovascular disease through the proatherogenic property of its oxidized liver-derived form. This therefore supports interest on these methanogenic species and its use as archaebiotics, a term coined from the notion of archaea-derived probiotics. PMID:25473158

  8. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specific DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides. PMID:26438537

  9. Archaea and the human gut: New beginning of an old story

    PubMed Central

    Gaci, Nadia; Borrel, Guillaume; Tottey, William; O’Toole, Paul William; Brugère, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are known as human gut inhabitants since more than 30 years ago through the detection of methane in the breath and isolation of two methanogenic species belonging to the order Methanobacteriales, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Methanosphaera stadtmanae. During the last decade, diversity of archaea encountered in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been extended by sequence identification and culturing of new strains. Here we provide an updated census of the archaeal diversity associated with the human GIT and their possible role in the gut physiology and health. We particularly focus on the still poorly characterized 7th order of methanogens, the Methanomassiliicoccales, associated to aged population. While also largely distributed in non-GIT environments, our actual knowledge on this novel order of methanogens has been mainly revealed through GIT inhabitants. They enlarge the number of final electron acceptors of the gut metabolites to mono- di- and trimethylamine. Trimethylamine is exclusively a microbiota-derived product of nutrients (lecithin, choline, TMAO, L-carnitine) from normal diet, from which seems originate two diseases, trimethylaminuria (or Fish-Odor Syndrome) and cardiovascular disease through the proatherogenic property of its oxidized liver-derived form. This therefore supports interest on these methanogenic species and its use as archaebiotics, a term coined from the notion of archaea-derived probiotics. PMID:25473158

  10. Development of an Enhanced Metaproteomic Approach for Deepening the Microbiome Characterization of the Human Infant Gut

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Weili; Richard J. Giannone; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Robert L. Hettich

    2014-10-28

    The early-life microbiota establishment in the human infant gut is highly variable and plays a crucial role in host nutrients and immunity maturation. While high-performance mass spectrometry (MS)-based metaproteomics is a powerful method for the functional characterization of complex microbial communities, the construction of comprehensive metaproteomic information in human fecal samples is inhibited by the presence of abundant human proteins. To alleviate this restriction, we have designed a novel metaproteomic strategy based on Double Filtering (DF) to enhance microbial protein characterization in complex fecal samples from healthy premature infants. We improved the overall depth of infant gut proteome measurement, with an increase in the number of identified low abundance proteins, and observed greater than twofold improvement in metrics for microbial protein identifications and quantifications with a relatively high rank correlation to control. We further showed the substantial enhancement of this approach for extensively interpreting microbial functional categories between infants by affording more detailed and confident identified categories. This approach provided an avenue for in-depth measurement in the microbial component of infant fecal samples and thus comprehensive characterization of infant gut microbiome functionality.

  11. Development of an Enhanced Metaproteomic Approach for Deepening the Microbiome Characterization of the Human Infant Gut

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Weili; Richard J. Giannone; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Robert L. Hettich

    2014-10-28

    The early-life microbiota establishment in the human infant gut is highly variable and plays a crucial role in host nutrients and immunity maturation. While high-performance mass spectrometry (MS)-based metaproteomics is a powerful method for the functional characterization of complex microbial communities, the construction of comprehensive metaproteomic information in human fecal samples is inhibited by the presence of abundant human proteins. To alleviate this restriction, we have designed a novel metaproteomic strategy based on Double Filtering (DF) to enhance microbial protein characterization in complex fecal samples from healthy premature infants. We improved the overall depth of infant gut proteome measurement, withmore » an increase in the number of identified low abundance proteins, and observed greater than twofold improvement in metrics for microbial protein identifications and quantifications with a relatively high rank correlation to control. We further showed the substantial enhancement of this approach for extensively interpreting microbial functional categories between infants by affording more detailed and confident identified categories. This approach provided an avenue for in-depth measurement in the microbial component of infant fecal samples and thus comprehensive characterization of infant gut microbiome functionality.« less

  12. Members of the human gut microbiota involved in recovery from Vibrio cholerae infection

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ansel; Shamsir Ahmed, A.M.; Subramanian, Sathish; Griffin, Nicholas W.; Drewry, Lisa L.; Petri, William A.; Haque, Rashidul; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Given the global burden of diarrheal diseases1, it is important to understand how members of the gut microbiota affect the risk for, course of, and recovery from disease in children and adults. The acute, voluminous diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae represents a dramatic example of enteropathogen invasion and gut microbial community disruption. We have conducted a detailed time-series metagenomic study of fecal microbiota collected during the acute diarrheal and recovery phases of cholera in a cohort of Bangladeshi adults living in an area with a high burden of disease2. We find that recovery is characterized by a pattern of accumulation of bacterial taxa that shows similarities to the pattern of assembly/maturation of the gut microbiota in healthy Bangladeshi children3. To define underlying mechanisms, we introduced into gnotobiotic mice an artificial community that was composed of human gut bacterial species that directly correlate with recovery from cholera in adults and are indicative of normal microbiota maturation in healthy Bangladeshi children3. One of the species, Ruminococcus obeum, exhibited consistent increases in its relative abundance upon V. cholerae infection of the mice. Follow-up analyses, including mono- and co-colonization studies, established that R. obeum restricts V. cholerae colonization, that R. obeum luxS [autoinducer-2 (AI-2) synthase] expression and AI-2 production increase significantly with V. cholerae invasion, and that R. obeum AI-2 causes quorum-sensing mediated repression of several V. cholerae colonization factors. Co-colonization with V. cholerae mutants disclosed that R. obeum AI-2 reduces Vibrio colonization/pathogenicity through a novel pathway that does not depend on the V. cholerae AI-2 sensor, LuxP. The approach described can be used to mine the gut microbiota of Bangladeshi or other populations for members that use autoinducers and/or other mechanisms to limit colonization with V. cholerae, or conceivably other

  13. Innate Immune Responses of Human Neonatal Cells to Bacteria from the Normal Gastrointestinal Flora

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Helen; Hessle, Christina; Rudin, Anna

    2002-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that the prevalence of allergy has increased due to decreased microbial stimulation early in life, leading to delayed maturation of the immune system. The aim of this study was to examine the cytokine pattern produced from cord blood mononuclear cells relative to adult cells after stimulation with bacterial strains from the normal flora. Mononuclear cells from cord and adult blood samples were stimulated with the following bacteria: Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus mitis, Corynebacterium minutissimum, Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Veillonella parvula, and Neisseria sicca. The levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-10, and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The TNF-α production was also analyzed after blocking CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), and TLR-4 prior to stimulation with bacteria. The levels of IL-12 and TNF-α were similar in cord and adult cells. Gram-positive bacteria induced considerably higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-α than gram-negative bacteria in both cord and adult cells. The levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in newborns than in adults, whereas the levels of IL-10 were similar in newborns and adults. Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria induced similar levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in cord cells. L. plantarum bound or signaled through CD14, TLR-2, and TLR-4, whereas E. coli acted mainly through CD14 and TLR-4. These results indicate that the innate immune response in newborns to commensal bacteria is strong and also suggest that different bacterial strains may have differential effects on the maturation of the immune system of infants. PMID:12438343

  14. Innate immune responses of human neonatal cells to bacteria from the normal gastrointestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Helen; Hessle, Christina; Rudin, Anna

    2002-12-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that the prevalence of allergy has increased due to decreased microbial stimulation early in life, leading to delayed maturation of the immune system. The aim of this study was to examine the cytokine pattern produced from cord blood mononuclear cells relative to adult cells after stimulation with bacterial strains from the normal flora. Mononuclear cells from cord and adult blood samples were stimulated with the following bacteria: Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus mitis, Corynebacterium minutissimum, Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Veillonella parvula, and Neisseria sicca. The levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-10, and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The TNF-alpha production was also analyzed after blocking CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), and TLR-4 prior to stimulation with bacteria. The levels of IL-12 and TNF-alpha were similar in cord and adult cells. Gram-positive bacteria induced considerably higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-alpha than gram-negative bacteria in both cord and adult cells. The levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in newborns than in adults, whereas the levels of IL-10 were similar in newborns and adults. Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria induced similar levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in cord cells. L. plantarum bound or signaled through CD14, TLR-2, and TLR-4, whereas E. coli acted mainly through CD14 and TLR-4. These results indicate that the innate immune response in newborns to commensal bacteria is strong and also suggest that different bacterial strains may have differential effects on the maturation of the immune system of infants. PMID:12438343

  15. Microbes in the gut: a digestable account of host-symbiont interactions.

    PubMed

    Pai, Rekha; Kang, Gagandeep

    2008-11-01

    The human bowel is host to a diverse group of bacteria with over 500 different bacterial species contributing to this diversity. Until recently these bacteria were regarded as residents without any specific functions. The last two decades have seen a radical change in our understanding of the interactions between the gut flora and their eukaryotic hosts and there is a growing appreciation of the spectrum of functions performed by these symbionts. Intestinal bacteria are recognized for their role in nutrient absorption, mucosal barrier function, angiogenesis, morphogenesis and postnatal maturation of intestinal cell lineages, intestinal motility and more importantly maturation of gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Although gut flora are implicated in certain pathological disorders, their remarkable contributions to health and homeostasis of the host need to be recognized and understood. PMID:19179677

  16. Ecophysiological consequences of alcoholism on human gut microbiota: implications for ethanol-related pathogenesis of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruya, Atsuki; Kuwahara, Akika; Saito, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko; Tsubo, Takahisa; Suga, Shogo; Inai, Makoto; Aoki, Yuichi; Takahashi, Seiji; Tsutsumi, Eri; Suwa, Yoshihide; Morita, Hidetoshi; Kinoshita, Kenji; Totsuka, Yukari; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; Shimoyama, Takefumi; Nakayama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Chronic consumption of excess ethanol increases the risk of colorectal cancer. The pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer (ER-CRC) is thought to be partly mediated by gut microbes. Specifically, bacteria in the colon and rectum convert ethanol to acetaldehyde (AcH), which is carcinogenic. However, the effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the human gut microbiome are poorly understood, and the role of gut microbes in the proposed AcH-mediated pathogenesis of ER-CRC remains to be elaborated. Here we analyse and compare the gut microbiota structures of non-alcoholics and alcoholics. The gut microbiotas of alcoholics were diminished in dominant obligate anaerobes (e.g., Bacteroides and Ruminococcus) and enriched in Streptococcus and other minor species. This alteration might be exacerbated by habitual smoking. These observations could at least partly be explained by the susceptibility of obligate anaerobes to reactive oxygen species, which are increased by chronic exposure of the gut mucosa to ethanol. The AcH productivity from ethanol was much lower in the faeces of alcoholic patients than in faeces of non-alcoholic subjects. The faecal phenotype of the alcoholics could be rationalised based on their gut microbiota structures and the ability of gut bacteria to accumulate AcH from ethanol. PMID:27295340

  17. Ecophysiological consequences of alcoholism on human gut microbiota: implications for ethanol-related pathogenesis of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuruya, Atsuki; Kuwahara, Akika; Saito, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko; Tsubo, Takahisa; Suga, Shogo; Inai, Makoto; Aoki, Yuichi; Takahashi, Seiji; Tsutsumi, Eri; Suwa, Yoshihide; Morita, Hidetoshi; Kinoshita, Kenji; Totsuka, Yukari; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; Shimoyama, Takefumi; Nakayama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Chronic consumption of excess ethanol increases the risk of colorectal cancer. The pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer (ER-CRC) is thought to be partly mediated by gut microbes. Specifically, bacteria in the colon and rectum convert ethanol to acetaldehyde (AcH), which is carcinogenic. However, the effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the human gut microbiome are poorly understood, and the role of gut microbes in the proposed AcH-mediated pathogenesis of ER-CRC remains to be elaborated. Here we analyse and compare the gut microbiota structures of non-alcoholics and alcoholics. The gut microbiotas of alcoholics were diminished in dominant obligate anaerobes (e.g., Bacteroides and Ruminococcus) and enriched in Streptococcus and other minor species. This alteration might be exacerbated by habitual smoking. These observations could at least partly be explained by the susceptibility of obligate anaerobes to reactive oxygen species, which are increased by chronic exposure of the gut mucosa to ethanol. The AcH productivity from ethanol was much lower in the faeces of alcoholic patients than in faeces of non-alcoholic subjects. The faecal phenotype of the alcoholics could be rationalised based on their gut microbiota structures and the ability of gut bacteria to accumulate AcH from ethanol. PMID:27295340

  18. Broad-spectrum antibacterial activity of carbon nanotubes to human gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanqing; Wang, Bing; Gao, Di; Guan, Ming; Zheng, Lingna; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang; Feng, Weiyue

    2013-08-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hold promise in manufacturing, environmental, and biomedical applications, as well as food and agricultural industries. Previous observations have shown that CNTs have antimicrobial activity; however, the impact of CNTs to human gut microbes has not been investigated. Here, the antibacterial activity of CNTs against the microbes commonly encountered in the human digestion system--L. acidophilus, B. adolescentis, E. coli, E. faecalis, and S. aureus--are evaluated. The bacteria studied include pathogenic and non-pathogenic, gram-positive and negative, and both sphere and rod strains. In this study, CNTs, including single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs, 1-3 μm), short and long multi-walled CNTs (s-MWCNTs: 0.5-2 μm; l-MWCNTs: >50 μm), and functionalized multi-walled CNTs (hydroxyl- and carboxyl-modification, 0.5-2 μm), all have broad-spectrum antibacterial effects. Notably, CNTs may selectively lyse the walls and membranes of human gut microbes, depending on not only the length and surface functional groups of CNTs, but also the shapes of the bacteria. The mechanism of antibacterial activity is associated with their diameter-dependent piercing and length-dependent wrapping on the lysis of microbial walls and membranes, inducing release of intracellular components DNA and RNA and allowing a loss of bacterial membrane potential, demonstrating complete destruction of bacteria. Thin and rigid SWCNT show more effective wall/membrane piercing on spherical bacteria than MWCNTs. Long MWCNT may wrap around gut bacteria, increasing the area making contact with the bacterial wall. This work suggests that CNTs may be broad-spectrum and efficient antibacterial agents in the gut, and selective application of CNTs could reduce the potential hazard to probiotic bacteria. PMID:23463684

  19. Higher-Level Production of Volatile Fatty Acids In Vitro by Chicken Gut Microbiotas than by Human Gut Microbiotas as Determined by Functional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Fang; Yin, Yeshi; Wang, Yuezhu; Deng, Bo; Yu, Hongwei David; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie; Wang, Shengyue

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the composition and function of gut microbiota. Here, we compared the bacterial compositions and fermentation metabolites of human and chicken gut microbiotas. Results generated by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region showed the compositions of human and chicken microbiotas to be markedly different, with chicken cecal microbiotas displaying more diversity than human fecal microbiotas. The nutrient requirements of each microbiota growing under batch and chemostat conditions were analyzed. The results showed that chicken cecal microbiotas required simple sugars and peptides to maintain balanced growth in vitro but that human fecal microbiotas preferred polysaccharides and proteins. Chicken microbiotas also produced higher concentrations of volatile fatty acids than did human microbiotas. Our data suggest that the availability of different fermentable substrates in the chicken cecum, which exist due to the unique anatomical structure of the cecum, may provide an environment favorable to the nourishment of microbiotas suited to the production of the higher-energy metabolites required by the bird. Therefore, gut structure, nutrition, immunity, and life-style all contribute to the selection of an exclusive bacterial community that produces types of metabolites beneficial to the host. PMID:22685152

  20. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Kei E; Slusher, Nicole A; Cabana, Michael D; Lynch, Susan V

    2010-01-01

    The human superorganism is a conglomerate of mammalian and microbial cells, with the latter estimated to outnumber the former by ten to one and the microbial genetic repertoire (microbiome) to be approximately 100-times greater than that of the human host. Given the ability of the immune response to rapidly counter infectious agents, it is striking that such a large density of microbes can exist in a state of synergy within the human host. This is particularly true of the distal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which houses up to 1000 distinct bacterial species and an estimated excess of 1 × 1014 microorganisms. An ever-increasing body of evidence implicates the GI microbiota in defining states of health and disease. Here, we review the literature in adult and pediatric GI microbiome studies, the emerging links between microbial community structure, function, infection and disease, and the approaches to manipulate this crucial ecosystem to improve host health. PMID:20377338

  1. Ecological Interactions of Bacteria in the Human Gut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falony, Gwen; de Vuyst, Luc

    The colon or large intestine is one of the most important organs of the human body (Macfarlane and Cummings, 1991). Moreover, its inhabitants, the colon microbiota, are the key elements of the human digestive ecosystem. The vast complexity of the human large-intestinal microbiota has inspired researchers to consider it as an organ itself, located inside the colon and acquired postnatally (Bäckhed et al., 2005; Zocco et al., 2007). From a physiologist's point of view, this image of the colon microbiota is relevant: like an organ, it is composed of different cell lineages that communicate with both one another and the host; it consumes, stores, and redistributes energy; it mediates physiologically important chemical transformations; and it is able to maintain and repair itself through self-replication (Bäckhed et al., 2005). As a microbial organ, the human colon community does not only broaden the digestive abilities of the host (Gill et al., 2006), but also influences body processes far beyond digestion (Roberfroid, 2005b; Turnbaugh et al., 2007).

  2. Comparative (Meta)genomic Analysis and Ecological Profiling of Human Gut-Specific Bacteriophage φB124-14

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Caplin, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Diston, David; Cheek, Elizabeth; Bowler, Lucas; Taylor, Huw; Ebdon, James; Jones, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage associated with the human gut microbiome are likely to have an important impact on community structure and function, and provide a wealth of biotechnological opportunities. Despite this, knowledge of the ecology and composition of bacteriophage in the gut bacterial community remains poor, with few well characterized gut-associated phage genomes currently available. Here we describe the identification and in-depth (meta)genomic, proteomic, and ecological analysis of a human gut-specific bacteriophage (designated φB124-14). In doing so we illuminate a fraction of the biological dark matter extant in this ecosystem and its surrounding eco-genomic landscape, identifying a novel and uncharted bacteriophage gene-space in this community. φB124-14 infects only a subset of closely related gut-associated Bacteroides fragilis strains, and the circular genome encodes functions previously found to be rare in viral genomes and human gut viral metagenome sequences, including those which potentially confer advantages upon phage and/or host bacteria. Comparative genomic analyses revealed φB124-14 is most closely related to φB40-8, the only other publically available Bacteroides sp. phage genome, whilst comparative metagenomic analysis of both phage failed to identify any homologous sequences in 136 non-human gut metagenomic datasets searched, supporting the human gut-specific nature of this phage. Moreover, a potential geographic variation in the carriage of these and related phage was revealed by analysis of their distribution and prevalence within 151 human gut microbiomes and viromes from Europe, America and Japan. Finally, ecological profiling of φB124-14 and φB40-8, using both gene-centric alignment-driven phylogenetic analyses, as well as alignment-free gene-independent approaches was undertaken. This not only verified the human gut-specific nature of both phage, but also indicated that these phage populate a distinct and unexplored ecological landscape

  3. The human gut sterolbiome: bile acid-microbiome endocrine aspects and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ridlon, Jason M; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-03-01

    The human body is now viewed as a complex ecosystem that on a cellular and gene level is mainly prokaryotic. The mammalian liver synthesizes and secretes hydrophilic primary bile acids, some of which enter the colon during the enterohepatic circulation, and are converted into numerous hydrophobic metabolites which are capable of entering the portal circulation, returned to the liver, and in humans, accumulating in the biliary pool. Bile acids are hormones that regulate their own synthesis, transport, in addition to glucose and lipid homeostasis, and energy balance. The gut microbial community through their capacity to produce bile acid metabolites distinct from the liver can be thought of as an "endocrine organ" with potential to alter host physiology, perhaps to their own favor. We propose the term "sterolbiome" to describe the genetic potential of the gut microbiome to produce endocrine molecules from endogenous and exogenous steroids in the mammalian gut. The affinity of secondary bile acid metabolites to host nuclear receptors is described, the potential of secondary bile acids to promote tumors, and the potential of bile acids to serve as therapeutic agents are discussed. PMID:26579434

  4. Utilisation of Mucin Glycans by the Human Gut Symbiont Ruminococcus gnavus Is Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Crost, Emmanuelle H.; Tailford, Louise E.; Le Gall, Gwenaelle; Fons, Michel; Henrissat, Bernard; Juge, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Commensal bacteria often have an especially rich source of glycan-degrading enzymes which allow them to utilize undigested carbohydrates from the food or the host. The species Ruminococcus gnavus is present in the digestive tract of ≥90% of humans and has been implicated in gut-related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Here we analysed the ability of two R. gnavus human strains, E1 and ATCC 29149, to utilize host glycans. We showed that although both strains could assimilate mucin monosaccharides, only R. gnavus ATCC 29149 was able to grow on mucin as a sole carbon source. Comparative genomic analysis of the two R. gnavus strains highlighted potential clusters and glycoside hydrolases (GHs) responsible for the breakdown and utilization of mucin-derived glycans. Transcriptomic and functional activity assays confirmed the importance of specific GH33 sialidase, and GH29 and GH95 fucosidases in the mucin utilisation pathway. Notably, we uncovered a novel pathway by which R. gnavus ATCC 29149 utilises sialic acid from sialylated substrates. Our results also demonstrated the ability of R. gnavus ATCC 29149 to produce propanol and propionate as the end products of metabolism when grown on mucin and fucosylated glycans. These new findings provide molecular insights into the strain-specificity of R. gnavus adaptation to the gut environment advancing our understanding of the role of gut commensals in health and disease. PMID:24204617

  5. The human gut sterolbiome: bile acid-microbiome endocrine aspects and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S.

    2015-01-01

    The human body is now viewed as a complex ecosystem that on a cellular and gene level is mainly prokaryotic. The mammalian liver synthesizes and secretes hydrophilic primary bile acids, some of which enter the colon during the enterohepatic circulation, and are converted into numerous hydrophobic metabolites which are capable of entering the portal circulation, returned to the liver, and in humans, accumulating in the biliary pool. Bile acids are hormones that regulate their own synthesis, transport, in addition to glucose and lipid homeostasis, and energy balance. The gut microbial community through their capacity to produce bile acid metabolites distinct from the liver can be thought of as an “endocrine organ” with potential to alter host physiology, perhaps to their own favor. We propose the term “sterolbiome” to describe the genetic potential of the gut microbiome to produce endocrine molecules from endogenous and exogenous steroids in the mammalian gut. The affinity of secondary bile acid metabolites to host nuclear receptors is described, the potential of secondary bile acids to promote tumors, and the potential of bile acids to serve as therapeutic agents are discussed. PMID:26579434

  6. Changes of the human gut microbiome induced by a fermented milk product

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Patrick; Pons, Nicolas; Agrawal, Anurag; Oozeer, Raish; Guyonnet, Denis; Brazeilles, Rémi; Faurie, Jean-Michel; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Houghton, Lesley A.; Whorwell, Peter J.; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Kennedy, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) consists of resident commensals and transient microbes conveyed by the diet but little is known about the role of the latter on GM homeostasis. Here we show, by a conjunction of quantitative metagenomics, in silico genome reconstruction and metabolic modeling, that consumption of a fermented milk product containing dairy starters and Bifidobacterium animalis potentiates colonic short chain fatty acids production and decreases abundance of a pathobiont Bilophila wadsworthia compared to a milk product in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, n = 28). The GM changes parallel improvement of IBS state, suggesting a role of the fermented milk bacteria in gut homeostasis. Our data challenge the view that microbes ingested with food have little impact on the human GM functioning and rather provide support for beneficial health effects. PMID:25209713

  7. Diversified mcr-1-Harbouring Plasmid Reservoirs Confer Resistance to Colistin in Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Huiyan; Li, Yihui; Li, Zhencui; Gao, Rongsui; Zhang, Han; Wen, Ronghui; Gao, George F.; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colistin is an ultimate line of refuge against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Very recently, the emergence of plasmid-mediated mcr-1 colistin resistance has become a great challenge to global public health, raising the possibility that dissemination of the mcr-1 gene is underestimated and diversified. Here, we report three cases of plasmid-carried MCR-1 colistin resistance in isolates from gut microbiota of diarrhea patients. Structural and functional analyses determined that the colistin resistance is conferred purely by the single mcr-1 gene. Genetic and sequence mapping revealed that mcr-1-harbouring plasmid reservoirs are present in diversity. Together, the data represent the first evidence of diversity in mcr-1-harbouring plasmid reservoirs of human gut microbiota. PMID:27048797

  8. Antimicrobial Use, Human Gut Microbiota and Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Caroline; Manges, Amee R.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials have profound detrimental effects on the structure and diversity of the indigenous intestinal microbiota. These alterations often impair colonization resistance, allowing the establishment and proliferation of C. difficile in the gut. Studies involving animal models have begun to decipher the precise mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates colonization resistance against C. difficile and numerous investigations have described gut microbiota alterations associated with C. difficile colonization or infection in human subjects. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective approach for the treatment of recurrent CDI that allows the restoration of a healthy intestinal ecosystem via infusion of fecal material from a healthy donor. The recovery of the intestinal microbiota after FMT has been examined in a few reports and work is being done to develop custom bacterial community preparations that could be used as a replacement for fecal material. PMID:27025623

  9. Divergence of catalytic mechanism within a glycosidase family provides insight into evolution of carbohydrate metabolism by human gut flora.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Tracey M; Turkenburg, Johan P; Potts, Jennifer R; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J

    2008-10-20

    Enzymatic cleavage of the glycosidic bond yields products in which the anomeric configuration is either retained or inverted. Each mechanism reflects the dispositions of the enzyme functional groups; a facet of which is essentially conserved in 113 glycoside hydrolase (GH) families. We show that family GH97 has diverged significantly, as it contains both inverting and retaining alpha-glycosidases. This reflects evolution of the active center; a glutamate acts as a general base in inverting members, exemplified by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron alpha-glucosidase BtGH97a, whereas an aspartate likely acts as a nucleophile in retaining members. The structure of BtGH97a and its complexes with inhibitors, coupled to kinetic analysis of active-site variants, reveals an unusual calcium ion dependence. 1H NMR analysis shows an inversion mechanism for BtGH97a, whereas another GH97 enzyme from B. thetaiotaomicron, BtGH97b, functions as a retaining alpha-galactosidase. PMID:18848471

  10. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes.

    PubMed

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E; Hemsworth, Glyn R; McKee, Lauren S; Tauzin, Alexandra S; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Kelly, Amelia G; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J; Martens, Eric C; Brumer, Harry

    2014-02-27

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed 'dietary fibre', from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables. Owing to the paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome, our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on the saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut. The xyloglucans (XyGs) are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition have been unclear. Here we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers XyG catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous XyG utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of XyG catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health. PMID:24463512

  11. In Vitro Method To Assess Soil Arsenic Metabolism by Human Gut Microbiota: Arsenic Speciation and Distribution.

    PubMed

    Yin, Naiyi; Zhang, Zhennan; Cai, Xiaolin; Du, Huili; Sun, Guoxin; Cui, Yanshan

    2015-09-01

    Arsenic (As) speciation and distribution are two important factors in assessing human health risk from As-contaminated soil. In this study, we used the combination of physiologically based extraction test (PBET) and Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME) to determine soil As metabolism by human gut microbiota. The results showed that the percentage of soil arsenate [As(V)] transformation reached 22.1-38.2%, while that of arsenite [As(III)] attained 66.5-92.0%; 30.1-56.4% of As(V) transformed was attached to the soil solid phase. In comparison to sequential extraction results, almost all amorphous Fe/Al-oxide-bound As was liberated in the colon phase. An X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) showed that the As(III) percentage in the soil solid phase reached 16.6-26.9% and reached 73.4% (soil 1) in the colon phase. Additionally, plenty of As(III) and different extents of methylation were also observed in colon extraction solution. As bioaccessibility in the colon phase was 1.8-2.8 times that in the small intestinal phase. Our results indicated that human gut microbiota increased As bioaccessibility, and large amounts of As(III) were adsorbed onto the soil solid phase as a result of microbial reduction. Determining As speciation and distribution in extraction solution and soil solid phases will allow for an accurate assessment of the risk to human health upon soil As exposure. PMID:26248026

  12. Metaproteomics Reveals Functional Shifts in Microbial and Human Proteins During Infant Gut Colonization Case

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Jacque C.; Pan, Chongle; Adams, Rachel M.; Brooks, Brandon; Banfield, Jillian F.; Morowitz, Michael J.; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the human gastrointestinal tract plays an important role in establishing health and homeostasis. However, the time-dependent functional signatures of microbial and human proteins during early colonization of the gut have yet to be determined. Thus, we employed shotgun proteomics to simultaneously monitor microbial and human proteins in fecal samples from a preterm infant during the first month of life. Microbial community complexity and functions increased over time, with compositional changes that were consistent with previous metagenomic and rRNA gene data indicating three distinct colonization phases. Overall microbial community functions were established relatively early in development and remained stable. Human proteins detected included those responsible for epithelial barrier function and antimicrobial activity. Some neutrophil-derived proteins increased in abundance early in the study period, suggesting activation of the innate immune system. Moreover, abundances of cytoskeletal and mucin proteins increased later in the time course, suggestive of subsequent adjustment to the increased microbial load. Our study provides the first snapshot of coordinated human and microbial protein expression in the infant gut during early development.

  13. Metaproteomics Reveals Functional Shifts in Microbial and Human Proteins During Infant Gut Colonization Case

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Young, Jacque C.; Pan, Chongle; Adams, Rachel M.; Brooks, Brandon; Banfield, Jillian F.; Morowitz, Michael J.; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the human gastrointestinal tract plays an important role in establishing health and homeostasis. However, the time-dependent functional signatures of microbial and human proteins during early colonization of the gut have yet to be determined. Thus, we employed shotgun proteomics to simultaneously monitor microbial and human proteins in fecal samples from a preterm infant during the first month of life. Microbial community complexity and functions increased over time, with compositional changes that were consistent with previous metagenomic and rRNA gene data indicating three distinct colonization phases. Overall microbial community functions were established relatively early in development andmore » remained stable. Human proteins detected included those responsible for epithelial barrier function and antimicrobial activity. Some neutrophil-derived proteins increased in abundance early in the study period, suggesting activation of the innate immune system. Moreover, abundances of cytoskeletal and mucin proteins increased later in the time course, suggestive of subsequent adjustment to the increased microbial load. Our study provides the first snapshot of coordinated human and microbial protein expression in the infant gut during early development.« less

  14. Metaproteomics reveals functional shifts in microbial and human proteins during a preterm infant gut colonization case.

    PubMed

    Young, Jacque C; Pan, Chongle; Adams, Rachel M; Brooks, Brandon; Banfield, Jillian F; Morowitz, Michael J; Hettich, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    Microbial colonization of the human gastrointestinal tract plays an important role in establishing health and homeostasis. However, the time-dependent functional signatures of microbial and human proteins during early colonization of the gut have yet to be determined. To this end, we employed shotgun proteomics to simultaneously monitor microbial and human proteins in fecal samples from a preterm infant during the first month of life. Microbial community complexity increased over time, with compositional changes that were consistent with previous metagenomic and rRNA gene data. More specifically, the function of the microbial community initially involved biomass growth, protein production, and lipid metabolism, and then switched to more complex metabolic functions, such as carbohydrate metabolism, once the community stabilized and matured. Human proteins detected included those responsible for epithelial barrier function and antimicrobial activity. Some neutrophil-derived proteins increased in abundance early in the study period, suggesting activation of the innate immune system. Likewise, abundances of cytoskeletal and mucin proteins increased later in the time course, suggestive of subsequent adjustment to the increased microbial load. This study provides the first snapshot of coordinated human and microbial protein expression in a preterm infant's gut during early development. PMID:26077811

  15. The impact of diet and lifestyle on gut microbiota and human health.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Michael A; Bird, Anthony R

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the role of diet and other environmental factors in modulating the composition and metabolic activity of the human gut microbiota, which in turn can impact health. This narrative review explores the relevant contemporary scientific literature to provide a general perspective of this broad area. Molecular technologies have greatly advanced our understanding of the complexity and diversity of the gut microbial communities within and between individuals. Diet, particularly macronutrients, has a major role in shaping the composition and activity of these complex populations. Despite the body of knowledge that exists on the effects of carbohydrates there are still many unanswered questions. The impacts of dietary fats and protein on the gut microbiota are less well defined. Both short- and long-term dietary change can influence the microbial profiles, and infant nutrition may have life-long consequences through microbial modulation of the immune system. The impact of environmental factors, including aspects of lifestyle, on the microbiota is particularly poorly understood but some of these factors are described. We also discuss the use and potential benefits of prebiotics and probiotics to modify microbial populations. A description of some areas that should be addressed in future research is also presented. PMID:25545101

  16. The Impact of Diet and Lifestyle on Gut Microbiota and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Michael A.; Bird, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the role of diet and other environmental factors in modulating the composition and metabolic activity of the human gut microbiota, which in turn can impact health. This narrative review explores the relevant contemporary scientific literature to provide a general perspective of this broad area. Molecular technologies have greatly advanced our understanding of the complexity and diversity of the gut microbial communities within and between individuals. Diet, particularly macronutrients, has a major role in shaping the composition and activity of these complex populations. Despite the body of knowledge that exists on the effects of carbohydrates there are still many unanswered questions. The impacts of dietary fats and protein on the gut microbiota are less well defined. Both short- and long-term dietary change can influence the microbial profiles, and infant nutrition may have life-long consequences through microbial modulation of the immune system. The impact of environmental factors, including aspects of lifestyle, on the microbiota is particularly poorly understood but some of these factors are described. We also discuss the use and potential benefits of prebiotics and probiotics to modify microbial populations. A description of some areas that should be addressed in future research is also presented. PMID:25545101

  17. Reversing Gut Damage in HIV Infection: Using Non-Human Primate Models to Instruct Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Rosalie; Mehraj, Vikram; Ghali, Peter; Couëdel-Courteille, Anne; Cheynier, Rémi; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to dramatic improvements in the lives of HIV-infected persons. However, residual immune activation, which persists despite ART, is associated with increased risk of non-AIDS morbidities. Accumulating evidence shows that disruption of the gut mucosal epithelium during SIV/HIV infections allows translocation of microbial products into the circulation, triggering immune activation. This disruption is due to immune, structural and microbial alterations. In this review, we highlighted the key findings of gut mucosa studies of SIV-infected macaques and HIV-infected humans that have revealed virus-induced changes of intestinal CD4, CD8 T cells, innate lymphoid cells, myeloid cells, and of the local cytokine/chemokine network in addition to epithelial injuries. We review the interplay between the host immune response and the intestinal microbiota, which also impacts disease progression. Collectively, these studies have instructed clinical research on early ART initiation, modifiers of microbiota composition, and recombinant cytokines for restoring gut barrier integrity. PMID:26981570

  18. Long-Term Green Tea Supplementation Does Not Change the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Pilou L. H. R.; Penders, John; Hursel, Rick; Budding, Andries E.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Green tea catechins may play a role in body weight regulation through interactions with the gut microbiota. Aim We examined whether green tea supplementation for 12 weeks induces changes in composition of the human gut microbiota. Methods 58 Caucasian men and women were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled design. For 12 weeks, subjects consumed either green tea (>0.56 g/d epigallocatechin-gallate + 0.28 ∼ 0.45 g/d caffeine) or placebo capsules. Fecal samples were collected twice (baseline, vs. week 12) for analyses of total bacterial profiles by means of IS-profiling, a 16S-23S interspacer region-based profiling method. Results No significant changes between baseline and week 12 in subjects receiving green tea or placebo capsules, and no significant interactions between treatment (green tea or placebo) and time (baseline and week 12) were observed for body composition. Analysis of the fecal samples in subjects receiving green tea and placebo showed similar bacterial diversity and community structures, indicating there were no significant changes in bacterial diversity between baseline and week 12 in subjects receiving green tea capsules or in subjects receiving placebo capsules. No significant interactions were observed between treatment (green tea or placebo) and time (baseline and week 12) for the gut microbial diversity. Although, there were no significant differences between normal weight and overweight subjects in response to green tea, we did observe a reduced bacterial alpha diversity in overweight as compared to normal weight subjects (p = 0.002). Conclusion Green tea supplementation for 12 weeks did not have a significant effect on composition of the gut microbiota. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01556321 PMID:27054321

  19. Pantoea intestinalis sp. nov., isolated from the human gut.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Nimonkar, Yogesh; Vaishampayan, Ankita; Mishra, Mrinal; Kumbhare, Shreyas; Josef, Neetha; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2015-10-01

    A novel bacterial strain, 29Y89BT, was isolated from a faecal sample of a healthy human subject. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, motile, non-spore-forming and rod-shaped. Strain 29Y89BT formed cream-coloured colonies 2 mm in diameter on trypticase soy agar and showed optimum growth at 35 °C. Strain 29Y89BT showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Pantoea gaviniae A18/07T (98.4 %) followed by Pantoea calida 1400/07T (97.2 %). Multi-locus sequence analysis using atpD (ATP synthase β subunit), gyrB (DNA gyrase), infB (initiation translation factor 2) and rpoB (RNA polymerase β subunit) genes also supported the result of 16S rRNA gene sequence based phylogeny. Strain 29Y89BT showed 62 and 40.7 % DNA-DNA relatedness with P. calida DSM 22759T and P. gaviniae DSM 22758T. Strain 29Y89BT contained C17  : 0 cyclo, C19  : 0 cyclo ω8c, C16 : 0, C14 : 0 and C12 : 0 as predominant fatty acids. In addition, strain 29Y89BT showed physiological and phenotypic differences from its closest relatives P. gaviniae DSM 22758T and P. calida DSM 22759T. The polar lipid profile mainly comprised phospholipids. The DNA G+C content was 59.1 mol%. Thus, based on the findings of the current study, strain 29Y89BT showed clear delineations from its closest relatives P. gaviniae DSM 22758T and P. calida DSM 22759T, and is thus considered to represent a novel species of the genus Pantoea, for which the name Pantoea intestinalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 29Y89BT ( = DSM 28113T = MCC 2554T). PMID:26297006

  20. Antibiotics and the Human Gut Microbiome: Dysbioses and Accumulation of Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Francino, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome is overly exposed to antibiotics, due, not only to their medical use, but also to their utilization in farm animals and crops. Microbiome composition can be rapidly altered by exposure to antibiotics, with potential immediate effects on health, for instance through the selection of resistant opportunistic pathogens that can cause acute disease. Microbiome alterations induced by antibiotics can also indirectly affect health in the long-term. The mutualistic microbes in the human body interact with many physiological processes, and participate in the regulation of immune and metabolic homeostasis. Therefore, antibiotic exposure can alter many basic physiological equilibria, promoting long-term disease. In addition, excessive antibiotic use fosters bacterial resistance, and the overly exposed human microbiome has become a significant reservoir of resistance genes, contributing to the increasing difficulty in controlling bacterial infections. Here, the complex relationships between antibiotics and the human microbiome are reviewed, with focus on the intestinal microbiota, addressing (1) the effects of antibiotic use on the composition and function of the gut microbiota, (2) the impact of antibiotic-induced microbiota alterations on immunity, metabolism, and health, and (3) the role of the gut microbiota as a reservoir of antibiotic resistances. PMID:26793178

  1. Development of an Enhanced Metaproteomic Approach for Deepening the Microbiome Characterization of the Human Infant Gut

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of early life microbiota in the human infant gut is highly variable and plays a crucial role in host nutrient availability/uptake and maturation of immunity. Although high-performance mass spectrometry (MS)-based metaproteomics is a powerful method for the functional characterization of complex microbial communities, the acquisition of comprehensive metaproteomic information in human fecal samples is inhibited by the presence of abundant human proteins. To alleviate this restriction, we have designed a novel metaproteomic strategy based on double filtering (DF) the raw samples, a method that fractionates microbial from human cells to enhance microbial protein identification and characterization in complex fecal samples from healthy premature infants. This method dramatically improved the overall depth of infant gut proteome measurement, with an increase in the number of identified low-abundance proteins and a greater than 2-fold improvement in microbial protein identification and quantification. This enhancement of proteome measurement depth enabled a more extensive microbiome comparison between infants by not only increasing the confidence of identified microbial functional categories but also revealing previously undetected categories. PMID:25350865

  2. The human gut virome: inter-individual variation and dynamic response to diet.

    PubMed

    Minot, Samuel; Sinha, Rohini; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Keilbaugh, Sue A; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2011-10-01

    Immense populations of viruses are present in the human gut and other body sites. Understanding the role of these populations (the human "virome") in health and disease requires a much deeper understanding of their composition and dynamics in the face of environmental perturbation. Here, we investigate viromes from human subjects on a controlled feeding regimen. Longitudinal fecal samples were analyzed by metagenomic sequencing of DNA from virus-like particles (VLP) and total microbial communities. Assembly of 336 Mb of VLP sequence yielded 7175 contigs, many identifiable as complete or partial bacteriophage genomes. Contigs were rich in viral functions required in lytic and lysogenic growth, as well as unexpected functions such as viral CRISPR arrays and genes for antibiotic resistance. The largest source of variance among virome samples was interpersonal variation. Parallel deep-sequencing analysis of bacterial populations showed covaration of the virome with the larger microbiome. The dietary intervention was associated with a change in the virome community to a new state, in which individuals on the same diet converged. Thus these data provide an overview of the composition of the human gut virome and associate virome structure with diet. PMID:21880779

  3. In vitro fermentation of alginate and its derivatives by human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaomiao; Li, Guangsheng; Shang, Qingsen; Chen, Xiuxia; Liu, Wei; Pi, Xiong'e; Zhu, Liying; Yin, Yeshi; Yu, Guangli; Wang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Alginate (Alg) has a long history as a food ingredient in East Asia. However, the human gut microbes responsible for the degradation of alginate and its derivatives have not been fully understood yet. Here, we report that alginate and the low molecular polymer derivatives of mannuronic acid oligosaccharides (MO) and guluronic acid oligosaccharides (GO) can be completely degraded and utilized at various rates by fecal microbiota obtained from six Chinese individuals. However, the derivative of propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS) was not hydrolyzed. The bacteria having a pronounced ability to degrade Alg, MO and GO were isolated from human fecal samples and were identified as Bacteroides ovatus, Bacteroides xylanisolvens, and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Alg, MO and GO can increase the production level of short chain fatty acids (SCFA), but GO generates the highest level of SCFA. Our data suggest that alginate and its derivatives could be degraded by specific bacteria in the human gut, providing the basis for the impacts of alginate and its derivates as special food additives on human health. PMID:26891629

  4. Dining in with Trillions of Fascinating Friends: Exploring Our Human Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    Our genetic landscape is a summation of the genes embedded in our human genome and in the genomes of our microbial symbionts (the microbiome). Similarly, our metabolic features (metabotypes) are an amalgamation of human and microbial traits. Therefore, understanding of the range of human genetic and metabolic diversity means that we must characterize our microbiomes, which contain at least several hundred-fold more genes than our human genome, as well as the factors that influence the properties of our microbial communities (microbiota). The results should provide an additional perspective about contemporary human biology as we assess how our changing lifestyles, cultural norms, socioeconomic status, and biosphere are influencing our microbial ecology and health status. I will discuss the results of our group's ongoing metagenomic studies of the interrelationships between diet and the structure and dynamic operations of the human gut microbiome. We believe that understanding these interrelationships is important for advancing our appreciation of the nutritional value of food ingredients, for creating new nutritional guidelines for humans at various stages of their lifespan, and for developing new ways to deliberately manipulate the properties of the gut microbiota to prevent or treat various diseases. We have developed a translational medicine pipeline that involves metagenomic analyses of the gut microbial communities of adult mono- and dizygotic twins living in the USA who are lean, or concordant or discordant for obesity, and twins aged 0–3 years living in developing countries who develop normally, or who become malnourished and are treated with a ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF). Intact fecal communities from these individuals, or ‘personal’ culture collections that capture the majority of bacterial diversity in their microbiota, are then transplanted into germ-free mice, which are fed the diets of the human donors, or systematically manipulated

  5. Immune disorders and its correlation with gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Im, Chang-Rok; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-08-01

    Allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis and asthma are common hyper-immune disorders in industrialized countries. Along with genetic association, environmental factors and gut microbiota have been suggested as major triggering factors for the development of atopic dermatitis. Numerous studies support the association of hygiene hypothesis in allergic immune disorders that a lack of early childhood exposure to diverse microorganism increases susceptibility to allergic diseases. Among the symbiotic microorganisms (e.g. gut flora or probiotics), probiotics confer health benefits through multiple action mechanisms including modification of immune response in gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Although many human clinical trials and mouse studies demonstrated the beneficial effects of probiotics in diverse immune disorders, this effect is strain specific and needs to apply specific probiotics for specific allergic diseases. Herein, we briefly review the diverse functions and regulation mechanisms of probiotics in diverse disorders. PMID:23091436

  6. Direct sequencing of human gut virome fractions obtained by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Džunková, Mária; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Moya, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The sequence assembly of the human gut virome encounters several difficulties. A high proportion of human and bacterial matches is detected in purified viral samples. Viral DNA extraction results in a low DNA concentration, which does not reach the minimal limit required for sequencing library preparation. Therefore, the viromes are usually enriched by whole genome amplification (WGA), which is, however, prone to the development of chimeras and amplification bias. In addition, as there is a very wide diversity of gut viral species, very extensive sequencing efforts must be made for the assembling of whole viral genomes. We present an approach to improve human gut virome assembly by employing a more precise preparation of a viral sample before sequencing. Particles present in a virome previously filtered through 0.2 μm pores were further divided into groups in accordance with their size and DNA content by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). One selected viral fraction was sequenced excluding the WGA step, so that unbiased sequences with high reliability were obtained. The DNA extracted from the 314 viral particles of the selected fraction was assembled into 34 contigs longer than 1,000 bp. This represents an increase to the number of assembled long contigs per sequenced Gb in comparison with other studies where non-fractioned viromes are sequenced. Seven of these contigs contained open reading frames (ORFs) with explicit matches to proteins related to bacteriophages. The remaining contigs also possessed uncharacterized ORFs with bacteriophage-related domains. When the particles that are present in the filtered viromes are sorted into smaller groups by FACS, large pieces of viral genomes can be recovered easily. This approach has several advantages over the conventional sequencing of non-fractioned viromes: non-viral contamination is reduced and the sequencing efforts required for viral assembly are minimized. PMID:26441889

  7. Gnotobiotic mouse model of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alejandro; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Rohwer, Forest L.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (phages) are the most abundant biological group on Earth and are more genetically diverse than their bacterial prey/hosts. To characterize their role as agents shaping gut microbial community structure, adult germ-free mice were colonized with a consortium of 15 sequenced human bacterial symbionts, 13 of which harbored one or more predicted prophages. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, was represented by a library of isogenic transposon mutants that covered 90% of its genes. Once assembled, the community was subjected to a staged phage attack with a pool of live or heat-killed virus-like particles (VLPs) purified from the fecal microbiota of five healthy humans. Shotgun sequencing of DNA from the input pooled VLP preparation plus shotgun sequencing of gut microbiota samples and purified fecal VLPs from the gnotobiotic mice revealed a reproducible nonsimultaneous pattern of attack extending over a 25-d period that involved five phages, none described previously. This system allowed us to (i) correlate increases in specific phages present in the pooled VLPs with reductions in the representation of particular bacterial taxa, (ii) provide evidence that phage resistance occurred because of ecological or epigenetic factors, (iii) track the origin of each of the five phages among the five human donors plus the extent of their genome variation between and within recipient mice, and (iv) establish the dramatic in vivo fitness advantage that a locus within a B. cellulosilyticus prophage confers upon its host. Together, these results provide a defined community-wide view of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the gut. PMID:24259713

  8. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-10-04

    We report that carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specificmore » DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Furthermore, our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.« less

  9. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-10-04

    We report that carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specific DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Furthermore, our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.

  10. Gnotobiotic mouse model of phage-bacterial host dynamics in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alejandro; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P; Rohwer, Forest L; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2013-12-10

    Bacterial viruses (phages) are the most abundant biological group on Earth and are more genetically diverse than their bacterial prey/hosts. To characterize their role as agents shaping gut microbial community structure, adult germ-free mice were colonized with a consortium of 15 sequenced human bacterial symbionts, 13 of which harbored one or more predicted prophages. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, was represented by a library of isogenic transposon mutants that covered 90% of its genes. Once assembled, the community was subjected to a staged phage attack with a pool of live or heat-killed virus-like particles (VLPs) purified from the fecal microbiota of five healthy humans. Shotgun sequencing of DNA from the input pooled VLP preparation plus shotgun sequencing of gut microbiota samples and purified fecal VLPs from the gnotobiotic mice revealed a reproducible nonsimultaneous pattern of attack extending over a 25-d period that involved five phages, none described previously. This system allowed us to (i) correlate increases in specific phages present in the pooled VLPs with reductions in the representation of particular bacterial taxa, (ii) provide evidence that phage resistance occurred because of ecological or epigenetic factors, (iii) track the origin of each of the five phages among the five human donors plus the extent of their genome variation between and within recipient mice, and (iv) establish the dramatic in vivo fitness advantage that a locus within a B. cellulosilyticus prophage confers upon its host. Together, these results provide a defined community-wide view of phage-bacterial host dynamics in the gut. PMID:24259713