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Sample records for human heart disease

  1. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  2. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  3. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  4. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  5. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  6. Proteomics in human disease: cancer, heart and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, P R; Zimny-Arndt, U; Zeindl-Eberhart, E; Stulik, J; Koupilova, K; Pleissner, K P; Otto, A; Müller, E C; Sokolowska-Köhler, W; Grabher, G; Stöffler, G

    1999-07-01

    In recent years, genomics has increased the understanding of many diseases. Proteomics is a rapidly growing research area that encompasses both genetic and environmental factors. The protein composition represents the functional status of a biological compartment. The five approaches presented here resulted in the detection of disease-associated proteins. Calgranulin B was upregulated in colorectal cancer, and hepatoma-derived aldose reductase-like protein was reexpressed in a rat model during hepatocarcinogenesis. In these two investigations, attention was focused on one protein, obviously differing in amount, directly after two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Additional methods, such as enzyme activity measurements and immunohistochemistry, confirmed the disease association of the two candidates resulting from 2-DE subtractive analysis. The following three investigations take advantage of the holistic potential of the 2-DE approach. The comparison of 2-DE patterns from dilated cardiomyopathy patients with those of controls revealed 25 statistically significant intensity differences, from which 12 were identified by amino acid analysis, Edman degradation or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). A human myocardial 2-DE database was constructed, containing 3300 protein spots and 150 identified protein species. The number of identified proteins was limited by the capacity of our group, rather than by the principle of feasibility. Another field where proteomics proves to be a valuable tool in identifying proteins of importance for diagnosis is proteome analysis of pathogenic microorganisms such as Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease) and Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis). Sera from patients with early or late symptoms of Lyme borreliosis contained antibodies of various classes against about 80 antigens each, containing the already described antigens OspA, B and C, flagellin, p83/100, and p39. Similarly, antibody reactivity to

  7. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart ...

  8. Heart disease is common in humans and chimpanzees, but is caused by different pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Varki, Nissi; Anderson, Dan; Herndon, James G; Pham, Tho; Gregg, Christopher J; Cheriyan, Monica; Murphy, James; Strobert, Elizabeth; Fritz, Jo; Else, James G; Varki, Ajit

    2009-02-01

    Heart disease is common in both humans and chimpanzees, manifesting typically as sudden cardiac arrest or progressive heart failure. Surprisingly, although chimpanzees are our closest evolutionary relatives, the major cause of heart disease is different in the two species. Histopathology data of affected chimpanzee hearts from two primate centers, and analysis of literature indicate that sudden death in chimpanzees (and in gorillas and orangutans) is commonly associated with diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis of unknown cause. In contrast, most human heart disease results from coronary artery atherosclerosis, which occludes myocardial blood supply, causing ischemic damage. The typical myocardial infarction of humans due to coronary artery thrombosis is rare in these apes, despite their human-like coronary-risk-prone blood lipid profiles. Instead, chimpanzee 'heart attacks' are likely due to arrythmias triggered by myocardial fibrosis. Why do humans not often suffer from the fibrotic heart disease so common in our closest evolutionary cousins? Conversely, why do chimpanzees not have the kind of heart disease so common in humans? The answers could be of value to medical care, as well as to understanding human evolution. A preliminary attempt is made to explore possibilities at the histological level, with a focus on glycosylation changes. PMID:25567850

  9. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  10. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common ...

  11. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most common type of heart ... heart information http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/heart-disease.html New Heart Guidelines Released; Talk to ...

  12. mga genosensor for early detection of human rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Kaushal, Ankur; Khare, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-05-01

    The 5' amino-labeled DNA probe complementary to mga gene of Streptococcus pyogenes was immobilized on carboxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes electrode and hybridized with 0.1-100 ng/6 μl single-stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) of S. pyogenes from throat swab of suspected rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients. Electrochemical response was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and electrochemical impedance (EI). The sensitivity of the sensor was 106.03 (μA/cm(2))/ng and limit of detection (LOD) was found 0.014 ng/6 μl with regression coefficient (R(2)) of 0.921 using DPV. The genosensor was characterized by FTIR and SEM, and electrode was found stable for 6 months on storage at 4 °C with 5-6 % loss in initial DPV current. mga genosensor is the first report on RHD sensor which can save life of several suspected patients by early diagnosis in 30 min. PMID:24639090

  13. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ... Some people who have diabetic heart disease have no signs or symptoms of ...

  14. [Induction of myocardial neoangiogenesis by human growth factors. A new therapeutic approach in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Stegmann, T J; Hoppert, T; Schneider, A; Gemeinhardt, S; Köcher, M; Ibing, R; Strupp, G

    2000-09-01

    Currently available approaches for treating human coronary heart disease aim to relieve symptoms and the risk of myocardial infarction either by reducing myocardial oxygen demand, preventing further disease progression, restoring coronary blood flow pharmacologically or mechanically, or bypassing the stenotic lesions and obstructed coronary artery segments. Gene therapy, especially using angiogenic growth factors, has emerged recently as a potential new treatment for cardiovascular disease. Following extensive experimental research on angiogenic growth factors, the first clinical studies on patients with coronary heart disease and peripheral vascular lesions have been performed. The polypeptides fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) appear to be particularly effective in initiating neovascularization (neoangiogenesis) in hypoxic or ischemic tissues. The first clinical study on patients with coronary heart disease treated by local intramyocardial injection of FGF-1 showed a 3-fold increase of capillary density mediated by the growth factor. Also, angiogenic growth factor injection intramyocardially as sole therapy for end-stage coronary disease showed an improvement of myocardial perfusion in the target areas as well as a reduction of symptoms and an increase in working capacity. Angiogenic therapy of the human myocardium introduces a new modality of treatment for coronary heart disease in terms of regulation of blood vessel growth. Beyond drug therapy, angioplasty and bypass surgery, this new approach may evolve into a fourth principle of treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:11076317

  15. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  17. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  18. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  19. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or rhythms The treatment of choice for most congenital heart diseases is surgery to repair the defect . There are ... Some inherited factors may play a role in congenital heart disease. Many family members may be affected. If you ...

  20. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  1. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  2. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  3. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  4. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on this ... may help you live a longer, healthier life. Risk Factors You Cannot Change Some of your heart ...

  5. Epidemiological aspects of heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Tao, Ziqi; Wei, Peng; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the main cause of mortality in heart patients following stroke, rheumatic heart disease and myocardial infarctions. Approximately 80% of individuals succumb to CVDs, due to poor living conditions in low and middle income families and malnutrition. Infectious diseases, human immunodeficiency, tuberculosis, malaria, high blood pressure or hypertension, obesity and overweight, and nutritional disorders including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high salt and sugar intake, as well as other factors are responsible for CVDs and CHDs in young as well as elderly individuals. The focus of the present review are recent epidemiological aspects of CVD and CHD as well as the usefulness of a Mediterranean diet for heart patients and the prevention of heart diseases. PMID:27602082

  6. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  7. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... or both arms, the neck, jaw, or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) — ...

  8. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  9. Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Women Share: Print Page Text Size: A A ... heart-and-circulation, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Women Coronary Heart Disease Sexual Health Women and ...

  10. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... very fast, but steady, heartbeat. Sick Sinus Syndrome ( SSS ) Sick sinus syndrome is not a disease, but ... the sinus node, is not working properly. In SSS , the heart rate can alternate between slow ( bradycardia ) ...

  11. Anthocyanins and heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins are red, blue, and purple pigments distributed throughout nature, and in our diet. One potential health benefit of dietary anthocyanins is protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence for beneficial effects of anthocyanins with respect to heart disease comes from epidemio...

  12. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes Educators JDRF American Heart Association MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this ...

  13. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... leading killer of women over age 25. It kills nearly twice as many women in the United States as all types of cancer. Men have a greater risk for heart disease earlier in life than women. Women's risk increases after menopause. EARLY ...

  14. Coordinating Electrical Activity of the Heart: Ankyrin Polypeptides in Human Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Mohler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Over the past ten years, ankyrin polypeptides have emerged as critical players in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Once thought to solely play only a structural role, loss-of-function variants in genes encoding ankyrin polypeptides have highlighted how this protein mediates the proper subcellular localization of the various electrical components of the excitation-contraction coupling machinery. A large body of evidence has revealed how the disruption of this localization is the primary cause of various cardiomyopathies, ranging from long QT syndrome 4, to sinus node disease, to more common forms of arrhythmias. Areas Covered This review details the varied roles that ankyrin polypeptides play in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and the development of ankyrin-specific cardiomyopathies. It will further discuss how ankyrin polypeptides may be involved in structural and electrical remodeling of the heart, post-myocardial infarct. Attention is given to how ankyrin interactions with membrane bound ion channels may regulate these channels’ response to stimuli. Special attention is given to exciting new data, which may offer the potential for unique therapies, for not only combating heart disease, but which also holds promise for wider applications to various disease states. Expert Opinion The ankyrin family of adapter proteins is emerging as an intimate player in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Until recently, these proteins have gone largely unappreciated for their importance in proper cardiac function. New insights into how these proteins function within the heart are offering potentially new avenues for therapies against cardiomyopathy. PMID:21457127

  15. Human care system for heart-rate and human-movement trajectory in home and its application to detect mental disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Yutaka; Kanazawa, Seigo; Endo, Maki; Tsuchiya, Naoki; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a heart rate monitoring system for detecting autonomic nervous system by the heart rate variability using an air pressure sensor to diagnose mental disease. Moreover, we propose a human behavior monitoring system for detecting the human trajectory in home by an infrared camera. In day and night times, the human behavior monitoring system detects the human movement in home. The heart rate monitoring system detects the heart rate in bed in night time. The air pressure sensor consists of a rubber tube, cushion cover and pressure sensor, and it detects the heart rate by setting it to bed. It unconstraintly detects the RR-intervals; thereby the autonomic nervous system can be assessed. The autonomic nervous system analysis can examine the mental disease. While, the human behavior monitoring system obtains distance distribution image by an infrared camera. It classifies adult, child and the other object from distance distribution obtained by the camera, and records their trajectories. This behavior, i.e., trajectory in home, strongly corresponds to cognitive disorders. Thus, the total system can detect mental disease and cognitive disorders by uncontacted sensors to human body.

  16. Long-Time Autocorrelation Function of ECG Signal for Healthy versus Diseased Human Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulessa, B.; Srokowski, T.; Drozdz, S.

    2003-01-01

    Long-time ECG time series for healthy subjects and diseased patients are analysed. In the first case, the power spectrum has the 1/f shape in a broad frequency range. However, its behaviour for very low and very high frequency is different and the entire spectrum is integrable. For patients with post-ictal heart rate oscillation in partial epilepsy the 1/f noise is not present. We determine the power spectrum by evaluating the Fourier transform of the signal in both cases and calculate the signal autocorrelation function. It falls with time faster for diseased patients then for healthy people. The presented method can serve as a diagnostic tool of some heart diseases.

  17. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this page: ... stroke. [Top] What is the connection between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? If you have diabetes, you ...

  18. Income and heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the unadjusted and adjusted effects of income on heart disease; its main disease intermediary, high blood pressure; and its main behavioural risk factors, smoking and physical inactivity. Design Random-digit dialing telephone survey collected through the Canadian Community Health Survey by Statistics Canada. Setting Saskatchewan. Participants A total of 27 090 residents aged 20 years and older; each health region in Saskatchewan was represented. Main outcome measures Overall, 178 variables related to demographic characteristics, socioeconomic factors, behaviour, life stress, disease intermediaries, health outcomes, and access to health care were analyzed to determine their unadjusted and adjusted effects on heart disease. Results The mean age of the sample was 52.6 years. Women represented 55.9% of the sample. Most respondents were married (52.3%) and had some postsecondary or graduate education (52.5%). The mean personal income was $23 931 and the mean household income was $37 533. All models statistically controlled for age. Five covariates independently associated with heart disease included high blood pressure, household income of $29 999 or less per year, being a daily smoker, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with high blood pressure included being overweight or obese, being a daily smoker, household income of $29 999 or less per year, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with daily smoking included being a visible minority, household income of $29 999 or less per year, not being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, and male sex. Six covariates independently associated with physical inactivity included being a visible minority, being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, male sex, household income of $29 999 or less per year, and being a daily smoker. Conclusion Household

  19. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition (PDF) Obesity (PDF) Peripheral Artery Disease (PDF) ... statistics, please contact the American Heart Association National Center, Office of Science & Medicine at statistics@heart.org . Please direct all ...

  20. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes or prediabetes ... can help prevent future health problems. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way our ...

  1. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  2. Characterization of human bone morphogenetic protein gene variants for possible roles in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei Feng; Deng, Xia; Zhou, Jing; Yan, Peng; Zhao, Er Ying; Liu, Shu Lin

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a complex illness with high rates of morbidity and mortality. In embryonic development, the heart is the first formed organ, which is strictly controlled by gene regulatory networks, including transcription factors, signaling pathways, epigenetic factors and microRNAs. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are essential in cardiogenesis as they can induce the expression of transcription factors, NKX2-5 and GATA binding protein 4, which are important in the development of the heart. The inhibition of BMP-2 and 4- inhibits the late expression of NKX2-5 and affects cardiac differentiation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BMP-2 and -4 variations may be associated with CHD in Chinese Han populations. The rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are genetic variations located within the translated region of the BMP-2 and -4, were evaluated in 230 patients with CHD from the Chinese Han population and 160 non CHD control individuals. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 test, implemented using SPSS software (version 13.0). The Hardy Weinberg equilibrium test was performed on the population using online Online Encyclopedia for Genetic Epidemiology studies software, and multiple-sequence alignments of the BMP proteins were performed using Vector NTI software. No statistically significant associations were identified between these genetic variations and the risk of CHD (rs1049007, P value=0.560; rs235768, P value=0.972; rs17563, P value=0.787). In addition, no correlation was found between the patients with CHD and the non-CHD control individuals. Therefore, the rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 genetic variations of BMP-2 were not associated with CHD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27357418

  3. Characterization of human bone morphogenetic protein gene variants for possible roles in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Feng; Deng, Xia; Zhou, Jing; Yan, Peng; Zhao, Er-Ying; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a complex illness with high rates of morbidity and mortality. In embryonic development, the heart is the first formed organ, which is strictly controlled by gene regulatory networks, including transcription factors, signaling pathways, epigenetic factors and microRNAs. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are essential in cardiogenesis as they can induce the expression of transcription factors, NKX2‑5 and GATA binding protein 4, which are important in the development of the heart. The inhibition of BMP‑2 and ‑4 inhibits the late expression of NKX2-5 and affects cardiac differentiation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BMP-2 and ‑4 variations may be associated with CHD in Chinese Han populations. The rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are genetic variations located within the translated region of the BMP-2 and -4, were evaluated in 230 patients with CHD from the Chinese Han population and 160 non-CHD control individuals. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 test, implemented using SPSS software (version 13.0). The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test was performed on the population using online Online Encyclopedia for Genetic Epidemiology studies software, and multiple-sequence alignments of the BMP proteins were performed using Vector NTI software. No statistically significant associations were identified between these genetic variations and the risk of CHD (rs1049007, P‑value=0.560; rs235768, P‑value=0.972; rs17563, P‑value=0.787). In addition, no correlation was found between the patients with CHD and the non‑CHD control individuals. Therefore, the rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 genetic variations of BMP-2 were not associated with CHD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27357418

  4. Mutations in NTRK3 suggest a novel signaling pathway in human congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Petra; Paluru, Prasuna; Simpson, Anisha M.; Latney, Brande; Iyer, Radhika; Brodeur, Garrett M.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common major birth defects and the leading cause of death from congenital malformations. The etiology remains largely unknown, though genetic variants clearly contribute. In a previous study, we identified a large copy number variant (CNV) that deleted 46 genes in a patient with a malalignment type ventricular septal defect (VSD). The CNV included the gene NTRK3 encoding neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor C (TrkC), which is essential for normal cardiogenesis in animal models. To evaluate the role of NTRK3 in human CHDs, we studied 467 patients with related heart defects for NTRK3 mutations. We identified four missense mutations in four patients with VSDs that were not found in ethnically matched controls and were predicted to be functionally deleterious. Functional analysis using neuroblastoma cell lines expressing mutant TrkC demonstrated that one of the mutations (c.278C>T, p.T93M) significantly reduced autophosphorylation of TrkC in response to ligand binding, subsequently decreasing phosphorylation of downstream target proteins. In addition compared to WT, three of the four cell lines expressing mutant TrkC showed altered cell growth in low-serum conditions without supplemental NT-3. These findings suggest a novel pathophysiological mechanism involving NTRK3 in the development of VSDs. PMID:25196463

  5. Heart disease and intimacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ... document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). ...

  6. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. Treatment of hypertension ...

  7. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  8. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Answers by Heart Fact Sheets Learn and live with our downloadable patient information sheets . Dozens of topics in a question-and-answer format that's brief, easy to follow and easy to read. ... Sodium and Salt 3 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 4 What are the Symptoms of ...

  9. Brief Report: Oxidative Stress Mediates Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis in a Human Model of Danon Disease and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Sherin I.; Perry, Cynthia N.; Bauer, Matthieu; Han, Sangyoon; Clegg, Stacey D.; Ouyang, Kunfu; Deacon, Dekker C.; Spinharney, Mary; Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Frazer, Kelly A.; Chen, Ju; Gong, Qiuming; Zhou, Zhengfeng; Chi, Neil C.; Adler, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Danon disease is a familial cardiomyopathy associated with impaired autophagy due to mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal-associated membrane protein type 2 (LAMP-2). Emerging evidence has highlighted the importance of autophagy in regulating cardiomyocyte bioenergetics, function, and survival. However, the mechanisms responsible for cellular dysfunction and death in cardiomyocytes with impaired autophagic flux remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for Danon disease, we created induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from two patients with different LAMP-2 mutations. Danon iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) exhibited impaired autophagic flux and key features of heart failure such as increased cell size, increased expression of natriuretic peptides, and abnormal calcium handling compared to control iPSC-CMs. Additionally, Danon iPSC-CMs demonstrated excessive amounts of mitochondrial oxidative stress and apoptosis. Using the sulfhydryl antioxidant N-acetylcysteine to scavenge free radicals resulted in a significant reduction in apoptotic cell death in Danon iPSC-CMs. In summary, we have modeled Danon disease using human iPSC-CMs from patients with mutations in LAMP-2, allowing us to gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of this disease. We demonstrate that LAMP-2 deficiency leads to an impairment in autophagic flux, which results in excessive oxidative stress, and subsequent cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Scavenging excessive free radicals with antioxidants may be beneficial for patients with Danon disease. In vivo studies will be necessary to validate this new treatment strategy. PMID:25826782

  10. Infections, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Famularo, G; Trinchieri, V; Santini, G; De Simone, C

    2000-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the immune response is involved in atherosclerosis. Studies done over the past several years have shown an association between markers of inflammation and coronary atherosclerosis with an exacerbation of the inflammatory process during acute myocardial ischemia. Overall, these data have greatly renewed interest in the infectious theory of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Search of bibliographic databases (from January 1991 through December 1999) and manual scanning of both peer-reviewed publications and other documents were used to identify pertinent literature. Infections and coronary heart disease were indexed as key words. A large number of studies have reported an association of human coronary heart disease and certain persistent bacterial and viral infections. The association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and coronary heart disease appears quite significant although the sequence of infection and disease is uncertain. The association between Helicobacter pylori and coronary heart disease may be accounted for by residual confounding from classic risk factors. Preliminary findings indicate that this association could be due to a higher prevalence of more virulent Helicobacter strains. Infection with Cytomegalovirus appears to be associated with a greater risk of restenosis after angioplasty rather than primary atherosclerosis. Early trials of appropriate antibiotic therapy in subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction have been encouraging. A causal relationship between infections and coronary heart disease is still elusive. Improved studies involving prospective collection of data are required to demonstrate such an association with potential implications for public health worldwide. PMID:10920505

  11. Beri-Beri Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gubbay, Eric R.

    1966-01-01

    Beri-beri heart disease is a distinctive clinical entity which must be distinguished from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and other forms of heart disease in chronic alcoholics. A 27-year-old man is described who for six months before the onset of symptoms of right heart failure—admitted to hospital with dyspnea and pitting edema in the lower limbs and over the sacrum—had lived over a tavern and consumed 24 pints of beer daily. The pathophysiology of beri-beri heart disease includes right heart failure, edema and peripheral vasodilatation in the muscular bed. These features were described by Wenckebach and others as early as 1928. Within the main entity, beri-beri heart disease, a number of sub-groups with special features and prognosis such as acute pernicious beri-beri have been described. Beri-beri heart disease is due to vitamin B1 deficiency and is curable if this deficiency is corrected in time. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2aFig. 2b PMID:5940785

  12. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  13. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jamal A, Homa DH, O’Connor E, Babb SD, Caraballo RS, Singh T, et al. Current cigarette ... Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your Risk Factors Phenomics Research on Coronary Heart Disease Based on Human Phenotype Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Gao, Kuo; Zhao, Huihui; Wang, Juan; Zhai, Xing; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of holistic, dynamics, complexity, and spatial and temporal features enable “Omics” and theories of TCM to interlink with each other. HPO, namely, “characterization,” can be understood as a sorting and generalization of the manifestations shown by people with diseases on the basis of the phenomics. Syndrome is the overall “manifestation” of human body pathological and physiological changes expressed by four diagnostic methods' information. The four diagnostic methods' data could be the most objective and direct manifestations of human body under morbid conditions. In this aspect, it is consistent with the connation of “characterization.” Meanwhile, the four diagnostic methods' data also equip us with features of characterization in HPO. In our study, we compared 107 pieces of four diagnostic methods' information with the “characterization database” to further analyze data of four diagnostic methods' characterization in accordance with the common characteristics of four diagnostic methods' information and characterization and integrated 107 pieces of four diagnostic methods' data to relevant items in HPO and finished the expansion of characterization information in HPO. PMID:25610858

  14. Being active when you have heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or ...

  15. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... obesity and metabolic syndrome —interact to cause harmful physical changes to the heart. Third, diabetes raises the risk ... outlook. The good news is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, physical activity can lower your blood pressure, help control ...

  16. ALOHA to women's heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Kimberly J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the American Heart Association, ALOHA program. ALOHA is a multidisciplinary approach to helping lay people and clinicians determine the best course of action for managing cardiac risk factors in women. ALOHA, an acronym that stands for designated interventions based on individualized assessment of patients, along with the Framingham risk assessment calculator, allows health care providers with their patients to individualize treatment for heart disease and management of risk factors. PMID:16699352

  17. Cardiac telocytes in normal and diseased hearts.

    PubMed

    Kostin, Sawa

    2016-07-01

    Our previous studies suggested that an important variable of the progression of contractile dysfunction to terminal heart failure is the imbalance between myocyte cell death and myocyte renewal. For this reason, preventing myocyte cell death and an increasing generation of new myocytes may represent attractive targets in the treatment of human heart failure. Prospective clues to enhance myocardial regeneration are the newly discovered cells termed telocytes, formerly called interstitial Cajal-like cells, which are believed to nurse or guide the endogenous and exogenous stem cells for activation and commitment, but they also act as supporting cells for progenitor cells migration toward injured myocardium. We have recently found that telocytes are reduced in the diseased and failing myocardium. Importantly, the imbalance between telocyte proliferation and telocyte death is responsible for the telocytes depletion in cardiac diseases leading to heart failure. We have also demonstrated that telocytes are influenced by the extracellular matrix protein composition such that the telocytes are almost absent in areas of severe fibrosis. It is plausible that the reduction in telocytes in diseased human hearts could participate in the abnormal three-dimensional spatial organization and disturbed intercellular signalling of the myocardium. Decreased telocytes in diseased hearts would also be predicted to alter the property of telocytes to maintain cardiac stem cell niche by decreasing the pool of cardiac stem cells and thereby impairing cardiac regeneration. PMID:26912117

  18. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders Overall, Asian American adults are less likely ... Disease Death Rates per 100,000 (2013) Asians/Pacific Islanders Non-Hispanic White Asians/Pacific Islanders /Non- ...

  19. Biomarkers and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, R-R; Lu, L; Liu, M; Cao, Y; Li, X-C; Liu, H; Wang, J; Zhang, P-Y

    2014-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) results from the impaired ability of heart to fill or pump out blood. HF is a common health problem with a multitude of causes and affects ~30 million people worldwide. Since ageing is a major risk factor for HF and as several treatment options are currently available to prolong the patients' survival, the number of affected patients is expected to grow. Even though traditional methods of assessment have been in use for managing HF, these are limited by time consuming and costly subjective interpretation and also by their invasive nature. Comparatively, biomarkers offer an objective and biologically relevant information that in conjunction with the patients' clinical findings provides optimal picture regarding the status of the HF patient and thus helps in diagnosis and prognosis. The current gold standard biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of HF are B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP). Additional novel biomarkers (e.g., mid-regional pro atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), mid-regional pro adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), troponins, soluble ST2 (sST2), growth differentiation factor (GDF)-15 and galectin-3) can potentially identify different pathophysiological processes such as myocardial insult, inflammation and remodeling as the causes for the development and progression of HF. Different biomarkers of HF not only reflect the underlying mechanisms/pathways of HF and also its progression and also point specific therapy options. A multi-biomarker approach for personalized medical care is not too far fetched and such approach can greatly enhance diagnosis, prognostication, and therapy guidance for HF. In this review we describe the current status of HF biomarkers in clinical use and in laboratory research and the efforts aimed at the identification of novel biomarkers for HF. PMID:25339488

  1. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. It’s a natural phase of a woman’s life cycle,” Dr. Goldberg said. “It’s important for women, as ... emphasizes: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish and nuts, while limiting red meat ...

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-11-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml-1 with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml-1.

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com

    2014-11-24

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml{sup −1}.

  4. Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2016-01-01

    Classical angina refers to typical substernal discomfort triggered by effort or emotions, relieved with rest or nitroglycerin. The well-accepted pathogenesis is an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. Goals in therapy are improvement in quality of life by limiting the number and severity of attacks, protection against future lethal events, and measures to lower the burden of risk factors to slow disease progression. New pathophysiological data, drugs, as well as conceptual and technological advances have improved patient care over the past decade. Behavioral changes to improve diets, increase physical activity, and encourage adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs, are difficult to achieve but are effective. PMID:26567972

  5. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159387.html Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans Better control of risk factors such as smoking, ... new study reports. Federal researchers found that fewer Americans over 40 have coronary heart disease. The rate ...

  6. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  7. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  8. MedlinePlus: Heart Diseases--Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Tests Cholesterol Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Heart-Health Screenings (American Heart Association) hs-CRP Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease ...

  9. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National Symbol The centerpiece of The Heart Truth ® is The Red Dress ® which was introduced ...

  10. Endothelial mitochondria and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sean Michael

    2010-10-01

    The endothelium is vital to the proper functioning in the heart, in particular due to its production of nitric oxide (NO) which regulates vascular tone. Damage to the endothelium contributes to the development of atherosclerosis, and hence to possible myocardial infarction and subsequent heart failure. Like most cells, endothelial cells contain mitochondria, despite their having relatively little dependence on oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production. However, endothelial mitochondria are centrally involved in maintaining the fine regulatory balance between mitochondrial calcium concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and NO. This raises the question of whether damage to endothelial mitochondria would have repercussions in terms of the development of heart disease. In fact, increasingly nuanced techniques enabling restricted transgenic expression of antioxidant proteins in mice has demonstrated that mitochondrial ROS do contribute to endothelial damage. New pharmaceutical approaches designed to target protective molecules such as ROS scavengers to the mitochondria promise to be effective in preventing heart disease. As well as protecting cardiomyocytes, these drugs may have the added benefit of preventing damage to the endothelial mitochondria. However, much remains to be done in understanding the contribution that mitochondria make to endothelial function. PMID:20558442

  11. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  12. Hydatid disease of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Calamai, G.; Perna, A. M.; Venturini, A.

    1974-01-01

    Calamai, G., Perna, A. M., and Venturini, A. (1974).Thorax, 29, 451-458. Hydatid disease of the heart: report of five cases and review of the literature. The world literature on the surgical treatment of echinococcosis of the heart is reviewed. Few cases are surgically treated, although the disease has been known for a long time. Localization to the liver and lungs is the most frequent. Cardiopulmonary bypass techniques make possible surgical treatment of hydatid cyst of the heart. The present paper is concerned with five cases operated upon between 1959 and 1969, three males and two females, their ages ranging from 13 to 46 years. A preoperative diagnosis was made in each case. One case was operated upon under cardiopulmonary bypass. The need for cardiopulmonary bypass on a stand-by basis is emphasized. The localization of the hydatid cyst was in the left ventricular wall (three cases), right ventricular wall (one case), and multiple (one case). The frequency of cardiac echinococcosis ranges between 0·5% and 2% according to various authors. Diagnosis is achieved with the aid of laboratory tests, radiology, and angiography; but the presence of the disease must be suspected in all patients who come from endemic areas. Surgical therapy is mandatory. Due to the growth characteristics of the cyst itself, the danger of damaging the ventricular wall at operation is increased; thus it is essential to have cardiopulmonary bypass facilities immediately available. Images PMID:4277513

  13. Pathophysiology of valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, YI; SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEIYING

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is caused by either damage or defect in one of the four heart valves, aortic, mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary. Defects in these valves can be congenital or acquired. Age, gender, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and type II diabetes contribute to the risk of disease. VHD is an escalating health issue with a prevalence of 2.5% in the United States alone. Considering the likely increase of the aging population worldwide, the incidence of acquired VHD is expected to increase. Technological advances are instrumental in identifying congenital heart defects in infants, thereby adding to the growing VHD population. Almost one-third of elderly individuals have echocardiographic or radiological evidence of calcific aortic valve (CAV) sclerosis, an early and subclinical form of CAV disease (CAVD). Of individuals ages >60, ~2% suffer from disease progression to its most severe form, calcific aortic stenosis. Surgical intervention is therefore required in these patients as no effective pharmacotherapies exist. Valvular calcium load and valve biomineralization are orchestrated by the concerted action of diverse cell-dependent mechanisms. Signaling pathways important in skeletal morphogenesis are also involved in the regulation of cardiac valve morphogenesis, CAVD and the pathobiology of cardiovascular calcification. CAVD usually occurs without any obvious symptoms in early stages over a long period of time and symptoms are identified at advanced stages of the disease, leading to a high rate of mortality. Aortic valve replacement is the only primary treatment of choice. Biomarkers such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, fetuin-A, calcium phosphate product, natriuretic peptides and osteopontin have been useful in improving outcomes among various disease states. This review, highlights the current understanding of the biology of VHD, with particular reference to molecular and cellular aspects of its regulation. Current clinical questions

  14. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  15. Thyroid Disease and the Heart.

    PubMed

    Klein, Irwin; Danzi, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid hormones have an intimate relationship with cardiac function. Some of the most significant clinical signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are the cardiac manifestations. In both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, the characteristic physiological effects of thyroid hormone can be understood from the actions at the molecular and cellular level. Here we explore topics from the metabolism and cellular effects of thyroid hormone to special considerations related to statin and amiodarone therapy for the alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism that accompany heart disease. PMID:26792255

  16. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve ... your doctor if you have symptoms of infective endocarditis (IE). Symptoms of this heart infection include fever, ...

  17. Targeting the unfolded protein response in heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C

    2016-01-01

    In neurological disease and diabetes, the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been investigated for years, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. All three branches of the UPR are involved in ischaemia/reperfusion and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease. PMID:24865516

  18. Critical congenital heart disease screening

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  19. Critical congenital heart disease screening.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a heart lesion for which neonates require early surgical intervention to survive. Without intervention, the rates of mortality and survival with significant disability are extremely high. Early diagnosis can potentially improve health outcomes in newborns with CCHD. Until recent years, no routine screening protocol existed. In the last few years, pulse oximetry screening for CCHD in newborns has been added to the list of recommended uniform screening panels and advocated by several health-care authorities. A positive screening test result warrants an echocardiogram to evaluate for CCHD. Newborn screens do not usually require parental consent. However, most of the states mandates in the United States include a statement allowing exemption from the screen on the basis of parental religious or personal beliefs. PMID:27390667

  20. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Distribution and role of gap junctions in normal myocardium and human ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Green, C R; Severs, N J

    1993-02-01

    the presence of large junctions arranged as a peripheral ring around the disk, with smaller junctions in an interior zone: an arrangement that may facilitate efficient intercellular transfer of current. By applying our immunolabelling techniques to tissue from hearts removed from transplant patients with advanced ischaemic heart disease, we have demonstrated that gap junction distribution between myocytes at the border zone of healed infarcts is markedly disordered. This abnormality may contribute to the genesis of reentrant arrhythmias in ischaemic heart disease. PMID:8478212

  1. [The lung in heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Sill, V

    1990-02-01

    The effects of "hypocirculation" and "hypercirculation" of the lungs are small. Hypocirculation has an influence of the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and can thus contribute to hypocapnia. In the early stages, hypercirculation--in particular via a left-to-right shung, leads to an increase in diffusion capacity; after a course of many years, a "counter-situation" occurs. Progressive pulmonary hypertension, as is exemplified for mitral stenosis, leads to measurable restrictive and obstructive impairment of function, and possible to unspecific hyper-reaction, as also, over the long-term, to a diminishement in membrane diffusion capacity. Chronic left heart failure is characterised by interstitial oedema at the level of the alveolar and bronchial capillary beds. The results are measurable restrictions in the static volumes, and in particular of the obstruction parameters and the closing volume that involve the small airways. In the individual case, no statement as to the extent of left heart failure is possible. In the passive pulmonary hypertension phase, diffusion capacity increases; in the further course of the disease, with development of interstitial and alveolar oedema, it decreases again. In acute left heart failure, the persistance and/or extent of pulmonary oedema is not determined solely by the magnitude of the pulmonary venous pressure. Permeability oedema--brought about by mediators--would appear to be significant on the basis of animal experiments. Not infrequently, left cardiac failure leads to small pleural effusions which occur in combination with substantial atelectasia, the aetiology of which is unclear. Interpretation difficulties are caused by the clinical findings and function-analytical data obtained in patients with a combination of chronic lung disease and reducted volume storage capacity of the pulmonary circulation and of the left heart failure, a common situation in the elderly patient. Diminished pulmonary function parameters that fail to

  2. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. PMID:27451323

  3. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion have been observed, and their importance revealed, in almost every tissue and cell type except adult cardiac myocytes. As each human heart is uniquely dependent upon mitochondria to generate massive amounts of ATP that fuel its approximately 38 million contractions per year, it seems odd that cardiac myocytes are the sole exception to the general rule that mitochondrial dynamism is important to function. Here, I briefly review the mechanisms for mitochondrial fusion and fission and examine current data that dispel the previous notion that mitochondrial fusion is dispensable in the heart. Rare and generally overlooked examples of cardiomyopathies linked either to naturally-occurring mutations or to experimentally-induced mutagenesis of mitochondrial fusion/fission genes are described. New findings from genetically targeted Drosophila and mouse models wherein mitochondrial fusion deficiency has specifically been induced in cardiac myocytes are discussed. PMID:22450031

  4. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about African-Americans and stroke at our Power To End Stroke website This content was last reviewed July 2015. ... Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  5. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the ... often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart ...

  6. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27226153

  7. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers during development and in adult life can cause either embryonic lethality or congenital heart diseases, and influences the response of adult hearts to pathological stresses. In this review, we describe current body of literature on the role of several common histone methylations and their modifying enzymes in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases. PMID:25942538

  8. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve ... This rare but serious infection is called infective endocarditis . The germs can enter the bloodstream through needles, ...

  9. Liver diseases in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Majid; Vakilian, Farveh; Amin, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a growing public health concern as a consequence of the ageing of the population and the improved survival of patients with HF. HF is defined as impaired organ perfusion and/or high filling pressure. It is a systemic and chronic disease and as such involves many organs, not least the liver and kidney. The complex vascular system of the liver and its high metabolic activity render it vulnerable to circulation disturbances and trigger many molecular and haemodynamic changes in patients. There are many studies describing the impact of liver disease on patient outcomes. Hepatic dysfunction is commonly seen in HF patients and is closely correlated with a poor outcome. Knowledge about the mechanisms and impacts of liver disease in HF helps us to know the stage of the disease and treat it properly. Moreover, many drugs and toxins that are metabolised in the liver and contribute to drug interactions should also be taken into account when prescribing medication for HF patients. In light of the above-mentioned points, the authors have compiled this review on congestive hepatopathy with the aim of providing physicians and cardiologists with a succinct and useful guide on the role of the liver in HF. PMID:27326014

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension and Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Roth, Todd S; Aboulhosn, Jamil A

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a frequent complication in adults with congenital heart disease. Regardless of etiology, the optimal treatment strategy for this difficult population is challenging. The new frontier of targeted PAH therapies has demonstrated improved functional capacity in the various phenotypes of PAH-CHD, with work currently in progress scrutinizing outcomes. In those who fail conventional medical therapy, heart and heart-lung (block) transplantation become the final therapeutic options, with the role of ventricular assist devices and the total artificial heart still under investigation in this group. PMID:27443136

  11. Screening and Characterization of Spontaneous Porcine Congenital Heart Defects for Gene Identification and Models of Human Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rodent models of human congenital birth defects have been instrumental for gene discovery and investigation of mechanisms of disease. However, these models are limited by their small size making practiced intervention or detailed anatomic evaluation difficult. Swine have similar anato...

  12. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart work harder and affect its ability to pump blood. Overview How the Heart Valves Work At the ... into the atria. As the ventricles contract, they pump blood through the pulmonary and aortic valves. The pulmonary ...

  13. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  14. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  15. Arrhythmias in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Robert M.; Tseng, Zian H.

    2014-01-01

    Late after surgical repair of complex congenital heart disease, atrial arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death are a major cause of mortality. The six cases in this article highlight common challenges in the management of arrhythmias in the adult congenital heart disease population. PMID:25197326

  16. Indications for Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siân Pincott, E; Burch, M

    2011-01-01

    In this review we have looked at indications for cardiac transplantation in congenital heart disease. An outline of the general principles of the use of transplant as a management strategy both as a first line treatment and following other surgical interventions is discussed. We explore the importance of the timing of patient referral and the evaluations undertaken, and how the results of these may vary between patients with congenital heart disease and patients with other causes of end-stage heart failure. The potential complications associated with patients with congenital heart disease need to be both anticipated and managed appropriately by an experienced team. Timing of transplantation in congenital heart disease is difficult to standardize as the group of patients is heterogeneous. We discuss the role and limitations of investigations such as BNP, 6 minute walk, metabolic exercise testing and self estimated physical functioning. We also discuss the suitability for listing. It is clear that congenital heart patients should not be considered to be at uniform high risk of death at transplant. Morbidity varies greatly in the congenital patient population with the failing Fontan circulation having a far higher risk than a failing Mustard circulation. However the underlying issue of imbalance between donor organ supply and demand needs to be addressed as transplant teams are finding themselves in the increasingly difficult situation of supporting growing numbers of patients with a diverse range of pathologies with declining numbers of donor organs. PMID:22548027

  17. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  18. Heart Disease Detection Using Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González S., A.; Acosta P., J. L.; Sandoval M., M.

    2004-09-01

    We develop a wavelet based method to obtain standardized gray-scale chart of both healthy hearts and of hearts suffering left ventricular hypertrophy. The hypothesis that early bad functioning of heart can be detected must be tested by comparing the wavelet analysis of the corresponding ECD with the limit cases. Several important parameters shall be taken into account such as age, sex and electrolytic changes.

  19. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  20. "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of ... Articles "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease / Women and Heart Disease / Blood Pressure ...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease? Some people ... have diabetic heart disease (DHD) may have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. This is called “ ...

  2. Coronary heart disease at altitude.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J K

    1994-01-01

    In the past, it has been assumed that some basic physiologic responses to altitude, exposure in coronary patients are comparable to those in normal young subjects. In fact there are similar changes in sympathetic activation, heart rate, and blood pressure early after ascent, with decrements in plasma volume, cardiac output, and stroke volume as acclimatization proceeds. These responses are described, and experience with coronary patients is reviewed. During the 1st 2 to 3 days at altitude, coronary patients are at greatest risk of untoward events. Gradual rather than abrupt ascent, a moderate degree of physical conditioning, early limitation of activity to a level tolerated at low altitude for somewhat less), and attention to blood pressure control all appear to have protective effects. Ascent to moderate altitude appears to entail little risk in coronary patients who are asymptomatic or have moderate exercise tolerance, provided that the above precautions are observed and that activity does not exceed levels at lower altitude. If activity is to be increased, pre-ascent treadmill exercise testing or Holter monitor data secured under conditions comparable to those anticipated at altitude may provide reasonable guidelines. For coronary patients previously evaluated and known to be in a high-risk category, indications for ascent should be examined more critically, and precautionary measures should be more rigorous. Advice for patients with known coronary disease who may desire to trek at very high altitude must involve individual evaluation, and guidelines remain elusive. PMID:7888800

  3. Lipoproteins, nutrition, and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Ernst J

    2002-02-01

    This article reviews the current status of our knowledge of lipoproteins, nutrition, and coronary heart disease (CHD). Special emphasis is placed on CHD risk assessment, dietary intervention studies, diet-gene interactions, and current dietary guidelines and the contributions of my laboratory to these areas. CHD remains a major cause of death and disability, and risk factors include age, sex, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, elevated serum LDL cholesterol, and low HDL cholesterol. Emerging independent risk factors include elevated serum concentrations of lipoprotein(a), remnant lipoproteins, and homocysteine. The cornerstone of CHD prevention is lifestyle modification. Dietary intervention studies support the concepts that restricting saturated fat and cholesterol and increasing the intake of essential fatty acids, especially n - 3 fatty acids, reduces CHD risk. The variability in LDL-cholesterol response to diet is large, related in part to APOE and APOA4 genotype. The use of antioxidants in intervention studies has not been shown to reduce CHD risk. Compliance with dietary recommendations remains a major problem, and directly altering the food supply may be the most effective way to ensure compliance. The available data indicate that the recommendation to use fats, oils, and sugars sparingly for CHD prevention should be modified to a recommendation to use animal, dairy, and hydrogenated fats; tropical oils; egg yolks; and sugars sparingly and to increase the use of vegetables, fruit, and whole grains. PMID:11815309

  4. Ischaemic heart disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Bondagji, Nabeel S.

    2012-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in pregnancy, particularly myocardial infarction (MI), is a rare yet potentially fatal condition for the mother and the foetus. With delays in the age of conception, the changes in some social habits among females including cigarette and shisha smoking in addition to an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus, IHD may represent a real hazard among pregnant women in the near future. The difficulty in the diagnosis emerges from the similarity of the signs and symptoms of ischaemia and infarct to some of the physiological adaptations that occur in a normal pregnancy. The physiological changes that are normal in pregnancy may aggravate pre-existing disease and may unmask some underlying unrecognized coronary vascular changes; therefore, the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and careful assessment of the underlying risk factors. The management of IHD always requires a multidisciplinary team approach. The management of each patient should be individualized according to the clinical condition, the risk factors, and the availability of the necessary support. Pregnancy after MI may be an acceptable and reasonably safe option provided the cited criteria are met. A systematic PubMed search was performed to identify all published data including cases reports, small series and systematic reviews in the existing literature. These publications were comprised of both retrospective and cross sectional population studies to maximize the number of cases considered in order to reach conclusions and make recommendations based on the best available evidence considering the rare occurrence of this event. The epidemiology, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment, and prognosis of IHD in pregnancy are the subjects of the present review. PMID:23960678

  5. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2014-03-11

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes. PMID:24620001

  6. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  7. Implantation of Total Artificial Heart in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S. L.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation. In the case presented here, a 17 year-old patient with congenital transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) experienced progressively worsening HF due to his congenital condition. He was hospitalized multiple times and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). However, his condition soon deteriorated to end-stage HF with multisystem organ failure. Due to the patient's grave clinical condition and the presence of complex cardiac lesions, the decision was made to proceed with a TAH. The abnormal arrangement of the patient's ventricles and great arteries required modifications to the TAH during implantation. With the TAH in place, the patient was able to return home and regain strength and physical well-being while awaiting a donor heart. He was successfully bridged to heart transplantation 5 months after receiving the device. This report highlights the TAH is feasible even in patients with structurally abnormal hearts, with technical modification. PMID:25078059

  8. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  9. [Indications for surgery for valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Baldus, Stephan; Rudolph, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demographic change, chronic valvular heart disease becomes increasingly important - especially age-related primary diseases of the aortic and mitral valve as well as secondary diseases of the mitral and tricuspid valve caused by other age-related cardiac disorders. Medical treatment is limited to symptom relief by use of diuretics. Specific drugs or drugs with a prognostic benefit are not available. Thus, valve repair or replacement are the key options for treatment of relevant valvular heart disease. While open heart surgery was the only approach for a long time, interventional, catheter-based therapies have evolved in the last decade. This article describes up-to-date recommendations on indications for surgery for the most prevalent valvular heart diseases in adults - aortic stenosis, and aortic, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation). PMID:26583817

  10. Public Service Announcement: Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Public Service Announcement Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You ... hearttruth.gov U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institutes ...

  11. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure , and/or diabetic cardiomyopathy . Initially, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following tests. Blood Pressure Measurement To measure your blood pressure, your doctor or nurse will use some type of a gauge, a stethoscope (or electronic sensor), ...

  12. Flying and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Macartney, F J

    1984-03-01

    Only those congenital defects carrying a very low risk of complication (either before or after surgical correction) were considered. Atrial Septal Defects--(a) Ostium primum defects should be treated with caution either before or after surgical correction because of the risk of progressive conduction disorders and mitral regurgitation. (b) Ostium secundum defects could be considered for licensing (if the defect is small) or with surgical repair if the right ventricular systolic pressure is normal. (c) Sinus venosus defects--if too small to require surgical repair, licensing may be considered provided ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring shows no evidence of arrhythmias. Surgery increases the risk of sino-atrial disease, thus licensing should be permitted only where there is no evidence of arrhythmia and adequate cardiological follow-up is possible. Ventricular Septal Defects--Subjects with very small defects not requiring surgical closure may be considered for licensing. Subjects who have had surgical closure have a risk of arrhythmias and should be carefully evaluated. Pulmonary Stenosis--If mild (either before or after surgery) may be licensed, but regular assessment perhaps including right heart catheterization is needed to demonstrate stability of the lesion. Persistent Ductus Arteriosus--Surgical closure should be recommended on diagnosis and need not affect licensing. Isolated Bicuspid Aortic Valve--Need not debar from licensing, but careful annual examination (with electrocardiogram 2-D echocardiography and fluroscopy ) is required to detect calcification, stenosis or regurgitation. Coarctation of aorta--Subjects who have had a repair before the age of 12 years may be considered for licensing after examination of other risk factors (blood pressure at rest and on exercise in particular). Those repaired over the age of 12 may be considered for restricted licensing if normotensive. These recommendations will need review in the light of further long

  13. Heart Disease Risk Factors for Children and Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women and Heart Disease Heart-smart curriculum & health games for grades K-6 at Project Heart . Heart ... sedentary activities like watching TV or playing video games? These are called sedentary activities, because there is ...

  14. FastStats: Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Pacific Islander Population Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Health of Hispanic or Latino ... diagnostic categories [PDF - 58 KB] Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure: United States, ... Association Get Email Updates To receive email ...

  15. Lyme Disease and the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension Stroke Journal of the American Heart Association Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Institution: NATIONAL ... Search Donate Circulation Institution: NATIONAL INST HEALTH LIBRARY Hello, Guest! My alerts Sign In Join Home About ...

  16. Celebrities Gather to Fight Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... courtesy of NIH/NHLBI Red Dress Campaign marks steady progress The number of heart disease deaths in ... death for men and women in the United States, kills nearly 500,000 women each year. NHLBI, ...

  17. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    MedlinePlus

    ... percent of smokers begin before age 18. Middle-Aged Women: At menopause, a woman's heart disease risk ... risk of developing high blood pressure for women aged 55 is about 90 percent. Beginning at age ...

  18. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  19. Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 ... or Longer-Term Acute short-term effects of air pollution tend to strike people who are elderly or ...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  1. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  2. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  3. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  4. AUTOPHAGY IN LOAD-INDUCED HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongxin; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    The heart is a highly plastic organ capable of remodeling in response to changes in physiological or pathological demand. When workload increases, the heart compensates through hypertrophic growth of individual cardiomyocytes to increase cardiac output. However, sustained stress, such as occurs with hypertension or following myocardial infarction, triggers changes in sarcomeric protein composition and energy metabolism, loss of cardiomyocytes, ventricular dilation, reduced pump function, and ultimately heart failure. It has been known for some time that autophagy is active in cardiomyocytes, occurring at increased levels in disease. Yet the potential contribution of cardiomyocyte autophagy to ventricular remodeling and disease pathogenesis has only recently been explored. This latter fact stems largely from the recent emergence of tools to probe molecular mechanisms governing cardiac plasticity and to define the role of autophagic flux in the context of heart disease. In this chapter, we briefly review prominent mouse models useful in the study of load-induced heart disease and standard techniques used to assess whether a molecular or cellular event is adaptive or maladaptive. We then outline methods available for monitoring autophagic activity in the heart, providing detailed protocols for several techniques unique to working with heart and other striated muscles. PMID:19216915

  5. Heart Failure in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Nonpharmacologic Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    LeMond, Lisa; Mai, Tuan; Broberg, Craig S; Muralidaran, Ashok; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-11-01

    In early stages, heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains an elusive diagnosis. Many ACHD patients seem well-compensated owing to chronic physical and psychological adaptations. HF biomarkers and cardiopulmonary exercise tests are often markedly abnormal, although patients report stable health and good quality of life. Treatment differs from acquired HF. Evidence for effective drug therapy in ACHD-related HF is lacking. Residual ventricular, valvular, and vascular abnormalities contribute to HF pathophysiology, leading to an emphasis on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies. This article reviews emerging perspectives on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies, including catheter-based interventions, surgical correction, and palliative care. PMID:26471822

  6. The Right Heart in Congenital Heart Disease, Mechanisms and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Guihaire, Julien; Haddad, François; Mercier, Olaf; Murphy, Daniel J.; Wu, Joseph C.; Fadel, Elie

    2012-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease, the right heart may support the pulmonary or the systemic circulation. Several congenital heart diseases primarily affect the right heart including Tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of great arteries, septal defects leading to pulmonary vascular disease, Ebstein anomaly and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. In these patients, right ventricular dysfunction leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. In this paper, our objective is to review the mechanisms and management of right heart failure associated with congenital heart disease. We will outline pearls and pitfalls in the management of congenital heart disease affecting the right heart and highlight recent advances in the field. PMID:23483726

  7. Heart Disease: Know Your Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... active, and choosing good nutrition. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  8. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... active, and choosing good nutrition. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  9. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... of transportation and lack of health insurance. Those factors can make early diagnoses and management of risks difficult, said Martha L. Daviglus, M.D., Ph.D., a cardiovascular epidemiologist at Northwestern University and University of Illinois and an American Heart ...

  10. Phase Transition in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-07-01

    A healthy human heart rate displays complex fluctuations which share characteristics of physical systems in a critical state. We demonstrate that the human heart rate in healthy individuals undergoes a dramatic breakdown of criticality characteristics, reminiscent of continuous second order phase transitions. By studying the germane determinants, we show that the hallmark of criticality—highly correlated fluctuations—is observed only during usual daily activity, and a breakdown of these characteristics occurs in prolonged, strenuous exercise and sleep. This finding is the first reported discovery of the dynamical phase transition phenomenon in a biological control system and will be a key to understanding the heart rate control system in health and disease.

  11. Design for Heart Disease Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    In this teaching and curriculum guide for community health education, a design is suggested for a course that could help prevent premature deaths due to heart disease. The course communicates facts regarding the causes of cardiovascular diseases, and outlines opportunities for attaining the degree of physical conditioning essential to prevention.…

  12. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Sep 16,2015 Plain old snoring ... evidence is very strong for the relationship between sleep apnea and hypertension and cardiovascular disease generally, so people really need to know that,” ...

  13. A neonate with critical congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Linder, Jarrett; Dawson, Emily; Williams, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is defined as a ductal-dependent congenital heart defect requiring surgical or percutaneous intervention via cardiac catheterization before 1 year of age. Most cases of CCHD can be diagnosed with prenatal ultrasound or fetal echocardiogram. If not prenatally diagnosed, CCHD can be stable in the newborn nursery due to persistent ductal patency, and the patient may only be diagnosed after ductal closure and development of cardiac symptoms at home. In this case, a 6-day-old female presented to the emergency department (ED) floppy with agonal respirations, poor capillary refill, and absent femoral pulses. On the day of presentation, the patient became increasingly fussy, refused feeding, and began to gasp. The patient was transported to the ED for evaluation, where a bedside echocardiogram revealed interrupted aortic arch (IAA), ventricular septal defect, minimal flow through a thread-like ductus arteriosus, and severely depressed cardiac function. IAA is very rare, with an incidence of three cases per 1 million live births. Patients require neonatal supportive care, continuous prostaglandin E1 infusion, and urgent referral for neonatal surgical repair in the first days to weeks of life. To reduce the volume of undiagnosed CCHD in the immediate newborn period, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Diseases in Newborns and Children (SACHDNC) recommended that CCHD screening via pulse oximetry be added to the recommended uniform screening panel. A positive screen results in an immediate referral for an echocardiogram. Fetal diagnosis, newborn screening, and/or careful clinical examination may have resulted in detection of IAA in our patient prior to ductal closure. PMID:24877491

  14. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  15. Project SuperHeart: An Evaluation of a Heart Disease Intervention Program For Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Joyce W.

    1981-01-01

    An effective way to prevent coronary heart disease in later life is to concentrate on preventive measures in the early years before coronary heart disease becomes established. Project SuperHeart, a heart disease intervention program for young children, includes physical fitness and classroom activities emphasizing basic nutritional habits. (JN)

  16. Pregnancy complicated by heart disease in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Shailaja; Shrestha, Nikesh Raj; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, characteristics and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Design Prospective single-centre registry. Setting Tertiary care teaching hospital in eastern Nepal. Patients Pregnant women presenting to the antenatal clinic and/or labour room between 1 March 2012 and 31 March 2013. Main outcome measures Prevalence, characteristics, and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Results Fifty-three out of 9463 pregnancies (0.6%) were complicated by cardiac disease. Proportions of acquired, congenital and arrhythmic heart disease amounted to 89%, 9% and 2%, respectively. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) was the most frequent cardiac disease complicating pregnancy (n=47). Among 45 women with RHD continuing pregnancy until delivery, 30 (67%) were primigravidae. The predominant valvular pathology was mitral stenosis (62%), followed by mitral regurgitation (21%) and aortic regurgitation (13%). Twenty women (44%) underwent elective or emergency caesarean section. Maternal and fetal/perinatal mortality of pregnancies complicated by RHD amounted to 4% and 16%, respectively. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III or class IV (HR 6.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 29.1, p=0.026), pulmonary hypertension (HR 9.1, 95% CI 1.6 to 51.5, p=0.012) and severe mitral stenosis (HR 7.0, 95% CI 1.4 to 34.4, p=0.017) were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality in an univariate analysis. Conclusions Rheumatic mitral stenosis was the most frequent heart disease complicating pregnancy in a consecutive cohort from a teaching hospital in Nepal. Exercise intolerance, pulmonary hypertension and severe mitral stenosis were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality. PMID:27326158

  17. Data from acellular human heart matrix.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Espinosa, M Angeles; González-Nicolas, M Angeles; Acebes, Judith R; Costanza, Salvatore; Moscoso, Isabel; Rodríguez, Hugo; García, Julio; Romero, Jesús; Kren, Stefan M; Bermejo, Javier; Yotti, Raquel; Del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Elizaga, Jaime; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Perfusion decellularization of cadaveric hearts removes cells and generates a cell-free extracellular matrix scaffold containing acellular vascular conduits, which are theoretically sufficient to perfuse and support tissue-engineered heart constructs. This article contains additional data of our experience decellularizing and testing structural integrity and composition of a large series of human hearts, "Acellular human heart matrix: a critical step toward whole heat grafts" (Sanchez et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide the information about the heart decellularization technique, the valve competence evaluation of the decellularized scaffolds, the integrity evaluation of epicardial and myocardial coronary circulation, the pressure volume measurements, the primers used to assess cardiac muscle gene expression and, the characteristics of donors, donor hearts, scaffolds and perfusion decellularization process. PMID:27331090

  18. A mouse model of human congenital heart disease: high incidence of diverse cardiac anomalies and ventricular noncompaction produced by heterozygous Nkx2-5 homeodomain missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eileen I.; Terada, Ryota; Ryan, Nicole J.; Briggs, Laura E.; Chowdhury, Rajib; Zárate, Miguel A.; Sugi, Yukiko; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Benson, D. Woodrow; Anderson, Robert H.; Kasahara, Hideko

    2014-01-01

    Background Heterozygous human mutations of NKX2-5 are highly penetrant and associated with varied congenital heart defects. The heterozygous knockout of murine Nkx2-5, in contrast, manifests less profound cardiac malformations, with low disease penetrance. We sought to study this apparent discrepancy between human and mouse genetics. Since missense mutations in the NKX2-5 homeodomain (DNA binding domain) are the most frequently reported type of human mutation, we replicated this genetic defect in a murine knock-in model. Methods and Results We generated a murine model in a 129/Sv genetic background by knocking-in an Nkx2-5 homeodomain missense mutation previously identified in humans. The mutation was located at homeodomain position 52Arg→Gly (R52G). All the heterozygous neonatal Nkx2-5+/R52G mice demonstrated a prominent trabecular layer in the ventricular wall, so called noncompaction, along with diverse cardiac anomalies, including atrioventricular septal defects, Ebstein’s malformation of the tricuspid valve, and perimembranous and/or muscular ventricular septal defects. In addition, P10 Nkx2-5+/R52G mice demonstrated atrial septal anomalies, with significant increase in the size of the inter-atrial communication and fossa ovalis, and decrease in the length of the flap valve compared to control Nkx2-5+/+ or Nkx2-5+/− mice. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate that heterozygous missense mutation in the murine Nkx2-5 homeodomain (R52G) are highly penetrant, and result in pleiotropic cardiac effects. Thus, in contrast to heterozygous Nkx2-5 knockout mice, the effects of the heterozygous knock-in mimic findings in humans with heterozygous missense mutation in NKX2-5 homeodomain. PMID:25028484

  19. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease. PMID:23246401

  20. Heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cermakova, P; Eriksdotter, M; Lund, L H; Winblad, B; Religa, P; Religa, D

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that heart failure is a risk factor for Alzheimer′s disease. Decreased cerebral blood flow and neurohormonal activation due to heart failure may contribute to the dysfunction of the neurovascular unit and cause an energy crisis in neurons. This leads to the impaired clearance of amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, resulting in the formation of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the relationship between heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease based on epidemiological studies, brain imaging research, pathological findings and the use of animal models. The importance of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and valve disease as well as the effect of relevant medications will be discussed. PMID:25041352

  1. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  2. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. PMID:24774396

  3. Computerized screening of children congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Amir A; Hancq, Joel; Dutoit, Thierry; Gharehbaghi, Arash; Kocharian, Armen; Kiani, A

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated screening of congenital heart diseases in children through heart sound analysis techniques. Our method relies on categorizing the pathological murmurs based on the heart sections initiating them. We show that these pathelogical murmur categories can be identified by examining the heart sound energy over specific frequency bands, which we call, Arash-Bands. To specify the Arash-Band for a category, we evaluate the energy of the heart sound over all possible frequency bands. The Arash-Band is the frequency band that provides the lowest error in clustering the instances of that category against the normal ones. The energy content of the Arash-Bands for different categories constitue a feature vector that is suitable for classification using a neural network. In order to train, and to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we use a training data-bank, as well as a test data-bank, collectively consisting of ninety samples (normal and abnormal). Our results show that in more than 94% of cases, our method correctly identifies children with congenital heart diseases. This percentage improves to 100%, when we use the Jack-Knife validation method over all the 90 samples. PMID:18718691

  4. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  5. Antibiotic trials for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey L; Muhlestein, Joseph B

    2004-01-01

    The possibility has been raised in recent years that infection might contribute as an inflammatory stimulus to chronic "noninfectious" degenerative diseases. Within the past decade, serious attention has been given to the possibility of bacterial vectors as causal factors of atherosclerosis. To date, the greatest amount of information has related to the intracellular organism Chlamydia pneumoniae. This interest has been stimulated by the frequent finding of bacterial antigens and, occasionally, recoverable organisms, within human atherosclerotic plaque. Indirect evidence for and against the benefit of anti-Chlamydia antibiotic agents comes from epidemiologic studies. Given the potential for confounding in observational studies, prospective, randomized intervention trials are required. These antibiotic trials have generated enthusiastic expectations for proving (or disproving) the infectious-disease hypothesis of atherosclerosis and establishing new therapies. However, these expectations have been tempered by important limitations and uncertainties. Negative outcomes can be explained not only by an incorrect hypothesis but also by inadequate study size or design or by an ineffective antibiotic regimen. In contrast, if studies are positive, the hypothesis still is not entirely proved, because a nonspecific anti-inflammatory effect or an anti-infective action against other organisms might be operative. The clinical trial data to date have not provided adequate support for the clinical use of antibiotics in primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. New and innovative experimental approaches, in addition to traditionally designed antibiotic trials, should be welcome in our attempts to gain adequate insight into the role of infection in atherosclerosis and its therapy. PMID:15061624

  6. Economic cycles and heart disease in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quast, Troy; Gonzalez, Fidel

    2014-05-01

    While a considerable literature has emerged regarding the relationship between the business cycles and mortality rates, relatively little is known regarding how economic fluctuations are related to morbidity. We investigate the relationship between business cycles and heart disease in Mexico using a unique state-level dataset of 512 observations consisting of real GDP and heart disease incidence rates (overall and by age group) from 1995 to 2010. Our study is one of the first to use a state-level panel approach to analyze the relationship between the business cycle and morbidity. Further, the state and year fixed effects employed in our econometric specification reduce possible omitted variable bias. We find a general procyclical, although largely statistically insignificant, contemporaneous relationship. However, an increase in GDP per capita sustained over five years is associated with considerable increases in the incidence rates of ischemic heart disease and hypertension. This procyclical relationship appears strongest in the states with the lowest levels of development and for the oldest age groups. Our results suggest that economic fluctuations may have important lagged effects on heart disease in developing countries. PMID:24681397

  7. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or discomfort in the muscles of your feet, calves, or thighs. Symptoms that usually appear during walking ... If you have any signs of heart disease, call your health care ... to see if the symptoms go away or dismiss them as nothing. Call ...

  8. Endometriosis Linked to Heart Disease in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... epidemiologic research in reproductive medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Missmer said the study found an association between endometriosis and the risk of heart disease, but can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. She believes this is the first study to ...

  9. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of people who have diabetes die of some type of cardiovascular disease. Diabetic women are at especially high risk for dying ... aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart ... levels—you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. But you can take steps to ...

  10. Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... convincing" case that gallstones, themselves, are a risk factor for heart disease. Stein, who wasn't involved in the research, is director of the urban community cardiology program at New York University School of Medicine. He said that people with ...

  11. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes. PMID:24775619

  12. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  13. Coronary heart disease and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Karamermer, Yusuf; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of coronary artery disease in female patients is increasing due to changing lifestyle patterns including cigarette smoking, diabetes and stress. Since women are delaying childbearing until older age, acute coronary syndrome will more frequently occur during pregnancy. Although rare, acute coronary syndrome during pregnancy often has devastating consequences. It is associated with increased maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity compared with the nonpregnant situation. Furthermore, it constitutes an important problem for the patient and the treating physician, because the selection of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches is greatly influenced not only by maternal, but also by fetal safety. PMID:19804311

  14. Pharmacogenomics of Hypertension and Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arwood, Meghan J.; Cavallari, Larisa H.; Duarte, Julio D.

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and hypertension is a predominant risk factor. Thus, effective blood pressure control is important to prevent adverse sequelae of hypertension, including heart failure, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and ischemic stroke. Over half of Americans have uncontrolled blood pressure, which may in part be explained by interpatient variability in drug response secondary to genetic polymorphism. As such, pharmacogenetic testing may be a supplementary tool to guide treatment. This review highlights the pharmacogenetics of antihypertensive response and response to drugs that treat adverse hypertension-related sequelae, particularly coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. While pharmacogenetic evidence may be more robust for the latter with respect to clinical implementation, there is increasing evidence of genetic variants that may help predict antihypertensive response. However, additional research and validation are needed before clinical implementation guidelines for antihypertensive therapy can become a reality. PMID:26272307

  15. [Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Clodi, Martin; Säly, Christoph; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Resl, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens; Eber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and heart failure are interacting dynamically. Patients being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Enhanced cardiovascular risk stratification based on biomarkers, symptoms and classical risk factors should be performed in patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27052249

  16. Rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    White, Harvey; Walsh, Warren; Brown, Alex; Riddell, Tania; Tonkin, Andrew; Jeremy, Richmond; Brieger, David; Zeitz, Chris; Kritharides, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Rates of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in Aboriginal people, Torres Strait Islanders and Māori continue to be unacceptably high. The impact of rheumatic heart disease is inequitable on these populations as compared with other Australians and New Zealanders. The associated cardiac morbidity, including the development of rheumatic valve disease, and cardiomyopathy, with possible sequelae of heart failure, development of atrial fibrillation, systemic embolism, transient ischaemic attacks, strokes, endocarditis, the need for interventions including cardiac surgery, and impaired quality of life, and shortened life expectancy, has major implications for the individual. The adverse health and social effects may significantly limit education and employment opportunities and increase dependency on welfare. Additionally there may be major adverse impacts on family and community life. The costs in financial terms and missed opportunities, including wasted young lives, are substantial. Prevention of acute rheumatic fever is dependent on the timely diagnosis and treatment of sore throats and skin infections in high-risk groups. Both Australia and New Zealand have registries for acute rheumatic fever but paradoxically neither includes all cases of chronic rheumatic heart disease many of whom would benefit from close surveillance and follow-up. In New Zealand and some Australian States there are programs to give secondary prophylaxis with penicillin, but these are not universal. Surgical outcomes for patients with rheumatic valvular disease are better for valve repair than for valve replacement. Special attention to the selection of the appropriate valve surgery and valve choice is required in pregnant women. It may be necessary to have designated surgical units managing Indigenous patients to ensure high rates of surgical repair rather than valve replacement. Surgical guidelines may be helpful. Long-term follow-up of the outcomes of surgery in

  17. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prospects for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease may be grimmer than ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 35 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke Improving care can save ... can reduce death among all ages. Problem Many deaths from heart disease and stroke can be prevented. ...

  19. Heart Disease Risk Factors | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents You Can Reduce Your Risk Certain traits, conditions, or habits may raise your ...

  20. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  1. U.S. Heart Disease Deaths Shifting South

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157873.html U.S. Heart Disease Deaths Shifting South Cardiac health has improved in North ... In the 1970s, U.S. counties with the highest death rates from heart disease were clustered in the ...

  2. Women, Men Share Similar Symptoms of Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... history of stroke, an inactive lifestyle, history of depression and a family history of early onset heart disease. Women also ... risk factors that are more common in women -- depression, inactivity, and family history of early onset heart disease -- are not ...

  3. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sermer, Mathew; Silversides, Candice K

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in paediatric congenital heart surgery, there are a growing number of women with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching childbearing age. Pregnancy, however, is associated with haemodynamic stresses which can result in cardiac decompensation in women with CHD. Many women with CHD are aware of their cardiac condition prior to pregnancy, and preconception counselling is an important aspect of their care. Preconception counselling allows women to make informed pregnancy decisions, provides an opportunity for modifications of teratogenic medications and, when necessary, repair of cardiac lesions prior to pregnancy. Less commonly, the haemodynamic changes of pregnancy unmask a previously unrecognised heart lesion. In general, pregnancy outcomes are favourable for women with CHD, but there are some cardiac lesions that carry high risk for both the mother and the baby, and this group of women require care by an experienced multidisciplinary team. This review discusses preconception counselling including contraception, an approach to risk stratification and management recommendations in women with some common CHDs.

  4. Tuning flux: autophagy as a target of heart disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Min; Morales, Cyndi R.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite maximum medical and mechanical support therapy, heart failure remains a relentlessly progressive disorder with substantial morbidity and mortality. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular cannibalization, has been implicated in virtually all forms of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, its role is context dependent, antagonizing or promoting disease depending on the circumstance. Here, we review current understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of heart failure and explore this pathway as a target of therapeutic intervention. Recent findings In preclinical models of heart disease, cardiomyocyte autophagic flux is activated; indeed, its role in disease pathogenesis is the subject of intense investigation to define mechanism. Similarly, in failing human heart of a variety of etiologies, cardiomyocyte autophagic activity is upregulated, and therapy, such as with mechanical support systems, elicits declines in autophagy activity. However, when suppression of autophagy is complete, rapid and catastrophic cell death occurs, consistent with a model in which basal autophagic flux is required for proteostasis. Thus, a narrow zone of ‘optimal’ autophagy seems to exist. The challenge moving forward is to tune the stress-triggered autophagic response within that ‘sweet spot’ range for therapeutic benefit. Summary Whereas we have known for some years of the participation of lysosomal mechanisms in heart disease, it is only recently that upstream mechanisms (autophagy) are being explored. The challenge for the future is to dissect the underlying circuitry and titrate the response into an optimal, proteostasis-promoting range in hopes of mitigating the ever-expanding epidemic of heart failure. PMID:21415729

  5. Ischemic heart disease and the Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle modification is primary in cardiovascular (CV) disease prevention. A major contribution is the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), defined by two of seven components. Italian investigators determined a significant decrease in peripheral arterial disease of 56 % for a high score. Multiple specific CV risk factors are also favorably modified by the MedDiet. This includes beneficial effect on inflammation, vascular endothelium, and insulin resistance. There is also evidence that coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome are decreased. Benefit appears to extend to new migrants in France. The economics of dietary adherence are favorable with decreased total lifetime health costs. Although mixed nuts appear to be a major factor in the MedDiet, special emphasis goes to extra virgin olive oil. Benefit also extends to other noncommunicable diseases with a decrease in cancer, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Further quantitation of benefit and understanding of mechanisms involved in dietary benefit is essential. PMID:24743900

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. PMID:26471823

  7. Contemporary treatment of amyloid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Palecek, Tomas; Fikrle, Michal; Nemecek, Eduard; Bauerova, Lenka; Kuchynka, Petr; Louch, William E; Spicka, Ivan; Rysava, Romana

    2015-01-01

    The amyloidoses represent a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein, amyloid, which is formed by insoluble extracellular fibrils in β-pleated sheets. Although cardiac involvement may occur in all types of amyloidoses, clinically relevant amyloid cardiomyopathy is a typical feature of AL amyloidosis and transthyretin-related amyloidoses. Congestive heart failure represents the commonest manifestation of amyloid heart disease. Noninvasive imaging techniques, especially echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance, play a major role in the diagnosis of amyloid cardiomyopathy; however, histological confirmation and exact typing of amyloid deposits is necessary whether in extracardiac location or directly in the myocardium. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is of utmost importance as the presence and especially the severity of cardiac involvement generally drives the prognosis of affected subjects and plays a major role in determining the intensity of specific treatment, namely in AL amyloidosis. The management of patients with amyloid heart disease is complex. Loop diuretics together with aldosterone antagonists represent the basis for influencing signs of congestion. In AL amyloidosis, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is generally considered to be a front-line treatment option, if the disease is diagnosed at its early stage. The combination of mephalan with dexamethasone has been the standard therapy for severely affected individuals; however, the combinations with several novel agents including immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomibe have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. New therapeutic substances with the potential to slow or even stop the progression of transthyretin-related amyloidosis are also extensively studied. PMID:25483951

  8. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  9. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  10. The Epidemiology of Coronary Heart Disease in Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, Richard F.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death among US blacks whose CHD mortality rates are among the highest in the world. Important to the advance of understanding the etiology, pathogenesis, and prevention of coronary heart disease is an examination of the epidemiology of coronary heart disease in blacks. PMID:3873545

  11. [Prevention of coronary heart disease: smoking].

    PubMed

    Heitzer, T; Meinertz, T

    2005-01-01

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of illness and premature death in Germany, claiming over 110,000 lives a year because it directly increases the risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, emphysema and a variety of cancers. The overwhelming majority of smokers begin tobacco use before they reach adulthood. Among those young people who smoke, the average age is now 13-14. In Germany, about 39% of male and 31% of female adults (age 18-60 years) continue to smoke, despite information about the unequivocally negative health consequences of smoking. The exact mechanisms of smoking-related vascular disease are not yet known. Smoking causes acute hemodynamic alterations such as increase in heart rate, systematic and coronary vascular resistance, myocardial contractility, and myocardial oxygen demand. These short-term effects could lower the ischemic threshold in smokers with coronary artery disease and contribute to the increased risk for acute cardiovascular events. Endothelial damage is thought to be an initiating event in atherosclerosis and early studies have demonstrated that long-term smoking has direct toxic effects with structural changes of human endothelial cells. Recent research has shown the importance of the functional role of the endothelium in regulating vascular tone, platelet-endothelial interactions, leukocyte adhesion and smooth muscle cell proliferation via synthesis and release of a variety of substances such as nitric oxide. There is strong evidence that smoking leads to endothelial dysfunction mainly by increased inactivation of nitric oxide by oxygen-derived free radicals. Smoking also increases oxidative modification of LDL and is associated with lower HDL plasma levels. Smoking induces a systemic inflammatory response with increased leukocyte count and elevation of the C-reactive protein level. Importantly, the prothrombotic effects of smoking have been repeatedly demonstrated to cause alterations in platelet function, imbalance of

  12. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers. PMID:23934094

  13. Biology of the cardiac myocyte in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Peter, Angela K; Bjerke, Maureen A; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2016-07-15

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a major risk factor for heart failure, and it has been shown that this increase in size occurs at the level of the cardiac myocyte. Cardiac myocyte model systems have been developed to study this process. Here we focus on cell culture tools, including primary cells, immortalized cell lines, human stem cells, and their morphological and molecular responses to pathological stimuli. For each cell type, we discuss commonly used methods for inducing hypertrophy, markers of pathological hypertrophy, advantages for each model, and disadvantages to using a particular cell type over other in vitro model systems. Where applicable, we discuss how each system is used to model human disease and how these models may be applicable to current drug therapeutic strategies. Finally, we discuss the increasing use of biomaterials to mimic healthy and diseased hearts and how these matrices can contribute to in vitro model systems of cardiac cell biology. PMID:27418636

  14. Irradiation-related ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, B.W.; Trock, B.J.; Goodman, R.L. )

    1990-04-01

    An expectation for long-term survival has emerged among several groups of cancer patients treated with therapeutic irradiation (eg, Hodgkin's disease, early stage breast cancer). Therefore, the cardiovascular sequelae of thoracic irradiation have recently come under scrutiny. Animal models have demonstrated that cardiac irradiation can directly damage the myocardial microvasculature and can indirectly damage the coronary macrovasculature when coupled with cholesterol feeding. A clear association between thoracic radiotherapy and ischemic heart disease was observed among older clinical studies using radiotherapeutic techniques that are no longer optimal by today's standards. Such a relationship could not be confirmed in modern studies in which treatment factors (such as dose and volume of heart irradiated) were more carefully controlled. 56 references.

  15. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-04-15

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:26965220

  16. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:27102136

  17. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy P.; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Findings: The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. Conclusions: The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD. PMID:24171883

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Shannalee R; Gay, Maresha S; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed 'developmental origins of health and disease'. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  19. Multimodality imaging in heart valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John B; Myerson, Saul G; Rajani, Ronak; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J; Dweck, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart valve disease, echocardiography is the mainstay for diagnosis, assessment and serial surveillance. However, other modalities, notably cardiac MRI and CT, are used if echocardiographic imaging is suboptimal but can also give complementary information to improve assessment of the valve lesion and cardiac compensation to aid the timing of surgery and determine risk. This statement discusses the way these imaging techniques are currently integrated to improve care beyond what is possible with echocardiography alone. PMID:26977308

  20. Holography for imaging in structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities for structural heart disease interventions have become a common feature in the procedural workflow. The images acquired are usually presented on 2D displays, thereby restricting their usefulness and the ability to interact with them. Holographic images created in real time from the volumetric data which float in the air during the procedure, in front of the operator and above the patient, could provide an intuitive and interactive display for the interventionalist and improve procedure outcomes. PMID:27174119

  1. Evaluation of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Francesca; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana

    2016-03-01

    The clinical approach to adults with congenital heart diseases (ACHDs) is unique in cardiovascular medicine because these patients encompass a broad range of presentations. Each patient, despite having similar diagnosis, will be anatomically and physiologically unlike others within ACHD population, in relation to the type of repair, age at repair, associated defects, with specific long-term risk factors and complications. Furthermore, as many patients will not complain of symptoms, clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing must also be based on the underlying main diagnostic category, with complete standardized lesion-specific clinical protocols, investigating all known risk factors specific for each congenital heart disease and performed as part of screening for significant long-term complications. The first part of this review will focus on clinical history, physical examination, and the most important diagnostic testing in ACHD population. The second part of the article will focus on some clinical issues we have to face in our daily practice, such as heart failure, cyanosis, and pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, as survival rates of ACHD population continue to improve and patients with this condition live longer, we will briefly report on a new clinical concern regarding the impact of acquired morbidities like coronary artery disease that appear to be of greater importance in defining outcome in older patients with ACHD. PMID:26957402

  2. [Indications for coronarography in heart valve diseases].

    PubMed

    Rangel, A; Hernández, J; Iris, J M; Baduí, E; Chávez, E

    1996-01-01

    Among 407 patients with rheumatic heart disease studied in our department, we found 8.3% with coronary atherosclerosis: 2.7% with mitral stenosis and 2.4% with aortic stenosis, lower figures than those reported in the literature. In our patients with coronary atherosclerosis, the male to female ratio was 1.6:1. The mean age of men and women with coronary atherosclerosis were 58.9 +/- 8.48 years and 60.33 +/- 5.75 years respectively. The cumulated relative frequency curve of the age was shifted to the right in the patients with coronary atherosclerosis, compared with the age frequency curve of the patients with normal coronary arteries: 50% of the cases with coronary atherosclerosis were < or = 60 years old; on the other hand, 50% of the patients with normal coronary arteries were < 53 years old. We only discovered 3 patients younger than 50 years old with coronary atherosclerosis. In order of frequency, the coronary arteries more affected were the anterior descending, right and circumflex. The mean coronary stenosis was 75.2 +/- 21.2%. Disease of one vessel was observed more frequently. We believe that age is not a good parameter to indicate coronarography in patients with valvular heart disease. If coronarography would be performed in all patients with valvular disease > or = 30 or 40 years old, would result in a great number of normal studies, with the consequent misspend of supplies and the increased risk of complications. On the other hand, restricting the coronarography indication, would miss the diagnosis in patients that might need myocardial revascularization. To restrict or to increase the indication of coronarography in patients with valvular disease will depend of the frequency between rheumatic heart disease and associated coronary atherosclerosis, and also on the atherosclerosis risk factors present in each patient. We recommend not to use the age of the patients as an index to indicate coronarography. PMID:8768624

  3. Human myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, H; Kjeldsen, K

    1996-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase is of major importance for active ion transport across the sarcolemma and thus for electrical as well as contractile function of the myocardium. Furthermore, it is receptor for digitalis glycosides. In human studies of the regulatory aspects of myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration a major problem has been to obtain tissue samples. Methodological accomplishments in quantification of myocardial Na,K-ATPase using vanadate facilitated 3H-ouabain binding to intact samples have, however, made it possible to obtain reliable measurements on human myocardial necropsies obtained at autopsy as well as on biopsies of a wet weight of only 1-2 mg obtained during heart catheterisation. However, access to the ultimately, normal, vital myocardial tissue has come from the heart transplantation programs, through which myocardial samples from cardiovascular healthy organ donors have become available. In the present paper we evaluate the various values reported for normal human myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration, its regulation in heart disease and the association with digitalization. Normal myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration level is found to be 700 pmol/g wet weight. No major variations were found between or within the walls of the heart ventricles. During the first few years of life a marked decrease in myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration is followed by a stable level obtained in early adulthood and normally maintained throughout life. In patients with enlarged cardiac x-ray silhouette a significant positive, linear correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and Na,K-ATPase concentration was established. A maximum reduction in Na,K-ATPase concentration of 89% was obtained when EF was reduced to 20%. Generally, heart failure associated with heart dilatation, myocardial hypertrophy as well as ischaemic heart disease is associated with reductions in myocardial Na,K-ATPase concentration of around 25%. During digoxin treatment of heart failure

  4. The clinical presentation and management of carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dobson, R; Burgess, M I; Pritchard, D M; Cuthbertson, D J

    2014-04-15

    Carcinoid heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Although cases of carcinoid syndrome and severe carcinoid heart disease requiring urgent intervention are well described, many patients with significant carcinoid heart disease may have insidious symptoms or even be asymptomatic. As haemodynamically significant carcinoid heart disease may be clinically silent, specific and individualised considerations must be made as to the most appropriate clinical criteria and time point at which surgical valve replacement should be undertaken in patients with carcinoid heart disease. PMID:24636550

  5. Morphology and biomechanics of human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Polienko, Asel V.; Ivanov, Dmitry V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: A study of the biomechanical characteristics of the human heart ventricles was performed. 80 hearts were extracted during autopsy of 80 corpses of adults (40 women and 40 men) aged 31-70 years. The samples were investigated in compliance with the recommendations of the ethics committee. Methods: Tension and compression tests were performed with help of the uniaxial testing machine Instron 5944. Cardiometry was also performed. Results: In this work, techniques for human heart ventricle wall biomechanical properties estimation were developed. Regularities of age and gender variability in deformative and strength properties of the right and left ventricle walls were found. These properties were characterized by a smooth growth of myocardial tissue stiffness and resistivity at a relatively low strain against reduction in their strength and elasticity from 31-40 to 61-70 years. It was found that tissue of the left ventricle at 61-70 years had a lower stretchability and strength compared with tissues of the right ventricle and septum. These data expands understanding of the morphological organization of the heart ventricles, which is very important for the development of personalized medicine. Taking into account individual, age and gender differences of the heart ventricle tissue biomechanical characteristics allows to rationally choosing the type of patching materials during reconstructive operations on heart.

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms in heart development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Shannalee R.; Gay, Maresha S.; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal intrauterine development has been linked to predisposition to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, a concept termed ‘developmental origins of health and disease’. Although the exact mechanisms underlying this developmental programming are unknown, a growing body of evidence supports the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA confer added levels of gene regulation without altering DNA sequences. These modifications are relatively stable signals, offering possible insight into the mechanisms underlying developmental origins of health and disease. This review will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms in heart development as well as aberrant epigenetic regulation contributing to cardiovascular disease. Additionally, we will address recent advances targeting epigenetic mechanisms as potential therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:25572405

  7. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D; Taylor, Robert L; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  8. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:26729106

  9. Vitamin D and ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lund, B; Badskjaer, J; Lund, B; Soerensen, O H

    1978-11-01

    Vitamin D has been proposed as a risk factor of ischaemic heart disease. In 12 patients with acute myocardial infarction the major circulating vitamin D metabolite, 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol (25-HCC), did not show any fluctuations during the first 4 days after onset of symptoms. The serum 25-HCC level was then measured in 128 patients consecutively admitted because of chest pain, 53 of whom had myocardial infarction and 75 had angina pectoris. The values found did not differ from those measured in 409 normal persons. The seasonal variations of serum 25-HCC were less pronounced in heart patients than in normals, probably due to less sun exposure in the summer months. The levels of serum 25-HCC did not correlate with the concentrations of serum cholesterol, glycerides, calcium or magnesium. Low serum calcium and magnesium were observed in all patients. Serum calcium was further reduced in the course of acute myocardial infarctions while serum parathyroid hormone rose significantly. We conclude that patients with ischaemic heart disease are not ingesting or producing in their skin elevated amount of vitamin D. PMID:744575

  10. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities

    PubMed Central

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-01-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context. PMID:23680886

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease? Major Signs and Symptoms The main sign of heart valve ... legs, abdomen, and veins in the neck Other Signs and Symptoms Heart valve disease can cause chest ...

  12. Programming and reprogramming a human heart cell

    PubMed Central

    Sahara, Makoto; Santoro, Federica; Chien, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    The latest discoveries and advanced knowledge in the fields of stem cell biology and developmental cardiology hold great promise for cardiac regenerative medicine, enabling researchers to design novel therapeutic tools and approaches to regenerate cardiac muscle for diseased hearts. However, progress in this arena has been hampered by a lack of reproducible and convincing evidence, which at best has yielded modest outcomes and is still far from clinical practice. To address current controversies and move cardiac regenerative therapeutics forward, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the key cellular and molecular programs involved in human cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration. In this review, we consider the fundamental principles that govern the “programming” and “reprogramming” of a human heart cell and discuss updated therapeutic strategies to regenerate a damaged heart. PMID:25712211

  13. Current applications of lasers in heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Garrett; Chan, Ming C.; Mason, Dean T.

    1993-03-01

    Although the laser has been in existence for abut 30 years, its application in heart disease has only been examined in the past decade. Much attention has been given its exciting potential in treating coronary artery disease. Transmitted through a catheter comprised of one or more thin optical fibers which can be threaded nonsurgically into the coronary artery, the laser can ablate atherosclerotic plaque that obstructs the artery and diminishes blood flow to the myocardium. In clinical studies, the laser can treat some obstructive lesions that are not suitable for balloon angioplasty (i.e., long and diffuse lesions, very tight stenoses, ostial lesions, calcified lesions). In patients who failed balloon angioplasty due to severe dissection or abrupt closure, the laser may seal up the dissections and restore antegrade blood flow. In addition, the laser may have other applications and treatment modalities that are still under investigation. It may ablate ectopic ventricular foci, or terminate supraventricular tachyrhythmia by destroying the heart's abnormal conduction pathways. It can cut the hypertrophied septum that is associated with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, or create a channel in the atrial septum as a palliative procedure in newborns with transposition of the great vessels. It may provide a wider orifice for blood flow within the heart in infants with pulmonary outflow obstruction and in adults with aortic valvular stenosis. It is also capable of fusing small thin-walled blood vessels together. Further, a more intriguing possibility is its use to bore several tiny channels in the myocardium to allow oxygenated blood from within the ventricular chamber to perfuse the ischemic heart tissue.

  14. Environmental stress, reactivity and ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Krantz, D S; Raisen, S E

    1988-03-01

    This article provides an overview of work in two areas of biobehavioural research: the effects of environmental stress and the role of psychophysiologic reactivity in the development of ischaemic heart disease. Attention is given first to evidence that low socio-economic status, low social support, and occupational settings characterized by high demands and low levels of control over the job are associated with increased coronary risk. Also discussed is a promising animal primate model of social stress and its role in development of coronary atherosclerosis. Next, we discuss physiological responsiveness (reactivity) to emotional stress, which is being studied as a marker of processes involved in the development of cardiovascular disease. Stress and psychophysiological reactivity constitute promising targets for research on biobehavioural antecedents of coronary disease and for clinical intervention studies. However, further evidence is needed before these variables can be regarded as proven coronary risk factors. PMID:3129010

  15. Republished: drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-03-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:23417686

  16. Drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:22875739

  17. Oxidative DNA damage measured in human lymphocytes: large differences between sexes and between countries, and correlations with heart disease mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Collins, A R; Gedik, C M; Olmedilla, B; Southon, S; Bellizzi, M

    1998-10-01

    The 'antioxidant hypothesis' proposes that vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids, and other antioxidants occurring in fruit and vegetables afford protection against heart disease and cancer by preventing oxidative damage to lipids and to DNA, respectively. To test elements of this hypothesis, we have measured blood levels of dietary antioxidants, and 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) concentrations in lymphocyte DNA, in healthy men and women from five European countries: France, Ireland, The Netherlands, Spain, and the U.K. Volunteers, aged 25 45, all nonsmokers, gave blood samples before and after a 12-wk carotenoid supplementation regime. Vitamin C was measured in plasma and vitamin E and carotenoids were measured in serum by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 8-oxo-dG was assayed by HPLC (with coulometric detection) in DNA isolated from lymphocytes from the same blood samples. Mean values were calculated for groups of volunteers at each sampling time according to country, sex, and supplementation (between 9 and 24 individual samples contributing to each mean). We found that 8-oxo-dG levels in lymphocyte DNA vary significantly according to sex and country. A low mean 8-oxo-dG concentration is seen in DNA of women from all five countries, and of men from France and Spain. 8-oxo-dG is significantly higher (up to about threefold) in lymphocyte DNA from men in Ireland and the U.K. Oxidative DNA damage is not significantly affected by carotenoid supplementation; nor is there any association with mean baseline levels of antioxidants, which are generally similar in the five countries. The five countries sampled lie on an axis from northern to southern Europe with a steep gradient in terms of premature heart disease. There is a strong association between premature coronary heart disease mortality in men and the mean levels of 8-oxo-dG for the five countries (r = 0.95, P < 0.01). Women have low coronary heart disease mortality rates, which do not correlate with 8-oxo

  18. Haemostatic defects in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, P; Värendh, G; Lundström, N R

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of defects of the haemostatic mechanism in 41 children with cyanotic congenital heart disease concluded that such abnormalities were common and normally involved factors synthesised in the liver, that is the vitamin K dependent factors (rothrombin, factors VII and IX) and factor V. No evidence was found of activation of the coagulation or fibrinolytic systems. The defects can be explained by deficient synthesis resulting from systemic hypoxia as well as from sluggishness of the local microcirculation caused by high blood viscosity. Vitamin K parenterally had no demonstrable effect. Replacement of these factors, possibly combined with measures to improve the microcirculation, therefore, appears to be the appropriate treatment. PMID:426953

  19. Chorea, polycythaemis, and cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, P D; Prosser, R; Wells, C E

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of polycythaemic chorea are described, both of which were complicated by severe heart disease. The first was a child with patent ductus arteriosus and coarctation of the aorta causing severe cyanosis and secondary polycythaemia. Chorea began intermittently at an early age, becoming continuous by his fifth birthday. The second was a middle-aged male with tight mitral stenosis and a story of paralytic chorea in his teens. Polycythaemia rubra vera was eventually diagnosed two years after mitral valvotomy, some seven years after the onset of chorea. Images PMID:1185193

  20. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Oster, Matthew E; Kochilas, Lazaros

    2016-03-01

    Screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the United States Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Since that time, CCHD screening with pulse oximetry has become nearly universal for newborns born in the United States. There are various algorithms in use. Although the goal of the screening program is to identify children who may have CCHD, most newborns who have a low oxygen saturation will not have CCHD. Further study is needed to determine optimal guidelines for CCHD screening in special settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, areas in high altitude, and home births. PMID:26876122

  1. Congenital Heart Disease and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Mike John; Shapiro, Adam J; Kennedy, Marcus Peter

    2016-03-01

    Through the better understanding of the genetics and clinical associations of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), an autosomal recessive disorder of ciliary motility and mucociliary clearance, the association between PCD and heterotaxic congenital heart disease (CHD) has been established. In parallel, research into the cause of CHD has elucidated further the role of ciliary function on the development of normal cardiovascular structure. Increased awareness by clinicians regarding this elevated risk of PCD in patients with CHD will allow for more comprehensive screening and identification of cases in this high-risk group with earlier diagnosis leading to improved health outcomes. PMID:26545972

  2. Atrial Macroreentry in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Darragh J; Sanders, Prashanthan; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C

    2015-01-01

    Macroreentrant atrial tachycardia is a common complication following surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD), and is often highly symptomatic with potentially significant hamodynamic consequences. Medical management is often unsuccessful, requiring the use of invasive procedures. Cavotricuspid isthmus dependent flutter is the most common circuit but atypical circuits also exist, involving sites of surgical intervention or areas of scar related to abnormal hemodynamics. Ablation can be technically challenging, due to complex anatomy, and difficulty with catheter stability. A thorough assessment of the pa-tients status and pre-catheter ablation planning is critical to successfully managing these patients. PMID:25308809

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miall-Allen, V. M.; Kemp, G. J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Taylor, D. J.; Radda, G. K.; Haworth, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of studying myocardial and skeletal muscle bioenergetics using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in babies and young children with congenital heart disease. SUBJECTS: 16 control subjects aged 5 months to 24 years and 18 patients with CHD, aged 7 months to 23 years, of whom 11 had cyanotic CHD, five had cardiac failure, and two had had a Senning procedure. DESIGN: 31P MRS was carried out using a 1.9 Tesla horizontal 65 cm bore whole body magnet to study the myocardium in 10 patients and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) in 14 patients, eight of whom were exercised, together with appropriate controls. RESULTS: In hypoxaemic patients, in skeletal muscle at rest intracellular pH (pHi) was abnormally high [7.06 (SEM 0.04) v 7.04 (0.05), P < 0.01] and showed a positive correlation with haemoglobin (P < 0.03). On exercise, hypoxaemic patients fatigued more quickly but end-exercise pHi and phosphocreatine recovery were normal, implying that an equivalent but smaller amount of work had been performed. End-exercise ADP concentration was lower. On recovery, the initial rate of phosphocreatine resynthesis was low. Skeletal muscle bioenergetics were within normal limits in those in heart failure. In the myocardium, the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio was similar in controls and hypoxaemic subjects, but low in those in heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: In heart failure, the myocardial phosphocreatine/ATP ratio was reduced, as in adults, while resting skeletal muscle studies were normal. By contrast, hypoxaemic children had normal myocardial bioenergetics, but showed skeletal muscle alkalinity, and energy reserves were more readily depleted on exercise. On recovery, the initially slow phosphocreatine resynthesis rate reflects a low rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis, probably due to an inadequate oxygen supply. 31P MRS offers a safe, non-invasive method of studying myocardial and skeletal muscle bioenergetics in children as young as 5 months

  4. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have any other heart problems. Echocardiography Echo uses sound waves to create a moving picture of your heart ... the surface of your chest. The transducer sends sound waves through your chest wall to your heart. Echoes ...

  5. Cereal grains and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Truswell, A S

    2002-01-01

    Cereal grains and their products provide around 30% of total energy intake in British adults, (much more than any of the other major food groups). Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the largest single cause of death in Britain and many other Western countries. This review examines the question whether there is a relation between cereal consumption and CHD. Several of the nutrients in cereals have known potential for reducing risk factors for CHD: the linoleic acid, fibre, vitamin E, selenium and folate. Cereals also contain phytoestrogens of the lignan family and several phenolic acids with antioxidant properties. Processing generally reduces the content of these nutrients and bioprotective substances. Although cereals at the farm gate are very low in salt, processed cereal foods, eg bread and some breakfast cereals, are high-salt foods and thus could contribute to raising blood pressure. Human experiments have clearly shown that oat fibre tends to lower plasma total and LDL cholesterol but wheat fibre does not. Rice bran and barley may also lower cholesterol but most people do not eat enough barley to have an effect. Cereal foods with low glycaemic index such as pasta and oats are beneficial for people with diabetes and might lower plasma lipids. Between 1996 and 2001 an accumulation of five very large cohort studies in the USA, Finland and Norway have all reported that subjects consuming relatively large amounts of whole grain cereals have significantly lower rates of CHD. This confirms an earlier report from a small British cohort. The protective effect does not seem to be due to cholesterol-lowering. While cohort studies have shown this consistent protective effect of whole grain cereals, there has been (only one) randomised controlled secondary prevention trial of advice to eat more cereal fibre. In this there was no reduction of the rate of reinfarction. The trial had some weaknesses, eg there were eight different diets, compliance was not checked objectively

  6. [Association between function of selenium and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    An excessive oxidative stress is considered to be responsible for the development and progression of heart disease. Deficiency of trace elements with antioxidative activities is present in patients with heart disease. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase(GPx), one of the central players of the heart's antioxidant system, and it's deficiency is implicated in certain types of heart disease. Our study suggests that myocardial oxidative stress in chronic heart failure may be augmented at least in part by concomitant GPx deficiency, and that the administration of Se could rescue the exhaustion of this selenoprotein, resulting in improved left ventricular function. PMID:27455811

  7. Valvular heart disease in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuily, Stéphane; Huttin, Olivier; Mohamed, Shirine; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Selton-Suty, Christine; Wahl, Denis

    2013-04-01

    Heart valve disease (HVD) is the most frequent cardiac manifestation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), with prevalence of 30 %. The definition is based on the presence of thickening or vegetation of the valves (mainly mitral and aortic) as described by Libman and Sacks for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Transthoracic and/or transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE and TEE, respectively) enable early and accurate diagnosis and help avoid misdiagnosis as rheumatic valve disease. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in SLE patients is associated with a threefold greater risk of HVD, confirming the crucial importance of these antibodies in the pathogenic process, leading to thrombotic manifestations on valves because of hypercoagulability. Natural history is characterized by worsening of HVD over time with an increased risk for stroke. APS patients undergoing valve-replacement surgery are at high risk of thrombotic and bleeding complications. Thus aPL-associated HVD has affects clinical management of APS patients. PMID:23456852

  8. The Apexcardiogram in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Howard H.

    1972-01-01

    The apexcardiogram (acg), when recorded serially in patients with acute myocardial infarction (ami), preinfarction angina (pia) and stable ischemic heart disease (ihd), appeared to reflect the abnormal patterns of contraction of the left ventricle in these conditions. Thus, paradoxical bulging (dyskinesis) of the systolic wave or increased “a” wave amplitude with gradual recovery over several weeks was found in all 60 patients with documented ami and in 18 of 20 patients with pia. Electrocardiogram changes were noted, however, in only eight of the pia patients. Changes in the acg frequently antedated ischemia in the ecg. Paradoxical bulging of the systolic wave of the acg was additionally noted in patients during the pain of angina pectoris but this promptly disappeared after the administration of nitroglycerine. Patients with classic angina often had normal resting ecg's but abnormal resting acg's. In contrast to the relatively transient abnormalities noted above, the acg remained unchanged in most patients with stable ihd during follow-up of three months to two years. Patients undergoing coronary bypass operations, however, showed immediate improvement in the acg in the postoperative period. These results suggest the acg reflects the contractile pattern of the left ventricle, and may be an indirectly recorded ventriculogram. Its enhanced sensitivity and the earlier development of changes in comparison to the ecg make this a valuable tool in the study of patients with heart disease. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:5008498

  9. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  10. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each year, the American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and other government agencies, brings together the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases, and their risk factors and presents them in its Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update. The Statistical Update is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, healthcare policy makers, media professionals, the lay public, and many others who seek the best national data available on disease morbidity and mortality and the risks, quality of care, medical procedures and operations, and costs associated with the management of these diseases in a single document. Indeed, since 1999, the Statistical Update has been cited more than 8700 times in the literature (including citations of all annual versions). In 2009 alone, the various Statistical Updates were cited ≈1600 times (data from ISI Web of Science). In recent years, the Statistical Update has undergone some major changes with the addition of new chapters and major updates across multiple areas. For this year’s edition, the Statistics Committee, which produces the document for the AHA, updated all of the current chapters with the most recent nationally representative data and inclusion of relevant articles from the literature over the past year and added a new chapter detailing how family history and genetics play a role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Also, the 2011 Statistical Update is a major source for monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in the population, with a focus on progress toward achievement of the AHA’s 2020 Impact Goals. Below are a few highlights from this year’s Update. Death Rates From CVD Have Declined, Yet the Burden of Disease Remains High The 2007 overall death rate from CVD (International Classification of Diseases 10, I00–I99) was 251.2 per 100 000. The rates were 294

  11. Vegetarianism, coronary disease risk factors and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Thorogood, M

    1994-02-01

    Recent studies of vegetarians confirm a lower risk of fatal heart disease amongst such subjects. Lipid levels are lower in vegetarians, even when the diet of comparable meat-eaters is low in fat. This may partly explain the lower mortality, but it is not clear whether the absence of meat or some other aspect of the vegetarian diet is causal in this relationship. PMID:15559026

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  13. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention. PMID:25037633

  14. Gallstone Disease and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Yang, Ling; Shen, Jie; Wang, Shanqing; Li, Mingqiang; Liu, Yongmei; Zhang, Libo; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gallstone disease (GSD) is related to multiple cardiovascular risk factors; the present study was to prospectively examine the association between GSD and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Approach and Results We examined the association of GSD with IHD among 199,292 men and 288,081 women aged 30–79 years in the China Kadoorie Biobank study. Participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the association of GSD with IHD. The prevalence of self-reported GSD was 3.7% in men and 7.3% in women at baseline. During 3,431,124 person-years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median, 7.2 years), we documented 10,245 incident IHD cases in men and 14,714 in women. As compared with men without GSD at baseline, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for IHD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.22) for men with GSD; the respective hazard ratio was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.20–1.34) in women and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.17–1.28) in the whole cohort. The sex difference in IHD risk associated with GSD was statistically significant (P=0.009 for interaction with sex). In addition, we found the association between GSD and IHD was stronger in non-hypertensive than hypertensive women (P<0.001 for interaction). Conclusions In this large prospective study, the presence of GSD was associated with an increased risk of incident IHD, independent of other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Our findings suggest novel prevention strategy to mitigate heart disease through improvement of gastrointestinal health. PMID:26272939

  15. Heart research advances using database search engines, Human Protein Atlas and the Sydney Heart Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Amy; Estigoy, Colleen; Raftery, Mark; Cameron, Darryl; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Lal, Sean; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2013-10-01

    This Methodological Review is intended as a guide for research students who may have just discovered a human "novel" cardiac protein, but it may also help hard-pressed reviewers of journal submissions on a "novel" protein reported in an animal model of human heart failure. Whether you are an expert or not, you may know little or nothing about this particular protein of interest. In this review we provide a strategic guide on how to proceed. We ask: How do you discover what has been published (even in an abstract or research report) about this protein? Everyone knows how to undertake literature searches using PubMed and Medline but these are usually encyclopaedic, often producing long lists of papers, most of which are either irrelevant or only vaguely relevant to your query. Relatively few will be aware of more advanced search engines such as Google Scholar and even fewer will know about Quertle. Next, we provide a strategy for discovering if your "novel" protein is expressed in the normal, healthy human heart, and if it is, we show you how to investigate its subcellular location. This can usually be achieved by visiting the website "Human Protein Atlas" without doing a single experiment. Finally, we provide a pathway to discovering if your protein of interest changes its expression level with heart failure/disease or with ageing. PMID:23856366

  16. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  17. Pathobiology of Ischemic Heart Disease: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Buja, L Maximilian; Vander Heide, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a perspective on knowledge of ischemic heart disease (IHD) obtained from the contemporary era of research which began in the 1960s and has continued to the present day. Important discoveries have been made by basic and translational scientists and clinicians. Pathologists have contributed significantly to insights obtained from experimental studies and clinicopathological studies in humans. The review also provides a perspective for future directions in research in IHD aimed at increasing basic knowledge and developing additional therapeutic options for patients with IHD. PMID:26897485

  18. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  19. MicroRNAs in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tanya; Rajakaruna, Cha; Caputo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a broad term which encompasses a spectrum of pathology, the most common phenotypes include atrial septal defects (ASDs), ventricular septal defects (VSDs), patent ductus arteriosus (PAD) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). The impact of CHD is profound and it is estimated to be responsible for over 40% of prenatal deaths. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, highly conserved, non-coding RNAs which have complex roles in a variety of pathophysiological states. miRs are post-transcriptional negative regulators of gene expression. Individual miRs are known to exert effects in multiple target genes, therefore the altered expression of a single miR could influence an entire gene network resulting in complex pathological states. Recent evidences suggest a role in the dysregulation of miRs in CHD. Mouse knock out models have contributed to our knowledge base revealing specific patterns of miR expression in cardiovascular physiology and pathological states. Specific miRs necessary for embryonic cardiac development have been revealed. Dysregulation of these miRs has been shown to cause structural abnormalities in the heart and vasculature, thus furthering our understanding of the processes which result in CHD. These advances have provided new insight into the signalling pathways responsible for CHD. Furthermore, this new appreciation for miRs in the development of CHD has uncovered their potential for new therapeutic targets where modulated miR activity may reduce the burden of disease. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the cause-effect relationships of miRs in CHD and consider their potential as a therapeutic targets and biomarkers in this clinical setting. PMID:26734643

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:25650280

  1. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential. PMID:26957336

  2. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kimberly Y; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    On March 16, 2012, the Ethics of the Heart 2012: Ethical and Policy Challenges in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Conference took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The first session focused on the ethics surrounding genetic testing in patients with congenital heart disease. Summarized here is the introductory presentation given by Dr Elizabeth Goldmuntz entitled "The Role of Genetic Testing in Congenital Heart Disease," followed by a case presentation given by Dr Lisa D'Alessandro. The case and the panel discussion that ensued highlight several ethical principles and challenges in this unique patient population. PMID:23799755

  3. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Heart." Managing Stress Research shows that strong emotions, such as anger, can trigger a heart attack. Learning how to manage stress , relax, and cope with problems can improve your emotional and physical health. Medicines Medicines are ...

  4. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in adults may be related to: Valve calcification Endocarditis Rheumatic fever In children, abnormal heart murmurs may ... Problem: Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation Heart Valves and Infective Endocarditis • Risks, Signs and Symptoms • Accurate Diagnosis • Treatment Options • ...

  5. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... may help me? ©2015, American Heart Association Multi-language Fact Sheet Topics Heart-related Conditions What is ...

  6. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population. PMID:26594349

  7. Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159330.html Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Prognosis may be ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Heart Diseases Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  8. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  9. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group on research in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roberta G; Pearson, Gail D; Barst, Robyn J; Child, John S; del Nido, Pedro; Gersony, Welton M; Kuehl, Karen S; Landzberg, Michael J; Myerson, Merle; Neish, Steven R; Sahn, David J; Verstappen, Amy; Warnes, Carole A; Webb, Catherine L

    2006-02-21

    The Working Group on research in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) was convened in September 2004 under the sponsorship of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the Office of Rare Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, to make recommendations on research needs. The purpose of the Working Group was to advise the NHLBI on the current state of the science in ACHD and barriers to optimal clinical care, and to make specific recommendations for overcoming those barriers. The members of the Working Group were chosen to provide expert input on a broad range of research issues from both scientific and lay perspectives. The Working Group reviewed data on the epidemiology of ACHD, long-term outcomes of complex cardiovascular malformations, issues in assessing morphology and function with current imaging techniques, surgical and catheter-based interventions, management of related conditions including pregnancy and arrhythmias, quality of life, and informatics. After research and training barriers were discussed, the Working Group recommended outreach and educational programs for adults with congenital heart disease, a network of specialized adult congenital heart disease regional centers, technology development to support advances in imaging and modeling of abnormal structure and function, and a consensus on appropriate training for physicians to provide care for adults with congenital heart disease. PMID:16487831

  10. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  11. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-01

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  12. State of the art coronary heart disease risk estimations based on the Framingham heart study.

    PubMed

    Reissigová, J; Tomecková, M

    2005-12-01

    The aim was to review the most interesting articles dealing with estimations of an individual's absolute coronary heart disease risk based on the Framingham heart study. Besides the Framingham coronary heart disease risk functions, results of validation studies of these Framingham risk functions are discussed. In general, the Framingham risk functions overestimated an individual's absolute risk in external (non-Framingham) populations with a lower occurrence of coronary heart disease compared with the Framingham population, and underestimated it in populations with a higher occurrence of coronary heart disease. Even if the calibration accuracy of the Framingham risk functions were not satisfying, the Framingham risk functions were able to rank individuals according to risk from low-risk to high-risk groups, with the discrimination ability of 60% and more. PMID:16419382

  13. The Role of Beta-Blocker in Heart Failure in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Norozi, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to the enormous progress in the field of cardiac surgery and paediatric cardiology since the mid of 20th century, more and more children with congenital heart defects reach the adulthood. This on the other hand encounter physician and patients various problems due to late complications after the heart surgery like congestive heart failure, arrhythmia and sudden death. One of the challenging area is the medical management of heart failure in these patients with complex anatomy and hemodynamics. The lack of evidence of the effectiveness of the anti congestive medications in this population in from of large randomized controlled trials, makes it difficult to establish universally accepted therapy guidelines. In this article we will review the evidence of the beta-blockers in heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease. Also we will discuss the mechanisms of heart failure in this patient's cohort and will review the literature with respect to the use of neurohormonal antagonists in congenital heart disease. There is an urgent need to initiate well-designed clinical trials to prove if the positive results of neurohormonal blockade in acquired heart failure in adults can be translated in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25198738

  14. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future. PMID:27509303

  15. CoQ₁₀ Function and Role in Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Macdonald, Peter; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential lipid of cells present in all cellular compartments. The functions of CoQ in mitochondrial respiration and as an antioxidant are established, although the lipid likely has additional, presently unknown, roles. While the therapeutic utility of CoQ10 supplements is recognized in the rare cases of primary CoQ10 deficiencies, a potential role for CoQ10 supplements in cardiovascular disease, particularly heart failure, has also been studied for over 40 years. This review summarizes our current knowledge in these areas derived from animal studies and human trials. Current evidence for a benefit of CoQ10 supplements in diseases other than primary CoQ10 deficiencies is insufficient. PMID:25974695

  16. A fast method to measure the 3D surface of the human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; Su, Xianyu; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjing; Zhang, Qican

    2003-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) automatic measurement of an object is widely used in many fields. In Biology and Medicine society, it can be applicable for surgery, orthopedics, viscera disease analysis and diagnosis etc. Here a new fast method to measure the 3D surface of human heart is proposed which can provide doctors a lot of information, such as the size of heart profile, the sizes of the left or right heart ventricle, and the curvature center and radius of heart ventricle, to fully analyze and diagnose pathobiology of human heart. The new fast method is optically and noncontacted and based upon the Phase Measurement Profilometry (PMP), which has higher measuring precision. A human heart specimen experiment has verified our method.

  17. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; de Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Methods Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes. PMID:25004417

  18. An original discovery: selenium deficiency and Keshan disease (an endemic heart disease).

    PubMed

    Chen, Junshi

    2012-01-01

    This is a review article telling a 50-years old story about the studies on selenium deficiency and Keshan disease in China, an endemic heart disease with high case-fatality, as an example of translational research. Extensive cross-sectional epidemiological studies showed that low selenium concentrations in cereal grains and low selenium status of local residents were associated with the occurrence of Keshan disease. Several large population based intervention trials using oral administration of sodium selenite tablets showed significant reduction of Keshan disease incidence. Based on the above evidence, it was concluded that selenium deficiency is the major cause of Keshan disease, although other etiological factors could not be ruled out. The implications of the findings include: provided critical scientific evidence for selenium being an essential trace element for humans; as scientific basis for identifying minimum requirement and RDA/RNI for selenium; and as solid reference for the formulation of effective preventive measures for Keshan disease in China. PMID:22705420

  19. Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Mohammad Nurulqadr

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell transplantation has emerged as a novel treatment option for ischemic heart disease. Different cell types have been utilized and the recent development of induced pluripotent stem cells has generated tremendous excitement in the regenerative field. Bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cell transplantation in preclinical large animal models of postinfarction left ventricular remodeling has demonstrated long-term functional and bioenergetic improvement. These beneficial effects are observed despite no significant engraftment of bone marrow cells in the myocardium and even lower differentiation of these cells into cardiomyocytes. It is thought to be related to the paracrine effect of these stem cells, which secrete factors that lead to long-term gene expression changes in the host myocardium, thereby promoting neovascularization, inhibiting apoptosis, and stimulating resident cardiac progenitor cells. Future studies are warranted to examine the changes in the recipient myocardium after stem cell transplantation and to investigate the signaling pathways involved in these effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1879–1897. PMID:20687781

  20. Drug-induced valvular heart disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Andrejak, Michel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Numerous reports have shown an unquestionable association between fibrotic valve disease and the following drugs: ergot alkaloids (such as methysergide and ergotamine), ergot-derived dopaminergic agonists (such as pergolide and cabergoline) and drugs metabolized into norfenfluramine (such as fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine and benfluorex). This review focuses on different aspects of drug-induced valvular heart disease: historical background; echocardiographic features; different drugs recognized as being responsible for valvular heart disease; and pathophysiology. PMID:23769407

  1. Autophagy and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peidu; Mizushima, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a major intracellular degradative process that delivers cytoplasmic materials to the lysosome for degradation. Since the discovery of autophagy-related (Atg) genes in the 1990s, there has been a proliferation of studies on the physiological and pathological roles of autophagy in a variety of autophagy knockout models. However, direct evidence of the connections between ATG gene dysfunction and human diseases has emerged only recently. There are an increasing number of reports showing that mutations in the ATG genes were identified in various human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases, infectious diseases, and cancers. Here, we review the major advances in identification of mutations or polymorphisms of the ATG genes in human diseases. Current autophagy-modulating compounds in clinical trials are also summarized. PMID:24323045

  2. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect. PMID:27323105

  3. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  4. The Heart Saver Handbook. A Manual for Those Working for Heart Disease Prevention through Dietary Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Heart Association, IL.

    This handbook for nutritionists and dietitians as well as other health professionals (physicians, nurses, and health educators) is a guide to the content and conduct of the Heart Saver Program, a health education program designed to help prevent heart disease by bringing about significant changes in the food habits of the public. The content…

  5. Myocardial commitment from human pluripotent stem cells: Rapid production of human heart grafts.

    PubMed

    Garreta, Elena; de Oñate, Lorena; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Oria, Roger; Tarantino, Carolina; Climent, Andreu M; Marco, Andrés; Samitier, Mireia; Martínez, Elena; Valls-Margarit, Maria; Matesanz, Rafael; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Montserrat, Nuria

    2016-08-01

    Genome editing on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) together with the development of protocols for organ decellularization opens the door to the generation of autologous bioartificial hearts. Here we sought to generate for the first time a fluorescent reporter human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line by means of Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to efficiently produce cardiomyocyte-like cells (CLCs) from hPSCs and repopulate decellularized human heart ventricles for heart engineering. In our hands, targeting myosin heavy chain locus (MYH6) with mCherry fluorescent reporter by TALEN technology in hESCs did not alter major pluripotent-related features, and allowed for the definition of a robust protocol for CLCs production also from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in 14 days. hPSCs-derived CLCs (hPSCs-CLCs) were next used to recellularize acellular cardiac scaffolds. Electrophysiological responses encountered when hPSCs-CLCs were cultured on ventricular decellularized extracellular matrix (vdECM) correlated with significant increases in the levels of expression of different ion channels determinant for calcium homeostasis and heart contractile function. Overall, the approach described here allows for the rapid generation of human cardiac grafts from hPSCs, in a total of 24 days, providing a suitable platform for cardiac engineering and disease modeling in the human setting. PMID:27179434

  6. The Arachidonate 15-Lipoxygenase Enzyme Product 15-HETE Is Present in Heart Tissue from Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Enhances Clot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lundqvist, Annika; Sandstedt, Mikael; Sandstedt, Joakim; Wickelgren, Ruth; Hansson, Göran I.; Jeppsson, Anders; Hultén, Lillemor Mattsson

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is a major cause of death and morbidity and the search for novel therapeutic targets is still required. We have previously shown that the enzyme arachidonate 15 lipoxygenase (ALOX15), which catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to 15-hydroxy eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), is highly expressed in ischemic heart tissue, but its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease is unclear. Here we showed that expression of ALOX15, but not ALOX12 or ALOX15B, was increased in ischemic versus non-ischemic human heart biopsy samples. A similar ALOX expression pattern was found in hypoxic human cardiomyocytes and cardiac endothelial cells. We also showed that levels of 15-HETE were significantly higher in ischemic versus non-ischemic human heart biopsy samples and showed a tendency to increase in serum from the patients with ischemic heart disease. Moreover, hypoxia increased the production of 15-HETE levels from human cardiomyocytes and cardiac endothelial cells. The hypoxia-induced increase in 15-HETE levels from human cardiomyocytes was inhibited by the ALOX15 inhibitor baicalein. Finally, by using intrinsic rotational thromboelastometry, we showed that human whole blood clotted faster in the presence of 15-HETE. In summary, we propose that increased ALOX15 expression in heart tissue under ischemic conditions may lead to increased production of 15-HETE, potentially contributing to thrombosis. PMID:27552229

  7. Potential effects of environmental chemical contamination in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Francesca; Chiappa, Enrico; Gargani, Luna; Picano, Eugenio

    2014-04-01

    There is compelling evidence that prenatal exposures to environmental xenobiotics adversely affect human development and childhood. Among all birth defects, congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent of all congenital malformations and remains the leading cause of death. It has been estimated that in most cases the causes of heart defects remain unknown, while a growing number of studies have indicated the potential role of environmental agents as risk factors in CHD occurrence. In particular, maternal exposure to chemicals during the first trimester of pregnancy represents the most critical window of exposure for CHD. Specific classes of xenobiotics (e.g. organochlorine pesticides, organic solvents, air pollutants) have been identified as potential risk factors for CHD. Nonetheless, the knowledge gained is currently still incomplete as a consequence of the frequent heterogeneity of the methods applied and the difficulty in estimating the net effect of environmental pollution on the pregnant mother. The presence of multiple sources of pollution, both indoor and outdoor, together with individual lifestyle factors, may represent a further confounding element for association with the disease. A future new approach for research should probably focus on individual measurements of professional, domestic, and urban exposure to physical and chemical pollutants in order to accurately retrace the environmental exposure of parents of affected offspring during the pre-conceptional and pregnancy periods. PMID:24452958

  8. Adult congenital heart disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension: the Texas Adult Congenital Heart Program experience.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wayne J; Parekh, Dhaval R; Safdar, Zeenat

    2011-11-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a common structural defect of the heart or major blood vessels. Patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) have medical needs that are distinct from those of pediatric patients with CHD, and the transition into adult health care is important for management of the patient with ACHD. A large proportion of patients with CHD develop diseases and complications associated with the long-term stress of intracardiac shunts. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a significant complication of some CHD lesions. The treatment of these patients remains challenging due to their combined heart and lung disease, and multidisciplinary care is ofen necessitated for a variety of secondary conditions. A number of treatment options are available for the management of PAH associated with CHD, including prostanoids, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and endothelin receptor antagonists. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of such ACHD patients with PAH. PMID:22104452

  9. Running, Heart Disease, and the Ironic Death of Jim Fixx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2002-01-01

    Runner Jim Fixx wrote a book about running and died young of a heart attack while running. Fixx and other authors believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a way of life and cure, advising readers to listen to their bodies instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy explains his behavior…

  10. Identification of mouse heart transcriptomic network sensitive to various heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Eui; Park, Inju; Cha, Hyeseon; Rho, Seong-Hwan; Park, Woo Jin; Cho, Chunghee; Kim, Do Han

    2008-05-01

    Exploring biological systems from highly complex datasets is an important task for systems biology. The present study examined co-expression dynamics of mouse heart transcriptome by spectral graph clustering (SGC) to identify a heart transcriptomic network. SGC of microarray data produced 17 classified biological conditions (called condition spectrum, CS) and co-expression patterns by generating bi-clusters. The results showed dynamic co-expression patterns with a modular structure enriched in heart-related CS (CS-1 and -13) containing abundant heart-related microarray data. Consequently, a mouse heart transcriptomic network was constructed by clique analysis from the gene clusters exclusively present in the heart-related CS; 31 cliques were used for constructing the network. The participating genes in the network were closely associated with important cardiac functions (e. g., development, lipid and glycogen metabolisms). Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database indicates that mutations of the genes in the network induced serious heart diseases. Many of the tested genes in the network showed significantly altered gene expression in an animal model of hypertrophy. The results suggest that the present approach is critical for constructing a heart-related transcriptomic network and for deducing important genes involved in the pathogenesis of various heart diseases. PMID:18320566

  11. A Common Polymorphism of the Human Cardiac Sodium Channel Alpha Subunit (SCN5A) Gene Is Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death in Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcsa, Boglárka; Dénes, Réka; Vörös, Krisztina; Rácz, Gergely; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt; Törő, Klára; Keszler, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac death remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Recent research has shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cardiac death, and several genetic variants in novel candidate genes have been identified as risk factors. However, the vast majority of studies performed so far investigated genetic associations with specific forms of cardiac death only (sudden, arrhythmogenic, ischemic etc.). The aim of the present investigation was to find a genetic marker that can be used as a general, powerful predictor of cardiac death risk. To this end, a case-control association study was performed on a heterogeneous cohort of cardiac death victims (n=360) and age-matched controls (n=300). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from five candidate genes (beta2 adrenergic receptor, nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein, ryanodine receptor 2, sodium channel type V alpha subunit and transforming growth factor-beta receptor 2) that had previously been shown to associate with certain forms of cardiac death were genotyped using sequence-specific real-time PCR probes. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the CC genotype of the rs11720524 polymorphism in the SCN5A gene encoding a subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel occurred more frequently in the highly heterogeneous cardiac death cohort compared to the control population (p=0.019, odds ratio: 1.351). A detailed subgroup analysis uncovered that this effect was due to an association of this variant with cardiac death in chronic ischemic heart disease (p=0.012, odds ratio = 1.455). None of the other investigated polymorphisms showed association with cardiac death in this context. In conclusion, our results shed light on the role of this non-coding polymorphism in cardiac death in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Functional studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological background of this association. PMID:26146998

  12. Diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2013-03-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. An early and accurate diagnosis of IHD is necessary to improve outcomes. According to recent guidelines, the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is based on increased or decreased value of cardiospecific troponins with one measure exceeding the 99th percentile upper reference limit, associated with symptoms suggestive for myocardial ischemia, indicative electrocardiogram abnormalities, and evidence of recent myocardial functional impairment or intracoronary thrombosis. The recent advent of highly sensitive troponin immunoassays has represented a paradigm shift, wherein the improved analytical sensitivity has increased the negative predictive value, while contextually decreasing the diagnostic specificity of these tests. Although several additional biomarkers have been proposed as surrogate or in combination with troponins, there is little evidence that any of these will substantially improve AMI diagnosis. With regard to therapy, early mechanical (i.e., percutaneous coronary intervention, PCI) or pharmacological reperfusion should be performed early in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) within 12 h of symptom onset, whereas fibrinolysis may be considered in all other circumstances. Patients undergoing primary PCI should also receive a combination of double antiplatelet therapy (i.e., aspirin and adenosine diphosphate receptor blocker), associated with parenteral anticoagulation, preferably with low-molecular-weight heparin. In analogy with STEMI, a wealth of data shows that primary early invasive strategy (i.e., PCI) and antiplatelet therapy remains the cornerstone of management of patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Stem cell-based therapy has also emerged as a potentially therapeutic option, and there are ongoing efforts among several investigators to translate basic research into clinical practice. PMID:23378254

  13. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation. PMID:24565255

  14. ATROPHIC CARDIOMYOCYTE SIGNALING IN HYPERTENSIVE HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Ahokas, Robert A.; Marion, Tony N.; Darazi, Fahed Al; Gerling, Ivan C.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Cardinal pathologic features of hypertensive heart disease (HHD) include not only hypertrophied cardiomyocytes and foci of scattered microscopic scarring, a footprint of prior necrosis, but also small myocytes ensnared by fibrillar collagen where disuse atrophy with protein degradation would be predicted. Whether atrophic signaling is concordant with the appearance of HHD and involves oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unexplored. Herein, we examine these possibilities focusing on the left ventricle (LV) and cardiomyocytes harvested from hypertensive rats receiving 4 wks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) alone or together with ZnSO4, a nonvasoactive antioxidant, with the potential to attenuate atrophy and optimize hypertrophy. Compared to untreated age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by: a) LV hypertrophy with preserved systolic function; b) concordant cardiomyocyte atrophy (<1000 μm2) found at sites bordering on fibrosis where they were re-expressing β-myosin heavy chain; and c) upregulation of ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin-1, and elevated 8-isoprostane and unfolded protein ER response with mRNA upregulation of stress markers. ZnSO4 cotreatment reduced lipid peroxidation, fibrosis and the number of atrophic myocytes, together with a further increase in cell area and width of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improved systolic function, but did not attenuate elevated blood pressure. We conclude that atrophic signaling, concordant with hypertrophy, occurs in the presence of a reparative fibrosis and induction of oxidative and ER stress at sites of scarring where myocytes are atrophied. ZnSO4 cotreatment in HHD with ALDOST attenuates the number of atrophic myocytes, optimizes size of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improves systolic function. PMID:24084216

  15. Atrophic cardiomyocyte signaling in hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Ahokas, Robert A; Marion, Tony N; Al Darazi, Fahed; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2013-12-01

    Cardinal pathological features of hypertensive heart disease (HHD) include not only hypertrophied cardiomyocytes and foci of scattered microscopic scarring, a footprint of prior necrosis, but also small myocytes ensnared by fibrillar collagen where disuse atrophy with protein degradation would be predicted. Whether atrophic signaling is concordant with the appearance of HHD and involves oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unexplored. Herein, we examine these possibilities focusing on the left ventricle and cardiomyocytes harvested from hypertensive rats receiving 4 weeks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) alone or together with ZnSO₄, a nonvasoactive antioxidant, with the potential to attenuate atrophy and optimize hypertrophy. Compared with untreated age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by (1) left ventricle hypertrophy with preserved systolic function; (2) concordant cardiomyocyte atrophy (<1000 μm²) found at sites bordering on fibrosis where they were reexpressing β-myosin heavy chain; and (3) upregulation of ubiquitin ligases, muscle RING-finger protein-1 and atrogin-1, and elevated 8-isoprostane and unfolded protein ER response with messenger RNA upregulation of stress markers. ZnSO₄ cotreatment reduced lipid peroxidation, fibrosis, and the number of atrophic myocytes, together with a further increase in cell area and width of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improved systolic function but did not attenuate elevated blood pressure. We conclude that atrophic signaling, concordant with hypertrophy, occurs in the presence of a reparative fibrosis and induction of oxidative and ER stress at sites of scarring where myocytes are atrophied. ZnSO₄ cotreatment in HHD with ALDOST attenuates the number of atrophic myocytes, optimizes size of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improves systolic function. PMID:24084216

  16. Autophagosomes and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Beau, Isabelle; Mehrpour, Maryam; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-04-01

    The autophagosome is a double-membrane bound compartment that initiates macroautophagy, a degradative pathway for cytoplasmic material terminating in the lysosomal compartment. The discovery of ATG genes involved in the formation of autophagosomes has greatly increased our understanding of the molecular basis of macroautophagy, and its role in cell function. Macroautophagy plays a pivotal role in cell fitness by removing obsolete organelles and protein aggregates. Its stimulation is an adaptive response to stressful situations, such as nutrient deprivation, intended to maintain a level of ATP compatible with cell survival. Macroautophagy is central for organ homeostasis, embryonic development, and longevity. Malfunctioning autophagy is observed in many human diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac and muscular diseases, infectious and inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and obesity. Discovering potential drug therapies that can be used to modulate macroautophagy is a major challenge, and likely to enhance the therapeutic arsenal against many human diseases. PMID:21256243

  17. Modeling heart disease in a dish: From somatic cells to disease-relevant cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Fabian; Lyon, Robert C.; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    A scientific milestone that has tremendously impacted the cardiac research field has been the discovery and establishment of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). Key to this discovery has been uncovering a viable path in generating human patient and disease-specific cardiac cells to dynamically model and study human cardiac diseases in an in vitro setting. Recent studies have demonstrated that hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes can be used to model and recapitulate various known disease features in hearts of patient donors harboring genetic-based cardiac diseases. Experimental drugs have also been tested in this setting and shown to alleviate disease phenotypes in hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, further paving the way for therapeutic interventions for cardiac disease. Here, we review state-of-the-art methods to generate high-quality hiPSC and differentiate them towards cardiomyocytes as well as the full range of genetic-based cardiac diseases, which have been modeled using hiPSC. We also provide future perspectives on exploiting the potential of hiPSC to compliment existing studies and gain new insights into the mechanisms underlying cardiac disease. PMID:24054750

  18. Echocardiographic image of an active human heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Echocardiographic images provide quick, safe images of the heart as it beats. While a state-of-the art echocardiograph unit is part of the Human Research Facility on International Space Station, quick transmission of images and data to Earth is a challenge. NASA is developing techniques to improve the echocardiography available to diagnose sick astronauts as well as study the long-term effects of space travel on their health. Echocardiography uses ultrasound, generated in a sensor head placed against the patient's chest, to produce images of the structure of the heart walls and valves. However, ultrasonic imaging creates an enormous volume of data, up to 220 million bits per second. This can challenge ISS communications as well as Earth-based providers. Compressing data for rapid transmission back to Earth can degrade the quality of the images. Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation are working with NASA to develop compression techniques that meet imaging standards now used on the Internet and by the medical community, and that ensure that physicians receive quality diagnostic images.

  19. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Afra, Leila Ghanbari; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients’ sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson’s Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. Results: The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of sexual satisfaction in patients with exposure ischemic heart disease is similar to the people without exposure it. Moreover, the men and the patients who do not receive cardiac medications have higher levels of sexual satisfaction. Nurses who are providing care to patients with ischemic heart disease need to pay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues. PMID:26234982

  20. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  1. Who Is at Risk for Diabetic Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... may explain why symptoms aren't noticed. Other Risk Factors Other factors also can raise the risk of ... Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors article. Risk Factors You Can Control Unhealthy blood cholesterol levels . This ...

  2. Rheumatic heart disease in Tennessee: An overlooked diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shahana A; Exil, Vernat

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease, already a major burden in low- and middle-income countries, is becoming an emerging problem in high-income countries. Although acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease have almost been eradicated in areas with established economies, the emergence of this problem may be attributable to the migration from low-income to high-income settings. Between 2010 and 2012, we diagnosed a cluster of rheumatic heart disease cases in children from the Middle Tennessee area. The goal of this report is to increase awareness among clinicians as the incidence and prevalence of acute rheumatic fever remain relatively significant in large US metropolitan areas. Although acute rheumatic fever is seasonal, a high suspicion index may lead to the early diagnosis and prevention of its cardiac complications. Furthermore, screening procedures may be recommended for populations at risk for rheumatic heart disease in endemic areas, and active surveillance with echocardiography-based screening might become very important. PMID:27489643

  3. Zygomycetes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribes, Julie A.; Vanover-Sams, Carolyn L.; Baker, Doris J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants or, less commonly, a clinical disease called zygomycosis. There are two orders of Zygomycetes containing organisms that cause human disease, the Mucorales and the Entomophthorales. The majority of human illness is caused by the Mucorales. While disease is most commonly linked to Rhizopus spp., other organisms are also associated with human infection, including Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces, and Syncephalastrum spp. Although Mortierella spp. do cause disease in animals, there is no longer sufficient evidence to suggest that they are true human pathogens. The spores from these molds are transmitted by inhalation, via a variety of percutaneous routes, or by ingestion of spores. Human zygomycosis caused by the Mucorales generally occurs in immunocompromised hosts as opportunistic infections. Host risk factors include diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, sustained immunosuppressive therapy, chronic prednisone use, iron chelation therapy, broad-spectrum antibiotic use, severe malnutrition, and primary breakdown in the integrity of the cutaneous barrier such as trauma, surgical wounds, needle sticks, or burns. Zygomycosis occurs only rarely in immunocompetent hosts. The disease manifestations reflect the mode of transmission, with rhinocerebral and pulmonary diseases being the most common manifestations. Cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and allergic diseases are also seen. The Mucorales are associated with angioinvasive disease, often leading to thrombosis, infarction of involved tissues, and tissue destruction mediated by a number of fungal proteases, lipases, and mycotoxins. If the diagnosis is not made early, dissemination often occurs. Therapy, if it is to be effective, must be started early and requires combinations of antifungal drugs, surgical intervention, and reversal of the underlying risk

  4. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hansson, E M; Lendahl, U

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of mortality worldwide with a steady increase in prevalence. There is currently no available cure beyond orthotopic heart transplantation, which for a number of reasons is an option only for a small fraction of all patients. Considerable hope has therefore been placed on the possibility of treating a failing heart by replacing lost cardiomyocytes, either through transplantation of various types of stem cells or by boosting endogenous regenerative mechanisms in the heart. Here, we review the current status of stem and progenitor cell-based therapies for heart disease. We discuss the pros and cons of different stem and progenitor cell types that can be considered for transplantation and describe recent advances in the understanding of how cardiomyocytes normally differentiate and how these cells can be generated from more immature cells ex vivo. Finally, we consider the possibility of activation of endogenous stem and progenitor cells to treat heart failure. PMID:23331408

  5. Prevalence of ischaemic heart disease in middle aged British men.

    PubMed Central

    Shaper, A G; Cook, D G; Walker, M; Macfarlane, P W

    1984-01-01

    The prevalence of ischaemic heart disease was determined by an administered questionnaire and electrocardiography in 7735 men aged 40-59 years drawn at random from general practices in 24 British towns. Overall, one quarter of these men had some evidence of ischaemic heart disease on questionnaire or electrocardiogram or both. On questionnaire, 14% of men had possible myocardial infarction or angina, with considerable overlap of the two syndromes. The prevalence of possible myocardial infarction combined with angina and of definite angina only showed a fourfold increase over the age range studied. Electrocardiographic evidence of ischaemic heart disease (definite or possible) was present in 15% of men, there being myocardial infarction in 4.2% and myocardial ischaemia in 10.3%. Electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial infarction increased fourfold over the age range studied. There was considerable overlap of questionnaire and electrocardiographic evidence of ischaemic heart disease. Nevertheless, more than half of those with possible myocardial infarction combined with angina had no resting electrocardiographic evidence of ischaemic heart disease, and half of those with definite myocardial infarction on electrocardiogram had no history of chest pain at any time. This national population based study strongly suggests that the prevalence of ischaemic heart disease in middle aged British men is greater than has been indicated by previous studies based on occupational groups. PMID:6732989

  6. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  7. Teaching focused echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease screening.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Daniel; Kado, Joseph H; Reményi, Bo; Colquhoun, Samantha M; Watson, Caroline; Rayasidamu, Sera C; Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) requires workers skilled in echocardiography, which typically involves prolonged, specialized training. Task shifting echocardiographic screening to nonexpert health workers may be a solution in settings with limited human resources. An 8-week training program was designed to train health workers without any prior experience in focused echocardiography for RHD screening. Seven health workers participated. At the completion of training, the health workers performed unsupervised echocardiography on 16 volunteer children with known RHD status. A pediatric cardiologist assessed image quality. Participants provided qualitative feedback. The quality of echocardiograms were high at completion of training (55 of 56 were adequate for diagnosis) and all cases of RHD were identified. Feedback was strongly positive. Training health workers to perform focused echocardiography for RHD screening is feasible. After systematic testing for accuracy, this training program could be adapted in other settings seeking to expand echocardiographic capabilities. PMID:26085762

  8. The human subject: an integrative animal model for 21st century heart failure research

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Pippin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a leading cause of death and it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality affecting tens of millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of extensive research conducted at enormous expense, only a handful of interventions have significantly impacted survival in heart failure. Even the most widely prescribed treatments act primarily to slow disease progression, do not provide sustained survival advantage, and have adverse side effects. Since mortality remains about 50% within five years of diagnosis, the need to increase our understanding of heart failure disease mechanisms and development of preventive and reparative therapies remains critical. Currently, the vast majority of basic science heart failure research is conducted using animal models ranging from fruit flies to primates; however, insights gleaned from decades of animal-based research efforts have not been proportional to research success in terms of deciphering human heart failure and developing effective therapeutics for human patients. Here we discuss the reasons for this translational discrepancy which can be equally attributed to the use of erroneous animal models and the lack of widespread use of human-based research methodologies and address why and how we must position our own species at center stage as the quintessential animal model for 21st century heart failure research. If the ultimate goal of the scientific community is to tackle the epidemic status of heart failure, the best way to achieve that goal is through prioritizing human-based, human-relevant research. PMID:26550463

  9. Transcriptional defect of an inherited NKX2-5 haplotype comprising a SNP, a nonsynonymous and a synonymous mutation, associated with human congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Sattlegger, Evelyn; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto; Wessel, Armin; Borlak, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in cardiac-specific transcription factor genes have been associated with congenital heart disease (CHD) and the homeodomain transcription factor NKX2-5 is an important member of this group. Indeed, more than 40 heterozygous NKX2-5 germline mutations have been observed in individuals with CHD, and these are spread along the coding region, with many shown to impact protein function. In pursuit of understanding causes of CHD, we analyzed n = 49 cardiac biopsies from 28 patients and identified by direct sequencing two nonsynonymous NKX2-5 alterations affecting alanine 119, namely c.356C>A (p.A119E) and c.355G>T, (p.A119S), in patients with AVSD and HLHS, respectively. In functional assays, a significant reduction in transcriptional activities could be determined for the NKX2-5 variants. Importantly, in one family the mother, besides p.A119E, carried a synonymous mutant allele in the homeodomain (c.543G>A, p.Q181), and a synonymous dbSNP (c.63A>G, p.E21) in the transactivation domain of the protein, that were transmitted to the CHD daughter. The presence of these variants in-cis with the p.A119E mutation led to a further reduction in transcriptional activities. Such difference in activity may be in part related to reduced protein expression for the double variant c.356C>A and c.543G>A. We propose changes in mRNA stability and folding, due to a silent mutation and a dbSNP in the NKX2-5 coding region to contribute to the functional defect. Although the clinical significance of the NKX2-5 haplotype identified in the CHD patients remains to be ascertained, we provide evidence of an interaction of a dbSNP, with synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations to negatively impact NKX2-5 transcriptional activity. PMID:24376681

  10. Transcriptional Defect of an Inherited NKX2-5 Haplotype Comprising a SNP, a Nonsynonymous and a Synonymous Mutation, Associated with Human Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Sattlegger, Evelyn; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto; Wessel, Armin; Borlak, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in cardiac-specific transcription factor genes have been associated with congenital heart disease (CHD) and the homeodomain transcription factor NKX2-5 is an important member of this group. Indeed, more than 40 heterozygous NKX2-5 germline mutations have been observed in individuals with CHD, and these are spread along the coding region, with many shown to impact protein function. In pursuit of understanding causes of CHD, we analyzed n = 49 cardiac biopsies from 28 patients and identified by direct sequencing two nonsynonymous NKX2-5 alterations affecting alanine 119, namely c.356C>A (p.A119E) and c.355G>T, (p.A119S), in patients with AVSD and HLHS, respectively. In functional assays, a significant reduction in transcriptional activities could be determined for the NKX2-5 variants. Importantly, in one family the mother, besides p.A119E, carried a synonymous mutant allele in the homeodomain (c.543G>A, p.Q181), and a synonymous dbSNP (c.63A>G, p.E21) in the transactivation domain of the protein, that were transmitted to the CHD daughter. The presence of these variants in-cis with the p.A119E mutation led to a further reduction in transcriptional activities. Such difference in activity may be in part related to reduced protein expression for the double variant c.356C>A and c.543G>A. We propose changes in mRNA stability and folding, due to a silent mutation and a dbSNP in the NKX2-5 coding region to contribute to the functional defect. Although the clinical significance of the NKX2-5 haplotype identified in the CHD patients remains to be ascertained, we provide evidence of an interaction of a dbSNP, with synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations to negatively impact NKX2-5 transcriptional activity. PMID:24376681

  11. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  12. Incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Karen; Böhm, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Worldwide, the numbers of women who have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or develop cardiac problems during pregnancy are increasing and, due to the lack of evidenced-based data, this provides challenges for the treating physician. Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is a complex topic as women can present either pre- or post-partum, due to a pre-existing heart disease such as operated on or unoperated on congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, chronic hypertension, or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Women often present with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. On the other hand, there are diseases which are directly related to pregnancy, such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy, or where pregnancy increases risk of a disease as, for example, the risk of myocardial infarction. These diseases can have long-term implications to the life of the affected women and their families. There is, in particular, a paucity of data from developing countries of this unique disease pattern and its presentations. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease in women presenting pre- or post-partum. PMID:24459193

  13. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart. PMID:23177618

  14. Human Engineered Heart Tissue: Analysis of Contractile Force.

    PubMed

    Mannhardt, Ingra; Breckwoldt, Kaja; Letuffe-Brenière, David; Schaaf, Sebastian; Schulz, Herbert; Neuber, Christiane; Benzin, Anika; Werner, Tessa; Eder, Alexandra; Schulze, Thomas; Klampe, Birgit; Christ, Torsten; Hirt, Marc N; Huebner, Norbert; Moretti, Alessandra; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Hansen, Arne

    2016-07-12

    Analyzing contractile force, the most important and best understood function of cardiomyocytes in vivo is not established in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM). This study describes the generation of 3D, strip-format, force-generating engineered heart tissues (EHT) from hiPSC-CM and their physiological and pharmacological properties. CM were differentiated from hiPSC by a growth factor-based three-stage protocol. EHTs were generated and analyzed histologically and functionally. HiPSC-CM in EHTs showed well-developed sarcomeric organization and alignment, and frequent mitochondria. Systematic contractility analysis (26 concentration-response curves) reveals that EHTs replicated canonical response to physiological and pharmacological regulators of inotropy, membrane- and calcium-clock mediators of pacemaking, modulators of ion-channel currents, and proarrhythmic compounds with unprecedented precision. The analysis demonstrates a high degree of similarity between hiPSC-CM in EHT format and native human heart tissue, indicating that human EHTs are useful for preclinical drug testing and disease modeling. PMID:27211213

  15. Arrhythmogenic and metabolic remodelling of failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Gloschat, C R; Koppel, A C; Aras, K K; Brennan, J A; Holzem, K M; Efimov, I R

    2016-07-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The global burden of HF continues to rise, with prevalence rates estimated at 1-2% and incidence approaching 5-10 per 1000 persons annually. The complex pathophysiology of HF impacts virtually all aspects of normal cardiac function - from structure and mechanics to metabolism and electrophysiology - leading to impaired mechanical contraction and sudden cardiac death. Pharmacotherapy and device therapy are the primary methods of treating HF, but neither is able to stop or reverse disease progression. Thus, there is an acute need to translate basic research into improved HF therapy. Animal model investigations are a critical component of HF research. However, the translation from cellular and animal models to the bedside is hampered by significant differences between species and among physiological scales. Our studies over the last 8 years show that hypotheses generated in animal models need to be validated in human in vitro models. Importantly, however, human heart investigations can establish translational platforms for safety and efficacy studies before embarking on costly and risky clinical trials. This review summarizes recent developments in human HF investigations of electrophysiology remodelling, metabolic remodelling, and β-adrenergic remodelling and discusses promising new technologies for HF research. PMID:27019074

  16. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... to talk to your doctor. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  17. Settling the 'Score' with Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Technology and medicine forged a bond in 1986 when a group of dedicated NASA scientists, University of Southern California (USC) medical professors, and a Dutch cardiologist joined forces to prevent heart attacks, using ultrasound images of astronauts blood-flow patterns and the supercomputer depended upon to orchestrate the "Star Wars" Strategic Defense Initiative.

  18. HEART DISEASE AS A COMPLICATION OF PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John J.

    1949-01-01

    Mere diagnosis of a valvular heart lesion without circulatory incapacity is inconsequential in considering the prognosis for a pregnant woman. There are grave dangers of heart failure during pregnancy, labor or the postpartum period in women who have had congestive failure prior to pregnancy or during a previous pregnancy and delivery. Decisions as to whether or not to recommend avoidance of pregnancy or therapeutic abortion should depend not alone upon the prospect of death during gestation or at the time of delivery, but also upon the possibility of increased impairment of heart function and physical incapacity of the mother in the postpartum period. Because of the extensive surgical procedure there are few indications for interrupting pregnancy after the third lunar month; and because the major circulatory loads do not increase after the eighth month, rarely should labor be prematurely induced after that time. The exertion of labor, although generally inconsequential, in some cases may produce sustained oxygen debt. In cases in which labor in a previous pregnancy has been accompanied by heart failure, cesarean section should be considered as a means of lessening the possibility of serious failure or death, although this is not a frequent consideration. In the resemblance of circulatory changes that occur, during delivery and immediately postpartum, to those changes produced by the closure of an arteriovenous shunt or patent ductus arteriosus, lies a suggestion as to some of the causative factors in heart failure during or soon after delivery. Probably of great importance is the decrease in blood volume and hemoconcentration at delivery followed by the return of water to the circulatory system, with consequent transient increase in blood volume, in the postpartum period. Additionally, the rise of venous pressure after use of oxytocic drugs suggests that rapid infusion of blood from an engorged uterus may cause an abrupt and perhaps poorly tolerated hypervolemia

  19. Heart-Healthy Families. Helping Your Kids Stay Fit Could Prevent Heart Disease in Their Futures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagnini, Frederic J.; Malone, Mary Jo

    1994-01-01

    The conditions and habits that lead to heart disease begin early in life. Obesity is the predecessor of a host of cardiovascular-related diseases; childhood obesity poses serious physical and psychological roadblocks for youngsters as they mature. The article suggests how families can adopt fitter lifestyles and instill good eating and exercise…

  20. Genetics of congenital heart disease: the glass half empty.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Akl C; Gelb, Bruce D; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2013-02-15

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital anomaly in newborn babies. Cardiac malformations have been produced in multiple experimental animal models, by perturbing selected molecules that function in the developmental pathways involved in myocyte specification, differentiation, or cardiac morphogenesis. In contrast, the precise genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis for these perturbations in humans remains poorly understood. Over the past few decades, researchers have tried to bridge this knowledge gap through conventional genome-wide analyses of rare Mendelian CHD families, and by sequencing candidate genes in CHD cohorts. Although yielding few, usually highly penetrant, disease gene mutations, these discoveries provided 3 notable insights. First, human CHD mutations impact a heterogeneous set of molecules that orchestrate cardiac development. Second, CHD mutations often alter gene/protein dosage. Third, identical pathogenic CHD mutations cause a variety of distinct malformations, implying that higher order interactions account for particular CHD phenotypes. The advent of contemporary genomic technologies including single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, next-generation sequencing, and copy number variant platforms are accelerating the discovery of genetic causes of CHD. Importantly, these approaches enable study of sporadic cases, the most common presentation of CHD. Emerging results from ongoing genomic efforts have validated earlier observations learned from the monogenic CHD families. In this review, we explore how continued use of these technologies and integration of systems biology is expected to expand our understanding of the genetic architecture of CHD. PMID:23410880

  1. Critical Scale Invariance in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Sakata, Seiichiro; Hayano, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the robust scale-invariance in the probability density function (PDF) of detrended healthy human heart rate increments, which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state where the mean level of the heart rate is dramatically changing. This scale-independent and fractal structure is markedly different from the scale-dependent PDF evolution observed in a turbulentlike, cascade heart rate model. These results strongly support the view that a healthy human heart rate is controlled to converge continually to a critical state.

  2. Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease: In Whom to Consider and When?

    PubMed Central

    Attenhofer Jost, Christine H.; Schmidt, Dörthe; Huebler, Michael; Balmer, Christian; Noll, Georg; Caduff, Rosmarie; Greutmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Due to impressive improvements in surgical repair options, even patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) may survive into adulthood and have a high risk of end-stage heart failure. Thus, the number of patients with CHD needing heart transplantation (HTx) has been increasing in the last decades. This paper summarizes the changing etiology of causes of death in heart failure in CHD. The main reasons, contraindications, and risks of heart transplantation in CHD are discussed and underlined with three case vignettes. Compared to HTx in acquired heart disease, HTx in CHD has an increased risk of perioperative death and rejection. However, outcome of HTx for complex CHD has improved over the past 20 years. Additionally, mechanical support options might decrease the waiting list mortality in the future. The number of patients needing heart-lung transplantation (especially for Eisenmenger's syndrome) has decreased in the last years. Lung transplantation with intracardiac repair of a cardiac defect is another possibility especially for patients with interatrial shunts. Overall, HTx will remain an important treatment option for CHD in the near future. PMID:23577237

  3. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rheumatic heart disease is unknown; however, possible mechanisms include chronic strain force in the atrial wall and inflammation. We report here a patient with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease with coconut atrium. Case Report: A 76-year-old man presented with breathlessness and leg edema due to right-sided heart failure. He was diagnosed with rheumatic fever at 8 years of age. Mitral commissurotomy and the mitral and aortic valve replacement were previously performed to treat mitral and aortic valvular stenosis. The profile view of the chest X-ray indicated a diffuse calcified outline of the LA wall. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hyper-tension and dilatation of both atria. Moreover, computed tomography showed nearly circumferential calcification of the LA wall. Despite intense medical treatment, he succumbed to heart failure. An autopsy demonstrated that the LA was markedly dilated, its wall was calcified, and its appearance was similar to the surface of an atherosclerotic aorta. Microscopic examination revealed intensive calcification in the endocardium. Minimal accumulation of inflammatory cells was noted. Although slight fibrosis was observed, the cardiac musculature was preserved. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies the histological changes of LA calcification associated with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:25819539

  4. Morbilliviruses and human disease.

    PubMed

    Rima, Bertus K; Duprex, W Paul

    2006-01-01

    Morbilliviruses are a group of viruses that belong to the family Paramyxoviridae. The most instantly recognizable member is measles virus (MV) and individuals acutely infected with the virus exhibit a wide range of clinical symptoms ranging from a characteristic mild self-limiting infection to death. Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rinderpest virus (RPV) cause a similar but distinctive pathology in dogs and cattle, respectively, and these, alongside experimental MV infection of primates, have been useful models for MV pathogenesis. Traditionally, viruses were identified because a distinctive disease was observed in man or animals; an infectious agent was subsequently isolated, cultured, and this could be used to recapitulate the disease in an experimentally infected host. Thus, satisfying Koch's postulates has been the norm. More recently, particularly due to the advent of exceedingly sensitive molecular biological assays, many researchers have looked for infectious agents in disease conditions for which a viral aetiology has not been previously established. For these cases, the modified Koch's postulates of Bradford Hill have been developed as criteria to link a virus to a specific disease. Only in a few cases have these conditions been fulfilled. Therefore, many viruses have over the years been definitely and tentatively linked to human diseases and in this respect the morbilliviruses are no different. In this review, human diseases associated with morbillivirus infection have been grouped into three broad categories: (1) those which are definitely caused by the infection; (2) those which may be exacerbated or facilitated by an infection; and (3) those which currently have limited, weak, unsubstantiated or no credible scientific evidence to support any link to a morbillivirus. Thus, an attempt has been made to clarify the published data and separate human diseases actually linked to morbilliviruses from those that are merely anecdotally associated. PMID:16362981

  5. Reemphasizing the Role of Exercise in Preventing Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1989-01-01

    A recent study suggests that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level may be a better predictor of heart disease than total cholesterol level. Even moderate amounts of aerobic exercise can raise the level of HDL-C and lower the risk of coronary artery disease. (SM)

  6. The potential protective effects of taurine on coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Oktawia P; Koenig, Karen L; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2010-01-01

    In humans, taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is mainly obtained from diet. Despite the fact that the health effects of taurine are largely unknown, taurine has become a popular supplement and ingredient in energy drinks in recent years. Evidence from mechanistic and animal studies has shown that the main biological actions of taurine include its ability to conjugate bile acids, regulate blood pressure (BP), and act as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. These actions suggest that high levels of taurine may be protective against coronary heart disease (CHD). However, data from epidemiologic and intervention studies in humans are limited. We review what is known about taurine's metabolism, its transportation in the body, its food sources, and evidence of its effect on cardiovascular health from in vitro, animal, and epidemiologic studies. We also discuss shortcomings of the human studies that need to be addressed in the future. The identification of taurine as a preventive factor for CHD may be of great public health importance. PMID:19592001

  7. Current use of pimobendan in canine patients with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Boswood, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    Pimobendan is a drug with both inotropic and vasodilatory properties and is widely used for the treatment of heart failure in dogs. The best evidence regarding its efficacy is derived from several clinical studies of dogs with the two most common conditions that result in heart failure: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD). The main studies addressing the effectiveness of pimobendan in dogs with DCM and DVMD are discussed in this article. PMID:20610012

  8. Nongenital human papillomavirus disease.

    PubMed

    Mayeaux, E J; Khan, Michelle J

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral cause of cancer, and is responsible for 5% of cancers worldwide. Following demonstration of the causative link between HPV and cervical cancer, HPV has been shown to be associated with several anogenital malignancies and with oral pharyngeal cancers. HPV-related anal and oral pharyngeal disease is rising in incidence and includes anal warts and neoplasia, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and oral pharyngeal neoplasia. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongenital HPV-related disease. PMID:23732034

  9. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  10. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  11. Heart transplantation in rapidly progressive end-stage heart failure associated with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Juan P; Cura, Geraldine; Ramallo, German; Diez, Mirta; Vigliano, Carlos A; Katus, Hugo A; Mereles, Derliz

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterised by chronic immune-mediated malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals induced by gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. It occurs in adults and children at rates approaching 1% of the population. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is infrequent. The authors present here a first case of a severe progressive dilated cardiomyopathy that required heart transplantation in young woman with celiac disease. PMID:22696747

  12. Evolutionary anticipation of the human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Victor, S.; Nayak, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the comparative anatomy of hearts from fish, frog, turtle, snake, crocodile, birds (duck, chicken, quail), mammals (elephant, dolphin, sheep, goat, ox, baboon, wallaby, mouse, rabbit, possum, echidna) and man. The findings were analysed with respect to the mechanism of evolution of the heart. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:11041025

  13. Cardiac image modelling: Breadth and depth in heart disease.

    PubMed

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; McCulloch, Andrew D; Nash, Martyn P; Pontre, Beau; Young, Alistair A

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of large-scale imaging studies and big health data, and the corresponding growth in analytics, machine learning and computational image analysis methods, there are now exciting opportunities for deepening our understanding of the mechanisms and characteristics of heart disease. Two emerging fields are computational analysis of cardiac remodelling (shape and motion changes due to disease) and computational analysis of physiology and mechanics to estimate biophysical properties from non-invasive imaging. Many large cohort studies now underway around the world have been specifically designed based on non-invasive imaging technologies in order to gain new information about the development of heart disease from asymptomatic to clinical manifestations. These give an unprecedented breadth to the quantification of population variation and disease development. Also, for the individual patient, it is now possible to determine biophysical properties of myocardial tissue in health and disease by interpreting detailed imaging data using computational modelling. For these population and patient-specific computational modelling methods to develop further, we need open benchmarks for algorithm comparison and validation, open sharing of data and algorithms, and demonstration of clinical efficacy in patient management and care. The combination of population and patient-specific modelling will give new insights into the mechanisms of cardiac disease, in particular the development of heart failure, congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction, contractile dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction. PMID:27349830

  14. Clinical and epidemiological study of chronic heart involvment in Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Barrios, H. García; Suárez, J. A.; Yépez, C. Gil

    1966-01-01

    It has been estimated that, in vast areas of the American continent, there is a high prevalence of human infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. Such infection can lead to a variety of heart diseases, predominantly with involvement of the myocardium. The aim of the present work was to determine the prevalence of heart disease in two rural areas of Venezuela with a high endemicity of Chagas' disease and to try to determine the natural history of the disease. It is shown that a form of chronic myocardial disease in patients with positive specific serology and good functional capacity is highly prevalent. Electrocardiographic patterns typical of the initial and developing stages of the disease, as well as early abnormalities of the cardiac rhythm, are described and illustrated. The present work forms part of a longitudinal study still in progress. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 4 PMID:4957485

  15. Pregnancy and non-valvular heart disease--anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Gaurab; Sengupta, Saikat; Rudra, Amitava; Debnath, Saurabh

    2010-01-01

    Non-valvular heart disease is an important cause of cardiac disease in pregnancy and presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologist during labor and delivery. A keen understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, in addition to the altered physiology of pregnancy, is the key to managing such patients. Disease-specific goals of management may help preserve the hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters within an acceptable limit and a successful conduct of labor and postpartum period. PMID:20442539

  16. Self-Management of Heart Disease in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Hohnbaum, Anh-Luu T; Marshall, Lia; Villa, Valentine M; Lee, Gi

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association estimates that 81% of people who die of coronary heart disease are 65 years old or older. The leading risk health behaviors include physical inactivity, poor diet, smoking, and binge drinking. Using the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), this study looked at how self-management, which includes a plan developed by a medical professional and the confidence to manage one's disease, may decrease negative risk behaviors in older adults. The presence of a plan and increased self-efficacy decreased engagement in negative dietary behaviors and low physical activity. Implications for strategies that address heart disease and self-management are discussed. PMID:26566582

  17. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease. PMID:26886381

  18. The emerging adult population with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, William G.; Webb, Gary D.

    2000-01-01

    The successes in managing infants and children with congenital heart disease have led to an emerging population of adult patients. As we enter this new century, the majority of patients with congenital heart disease will be adults, not children. It is important to maintain our commitment for continuing care to the emerging adult population. Psycho-social issues, including employment and pregnancy counseling, are required as well as the ongoing need for medical and occasionally surgical intervention. The health care system needs to develop supra-regional tertiary referral centers for care of these patients and provide information sharing and support for community-based physicians interested in the welfare of the adult with congenital heart disease. Copyright 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company PMID:11486200

  19. Plasma homocysteine levels in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chacko, K A

    1998-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is being identified as a risk factor for coronary heart disease but its role among Asian Indians has not been studied. This has practical importance because (1) the data generated in the West may not represent Indian population, and (2) the condition is remediable. To assess the magnitude of this problem, we studied 56 patients with coronary heart disease, and 53 control subjects. Details of diet, smoking, medication, hypertension and diabetes were recorded; lipids and sugar levels were estimated in all. Patients with renal and liver diseases were excluded. Serum homocysteine was estimated using liquid chromatography. Both the groups were comparable by age and sex. Higher, but statistically insignificant homocysteine levels were seen in patients with coronary heart disease: 10.98 +/- 9.04 nmol/ml vs 9.41 +/- 3.60 nmol/ml in control subjects. Among males, higher, but statistically insignificant levels were seen in coronary heart disease patients: 11.96 +/- 9.41 nmol/ml vs 9.87 +/- 3.50 nmol/ ml in control subjects; among females, the levels were lower though not significant: 5.10 +/- 1.64 nmol/ml vs 6.39 +/- 2.99 nmol/ml. Sub-group analysis with age 40 as dividing point did not show significant difference. Six (10.7%) patients with coronary heart disease and three (5.7%) control subjects had homocysteine levels above 95th percentile of control subjects (p = NS). Twenty-three (41.1%) coronary heart disease patients and 19 (35.9%) control subjects had levels above 10 nmol/ml (p = NS). We conclude that homocysteine is not a major risk factor for coronary heart disease in the study population. The lack of statistical significance could be due to inadequate sample size although some past studies reporting statistically significant association between coronary heart disease and homocysteine involved similar or smaller number of subjects. Larger studies are warranted to see if ethnic differences also have any role. PMID:9753851

  20. The alteration of interelemental ratios in myocardium under the congenital heart disease (SRXRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunova, V. A.; Zvereva, V. V.; Okuneva, G. N.; Levicheva, E. N.

    2007-05-01

    It is the myocardium that bears the basic functional loading during heart working, including muscle contractility and enzyme activity. The elemental concentrations in myocardium tissue of heart were determined by SRXRF technique. Our investigation is systematical: the elemental content in each compartment (left and right ventricles, left and right auricles) of hearts of healthy and diseased children (congenital heart diseases, transposition of main vessels (TMV)) was analyzed. The elemental distribution in myocardium of four heart chambers of human fetuses was also analyzed. Following elements were determined: S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr. It was revealed that the elemental concentrations in myocardium of both ventricles are almost constant in heart of fetuses and healthy children. The transition from pre-natal study (fetus) to post-natal study is accompanied by the redistribution of chemical elements in myocardium. The higher concentrations of S, Fe, Ca, Sr and Cu in myocardium of children are observed, the content of K, Br, Rb and especially Se is lower than in heart of fetuses. The elemental distribution in myocardium of children TMV is considerably different in comparison with the healthy children: the higher levels of Cu are observed. The content of Se is lower.

  1. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined. PMID:22686063

  2. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management. PMID:24656111

  3. Predicting Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The FINRISK Calculator.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Peltonen, Markku; Puska, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    The FINRISK risk calculator predicts 10-year risk for coronary heart disease, stroke incidence, and their combination. The model is based on 10-year cohort follow-up from 3 different cohorts in 1982, 1987, and 1992 from a random population sample in 3 areas in Finland. Coronary heart disease, stroke, and their combination are predicted by smoking, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diabetes, and family history. The Internet-based calculator is commonly used in Finland in health services to assess the need for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia treatment and is used also in patients' counseling. PMID:27242089

  4. Computational fluid dynamics models and congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Corsini, Chiara; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful tool to investigate hemodynamics of the circulatory system. With improving imaging techniques and detailed clinical investigations, it is now possible to construct patient-specific models of reconstructive surgeries for the treatment of congenital heart diseases. These models can help clinicians to better understand the hemodynamic behavior of different surgical options for a treated patient. This review outlines recent advances in mathematical modeling in congenital heart diseases, the discoveries and limitations these models present, and future directions that are on the horizon. PMID:24432298

  5. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  6. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  7. Contrast stress echocardiography in hypertensive heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with atherosclerosis and cardiac and vascular structural and functional changes. Myocardial ischemia may arise in hypertension independent of coronary artery disease through an interaction between several pathophysiological mechanisms, including left ventricular hypertrophy, increased arterial stiffness and reduced coronary flow reserve associated with microvascular disease and endothelial dysfunction. The present case report demonstrates how contrast stress echocardiography can be used to diagnose myocardial ischemia in a hypertensive patient with angina pectoris but without significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The myocardial ischemia was due to severe resistant hypertension complicated with concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and increased arterial stiffness. PMID:22093163

  8. Preparticipation athletic screening for genetic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Merle; Sanchez-Ross, Monica; Sherrid, Mark V

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young athletes is relatively uncommon but tragic when it occurs. Many of these deaths can be prevented by pre-exercise screening to identify cardiac abnormalities and those at high risk. Although recent research has provided much needed information on SCD in athletes, there remain significant gaps in the knowledge needed to determine an optimal screening protocol. This review examines the incidence and demographics of SCD in athletes and the difficulties in determining whether changes in an athlete's heart are due to training or represent a potentially malignant congenital abnormality. Current guidelines for screening and the intense debate over the use of the 12-lead electrocardiogram are discussed. Lastly, the importance of a response plan to an apparent SCD event that includes on-site/on-field automated external defibrillators will be discussed. A case study that illustrates the challenges in screening is presented. PMID:22687598

  9. How Can Heart Disease be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Treated?" Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story 04/ ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story 04/ ...

  10. Adaptive genetic variation and heart disease risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review: Obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease are complex and determined by both genetic and environmental factors and their interrelationships. Many associations from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene approaches have described a multitude of polymorphis...

  11. Hyperhomocysteinaemia, Helicobacter pylori, and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, J J; Sanderson, J E

    1996-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinaemia and Helicobacter pylori infection have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. These two risk factors, though they seem unrelated, could be linked by a deficiency of vitamins and folate caused by chronic gastritis in H pylori infection. This nutritional defect could lead to failure of methylation by 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolic acid and thus exacerbate the accumulation of homocysteine in susceptible patients. Homocysteine is toxic to endothelial cells and results in coronary artery disease. PMID:8983673

  12. Prevention of rheumatic Fever and heart disease: nepalese experience.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Prakash Raj; Wyber, Rosemary

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a major public health problem in Nepal that affects young children and adolescents. Historically, many young people suffered severe valvular disease and died awaiting heart valve replacement. For some years, the Nepal Heart Foundation (NHF) advocated for a more comprehensive program to reduce the burden of RHD. In 2007, the government of Nepal announced funding for an RHD control program to be implemented by the NHF. The core focus of the program was to deliver antibiotics for the secondary prophylaxis of RHD. The NHF has developed a program of community awareness, free medication, RHD register development, health worker training, guideline development, and clinical audit. These services are being implemented with expanding geographic scope. This paper provides a narrative overview of the Nepalese experience designing, implementing, and beginning to evaluate this program. Challenges and successes relevant to register-based programs are highlighted. PMID:25690503

  13. Families of children with congenital heart disease: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Wei, Holly; Roscigno, Cecelia I; Hanson, Cherissa C; Swanson, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    In 2000 and 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched two initiatives to encourage treatment innovations and research on children with heart disease and their families. Since then, no systematic reviews have examined the evidence regarding the impacts of having a child with congenital heart disease (CHD) on families. This review synthesized key findings regarding families of children with CHD, critiqued research methods, described what has been done, and provided recommendations for future inquiry. Databases searched included PubMed, CINAHL, Family & Society Studies Worldwide, Women's Studies International, and PsycINFO. The literature search followed the PRISMA guidelines. As a result, ninety-four articles were reviewed. Four major themes were derived: parents' psychological health, family life, parenting challenges, and family-focused interventions. In conclusion, while they found parents having psychological symptoms, researchers did not explore parents' appraisals of what led to their symptoms. Research is needed to explore parents' experiences and expectations. PMID:26404115

  14. Recent development of ischaemic heart disease in sex difference

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Wang; Lei, Wang; Peng, Song

    2007-01-01

    Despite a dramatic decline in mortality over the past years, coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability in the world. At the same time, with the great improvement of medical science, there is a growing population of postmyocardial infarction, postrevascularisation and heart failure survivors. Furthermore, there are rising rates of cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome in the world. All the above contribute to the rising incidence rates of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) among women and men. This review highlights sex‐specific issues in IHD presentation, evaluation and outcomes, with several new results published from the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation study. New evidence on traditional and novel risk markers as well as sex‐specific differences in symptoms and diagnostic approaches have also been discussed. PMID:17403950

  15. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Services. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story 04/ ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story 04/ ...

  16. How Is Heart Valve Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made from pig, cow, or human ... the valve. Man-made valves last longer than biological valves and usually don’t have to be ...

  17. Longitudinal study of heart disease in a Jamaican rural population

    PubMed Central

    Miall, W. E.; Del Campo, E.; Fodor, J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Ruiz, L.; Standard, K. L.; Swan, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    A long-term epidemiological study of heart disease in a representative rural community in Jamaica was started in 1962-63 and the first follow-up survey was carried out in 1967-68. This report describes the prevalence of several cardiovascular characteristics at each survey, and their associations with other measurements. The nature of the electrocardiographic abnormalities and their relationship with symptoms of effort pain and prolonged chest pain suggests that much of the disease seen in this population is ultimately ischaemic in origin despite evidence that classical myocardial infarction and severe coronary atheroma are relatively infrequent. Nevertheless both the symptoms and the electrocardiographic abnormalities had features that were not completely typical of occlusive disease of extramural coronary arteries. These findings are discussed in terms of the four conditions—hypertension, conventional coronary heart disease, small artery disease, and cardiomyopathy—that are believed to account for most cases of heart disease in this community, and it is concluded that the overall pattern of disease cannot be explained by any single disorder of overriding importance. The evidence suggests that all may be important contributors. PMID:4538187

  18. Cardiac autoimmunity in HIV related heart muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Currie, P; Goldman, J; Caforio, A; Jacob, A; Baig, M; Brettle, R; Haven, A; Boon, N; McKenna, W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive patients with and without echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular dysfunction.
Subjects—74 HIV positive patients including 28 with echocardiographic evidence of heart muscle disease, 52 HIV negative people at low risk of HIV infection, and 14 HIV negative drug users who had all undergone non-invasive cardiac assessment were studied along with a group of 200 healthy blood donors.
Results—Cardiac autoantibodies detected by indirect immunofluorescence (serum dilution 1/10) were more common in the HIV positive patients (15%), particularly the HIV heart muscle disease group (21%), than in HIV negative controls (3.5%) (both p < 0.001). By ELISA (dilution 1/320), abnormal anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were found more often in HIV patients with heart muscle disease (43%) than in HIV positive patients with normal hearts (19%) or in HIV negative controls (3%) (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were greater in HIV positive patients than in HIV negative controls, regardless of cardiac status ((mean SD) 0.253 (0.155) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.003). In particular the mean antibody concentration was higher in the HIV heart muscle disease patients (0.291 (0.160) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.001) than in HIV negative controls. On follow up, six subjects with normal echocardiograms but raised autoantibody concentrations had died after a median of 298 days, three with left ventricular abnormalities at necropsy. This compared with a median survival of 536 days for 21 HIV positive patients with normal cardiological and immunological results.
Conclusions—There is an increased frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive individuals, particularly those with heart muscle disease. The data support a role for cardiac autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of HIV related heart

  19. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  20. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  1. Hierarchical Structure of Heart Rate Variability in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Z.; Ching, E. S. C.; Lin, D. C.

    2004-03-01

    We show a hierarchical structure (HS) of the She-Leveque form in the beat-to-beat RR intervals of heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. This structure, first found as an empirical law in turbulent fluid flows, implies further details in the HRV multifractal scaling. We tested HS using daytime RRi data from healthy subjects and heart diseased patients with congestive heart failure and found a universal law C(b) where b characterizes the multifractality of HRV and C is related to a co-dimension parameter of the most violent events in the fluctuation. The potential of diagnosis is discussed based on the characteristics of this finding. To model the HRV phenomenology, we propose a local-feedback-global-cascade (LFGC) model based on the She-Waymire (SW) cascade solution to the HS in fluid turbulence. This model extends from the previous work in that it integrates additive law multiplicatively into the cascade structure. It is an attempt to relate to the cardiovascular physiology which consists of numerous feedback controls that function primarily on the principle of additive law. In particular, the model is based on the same philosophy as the SW cascade that its multifractal dynamics consists of a singular and a modulating component. In the LFGC model, we introduce local feedback to model the dynamics of the modulating effect. The novelty of our model is to incorporate the cascade structure in the scheduling for the feedback control. This model also represents an alternative solution to the HS. We will present the simulation results by the LFGC model and discuss its implication in physiology terms.

  2. Organophosphate inhibition of human heart muscle cholinesterase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Chemnitius, J M; Sadowski, R; Winkel, H; Zech, R

    1999-05-14

    The rate of acetylcholine hydrolysis of mammalian heart muscle influences cardiac responses to vagal innervation. We characterized cholinesterases of human left ventricular heart muscle with respect to both substrate specificity and irreversible inhibition kinetics with the organophosphorus inhibitor N,N'-di-isopropylphosphorodiamidic fluoride (mipafox). Specimens were obtained postmortem from three men and four women (61 +/- 5 years) with no history of cardiovascular disease. Myocardial choline ester hydrolyzing activity was determined with acetylthiocholine (ASCh; 1.25 mM), acetyl-beta-methylthiocholine (AbetaMSCh; 2.0 mM), and butyrylthiocholine (BSCh; 30 mM). After irreversible and covalent inhibition (60 min; 25 degrees C) with a wide range of mipafox concentrations (50 nM-5 mM), residual choline ester hydrolyzing activities were fitted to a sum of up to five exponentials using weighted least-squares non-linear curve fitting. In each ease, quality of curve fitting reached its optimum on the basis of a four component model. Final classification of heart muscle cholinesterases was achieved according to substrate hydrolysis patterns (nmol/min per g wet weight) and to second-order organophosphate inhibition rate constants k2 (1/mol per min); one choline ester hydrolyzing enzyme was identified as acetylcholinesterase (AChE; k2/mipafox = 6.1 (+/- 0.8) x 10(2)), and one as butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; k2/mipafox = 5.3 (+/- 1.1) x 10(3)). An enzyme exhibiting both ChE-like substrate specificity and relative resistance to mipafox inhibition (k2/mipafox = 5.2 (+/- 1.0) x 10(-1)) was classified as atypical cholinesterase. PMID:10421452

  3. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation). PMID:27593250

  4. Rosai-Dorfman disease and the heart

    PubMed Central

    O'Gallagher, Kevin; Dancy, Luke; Sinha, Aish; Sado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a non-malignant pathology of histiocyte proliferation. The classical clinical presentation is with painless cervical lymphadenopathy, but extranodal involvement is frequent, occurring in approximately 40% of cases. The literature was systematically reviewed to identify reported cases of RDD with cardiac involvement. Eighteen cases were identified (3 pediatric and 15 adult). In adult cardiac RDD (cRDD), three patterns of disease were noted: an intra-cardiac mass, epicardial involvement, and pulmonary artery involvement. Reported cases suggest that surgical excision of intra-cardiac masses confers a good prognosis. PMID:26989642

  5. [Telemedicine for heart failure, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Christiansen, St; Klötzer, J-P

    2016-03-01

    It is generally believed that telemedicine has a tremendous potential to improve health care. This publication reviews the current knowledge available on telemedical concepts for heart failure, diabetes and chronic pulmonary diseases, discusses existing difficulties, and suggests how such concepts could best be used in the near future. PMID:27111954

  6. Ischaemic heart disease mortality and the business cycle in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bunn, A R

    1979-08-01

    Trends in Australian heart disease mortality were assessed for association with the business cycle. Correlation models of mortality and unemployment series were used to test for association. An indicator series of "national stress" was developed. The three series were analyzed in path models to quantify the links between unemployment, national stress, and heart disease. Ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality and national stress were found to follow the business cycle. The two periods of accelerating IHD mortality coincided with economic recession. The proposed "wave hypothesis" links the trend in IHD mortality to the high unemployment of severe recession. The mortality trend describes a typical epidemic parabolic path from the Great Depression to 1975, with a smaller parabolic trend at the 1961 recession. These findings appear consistent with the hypothesis that heart disease is, to some degree, a point source epidemic arising with periods of severe economic recession. Forecasts under the hypothesis indicate a turning point in the mortality trend between 1976 and 1978. (Am J Public Health 69:772-781, 1979). PMID:453409

  7. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  8. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  9. Irish contributions to our understanding of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Ireland has made an amazing contribution to our understanding of heart disease. From Robert Graves in 1796 to Jeremy Swan and Denis Burkitt in the 1990s the names of many Irishmen have become familiar to all of us. PMID:16352150

  10. Assessing Potential Predisposition of Elementary School Children to Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Thomas A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A health assessment battery was developed to screen elementary school children in Clovis (California) for factors that might lead to heart disease. Students' height, blood pressure, flexibility, weight, and body fatness (by skin-fold tests) were measured. Plans call for future development of longitudinal student profiles. (Authors/PP)

  11. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  12. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  13. A heart disease recognition embedded system with fuzzy cluster algorithm.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Helton Hugo; Moreno, Robson Luiz; Pimenta, Tales Cleber; Crepaldi, Paulo C; Cintra, Evaldo

    2013-06-01

    This article presents the viability analysis and the development of heart disease identification embedded system. It offers a time reduction on electrocardiogram - ECG signal processing by reducing the amount of data samples, without any significant loss. The goal of the developed system is the analysis of heart signals. The ECG signals are applied into the system that performs an initial filtering, and then uses a Gustafson-Kessel fuzzy clustering algorithm for the signal classification and correlation. The classification indicated common heart diseases such as angina, myocardial infarction and coronary artery diseases. The system uses the European electrocardiogram ST-T Database (EDB) as a reference for tests and evaluation. The results prove the system can perform the heart disease detection on a data set reduced from 213 to just 20 samples, thus providing a reduction to just 9.4% of the original set, while maintaining the same effectiveness. This system is validated in a Xilinx Spartan(®)-3A FPGA. The field programmable gate array (FPGA) implemented a Xilinx Microblaze(®) Soft-Core Processor running at a 50MHz clock rate. PMID:23394802

  14. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins. PMID:7582364

  15. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  16. [Risk management of coronary heart disease-prevention].

    PubMed

    Dorner, Thomas; Rieder, Anita

    2004-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and is responsible for 45% of deaths in the western world and 24.5% of deaths in the developing countries. In the 21st century these diseases will continue to dominate the disease spectrum and death statistics in both the industrialised and developing worlds. Since 1975 mortality from cardiovascular disease has decreased by about 24 to 28% in most countries. About 45% of this reduction can be attributed to an improvement in treatment of coronary heart disease and around 55% are attributable to a reduction in risk factors, in particular, stopping smoking and control of hypertension. However, especially in the case of ischaemic heart disease, it is not clear whether the reduction in mortality reflects a reduction in incidence of this disease. Due to the aging population and the reduction in age-related mortality, it is expected that the absolute number of people with heart disease will increase. Furthermore, the increase in prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes as well as the higher prevalence of female smokers compared with thirty years ago could result in an increase in mortality over the next years and decades. It has been shown that prevention strategies, such as education campaigns aimed at the general public, can potentially greatly contribute to a reduction in incidence of cardiovascular disease at every stage. In order for such campaigns to be effective, it is necessary to understand and reduce the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A large proportion of these risk factors are associated with lifestyle and are therefore modifiable. These modifiable risk factors include smoking, hypertension, poor diet, dyslipidemia, lack of exercise, overweight, adiposity and diabetes mellitus and optimisation of these should be a key aim for all adults. Gender differences also play a role in the incidence and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Incidence of myocardial

  17. Caring for infants with congenital heart disease and their families.

    PubMed

    Saenz, R B; Beebe, D K; Triplett, L C

    1999-04-01

    Congenital heart defects are classified into two broad categories: acyanotic and cyanotic lesions. The most common acyanotic lesions are ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, atrioventricular canal, pulmonary stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic stenosis and coarctation of the aorta. Congestive heart failure is the primary concern in infants with acyanotic lesions. The most common cyanotic lesions are tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries. In infants with cyanotic lesions, hypoxia is more of a problem than congestive heart failure. Suspicion of a congenital heart defect should be raised by the presence of feeding difficulties in association with tachypnea, sweating and subcostal recession, or severe growth impairment. Follow-up of infants with congenital heart disease should follow the schedule of routine care for healthy babies with some modifications, such as administration of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. More frequent follow-up is required if congestive heart failure is present. Family psychosocial issues should also be addressed. One of the main roles for the family physician is to help the parents put the diagnosis in perspective by clarifying expectations and misconceptions, and answering specific questions. PMID:10208705

  18. A study of heart diseases without clinical signs of heart failure in 47 cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buczinski, Sébastien; Francoz, David; Fecteau, Gilles; DiFruscia, Rocky

    2010-01-01

    In this retrospective study, features of 47 cattle suffering from heart disease (HD) without clinical signs of heart failure (HF) were reviewed. The most common reasons for referral were respiratory problems (n =14), anorexia (n = 13), fever (n = 10), and lameness (n = 9). Thirty-nine animals were tachypneic. In 31 cases, cardiac auscultation revealed abnormalities. The final diagnoses were bacterial endocarditis (BE; n = 19), congenital heart disease (CHD; n = 18), pericarditis (n = 8), cardiomyopathy (n = 1), and lymphoma (n = 1). Echocardiography was performed in 39 cases. Gross pathology examination confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis in 4 of 5 cases of pericarditis, 6 of 6 cases of BE, and 4 of 6 cases of CHD. Short-term prognosis was guarded with 19 cases (40.4%) being discharged. Premature death within 2 mo after discharge (n = 5), early culling because of poor breeding performance (n = 5), and normal productive life in the herd (n = 5) were observed in the cases that were followed. Echocardiography may be the most sensitive tool for the antemortem diagnosis of heart disease in cattle. PMID:21286323

  19. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  20. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  1. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  2. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  3. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  4. The winding road to regenerating the human heart

    PubMed Central

    Gerbin, Kaytlyn A.; Murry, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerating the human heart is a challenge that has engaged researchers and clinicians around the globe for nearly a century. From the repair of the first septal defect in 1953, followed by the first successful heart transplant in 1967, and later to the first infusion of bone-marrow derived cells to the human myocardium in 2002, significant progress has been made in heart repair. Yet, chronic heart failure remains a leading pathological burden worldwide. Why has regenerating the human heart been such a challenge, and how close are we to achieving clinically relevant regeneration? Exciting progress has been made to establish cell transplantation techniques in recent years, and new pre-clinical studies in large animal models have shed light on the promises and challenges that lie ahead. In this review, we will discuss the history of cell therapy approaches and provide an overview of clinical trials using cell transplantation for heart regeneration. Focusing on the delivery of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, current experimental strategies in the field will be discussed as well as their clinical translation potential. Although the human heart has not been regenerated yet, decades of experimental progress have guided us onto a promising pathway. Summary Exciting progress has been made in recent years to establish clinical cell transplantation techniques, and new pre-clinical studies in large animal models have shed light on the promises and challenges that lie ahead. Although the human heart has not been regenerated yet, decades of experimental progress in pre-clinical and clinical trials have guided us onto a promising pathway. PMID:25795463

  5. Coronary heart disease in Asian Indians: perspectives of family members.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shantala; Wilkes, Lesley M; Jackson, Debra

    Despite the high prevalence rate and significant mortality and morbidity from coronary heart disease in Asian Indians (irrespective of their religious background), very few studies have reported on family members' experiences of caring for a person with coronary heart disease. This paper reports on family members' experiences of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians residing in Australia, and is part of a larger study that explored the experiences and/or understanding of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians from the perspective of patients, family members and 'healthy' participants. Using a constructivist approach semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with five family members. Findings are represented under the following main categories: 1. A period of complexity for family members; 2. Indian Culture: Its influence on health/health behaviour & illness experience; 3. Impact of migration and societal discrimination; 4. Disappointment with health care services and the health system; and 5. Strategies to prevent cardiac illness and attain optimal health. Cultural factors had both positive and negative influences not only on the illness experience but also on health behaviour and attitude. The impact of Indian culture in relation to coronary heart disease needs to be understood not only at the cultural level by providing culturally sensitive health care, but also by educating Asian Indians to change their health attitude and behaviour and improve their lifestyle. Asian Indians need education and advice to become more resilient and adaptable to a Western society and also to become aware of the acculturative effects of a Western lifestyle. PMID:17343522

  6. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. PMID:25847571

  7. Rheumatic heart disease echocardiographic screening: approaching practical and affordable solutions.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Bruno R; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Lopes, Eduardo L V; Rezende, Vitória M L R; Landay, Taylor; Ribeiro, Antonio L P; Sable, Craig; Beaton, Andrea Z

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) affects at least 32.9 million people worldwide and ranks as a leading cause of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). Echocardiographic screening has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for early RHD detection, and holds potential for global RHD control. However, national screening programmes have not emerged. Major barriers to implementation include the lack of human and financial resources in LMICs. Here, we focus on recent research advances that could make echocardiographic screening more practical and affordable, including handheld echocardiography devices, simplified screening protocols and task shifting of echocardiographic screening to non-experts. Additionally, we highlight some important remaining questions before echocardiographic screening can be widely recommended, including demonstration of cost-effectiveness, assessment of the impact of screening on children and communities, and determining the importance of latent RHD. While a single strategy for echocardiographic screening in all high-prevalence areas is unlikely, we believe recent advancements are bringing the public health community closer to developing sustainable programmes for echocardiographic screening. PMID:26891757

  8. Dysfunction of the β2-spectrin-based pathway in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sakima A; Hughes, Langston D; Kline, Crystal F; Kempton, Amber N; Dorn, Lisa E; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael; Webb, Tyler R; Wright, Patrick; Voigt, Niels; Binkley, Philip F; Janssen, Paul M L; Kilic, Ahmet; Carnes, Cynthia A; Dobrev, Dobromir; Rasband, Matthew N; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    β2-Spectrin is critical for integrating membrane and cytoskeletal domains in excitable and nonexcitable cells. The role of β2-spectrin for vertebrate function is illustrated by dysfunction of β2-spectrin-based pathways in disease. Recently, defects in β2-spectrin association with protein partner ankyrin-B were identified in congenital forms of human arrhythmia. However, the role of β2-spectrin in common forms of acquired heart failure and arrhythmia is unknown. We report that β2-spectrin protein levels are significantly altered in human cardiovascular disease as well as in large and small animal cardiovascular disease models. Specifically, β2-spectrin levels were decreased in atrial samples of patients with atrial fibrillation compared with tissue from patients in sinus rhythm. Furthermore, compared with left ventricular samples from nonfailing hearts, β2-spectrin levels were significantly decreased in left ventricle of ischemic- and nonischemic heart failure patients. Left ventricle samples of canine and murine heart failure models confirm reduced β2-spectrin protein levels. Mechanistically, we identify that β2-spectrin levels are tightly regulated by posttranslational mechanisms, namely Ca(2+)- and calpain-dependent proteases. Furthermore, consistent with this data, we observed Ca(2+)- and calpain-dependent loss of β2-spectrin downstream effector proteins, including ankyrin-B in heart. In summary, our findings illustrate that β2-spectrin and downstream molecules are regulated in multiple forms of cardiovascular disease via Ca(2+)- and calpain-dependent proteolysis. PMID:27106045

  9. Mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in the developing and diseased heart

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W.; Vega, Rick B.; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a complex organelle that serves essential roles in energy transduction, ATP production, and a myriad of cellular signaling events. A finely tuned regulatory network orchestrates the biogenesis, maintenance, and turnover of mitochondria. The high-capacity mitochondrial system in the heart is regulated in a dynamic way to generate and consume enormous amounts of ATP in order to support the constant pumping function in the context of changing energy demands. This review describes the regulatory circuitry and downstream events involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and its coordination with mitochondrial dynamics in developing and diseased hearts. PMID:26443844

  10. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

  11. Association of heart block with uncommon disease States.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Antonelli, Dante; Suleiman, Khaled; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-09-01

    A variety of diseases, other than the common Lev-Lenègre disease, are associated with cardiac conduction system abnormalities. These include acute processes, such as acute rheumatic fever, and other disorders, such as sarcoidosis, connective tissue disorders, neoplasms, and bacterial endocarditis with cardiac abscess formation. The purpose of the study is to raise awareness of these rare conditions. We present 10 adult patients (4 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range: 19-69), with various rare diseases associated with heart block, who needed temporary or permanent pacemaker therapy in the past two decades. These conditions included acute rheumatic carditis, Wegener granulomatosis, cardiac involvement of metastatic breast cancer, bacterial endocarditis, sarcoidosis, S/P chest radiotherapy, and quadriplegia with syringomyelia postspinal cord injury, and adult congenital heart block. We conclude that patients with these disorders should be followed periodically, to allow for early detection and treatment of cardiac conduction disturbances, with pacemaker therapy. PMID:24436606

  12. Social class and heart disease mortality among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Williams, Carol R; Moore, Latetia; Chen, Fangfei

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine variation in heart disease death rates by the social class of decedents. The term, "social class" refers to a complex set of phenomena such as control over economic resources, social status, and power relative to others in society. The target population for this study was African-American adults aged 35-74 years old who resided in the United States during the years 1996-1997. As a proxy for social class, we examined 5 levels of educational attainment: 0-8 years of school completed (Social Class I), 9-11 years of school completed (Social Class II), high school graduate/12 years of school completed (Social Class III), some college completed (Social Class IV), and college degree completed (Social Class V). Older age, male gender, and lower social class were all independently associated with higher heart disease death rates. For all ages, more disadvantaged social classes had a higher risk of heart disease mortality. The highest relative risks were found for Social Classes I and II among the younger age groups. Many of the "prerequisites" for the "heart healthy lifestyle" are predicated on the benefits of a privileged social class position. For African Americans, there are the additional stressors of segregation, exclusion, and discrimination to overcome, as well as the cumulative physiological toll of lifetime resistance to various forms of racism. For many African Americans in disadvantaged social class positions, the obstacles to reducing the risk for heart disease are very difficult to overcome. PMID:12477160

  13. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines. PMID:27482251

  14. Genetic Mapping in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J.; Lander, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful approach to identify genes and biological processes underlying any trait influenced by inheritance, including human diseases. We discuss the intellectual foundations of genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits in humans, examine lessons emerging from linkage analysis of Mendelian diseases and genome-wide association studies of common diseases, and discuss questions and challenges that lie ahead. PMID:18988837

  15. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Farber, Gregory K; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D; Burns, Kristin M; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C; Chung, Wendy K; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H; Forrest, Christopher B; Gaynor, William J; Gaies, Michael G; Go, Alan S; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L; Schwartz, Steven M; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of congenital heart disease data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in congenital heart disease, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the working group. PMID:27045129

  16. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  17. Abdominal obesity is associated with heart disease in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between overall obesity and fat distribution in dogs and the development of heart disease is unclear. In the present study we evaluated the association between overall obesity and fat distribution and clinical heart disease by morphometric and computed tomography (CT)-based measurements. Body condition score (BCS), modified body mass index (MBMI, kg/m2), waist-to-hock-to-stifle distance ratio (WHSDR), waist-to-ilium wing distance ratio (WIWDR), and waist-to-truncal length ratio (WTLR) were compared between dogs with (n = 44) and without (n = 43) heart disease using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Intra-abdominal fat (IAF) and subcutaneous fat (SQF) were measured in dogs with (n = 8) and without (n = 9) heart disease at the center of the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae by CT. Results BCS was similar between heart disease and healthy groups (3.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.3 ± 0.1, P = 0.126). The following morphometric measurements were greater in the heart disease group compared with healthy canines: MBMI (65.0 ± 4.5 vs. 52.5 ± 3.7 kg/m2, respectively, P = 0.035); WIWDR (4.1 ± 0.1 vs. 3.1 ± 0.1, P < 0.01); and WTLR (1.25 ± 0.04 vs. 1.05 ± 0.04, P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in WHSDR (3.6 ± 0.1 vs. 3.7 ± 0.2, P = 0.875). Interestingly, IAF was significantly increased in dogs with heart disease compared with healthy dogs (23.5 ± 1.5% vs. 19.4 ± 1.2%, P = 0.039) whereas SQF was similar between two groups (35.5 ± 2.7% vs. 38.6 ± 3.5%, P = 0.496). Of the five morphometric indices studied, WIWDR and WTLR provided acceptable discrimination for diagnosing heart disease in dogs, with areas under the ROC curve of 0.778 (95% confidence interval [CI]:0.683-0.874) and 0.727 (95% CI:0.619-0.835), respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that abdominal obesity, rather than overall obesity, is associated

  18. Women and heart disease, the underrecognized burden: sex differences, biases, and unmet clinical and research challenges.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Stacy; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-04-01

    For many years the significance of heart disease in women was vastly underappreciated, and women were significantly underrepresented in cardiovascular clinical research. We now know that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women. Women and men share many similarities in the pathophysiology and manifestations of heart disease. However, as research advances with the continued inclusion of more women, knowledge about gender differences between the female and male heart, both on a physiological and pathophysiological basis, grows. These differences can be found in all domains of cardiovascular health and disease, including heart rhythm, heart failure, coronary disease and valvular disease. Further understanding of gender differences in the heart is crucial for advancing our ability to maintain a healthy population and identify and treat heart disease in both women and men. Specific examples within the spectrum of heart disease will be discussed in this review paper, and areas for further research will be proposed. PMID:26957643

  19. Women with Migraine May Face Higher Threat of Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women With Migraine May Face Higher Threat of Heart Disease, Stroke Researchers say it should be considered an ... headaches may have a slightly increased risk of heart disease or stroke, a new study suggests. "Migraine should ...

  20. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Endometriosis linked to heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript052316.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Endometriosis linked to heart disease : 05/23/2016 To ... use MedlinePlus to follow up on weekly topics. Endometriosis significantly increases the risk of developing heart disease ...

  1. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  2. Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158240.html Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer Guideline applies ... of heart disease should take a low-dose aspirin each day to reduce their risk of both ...

  3. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Salt linked to heart disease among CKD patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript072516.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Salt linked to heart disease among CKD patients : 07/ ... kidney disease - and eat a diet high in salt - comparatively increase their odds of a heart attack ...

  4. Coronary embolism in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Charles, R G; Epstein, E J; Holt, S; Coulshed, N

    1982-01-01

    Coronary embolism is considered to be rare but recent evidence suggests that it may be underdiagnosed, and implicated in acute myocardial infarction associated with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Twenty-six patients were studied. In six, coronary embolism was a primary cause of death confirmed at autopsy. In 20 patients, 23 episodes of coronary embolism were diagnosed clinically. The left coronary system was occluded in 65 per cent, transient electrocardiographic changes occurred in 30 per cent, and either no history or an atypical history of acute myocardial infarction occurred in 29 per cent. Other systemic emboli occurred in 25 per cent. Aortic valve lesions were present in 70 per cent and combined mitral and aortic valve disease in 55 per cent of the patients. The incidence of coronary risk factors was low. Sequelae included increased dyspnoea (35 per cent), ventricular aneurysm (25 per cent) and cardiac failure (12 per cent). Angina rarely followed acute myocardial infarction. PMID:7111677

  5. Advanced clinical insights & practice: ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Benner, Randall W; Zavarella, Matthew S

    2008-03-01

    This issue sees the debut of a new series of continuing education articles. The series, Advanced Clinical Insights & Practice, is designed to provide continuing education to an ever-expanding realm of paramedicine that needs more of it: the critical care transport paramedic. Secondly, and equally important, are the benefits that can be reaped by other certification levels reading this feature. For EMT-Basics and Intermediates, it will provide a great enhancement to your core knowledge, although most of the interventions discussed will be beyond your traditional scope. For paramedics, it will augment both your pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment/management skills of diseases and injuries discussed. Ultimately though, it is hoped that anyone who reads these articles will become a better clinician. The next article will appear in the July issue. PMID:18814637

  6. Importance of blood cellular genomic profile in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baba, M Iqbal; Kaul, Deepak; Grover, Anil

    2006-01-01

    Since receptor/transcription factor family especially peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors PPARs (alpha, gamma) and liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha) have been recognized to play crucial role in both lipid metabolism and inflammation, the present study was addressed to explore the interrelationship between blood cellular genomic expression profile, serum lipid levels and severity of coronary heart disease (CHD) in human subjects. Based upon the demographic and laboratory data, the human subjects were divided into 4 groups. Genomic expression profile in the subjects belonging to these groups was determined by measuring the transcriptional expression of genes coding for PPARs (alpha, gamma), CD36, LXRalpha and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in their blood mononuclear cells. This genomic expression profile was correlated with serum lipid profile as well as with the severity of CHD (revealed by coronary angiography coupled with modified Gensini score) using standard statistical analytical methods. Further in vitro and in vivo effect of statins on such genomic profile was also explored. Although genes coding for PPARs (alpha, gamma), CD36, LDLR showed correlation with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis , blood cellular LXRalpha genomic profile showed conspicuous negative correlation with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in subjects with or without hypercholesterolemia. This view was further confirmed in experiments directed to understand the effect of statins on the cellular genomic profile of PPARs (alpha, gamma) and LXRalpha. Based on these reported findings, we propose that blood cellular LXRalpha genomic profile has a protective effect against the development of CHD and hence may be of importance in devising synthetic therapeutic drugs for CHD in future. PMID:16252156

  7. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member’s physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists’ performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists’ via speakers. We recorded the audience members’ electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience’s heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience’s sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience’s physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience’s superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance. PMID:27104377

  8. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member's physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists' performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists' via speakers. We recorded the audience members' electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience's heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience's sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience's physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience's superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance. PMID:27104377

  9. Seasonality and Coronary Heart Disease Deaths in United States Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Mbanu, Ibeawuchi; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Peeples, Lynne; Stallings, Leonard A.; Kales, Stefanos N.

    2013-01-01

    United States firefighters have a high on-duty fatality rate and coronary heart disease is the leading cause. Seasonality affects the incidence of cardiovascular events in the general population, but its effects on firefighters are unknown. We statistically examined the seasonal and annual variation of all on-duty coronary heart disease deaths among US firefighters between 1994 and 2004 using the chi-square distribution and Poisson regression model of the monthly fatality counts. We also examined the effect of ambient temperature (apparent as well as wind chill temperature) on coronary heart disease fatalities during the study span using a time-stratified, case-crossover study design. When grouped by season, we observed the distribution of the 449 coronary heart disease fatalities to show a relative peak in winter (32%) and relative nadir in spring (21%). This pattern was significantly different (p=0.005) from the expected distribution under the null hypothesis where season has no effect. The pattern persisted in additional analyses, stratifying the deaths by the type of duty in which the firefighters were engaged at the time of their deaths. In the Poisson regression model of the monthly fatality counts, the overall goodness-of-fit between the actual and predicted case counts was excellent ( χ42 = 16.63; p = 0.002). Two distinct peaks were detected, one in January-February and the other in August-September. Overall, temperature was not associated with increased risk of on-duty death. After allowing for different effects of temperature in mild/hot versus cold periods, a 1°C increase was not protective in cold weather, nor did it increase the risk of death in warmer weather. The findings of this study reveal statistical evidence for excess coronary heart disease deaths among firefighters during winter; however, the temporal pattern coronary heart disease deaths was not linked to temperature variation. We also found the seasonal pattern to be independent of duty

  10. Acute myeloid leukaemia as a cause of acute ischaemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    van Haelst, P.L.; Schot, B.; Hoendermis, E.S.; van den Berg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is almost invariably the result of atherosclerotic degeneration of the coronary arteries. However, other causes of ischaemic heart disease should always be considered. Here we describe two patients with a classic presentation of ischaemic heart disease resulting from acute leukaemia. The pathophysiological mechanisms of acute leukaemia leading to ischaemic heart disease are discussed. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1BFigure 2 PMID:25696595

  11. Ischemic heart disease in systemic inflammatory diseases. An appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Paola; Marsico, Fabio; Parente, Antonio; Paolillo, Stefania; Cecere, Milena; Casaretti, Laura; Pellegrino, Angela Maria; Formisano, Tiziana; Fabiani, Irma; Soricelli, Andrea; Trimarco, Bruno; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory diseases are inflammatory syndromes that are associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The link between inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases can be attributed to coexistence of classical risk factors and of inflammatory mechanisms activated in systemic inflammatory diseases and involving the immune system. Yet, clinical implications of these findings are not entirely clear and deeper knowledge and awareness of cardiac involvement in inflammatory diseases are necessary. The aims of this review are to summarize cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases and to identify areas where evidence is currently lacking that deserve further investigation in the future. PMID:24331863

  12. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori; Souza, Rogerio; Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested. PMID:24061754

  13. Epidemiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Guha, Ashrith; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Park, Myung H

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left side heart disease is associated with adverse outcomes. The exact prevalence of PH in the different pathologies that affect the left ventricle, however, is difficult to access with the current literature. The lack of a standard definition of PH in older studies, the different modalities to assess pulmonary artery pressures and the varying disease severity, all account for the great variability in the reported prevalence of PH. PH can accompany heart failure (HF) with reduced (HFrEF) or preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) as well as mitral and aortic valve disease; in any of these instances it is important to recognize whether the elevation of pulmonary pressures is driven by elevated left ventricular pressures only (isolated post-capillary PH) or if there is an accompanying remodeling component in the pulmonary arterioles (combined post-capillary and pre-capillary PH). The objective of this review is to describe the definitions, prevalence and the risk factors associated with the development of PH in the setting of HFrEF, HFpEF and valvular heart disease. PMID:27402130

  14. Particulate matter and heart disease: Evidence from epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Annette . E-mail: peters@gsf.de

    2005-09-01

    The association between particulate matter and heart disease was noted in the mid-nineties of last century when the epidemiological evidence for an association between air pollution and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease accumulated and first hypotheses regarding the pathomechanism were formulated. Nowadays, epidemiological studies have demonstrated coherent associations between daily changes in concentrations of ambient particles and cardiovascular disease mortality, hospital admission, disease exacerbation in patients with cardiovascular disease and early physiological responses in healthy individuals consistent with a risk factor profile deterioration. In addition, evidence was found that annual average PM{sub 2.5} exposures are associated with increased risks for mortality caused by ischemic heart disease and dysrhythmia. Thereby, evidence is suggesting not only a short-term exacerbation of cardiovascular disease by ambient particle concentrations but also a potential role of particles in defining patients' vulnerability to acute coronary events. While this concept is consistent with the current understanding of the factors defining patients' vulnerability, the mechanisms and the time-scales on which the particle-induced vulnerability might operate are unknown.

  15. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  16. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22278660

  17. Human gene copy number spectra analysis in congenital heart malformations.

    PubMed

    Tomita-Mitchell, Aoy; Mahnke, Donna K; Struble, Craig A; Tuffnell, Maureen E; Stamm, Karl D; Hidestrand, Mats; Harris, Susan E; Goetsch, Mary A; Simpson, Pippa M; Bick, David P; Broeckel, Ulrich; Pelech, Andrew N; Tweddell, James S; Mitchell, Michael E

    2012-05-01

    The clinical significance of copy number variants (CNVs) in congenital heart disease (CHD) continues to be a challenge. Although CNVs including genes can confer disease risk, relationships between gene dosage and phenotype are still being defined. Our goal was to perform a quantitative analysis of CNVs involving 100 well-defined CHD risk genes identified through previously published human association studies in subjects with anatomically defined cardiac malformations. A novel analytical approach permitting CNV gene frequency "spectra" to be computed over prespecified regions to determine phenotype-gene dosage relationships was employed. CNVs in subjects with CHD (n = 945), subphenotyped into 40 groups and verified in accordance with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code, were compared with two control groups, a disease-free cohort (n = 2,026) and a population with coronary artery disease (n = 880). Gains (≥200 kb) and losses (≥100 kb) were determined over 100 CHD risk genes and compared using a Barnard exact test. Six subphenotypes showed significant enrichment (P ≤ 0.05), including aortic stenosis (valvar), atrioventricular canal (partial), atrioventricular septal defect with tetralogy of Fallot, subaortic stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, and truncus arteriosus. Furthermore, CNV gene frequency spectra were enriched (P ≤ 0.05) for losses at: FKBP6, ELN, GTF2IRD1, GATA4, CRKL, TBX1, ATRX, GPC3, BCOR, ZIC3, FLNA and MID1; and gains at: PRKAB2, FMO5, CHD1L, BCL9, ACP6, GJA5, HRAS, GATA6 and RUNX1. Of CHD subjects, 14% had causal chromosomal abnormalities, and 4.3% had likely causal (significantly enriched), large, rare CNVs. CNV frequency spectra combined with precision phenotyping may lead to increased molecular understanding of etiologic pathways. PMID:22318994

  18. Human gene copy number spectra analysis in congenital heart malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Donna K.; Struble, Craig A.; Tuffnell, Maureen E.; Stamm, Karl D.; Hidestrand, Mats; Harris, Susan E.; Goetsch, Mary A.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Bick, David P.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Pelech, Andrew N.; Tweddell, James S.; Mitchell, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical significance of copy number variants (CNVs) in congenital heart disease (CHD) continues to be a challenge. Although CNVs including genes can confer disease risk, relationships between gene dosage and phenotype are still being defined. Our goal was to perform a quantitative analysis of CNVs involving 100 well-defined CHD risk genes identified through previously published human association studies in subjects with anatomically defined cardiac malformations. A novel analytical approach permitting CNV gene frequency “spectra” to be computed over prespecified regions to determine phenotype-gene dosage relationships was employed. CNVs in subjects with CHD (n = 945), subphenotyped into 40 groups and verified in accordance with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code, were compared with two control groups, a disease-free cohort (n = 2,026) and a population with coronary artery disease (n = 880). Gains (≥200 kb) and losses (≥100 kb) were determined over 100 CHD risk genes and compared using a Barnard exact test. Six subphenotypes showed significant enrichment (P ≤ 0.05), including aortic stenosis (valvar), atrioventricular canal (partial), atrioventricular septal defect with tetralogy of Fallot, subaortic stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, and truncus arteriosus. Furthermore, CNV gene frequency spectra were enriched (P ≤ 0.05) for losses at: FKBP6, ELN, GTF2IRD1, GATA4, CRKL, TBX1, ATRX, GPC3, BCOR, ZIC3, FLNA and MID1; and gains at: PRKAB2, FMO5, CHD1L, BCL9, ACP6, GJA5, HRAS, GATA6 and RUNX1. Of CHD subjects, 14% had causal chromosomal abnormalities, and 4.3% had likely causal (significantly enriched), large, rare CNVs. CNV frequency spectra combined with precision phenotyping may lead to increased molecular understanding of etiologic pathways. PMID:22318994

  19. Cardiac myosin-Th17 responses promote heart failure in human myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer M.; Cooper, Leslie T.; Kem, David C.; Stavrakis, Stavros; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Shevach, Ethan M.; Fairweather, DeLisa; Stoner, Julie A.; Cox, Carol J.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2016-01-01

    In human myocarditis and its sequela dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the mechanisms and immune phenotype governing disease and subsequent heart failure are not known. Here, we identified a Th17 cell immunophenotype of human myocarditis/DCM with elevated CD4+IL17+ T cells and Th17-promoting cytokines IL-6, TGF-β, and IL-23 as well as GM-CSF–secreting CD4+ T cells. The Th17 phenotype was linked with the effects of cardiac myosin on CD14+ monocytes, TLR2, and heart failure. Persistent heart failure was associated with high percentages of IL-17–producing T cells and IL-17–promoting cytokines, and the myocarditis/DCM phenotype included significantly low percentages of FOXP3+ Tregs, which may contribute to disease severity. We demonstrate a potentially novel mechanism in human myocarditis/DCM in which TLR2 peptide ligands from human cardiac myosin stimulated exaggerated Th17-related cytokines including TGF-β, IL-6, and IL-23 from myocarditic CD14+ monocytes in vitro, and an anti-TLR2 antibody abrogated the cytokine response. Our translational study explains how an immune phenotype may be initiated by cardiac myosin TLR ligand stimulation of monocytes to generate Th17-promoting cytokines and development of pathogenic Th17 cells in human myocarditis and heart failure, and provides a rationale for targeting IL-17A as a therapeutic option. PMID:27366791

  20. Tissue Doppler Imaging in Coronary Artery Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Michele; Totaro, Antonio; Ieva, Riccardo; Ferraretti, Armando; Musaico, Francesco; Biase, Matteo Di

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the prognostic role of TDI-derived parameters in major cardiac diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF). In these conditions, myocardial mitral annular systolic (S’) and early diastolic (E’) velocities have been shown to predict mortality or cardiovascular events. In heart failure non invasive assessment of LV diastolic pressure by transmitral to mitral annular early diastolic velocity ratio (E/E’) is a strong prognosticator, especially when E/E’ is > or =15. Moreover, other parameters derived by TDI, as cardiac time intervals and Myocardial Performance Index, might play a role in the prognostic stratification in CAD and HF. Recently, a three-dimensional (3-D) TDI imaging modality, triplane TDI, has become available, and this allows calculation of 3-Dvolumes and LV ejection fraction. We present a brief update of TDI. PMID:22845815

  1. Clinical use of echocardiography in structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Kentaro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a development of devices for transcatheter interventions, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis, percutaneous mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation, and percutaneous closure of atrial septal defect, has led to a greatly expanded armamentarium of catheter-based approaches for patients with structural heart disease (SHD). Comorbidity and anatomical limitations specific to each procedure are known to influence outcomes during and after the intervention. Therefore, risk stratification of the intervention including anatomical and functional assessments is critically important. Furthermore, echocardiography reveals both physiological and anatomical abnormalities of SHD in real-time even in the operation theater. Consequently, echocardiography plays an essential role in providing not only preoperative assessment of SHD but also intra-procedural monitoring and postoperative follow-up. This document is intended as a reference for cardiac surgeons using echocardiography clinically for patients with SHD, particularly those with valvular heart disease and atrial septal defect. PMID:27138937

  2. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization. PMID:25493947

  3. Oral health of patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Breminand; Vayej, Ahmed C

    2012-07-01

    In order to determine whether adequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis, we studied 44 black patients with severe rheumatic heart disease before they had cardiac surgery. Plaque and gingival index scores were calculated and panoramic radiographs were done in all patients. There were 17 males and 27 females (mean age: 30.6 years). The plaque and gingival index scores were classified as poor in 31.8 and 54.6% of patients, respectively. Panoramic radiographic findings included caries in 56.8% of patients, peri-apical pathology in 18.1% and retained roots in 22.7% of patients. This study demonstrates that inadequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease. The oral and dental care of patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis needs to be improved. PMID:22836156

  4. [Multimodal imaging of ischemic heart diseases: A 2015 update].

    PubMed

    Di Marco, L; Rosset, M; Zhang-Yin, J; Ohana, M

    2016-05-01

    Current realities and future possibilities of imaging in the ischemic heart diseases are very broad and constantly evolving, with the improvement of existing technologies and the introduction of new features such as dual-energy CT, strain ultrasound, multimodality fusion or perfusion MRI. Regular collaboration between prescribing clinicians, cardiologists, radiologists and nuclear radiologists is therefore essential to tailor the examination to the specific clinical question. The indications for each modality will therefore depend on its diagnostic performance, cost, acquisition and post-processing times and eventual radiation exposure. This review will detail principles and applications of current cardiac imaging examinations: echocardiography, nuclear medicine, MRI, CT and coronary angiography, emphasizing their current strengths and weaknesses in the ischemic heart diseases management. PMID:26775644

  5. Software innovations in computed tomography for structural heart disease interventions.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela; Marwan, Mohamed; Gaede, Luise; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-05-17

    Computed tomography (CT) provides high, isotropic spatial resolution and has become firmly established in pre-procedural imaging for structural heart disease interventions. It allows determination of the exact dimensions of the target structure, provides information regarding the access route and permits identification of fluoroscopic projection angles to provide optimal visualisation for device placement. Several software solutions are available and have been systematically evaluated in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The use of software products to perform automated measurements can be useful, especially when the experience and expertise regarding evaluation of CT in the context of structural heart disease are limited. In scientific studies, software has been demonstrated to provide accurate support for annulus sizing and prosthesis selection, to aid in reliably identifying patients in whom a transfemoral access may be problematic, and to suggest suitable angulations for fluoroscopic imaging to achieve an orthogonal view onto the aortic valve during implantation. PMID:27174116

  6. Arrhythmia diagnosis and management throughout life in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Bradley C; Berul, Charles I

    2016-03-01

    Arrhythmias, covering bradycardia and tachycardia, occur in association with congenital heart disease (CHD) and as a consequence of surgical repair. Symptomatic bradycardia can occur due to sinus node dysfunction or atrioventricular block secondary to either unrepaired CHD or surgical repair in the area of the conduction system. Tachyarrhythmias are common in repaired CHD due to scar formation, chamber distension or increased chamber pressure, all potentially leading to abnormal automaticity and heterogeneous conduction properties as a substrate for re-entry. Atrial arrhythmias occur more frequently, but ventricular tachyarrhythmias may be associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, notably in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot or aortic stenosis. Defibrillator implantation provides life-saving electrical therapy for hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias. Ablation procedures with 3D electroanatomic mapping technology offer a viable alternative to pharmacologic or device therapy. Advances in electrophysiology have allowed for successful management of arrhythmias in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:26642231

  7. Imaging Systemic Inflammatory Networks in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Frantz, Stefan; Swirski, Filip K.; Mulder, Willem J.M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Ertl, Georg; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Piek, Jan; Stroes, Erik; Schwaiger, Markus; Mann, Douglas L.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2015-01-01

    While acute myocardial infarction mortality declines, patients continue to face reinfarction and/or heart failure. The immune system, which intimately interacts with healthy and diseased tissues through resident and recruited leukocytes, is a central interface for a global host response to ischemia. Pathways that enhance the systemic leukocyte supply may be potential therapeutic targets. Pre-clinically, imaging helps identify immunity’s decision nodes, which may serve as such targets. In translating the rapidly expanding preclinical data on immune activity, the difficulty of obtaining multiple clinical tissue samples from involved organs is an obstacle that whole-body imaging can help overcome. In patients, molecular and cellular imaging can be integrated with blood-based diagnostics to assess the translatability of discoveries, including the activation of hematopoietic tissues after myocardial infarction, and serve as an endpoint in clinical trials. In this review, we discuss these concepts while focusing on imaging immune activity in organs involved in ischemic heart disease. PMID:25881940

  8. Fatty acids, membrane viscosity, serotonin and ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Novel markers for ischemic heart disease are under investigation by the scientific community at international level. This work focuses on a specific platelet membrane fatty acid condition of viscosity which is linked to molecular aspects such as serotonin and G proteins, factors involved in vascular biology. A suggestive hypothesis is considered about the possibility to use platelet membrane viscosity, in relation to serotonin or, indirectly, the fatty acid profile, as indicator of ischemic risk. PMID:20825633

  9. Cardiac surgery for ergotamine-induced multivalvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lazopoulos, George; Papaioannou, George; Kantartzis, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Ergotamine is used to abort or prevent vascular headache. Valvular heart disease as an adverse effect of long-term ergotamine therapy has been rarely reported in the English literature, with only a few cases published. It is hypothesized that ergot-derived agents stimulate serotonergic receptors (5-HT2B), causing proliferation of myofibroblasts, with subsequent thickening of valve leaflets and chords. This case presentation aims at increasing clinicians' awareness of this potential complication. PMID:23475795

  10. Right ventricular long noncoding RNA expression in human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Su, Yan Ru; Clark, Travis; Brittain, Evan; Absi, Tarek; Maltais, Simon; Hemnes, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart failure (HF) has not been widely studied. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we compared lncRNA expression in 22 explanted human HF hearts with lncRNA expression in 5 unused donor human hearts. We used Cufflinks to identify isoforms and DESeq to identify differentially expressed genes. We identified the noncoding RNAs by cross-reference to Ensembl release 73 (Genome Reference Consortium human genome build 37) and explored possible functional roles using a variety of online tools. In HF hearts, RNA-Seq identified 84,793 total messenger RNA coding and noncoding different transcripts, including 13,019 protein-coding genes, 2,085 total lncRNA genes, and 1,064 pseudogenes. By Ensembl noncoding RNA categories, there were 48 lncRNAs, 27 pseudogenes, and 30 antisense RNAs for a total of 105 differentially expressed lncRNAs in HF hearts. Compared with donor hearts, HF hearts exhibited differential expression of 7.7% of protein-coding genes, 3.7% of lncRNAs (including pseudogenes), and 2.5% of pseudogenes. There were not consistent correlations between antisense lncRNAs and parent genes and between pseudogenes and parent genes, implying differential regulation of expression. Exploratory in silico functional analyses using online tools suggested a variety of possible lncRNA regulatory roles. By providing a comprehensive profile of right ventricular polyadenylated messenger RNA transcriptome in HF, RNA-Seq provides an inventory of differentially expressed lncRNAs, including antisense transcripts and pseudogenes, for future mechanistic study. PMID:25992278

  11. Assessing the relationship between dental disease and coronary heart disease in elderly U.S. veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Dominguez, B L; Grossman, N

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have shown a link between dental disease and coronary heart disease. The authors studied 320 U.S. veterans in a convenience sample to assess the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases among older people. They present cross-sectional data confirming that a statistically significant association exists between a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and certain oral health parameters, such as the number of missing teeth, plaque benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide test scores, salivary levels of Streptococcus sanguis and complaints of xerostomia. The oral parameters in these subjects were independent of and more strongly associated with coronary heart disease than were recognized risk factors, such as serum cholesterol levels, body mass index, diabetes and smoking status. However, because of the convenience sample studied, these findings cannot be generalized to other populations. PMID:9529805

  12. Postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Peiling; Wang, Tuanjie; Gao, Jun; Yao, Jinhua; Li, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease. Methods: Three hundreds children with congenital heart disease admitted to our hospital to receive surgeries from February 2010 to February 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 120 children were tested as positive by sputum culture, with the infection rate of 40.0%. The top five most common pathogenic microorganisms included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. S. epidermidis, S. aureus and Enterococcus were highly resistant to penicillin, azithromycin and erythromycin, moderately susceptible to levofloxacin and cefazolin, and completely susceptible to vancomycin. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that hospitalization stay length, combined use of antibiotics, systemic use of hormones, mechanical ventilation and catheter indwelling were the independent risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections (P<0.05). Conclusion: Nosocomial infection, which was the most frequent postoperative complication of pediatric congenital heart disease, was predominantly induced by Gram-positive bacteria that were highly susceptible to cephalosporins and vancomycin. Particular attention should be paid to decrease relevant risk factors to improve the prognosis. PMID:24948978

  13. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Yu, Yanan; Li, Bing; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yijun; Shen, Chunti; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  14. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, YE; ZHANG, YINGYING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; YU, YANAN; LI, BING; WANG, PENGQIAN; LI, HAIXIA; ZHAO, YIJUN; SHEN, CHUNTI; WANG, ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  15. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg; Fisher, Robyn L.; Vickers, Alison E.M.

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  16. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika; Asp, Julia; Synnergren, Jane; Johansson, Cecilia Thalen; Palmqvist, Lars; Jeppsson, Anders; Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson

    2012-07-27

    important insights into the underlying association between hypoxia and inflammation in the human ischemic heart disease.

  17. Nebivolol: a multifaceted antioxidant and cardioprotectant in hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Usman; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Al Darazi, Fahed; Ahokas, Robert A; Sun, Yao; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Gerling, Ivan C; Weber, Karl T

    2013-11-01

    Cardiomyocyte necrosis with attendant microscopic scarring is a pathological feature of human hypertensive heart disease (HHD). Understanding the pathophysiological origins of necrosis is integral to its prevention. In a rat model of HHD associated with aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST), myocyte necrosis is attributable to oxidative stress induced by cytosolic-free [Ca]i and mitochondrial [Ca]m overloading in which the rate of reactive oxygen species generation overwhelms their rate of detoxification by endogenous Zn-based antioxidant defenses. We hypothesized that nebivolol (Neb), unlike another β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist atenolol (Aten), would have a multifaceted antioxidant potential based on its dual property as a β3 receptor agonist, which activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) generation. NO promotes the release of cytosolic Zn sequestered inactive by its binding protein, metallothionein. Given the reciprocal regulation between these cations, increased [Zn]i reduces Ca entry and attendant rise in [Ca]i and [Ca]m. Herein, we examined the antioxidant and cardioprotectant properties of Neb and Aten in rats receiving 4 weeks ALDOST. Compared with untreated age-/sex-matched controls, ALDOST alone or ALDOST with Aten, Neb cotreatment induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation, NO generation and a marked increase in [Zn]i with associated decline in [Ca]i and [Ca]m. Attendant antioxidant profile at subcellular and cellular levels included attenuation of mitochondrial H2O2 production and lipid peroxidation expressed as reduced 8-isoprostane concentrations in both mitochondria and cardiac tissue. Myocyte salvage was expressed as reduced microscopic scarring and tissue collagen volume fraction. Neb is a multifaceted antioxidant with unique properties as cardioprotectant in HHD. PMID:23921314

  18. An android-based heart monitoring system for the elderly and for patients with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pierleoni, Paola; Pernini, Luca; Belli, Alberto; Palma, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The current trend in health monitoring systems is to move from the hospital to portable personal devices. This work shows how consumer devices like heart rate monitors can be used not only for applications in sports, but also for medical research and diagnostic purposes. The goal pursued by our group was to develop a simple, accurate, and inexpensive system that would use a few pieces of data acquired by the heart rate monitor and process them on a smartphone to (i) provide detailed test reports about the user's health state; (ii) store report records; (iii) generate emergency calls or SMSs; and (iv) connect to a remote telemedicine portal to relay the data to an online database. The system developed by our team uses sophisticated algorithms to detect stress states, detect and classify arrhythmia events, and calculate energy consumption. It is suitable for use by elderly subjects and by patients with heart disease (e.g., those recovering from myocardial infarction) or neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Easy, immediate, and economical remote health control can therefore be achieved without the need for expensive hospital equipment, using only portable consumer devices. PMID:25210513

  19. Depression and Heart Rate Variability in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gehi, Anil; Mangano, Dennis; Pipkin, Sharon; Browner, Warren S.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Depression is associated with low heart rate variability (HRV) in patients following myocardial infarction, suggesting that alterations in the autonomic nervous system may contribute to the adverse cardiac outcomes associated with depression. Whether depression is associated with low HRV in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) is not known. Objective To examine the association between major depression and 24-hour HRV in patients with stable CHD. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study of 873 outpatients with stable CHD recruited from outpatient clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. Main Outcome Measures Major depression was assessed using the Computerized National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Heart rate variability was measured by 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography. Results A total of 195 participants (22%) had major depression. Overall, we observed no association between depression and HRV as measured by time domain or frequency domain variables. Mean HRV was similar in participants with and without depression (all P values >.10), and participants with depression were no more likely than those without depression to have low HRV (all P values >.10). Conclusions We found no evidence of an association between depression and HRV in 873 outpatients with stable CHD. These findings raise questions about the potential role of HRV in the association between depression and cardiovascular disease. PMID:15939843

  20. An Android-Based Heart Monitoring System for the Elderly and for Patients with Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The current trend in health monitoring systems is to move from the hospital to portable personal devices. This work shows how consumer devices like heart rate monitors can be used not only for applications in sports, but also for medical research and diagnostic purposes. The goal pursued by our group was to develop a simple, accurate, and inexpensive system that would use a few pieces of data acquired by the heart rate monitor and process them on a smartphone to (i) provide detailed test reports about the user's health state; (ii) store report records; (iii) generate emergency calls or SMSs; and (iv) connect to a remote telemedicine portal to relay the data to an online database. The system developed by our team uses sophisticated algorithms to detect stress states, detect and classify arrhythmia events, and calculate energy consumption. It is suitable for use by elderly subjects and by patients with heart disease (e.g., those recovering from myocardial infarction) or neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Easy, immediate, and economical remote health control can therefore be achieved without the need for expensive hospital equipment, using only portable consumer devices. PMID:25210513

  1. Vitamin E supplementation in the prevention of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, S; Allison, T G; Hensrud, D D

    2001-11-01

    Vitamin E consists of a number of compounds, tocopherols and tocotrienols, that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants. A hypothesis is that vitamin E may slow the progression of atherosclerosis by blocking the oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and thus decrease its uptake into the arterial lumen. Basic science and animal studies have generally supported this hypothesis. Observational studies have primarily assessed patients with no established coronary heart disease (CHD), and results have generally supported a protective role of vitamin E in CHD. Early primary and secondary prevention clinical trials (Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Protection study and Cambridge Heart Antioxidant Study) showed mixed results. Despite years of encouraging evidence from basic science and observational studies, 3 large randomized clinical trials (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto miocardico, Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation, and Primary Prevention Project) with a combined total of more than 25,000 patients failed to show a significant benefit with vitamin E taken as a dietary supplement for the prevention of CHD. Four large randomized primary prevention trials currently under way should add to our knowledge. The American Heart Association has recommended consumption of a balanced diet with emphasis on antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables but has made no recommendations regarding vitamin E supplementation for the general population. Although vitamin E supplementation seems to be safe for most people, recommendations from health care professionals should reflect the uncertainty of established benefit as demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:11702901

  2. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer’s vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer’s vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of ‘heart jogging’ and the direction of ‘heart looping’.  ‘Heart jogging’ is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward ‘jog’. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish ‘heart jogging orthologs’ are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  3. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  4. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Majumder, A A S

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future. PMID:26896274

  5. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  6. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  7. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  8. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  9. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  10. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  11. "The Heart Truth:" Using the Power of Branding and Social Marketing to Increase Awareness of Heart Disease in Women.

    PubMed

    Long, Terry; Taubenheim, Ann; Wayman, Jennifer; Temple, Sarah; Ruoff, Beth

    2008-03-01

    In September 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched The Heart Truth, the first federally-sponsored national campaign aimed at increasing awareness among women about their risk of heart disease. A traditional social marketing approach, including an extensive formative research phase, was used to plan, implement, and evaluate the campaign. With the creation of the Red Dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness, the campaign integrated a branding strategy into its social marketing framework. The aim was to develop and promote a women's heart disease brand that would create a strong emotional connection with women. The Red Dress brand has had a powerful appeal to a wide diversity of women and has given momentum to the campaign's three-part implementation strategy of partnership development, media relations, and community action. In addition to generating its own substantial programming, The Heart Truth became a catalyst for a host of other national and local educational initiatives, both large and small. By the campaign's fifth anniversary, surveys showed that women were increasingly aware of heart disease as their leading cause of death and that the rise in awareness was associated with increased action to reduce heart disease risk. PMID:19122892

  12. Direct observation of homoclinic orbits in human heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2003-05-01

    Homoclinic trajectories of the interbeat intervals between contractions of ventricles of the human heart are identified. The interbeat intervals are extracted from 24-h Holter ECG recordings. Three such recordings are discussed in detail. Mappings of the measured consecutive interbeat intervals are constructed. In the second and in some cases in the fourth iterate of the map of interbeat intervals homoclinic trajectories associated with a hyperbolic saddle are found. The homoclinic trajectories are often persistent for many interbeat intervals, sometimes spanning many thousands of heartbeats. Several features typical for homoclinic trajectories found in other systems were identified, including a signature of the gluing bifurcation. The homoclinic trajectories are present both in recordings of heart rate variability obtained from patients with an increased number of arrhythmias and in cases in which the sinus rhythm is dominant. The results presented are a strong indication of the importance of deterministic nonlinear instabilities in human heart rate variability.

  13. Conditional Lineage Ablation to Model Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Paul; Morley, Gregory; Huang, Qian; Fischer, Avi; Seiler, Stephanie; Horner, James W.; Factor, Stephen; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Jalife, Jose; Fishman, Glenn I.

    1998-09-01

    Cell loss contributes to the pathogenesis of many inherited and acquired human diseases. We have developed a system to conditionally ablate cells of any lineage and developmental stage in the mouse by regulated expression of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene by using tetracycline-responsive promoters. As an example of this approach, we targeted expression of DTA to the hearts of adult mice to model structural abnormalities commonly observed in human cardiomyopathies. Induction of DTA expression resulted in cell loss, fibrosis, and chamber dilatation. As in many human cardiomyopathies, transgenic mice developed spontaneous arrhythmias in vivo, and programmed electrical stimulation of isolated-perfused transgenic hearts demonstrated a strikingly high incidence of spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachycardia. Affected mice showed marked perturbations of cardiac gap junction channel expression and localization, including a subset with disorganized epicardial activation patterns as revealed by optical action potential mapping. These studies provide important insights into mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis and suggest that conditional lineage ablation may have wide applicability for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  14. Role of autophagy in metabolic syndrome-associated heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Sidney Y; Xu, Xihui

    2015-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of multiple metabolic risk factors including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Over the past decades, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome has increased dramatically, imposing a devastating, pandemic health threat. More importantly, individuals with metabolic syndrome are at an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and overall cardiovascular diseases. One of the common comorbidities of metabolic syndrome is heart anomalies leading to the loss of cardiomyocytes, cardiac dysfunction and ultimately heart failure. Up-to-date, a plethora of cell signaling pathways have been postulated for the pathogenesis of cardiac complications in obesity including lipotoxicity, inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and sympathetic overactivation although the precise mechanism of action underscoring obesity-associated heart dysfunction remains elusive. Recent evidence has indicated a potential role of protein quality control in components of metabolic syndrome. Within the protein quality control system, the autophagy-lysosome pathway is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for bulk degradation of large intracellular organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy has been demonstrated to play an indispensible role in the maintenance of cardiac geometry and function under both physiological and pathological conditions. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that autophagy plays a pivotal role in the etiology of cardiac anomalies under obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this minireview, we will discuss on how autophagy is involved in the regulation of cardiac function in obesity and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24810277

  15. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein and Arrhythmogenesis in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders, including ischemic heart disease. Although mitochondria are well recognized for their role in energy production and cell death, mechanisms by which they control excitation-contraction coupling, excitability, and arrhythmias are less clear. The translocator protein (TSPO) is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that is expressed in multiple organ systems. The abundant expression of TSPO in macrophages has been leveraged to image the immune response of the heart to inflammatory processes. More recently, the recognition of TSPO as a regulator of energy-dissipating mitochondrial pathways has extended its utility from a diagnostic marker of inflammation to a therapeutic target influencing diverse pathophysiological processes. Here, we provide an overview of the emerging role of TSPO in ischemic heart disease. We highlight the importance of TSPO in the regenerative process of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced ROS release through its effects on the inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) and the permeability transition pore (PTP). We discuss evidence implicating TSPO in arrhythmogenesis in the settings of acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:25918579

  16. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel; Azorin, Inmaculada; Sirera, Rafael; Martinez-Dolz, Luis; Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan; Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R.; Salvador, Antonio; Portoles, Manuel

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  17. Characteristic parameters of electromagnetic signals from a human heart system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-Yuan; Pei, Liu-Qing; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Su-Ming; Gao, Hong-Lei; Dai, Yuan-Dong

    2011-04-01

    The electromagnetic field of a human heart system is a bioelectromagnetic field. Electrocardiography (ECG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) are both carriers of electromagnetic information about the cardiac system, and they are nonstationary signals. In this study, ECG and MCG data from healthy subjects are acquired; the MCG data are captured using a high-Tc radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUIDs) and the QRS complexes in these data are analysed by the evolutionary spectrum analysis method. The results show that the quality factor Q and the central frequency fz of the QRS complex evolutionary spectrum are the characteristic parameters (CHPs) of ECG and MCG in the time—frequency domain. The confidence intervals of the mean values of the CHPs are estimated by the Student t distribution method in mathematical statistics. We believe that there are threshold ranges of the mean values of Q and fz for healthy subjects. We have postulated the following criterion: if the mean values of CHPs are in the proper ranges, the cardiac system is in a normal condition and it possesses the capability of homeostasis. In contrast, if the mean values of the CHPs do not lie in the proper ranges, the homeostasis of the cardiac system is lacking and some cardiac disease may follow. The results and procedure of MCG CHPs in the study afford a technological route for the application of HTc rf SQUIDs in cardiology.

  18. Preconception Counseling for Women with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Min-Tai; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Shenn-Nan; Chiu, Hsin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    With advances that have been made over the recent decades in transcatheter and surgical interventions, most patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) can survive into adulthood. Overall, probably half of these surviving patients are female. When these female CHD patients reach childbearing age, however, pregnancy management will be a major issue. In order to meet the demands of fetal growth, the maternal cardiovascular system starts a series of adaptations beginning in early pregnancy. These adaptations include: decreased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, decreased blood pressure, expansion of the blood volume, increased heart rate and increased cardiac output. For women with CHD, this hemodynamic alteration may increase the risks of adverse cardiovascular events as well as the fetal and neonatal complications. Therefore, proper risk stratification and effective counseling for women with CHD who are planning their pregnancies is an important undertaking. PMID:27122914

  19. Pathways in heart failure disease management across socioeconomic spectra.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathy; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Gopie, Stephanie; Arcement, Lee

    2011-12-01

    Caring for heart failure patients with a low socioeconomic status presents a unique set of challenges for health care providers. Heart failure disease management programs can integrate the use of teaching DVDs to overcome deficiencies in health literacy and take advantage of the Wal-Mart/Target $4 dollar medication program to provide life-saving medical therapy. In addition, open discussions with the patient and family regarding the costs of medications and the reality of what they can afford to pay monthly on a long term basis can guide the physician to prescribing medications by prioritizing use with a focus on evidence-based data for the medications with the highest mortality reduction. Finally, connecting inpatient visits to outpatient visits through the use of electronic medical records systems can facilitate avoidance of unnecessary repeat lab and diagnostic testing. PMID:22089272

  20. [Stress cardiac MRI in management of ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Russel, S; Darmon, S; Vermillet, A; Haziza, F

    2014-11-01

    Stress magnetic cardiac resonance imaging (MRI) development is in progress. Many cardiac imaging technics already known are completed by this safe radiation free exam with a short time acquisition (30minutes) and a good diagnostic performance in particular for patients with three vessels coronary artery diseases. Best indication concerns symptomatic patients unable to exercise with intermediate or high pretest probability. Pharmacological heart stress can be induced with vasodilatators or dobutamine to identify the presence and extent of myocardial ischemia, with high precision to guide coronary vessels revascularization. MRI gives many other interesting informations like heart anatomy, left ventricular function. Myocardial viability can be assessed with study of late gadolinium enhancement or analysis of contractile reserve with low dose of dobutamine. PMID:25281219

  1. Management of Hypertension among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Zizi, Ferdinand; Brimah, Perry; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Makaryus, Amgad N; McFarlane, Samy; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common outcome of hypertension. Hypertension accelerates the development of atherosclerosis, and sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) can destabilize vascular lesions and precipitate acute coronary events. Hypertension can cause myocardial ischemia in the absence of CHD. These cardiovascular risks attributed to hypertension can be reduced by optimal BP control. Although several antihypertensive agents exist, the choice of agent and the appropriate target BP for patients with CHD remain controversial. In this succinct paper, we examine the evidence and the mechanisms for the linkage between hypertension and CHD and we discuss the treatment options and the goals of therapy that are consistent with the report of the seventh Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) and American Heart Association scientific statement. We anticipate changes in the recommendations of the forthcoming JNC 8. PMID:21785704

  2. Adult congenital heart disease: A paradigm of epidemiological change.

    PubMed

    Ntiloudi, Despοina; Giannakoulas, George; Parcharidou, Despοina; Panagiotidis, Theofilos; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2016-09-01

    Increasing survival rates for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) represent a major achievement of modern medicine. Despite incredible progress been made in diagnosis, follow-up, early treatment and management in adulthood, many patients are faced with long-term complications, such as arrhythmia, thromboembolism, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, endocarditis and/or the need for reoperation. In parallel, half of the patients are female, most of childbearing age, and, thus warrant specialist reproductive counseling and appropriate obstetric care. It is not surprising therefore, that healthcare utilization has steadily increased for CHD in recent years. Furthermore, cardiology and other medical disciplines are now faced with new challenges, namely the provision of expert care and optimal, lifelong medical surveillance for these patients. PMID:27240150

  3. Basic axes of human heart in correlation with heart mass and right ventricular wall thickness.

    PubMed

    Skwarek, M; Grzybiak, M; Kosiński, A; Hreczecha, J

    2006-11-01

    A comparison of the data published in anatomy textbooks and anthropological tables does not reveal any change in basic heart dimensions during the period since the beginning of the 20th century to nowadays. However, normal values of many other parameters have changed up to 30% over the same period. These changes may be caused by the acceleration phenomenon or the extension of average lifespan. The progress of laboratory medicine methodology permitted the introduction of new biochemical tests in myocardial infarct diagnosis, such as myoglobin and troponins T and I measurement, as well as better understanding of cardiac metabolism. Parameters describing the direction and intensity of metabolic changes are substrate extraction and metabolic equilibrium. The expression describing metabolic equilibrium contains heart mass value. Therefore, as studying heart mass in vivo is not possible, it may be important to study it in vitro. The study was performed on a group of 107 formalin-fixed human hearts. The organs came from adults of both sexes: 30 women and 77 men, aged 18 to 90 years. None of the hearts carried signs of macroscopic developmental abnormalities or pathologic changes. PMID:17171620

  4. Mechanical Unloading Promotes Myocardial Energy Recovery in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M.; Youker, Keith A.; Yin, Zheng; Estep, Jerry D.; Stevens, Robert D.; Wenner, Brett; Ilkayeva, Olga; Loebe, Matthias; Peterson, Leif E.; Lyon, Christopher J.; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Hsueh, Willa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired bioenergetics is a prominent feature of the failing heart, but the underlying metabolic perturbations are poorly understood. Methods and Results We compared metabolomic, gene transcript, and protein data from six paired failing human left ventricular (LV) tissue samples obtained during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) insertion (heart failure (HF) samples) and at heart transplant (post-LVAD samples). Non-failing left ventricular (NFLV) wall samples procured from explanted hearts of patients with right HF served as novel comparison samples. Metabolomic analyses uncovered a distinct pattern in HF tissue: 2.6 fold increased pyruvate concentrations coupled with reduced Krebs cycle intermediates and short-chain acylcarnitines, suggesting a global reduction in substrate oxidation. These findings were associated with decreased transcript levels for enzymes that catalyze fatty acid oxidation and pyruvate metabolism and for key transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator1α (PGC1A, 1.3 fold) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRA, 1.2 fold) and γ (ERRG, 2.2 fold). Thus, parallel decreases in key transcription factors and their target metabolic enzyme genes can explain the decreases in associated metabolic intermediates. Mechanical support with LVAD improved all of these metabolic and transcriptional defects. Conclusions These observations underscore an important pathophysiologic role for severely defective metabolism in HF, while the reversibility of these defects by LVAD suggests metabolic resilience of the human heart. PMID:24825877

  5. Congenital Heart Disease: How to Care for Your Baby and Yourself

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Heart Disease | How to Care for Your Baby and Yourself I was depressed when I found out my baby has a heart problem. ... a sick baby. Source Caring for Infants with Congenital Heart Disease and Their Families by RB Saenz, M.D., ...

  6. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W.; Shull, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions. PMID:26064889

  7. SERCA2 Haploinsufficiency in a Mouse Model of Darier Disease Causes a Selective Predisposition to Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Lasko, Valerie M; Nieman, Michelle L; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yigang; Wieczorek, David W; Shull, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Null mutations in one copy of ATP2A2, the gene encoding sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), cause Darier disease in humans, a skin condition involving keratinocytes. Cardiac function appears to be unimpaired in Darier disease patients, with no evidence that SERCA2 haploinsufficiency itself causes heart disease. However, SERCA2 deficiency is widely considered a contributing factor in heart failure. We therefore analyzed Atp2a2 heterozygous mice to determine whether SERCA2 haploinsufficiency can exacerbate specific heart disease conditions. Despite reduced SERCA2a levels in heart, Atp2a2 heterozygous mice resembled humans in exhibiting normal cardiac physiology. When subjected to hypothyroidism or crossed with a transgenic model of reduced myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 deficiency caused no enhancement of the disease state. However, when combined with a transgenic model of increased myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity, SERCA2 haploinsufficiency caused rapid onset of hypertrophy, decompensation, and death. These effects were associated with reduced expression of the antiapoptotic Hax1, increased levels of the proapoptotic genes Chop and Casp12, and evidence of perturbations in energy metabolism. These data reveal myofibrillar Ca(2+)-sensitivity to be an important determinant of the cardiac effects of SERCA2 haploinsufficiency and raise the possibility that Darier disease patients are more susceptible to heart failure under certain conditions. PMID:26064889

  8. EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND STROKE IN JAPANESE MEN LIVING IN JAPAN, HAWAII AND CALIFORNIA. CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK FACTORS IN JAPAN AND HAWAII

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various risk factors were evaluated to explain a significantly greater incidence of coronary heart disease in men of Japanese ancestry resident in Hawaii compared with men resident in Japan. The independent predictors of incidence of coronary heart disease in both Japan and Hawai...

  9. Pulmonary heart disease: The heart-lung interaction and its impact on patient phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Forfia, Paul R.; Vaidya, Anjali; Wiegers, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary heart disease (PHD) refers to altered structure or function of the right ventricle occurring in association with abnormal respiratory function. Although nearly always associated with some degree of PH, the degree, nature, severity, and causality of PH in relation to the PHD is not necessarily linear and direct. Abnormal gas exchange is a fundamental underpinning of PHD, affecting pulmonary vascular, cardiac, renal, and neurohormonal systems. Direct and indirect effects of chronic respiratory disease can disrupt the right ventricular-pulmonary arterial (RV-PA) interaction and, likewise, factors such as sympathetic nervous system activation, altered blood viscosity, and salt and water retention can function in a feedback loop to further influence RV-PA function. Left heart function may also be affected, especially in those with pre-existing left heart disease. Thus, the physiologic interactions between abnormal respiratory and cardiovascular function are complex, with PHD representing a heterogeneous end organ effect of an integrated multisystem process. In this review, we propose to separate PHD into two distinct entities, “Type I” and “Type II” PHD. Type I PHD is most common, and refers to subjects with chronic respiratory disease (CRD) where the perturbations in respiratory function dominate over more mild cardiac and circulatory disruptions. In contrast, Type II PHD refers to the smaller subset of patients with more severe pulmonary vascular and right heart dysfunction, whom often present in a fashion similar to patients with PAH. Phenotypic differences are not made by PA pressure alone, but instead by differences in the overall physiology and clinical syndrome. Thus, key differences can be seen in symptomatology, physical signs, cardiac imaging, hemodynamics, and the cardiovascular and gas exchange responses to exercise. Such key baseline differences in the overall physiologic phenotype are likely critical to predicting response to PH specific

  10. Phosphodiesterase 9A Controls Nitric-oxide Independent cGMP and Hypertrophic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong I.; Zhu, Guangshuo; Sasaki, Takashi; Cho, Gun-Sik; Hamdani, Nazha; Holewinski, Ronald; Jo, Su-Hyun; Danner, Thomas; Zhang, Manling; Rainer, Peter P.; Bedja, Djahida; Kirk, Jonathan A.; Ranek, Mark J.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Kwon, Chulan; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Paulus, Walter J.; Takimoto, Eiki; Kass, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a second messenger molecule that transduces nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptide (NP) coupled signaling, stimulating phosphorylation changes by protein kinase G (PKG). Enhancing cGMP synthesis or blocking its degradation by phosphodiesterase type 5A (PDE5A) protects against cardiovascular disease1,2. However, cGMP stimulation alone is limited by counter-adaptions including PDE upregulation3. Furthermore, though PDE5A regulates NO-generated cGMP4,5, NO-signaling is often depressed by heart disease6. PDEs controlling NP-coupled cGMP remain uncertain. Here we show that cGMP-selective PDE9A7,8 is expressed in mammalian heart including humans, and is upregulated by hypertrophy and cardiac failure. PDE9A regulates NP rather than NO-stimulated cGMP in heart myocytes and muscle, and its genetic or selective pharmacological inhibition protects against pathological responses to neuro-hormones, and sustained pressure-overload stress. PDE9A inhibition reverses pre-established heart disease independent of NO-synthase (NOS) activity, whereas PDE5A inhibition requires active NOS. Transcription factor activation and phospho-proteome analyses of myocytes with each PDE selectively inhibited reveals substantial differential targeting, with phosphorylation changes from PDE5A inhibition being more sensitive to NOS activation. Thus, unlike PDE5A, PDE9A can regulate cGMP signaling independent of the NO-pathway, and its role in stress-induced heart disease suggests potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:25799991

  11. Bioengineering and Stem Cell Technology in the Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Alexis; Edel, Michael J.; Blue, Gillian; Dilley, Rodney J.; Harvey, Richard P.; Winlaw, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease places a significant burden on the individual, family and community despite significant advances in our understanding of aetiology and treatment. Early research in ischaemic heart disease has paved the way for stem cell technology and bioengineering, which promises to improve both structural and functional aspects of disease. Stem cell therapy has demonstrated significant improvements in cardiac function in adults with ischaemic heart disease. This finding, together with promising case studies in the paediatric setting, demonstrates the potential for this treatment in congenital heart disease. Furthermore, induced pluripotent stems cell technology, provides a unique opportunity to address aetiological, as well as therapeutic, aspects of disease. PMID:26239354

  12. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26597703

  13. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  14. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J A; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E B

    2009-12-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  15. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T.; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  16. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  17. Total lymphatic irradiation and bone marrow in human heart transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, D.R.; Hong, R.; Greenberg, A.J.; Gilbert, E.F.; Dacumos, G.C.; Dufek, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    Six patients, aged 36 to 59 years, had heart transplants for terminal myocardial disease using total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow in addition to conventional therapy. All patients were poor candidates for transplantation because of marked pulmonary hypertension, unacceptable tissue matching, or age. Two patients are living and well more than four years after the transplants. Two patients died of infection at six and seven weeks with normal hearts. One patient, whose preoperative pulmonary hypertension was too great for an orthotopic heart transplant, died at 10 days after such a procedure. The other patient died of chronic rejection seven months postoperatively. Donor-specific tolerance developed in 2 patients. TLI and donor bone marrow can produce specific tolerance to donor antigens and allow easy control of rejection, but infection is still a major problem. We describe a new technique of administering TLI with early reduction of prednisone that may help this problem.

  18. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Women and Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... Truth Campaign" Urges Women To Take Good Blood Pressure Seriously February is American Heart Month, and the ...

  19. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... brings leading celebrities together in fashions created by America's top designers for women's heart health. Celebrity participants ... However, data on increasing rates of overweight and obesity, important risk factors for heart disease in younger ...

  20. Women and heart disease: same disease, different issues.

    PubMed

    Caves, W

    1998-01-01

    The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) has rapidly increased within the female population. Since CAD is the number one cause of death in women, it is important for women to be able to recognize both non-modifiable risk factors (family history, age and race) and modifiable risk factors (smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, sedentary life style, weight control and stress). With this knowledge, every women would be able to control modifiable risk factors. The objective of this paper is to review the current literature and to extract key issues regarding risk factor management. PMID:9801515

  1. Characteristics of reactive electropermeable points on the auricles of coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Saku, K; Mukaino, Y; Ying, H; Arakawa, K

    1993-05-01

    In oriental medicine there is a hypothesis related to acupuncture that the auricle is a projection of the functional anatomy of the whole human body. In this study reactive electropermeable points (REPP), that is, points on the skin with low electrical resistance, on the auricle were measured on patients with coronary heart disease using a neurometer LC-M. Our findings correlated positively with the particular points--heart I (shin) and heart II (shinzo)*--named by the Chinese group as being related to the functional anatomy of the heart. The incidence of positive REPP test results at the shin and shinzo points for subjects with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were extremely high, and positive test results for patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) and angina pectoris (AP) were also significant. There was no significant difference in the incidence rates of REPP at the shin and shinzo points between the OMI and AP groups. High incidence of positive REPP test results at the lung and heart III (shinyu) points occurred only in the AMI group, and this was significantly high when compared with the control group. PMID:8504576

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zangiabadi, Amirmasoud; De Pasquale, Carmine G.; Sajkov, Dimitar

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD), including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV) range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH. PMID:25165714

  3. [Interventional therapy of heart valve diseases: future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Figulla, H R; Lauten, A

    2015-04-01

    Transcatheter procedures have been adopted as novel treatment strategy for patients with valvular heart disease, particularly for those who are inoperable or at high risk for surgical valve procedures. Significant technological advances have resulted in an improvement of devices for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) with downsizing of crossing profiles, reduction in the rate of paravalvular leakage and conduction abnormalities as well as a lower short- and mid-term mortality and a higher patient acceptance. In the near future, TAVI may potentially develop as first-line treatment for the majority of patients with aortic valve disease. For patients with mitral and pulmonary stenosis, balloon valvuloplasty is effective and well established and should be preferred over valve replacement, last but not least also for economic reasons. For treatment of mitral regurgitation, several transcatheter devices aiming to restore or replace mitral valve function are currently under investigation. This review summarizes the current state of interventional treatment of valvular heart disease along with implications for the future. PMID:25822420

  4. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies. PMID:23834957

  5. Differential expression of embryonic epicardial progenitor markers and localization of cardiac fibrosis in adult ischemic injury and hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Caitlin M; Kanisicak, Onur; van Berlo, Jop H; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2013-12-01

    During embryonic heart development, the transcription factors Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 regulate activation and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells, including fibroblast lineages. Expression of these epicardial progenitor factors and localization of cardiac fibrosis were examined in mouse models of cardiovascular disease and in human diseased hearts. Following ischemic injury in mice, epicardial fibrosis is apparent in the thickened layer of subepicardial cells that express Wt1, Tbx18, and Tcf21. Perivascular fibrosis with predominant expression of Tcf21, but not Wt1 or Tbx18, occurs in mouse models of pressure overload or hypertensive heart disease, but not following ischemic injury. Areas of interstitial fibrosis in ischemic and hypertensive hearts actively express Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18. In all areas of fibrosis, cells that express epicardial progenitor factors are distinct from CD45-positive immune cells. In human diseased hearts, differential expression of Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 also is detected with epicardial, perivascular, and interstitial fibrosis, indicating conservation of reactivated developmental mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis in mice and humans. Together, these data provide evidence for distinct fibrogenic mechanisms that include Tcf21, separate from Wt1 and Tbx18, in different fibroblast populations in response to specific types of cardiac injury. PMID:24140724

  6. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  7. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  8. Ventricular Tachycardia Following Surgical Repair of Complex Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Baysa, Sherrie Joy; Kanter, Ronald J

    2016-03-01

    A nine year old boy with complex congenital heart disease requiring right ventricular outflow tract surgery and palpitations had inducible monomorphic ventricular tachycardia at 300 bpm by programmed ventricular stimulation. He was treated with enteral phenytoin. With a therapeutic plasma level, repeat electrophysiological study was negative for inducible ventricular tachycardia using an aggressive pacing protocol. An insertable loop recorder was implanted, and the family was prescribed an automatic external defibrillator. The decision to not place an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator was based upon anticipated need for serial cardiac MRI scans to monitor the effect of progressive outflow tract stenosis and regurgitation. PMID:26920195

  9. The Management of Athletes with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Molossi, Silvana; Grenier, Michelle

    2015-07-01

    Although rare, sudden cardiac death (SCD) is devastating to families and communities. Screening of athletes prior to sports participation by trained professionals is useful in identifying individuals who carry known risk factors for SCD. Inclusive in this population are those athletes with congenital heart disease. Sports medicine specialists should be able to identify those at risk for adverse events surrounding vigorous activity and direct appropriate evaluation by the specialist (ie, cardiologist) as deemed appropriate. Equally importantly, they should be able to coach individuals in order to improve performance and quality of life with exercise in a safe environment. PMID:26100428

  10. Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Heart Valve Interstitial Cell Population in Mitral Valve Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sauls, Kimberly; Koenig, Sara N.; Anstine, Lindsey J.; Garg, Vidu; Norris, Russell A.; Lincoln, Joy

    2015-01-01

    The heart valve interstitial cell (VIC) population is dynamic and thought to mediate lay down and maintenance of the tri-laminar extracellular matrix (ECM) structure within the developing and mature valve throughout life. Disturbances in the contribution and distribution of valve ECM components are detrimental to biomechanical function and associated with disease. This pathological process is associated with activation of resident VICs that in the absence of disease reside as quiescent cells. While these paradigms have been long standing, characterization of this abundant and ever-changing valve cell population is incomplete. Here we examine the expression pattern of Smooth muscle α-actin, Periostin, Twist1 and Vimentin in cultured VICs, heart valves from healthy embryonic, postnatal and adult mice, as well as mature valves from human patients and established mouse models of disease. We show that the VIC population is highly heterogeneous and phenotypes are dependent on age, species, location, and disease state. Furthermore, we identify phenotypic diversity across common models of mitral valve disease. These studies significantly contribute to characterizing the VIC population in health and disease and provide insights into the cellular dynamics that maintain valve structure in healthy adults and mediate pathologic remodeling in disease states. PMID:26527432

  11. Dynamics of Cell Generation and Turnover in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia; Felker, Anastasia; Salehpour, Mehran; Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Szewczykowska, Mirosława; Jackowska, Teresa; Dos Remedios, Cris; Malm, Torsten; Andrä, Michaela; Jashari, Ramadan; Nyengaard, Jens R; Possnert, Göran; Jovinge, Stefan; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-06-18

    The contribution of cell generation to physiological heart growth and maintenance in humans has been difficult to establish and has remained controversial. We report that the full complement of cardiomyocytes is established perinataly and remains stable over the human lifespan, whereas the numbers of both endothelial and mesenchymal cells increase substantially from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C revealed a high turnover rate of endothelial cells throughout life (>15% per year) and more limited renewal of mesenchymal cells (<4% per year in adulthood). Cardiomyocyte exchange is highest in early childhood and decreases gradually throughout life to <1% per year in adulthood, with similar turnover rates in the major subdivisions of the myocardium. We provide an integrated model of cell generation and turnover in the human heart. PMID:26073943

  12. Geometry of the capillary net in human hearts.

    PubMed

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Spatenka, J; Samánek, M

    1997-01-01

    The geometry of the coronary capillary bed in human hearts was studied using samples obtained during cardiac surgery of children operated for tetralogy of Fallot and samples from fresh normal hearts used for valve harvesting. The results revealed a similar coronary capillary density and heterogeneity of capillary spacing in samples from both groups. A double-staining method was used to distinguish between capillary segments close to the feeding arteriole (proximal capillaries) and segments distant from the arteriole (distal capillaries). In both groups of hearts, capillary segment length was consistently shorter on the venular than the arteriolar portion of the capillary. Similarly, capillary domain areas were also smaller and the resulting capillary supply unit was smaller along venular portions compared to arteriolar regions of the capillary bed. This distinctive geometry would provide advantageous geometric conditions for tissue oxygen supply. PMID:9176723

  13. [Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Poskurica, Mileta; Petrović, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60%) among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF), and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD) and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF). Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP) are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°). In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable. PMID:25731010

  14. Advances in the Study of Heart Development and Disease Using Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daniel R.; Samsa, Leigh Ann; Qian, Li; Liu, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of cardiovascular disease are key players in the translational medicine pipeline used to define the conserved genetic and molecular basis of disease. Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are the most common type of human birth defect and feature structural abnormalities that arise during cardiac development and maturation. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a valuable vertebrate model organism, offering advantages over traditional mammalian models. These advantages include the rapid, stereotyped and external development of transparent embryos produced in large numbers from inexpensively housed adults, vast capacity for genetic manipulation, and amenability to high-throughput screening. With the help of modern genetics and a sequenced genome, zebrafish have led to insights in cardiovascular diseases ranging from CHDs to arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy. Here, we discuss the utility of zebrafish as a model system and summarize zebrafish cardiac morphogenesis with emphasis on parallels to human heart diseases. Additionally, we discuss the specific tools and experimental platforms utilized in the zebrafish model including forward screens, functional characterization of candidate genes, and high throughput applications. PMID:27335817

  15. Rheumatic heart disease: progress and challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bela; Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Rajesh; Brahmadathan, K N; Abraham, Vinod Joseph; Tandon, Rajan

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatic heart disease, a neglected disease, continues to be a burden in India and other developing countries. It is a result of an autoimmune sequalae in response to group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GAS) infection of the pharynx. Acute rheumatic fever (RF), a multisystem inflammatory disease, is followed by rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and has manifestations of joints, skin and central nervous system involvement. A review of epidemiological studies indicates unchanged GAS pharyngitis and carrier rates in India. The apparent decline in RHD rates in India as indicated by the epidemiological studies has to be taken with caution as methodological differences exist among studies. Use of echocardiography increases case detection rates of RHD in population surveys. However, the significance of echo based diagnosis of carditis needs further evaluation to establish the significance. Research in this area through prospective follow up studies will have to be undertaken by the developing countries as the interest of developed countries in the disease has waned due the declined burden in their populations. Prevention of RHD is possible through treatment of GAS pharyngitis (primary prophylaxis) and continued antibiotic treatment for number of years in patients with history of RF to prevent recurrences (secondary prophylaxis). The cost effectiveness and practicality of secondary prophylaxis is well documented. The challenge to any secondary prophylaxis program for prevention of RF in India will be the availability of benzathine penicillin G and dissipation of fears of allergic reactions to penicillin among practitioners, general public and policy makers. The authors review here the progress and challenges in epidemiology, diagnosis and primary and secondary prevention of RF and RHD. PMID:22941214

  16. Rheumatic Heart Disease in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    Woldu, Bethel; Bloomfield, Gerald S

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic valvular disease resulting after severe or repetitive episodes of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), an autoimmune response to group A Streptococcus infection. RHD has been almost eliminated with improved social and health infrastructure in affluent countries while it remains a neglected disease with major cause of morbidity and mortality in many low- and middle-income countries, and resource-limited regions of high-income countries. Despite our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis of RHD, there have not been any significant advances to prevent or halt progression of disease in recent history. Long-term penicillin-based treatment and surgery remain the backbone of a RHD control program in the absence of an effective vaccine. The advent of echocardiographic screening algorithms has improved the accuracy of diagnosing RHD and has shed light on the enormous burden of disease. Encouragingly, this has led to a rekindled commitment from researchers in the most affected countries to advocate and take bold actions to end this disease of social inequality. PMID:27566329

  17. Commonly Asked Questions about Children and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... only the heart. It has specialized probes and hardware that allow clear images of the fetal heart. ... Defects • Understand Your Risk • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Congenital Heart Defects and Other Educational Brochures ...

  18. Pharmacogenetic Profiling in the Treatment of Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of gene-drug interactions. In the post-Human Genome era, and with the realization that personal genotypes differ by millions of bases (gene polymorphisms), the application of genetics to explain inter-individual differences in clinical drug response seems to offer great promise. Here, recent basic and translational developments in pharmacogenetic profiling of β-blocker response in heart failure are reviewed in the context of the possible consequences of such advances on drug development and clinical therapeutics. PMID:19931195

  19. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26069271

  20. Guided Tissue Regeneration in Heart Valve Replacement: From Preclinical Research to First-in-Human Trials

    PubMed Central

    Iop, L.; Gerosa, G.

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve tissue-guided regeneration aims to offer a functional and viable alternative to current prosthetic replacements. Not requiring previous cell seeding and conditioning in bioreactors, such exceptional tissue engineering approach is a very fascinating translational regenerative strategy. After in vivo implantation, decellularized heart valve scaffolds drive their same repopulation by recipient's cells for a prospective autologous-like tissue reconstruction, remodeling, and adaptation to the somatic growth of the patient. With such a viability, tissue-guided regenerated conduits can be delivered as off-the-shelf biodevices and possess all the potentialities for a long-lasting resolution of the dramatic inconvenience of heart valve diseases, both in children and in the elderly. A review on preclinical and clinical investigations of this therapeutic concept is provided with evaluation of the issues still to be well deliberated for an effective and safe in-human application. PMID:26495295

  1. Some Ethical Legal Issues in Heart Disease Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pyng Jing

    2014-01-01

    Ethical concerns, cultural norms, and legal issues must be carefully considered when treating a patient with heart disease. Although physicians or surgeons must play a role in course of treatment decision making, they should be guided by evidence-based data and the preferences of patients and/or the patient’s parents. However, there is no obligation to provide this type of informed consultation and approval unless these ethical issues become law - which typically occurs through litigation. In this review, we examined common ethical principles that are integral to the regular decisions made by clinicians every day. Some special ethical issues and associated litigation, if any, which might occur perioperatively will also be reviewed. Finally, the final judgments of civil and criminal courts of Taiwan, particularly lawsuits involving physicians associated with coronary artery disease care or aortic aneurysm, will also be introduced. PMID:27122831

  2. Heart Valve Structure and Function in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The mature heart valves are made up of highly organized extracellular matrix (ECM) and valve interstitial cells (VIC) surrounded by an endothelial cell layer. The ECM of the valves is stratified into elastin-, proteoglycan- and collagen-rich layers that confer distinct biomechanical properties to the leaflets and supporting structures. Signaling pathways have critical functions in primary valvulogenesis as well as maintenance of valve structure and function over time. Animal models provide powerful tools to study valve development and disease processes. Valve disease is a significant public health problem and increasing evidence implicates aberrant developmental mechanisms underlying pathogenesis. Further studies are necessary to determine regulatory pathway interactions underlying pathogenesis in order to generate new avenues for novel therapeutics. PMID:20809794

  3. Predictive Value of Auricular Diagnosis on Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwai-Ping Suen, Lorna; Lau, Yuk-kong; Ma, Hok-cheung; Lai, Kam-wai; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    The ear has a reflexive property; therefore, various physical attributes may appear on the auricle when disorders of the internal organs or other parts of the body exist. Auricular diagnostics is an objective, painless, and noninvasive method that provides rapid access to information. Thus, the association between auricular signals and coronary heart disease (CHD) should be further investigated. A case control study was conducted to determine the predictive value of auricular signals on 100 cases of CHD (CHD+ve = 50; CHD−ve = 50) via visual inspection, electrical skin resistance measurement, and tenderness testing. The results showed that the presence of an ear lobe crease (ELC) was significantly associated with coronary heart disease. The “heart” zone of the CHD+ve group significantly exhibited higher conductivity on both ears than that of the controls. The CHD+ve group experienced significant tenderness in the “heart” region compared with those in the CHD−ve group in both acute and chronic conditions. Further studies that take into consideration the impact of age, race, and earlobe shape on ELC prevalence in a larger sample should be done. PMID:23326290

  4. Milk and other dietary influences on coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    While dietary links to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality have been studied for many years, the correlation has not clearly been resolved, especially for older populations. In this paper, a multi-country statistical approach involving 32 countries is used to find dietary links to IHD and CHD for various age groups aged 35+. For IHD, milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+, while for females aged 35-64, sugar was found to have the highest association. In the case of CHD, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65-74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations, and for females aged 45-64, sugar had the highest association. A number of mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that might explain the milk carbohydrate or non-fat milk association. One of the most prominent theories is that animal proteins contribute to homocysteine (Hcy) production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert Hcy to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with Hcy from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries.

  5. UK heart disease prevention project: incidence and mortality results.

    PubMed

    Rose, G; Tunstall-Pedoe, H D; Heller, R F

    1983-05-14

    Results are presented for the UK centre of the WHO European Collaborative Trial in the Multifactorial Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). 18 210 men took part, aged 40 to 59; they were employed in 24 factories, which formed the allocation units for a randomised controlled trial lasting 5-6 years. Intervention comprised advice on cholesterol-lowering diet, smoking cessation, weight control, exercise, and treatment of hypertension. Advice was given mainly through factory medical departments, the staff being supplemented a little by a visiting central team. Self-reported cigarette smoking was moderately reduced, but changes in other risk factors were small and not well sustained. There was no clear effect on hard CHD end-points (coronary deaths and myocardial infarction) or on all-causes mortality. However, there was a 36% reduction in the rate at which intervention subjects reported ill with other CHD (principally angina) during the study, and at the end fewer intervention men gave positive responses to a self-administered questionnaire on angina and chest pain. These apparent benefits were not substantiated by electrocardiographic evidence, suggesting that participation in a heart disease prevention campaign may bias reporting of symptoms. Experience in other centres of the Collaborative Trial, however, suggests that more effective risk factor control does reduce CHD incidence and mortality. This implies that for the UK the problem is to find means of enhancing the acceptance of health advice. PMID:6133103

  6. Recent Advances in Surgery of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerbode, Frank; Sharma, Giridhari

    1970-01-01

    In the cyanotic group palliative procedures for transposition of the great arteries are frequently life-saving in infancy, and the definitive operations such as the atrial baffle, and the Rastelli procedure for those with ventricular septal defect and pulmonic stenosis, are now firmly established. In tetralogy of Fallot shunting procedures continue to be employed in infancy and early childhood, and the complete repair is usually done after the age of five. Corrective operations for total anomalous venous return may have to be staged, and the results are more satisfactory in older children. The various forms of endocardial cushion defects can usually be recognized accurately preoperatively, and where the normal anatomical relationships can be restored, excellent results obtained. Brilliant operative success can now be had in some forms of truncus arteriosus and double outlet right ventricle. It is quite common to find congenital heart disease in adults, frequently after many years of having been treated as rheumatic heart disease. The operative risk in this group is less than 10 percent, and in most instances such patients are restored to their normal physiological age after operation. PMID:4926370

  7. [The prevalence of symptomatic infantile heart disease at Louga Regional Hospital, Senegal].

    PubMed

    Ngouala, Georges Antoine Bazolo Ba; Affangla, Désiré Alain; Leye, Mohamed; Kane, Abdoul

    2015-01-01

    The management of congenital or acquired infantile heart diseases in sub-Saharan African countries still presents problems, particularly with diagnosis and access to surgical treatment. Our objectives were to describe the heart diseases observed in the paediatric setting of the Louga Regional Hospital (LRH) and report their short-term evolution. In the study period from 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2012, 82 children out of 18,815 presented with heart disease, which was a prevalence of 4.3/1,000. There was a female predominance, with a ratio of 1.2. The most frequent presenting conditions were dyspnoea at 47.5%, followed by heart murmurs at 35.3%, and congestive heart failure at 13.4%. Congenital heart diseases were the most frequent, representing 69.5% of the cases, followed by acquired heart diseases at 29.3%, and mixed-type cases at 1.2%. The most frequently encountered congenital heart diseases were ventricular septal defect (24.4%), followed by atrioventricular septal defect (12.2%), tetralogy of Fallot (9.8%) and patent ductus arteriosus (7.3%). Acquired heart disease was represented by rheumatic heart disease, found in 25.6% of the cases, and tuberculous pericarditis in 3.7%. The mortality rate was high, with 20 children dying (24.4%) during the study period. Only 13 out of 82 patients (15.9%) were operable and surgery was carried out in France, courtesy of the association Humanitarian Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque. Infantile heart diseases were therefore not very frequent in the paediatric unit of Louga Regional Hospital. However, congenital heart disease was more frequent than acquired heart disease, with a high mortality rate. Access to surgery remains limited. PMID:26407327

  8. 3D Printing to Guide Ventricular Assist Device Placement in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Saeed, Omar; Zaidi, Ali; Sanz, Javier; Nielsen, James C; Hsu, Daphne T; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2016-04-01

    As the population of adults with congenital heart disease continues to grow, so does the number of these patients with heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are underutilized in adults with congenital heart disease due to their complex anatomic arrangements and physiology. Advanced imaging techniques that may increase the utilization of mechanical circulatory support in this population must be explored. Three-dimensional printing offers individualized structural models that would enable pre-surgical planning of cannula and device placement in adults with congenital cardiac disease and heart failure who are candidates for such therapies. We present a review of relevant cardiac anomalies, cases in which such models could be utilized, and some background on the cost and procedure associated with this process. PMID:27033018

  9. Periodontal disease as a risk marker in coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Borgnakke, Wenche S.; Taylor, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Over half a million Americans die each year from coronary heart disease (CHD), 26 million suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), and a large proportion have periodontal disease (PD), a chronic infection of the tissues surrounding teeth. Chronic inflammation contributes to CHD and CKD occurrence and progression, and PD contributes to the cumulated chronic systemic inflammatory burden. This review examines recent evidence regarding the role of PD in CHD and CKD. Recent findings Periodontal pathogens cause both local infection and bacteremia, eliciting local and systemic inflammatory responses. PD is associated with the systemic inflammatory reactant CRP, a major risk factor for both CHD and CKD. Non-surgical PD treatment is shown to improve periodontal health, endothelial function and levels of CRP and other inflammatory markers. Evidence for the association of PD with CKD consists of a small body of literature represented mainly by cross-sectional studies. No definitive randomized-controlled trials exist with either CHD or CKD as primary endpoints. Summary Recent evidence links PD with CHD and CKD. Adding oral health self-care and referral for professional periodontal assessment and therapy to the repertoire of medical care recommendations is prudent to improve patients’ oral health and possibly reduce CHD and CKD risk. PMID:20948377

  10. Prototype early warning system for heart disease detection using Android Application.

    PubMed

    Zennifa, Fadilla; Fitrilina; Kamil, Husnil; Iramina, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Heart Disease affects approximately 70 million people worldwide where most people do not even know the symptoms. This research examines the prototype of early warning system for heart disease by android application. It aims to facilitate users to early detect heart disease which can be used independently. To build the application in android phone, variable centered intelligence rule system (VCIRS) as decision makers and pulse sensor - Arduino as heart rate detector were applied in this study. Moreover, in Arduino, the heart rate will become an input for symptoms in Android Application. The output of this system is the conclusion statement of users diagnosed with either coronary heart disease, hypertension heart disease, rheumatic heart disease or do not get any kind of heart disease. The result of diagnosis followed by analysis of the value of usage variable rate (VUR) rule usage rate (RUR) and node usage rate (NUR) that shows the value of the rule that will increase when the symptoms frequently appear. This application was compared with the medical analysis from 35 cases of heart disease and it showed concordance between diagnosis from android application and expert diagnosis of the doctors. PMID:25570737

  11. [Ca2+]i in human heart failure: a review and discussion of current areas of controversy.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, R.; Helm, P. A.; Hajjar, R. J.; Saha, C.; Gwathmey, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple abnormalities have been reported in the setting of human heart failure. It is unclear whether detected changes reflect adaptive alterations in myocardium subjected to increased and sustained hemodynamic overload or are pathogenic to the disease process. As a result of the observation that the primary defect in heart failure is decreased pump function, investigators have concentrated their efforts on determining systolic [Ca2+]i as a logical corollary and a causative mechanism for contractile dysfunction. A simple cause and effect relationship has therefore been proposed with regard to contractile dysfunction and [Ca2+]i. Yet some investigators have found no difference in peak systolic [Ca2+]i between failing and non-failing human myocardium, whereas others have found peak [Ca2+]i to be significantly reduced in failing hearts. Resting calcium concentrations have been reported either to be elevated in failing human myocardium or not different from non-failing human myocardium. Investigators should now appreciate that the force-calcium relationship is not a simple relationship. One must take into account the prolonged time course and slowed mobilization of [Ca2+]i as opposed to simply peak [Ca2+]i. When put in perspective of mechanisms and determinants of the Ca(2+)-force relationship, we begin to realize that failing human myocardium has the "potential" to generate normal levels of force. Only when stressed by [Ca2+]i overload and/or frequency perturbation does myocardium from patients with end-stage heart disease demonstrate contractile failure. Although [Ca2+]i availability and mobilization are likely to play a role in the systolic as well as diastolic dysfunction reported in human heart failure, it is likely that other mechanisms are involved as well (e.g., myocardial energetics). Myocardial energetics is directly related to [Ca2+]i and mobilization in failing human myocardium, because metabolites, e.g., ADP, inhibit pumps, such as sarcoplasmic reticulum

  12. Virtual histology of the human heart using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Moazami, Nader; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for the visualization of micron-scale structures within nontransparent biological tissues. For the first time, we demonstrate the use of OCT in identifying components of the cardiac conduction system and other structures in the explanted human heart. Reconstructions of cardiac structures up to 2 mm below the tissue surface were achieved and validated with Masson Trichrome histology in atrial, ventricular, sinoatrial nodal, and atrioventricular nodal preparations. The high spatial resolution of OCT provides visualization of cardiac fibers within the myocardium, as well as elements of the cardiac conduction system; however, a limiting factor remains its depth penetration, demonstrated to be ∼2 mm in cardiac tissues. Despite its currently limited imaging depth, the use of OCT to identify the structural determinants of both normal and abnormal function in the intact human heart is critical in its development as a potential aid to intracardiac arrhythmia diagnosis and therapy. PMID:19895104

  13. Virtual histology of the human heart using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Moazami, Nader; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for the visualization of micron-scale structures within nontransparent biological tissues. For the first time, we demonstrate the use of OCT in identifying components of the cardiac conduction system and other structures in the explanted human heart. Reconstructions of cardiac structures up to 2 mm below the tissue surface were achieved and validated with Masson Trichrome histology in atrial, ventricular, sinoatrial nodal, and atrioventricular nodal preparations. The high spatial resolution of OCT provides visualization of cardiac fibers within the myocardium, as well as elements of the cardiac conduction system; however, a limiting factor remains its depth penetration, demonstrated to be ~2 mm in cardiac tissues. Despite its currently limited imaging depth, the use of OCT to identify the structural determinants of both normal and abnormal function in the intact human heart is critical in its development as a potential aid to intracardiac arrhythmia diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Facilitators and Threats to the Patient Dignity in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Diseases: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Rabori, Roghayeh Mehdipour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient’s dignity is an important issue which is highlighted in nursing It is an issue that is highly dependent on context and culture. Heart disease is the most common disease in Iran and the world. Identification of facilitator and threatening patient dignity in heart patients is vital. This study aimed to explore facilitator and threatening patient dignity in hospitalized patients with heart disease. Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was performed in 2014 in Kerman, Iran. 20 patients admitted to coronary care units and 5 personnel were selected using purposeful sampling in semi-structured and in depth interviews. Researchers also used documentation and field notes until data saturation. Qualitative data analysis was done constantly and simultaneously with data collection Results: Three central themes emerged: a) Care context which includes human environment and physical environment, b) Holistic safe care including meeting the needs of patients both in the hospital and after discharge, c) Creating a sense of security and an effective relationship between patient and nurse, including a respectful relationship and account the family in health team. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that care context is important for patient dignity as well as physical environment and safe holistic care. PMID:26793729

  15. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts.

    PubMed

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortés, Raquel; Azorín, Inmaculada; Sirera, Rafael; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, José R; Salvador, Antonio; Portolés, Manuel

    2012-02-10

    We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n=38) and DCM (n=27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n=6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p<0.05) and DCM (141%, p<0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p<0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p<0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p<0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p<0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p<0.05 and 131%, p<0.001) and DCM (56%, p<0.01 and 69%, p<0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p<0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p<0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p<0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p<0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein. PMID:22244875

  16. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  17. Transcatheter interventions for multiple lesions in adults with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Tahir; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnosis, surgery and interventional management have significantly changed the quality of life of patients with congenital heart disease. Historically, congenital heart disease patients with multiple cardiac lesions have been referred for surgery; however, with the advent of newer technologies and expertise, transcatheter treatment has evolved as an alternative option. A series of patients who underwent interventional procedures for multiple congenital heart disease lesions with excellent procedural and medium-term outcomes is reported. PMID:22826648

  18. Schools Play a Role in Fighting Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Norma B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes "HeartPower," a health promotion program for students from preschool to middle school. Designed to supplement existing class curriculum, "HeartPower" helps educators teach students to learn, live, and love the behaviors that contribute to a healthier heart for a lifetime. Information on obtaining and using "HeartPower" is included. (SM)

  19. Pregnancy and contraception in young women with congenital heart disease: General considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Rachel M; Sermer, Mathew; Colman, Jack M

    2011-01-01

    Young women with heart disease are increasingly being seen in obstetrical referral centres owing, in large part, to the dramatic improvements in survival of young adults with congenital heart disease in recent years. Although pregnancies in most women with heart disease result in favourable outcomes, there are important exceptions that must be recognized. These exceptions pose significant mortality risk to the mother and/or the fetus. The present article outlines cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy, general outcomes and management considerations for practitioners caring for pregnant young women with congenital heart disease. A lesion-specific review is published in a complementary article. PMID:22468131

  20. Assessing the Global Burden of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Andrew E.; Oliver, John T.; Mirzaie, Masoud; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Chilov, Marina; Anderson, Laurie; Morrison, Janina L.; Khan, Aayla; Zhang, Nasen; Haynes, Norrisa; Tran, Jackie; Murphy, Adrianna; DeGennaro, Vincent; Roth, Gregory; Zhao, Dong; Peer, Nasheeta; Pichon-Riviere, Andres; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Pogosova, Nana; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Naghavi, Mohsen; Ezzati, Majid; Mensah, George A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. The GBD (Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors) study (GBD 2010 Study) conducted a systematic review of IHD epidemiology literature from 1980 to 2008 to inform estimates of the burden on IHD in 21 world regions in 1990 and 2010. METHODS The disease model of IHD for the GBD 2010 Study included IHD death and 3 sequelae: myocardial infarction, heart failure, and angina pectoris. Medline, EMBASE, and LILACS were searched for IHD epidemiology studies in GBD high-income and low- and middle-income regions published between 1980 and 2008 using a systematic protocol validated by regional IHD experts. Data from included studies were supplemented with unpublished data from selected high-quality surveillance and survey studies. The epidemiologic parameters of interest were incidence, prevalence, case fatality, and mortality. RESULTS Literature searches yielded 40,205 unique papers, of which 1,801 met initial screening criteria. Upon detailed review of full text papers, 137 published studies were included. Unpublished data were obtained from 24 additional studies. Data were sufficient for high-income regions, but missing or sparse in many low- and middle-income regions, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. CONCLUSIONS A systematic review for the GBD 2010 Study provided IHD epidemiology estimates for most world regions, but highlighted the lack of information about IHD in Sub-Saharan Africa and other low-income regions. More complete knowledge of the global burden of IHD will require improved IHD surveillance programs in all world regions. PMID:23682350

  1. Mouse models of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  2. Cohesin and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinglan; Krantz, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominant multisystem disorder caused by a disruption of cohesin function. The cohesin ring complex is composed of four protein subunits and more than 25 additional proteins involved in its regulation. The discovery that this complex also has a fundamental role in long-range regulation of transcription in Drosophila has shed light on the mechanism likely responsible for its role in development. In addition to the three cohesin proteins involved in CdLS, a second multisystem, recessively inherited, developmental disorder, Roberts-SC phocomelia, is caused by mutations in another regulator of the cohesin complex, ESCO2. Here we review the phenotypes of these disorders, collectively termed cohesinopathies, as well as the mechanism by which cohesin disruption likely causes these diseases. PMID:18767966

  3. Using local lexicalized rules to identify heart disease risk factors in clinical notes.

    PubMed

    Karystianis, George; Dehghan, Azad; Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Keane, John A; Nenadic, Goran

    2015-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death globally and a significant part of the human population lives with it. A number of risk factors have been recognized as contributing to the disease, including obesity, coronary artery disease (CAD), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and family history of premature CAD. This paper describes and evaluates a methodology to extract mentions of such risk factors from diabetic clinical notes, which was a task of the i2b2/UTHealth 2014 Challenge in Natural Language Processing for Clinical Data. The methodology is knowledge-driven and the system implements local lexicalized rules (based on syntactical patterns observed in notes) combined with manually constructed dictionaries that characterize the domain. A part of the task was also to detect the time interval in which the risk factors were present in a patient. The system was applied to an evaluation set of 514 unseen notes and achieved a micro-average F-score of 88% (with 86% precision and 90% recall). While the identification of CAD family history, medication and some of the related disease factors (e.g. hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia) showed quite good results, the identification of CAD-specific indicators proved to be more challenging (F-score of 74%). Overall, the results are encouraging and suggested that automated text mining methods can be used to process clinical notes to identify risk factors and monitor progression of heart disease on a large-scale, providing necessary data for clinical and epidemiological studies. PMID:26133479

  4. Coronary heart disease: prevalence and dietary sugars in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Smith, C; Woodward, M

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to investigate the effects of dietary intakes of different types of sugars (extrinsic, intrinsic, and lactose) and the dietary fat to sugar ratio on prevalent coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGN--This was a baseline cross sectional survey of CHD risk factors. SETTING--Twenty two Scottish health districts were surveyed between 1984 and 1986. PARTICIPANTS--A total of 10,359 men and women aged 40-59 years were screened as part of the Scottish Heart Health Study, and a further 1267 men and women aged 25-39 and 60-64 years were screened as part of the Scottish MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) Study. The response rates were 74% and 64% respectively. METHODS--Subjects completed a questionnaire which included sociodemographic, health, and food frequency information. Medical history, response to the Rose chest pain questionnaire, and results of a 12 lead ECG recording were used to categorize subjects into CHD diagnosed, previously CHD undiagnosed, or no CHD groups. The chi 2 statistic was used to determine whether the CHD groups differed in their sugar consumption, and multiple logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for other potential coronary risk factors, was used to calculate odds ratios for prevalent CHD by intake fifths of dietary sugars. MAIN RESULTS--Men, but not women, differed in their sugar consumption by CHD group. The odds ratios showed a tendency for a U shaped relationship for extrinsic sugar intake with CHD prevalence, but no significant effect of the fat to sugar ratio (possible marker of obesity) on CHD was seen. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest that neither extrinsic sugar, intrinsic sugar, nor the fat to sugar ratio are significant independent predictors of prevalent CHD in the Scottish population, when the other major risk factors such as cigarette smoking, blood cholesterol concentration, and antioxidant vitamins intake are accounted for. These new data for different sugar types

  5. High Contrast Ultrafast Imaging of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Papadacci, Clement; Pernot, Mathieu; Couade, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive ultrafast imaging for human cardiac applications is a big challenge to image intrinsic waves such as electromechanical waves or remotely induced shear waves in elastography imaging techniques. In this paper we propose to perform ultrafast imaging of the heart with adapted sector size by using diverging waves emitted from a classical transthoracic cardiac phased array probe. As in ultrafast imaging with plane wave coherent compounding, diverging waves can be summed coherently to obtain high-quality images of the entire heart at high frame rate in a full field-of-view. To image shear waves propagation at high SNR, the field-of-view can be adapted by changing the angular aperture of the transmitted wave. Backscattered echoes from successive circular wave acquisitions are coherently summed at every location in the image to improve the image quality while maintaining very high frame rates. The transmitted diverging waves, angular apertures and subapertures size are tested in simulation and ultrafast coherent compounding is implemented on a commercial scanner. The improvement of the imaging quality is quantified in phantom and in vivo on human heart. Imaging shear wave propagation at 2500 frame/s using 5 diverging waves provides a strong increase of the Signal to noise ratio of the tissue velocity estimates while maintaining a high frame rate. Finally, ultrafast imaging with a 1 to 5 diverging waves is used to image the human heart at a frame rate of 900 frames/s over an entire cardiac cycle. Thanks to spatial coherent compounding, a strong improvement of imaging quality is obtained with a small number of transmitted diverging waves and a high frame rate, which allows imaging the propagation of electromechanical and shear waves with good image quality. PMID:24474135

  6. [Real time 3D echocardiography in congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Acar, P; Dulac, Y; Taktak, A; Villacèque, M

    2004-05-01

    The introduction of the 3D mode in echocardiography has led to its use in everyday clinical practice. One hundred and fifty real time 3D echocardiographic examinations were performed in 20 foetus, 110 children and 20 adults with various congenital heart lesions (shunts, valvular lesions, aortic diseases). The 4x matricial probe enables the instantaneous acquisition of transthoracic volumes. Four modes of 3D imaging were used: real time, total volume, colour Doppler and biplane. Quantitative measurements were performed at an outlying station. The feasibility of the method in the foetus, the child and the adult was respectively 90%, 99% and 85%. Real time 3D echocardiography did not affect the diagnoses made by standard echocardiography. The 3D imaging gave a more accurate description of atrial septal defects and congenital valvular lesions. Biplane imaging was decisive in the quantitative approach to aortic dilatation of Marfan's syndrome and in segmental analysis of the foetal heart. 3D colour Doppler imaging has been disappointing but the possibilities of volumic quantification of blood flow are very promising. The present limitations of the method are the inadequate resolution in the small child and the absence of quantitative measurement on the echograph. The facility of utilisation of the matricial probe should lead to routine usage of 3D echocardiography as with 2D and the Doppler modes. Its value should be decisive in many congenital cardiac lesions requiring surgery or interventional catheterisation. PMID:15214550

  7. Practical stepwise approach to rhythm disturbances in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Huh, June

    2010-06-01

    Patients with congenital heart diseases (CHD) are confronted with early- and late-onset complications, such as conduction disorders, arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction, altered coronary flow, and ischemia, throughout their lifetime despite successful hemodynamic and/or anatomical correction. Rhythm disturbance is a well-known and increasingly frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CHD. Predisposing factors to rhythm disturbances include underlying cardiac defects, hemodynamic changes as part of the natural history, surgical repair and related scarring, and residual hemodynamic abnormalities. Acquired factors such as aging, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and others may also contribute to arrhythmogenesis in CHD. The first step in evaluating arrhythmias in CHD is to understand the complex anatomy and to find predisposing factors and hemodynamic abnormalities. A practical stepwise approach can lead to diagnosis and prompt appropriate interventions. Electrophysiological assessment and management should be done with integrated care of the underlying heart defects and hemodynamic abnormalities. Catheter ablation and arrhythmia surgery have been increasingly applied, showing increasing success rates with technological advancement despite complicated arrhythmia circuits in complex anatomy and the difficulty of access. Correction of residual hemodynamic abnormalities may be critical in the treatment of arrhythmia in patients with CHD. PMID:21189938

  8. Practical stepwise approach to rhythm disturbances in congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart diseases (CHD) are confronted with early- and late-onset complications, such as conduction disorders, arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction, altered coronary flow, and ischemia, throughout their lifetime despite successful hemodynamic and/or anatomical correction. Rhythm disturbance is a well-known and increasingly frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CHD. Predisposing factors to rhythm disturbances include underlying cardiac defects, hemodynamic changes as part of the natural history, surgical repair and related scarring, and residual hemodynamic abnormalities. Acquired factors such as aging, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and others may also contribute to arrhythmogenesis in CHD. The first step in evaluating arrhythmias in CHD is to understand the complex anatomy and to find predisposing factors and hemodynamic abnormalities. A practical stepwise approach can lead to diagnosis and prompt appropriate interventions. Electrophysiological assessment and management should be done with integrated care of the underlying heart defects and hemodynamic abnormalities. Catheter ablation and arrhythmia surgery have been increasingly applied, showing increasing success rates with technological advancement despite complicated arrhythmia circuits in complex anatomy and the difficulty of access. Correction of residual hemodynamic abnormalities may be critical in the treatment of arrhythmia in patients with CHD. PMID:21189938

  9. Cardiac Embryology and Molecular Mechanisms of Congenital Heart Disease: A Primer for Anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Kloesel, Benjamin; DiNardo, James A; Body, Simon C

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart disease is diagnosed in 0.4% to 5% of live births and presents unique challenges to the pediatric anesthesiologist. Furthermore, advances in surgical management have led to improved survival of those patients, and many adult anesthesiologists now frequently take care of adolescents and adults who have previously undergone surgery to correct or palliate congenital heart lesions. Knowledge of abnormal heart development on the molecular and genetic level extends and improves the anesthesiologist's understanding of congenital heart disease. In this article, we aim to review current knowledge pertaining to genetic alterations and their cellular effects that are involved in the formation of congenital heart defects. Given that congenital heart disease can currently only occasionally be traced to a single genetic mutation, we highlight some of the difficulties that researchers face when trying to identify specific steps in the pathogenetic development of heart lesions. PMID:27541719

  10. Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution and mortality due to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Torén, Kjell; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Nilsson, Tohr; Järvholm, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Objectives A growing number of epidemiological studies are showing that ambient exposure to particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, whether occupational exposure increases this risk is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine whether occupational exposure to particulate air pollution increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Methods The study population was a cohort of 176 309 occupationally exposed Swedish male construction workers and 71 778 unexposed male construction workers. The definition of exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man‐made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), wood dust, fumes (metal fumes, asphalt fumes and diesel exhaust) and gases and irritants (organic solvents and reactive chemicals) was based on a job‐exposure matrix with focus on exposure in the mid‐1970s. The cohort was followed from 1971 to 2002 with regard to mortality to ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Relative risks (RR) were obtained by the person‐years method and from Poisson regression models adjusting for baseline values of blood pressure, body mass index, age and smoking habits. Results Any occupational particulate air pollution was associated with an increased risk for ischemic heart disease (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.19), but there was no increased risk for cerebrovascular disease (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.07). There was an increased risk for ischaemic heart disease and exposure to inorganic dust (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and exposure to fumes (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.10), especially diesel exhaust (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.24). There was no significantly increased risk for cerebrovascular disease and exposure to inorganic dust, fumes or wood dust. Conclusions Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution, especially diesel exhaust, among construction workers increases the risk for ischaemic heart disease. PMID

  11. Disparities in heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases among women

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Jean; Pettey, Christina; Lefler, Leanne L; Heo, Seongkum

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews literature pertinent to cardiovascular disparities in women, focusing primarily on heart failure (HF). It provides an in-depth look at causes, biological influences, self-management and lack of adherence to HF-treatment guidelines in women. Disparities in treatment of causative factors of HF, such as myocardial infarction and hypertension, contribute to women having poorer HF outcomes than men. This article discusses major contributing reasons for nonadherence to medication regimes for HF in women, including advanced age at time of diagnosis, likelihood of multiple comorbidities, lack of social support and low socioeconomic status. Limited inclusion of women in clinical trials and the scarcity of gender analyses for HF and other cardiovascular diseases continues to limit the applicability of research findings to women. PMID:22757737

  12. Congenital Heart Disease: The Crossroads of Genetics, Epigenetics and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Vecoli, Cecilia; Pulignani, Silvia; Foffa, Ilenia; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are recognized as the most common type of birth malformations. Although recent advances in pre- and neonatal diagnosis as well as in surgical procedures have reduced the morbidity and mortality for many CHD, the etiology for CHD remains undefined. In non-syndromic and isolated (without a familial history or a Mendelian inheritance) forms of CHDs, a multifactorial pathogenesis with interplay between inherited and non-inherited causes is recognized. In this paper, we discuss the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms, mediating abnormal cardiac development in non-syndromic and isolated CHD, including mutations in cardiac transcription factors, the role of somatic mutations and epigenetic alterations as well as the influence of gene-environment interactions. In the near future, the advent of high-throughput genomic technologies with the integration of system biology will expand our understanding of isolated, non-syndromic CHDs for their prevention, early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25435801

  13. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  14. Family coronary heart disease: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Superko, H Robert; Roberts, Robert; Garrett, Brenda; Pendyala, Lakshmana; King, Spencer

    2010-12-01

    A family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) is an accepted risk factor for cardiovascular events and is independent of common CHD risk factors. Advances in the understanding of genetic influences on CHD risk provide the opportunity to apply this knowledge and improve patient care. Utility of inherited cardiovascular risk testing exists by utilizing both phenotypes and genotypes and includes improved CHD risk prediction, selection of the most appropriate treatment, prediction of outcome, and family counseling. The major impediment to widespread clinical adoption of this concept involves un-reimbursed staff time, educational needs, access to a standardized and efficient assessment mechanism, and privacy issues. The link between CHD and inheritance is indisputable and the evidence strong and consistent. For clinicians, the question is how to utilize this information, in an efficient manner, in order to improve patient care and detection of high-risk family members. PMID:21184539

  15. Coronary heart disease. The size and nature of the problem.

    PubMed

    Turner, R W

    1980-08-01

    In the U.K., coronary heart disease has reached epidemic proportions. It is the commonest cause of death after the age of 35 years and the fastest rate of increase is in early middle age. The epidemic is due mainly to our way of life. The most important factors are dietary, with smoking, physical inactivity and stress also contributing. Twenty independent working parties from different countries have reviewed the dietary evidence and reached a strong consensus on dietary recommendations. Little action has been taken in the U.K. The Coronary Prevention Group has been formed to consider the reasons for this inaction and also the implication for research, the government, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and Social Security, the food and agriculture industries, caterers, nutrition education and for individuals, of the dietary recommendations. PMID:7465457

  16. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  17. Guanxin II (II) for the management of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Qin, Feng; Huang, Xi

    2009-12-01

    This article presents an integrated overview of Guanxin II (II) regarding its quality control, pharmacokinetics, pharmacology, clinical studies, adverse events, dosage and administration, and its pharmacoeconomic assessment. It has been demonstrated that Guanxin II has beneficial effects on coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanism was proved to be its anti-ischemic, anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory effects, and so on. Tanshinol, hydroxysafflor yellow A and ferulic acid might be responsible for the cardioprotective effect of Guanxin II. In terms of acquisition cost, Guanxin II is cheaper than other drugs currently available for CHD. Guanxin II is safe, cheap, and effective in the management of CHD. However, the mechanism of its cardioprotective effects has not been completely understood because of limitations in the research methodologies of Chinese medicine. Further work should be carried out with single components such as tanshinol, hydroxysafflor yellow A and ferulic acid, using modern biochemical and molecular methods. PMID:20082256

  18. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  19. Pulmonary vascular resistance in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N J; Shinebourne, E A; Scallan, M J; Sopwith, T A; Denison, D M

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic blood flow and pulmonary vascular resistance were measured in 21 children with congenital heart disease. Blood flow was calculated by the direct Fick method, using measurements of metabolic gas exchange obtained by remote respiratory mass spectrometry. The observations showed that the administration of oxygen caused an appreciable fall in pulmonary vascular resistance in 16 of the 21 children studied and that this fall would not have been appreciated from a study of pulmonary arterial pressure alone as it was masked by a corresponding rise in blood flow. In 10 of 14 children, in whom superior vena caval blood was also sampled, the rise in flow was largely due to an increase in intracardiac left to right shunt. It was accompanied by widening of the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, perhaps due to imperfect gas equilibration within the lung. PMID:6515594

  20. Mitochondrial Fission and Autophagy in the Normal and Diseased Heart

    PubMed Central

    Iglewski, Myriam; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio; Rothermel, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained hypertension promotes structural, functional and metabolic remodeling of cardiomyocyte mitochondria. As long-lived, postmitotic cells, cardiomyocytes turn over mitochondria continuously to compensate for changes in energy demands and to remove damaged organelles. This process involves fusion and fission of existing mitochondria to generate new organelles and separate old ones for degradation via autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent proteolytic pathway capable of processing cellular components, including organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy can be either nonselective or selective and contributes to remodeling of the myocardium under stress. Fission of mitochondria, loss of membrane potential, and ubiquitination are emerging as critical steps that direct selective autophagic degradation of mitochondria. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms controlling mitochondrial dynamics, including fission, fusion, transport, and degradation. Furthermore, it examines recent studies revealing the importance of these processes in normal and diseased heart. PMID:20865352