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Sample records for human hedgehog-interacting protein

  1. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  2. Structural insights into hedgehog ligand sequestration by the human hedgehog-interacting protein HIP

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Benjamin; Aricescu, A. Radu; Harlos, Karl; O’Callaghan, Chris A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Siebold, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) morphogens play fundamental roles in development whilst dysregulation of Hh signaling leads to disease. Multiple cell surface receptors are responsible for transducing and/or regulating Hh signals. Among these, the hedgehog-interacting protein (HIP) is a highly conserved, vertebrate-specific, inhibitor of Hh signaling. We have solved a series of crystal structures for the human HIP ectodomain and Desert Hh in isolation, as well as Sonic and Desert Hh-HIP complexes, with and without calcium. The interaction determinants, confirmed by biophysical studies and mutagenesis, reveal novel and distinct functions for Hh zinc- and calcium-binding sites; functions which appear common to all vertebrate Hhs. Zinc makes a key contribution to the Hh-HIP interface while calcium prevents electrostatic repulsion between the two proteins, thus playing a major modulatory role. This interplay of several metal-binding sites suggests a tuneable mechanism for regulation of Hh signaling. PMID:19561611

  3. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  4. Cysteine-rich domains related to Frizzled receptors and Hedgehog-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Frizzled and Smoothened are homologous seven-transmembrane proteins functioning in the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, respectively. They harbor an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (FZ-CRD), a mobile evolutionary unit that has been found in a number of other metazoan proteins and Frizzled-like proteins in Dictyostelium. Domains distantly related to FZ-CRDs, in Hedgehog-interacting proteins (HHIPs), folate receptors and riboflavin-binding proteins (FRBPs), and Niemann-Pick Type C1 proteins (NPC1s), referred to as HFN-CRDs, exhibit similar structures and disulfide connectivity patterns compared with FZ-CRDs. We used computational analyses to expand the homologous set of FZ-CRDs and HFN-CRDs, providing a better understanding of their evolution and classification. First, FZ-CRD-containing proteins with various domain compositions were identified in several major eukaryotic lineages including plants and Chromalveolata, revealing a wider phylogenetic distribution of FZ-CRDs than previously recognized. Second, two new and distinct groups of highly divergent FZ-CRDs were found by sensitive similarity searches. One of them is present in the calcium channel component Mid1 in fungi and the uncharacterized FAM155 proteins in metazoans. Members of the other new FZ-CRD group occur in the metazoan-specific RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) proteins that are putative tumor suppressors acting as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. Finally, sequence and three-dimensional structural comparisons helped us uncover a divergent HFN-CRD in glypicans, which are important morphogen-binding heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Such a finding reinforces the evolutionary ties between the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways and underscores the importance of gene duplications in creating essential signaling components in metazoan evolution. PMID:22693159

  5. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. PMID:27009877

  6. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  7. Phosphorylation of human link proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oester, D.A.; Caterson, B.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1986-06-13

    Three link proteins of 48, 44 and 40 kDa were purified from human articular cartilage and identified with monoclonal anti-link protein antibody 8-A-4. Two sets of lower molecular weight proteins of 30-31 kDa and 24-26 kDa also contained link protein epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibody and were most likely degradative products of the intact link proteins. The link proteins of 48 and 40 kDa were identified as phosphoproteins while the 44 kDa link protein did not contain /sup 32/P. The phosphorylated 48 and 40 kDa link proteins contained approximately 2 moles PO/sub 4//mole link protein.

  8. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  9. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  10. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Human genome protein function database.

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    A database which focuses on the normal functions of the currently-known protein products of the Human Genome was constructed. Information is stored as text, figures, tables, and diagrams. The program contains built-in functions to modify, update, categorize, hypertext, search, create reports, and establish links to other databases. The semi-automated categorization feature of the database program was used to classify these proteins in terms of biomedical functions. PMID:1807638

  12. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  13. Protein Evolution of Human Milk.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Sagar K; Giuffrida, Francesca; Bertschy, Emmanuelle; De Castro, Antonio; Destaillats, Frédéric; Lee, Le Ye

    2016-01-01

    Given the documented short- and long-term advantages of breastfeeding, human milk (HM) as a sole source of nutrition for the first few months of newborn life is considered a normative standard. Each macroconstituent of HM plays a crucial role in the growth and development of the baby. Lipids are largely responsible for providing more than 50% of the energy as well as providing essential fatty acids and minor lipids that are integral to all cell membranes. Carbohydrates can be broadly divided into lactose and oligosaccharides, which are a readily digestible source of glucose and indigestible nonnutritive components, respectively. Proteins in HM provide essential amino acids indispensable for the growth of infants. What is more interesting is that protein concentration profoundly changes from colostrum to mature milk. In this report, we share data from an observatory, single-center, longitudinal trial assessing the constituents of HM collected 30, 60 and 120 days postpartum from 50 mothers (singleton deliveries: 25 male and 25 female infants). The protein content decreased with evolving stages of lactation from an average of 1.45 to 1.38 g/100 ml. The data did not show any gender differences as it was reported for lipid content at 120 days postpartum by our group. Additionally, we also share consolidated literature data on protein evolution of HM during the first year of lactation. PMID:27336906

  14. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  15. Extreme multifunctional proteins identified from a human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Robisson, Benoit; Spinelli, Lionel; Guien, Céline; Becker, Emmanuelle; Brun, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins are a subclass of multifunctional proteins whose functions are unrelated. Although they may play important roles in cells, there has been no large-scale method to identify them, nor any effort to characterize them as a group. Here, we propose the first method for the identification of ‘extreme multifunctional' proteins from an interactome as a first step to characterize moonlighting proteins. By combining network topological information with protein annotations, we identify 430 extreme multifunctional proteins (3% of the human interactome). We show that the candidates form a distinct sub-group of proteins, characterized by specific features, which form a signature of extreme multifunctionality. Overall, extreme multifunctional proteins are enriched in linear motifs and less intrinsically disordered than network hubs. We also provide MoonDB, a database containing information on all the candidates identified in the analysis and a set of manually curated human moonlighting proteins. PMID:26054620

  16. Human protein reference database--2006 update.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gopa R; Suresh, M; Kumaran, K; Kannabiran, N; Suresh, Shubha; Bala, P; Shivakumar, K; Anuradha, N; Reddy, Raghunath; Raghavan, T Madhan; Menon, Shalini; Hanumanthu, G; Gupta, Malvika; Upendran, Sapna; Gupta, Shweta; Mahesh, M; Jacob, Bincy; Mathew, Pinky; Chatterjee, Pritam; Arun, K S; Sharma, Salil; Chandrika, K N; Deshpande, Nandan; Palvankar, Kshitish; Raghavnath, R; Krishnakanth, R; Karathia, Hiren; Rekha, B; Nayak, Rashmi; Vishnupriya, G; Kumar, H G Mohan; Nagini, M; Kumar, G S Sameer; Jose, Rojan; Deepthi, P; Mohan, S Sujatha; Gandhi, T K B; Harsha, H C; Deshpande, Krishna S; Sarker, Malabika; Prasad, T S Keshava; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2006-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) (http://www.hprd.org) was developed to serve as a comprehensive collection of protein features, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein-protein interactions. Since the original report, this database has increased to >20 000 proteins entries and has become the largest database for literature-derived protein-protein interactions (>30 000) and PTMs (>8000) for human proteins. We have also introduced several new features in HPRD including: (i) protein isoforms, (ii) enhanced search options, (iii) linking of pathway annotations and (iv) integration of a novel browser, GenProt Viewer (http://www.genprot.org), developed by us that allows integration of genomic and proteomic information. With the continued support and active participation by the biomedical community, we expect HPRD to become a unique source of curated information for the human proteome and spur biomedical discoveries based on integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data. PMID:16381900

  17. Human protein reference database—2006 update

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gopa R.; Suresh, M.; Kumaran, K.; Kannabiran, N.; Suresh, Shubha; Bala, P.; Shivakumar, K.; Anuradha, N.; Reddy, Raghunath; Raghavan, T. Madhan; Menon, Shalini; Hanumanthu, G.; Gupta, Malvika; Upendran, Sapna; Gupta, Shweta; Mahesh, M.; Jacob, Bincy; Mathew, Pinky; Chatterjee, Pritam; Arun, K. S.; Sharma, Salil; Chandrika, K. N.; Deshpande, Nandan; Palvankar, Kshitish; Raghavnath, R.; Krishnakanth, R.; Karathia, Hiren; Rekha, B.; Nayak, Rashmi; Vishnupriya, G.; Kumar, H. G. Mohan; Nagini, M.; Kumar, G. S. Sameer; Jose, Rojan; Deepthi, P.; Mohan, S. Sujatha; Gandhi, T. K. B.; Harsha, H. C.; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Sarker, Malabika; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2006-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) () was developed to serve as a comprehensive collection of protein features, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein–protein interactions. Since the original report, this database has increased to >20 000 proteins entries and has become the largest database for literature-derived protein–protein interactions (>30 000) and PTMs (>8000) for human proteins. We have also introduced several new features in HPRD including: (i) protein isoforms, (ii) enhanced search options, (iii) linking of pathway annotations and (iv) integration of a novel browser, GenProt Viewer (), developed by us that allows integration of genomic and proteomic information. With the continued support and active participation by the biomedical community, we expect HPRD to become a unique source of curated information for the human proteome and spur biomedical discoveries based on integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data. PMID:16381900

  18. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders.

  19. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  20. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  1. Human telomeric proteins occupy selective interstitial sites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Xiong, Yuanyan; Kim, Hyeung; He, Quanyuan; Li, Yumei; Chen, Rui; Songyang, Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Human telomeres are bound and protected by protein complexes assembled around the six core telomeric proteins RAP1, TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TPP1, and POT1. The function of these proteins on telomeres has been studied extensively. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested possible roles for these proteins outside of telomeres. However, the non-canonical (extra-telomeric) function of human telomeric proteins remains poorly understood. To this end, we systematically investigated the binding sites of telomeric proteins along human chromosomes, by performing whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for RAP1 and TRF2. ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that RAP1 and TRF2 could be found on a small number of interstitial sites, including regions that are proximal to genes. Some of these binding sites contain short telomere repeats, suggesting that telomeric proteins could directly bind to interstitial sites. Interestingly, only a small fraction of the available interstitial telomere repeat-containing regions were occupied by RAP1 and TRF2. Ectopically expressed TRF2 was able to occupy additional interstitial telomere repeat sites, suggesting that protein concentration may dictate the selective targeting of telomeric proteins to interstitial sites. Reducing RAP1 and TRF2 expression by RNA interference led to altered transcription of RAP1- and TRF2-targeted genes. Our results indicate that human telomeric proteins could occupy a limited number of interstitial sites and regulate gene transcription. PMID:21423278

  2. The human "magnesome": detecting magnesium binding sites on human proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnesium research is increasing in molecular medicine due to the relevance of this ion in several important biological processes and associated molecular pathogeneses. It is still difficult to predict from the protein covalent structure whether a human chain is or not involved in magnesium binding. This is mainly due to little information on the structural characteristics of magnesium binding sites in proteins and protein complexes. Magnesium binding features, differently from those of other divalent cations such as calcium and zinc, are elusive. Here we address a question that is relevant in protein annotation: how many human proteins can bind Mg2+? Our analysis is performed taking advantage of the recently implemented Bologna Annotation Resource (BAR-PLUS), a non hierarchical clustering method that relies on the pair wise sequence comparison of about 14 millions proteins from over 300.000 species and their grouping into clusters where annotation can safely be inherited after statistical validation. Results After cluster assignment of the latest version of the human proteome, the total number of human proteins for which we can assign putative Mg binding sites is 3,751. Among these proteins, 2,688 inherit annotation directly from human templates and 1,063 inherit annotation from templates of other organisms. Protein structures are highly conserved inside a given cluster. Transfer of structural properties is possible after alignment of a given sequence with the protein structures that characterise a given cluster as obtained with a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based procedure. Interestingly a set of 370 human sequences inherit Mg2+ binding sites from templates sharing less than 30% sequence identity with the template. Conclusion We describe and deliver the "human magnesome", a set of proteins of the human proteome that inherit putative binding of magnesium ions. With our BAR-hMG, 251 clusters including 1,341 magnesium binding protein structures

  3. Increased Adipose Protein Carbonylation in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frohnert, Brigitte I.; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Serrot, Federico J.; Foncea, Rocio E.; Moran, Antoinette; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Choudry, Umar; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with obesity but mechanisms controlling this relationship in humans are not fully understood. Studies in animal models suggest a linkage between adipose reactive oxygen species (ROS) and insulin resistance. ROS oxidize cellular lipids to produce a variety of lipid hydroperoxides that in turn generate reactive lipid aldehydes that covalently modify cellular proteins in a process termed carbonylation. Mammalian cells defend against reactive lipid aldehydes and protein carbonylation by glutathionylation using glutathione-S-transferase A4 (GSTA4) or carbonyl reduction/oxidation via reductases and/or dehydrogenases. Insulin resistance in mice is linked to ROS production and increased level of protein carbonylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose transport, and altered adipokine secretion. To assess protein carbonylation and insulin resistance in humans, eight healthy participants underwent subcutaneous fat biopsy from the periumbilical region for protein analysis and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance testing to measure insulin sensitivity. Soluble proteins from adipose tissue were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the major carbonylated proteins identified as the adipocyte and epithelial fatty acid–binding proteins. The level of protein carbonylation was directly correlated with adiposity and serum free fatty acids (FFAs). These results suggest that in human obesity oxidative stress is linked to protein carbonylation and such events may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:21593812

  4. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  5. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83%) of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134%) than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109%) or occurrence ranking (~46%). Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high-confidence protein interactions

  6. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  7. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  8. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  9. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy. PMID:22226014

  10. Dietary protein intake and human health.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2016-03-16

    A protein consists of amino acids (AA) linked by peptide bonds. Dietary protein is hydrolyzed by proteases and peptidases to generate AA, dipeptides, and tripeptides in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. These digestion products are utilized by bacteria in the small intestine or absorbed into enterocytes. AA that are not degraded by the small intestine enter the portal vein for protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and other tissues. AA are also used for cell-specific production of low-molecular-weight metabolites with enormous physiological importance. Thus, protein undernutrition results in stunting, anemia, physical weakness, edema, vascular dysfunction, and impaired immunity. Based on short-term nitrogen balance studies, the Recommended Dietary Allowance of protein for a healthy adult with minimal physical activity is currently 0.8 g protein per kg body weight (BW) per day. To meet the functional needs such as promoting skeletal-muscle protein accretion and physical strength, dietary intake of 1.0, 1.3, and 1.6 g protein per kg BW per day is recommended for individuals with minimal, moderate, and intense physical activity, respectively. Long-term consumption of protein at 2 g per kg BW per day is safe for healthy adults, and the tolerable upper limit is 3.5 g per kg BW per day for well-adapted subjects. Chronic high protein intake (>2 g per kg BW per day for adults) may result in digestive, renal, and vascular abnormalities and should be avoided. The quantity and quality of protein are the determinants of its nutritional values. Therefore, adequate consumption of high-quality proteins from animal products (e.g., lean meat and milk) is essential for optimal growth, development, and health of humans. PMID:26797090

  11. Surfactant protein D in human lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hartl, D; Griese, M

    2006-06-01

    The lung is continuously exposed to inhaled pollutants, microbes and allergens. Therefore, the pulmonary immune system has to defend against harmful pathogens, while an inappropriate inflammatory response to harmless particles must be avoided. In the bronchoalveolar space this critical balance is maintained by innate immune proteins, termed surfactant proteins. Among these, surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a central role in the pulmonary host defence and the modulation of allergic responses. Several human lung diseases are characterized by decreased levels of bronchoalveolar SP-D. Thus, recombinant SP-D has been proposed as a therapeutical option for cystic fibrosis, neonatal lung disease and smoking-induced emphysema. Furthermore, SP-D serum levels can be used as disease activity markers for interstitial lung diseases. This review illustrates the emerging role of SP-D translated from in vitro studies to human lung diseases. PMID:16684127

  12. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  13. Chemical Polysialylation of Recombinant Human Proteins.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Ivan V; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Belogurov, Alexey A; Genkin, Dmitry D; Deyev, Sergey M; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    Design of drug with prolonged therapeutic action is one of the rapid developing fields of modern medical science and required implementation of different methods of protein chemistry and molecular biology. There are several therapeutic proteins needing increasing of their stability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamics parameters. To make long-live DNA-encoded drug PEGylation was proposed. Alternatively polysialic (colominic) acid, extracted from the cell wall of E. coli, fractionated to the desired size by anion-exchange chromatography and chemically activated to the amine-reactive aldehyde form, may be chemically attached to the polypeptide chain. Conjugates of proteins and polysialic acid generally resemble properties of protein-PEG conjugates, but possess significant negative net charge and are thought to be fully degradable after endocytosis due to the presence of intracellular enzymes, hydrolyzing the polysialic acid. Complete biodegradation of the polysialic acid moiety makes this kind of conjugates preferable for creation of drugs, intended for chronic use. Here, we describe two different protocols of chemical polysialylation. First protocol was employed for the CHO-derived human butyrylcholinesterase with optimized for recovery of specific enzyme activity. Polysialic acid moieties are attached at various lysine residues. Another protocol was developed for high-yield conjugation of human insulin; major conjugation point is the N-terminal residue of the insulin's light chain. These methods may allow to produce polysialylated conjugates of various proteins or polypeptides with reasonable yield and without significant loss of functional activity. PMID:26082236

  14. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  15. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  16. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  17. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  18. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  19. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    PubMed

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants. PMID:23158513

  20. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  1. Oxidative damage to human plasma proteins by ozone.

    PubMed

    Cross, C E; Reznick, A Z; Packer, L; Davis, P A; Suzuki, Y J; Halliwell, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human plasma to ozone produces oxidative protein damage, measured as protein carbonyl formation. Isolated human albumin or creatine phosphokinase are oxidized much faster than are total proteins. Consideration must be given to proteins as targets of oxidative injury by ozone in vivo. PMID:1568641

  2. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  3. Protein oxidation, UVA and human DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Brem, Reto

    2016-08-01

    Solar UVB is carcinogenic. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the carcinogenicity of UVB by excising potentially mutagenic UVB-induced DNA lesions. Despite this capacity for DNA repair, non-melanoma skin cancers and apparently normal sun-exposed skin contain huge numbers of mutations that are mostly attributable to unrepaired UVB-induced DNA lesions. UVA is about 20-times more abundant than UVB in incident sunlight. It does cause some DNA damage but this does not fully account for its biological impact. The effects of solar UVA are mediated by its interactions with cellular photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress. The proteome is a significant target for damage by UVA-induced ROS. In cultured human cells, UVA-induced oxidation of DNA repair proteins inhibits DNA repair. This article addresses the possible role of oxidative stress and protein oxidation in determining DNA repair efficiency - with particular reference to NER and skin cancer risk. PMID:27324272

  4. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  5. Human protein kinase CK2 genes.

    PubMed

    Wirkner, U; Voss, H; Lichter, P; Pyerin, W

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the genomic structure of human protein kinase CK2. Of the presumably four genes, the gene encoding the regulatory subunit beta and a processed (pseudo)gene of the catalytic subunit alpha have been characterized completely. In addition, a 18.9 kb-long central part of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit alpha has been characterized. The subunit beta gene spans 4.2 kb and is composed of seven exons. Its promoter region shows several features of a "housekeeping gene" and shares common features with the promoter of the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Conforming to the genomic structure, the beta gene transcripts form a band around 1.1 kb. The central part of the subunit alpha gene contains eight exons comprising bases 102 to 824 of the translated region. Within the introns, 16 Alu repeats were identified, some of which arranged in tandems. The structure of both human CK2 coding genes, alpha and beta, is highly conserved. Several introns are located at corresponding positions in the respective genes of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The processed alpha (pseudo)gene has a complete open reading frame and is 99% homologous to the coding region of the CK2 alpha cDNA. Although the gene has a promoter-like upstream region, no transcript could be identified so far. The genomic clones were used for localization in the human genome. The beta gene was mapped to locus 6p21, the alpha gene to locus 20p13 and the alpha (pseudo)gene to locus 11p15. There is no evidence for additional alpha or beta loci in the human genome. PMID:7735323

  6. Proteins of human milk. I. Identification of major components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.G.; Powers, M.T.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    Traditionally, human milk proteins are identified largely by reference to bovine milk. Hence, to identify the major proteins in human milk, we subjected human and bovine milk, in parallel, to high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. Isoelectric precipitation at pH 4.6 was our criterion for distinguishing whey proteins from those of the casein complex. The ..cap alpha..- and..beta..-caseins were identified on the basis of relative abundance, relative molecular mass, and relative isoelectric points. No protein disappeared from ISO-DALT patterns of human milk after rennin treatment, and no new protein comparable to bovine para K-casein appeared in the BASO-DALT patterns; this suggests that K-casein is absent from human milk. The proteins identified in human milk patterns include the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. casein families, lactalbumin, albumin, transferrin, IgA, and lactoferrin. Numerous additional proteins seen in patterns for human milk remain to be identified.

  7. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:27543868

  8. The proteins of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Costa, Alberto C S

    2006-08-15

    Recent genomic sequence annotation suggests that the long arm of human chromosome 21 encodes more than 400 genes. Because there is no evidence to exclude any significant segment of 21 q from containing genes relevant to the Down syndrome (DS) cognitive phenotype, all genes in this entire set must be considered as candidates. Only a subset, however, is likely to make critical contributions. Determining which these are is both a major focus in biology and a critical step in efficient development of therapeutics. The subtle molecular abnormality in DS, the 50% increase in chromosome 21 gene expression, presents significant challenges for researchers in detection and quantitation. Another challenge is the current limitation in understanding gene functions and in interpreting biological characteristics. Here, we review information on chromosome 21-encoded proteins compiled from the literature and from genomics and proteomics databases. For each protein, we summarize their evolutionary conservation, the complexity of their known protein interactions and their level of expression in brain, and discuss the implications and limitations of these data. For a subset, we discuss neurologically relevant phenotypes of mouse models that include knockouts, mutations, or overexpression. Lastly, we highlight a small number of genes for which recent evidence suggests a function in biochemical/cellular pathways that are relevant to cognition. Until knowledge deficits are overcome, we suggest that effective development of gene-phenotype correlations in DS requires a serious and continuous effort to assimilate broad categories of information on chromosome 21 genes, plus the creation of more versatile mouse models. PMID:17048356

  9. Functional prediction of hypothetical proteins in human adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Dorden, Shane; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Assigning functional information to hypothetical proteins in virus genomes is crucial for gaining insight into their proteomes. Human adenoviruses are medium sized viruses that cause a range of diseases. Their genomes possess proteins with uncharacterized function known as hypothetical proteins. Using a wide range of protein function prediction servers, functional information was obtained about these hypothetical proteins. A comparison of functional information obtained from these servers revealed that some of them produced functional information, while others provided little functional information about these human adenovirus hypothetical proteins. The PFP, ESG, PSIPRED, 3d2GO, and ProtFun servers produced the most functional information regarding these hypothetical proteins. PMID:26664031

  10. The Proteins of Human Chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Costa, Alberto C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent genomic sequence annotation suggests that the long arm of human chromosome 21 encodes more than 400 genes. Because there is no evidence to exclude any significant segment of 21q from containing genes relevant to the Down syndrome cognitive phenotype, all genes in this entire set must be considered as candidates. Only a subset, however, is likely to make critical contributions. Determining which these are is both a major focus in biology and a critical step in efficient development of therapeutics. The subtle molecular abnormality in Down syndrome, the 50% increase in chromosome 21 gene expression, presents significant challenges for researchers in detection and quantitation. Another challenge is the current limitation in understanding gene functions and in interpreting biological characteristics. Here, we review information on chromosome 21-encoded proteins compiled from the literature and from genomics and proteomics databases. For each protein, we summarize their evolutionary conservation, the complexity of their known protein interactions and their level of expression in brain, and discuss the implications and limitations of these data. For a subset, we discuss neurologically relevant phenotypes of mouse models that include knockouts, mutations or overexpression. Lastly, we highlight a small number of genes for which recent evidence suggests a function in biochemical/cellular pathways that are relevant to cognition. Until knowledge deficits are overcome, we suggest that effective development of gene-phenotype correlations in Down syndrome requires a serious and continuous effort to assimilate broad categories of information on chromosome 21 genes, plus the creation of more versatile mouse models. PMID:17048356

  11. The protein interaction landscape of the human CMGC kinase group.

    PubMed

    Varjosalo, Markku; Keskitalo, Salla; Van Drogen, Audrey; Nurkkala, Helka; Vichalkovski, Anton; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias

    2013-04-25

    Cellular information processing via reversible protein phosphorylation requires tight control of the localization, activity, and substrate specificity of protein kinases, which to a large extent is accomplished by complex formation with other proteins. Despite their critical role in cellular regulation and pathogenesis, protein interaction information is available for only a subset of the 518 human protein kinases. Here we present a global proteomic analysis of complexes of the human CMGC kinase group. In addition to subgroup-specific functional enrichment and modularity, the identified 652 high-confidence kinase-protein interactions provide a specific biochemical context for many poorly studied CMGC kinases. Furthermore, the analysis revealed a kinase-kinase subnetwork and candidate substrates for CMGC kinases. Finally, the presented interaction proteome uncovered a large set of interactions with proteins genetically linked to a range of human diseases, including cancer, suggesting additional routes for analyzing the role of CMGC kinases in controlling human disease pathways. PMID:23602568

  12. A Survey of Membrane Proteins in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Nguyen Tien; Van Chi, Phan

    2012-01-01

    Serum and membrane proteins are two of the most attractive targets for proteomic analysis. Previous membrane protein studies tend to focus on tissue sample, while membrane protein studies in serum are still limited. In this study, an analysis of membrane proteins in normal human serum was carried out. Nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS) and bioinformatics tools were used to identify membrane proteins. Two hundred and seventeen membrane proteins were detected in the human serum, of which 129 membrane proteins have at least one transmembrane domain (TMD). Further characterizations of identified membrane proteins including their subcellular distributions, molecular weights, post translational modifications, transmembrane domains and average of hydrophobicity, were also implemented. Our results showed the potential of membrane proteins in serum for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. PMID:25288886

  13. Protein-Linked Glycan Degradation in Infants Fed Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Sela, David; Underwood, Mark A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2014-01-01

    Many human milk proteins are glycosylated. Glycosylation is important in protecting bioactive proteins and peptide fragments from digestion. Protein-linked glycans have a variety of functions; however, there is a paucity of information on protein-linked glycan degradation in either the infant or the adult digestive system. Human digestive enzymes can break down dietary disaccharides and starches, but most of the digestive enzymes required for complex protein-linked glycan degradation are absent from both human digestive secretions and the external brush border membrane of the intestinal lining. Indeed, complex carbohydrates remain intact throughout their transit through the stomach and small intestine, and are undegraded by in vitro incubation with either adult pancreatic secretions or intact intestinal brush border membranes. Human gastrointestinal bacteria, however, produce a wide variety of glycosidases with regio- and anomeric specificities matching those of protein-linked glycan structures. These bacteria degrade a wide array of complex carbohydrates including various protein-linked glycans. That bacteria possess glycan degradation capabilities, whereas the human digestive system, perse, does not, suggests that most dietary protein-linked glycan breakdown will be of bacterial origin. In addition to providing a food source for specific bacteria in the colon, protein-linked glycans from human milk may act as decoys for pathogenic bacteria to prevent invasion and infection of the host. The composition of the intestinal microbiome may be particularly important in the most vulnerable humans-the elderly, the immunocompromised, and infants (particularly premature infants). PMID:24533224

  14. Determination of Dideoxyosone Precursors of AGEs in Human Lens Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Johar, Kaid; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2011-01-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-{[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl) benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 AU/mg protein vs. 31.7±19.5 AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. PMID:21820400

  15. S100 protein family in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyan; Xu, Chengshan; Jin, Qing’e; Liu, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    S100 protein family has been implicated in multiple stages of tumorigenesis and progression. Among the S100 genes, 22 are clustered at chromosome locus 1q21, a region frequently rearranged in cancers. S100 protein possesses a wide range of intracellular and extracellular functions such as regulation of calcium homeostasis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell invasion and motility, cytoskeleton interactions, protein phosphorylation, regulation of transcriptional factors, autoimmunity, chemotaxis, inflammation and pluripotency. Many lines of evidence suggest that altered expression of S100 proteins was associated with tumor progression and prognosis. Therefore, S100 proteins might also represent potential tumor biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize the evidence connecting S100 protein family and cancer and discuss the mechanisms by which S100 exerts its diverse functions. PMID:24660101

  16. Determination of dideoxyosone precursors of AGEs in human lens proteins.

    PubMed

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Kaid Johar, S R; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2011-10-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl)benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by Western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 vs. 31.7±19.5AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. PMID:21820400

  17. The Evolution of Human Cells in Terms of Protein Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Adam J.; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Gough, Julian; Rackham, Owen J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are composed of hundreds of cell types. As the genomic DNA of each somatic cell is identical, cell type is determined by what is expressed and when. Until recently, little has been reported about the determinants of human cell identity, particularly from the joint perspective of gene evolution and expression. Here, we chart the evolutionary past of all documented human cell types via the collective histories of proteins, the principal product of gene expression. FANTOM5 data provide cell-type–specific digital expression of human protein-coding genes and the SUPERFAMILY resource is used to provide protein domain annotation. The evolutionary epoch in which each protein was created is inferred by comparison with domain annotation of all other completely sequenced genomes. Studying the distribution across epochs of genes expressed in each cell type reveals insights into human cellular evolution in terms of protein innovation. For each cell type, its history of protein innovation is charted based on the genes it expresses. Combining the histories of all cell types enables us to create a timeline of cell evolution. This timeline identifies the possibility that our common ancestor Coelomata (cavity-forming animals) provided the innovation required for the innate immune system, whereas cells which now form the brain of human have followed a trajectory of continually accumulating novel proteins since Opisthokonta (boundary of animals and fungi). We conclude that exaptation of existing domain architectures into new contexts is the dominant source of cell-type–specific domain architectures. PMID:24692656

  18. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Ye; Yu, Xin-Da; Song, Chun-Juan; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Xin-Rong; Duan, Ying; Zhang, Ju

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system. METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this, cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein’s cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein. RESULTS: The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced, with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank: DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted. CONCLUSION: F protein expresses cDNA clone in a prokaryotic system, which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein. PMID:17465469

  19. neXtProt: a knowledge platform for human proteins.

    PubMed

    Lane, Lydie; Argoud-Puy, Ghislaine; Britan, Aurore; Cusin, Isabelle; Duek, Paula D; Evalet, Olivier; Gateau, Alain; Gaudet, Pascale; Gleizes, Anne; Masselot, Alexandre; Zwahlen, Catherine; Bairoch, Amos

    2012-01-01

    neXtProt (http://www.nextprot.org/) is a new human protein-centric knowledge platform. Developed at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), it aims to help researchers answer questions relevant to human proteins. To achieve this goal, neXtProt is built on a corpus containing both curated knowledge originating from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot knowledgebase and carefully selected and filtered high-throughput data pertinent to human proteins. This article presents an overview of the database and the data integration process. We also lay out the key future directions of neXtProt that we consider the necessary steps to make neXtProt the one-stop-shop for all research projects focusing on human proteins. PMID:22139911

  20. neXtProt: a knowledge platform for human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Lydie; Argoud-Puy, Ghislaine; Britan, Aurore; Cusin, Isabelle; Duek, Paula D.; Evalet, Olivier; Gateau, Alain; Gaudet, Pascale; Gleizes, Anne; Masselot, Alexandre; Zwahlen, Catherine; Bairoch, Amos

    2012-01-01

    neXtProt (http://www.nextprot.org/) is a new human protein-centric knowledge platform. Developed at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), it aims to help researchers answer questions relevant to human proteins. To achieve this goal, neXtProt is built on a corpus containing both curated knowledge originating from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot knowledgebase and carefully selected and filtered high-throughput data pertinent to human proteins. This article presents an overview of the database and the data integration process. We also lay out the key future directions of neXtProt that we consider the necessary steps to make neXtProt the one-stop-shop for all research projects focusing on human proteins. PMID:22139911

  1. Mitochondrial Protein Import and Human Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, James A.; Mark Payne, R.

    2009-01-01

    The targeting and assembly of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins are essential processes because the energy supply of humans is dependent upon the proper functioning of mitochondria. Defective import of mitochondrial proteins can arise from mutations in the targeting signals within precursor proteins, from mutations that disrupt the proper functioning of the import machinery, or from deficiencies in the chaperones involved in the proper folding and assembly of proteins once they are imported. Defects in these steps of import have been shown to lead to oxidative stress, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic disorders. In addition, protein import into mitochondria has been found to be a dynamically regulated process that varies in response to conditions such as oxidative stress, aging, drug treatment, and exercise. This review focuses on how mitochondrial protein import affects human health and disease. PMID:17300922

  2. Human protein reference database as a discovery resource for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J. Daniel; Kristiansen, Troels Z.; Amanchy, Ramars; Surendranath, Vineeth; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T. K. B.; Chandrika, K. N.; Deshpande, Nandan; Suresh, Shubha; Rashmi, B. P.; Shanker, K.; Padma, N.; Niranjan, Vidya; Harsha, H. C.; Talreja, Naveen; Vrushabendra, B. M.; Ramya, M. A.; Yatish, A. J.; Joy, Mary; Shivashankar, H. N.; Kavitha, M. P.; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R.; Chandran, Sreenath; Mohan, Sujatha; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Prasad, C. K.; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2004-01-01

    The rapid pace at which genomic and proteomic data is being generated necessitates the development of tools and resources for managing data that allow integration of information from disparate sources. The Human Protein Reference Database (http://www.hprd.org) is a web-based resource based on open source technologies for protein information about several aspects of human proteins including protein–protein interactions, post-translational modifications, enzyme–substrate relationships and disease associations. This information was derived manually by a critical reading of the published literature by expert biologists and through bioinformatics analyses of the protein sequence. This database will assist in biomedical discoveries by serving as a resource of genomic and proteomic information and providing an integrated view of sequence, structure, function and protein networks in health and disease. PMID:14681466

  3. Mineral-bound noncollagenous proteins in archaeological human skeletons.

    PubMed

    Freundorfer, S; Grupe, G; Weickmann, D

    1995-05-01

    Archaeometric approaches to archaelogical human bone also include the extraction, identification and molecular analysis of surviving bone proteins. Due to its abundance as a matrix protein, most studies focus on collagen (e.g. radiocarbon dating). Also, a variety of serum proteins are detectable in excavated skeletons. Very limited knowledge still exists on mineral-bound noncollagenous bone proteins from ancient bones because, in the mature tissue, they occur in trace amounts only. Moreover, post-mortem decomposition is likely to change characteristic features of the molecules. Due to their suggested role as growth and developmental factors, identification and quantification of such proteins should be valuable for both physical anthropology and epidemiology. We present a valid method for the detection of small amounts of surviving mineral-bound noncollagenous proteins in excavated human bones up to 7500 years of age. PMID:7588569

  4. Spaceflight and protein metabolism, with special reference to humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Gaprindashvili, T.

    1994-01-01

    Human space missions have shown that human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Specific changes include a loss of lean body mass, decreased muscle mass in the calves, decreased muscle strength, and changes in plasma proteins and amino acids. The major muscle loss is believed to be associated with the antigravity (postural) muscle. The most significant loss of protein appears to occur during the first month of flight. The etiology is believed to be multifactorial with contributions from disuse atrophy, undernutrition, and a stress type of response. This article reviews the results of American and Russian space missions to investigate this problem in humans, monkeys, and rats. The relationship of the flight results with ground-based models including bedrest for humans and hindlimb unweighting for rats is also discussed. The results suggest that humans adapt to spaceflight much better than either monkeys or rats.

  5. Characterization of mercury-containing protein in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yun, Zhaojun; Li, Lu; Liu, Lihong; He, Bin; Zhao, Xingchen; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-06-01

    Characterization of mercury binding protein in the human body is very important for understanding the metabolism and the mechanism of toxication of ingested mercuric compounds. In this study, mercury-containing protein in human plasma was separated by on-line heart-cutting two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC). This 2D separation system used size exclusion liquid chromatography (SEC) followed by weak anion exchange liquid chromatography (WAX) and the two LC parts were coupled by a six-port valve equipped with a storage loop and controled by the computer. The WAX effluent was determined by both UV detection and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to locate the mercury-containing protein. A unique mercury-containing protein fraction was obtained by 2D-HPLC separation and subsequently identified by HPLC coupled with linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC-LTQ-FT). The database search confirmed that the mercury-containing protein in the human plasma is human serum albumin (HSA). The stoichiometry and thermodyamics interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) with HSA was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and two binding types were observed. Mercury-containing protein in human plasma was separated and identified in the present study and it is important for understanding the metabolism of mercury in the human body. PMID:23748885

  6. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Lamanda, Andreas; Cheaib, Zeinab; Turgut, Melek Dilek; Lussi, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum) of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16%) between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate) staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s) belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva. PMID:17327922

  7. Human plasma protein N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Florent; Reiding, Karli R; Jansen, Bas C; Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Bondt, Albert; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant and complex protein modification, and can have a profound structural and functional effect on the conjugate. The oligosaccharide fraction is recognized to be involved in multiple biological processes, and to affect proteins physical properties, and has consequentially been labeled a critical quality attribute of biopharmaceuticals. Additionally, due to recent advances in analytical methods and analysis software, glycosylation is targeted in the search for disease biomarkers for early diagnosis and patient stratification. Biofluids such as saliva, serum or plasma are of great use in this regard, as they are easily accessible and can provide relevant glycosylation information. Thus, as the assessment of protein glycosylation is becoming a major element in clinical and biopharmaceutical research, this review aims to convey the current state of knowledge on the N-glycosylation of the major plasma glycoproteins alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, antithrombin-III, apolipoprotein B-100, apolipoprotein D, apolipoprotein F, beta-2-glycoprotein 1, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG, IgM, haptoglobin, hemopexin, histidine-rich glycoprotein, kininogen-1, serotransferrin, vitronectin, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein. In addition, the less abundant immunoglobulins D and E are included because of their major relevance in immunology and biopharmaceutical research. Where available, the glycosylation is described in a site-specific manner. In the discussion, we put the glycosylation of individual proteins into perspective and speculate how the individual proteins may contribute to a total plasma N-glycosylation profile determined at the released glycan level. PMID:26555091

  8. Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuliang; Sedwick, David; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11 which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs. PMID:25263441

  9. Systems Proteomics View of the Endogenous Human Claudin Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Koval, Michael; Ranganathan, Shoba; Fanayan, Susan; Hancock, William S; Lundberg, Emma K; Beavis, Ronald C; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; McQuade, Leon; Kelleher, Neil L; Baker, Mark S

    2016-02-01

    Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein-protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation. PMID:26680015

  10. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes against the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, A; Egan, J E; Houghten, R A; Sadoff, J C; Hoffman, S L

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of malaria sporozoites protect against malaria in rodents. Although there is interest in developing human vaccines that induce CTL against the Plasmodium falciparum CS protein, humans have never been shown to produce CTL against any Plasmodium species protein or other parasite protein. We report that when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three of four volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites were stimulated in vitro with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the P. falciparum CS protein or a peptide including only amino acids 368-390 of the P. falciparum CS protein [CS-(368-390)], the PBMC lysed autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells transfected with the P. falciparum CS protein gene or incubated with CS-(368-390) tricosapeptide. Activity was antigen specific, genetically restricted, and dependent on CD8+ T cells. In one volunteer, seven peptides reflecting amino acids 311-400 were tested, and, as in B10.BR mice, CTL activity was only associated with the CS-(368-390) peptide. Development of an assay for studying human CTL against the CS and other malaria proteins and a method for constructing target cells by direct gene transfection provide a foundation for studying the role of CTL in protection against malaria. PMID:1707538

  11. LGI Proteins and Epilepsy in Human and Animals.

    PubMed

    Pakozdy, A; Patzl, M; Zimmermann, L; Jokinen, T S; Glantschnigg, U; Kelemen, A; Hasegawa, D

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) protein was first thought to have a suppressor effect in the formation of some cancers. Developments in physiology and medicine made it possible to characterize the function of the LGI protein family and its crucial role in different conditions more precisely. These proteins play an important role in synaptic transmission, and dysfunction may cause hyperexcitability. Genetic mutation of LGI1 was confirmed to be the cause of autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy in humans. The LGI2 mutation was identified in benign familial juvenile epilepsy in Lagotto Romagnolo (LR) dogs. Cats with familial spontaneous temporal lobe epilepsy have been reported, and the etiology might be associated with LGI protein family dysfunction. In addition, an autoimmune reaction against LGI1 was detected in humans and cats with limbic encephalitis. These advances prompted a review of LGI protein function and its role in different seizure disorders. PMID:26032921

  12. Induction of Mycobacterium avium proteins upon infection of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Brunori, Lara; Giannoni, Federico; Bini, Luca; Liberatori, Sabrina; Frota, Cristiane; Jenner, Peter; Thoresen, Ove Fredrik; Orefici, Graziella; Fattorini, Lanfranco

    2004-10-01

    Induction of Mycobacterium avium proteins labelled with [35S]methionine and mRNAs upon infection of the human macrophage cell line THP-1 was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. M. avium overexpressed proteins within the macrophages that are involved in fatty acids metabolism (FadE2, FixA), cell wall synthesis (KasA), and protein synthesis (EF-tu). The correlation of differential protein and mRNA expression varied between good and no correlation. Overall, these four proteins may be involved in the adaptation and survival of M. avium within human macrophages. PMID:15378697

  13. Deep Conservation of Human Protein Tandem Repeats within the Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, Elke; Gascuel, Olivier; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are a major element of protein sequences in all domains of life. They are particularly abundant in mammals, where by conservative estimates one in three proteins contain a TR. High generation-scale duplication and deletion rates were reported for nucleic TR units. However, it is not known whether protein TR units can also be frequently lost or gained providing a source of variation for rapid adaptation of protein function, or alternatively, tend to have conserved TR unit configurations over long evolutionary times. To obtain a systematic picture, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of the mode of evolution for human protein TRs. For this purpose, we propose a novel method for the detection of orthologous TRs based on circular profile hidden Markov models. For all detected TRs, we reconstructed bispecies TR unit phylogenies across 61 eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Moreover, we performed additional analyses to correlate functional and structural annotations of human TRs with their mode of evolution. Surprisingly, we find that the vast majority of human TRs are ancient, with TR unit number and order preserved intact since distant speciation events. For example, ≥61% of all human TRs have been strongly conserved at least since the root of all mammals, approximately 300 Ma. Further, we find no human protein TR that shows evidence for strong recent duplications and deletions. The results are in contrast to the high generation-scale mutability of nucleic TRs. Presumably, most protein TRs fold into stable and conserved structures that are indispensable for the function of the TR-containing protein. All of our data and results are available for download from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/TRE. PMID:24497029

  14. Detection of protein C activation in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, K A; Kass, B L; Beeler, D L; Rosenberg, R D

    1984-01-01

    We have developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the dodecapeptide that is liberated from protein C when this zymogen is activated by thrombin bound to thrombomodulin present on the vascular endothelium. The protein C activation peptide (PCP) was synthesized using the solid-phase method of Merrifield. Antisera were raised in rabbits to the synthetic analogue coupled to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. The antibody population obtained was used together with a 125I-labeled tyrosinated ligand and various concentrations of unlabeled PCP to construct a double antibody RIA capable of measuring as little as 10 pM of this component. We have established that the synthetic dodecapeptide has the same immunoreactivity as the native peptide and that the reactivity of protein C is less than 1/2,000 that of PCP on a molar basis. The extremely low levels of peptide in normal individuals as well as the nonspecific contributions of plasma constituents to the immunoreactive signal, necessitated the development of a procedure by which the PCP could be reproducibly extracted from plasma and concentrated approximately 20-fold. This methodology permitted us to demonstrate that the plasma PCP levels in 17 normal donors averaged 6.47 pM, and that elevations up to 180 pM were observed in individuals with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. The validity of these measurements of protein C activation is supported by the fact that, in both of these situations, the RIA signal migrates on reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography in a manner identical to that of the native dodecapeptide. We have also noted that the mean PCP concentration in seven patients fully anticoagulated with warfarin averaged 2.61 pM. Our studies also show that PCP is cleared from the plasma of primates with a t1/2 of approximately 5 min. Given that the t1/2 of activated protein C is estimated to be 10-15 min, the latter enzyme appears to exert its effects on the activated cofactors of the

  15. Proteins associated with human parainfluenza virus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Jambou, R C; Elango, N; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The polypeptides associated with human parainfluenza virus type 3 were identified. Five proteins were present in detergent- and salt-resistant viral cores. Of these, three proteins designated NP0, NP1, and NP2 of 68,000, 58,000, and 52,000 daltons, respectively, were stably associated with 50S RNA in CsCl gradient-purified nucleocapsids. The amounts of NP1 and NP2 were variable, and these proteins were shown to be structurally related to the major nucleocapsid protein (NP0) by partial Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease mapping. The other core proteins included a 240K protein designated L (candidate for the viral polymerase) and an 84K protein designated as the phosphoprotein (P) on the basis of a predominant incorporation of Pi. The viral envelope had four prominent proteins (72, 53, 40, and 12K) under reducing conditions of electrophoresis. The 72 and 53K proteins were specifically labeled with [3H]glucosamine and [3H]mannose. When sulfhydryl reagents were removed, a new 62K protein was visualized in place of the 72, 53, and 12K proteins. The 53 and 12K proteins were interpreted to be the two subunits (F1 and F2) of the fusion protein, and the 72K protein was designated as the HN (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase) glycoprotein. The unglycosylated 40K protein represented the viral matrix protein (M). Immunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates with rabbit hyperimmune antiserum against purified virus confirmed the viral origin of these polypeptides. Images PMID:2993658

  16. Multiple protein-protein interactions converging on the Prp38 protein during activation of the human spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Tonio; Ulrich, Alexander K C; Apelt, Luise; Will, Cindy L; Bartlick, Natascha; Seeger, Martin; Weber, Gert; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2016-02-01

    Spliceosomal Prp38 proteins contain a conserved amino-terminal domain, but only higher eukaryotic orthologs also harbor a carboxy-terminal RS domain, a hallmark of splicing regulatory SR proteins. We show by crystal structure analysis that the amino-terminal domain of human Prp38 is organized around three pairs of antiparallel α-helices and lacks similarities to RNA-binding domains found in canonical SR proteins. Instead, yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that the amino-terminal domain is a versatile protein-protein interaction hub that possibly binds 12 other spliceosomal proteins, most of which are recruited at the same stage as Prp38. By quantitative, alanine surface-scanning two-hybrid screens and biochemical analyses we delineated four distinct interfaces on the Prp38 amino-terminal domain. In vitro interaction assays using recombinant proteins showed that Prp38 can bind at least two proteins simultaneously via two different interfaces. Addition of excess Prp38 amino-terminal domain to in vitro splicing assays, but not of an interaction-deficient mutant, stalled splicing at a precatalytic stage. Our results show that human Prp38 is an unusual SR protein, whose amino-terminal domain is a multi-interface protein-protein interaction platform that might organize the relative positioning of other proteins during splicing. PMID:26673105

  17. Human Proteinpedia enables sharing of human protein data

    SciTech Connect

    Mathivanan, Suresh; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ahn, Natalie G.; Alexandre, Hainard; Amanchy, Ramars; Andrews, Philip C.; Bader, Joel S.; Balgley, Brian M.; Bantscheff, Marcus; Bennett, Keiryn; Bjorling, Erik; Blagoev, Blagoy; Bose , Ron; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Burlingame, Alma S.; Bustelo, Xos R.; Cagney, Gerard; Cantin, Greg T; Cardasis, Helene L; Celis, Julio E; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chu, Feixia; Cole, Phillip A.; Costello, Catherine E; Cotter , Robert J.; Crockett, David; DeLany , James P.; De Marzo, Angelo M; DeSouza, Leroi V; Deutsch, Eric W.; Dransfield , Eric; Drewes , Gerard; Droit , Arnaud; Dunn, Michael; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo; Ewing, Rob M.; Van Eyk , Jennifer; Faca , Vitor; Falkner , Jayson; Fang, Xiangming; Fenselau , Catherine; Figeys , Daniel; Gagne , Pierre; Gelfi , Cecilia; Gevaert , Kris; Gimble , Jeffrey; Gnad , Florian; Goel, Renu; Gromov , Pavel; Hanash, Samir M.; Hancock, William S.; Harsha , HC; Hart , Gerald; Faith , Hays; He , Fuchu; Hebbar , Prashantha; Helsens , Kenny; Hermeking , Heiko; Hide , Winston; Hjerno, Karin; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Hofmann, Oliver; Horn , David M.; Hruban , Ralph H.; Ibarrola , Nieves; James , Peter; Jensen , Ole N.; Jensen, Pia H.; Jung , Peter; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Kheterpal , Indu; Kikuno , Reiko; Korf, Ulrike; Korner, Roman; Kuster, Bernhard; Kwon , Min-Seok; Lee , Hyoung-Joo; Lee , Young - Jin; Lefevre , Michael; Lehvaslaiho, Minna; Lescuyer, Pierre; Levander, Fredrik; Lim, Megan S.; Lobke, Christian; Loo, Joseph; Mann, Matthias; Martens , Lennart; Martinez-Heredia, Juan; McComb, Mark E.; McRedmond , James; Mehrle, Alexander; Menon, Rajasree; Miller, Christine A.; Mischak, Harald; Mohan, S Sujatha; Mohmood , Riaz; Molina , Henrik; Moran , Michael F.; Morgan, James D.; Moritz , Robert; Morzel, Martine; Muddiman, David C.; Nalli , Anuradha; Navarro, J. D.; Neubert , Thomas A.; Ohara , Osamu; Oliva, Rafael; Omenn, Gilbert; Oyama , Masaaki; Paik, Young-Ki; Pennington , Kyla; Pepperkok, Rainer; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Poirier, Guy G.; Prasad, T S Keshava; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rahiman , B Abdul; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Ramachandra , Y L; Rice, Robert H.; Rick , Jens; Ronnholm , Ragna H.; Salonen , Johanna; Sanchez , Jean - Charles; Sayd , Thierry; Seshi, Beerelli; Shankari, Kripa; Sheng , Shi Jun; Shetty , Vivekananda; Shivakumar, K.; Simpson, Richard J.; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Siu , K W Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Richard D.; States, David J.; Sugano, Sumio; Sullivan , Matthew; Superti - Furga, Giulio; Takatalo , Maarit; Thongboonkerd , Visith; Trinidad , Jonathan C.; Uhlen , Mathias; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Vasilescu , Julian; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Vidal - Taboada, Jose - Manuel; Vihinen, Mauno; Wait , Robin; Wang, Xiaoyue; Wiemann, Stefan; Wu , Billy; Xu, Tao; Yates, John R.; Zhong, Jun; Zhou, Ming; Zhu, Yunping; Zurbig, Petra; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-02-01

    Proteomic technologies, such as yeast twohybrid, mass spectrometry (MS), protein/ peptide arrays and fluorescence microscopy, yield multi-dimensional data sets, which are often quite large and either not published or published as supplementary information that is not easily searchable. Without a system in place for standardizing and sharing data, it is not fruitful for the biomedical community to contribute these types of data to centralized repositories. Even more difficult is the annotation and display of pertinent information in the context of the corresponding proteins. Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia that anyone can edit, has already proven quite successful1 and can be used as a model for sharing biological data. However, the need for experimental evidence, data standardization and ownership of data creates scientific obstacles.

  18. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Human Coronavirus NL63

    PubMed Central

    Zuwała, Kaja; Golda, Anna; Kabala, Wojciech; Burmistrz, Michał; Zdzalik, Michal; Nowak, Paulina; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Florek, Dominik; Zeglen, Sławomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV. PMID:25700263

  19. Development of a full-length human protein production pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin; Petritis, Brianne; Sau, Sujay; Rauf, Femina; Gaskin, Michael; Ober-Reynolds, Benjamin; Mineyev, Irina; Magee, Mitch; Chaput, John; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    There are many proteomic applications that require large collections of purified protein, but parallel production of large numbers of different proteins remains a very challenging task. To help meet the needs of the scientific community, we have developed a human protein production pipeline. Using high-throughput (HT) methods, we transferred the genes of 31 full-length proteins into three expression vectors, and expressed the collection as N-terminal HaloTag fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and two commercial cell-free (CF) systems, wheat germ extract (WGE) and HeLa cell extract (HCE). Expression was assessed by labeling the fusion proteins specifically and covalently with a fluorescent HaloTag ligand and detecting its fluorescence on a LabChip® GX microfluidic capillary gel electrophoresis instrument. This automated, HT assay provided both qualitative and quantitative assessment of recombinant protein. E. coli was only capable of expressing 20% of the test collection in the supernatant fraction with ≥20 μg yields, whereas CF systems had ≥83% success rates. We purified expressed proteins using an automated HaloTag purification method. We purified 20, 33, and 42% of the test collection from E. coli, WGE, and HCE, respectively, with yields ≥1 μg and ≥90% purity. Based on these observations, we have developed a triage strategy for producing full-length human proteins in these three expression systems. PMID:24806540

  20. Molecular interactions of graphene oxide with human blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenry, Affa Affb Affc; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and human blood plasma proteins. To gain an insight into the bio-physico-chemical activity of GO in biological and biomedical applications, we performed a series of biophysical assays to quantify the molecular interactions between GO with different lateral size distributions and the three essential human blood plasma proteins. We elucidate the various aspects of the GO-protein interactions, particularly, the adsorption, binding kinetics and equilibrium, and conformational stability, through determination of quantitative parameters, such as GO-protein association constants, binding cooperativity, and the binding-driven protein structural changes. We demonstrate that the molecular interactions between GO and plasma proteins are significantly dependent on the lateral size distribution and mean lateral sizes of the GO nanosheets and their subtle variations may markedly influence the GO-protein interactions. Consequently, we propose the existence of size-dependent molecular interactions between GO nanosheets and plasma proteins, and importantly, the presence of specific critical mean lateral sizes of GO nanosheets in achieving very high association and fluorescence quenching efficiency of the plasma proteins. We anticipate that this work will provide a basis for the design of graphene-based and other related nanomaterials for a plethora of biological and biomedical applications.

  1. Proteome-scale purification of human proteins from bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Pascal; Hu, Yanhui; Shen, Binghua; Halleck, Allison; Koundinya, Malvika; Harlow, Ed; LaBaer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    The completion of the human genome project and the development of high-throughput approaches herald a dramatic acceleration in the pace of biological research. One of the most compelling next steps will be learning the functional roles of all proteins. Achievement of this goal depends in part on the rapid expression and isolation of proteins at large scale. We exploited recombinational cloning to facilitate the development of methods for the high-throughput purification of human proteins. cDNAs were introduced into a master vector from which they could be rapidly transferred into a variety of protein expression vectors for further analysis. A test set of 32 sequence-verified human cDNAs of various sizes and activities was moved into four different expression vectors encoding different affinity-purification tags. By means of an automatable 2-hr protein purification procedure, all 128 proteins were purified and subsequently characterized for yield, purity, and steps at which losses occurred. Under denaturing conditions when the His6 tag was used, 84% of samples were purified. Under nondenaturing conditions, both the glutathione S-transferase and maltose-binding protein tags were successful in 81% of samples. The developed methods were applied to a larger set of 336 randomly selected cDNAs. Sixty percent of these proteins were successfully purified under denaturing conditions and 82% of these under nondenaturing conditions. A relational database, FLEXProt, was built to compare properties of proteins that were successfully purified and proteins that were not. We observed that some domains in the Pfam database were found almost exclusively in proteins that were successfully purified and thus may have predictive character. PMID:11880620

  2. Exceptional overproduction of a functional human membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Nyblom, Maria; Oberg, Fredrik; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Hallgren, Karin; Findlay, Heather; Wikström, Jennie; Karlsson, Anders; Hansson, Orjan; Booth, Paula J; Bill, Roslyn M; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2007-11-01

    Eukaryotic--especially human--membrane protein overproduction remains a major challenge in biochemistry. Heterologously overproduced and purified proteins provide a starting point for further biochemical, biophysical and structural studies, and the lack of sufficient quantities of functional membrane proteins is frequently a bottleneck hindering this. Here, we report exceptionally high production levels of a correctly folded and crystallisable recombinant human integral membrane protein in its active form; human aquaporin 1 (hAQP1) has been heterologously produced in the membranes of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. After solubilisation and a two step purification procedure, at least 90 mg hAQP1 per liter of culture is obtained. Water channel activity of this purified hAQP1 was verified by reconstitution into proteoliposomes and performing stopped-flow vesicle shrinkage measurements. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of hAQP1 in crude membrane preparations, and also from purified protein reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Furthermore, crystallisation screens yielded diffraction quality crystals of untagged recombinant hAQP1. This study illustrates the power of the yeast P. pastoris as a host to produce exceptionally high yields of a functionally active, human integral membrane protein for subsequent functional and structural characterization. PMID:17869538

  3. Antibody Response to Cryptococcus neoformans Proteins in Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin-Chi; Goldman, David L.; Doering, Tamara L.; Pirofski, Liise-anne; Casadevall, Arturo

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence and specificity of serum antibodies to Cryptococcus neoformans proteins was studied in mice and rats with experimental infection, in individuals with or without a history of potential laboratory exposure to C. neoformans, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals who developed cryptococcosis, in matched samples from HIV-positive individuals who did not develop cryptococcosis, and in HIV-negative individuals. Rodents had little or no serum antibody reactive with C. neoformans proteins prior to infection. The intensity and specificity of the rodent antibody response were dependent on the species, the mouse strain, and the viability of the inoculum. All humans had serum antibodies reactive with C. neoformans proteins regardless of the potential exposure, the HIV infection status, or the subsequent development of cryptococcosis. Our results indicate (i) a high prevalence of antibodies reactive with C. neoformans proteins in the sera of rodents after cryptococcal infection and in humans with or without HIV infection; (ii) qualitative and quantitative differences in the antibody profiles of HIV-positive individuals; and (iii) similarities and differences between humans, mice, and rats with respect to the specificity of the antibodies reactive with C. neoformans proteins. The results are consistent with the view that C. neoformans infections are common in human populations, and the results have implications for the development of vaccination strategies against cryptococcosis. PMID:10225877

  4. Human CAP18: a novel antimicrobial lipopolysaccharide-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Hirata, M; Balint, R F; Lee, J; Zhong, J; Wright, S C

    1995-01-01

    CAP18 (18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein) is a protein originally identified and purified from rabbit leukocytes on the basis of its capacity to bind and inhibit various activities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we report the cloning of human CAP18 and characterize the anti-LPS activity of the C-terminal fragment. Oligonucleotide probes designed from the rabbit CAP18 cDNA were used to identify human CAP18 from a bone marrow cDNA library. The cDNA encodes a protein composed of a 30-amino-acid signal peptide, a 103-amino-acid N-terminal domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain of 37 amino acids homologous to the LPS-binding antimicrobial domain of rabbit CAP18, designated CAP18(104-140). A human CAP18-specific antiserum was generated by using CAP18 expressed as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein. Western blots (immunoblots) with this antiserum showed specific expression of human CAP18 in granulocytes. Synthetic human CAP18(104-140) and a more active truncated fragment, CAP18(104-135), were shown to (i) bind to erythrocytes coated with diverse strains of LPS, (ii) inhibit LPS-induced release of nitric oxide from macrophages, (iii) inhibit LPS-induced generation of tissue factor, and (iv) protect mice from LPS lethality. CAP18(104-140) may have therapeutic utility for conditions associated with elevated concentrations of LPS. PMID:7890387

  5. MATERNAL PROTEIN HOMEOSTASIS AND MILK PROTEIN SYNTHESIS DURING FEEDING AND FASTING IN HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about amino acid (aa) and protein metabolism in lactating women. We hypothesized: 1) aa sources other than the plasma acid pool provide substrate for milk protein synthesis in humans; and 2) if albumin was one such source, then albumin fractional synthesis rate (FSR) is higher in th...

  6. Development of Human Protein Reference Database as an Initial Platform for Approaching Systems Biology in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J. Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars; Kristiansen, Troels Z.; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Surendranath, Vineeth; Niranjan, Vidya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T.K.B.; Gronborg, Mads; Ibarrola, Nieves; Deshpande, Nandan; Shanker, K.; Shivashankar, H.N.; Rashmi, B.P.; Ramya, M.A.; Zhao, Zhixing; Chandrika, K.N.; Padma, N.; Harsha, H.C.; Yatish, A.J.; Kavitha, M.P.; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Suresh, Shubha; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R.; Chandran, Sreenath; Krishna, Subhalakshmi; Joy, Mary; Anand, Sanjeev K.; Madavan, V.; Joseph, Ansamma; Wong, Guang W.; Schiemann, William P.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Huang, Lily; Khosravi-Far, Roya; Steen, Hanno; Tewari, Muneesh; Ghaffari, Saghi; Blobe, Gerard C.; Dang, Chi V.; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Pevsner, Jonathan; Jensen, Ole N.; Roepstorff, Peter; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Hamosh, Ada; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2003-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, disease associations, tissue expression, and subcellular localization were extracted from the literature for a nonredundant set of 2750 human proteins. Almost all the information was obtained manually by biologists who read and interpreted >300,000 published articles during the annotation process. This database, which has an intuitive query interface allowing easy access to all the features of proteins, was built by using open source technologies and will be freely available at http://www.hprd.org to the academic community. This unified bioinformatics platform will be useful in cataloging and mining the large number of proteomic interactions and alterations that will be discovered in the postgenomic era. PMID:14525934

  7. Regulation of the retinoblastoma proteins by the human herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Adam J; Kalejta, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that alter the environment of infected cells in order to replicate more efficiently. One way viruses achieve this is by modulating cell cycle progression. The main regulators of progression out of G0, through G1, and into S phase are the members of the retinoblastoma (Rb) family of tumor suppressors. Rb proteins repress the transcription of genes controlled by the E2F transcription factors. Because the expression of E2F-responsive genes is required for cell cycle progression into the S phase, Rb arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1. A number of viral proteins directly target Rb family members for inactivation, presumably to create an environment more hospitable for viral replication. Such viral proteins include the extensively studied oncoproteins E7 (from human papillomavirus), E1A (from adenovirus), and the large T (tumor) antigen (from simian virus 40). Elucidating how these three viral proteins target and inactivate Rb has proven to be an invaluable approach to augment our understanding of both normal cell cycle progression and carcinogenesis. In addition to these proteins, a number of other virally-encoded inactivators of the Rb family have subsequently been identified including a surprising number encoded by human herpesviruses. Here we review how the human herpesviruses modulate Rb function during infection, introduce the individual viral proteins that directly or indirectly target Rb, and speculate about what roles Rb modulation by these proteins may play in viral replication, pathogenesis, and oncogenesis. PMID:19146698

  8. A nuclear protein associated with human cancer cells binds preferentially to a human repetitive DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J. ); Law, M.L.; Puck, T.T. Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver )

    1989-11-01

    A protein (Rp66) of 66 kDa was shown by DNA-binding protein blot assay to bind to a human repetitive DNA sequence (low-repeat sequences; LRS) in each of 10 transformed human cell lines examined. This protein-DNA interaction was not observed in 11 normal human cell cultures or in the Chinese hamster cell line CHO-K1. Gel retardation assay confirmed the specificity of the protein-DNA binding between Rp66 and LRS. In a histiocytic lymphoma human cell line, U937, that can be induced to differentiate in the presence of phorbol ester, this binding disappeared after cell differentiation. These together with other results cited suggest a regulatory role for these repetitive sequences in the human genome, with particular application to cancer.

  9. Assessment of protein domain fusions in human protein interaction networks prediction: application to the human kinetochore model.

    PubMed

    Morilla, Ian; Lees, Jon G; Reid, Adam J; Orengo, Christine; Ranea, Juan A G

    2010-12-31

    In order to understand how biological systems function it is necessary to determine the interactions and associations between proteins. Some proteins, involved in a common biological process and encoded by separate genes in one organism, can be found fused within a single protein chain in other organisms. By detecting these triplets, a functional relationship can be established between the unfused proteins. Here we use a domain fusion prediction method to predict these protein interactions for the human interactome. We observed that gene fusion events are more related to physical interaction between proteins than to other weaker functional relationships such as participation in a common biological pathway. These results suggest that domain fusion is an appropriate method for predicting protein complexes. The most reliable fused domain predictions were used to build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. These predicted PPI network models showed the same topological features as real biological networks and different features from random behaviour. We built the PPI domain fusion sub-network model of the human kinetochore and observed that the majority of the predicted interactions have not yet been experimentally characterised in the publicly available PPI repositories. The study of the human kinetochore domain fusion sub-network reveals undiscovered kinetochore proteins with presumably relevant functions, such as hubs with many connections in the kinetochore sub-network. These results suggest that experimentally hidden regions in the predicted PPI networks contain key functional elements, associated with important functional areas, still undiscovered in the human interactome. Until novel experiments shed light on these hidden regions; domain fusion predictions provide a valuable approach for exploring them. PMID:20851221

  10. Comparative analysis of protein unfoldedness in human housekeeping and non-housekeeping proteins.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Neeraj; Ganapathi, Mythily; Kumar, Kaushal; Dasgupta, Dipayan; Das Sutar, Sushanta Kumar; Dash, Debasis

    2004-11-22

    Absence of any regular structure is increasingly being observed in structural studies of proteins. These disordered regions or random coils, which have been observed under physiological conditions, are indicators of protein plasticity. The wide variety of interactions possible due to the flexibility of these 'natively disordered' regions confers functional advantage to the protein and the organism in general. This concept is underscored by the increasing proportion of intrinsically unstructured proteins seen with the ascension in the complexity of the organisms. The 'natively unfolded/disordered' state of the protein can be predicted utilizing Uversky's or Dunker's algorithm. We utilized Uversky's prediction scheme and based on the unique position of a protein in the charge-hydrophobicity plot, a derived net score was used to predict the overall disorder of the human housekeeping and non-housekeeping proteins. Substantial numbers of proteins in both the classes were predicted to be unfolded. However, comparative genomic analysis of predicted unfolded Homo sapiens proteins with homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus revealed significant increase in unfoldedness in non-housekeeping proteins in comparison with housekeeping proteins. Our analysis in the evolutionary context suggests addition or substitution of amino acid residues which favour unfoldedness in non-housekeeping proteins compared to housekeeping proteins. PMID:15238363

  11. Site-Specific GlcNAcylation of Human Erythrocyte Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zihao; Park, Kyoungsook; Comer, Frank; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.; Saudek, Christopher D.; Hart, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is upregulated in diabetic tissues and plays a role in insulin resistance and glucose toxicity. Here, we investigated the extent of GlcNAcylation on human erythrocyte proteins and compared site-specific GlcNAcylation on erythrocyte proteins from diabetic and normal individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—GlcNAcylated erythrocyte proteins or GlcNAcylated peptides were tagged and selectively enriched by a chemoenzymatic approach and identified by mass spectrometry. The enrichment approach was combined with solid-phase chemical derivatization and isotopic labeling to detect O-GlcNAc modification sites and to compare site-specific O-GlcNAc occupancy levels between normal and diabetic erythrocyte proteins. RESULTS—The enzymes that catalyze the cycling (addition and removal) of O-GlcNAc were detected in human erythrocytes. Twenty-five GlcNAcylated erythrocyte proteins were identified. Protein expression levels were compared between diabetic and normal erythrocytes. Thirty-five O-GlcNAc sites were reproducibly identified, and their site-specific O-GlcNAc occupancy ratios were calculated. CONCLUSIONS—GlcNAcylation is differentially regulated at individual sites on erythrocyte proteins in response to glycemic status. These data suggest not only that site-specific O-GlcNAc levels reflect the glycemic status of an individual but also that O-GlcNAc site occupancy on erythrocyte proteins may be eventually useful as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of diabetes. PMID:18984734

  12. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  13. Exploiting Bacterial Operons To Illuminate Human Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Banci, Lucia; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Organisms from all kingdoms of life use iron-sulfur proteins (FeS-Ps) in a multitude of functional processes. We applied a bioinformatics approach to investigate the human portfolio of FeS-Ps. Sixty-one percent of human FeS-Ps bind Fe4S4 clusters, whereas 39% bind Fe2S2 clusters. However, this relative ratio varies significantly depending on the specific cellular compartment. We compared the portfolio of human FeS-Ps to 12 other eukaryotes and to about 700 prokaryotes. The comparative analysis of the organization of the prokaryotic homologues of human FeS-Ps within operons allowed us to reconstruct the human functional networks involving the conserved FeS-Ps common to prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These functional networks have been maintained during evolution and thus presumably represent fundamental cellular processes. The respiratory chain and the ISC machinery for FeS-P biogenesis are the two conserved processes that involve the majority of human FeS-Ps. Purine metabolism is another process including several FeS-Ps, in which BOLA proteins possibly have a regulatory role. The analysis of the co-occurrence of human FeS-Ps with other proteins highlighted numerous links between the iron-sulfur cluster machinery and the response mechanisms to cell damage, from repair to apoptosis. This relationship probably relates to the production of reactive oxygen species within the biogenesis and degradation of FeS-Ps. PMID:26889782

  14. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Summary AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post translational modification employed by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes and is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method to identify new substrates using protein microarrays, which can significantly expand the list of potential substrates. Here, we describe procedures to detect AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high throughput, and non-radioactive manner. The approach employs high-density protein microarrays fabricated using NAPPA (Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition. The assay can be accomplished within 11 hours. PMID:25881200

  15. Propeptide of human protein C is necessary for. gamma. -carboxylation

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.C.; Rudinski, M.S.; Schach, B.G.; Berkner, K.L.; Kumar, A.A.; Hagen, F.S.; Sprecher, C.A.; Insley, M.Y.; Davie, E.W.

    1987-11-03

    Protein C is one of a family of vitamin K dependent proteins, including blood coagulation factors and bone proteins, that contains ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid. Sequence analysis of the cDNAs for these proteins has revealed the presence of a prepro leader sequence that contains a pre sequence or hydrophobic signal sequence and a propeptide containing a number of highly conserved amino acids. The pre region is removed from the growing polypeptide chain by signal peptidase, while the pro region is subsequently removed from the protein prior to secretion. In the present study, deletion mutants have been constructed in the propeptide region of the cDNA for human protein C, and the cDNAs were then expressed in mammalian cell culture. These deletions included the removal of 4, 9, 12, 15, 16, or 17 amino acids comprising the carboxyl end of the leader sequence of 42 amino acids. The mutant proteins were then examined by Western blotting, barium citrate adsorption and precipitation, amino acid sequence analysis, and biological activity and compared with the native protein present in normal plasma. These experiments have shown that protein C is readily synthesized in mammalian cell cultures, processed, and secreted as a two-chain molecule with biological activity. Furthermore, the pre portion or signal sequence in human protein C is 18 amino acids in length, and the pro portion of the leader sequence is 24 amino acids in length. Also, during biosynthesis and secretion, the amino-terminal region of the propeptide (residues from about -12 through -17) is important for ..gamma..-carboxylation of protein C, while the present data and those of others indicate that the carboxyl-terminal portion of propeptide (residues -1 through -4) is important for the removal of the pro leader sequence by proteolytic processing.

  16. Predicting disease-related genes by topological similarity in human protein-protein interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hu, Ke; Tang, Yi

    2010-08-01

    Predicting genes likely to be involved in human diseases is an important task in bioinformatics field. Nowadays, the accumulation of human protein-protein interactions (PPIs) data provides us an unprecedented opportunity to gain insight into human diseases. In this paper, we adopt the topological similarity in human protein-protein interaction network to predict disease-related genes. As a computational algorithm to speed up the identification of disease-related genes, the topological similarity has substantial advantages over previous topology-based algorithms. First of all, it provides a global measurement of similarity between two vertices. Secondly, quantity which can measure new topological feature has been integrated into the notion of topological similarity. Our method is specially designed for predicting disease-related genes of single disease-gene family. The proposed method is applied to human protein-protein interaction and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) data. The results show a significant enrichment of disease-related genes that are characterized by higher topological similarity than other genes.

  17. Antibody-based Protein Profiling of the Human Chromosome 21*

    PubMed Central

    Uhlén, Mathias; Oksvold, Per; Älgenäs, Cajsa; Hamsten, Carl; Fagerberg, Linn; Klevebring, Daniel; Lundberg, Emma; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Kondo, Tadashi; Sivertsson, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    The Human Proteome Project has been proposed to create a knowledge-based resource based on a systematical mapping of all human proteins, chromosome by chromosome, in a gene-centric manner. With this background, we here describe the systematic analysis of chromosome 21 using an antibody-based approach for protein profiling using both confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry, complemented with transcript profiling using next generation sequencing data. We also describe a new approach for protein isoform analysis using a combination of antibody-based probing and isoelectric focusing. The analysis has identified several genes on chromosome 21 with no previous evidence on the protein level, and the isoform analysis indicates that a large fraction of human proteins have multiple isoforms. A chromosome-wide matrix is presented with status for all chromosome 21 genes regarding subcellular localization, tissue distribution, and molecular characterization of the corresponding proteins. The path to generate a chromosome-specific resource, including integrated data from complementary assay platforms, such as mass spectrometry and gene tagging analysis, is discussed. PMID:22042635

  18. Instability of the biotin-protein bond in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Mock, Nell I; Mock, Donald M

    2004-04-15

    Labeling proteins with biotin offers an alternative to labeling with radioisotopes for pharmacokinetic studies in humans. However, stability of the biotin-protein bond is a critical tacit assumption. Using release of biotin from immunoglobulin G as the outcome, we individually evaluated stability of the biotin label produced by six biotinylation agents: biotin PEO-amine, 5-(biotinamido)-pentylamine, iodoacetyl-LC-biotin, NHS-LC-biotin, sulfo-NHS-LC-biotin, and biotin-LC-hydrazide. Each of the six biotinylated proteins was incubated at room temperature for 4h in human plasma or in phosphate-buffered saline (control). Free biotin was separated from the biotinylated protein by ultrafiltration and quantitated by avidin-binding assay. For each biotinylation reagent, biotin release was significantly increased by plasma (p < 0.0001 vs control by unpaired t test). Moreover, the hydrazide bond was also unstable in buffer. Biotin remaining on the protein was quantitated directly using capture of europium-streptavidin by the immobilized biotinylated immunoglobulin G. Consistent with biotin release data, streptavidin capture was reduced by plasma to 8% of control. We conclude that all of the biotinylating agents produce biotin-protein bonds that are susceptible to hydrolysis by factors present in human plasma; five of six are stable in buffer. PMID:15051531

  19. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  20. Human muscle proteins: analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1983-09-01

    Proteins from single frozen sections of human muscle were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and detected by fluorography or Coomassie Blue staining. The major proteins were identical in different normal muscles obtained from either sex at different ages, and in Duchenne and myotonic dystrophy samples. Congenital myopathy denervation atrophy, polymyositis, and Becker's muscular dystrophy samples, however, showed abnormal myosin light chain compositions, some with a decrease of fast-fiber myosin light chains and others with a decrease of slow-fiber light chains. These protein alterations did not correlate with any specific disease, and may be cause by generalized muscle-fiber damage.

  1. Absolute Quantification of Selected Proteins in the Human Osteoarthritic Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, Mandy J.; Beynon, Robert J.; Clegg, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a loss of extracellular matrix which is driven by catabolic cytokines. Proteomic analysis of the OA cartilage secretome enables the global study of secreted proteins. These are an important class of molecules with roles in numerous pathological mechanisms. Although cartilage studies have identified profiles of secreted proteins, quantitative proteomics techniques have been implemented that would enable further biological questions to be addressed. To overcome this limitation, we used the secretome from human OA cartilage explants stimulated with IL-1β and compared proteins released into the media using a label-free LC-MS/MS-based strategy. We employed QconCAT technology to quantify specific proteins using selected reaction monitoring. A total of 252 proteins were identified, nine were differentially expressed by IL-1 β stimulation. Selected protein candidates were quantified in absolute amounts using QconCAT. These findings confirmed a significant reduction in TIMP-1 in the secretome following IL-1β stimulation. Label-free and QconCAT analysis produced equivocal results indicating no effect of cytokine stimulation on aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, fibromodulin, matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 or plasminogen release. This study enabled comparative protein profiling and absolute quantification of proteins involved in molecular pathways pertinent to understanding the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:24132152

  2. Evaluation of silica nanoparticle binding to major human blood proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Katsutomo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Nagano, Kazuya; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    Nanomaterials are used for various biomedical applications because they are often more effective than conventional materials. Recently, however, it has become clear that the protein corona that forms on the surface of nanomaterials when they make contact with biological fluids, such as blood, influences the pharmacokinetics and biological responses induced by the nanomaterials. Therefore, when evaluating nanomaterial safety and efficacy, it is important to analyze the interaction between nanomaterials and proteins in biological fluids and to evaluate the effects of the protein corona. Here, we evaluated the interaction of silica nanoparticles, a commonly used nanomaterial, with the human blood proteins albumin, transferrin, fibrinogen, and IgG. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the amount of albumin, transferrin, and IgG binding to the silica particles increased as the particle size decreased under conditions where the silica particle mass remained the same. However, under conditions in which the specific surface area remained constant, there were no differences in the binding of human plasma proteins to the silica particles tested, suggesting that the binding of silica particles with human plasma proteins is dependent on the specific surface area of the silica particles. Furthermore, the amount of albumin, transferrin, and IgG binding to silica nanoparticles with a diameter of 70 nm (nSP70) and a functional amino group was lower than that with unmodified nSP70, although there was no difference in the binding between nSP70 with the surface modification of a carboxyl functional group and nSP70. These results suggest that the characteristics of nanomaterials are important for binding with human blood proteins; this information may contribute to the development of safe and effective nanomaterials.

  3. Human SUMO fusion systems enhance protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Haolong; Guan, Wei; Ling, Haili; Wang, Zhiyong; Mu, Tianyang; Shuler, Franklin D; Fang, Xuexun

    2010-10-01

    A major challenge associated with recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is generation of large quantities of soluble, functional protein. Yeast SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier), has been shown to enhance heterologous protein expression and solubility as fusion tag, however, the effects of human SUMOs on protein expression have not been investigated. Here we describe the use of human SUMO1 and SUMO2 as a useful gene fusion technology. Human SUMO1 and SUMO2 fusion expression vectors were constructed and tested in His-tag and ubiquitin fusion expression systems. Two difficult-to-express model proteins, matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP13) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) were fused to the C-terminus of the human SUMO1 and SUMO2 expression vectors. These constructs were expressed in E. coli and evaluation of MMP13 and eGFP expression and solubility was conducted. We found that both SUMO1 and SUMO2 had the ability to enhance the solubility of MMP13 and eGFP, with the SUMO2 tag having a more significant effect. Since fusion tags produce varying quantities of soluble proteins, we assessed the effect of SUMO2 coupled with ubiquitin (Ub). SUMO2-ubiquitin and ubiquitin-SUMO2 fusion expression plasmids were constructed with eGFP as a passenger protein. Following expression in E. coli, both plasmids could improve eGFP expression and solubility similar to the SUMO2 fusion and better than the ubiquitin fusion. The sequential order of SUMO2 and ubiquitin had little effect on expression and solubility of eGFP. Purification of eGFP from the gene fusion product, SUMO2-ubiquitin-eGFP, involved cleavage by a deubiquitinase (Usp2-cc) and Ni-Sepharose column chromatography. The eGFP protein was purified to high homogeneity. In summary, human SUMO1 and SUMO2 are useful gene fusion technologies enhancing the expression, solubility and purification of model heterologous proteins. PMID:20457256

  4. CentrosomeDB: a human centrosomal proteins database

    PubMed Central

    Nogales-Cadenas, Rubén; Abascal, Federico; Díez-Pérez, Javier; Carazo, José María; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Active research on the biology of the centrosome during the past decades has allowed the identification and characterization of many centrosomal proteins. Unfortunately, the accumulated data is still dispersed among heterogeneous sources of information. Here we present centrosome:db, which intends to compile and integrate relevant information related to the human centrosome. We have compiled a set of 383 likely human centrosomal genes and recorded the associated supporting evidences. Centrosome:db offers several perspectives to study the human centrosome including evolution, function and structure. The database contains information on the orthology relationships with other species, including fungi, nematodes, arthropods, urochordates and vertebrates. Predictions of the domain organization of centrosome:db proteins are graphically represented at different sections of the database, including sets of alternative protein isoforms, interacting proteins, groups of orthologs and the homologs identified with blast. Centrosome:db also contains information related to function, gene–disease associations, SNPs and the 3D structure of proteins. Apart from important differences in the coverage of the set of centrosomal genes, our database differentiates from other similar initiatives in the way information is treated and analyzed. Centrosome:db is publicly available at http://centrosome.dacya.ucm.es. PMID:18971254

  5. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, ...

  6. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  7. Human protein atlas and the use of microarray technologies.

    PubMed

    Hober, S; Uhlén, M

    2008-02-01

    Currently one of the most challenging tasks in biological and medical research is to explore and understand the function of all proteins encoded by the genome of an organism. A systematic approach based on the genome sequences is feasible because the full genome of many organisms presently is available and many more are underway. For the production of expression atlases different strategies are used. Early attempts to acquire information about protein expression levels have focused on the analysis of mRNA levels within different tissues and cell types. Recently, novel strategies to focus directly on protein levels have been developed. To assess global protein expression in a systematic and high-throughput manner, methods based on design of specific affinity ligands to recognize the proteins have been presented. By subsequently using these affinity molecules for detection of the corresponding proteins in a wide range of platforms, important information can be gained. This article focuses on strategies to profile protein levels and in particular the human protein atlas initiative and the use of microarray technologies. PMID:18187316

  8. Integrative analysis of human protein, function and disease networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Aiping; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks serve as a powerful tool for unraveling protein functions, disease-gene and disease-disease associations. However, a direct strategy for integrating protein interaction, protein function and diseases is still absent. Moreover, the interrelated relationships among these three levels are poorly understood. Here we present a novel systematic method to integrate protein interaction, function, and disease networks. We first identified topological modules in human protein interaction data using the network topological algorithm (NeTA) we previously developed. The resulting modules were then associated with functional terms using Gene Ontology to obtain functional modules. Finally, disease modules were constructed by associating the modules with OMIM and GWAS. We found that most topological modules have cohesive structure, significant pathway annotations and good modularity. Most functional modules (70.6%) fully cover corresponding topological modules, and most disease modules (88.5%) are fully covered by the corresponding functional modules. Furthermore, we identified several protein modules of interest that we describe in detail, which demonstrate the power of our integrative approach. This approach allows us to link genes, and pathways with their corresponding disorders, which may ultimately help us to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. PMID:26399914

  9. Identification of Cellular Proteins that Interact with Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early Protein 1 by Protein Array Assay

    PubMed Central

    Puerta Martínez, Francisco; Tang, Qiyi

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression during infection is characterized as a sequential process including immediate-early (IE), early (E), and late (L)-stage gene expression. The most abundantly expressed gene at the IE stage of infection is the major IE (MIE) gene that produces IE1 and IE2. IE1 has been the focus of study because it is an important protein, not only for viral gene expression but also for viral replication. It is believed that IE1 plays important roles in viral gene regulation by interacting with cellular proteins. In the current study, we performed protein array assays and identified 83 cellular proteins that interact with IE1. Among them, seven are RNA-binding proteins that are important in RNA processing; more than half are nuclear proteins that are involved in gene regulations. Tumorigenesis-related proteins are also found to interact with IE1, implying that the role of IE1 in tumorigenesis might need to be reevaluated. Unexpectedly, cytoplasmic proteins, such as Golgi autoantigen and GGA1 (both related to the Golgi trafficking protein), are also found to be associated with IE1. We also employed a coimmunoprecipitation assay to test the interactions of IE1 and some of the proteins identified in the protein array assays and confirmed that the results from the protein array assays are reliable. Many of the proteins identified by the protein array assay have not been previously reported. Therefore, the functions of the IE1-protein interactions need to be further explored in the future. PMID:24385082

  10. An extensive library of surrogate peptides for all human proteins.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yassene; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting the most appropriate surrogate peptides to represent a target protein is a major component of experimental design in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM). Our software PeptidePicker with its v-score remains distinctive in its approach of integrating information about the proteins, their tryptic peptides, and the suitability of these peptides for MRM that is available online in UniProtKB, NCBI's dbSNP, ExPASy, PeptideAtlas, PRIDE, and GPMDB. The scoring algorithm reflects our "best knowledge" for selecting candidate peptides for MRM, based on the uniqueness of the peptide in the targeted proteome, its physiochemical properties, and whether it has previously been observed. Here we present an updated approach where we have already compiled a list of all possible surrogate peptides of the human proteome. Using our stringent selection criteria, the list includes 165k suitable MRM peptides covering 17k proteins of the human reviewed proteins in UniProtKB. Compared to average of 2-4min per protein for retrieving and integrating the information, the precompiled list includes all peptides available instantly. This allows a more cohesive and faster design of a multiplexed MRM experiment and provides insights into evidence for a protein's existence. We will keep this list up-to-date as proteomics data repositories continue to grow. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics. PMID:26232110

  11. Nuclear and nucleolar targeting of human ribosomal protein S6.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C; Lipsius, E; Kruppa, J

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric proteins were constructed to define the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of human ribosomal protein S6. The complete cDNA sequence, different cDNA fragments and oligonucleotides of the human ribosomal proteins S6, respectively, were joined to the 5' end of the entire LacZ gene of Escherichia coli by using recombinant techniques. The hybrid genes were transfected into L cells, transiently expressed, and the intracellular location of the fusion proteins was determined by their beta-galactosidase activity. Three NLSs were identified in the C-terminal half of the S6 protein. Deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that a single NLS is sufficient for targeting the corresponding S6-beta-galactosidase chimera into the nucleus. Removal of all three putative NLSs completely blocked the nuclear import of the resulting S6-beta-galactosidase fusion protein, which instead became evenly distributed in the cytoplasm. Chimeras containing deletion mutants of S6 with at least one single NLS or unmodified S6 accumulated in the nucleolus. Analysis of several constructs reveals the existence of a specific domain that is essential but not sufficient for nucleolar accumulation of S6. Images PMID:8590812

  12. Human testis expresses a specific poly(A)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Féral, C; Guellaën, G; Pawlak, A

    2001-05-01

    In testis mRNA stability and translation initiation are extensively under the control of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABP). Here we have cloned a new human testis-specific PABP (PABP3) of 631 amino acids (70.1 kDa) with 92.5% identical residues to the ubiquitous PABP1. A northern blot of multiple human tissues hybridised with PABP3- and PABP1-specific oligonucleotide probes revealed two PABP3 mRNAs (2.1 and 2.5 kb) detected only in testis, whereas PABP1 mRNA (3.2 kb) was present in all tested tissues. In human adult testis, PABP3 mRNA expression was restricted to round spermatids, whereas PABP1 was expressed in these cells as well as in pachytene spermatocytes. PABP3-specific antibodies identified a protein of 70 kDa in human testis extracts. This protein binds poly(A) with a slightly lower affinity as compared to PABP1. The human PABP3 gene is intronless with a transcription start site 61 nt upstream from the initiation codon. A sequence of 256 bp upstream from the transcription start site drives the promoter activity of PABP3 and its tissue-specific expression. The expression of PABP3 might be a way to bypass PABP1 translational repression and to produce the amount of PABP needed for active mRNA translation in spermatids. PMID:11328870

  13. Annexin A6 protein is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elisabeth M; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Pohl, Rebekka; Wanninger, Josef; Hoy, Andrew J; Grewal, Thomas; Eisinger, Kristina; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Liebisch, Gerhard; Weiss, Thomas S; Buechler, Christa

    2016-07-01

    Annexin A6 (AnxA6) is a lipid-binding protein highly expressed in the liver, regulating cholesterol homeostasis and signaling pathways with a role in liver physiology. Here, we analyzed whether hepatic AnxA6 levels are affected by pathological conditions that are associated with liver dysfunction and liver injury. AnxA6 levels in the fatty liver of mice fed a high-fat diet, in ob/ob and db/db animals and in human fatty liver are comparable to controls. Similarly, AnxA6 levels appear unaffected in murine nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and human liver fibrosis. Accordingly, adiponectin, lysophosphatidylcholine, palmitate, and TGFbeta, all of which have a role in liver injury, do not affect AnxA6 expression in human hepatocytes. Likewise, adiponectin and IL8 do not alter AnxA6 levels in primary human hepatic stellate cells. However, in hepatic tumors of 18 patients, AnxA6 protein levels are substantially reduced compared to nontumorous tissues. AnxA6 mRNA is even increased in the tumors suggesting that posttranscriptional mechanisms are involved herein. Lipidomic analysis shows trends toward elevated cholesteryl ester and sphingomyelin in the tumor samples, yet the ratio of tumor to nontumorous AnxA6 does not correlate with these lipids. The current study shows that AnxA6 is specifically reduced in human hepatocellular carcinoma suggesting a role of this protein in hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27334756

  14. Unique expression of cytoskeletal proteins in human soft palate muscles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Farhan; Berggren, Diana; Holmlund, Thorbjörn; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Stål, Per

    2016-03-01

    The human oropharyngeal muscles have a unique anatomy with diverse and intricate functions. To investigate if this specialization is also reflected in the cytoarchitecture of muscle fibers, intermediate filament proteins and the dystrophin-associated protein complex have been analyzed in two human palate muscles, musculus uvula (UV) and musculus palatopharyngeus (PP), with immunohistochenmical and morphological techniques. Human limb muscles were used as reference. The findings show that the soft palate muscle fibers have a cytoskeletal architecture that differs from the limb muscles. While all limb muscles showed immunoreaction for a panel of antibodies directed against different domains of cytoskeletal proteins desmin and dystrophin, a subpopulation of palate muscle fibers lacked or had a faint immunoreaction for desmin (UV 11.7% and PP 9.8%) and the C-terminal of the dystrophin molecule (UV 4.2% and PP 6.4%). The vast majority of these fibers expressed slow contractile protein myosin heavy chain I. Furthermore, an unusual staining pattern was also observed in these fibers for β-dystroglycan, caveolin-3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase nNOS, which are all membrane-linking proteins associated with the dystrophin C-terminus. While the immunoreaction for nNOS was generally weak or absent, β-dystroglycan and caveolin-3 showed a stronger immunostaining. The absence or a low expression of cytoskeletal proteins otherwise considered ubiquitous and important for integration and contraction of muscle cells indicate a unique cytoarchitecture designed to meet the intricate demands of the upper airway muscles. It can be concluded that a subgroup of muscle fibers in the human soft palate appears to have special biomechanical properties, and their unique cytoarchitecture must be taken into account while assessing function and pathology in oropharyngeal muscles. PMID:26597319

  15. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  16. Protein-protein interaction between ezrin and p65 in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, R; Li, F X; Shao, W F; Wen, Q S; Yu, X R; Xiong, J B

    2016-01-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the co-localization and protein-protein interactions between ezrin and p65 in human breast cancer cells. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS) was used to uncover novel protein interactions with ezrin in MDA-MB-231 cells. Endogenous co-immunoprecipitation was used to validate protein-protein interactions between ezrin and p65 in MDA-MB-231. Exogenous interactions between ezrin and p65 were validated in MDA-MB-231 cells via Flag-ezrin and HA-p65 co-transfection and followed by co-immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence staining was used to visualize ezrin and p65 co-localization in MDA-MB-231. LCMS results showed that there were 1000 proteins interacting with ezrin in MDA-MB-231 cells. Ezrin and p65 interactions were confirmed with both endogenous and exogenous methods. We were also able to visualize ezrin and p65 co-localization in MDA-MB-231. In summary, we found protein-protein interactions between Ezrin and p65 in human breast cancer cells. PMID:27420986

  17. Dietary protein intake impacts human skeletal muscle protein fractional synthetic rates after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Douglas R; Pikosky, Matthew A; Gaine, P Courtney; Martin, William; Wolfe, Robert R; Tipton, Kevin D; Maclean, David; Maresh, Carl M; Rodriguez, Nancy R

    2005-10-01

    This investigation evaluated the physiological impact of different dietary protein intakes on skeletal muscle protein synthesis postexercise in endurance runners. Five endurance-trained, male runners participated in a randomized, crossover design diet intervention, where they consumed either a low (0.8 g/kg; LP)-, moderate (1.8 g/kg; MP)-, or high (3.6 g/kg; HP)-protein diet for 4 wk. Diets were designed to be eucaloric with carbohydrate, fat, and protein approximating 60, 30, and 10%; 55, 30, and 15%; and 40, 30, and 30% for LP, MP, and HP, respectively. Substrate oxidation was assessed via indirect calorimetry at 3 wk of the dietary interventions. Mixed-muscle protein fractional synthetic rate (FSR) was measured after an endurance run (75 min at 70% V(O2 peak)) using a primed, continuous infusion of [(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Protein oxidation increased with increasing protein intake, with each trial being significantly different from the other (P < 0.01). FSR after exercise was significantly greater for LP (0.083%/h) and MP (0.078%/h) than for HP (0.052%/h; P < 0.05). There was no difference in FSR between LP and MP. This is the first investigation to establish that habitual dietary protein intake in humans modulates skeletal muscle protein synthesis after an endurance exercise bout. Future studies directed at mechanisms by which level of protein intake influences skeletal muscle turnover are needed. PMID:15914508

  18. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, E A; Rosen, V; D'Alessandro, J S; Bauduy, M; Cordes, P; Harada, T; Israel, D I; Hewick, R M; Kerns, K M; LaPan, P

    1990-01-01

    We have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 micrograms of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans. Images PMID:2315314

  19. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  20. Quality control of cytoskeletal proteins and human disease.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Victor F; Leroux, Michel R; Stirling, Peter C

    2010-05-01

    Actins and tubulins are abundant cytoskeletal proteins that support diverse cellular processes. Owing to the unique properties of these filament-forming proteins, an intricate cellular machinery consisting minimally of the chaperonin CCT, prefoldin, phosducin-like proteins, and tubulin cofactors has evolved to facilitate their biogenesis. More recent evidence also suggests that regulated degradation pathways exist for actin (via TRIM32) and tubulin (via parkin or cofactor E-like). Collectively, these pathways maintain the quality control of cytoskeletal proteins ('proteostasis'), ensuring the appropriate function of microfilaments and microtubules. Here, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of the quality control of actin and tubulin, and discuss emerging links between cytoskeletal proteostasis and human diseases. PMID:20116259

  1. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  2. Human cytomegalovirus RL13 protein interacts with host NUDT14 protein affecting viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanping; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the host and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is important in determining the outcome of a viral infection. The HCMV RL13 gene product exerts independent, inhibitory effects on viral growth in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. At present, there are few reports on the interactions between the HCMV RL13 protein and human host proteins. The present study provided direct evidence for the specific interaction between HCMV RL13 and host nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)‑type motif 14 (NUDT14), a UDP‑glucose pyrophosphatase, using two‑hybrid screening, an in vitro glutathione S‑transferase pull‑down assay, and co‑immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Additionally, the RL13 protein was shown to co‑localize with the NUDT14 protein in the HEK293 cell membrane and cytoplasm, demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Decreasing the expression level of NUDT14 via NUDT14‑specific small interfering RNAs increased the number of viral DNA copies in the HCMV‑infected cells. However, the overexpression of NUDT14 in a stably expressing cell line did not affect viral DNA levels significantly in the HCMV infected cells. Based on the known functions of NUDT14, the results of the present study suggested that the interaction between the RL13 protein and NUDT14 protein may be involved in HCMV DNA replication, and that NUDT14 may offer potential in the modulation of viral infection. PMID:26781650

  3. Protein Targets of Reactive Electrophiles in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Nah-Young; Liu, Qinfeng; Stamer, Sheryl L.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    Liver microsomes are widely used to study xenobiotic metabolism in vitro and covalent binding to microsomal proteins serves as a surrogate marker for toxicity mediated by reactive metabolites. We have applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to identify protein targets of the biotin-tagged model electrophiles 1-biotinamido-4-(4′-[maleimidoethylcyclohexane]-carboxamido)butane (BMCC) and N-iodoacetyl-N-biotinylhexylenediamine (IAB) in human liver microsomes. The biotin-tagged peptides resulting from in-gel tryptic digestion were enriched by biotin-avidin chromatography and LC-MS-MS was used to identify 376 microsomal cysteine thiol targets of BMCC and IAB in 263 proteins. Protein adduction was selective and reproducible and only 90 specific cysteine sites in 70 proteins (approximately 25% of the total) were adducted by both electrophiles. Differences in adduction selectivity correlated with different biological effects of the compounds, as IAB, but not BMCC induced ER stress in HEK293 cells. Targeted LC-MS-MS analysis of microsomal glutathione-S-transferase cysteine 50, a target of both IAB and BMCC, detected time-dependent adduction by the reactive acetaminophen metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine during microsomal incubations. The results indicate that electrophiles selectively adduct microsomal proteins, but display differing target selectivities that correlate with differences in toxicity. Analysis of selected microsomal protein adduction reactions thus could provide a more specific indication of potential toxicity than bulk covalent binding of radiolabeled compounds. PMID:17480101

  4. Protein Stability, Folding and Misfolding in Human PGK1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Giovanna; Maggi, Maristella; Pey, Angel L

    2013-01-01

    Conformational diseases are often caused by mutations, altering protein folding and stability in vivo. We review here our recent work on the effects of mutations on the human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (hPGK1), with a particular focus on thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and misfolding. Expression analyses and in vitro biophysical studies indicate that disease-causing mutations enhance protein aggregation propensity. We found a strong correlation among protein aggregation propensity, thermodynamic stability, cooperativity and dynamics. Comparison of folding and unfolding properties with previous reports in PGKs from other species suggests that hPGK1 is very sensitive to mutations leading to enhance protein aggregation through changes in protein folding cooperativity and the structure of the relevant denaturation transition state for aggregation. Overall, we provide a mechanistic framework for protein misfolding of hPGK1, which is insightful to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target native state stability and foldability in hPGK1 deficient patients. PMID:24970202

  5. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins.

    PubMed

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  6. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  7. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  8. Bryostatins activate protein kinase C in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.; Tallant, E.A.; Pettit, G.R.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Bryostatins, macrocyclic lactones isolated from a marine bryozoan, have antineoplastic activity in the P388 lymphocytic leukemia system. These compounds also stimulate growth in Swiss 3T3 cells, induce secretion in leukocytes, inhibit phorbol dibutyrate binding to a high affinity receptor, and activate the C-kinase in vitro. In human platelets, phorbol esters induce aggregation and activate protein kinase C, resulting in phosphorylation of a 47K protein and the 20K myosin light chain. The authors now show that bryostatin 7 (B-7) triggers platelet aggregation to the same rate and extent as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). B-7 also causes the in vivo activation of the C-kinase, resulting in phosphorylation of both the 47K and the 20K proteins; the time courses and dose-responses of these B-7-induced phosphorylations were similar to those found with PMA. In addition, B-7 increases the level of /sup 32/P-incorporation into the platelet polyphosphoinositides, which also occurs in response to PMA. Bryostatin 3 (B-3), which has been shown to be much less potent than B-7 in mimicking other PMA effects, was much less effective than PMA or B-7 in inducing platelet aggregation and in stimulating /sup 32/P-incorporation into both proteins and the phosphoinositides. These results demonstrate that, intact human platelets, bryostatins mimic the phorbol esters tumor promoters and directly activate protein kinase C.

  9. PCDq: human protein complex database with quality index which summarizes different levels of evidences of protein complexes predicted from H-Invitational protein-protein interactions integrative dataset

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins interact with other proteins or biomolecules in complexes to perform cellular functions. Existing protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases and protein complex databases for human proteins are not organized to provide protein complex information or facilitate the discovery of novel subunits. Data integration of PPIs focused specifically on protein complexes, subunits, and their functions. Predicted candidate complexes or subunits are also important for experimental biologists. Description Based on integrated PPI data and literature, we have developed a human protein complex database with a complex quality index (PCDq), which includes both known and predicted complexes and subunits. We integrated six PPI data (BIND, DIP, MINT, HPRD, IntAct, and GNP_Y2H), and predicted human protein complexes by finding densely connected regions in the PPI networks. They were curated with the literature so that missing proteins were complemented and some complexes were merged, resulting in 1,264 complexes comprising 9,268 proteins with 32,198 PPIs. The evidence level of each subunit was assigned as a categorical variable. This indicated whether it was a known subunit, and a specific function was inferable from sequence or network analysis. To summarize the categories of all the subunits in a complex, we devised a complex quality index (CQI) and assigned it to each complex. We examined the proportion of consistency of Gene Ontology (GO) terms among protein subunits of a complex. Next, we compared the expression profiles of the corresponding genes and found that many proteins in larger complexes tend to be expressed cooperatively at the transcript level. The proportion of duplicated genes in a complex was evaluated. Finally, we identified 78 hypothetical proteins that were annotated as subunits of 82 complexes, which included known complexes. Of these hypothetical proteins, after our prediction had been made, four were reported to be actual subunits of the

  10. Guidelines for the nomenclature of the human heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; Kubota, Hiroshi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Chen, Bin; Hightower, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    The expanding number of members in the various human heat shock protein (HSP) families and the inconsistencies in their nomenclature have often led to confusion. Here, we propose new guidelines for the nomenclature of the human HSP families, HSPH (HSP110), HSPC (HSP90), HSPA (HSP70), DNAJ (HSP40), and HSPB (small HSP) as well as for the human chaperonin families HSPD/E (HSP60/HSP10) and CCT (TRiC). The nomenclature is based largely on the more consistent nomenclature assigned by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee and used in the National Center of Biotechnology Information Entrez Gene database for the heat shock genes. In addition to this nomenclature, we provide a list of the human Entrez Gene IDs and the corresponding Entrez Gene IDs for the mouse orthologs. PMID:18663603

  11. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  12. Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Metabolism Responses to Amino Acid Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Healthy individuals maintain remarkably constant skeletal muscle mass across much of adult life, suggesting the existence of robust homeostatic mechanisms. Muscle exists in dynamic equilibrium whereby the influx of amino acids (AAs) and the resulting increases in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) associated with the intake of dietary proteins cancel out the efflux of AAs from muscle protein breakdown that occurs between meals. Dysregulated proteostasis is evident with aging, especially beyond the sixth decade of life. Women and men aged 75 y lose muscle mass at a rate of ∼0.7% and 1%/y, respectively (sarcopenia), and lose strength 2- to 5-fold faster (dynapenia) as muscle "quality" decreases. Factors contributing to the disruption of an otherwise robust proteostatic system represent targets for potential therapies that promote healthy aging. Understanding age-related impairments in anabolic responses to AAs and identifying strategies to mitigate these factors constitute major areas of interest. Numerous studies have aimed to identify 1) the influence of distinct protein sources on absorption kinetics and muscle anabolism, 2) the latency and time course of MPS responses to protein/AAs, 3) the impacts of protein/AA intake on muscle microvascular recruitment, and 4) the role of certain AAs (e.g., leucine) as signaling molecules, which are able to trigger anabolic pathways in tissues. This review aims to discuss these 4 issues listed, to provide historical and modern perspectives of AAs as modulators of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism, to describe how advances in stable isotope/mass spectrometric approaches and instrumentation have underpinned these advances, and to highlight relevant differences between young adults and older individuals. Whenever possible, observations are based on human studies, with additional consideration of relevant nonhuman studies. PMID:27422520

  13. Solution structure of the human signaling protein RACK1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The adaptor protein RACK1 (receptor of activated kinase 1) was originally identified as an anchoring protein for protein kinase C. RACK1 is a 36 kDa protein, and is composed of seven WD repeats which mediate its protein-protein interactions. RACK1 is ubiquitously expressed and has been implicated in diverse cellular processes involving: protein translation regulation, neuropathological processes, cellular stress, and tissue development. Results In this study we performed a biophysical analysis of human RACK1 with the aim of obtaining low resolution structural information. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments demonstrated that human RACK1 is globular and monomeric in solution and its low resolution structure is strikingly similar to that of an homology model previously calculated by us and to the crystallographic structure of RACK1 isoform A from Arabidopsis thaliana. Both sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation techniques showed that RACK1 is predominantly a monomer of around 37 kDa in solution, but also presents small amounts of oligomeric species. Moreover, hydrodynamic data suggested that RACK1 has a slightly asymmetric shape. The interaction of RACK1 and Ki-1/57 was tested by sedimentation equilibrium. The results suggested that the association between RACK1 and Ki-1/57(122-413) follows a stoichiometry of 1:1. The binding constant (KB) observed for RACK1-Ki-1/57(122-413) interaction was of around (1.5 ± 0.2) × 106 M-1 and resulted in a dissociation constant (KD) of (0.7 ± 0.1) × 10-6 M. Moreover, the fluorescence data also suggests that the interaction may occur in a cooperative fashion. Conclusion Our SAXS and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments indicated that RACK1 is predominantly a monomer in solution. RACK1 and Ki-1/57(122-413) interact strongly under the tested conditions. PMID:20529362

  14. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn2+ complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn2+ similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn2+-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1. PMID:21931216

  15. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT. PMID:22289120

  16. Characterization of Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Morgan, Brandie R; Anumanthan, Govindaraj; Sharma, Ajay; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Rieger, Frank G

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins are DNA-binding transcription factors involved in cellular proliferation, migration, inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis. However, their expression and role in the cornea is unknown. The present study was undertaken to characterize the expression of Id proteins and their interactions with the pro-fibrotic cytokine Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) and anti-fibrotic cytokine, bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7) in human cornea. Human donor corneas procured from Eye Bank were used. Id proteins were localized in human corneal sections using immunofluorescence. Primary cultures of human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) were established and treated with either TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) or BMP7 (10 ng/ml) for 24 h in serum free medium. Expression of Id's in response to TGFβ1, BMP7 and TGFβ1 + BMP7 was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Id1 and Id2 proteins were ubiquitously expressed in the epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes in human cornea. The Id1 was localized to the basal epithelial cells as seen by immunohistochemistry. HCF expressed all known mammalian Id genes (Id1-Id4). In addition, Id1 and Id2 are selectively expressed in HCF. Treatment of human recombinant TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) to serum-starved HCF showed a significant increase in Id genes (Id1, Id2 and Id4) at 2 h time point compared to BMP7 treatment, which showed time dependent increase in the expression of Id1-Id3 at 24-48 h. Combined treatment with TGFβ1 + BMP7 to HCF showed a significant increase in Id1 transcript and an increasing trend in Id3 and Id4 expression. The results of this study suggest that Id family of genes (Id1-Id4) are localized in the human cornea and expressed in the corneal fibroblasts. Also, Id's were differentially regulated with TGFβ1 and/or BMP7 in a time dependent manner and might serve as a therapeutic target in corneal fibrosis. PMID:26712606

  17. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ . PMID:26503432

  18. Oxidation of methionine residues in proteins of activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Fliss, H; Weissbach, H; Brot, N

    1983-01-01

    A simple assay for the detection of 35S-labeled methionine sulfoxide residues in proteins is described. The assay, which is based on the ability of CNBr to react with methionine but not with methionine sulfoxide, requires the prelabeling of cellular proteins with [35S]methionine. The assay was used to study the extent of methionine oxidation in newly synthesized proteins of both activated and quiescent human neutrophils. In cells undergoing a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced respiratory burst, about 66% of all methionine residues in newly synthesized proteins were oxidized to the sulfoxide derivative, as compared with 9% in cells not treated with the phorbol ester. In contrast, quantitation of methionine sulfoxide content in the total cellular protein by means of amino acid analysis showed that only 22% of all methionine residues were oxidized in activated cells as compared with 9% in quiescent cells. It is proposed that methionine residues in nascent polypeptide chains are more susceptible to oxidation than those in completed proteins. PMID:6580633

  19. Reactivity of human salivary proteins families toward food polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Soares, Susana; Vitorino, Rui; Osório, Hugo; Fernandes, Ana; Venâncio, Armando; Mateus, Nuno; Amado, Francisco; de Freitas, Victor

    2011-05-25

    Tannins are well-known food polyphenols that interact with proteins, namely, salivary proteins. This interaction is an important factor in relation to their bioavailability and is considered the basis of several important properties of tannins, namely, the development of astringency. It has been generally accepted that astringency is due to the tannin-induced complexation and/or precipitation of salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) in the oral cavity. However, this complexation is thought to provide protection against dietary tannins. Neverthless, there is no concrete evidence and agreement about which PRP families (acidic, basic, and glycosylated) are responsible for the interaction with condensed tannins. In the present work, human saliva was isolated, and the proteins existing in saliva were characterized by chromatographic and proteomic approaches (HPLC-DAD, ESI-MS, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and MALDI-TOF). These approaches were also adapted to study the affinity of the different families of salivary proteins to condensed tannins by the interaction of saliva with grape seed procyanidins. The results obtained when all the main families of salivary proteins are present in a competitive assay, like in the oral cavity, demonstrate that condensed tannins interact first with acidic PRPs and statherin and thereafter with histatins, glycosylated PRPs, and bPRPs. PMID:21417408

  20. Buffer interference with protein dynamics: a case study on human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-02-18

    Selection of suitable buffer types is often a crucial step for generating appropriate protein samples for NMR and x-ray crystallographic studies. Although the possible interaction between MES buffer (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and proteins has been discussed previously, the interaction is usually thought to have no significant effects on the structures of proteins. In this study, we demonstrate the direct, albeit weak, interaction between MES and human liver fatty acid binding protein (hLFABP). Rather than affecting the structure of hLFABP, we found that the dynamics of hLFABP, which were previously proposed to be relevant to its functions, were significantly affected by the binding of hLFABP with MES. Buffer interference with protein dynamics was also demonstrated with Bis-Tris buffer, which is quite different from MES and fatty acids in terms of their molecular structures and properties. This result, to our knowledge, is the first published report on buffer interference with protein dynamics on a microsecond to millisecond timescale and could represent a generic problem in the studies of functionally relevant protein dynamics. Although being a fortuity, our finding of buffer-induced changes in protein dynamics offers a clue to how hLFABP accommodates its ligands. PMID:19217864

  1. Purification of alpha feto protein from human cord blood.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, R; Agarkar, V; Sharma, G L; Sarma, P U

    1998-11-01

    Alpha Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major serum protein in the developing fetus and is of clinical significance as it is an oncofetal protein being synthesized by fetal organs and malignant tumors. AFP is here used as a diagnostic marker for hepatic carcinomas. In view of structural homology and similarities in physico-chemical properties with serum albumin, the separation and purification of AFP has always been a problem. Immunologically active AFP has been purified from human cord plasma using pseudoaffinity chromatography based on Cibacron blue substituted Sephadex G-100. AFP was quantified using rocket immunoelectrophoresis and double sandwich ELISA. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against purified AFP in mice. The purified antibodies were conjugated with peroxidase for use in double antibody sandwich ELISA. Purification of AFP from human cord plasma by an improved method with 55% recovery is reported. PMID:9805348

  2. Coactosin-like protein, a human F-actin-binding protein: critical role of lysine-75.

    PubMed Central

    Provost, P; Doucet, J; Stock, A; Gerisch, G; Samuelsson, B; Rådmark, O

    2001-01-01

    Coactosin-like protein (CLP) was recently identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using 5-lipoxygenase as bait. In the present study, we report the functional characterization of CLP as a human filamentous actin (F-actin)-binding protein. CLP mRNA shows a wide tissue distribution and is predominantly expressed in placenta, lung, kidney and peripheral-blood leucocytes. Endogenous CLP is localized in the cytosol of myeloid cells. Using a two-hybrid approach, actin was identified as a CLP-interacting protein. Binding experiments indicated that CLP associates with F-actin, but does not form a stable complex with globular actin. In transfected mammalian cells, CLP co-localized with actin stress fibres. CLP bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of 1:2 (CLP: actin subunits), but could be cross-linked to only one subunit of actin. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the involvement of Lys(75) of CLP in actin binding, a residue highly conserved in related proteins and supposed to be exposed on the surface of the CLP protein. Our results identify CLP as a new human protein that binds F-actin in vitro and in vivo, and indicate that Lys(75) is essential for this interaction. PMID:11583571

  3. Methylation-controlled J-protein MCJ acts in the import of proteins into human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schusdziarra, Christina; Blamowska, Marta; Azem, Abdussalam; Hell, Kai

    2013-04-01

    Loss of expression of the methylation-controlled J gene, MCJ (DNAJC15), is observed in cases of several tumors and plays a crucial role in the chemoresistance of ovarian cancer cells. Aside from the pathophysiological effects, almost nothing is known about the cellular function of MCJ. Here, we provide the first evidence that MCJ acts in the biogenesis of mitochondria. Our results demonstrate that MCJ is located in mitochondria. It is anchored in the mitochondrial inner membrane with the C-terminal J domain facing the matrix space. We show that MCJ forms a stable subcomplex with a component of the mitochondrial import motor, MAGMAS, a protein overexpressed in cells treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and in prostate carcinomas. In addition, MCJ and MAGMAS interact with the core components of the TIM23 pre-protein translocase. We demonstrate that the recombinant soluble MCJ domain stimulates the ATPase activity of the human mtHsp70 chaperone, mortalin, the central component of the import motor of the TIM23 translocase. This stimulation is counteracted by MAGMAS. Moreover, pre-protein import into mitochondria is impaired in the absence of MCJ. Interestingly, MCJ is able to take over the function of Tim14, the essential J co-chaperone of the mitochondrial protein import motor in yeast. In summary, our results show that MCJ functions as J co-chaperone of the human TIM23 pre-protein translocase, suggesting a link between mitochondrial pre-protein import and tumorigenesis. PMID:23263864

  4. Nitrogen and food production: proteins for human diets.

    PubMed

    Smil, Vaclav

    2002-03-01

    Nitrogen was the most commonly yield-limiting nutrient in all pre-industrial agricultures. Only the Haber-Bosch synthesis of ammonia broke this barrier. The rising dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers, which represents the largest human interference in the biospheric N cycle, has two different roles. In affluent nations it helps to produce excess of food in general, and of animal foods in particular, and it boosts agricultural exports. But for at least a third of humanity in the world's most populous countries the use of N fertilizers makes the difference between malnutrition and adequate diet. Our understanding of human N (protein) needs has undergone many revisions and although some uncertainties still remain it is clear that average protein intakes are excessive in rich countries and inadequate for hundreds of millions of people in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. More dietary protein will be needed to eliminate these disparities but the future global use of N fertilizers can be moderated not just by better agronomic practices but also by higher feeding efficiencies and by gradual changes of prevailing diets. As a result, it could be possible to supply adequate nutrition to the world's growing population without any massive increases of N inputs. PMID:12078001

  5. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  6. PIPs: human protein–protein interaction prediction database

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Mark D.; Scott, Michelle S.; Barton, Geoffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    The PIPs database (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/www-pips) is a resource for studying protein–protein interactions in human. It contains predictions of >37 000 high probability interactions of which >34 000 are not reported in the interaction databases HPRD, BIND, DIP or OPHID. The interactions in PIPs were calculated by a Bayesian method that combines information from expression, orthology, domain co-occurrence, post-translational modifications and sub-cellular location. The predictions also take account of the topology of the predicted interaction network. The web interface to PIPs ranks predictions according to their likelihood of interaction broken down by the contribution from each information source and with easy access to the evidence that supports each prediction. Where data exists in OPHID, HPRD, DIP or BIND for a protein pair this is also reported in the output tables returned by a search. A network browser is included to allow convenient browsing of the interaction network for any protein in the database. The PIPs database provides a new resource on protein–protein interactions in human that is straightforward to browse, or can be exploited completely, for interaction network modelling. PMID:18988626

  7. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  8. Glycosylation increases the thermostability of human aquaporin 10 protein.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Fredrik; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Fischer, Gerhard; Moberg, Andreas; Pedersen, Anders; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Human aquaporin10 (hAQP10) is a transmembrane facilitator of both water and glycerol transport in the small intestine. This aquaglyceroporin is located in the apical membrane of enterocytes and is believed to contribute to the passage of water and glycerol through these intestinal absorptive cells. Here we overproduced hAQP10 in the yeast Pichia pastoris and observed that the protein is glycosylated at Asn-133 in the extracellular loop C. This finding confirms one of three predicted glycosylation sites for hAQP10, and its glycosylation is unique for the human aquaporins overproduced in this host. Nonglycosylated protein was isolated using both glycan affinity chromatography and through mutating asparagine 133 to a glutamine. All three forms of hAQP10 where found to facilitate the transport of water, glycerol, erythritol, and xylitol, and glycosylation had little effect on functionality. In contrast, glycosylated hAQP10 showed increased thermostability of 3-6 °C compared with the nonglycosylated protein, suggesting a stabilizing effect of the N-linked glycan. Because only one third of hAQP10 was glycosylated yet the thermostability titration was mono-modal, we suggest that the presence of at least one glycosylated protein within each tetramer is sufficient to convey an enhanced structural stability to the remaining hAQP10 protomers of the tetramer. PMID:21733844

  9. Serologic Cross-Reactions between Nucleocapsid Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yange; Pohl, Jan; Brooks, W. Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) share virologic and epidemiologic features and cause clinically similar respiratory illness predominantly in young children. In a previous study of acute febrile respiratory illness in Bangladesh, we tested paired serum specimens from 852 children presenting fever and cough for diagnostic increases in titers of antibody to hRSV and hMPV by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Unexpectedly, of 93 serum pairs that showed a ≥4-fold increase in titers of antibody to hRSV, 24 (25.8%) showed a concurrent increase in titers of antibody to hMPV; of 91 pairs showing an increase to hMPV, 13 (14.3%) showed a concurrent increase to hRSV. We speculated that common antigens shared by these viruses explain this finding. Since the nucleocapsid (N) proteins of these viruses show the greatest sequence homology, we tested hyperimmune antisera prepared for each virus against baculovirus-expressed recombinant N (recN) proteins for potential cross-reactivity. The antisera were reciprocally reactive with both proteins. To localize common antigenic regions, we first expressed the carboxy domain of the hMPV N protein that was the most highly conserved region within the hRSV N protein. Although reciprocally reactive with antisera by Western blotting, this truncated protein did not react with hMPV IgG-positive human sera by EIA. Using 5 synthetic peptides that spanned the amino-terminal portion of the hMPV N protein, we identified a single peptide that was cross-reactive with human sera positive for either virus. Antiserum prepared for this peptide was reactive with recN proteins of both viruses, indicating that a common immunoreactive site exists in this region. PMID:25740767

  10. Prediction of human protein-protein interaction by a domain-based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopan; Jiao, Xiong; Song, Jie; Chang, Shan

    2016-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are vital to a number of biological processes. With computational methods, plenty of domain information can help us to predict and assess PPIs. In this study, we proposed a domain-based approach for the prediction of human PPIs based on the interactions between the proteins and the domains. In this method, an optimizing model was built with the information from InterDom, 3did, DOMINE and Pfam databases. With this model, for 147 proteins in the integrin adhesome PPI network, 736 probable PPIs have been predicted, and the corresponding confidence probabilities of these PPIs were also calculated. It provides an opportunity to visualize the PPIs by using network graphs, which were constructed with Cytoscape, so that we can indicate underlying pathways possible. PMID:26925814

  11. Molecular cloning of a human protein that binds to the retinoblastoma protein and chromosomal mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Saijo, M.; Sakai, Y.; Taya, Y.

    1995-06-10

    We have isolated distinct clones for cellular proteins that bind to the retinoblastoma protein by direct screening of cDNA expression libraries using purified pRB as a probe. The total nucleotide sequence of one of these clones, RBQ-3, was determined and found to encode a protein of 66 kDa localized in the nucleus. The RBQ-3 preferentially binds to underphosphory-lated pRB. The region used for binding to this protein was mapped to the E1A-binding pocket B of pRB, which has sequence similarity to the general transcription factor TFIIB. We have mapped the gene to 1q32 using polymerase chain reaction analysis on a human-hamster hybrid cell panel and chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization. 64 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Bioinformatics Annotation of Human Y Chromosome-Encoded Protein Pathways and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-09-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of human Y chromosome-encoded proteins, their pathways, and their interactions using bioinformatics tools. From the NCBI annotation release 107 of human genome, we retrieved a total of 66 proteins encoded on Y chromosome. Most of the retrieved proteins were also matched with the proteins listed in the core databases of the Human Proteome Project including neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and the Human Protein Atlas. When we examined the pathways of human Y-encoded proteins through KEGG database and Pathway Studio software, many of proteins fall into the categories related to cell signaling pathways. Using the STRING program, we found a total of 49 human Y-encoded proteins showing strong/medium interaction with each other. While using the Pathway studio software, we found that a total of 16 proteins interact with other chromosome-encoded proteins. In particular, the SRY protein interacted with 17 proteins encoded on other chromosomes. Additionally, we aligned the sequences of human Y-encoded proteins with the sequences of chimpanzee and mouse Y-encoded proteins using the NCBI BLAST program. This analysis resulted in a significant number of orthologous proteins between human, chimpanzee, and mouse. Collectively, our findings provide the scientific community with additional information on the human Y chromosome-encoded proteins. PMID:26279084

  13. Computational prediction of virus-human protein-protein interactions using embedding kernelized heterogeneous data.

    PubMed

    Nourani, Esmaeil; Khunjush, Farshad; Durmuş, Saliha

    2016-05-24

    Pathogenic microorganisms exploit host cellular mechanisms and evade host defense mechanisms through molecular pathogen-host interactions (PHIs). Therefore, comprehensive analysis of these PHI networks should be an initial step for developing effective therapeutics against infectious diseases. Computational prediction of PHI data is gaining increasing demand because of scarcity of experimental data. Prediction of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) within PHI systems can be formulated as a classification problem, which requires the knowledge of non-interacting protein pairs. This is a restricting requirement since we lack datasets that report non-interacting protein pairs. In this study, we formulated the "computational prediction of PHI data" problem using kernel embedding of heterogeneous data. This eliminates the abovementioned requirement and enables us to predict new interactions without randomly labeling protein pairs as non-interacting. Domain-domain associations are used to filter the predicted results leading to 175 novel PHIs between 170 human proteins and 105 viral proteins. To compare our results with the state-of-the-art studies that use a binary classification formulation, we modified our settings to consider the same formulation. Detailed evaluations are conducted and our results provide more than 10 percent improvements for accuracy and AUC (area under the receiving operating curve) results in comparison with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27072625

  14. NRIP, a novel calmodulin binding protein, activates calcineurin to dephosphorylate human papillomavirus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lin, Chia-Yi; Chen, Show-Li

    2011-07-01

    Previously, we found a gene named nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP) (or DCAF6 or IQWD1). We demonstrate that NRIP is a novel binding protein for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) E2 protein. HPV-16 E2 and NRIP can directly associate into a complex in vivo and in vitro, and the N-terminal domain of NRIP interacts with the transactivation domain of HPV-16 E2. Only full-length NRIP can stabilize E2 protein and induce HPV gene expression, and NRIP silenced by two designed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) decreases E2 protein levels and E2-driven gene expression. We found that NRIP can directly bind with calmodulin in the presence of calcium through its IQ domain, resulting in decreased E2 ubiquitination and increased E2 protein stability. Complex formation between NRIP and calcium/calmodulin activates the phosphatase calcineurin to dephosphorylate E2 and increase E2 protein stability. We present evidences for E2 phosphorylation in vivo and show that NRIP acts as a scaffold to recruit E2 and calcium/calmodulin to prevent polyubiquitination and degradation of E2, enhancing E2 stability and E2-driven gene expression. PMID:21543494

  15. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that is used by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes, and it is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method for identifying new substrates using protein microarrays, which can markedly expand the list of potential substrates. Here we describe procedures for detecting AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high-throughput and nonradioactive manner. The approach uses high-density protein microarrays fabricated using nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The assay can be accomplished within 11 h. PMID:25881200

  16. Biosynthesis of von Willebrand protein by human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sporn, L A; Chavin, S I; Marder, V J; Wagner, D D

    1985-01-01

    Immunofluorescence staining of buffy coat smears from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in accelerated phase showed that approximately 13% of all nucleated cells contained von Willebrand protein and, therefore, appeared to be of megakaryocytic origin. This was confirmed by positive staining with antisera against platelet factor 4 and platelet glycoproteins. Short-term cultures of the buffy coat, which lacked endothelial cells, were metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine, and von Willebrand protein was immunopurified from cell lysates and culture medium. Cultures from this patient synthesized and secreted von Willebrand protein, in contrast with cultures from other patients with leukemia, who lacked circulating megakaryocytes, and from normal volunteers. The subunit composition of the megakaryocytic von Willebrand protein was very similar to that of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The size of the processed subunit (220 kD) and of the cellular (260 kD) and secreted (275 kD) precursors from the two cell types were indistinguishable by gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, the ratio of precursor to processed subunit and the pattern of cellular and secreted nonreduced multimers were very similar. It appears, therefore, that the processing steps in biosynthesis of von Willebrand protein used by the megakaryocytes are very similar to those of umbilical vein endothelial cells. Images PMID:2413071

  17. Leucine incorporation into mixed skeletal muscle protein in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, K.S.; Halliday, D.; Griggs, R.C. Clinical Research Centre, Harrow )

    1988-02-01

    Fractional mixed skeletal muscle protein synthesis (FMPS) was estimated in 10 postabsorptive healthy men by determining the increment in the abundance of ({sup 13}C)-leucine in quadriceps muscle protein during an intravenous infusion of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine. Whole-body muscle protein synthesis (MPS) was calculated based on the estimation of muscle mass from creatinine excretion and compared with whole-body protein synthesis (WBPS) calculated from the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux. A significant correlation was found between MPS. The contribution of MPS to WBPS was 27 {plus minus} 1%, which is comparable to the reports in other species. Morphometric analyses of adjacent muscle samples in eight subjects demonstrated that the biopsy specimens consisted of 86.5 {plus minus} 2% muscular as opposed to other tissues. Because fiber type composition varies between biopsies, the authors examined the relationship between proportions of each fiber type and FMPS. Variation in the composition of biopsies and in fiber-type proportion did not affect the estimation of muscle protein synthesis rate. They conclude that stable isotope techniques using serial needle biopsies permit the direct measurement of FMPS in humans and that this estimation is correlated with an indirect estimation of WBPS.

  18. Comparing human-Salmonella with plant-Salmonella protein-protein interaction predictions.

    PubMed

    Schleker, Sylvia; Kshirsagar, Meghana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis is the most frequent foodborne disease worldwide and can be transmitted to humans by a variety of routes, especially via animal and plant products. Salmonella bacteria are believed to use not only animal and human but also plant hosts despite their evolutionary distance. This raises the question if Salmonella employs similar mechanisms in infection of these diverse hosts. Given that most of our understanding comes from its interaction with human hosts, we investigate here to what degree knowledge of Salmonella-human interactions can be transferred to the Salmonella-plant system. Reviewed are recent publications on analysis and prediction of Salmonella-host interactomes. Putative protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between Salmonella and its human and Arabidopsis hosts were retrieved utilizing purely interolog-based approaches in which predictions were inferred based on available sequence and domain information of known PPIs, and machine learning approaches that integrate a larger set of useful information from different sources. Transfer learning is an especially suitable machine learning technique to predict plant host targets from the knowledge of human host targets. A comparison of the prediction results with transcriptomic data shows a clear overlap between the host proteins predicted to be targeted by PPIs and their gene ontology enrichment in both host species and regulation of gene expression. In particular, the cellular processes Salmonella interferes with in plants and humans are catabolic processes. The details of how these processes are targeted, however, are quite different between the two organisms, as expected based on their evolutionary and habitat differences. Possible implications of this observation on evolution of host-pathogen communication are discussed. PMID:25674082

  19. Human odontoblasts express transient receptor protein and acid-sensing ion channel mechanosensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Solé-Magdalena, Antonio; Revuelta, Enrique G; Menénez-Díaz, Ivan; Calavia, Marta G; Cobo, Teresa; García-Suárez, Olivia; Pérez-Piñera, Pablo; De Carlos, Felix; Cobo, Juan; Vega, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Diverse proteins of the denegerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENa(+) C) superfamily, in particular those belonging to the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family, as well as some members of the transient receptor protein (TRP) channel, function as mechanosensors or may be required for mechanosensation in a diverse range of species and cell types. Therefore, we investigated the putative mechanosensitive function of human odontoblasts using immunohistochemistry to detect ENa(+) C subunits (α, β, and γ) and ASIC (1, 2, 3, and 4) proteins, as well as TRPV4, in these cells. Positive and specific immunoreactivity in the odontoblast soma and/or processes was detected for all proteins studied except α-ENa(+) C. The intensity of immunostaining was high for β-ENa(+) C and ASIC2, whereas it was low for ASIC1, ASIC3, γ-ENa(+) C, and TRPV4, being absent for α-ENa(+) C and ASIC4. These results suggest that human odontoblasts in situ express proteins related to mechanosensitive channels that probably participate in the mechanisms involved in teeth sensory transmission. PMID:20836083

  20. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  1. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-9 potently induces osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Sawako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Furue, Kirara; Sena, Kotaro; Shinohara, Yukiya; Noguchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    To accomplish effective periodontal regeneration for periodontal defects, several regenerative methods using growth and differentiation factors, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), have been developed. Bone morphogenetic protein-9 exhibits the most potent osteogenic activity of this growth factor family. However, it is unclear whether exogenous BMP-9 can induce osteogenic differentiation in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Here, we examined the effects of recombinant human (rh) BMP-9 on osteoblastic differentiation in human PDL fibroblasts in vitro, compared with rhBMP-2. Recombinant human BMP-9 potently induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and increased expression of runt-related transcription factor-2/core binding factor alpha 1 (RUNX2/CBFA1), osterix, inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation-1 (ID1), osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein genes, compared with rhBMP-2. The levels of rhBMP-9-induced osterix and ALP mRNA were significantly reduced in activin receptor-like kinase-1 and -2 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-transfected human PDL fibroblasts. Recombinant human BMP-9-induced ALP activity was not inhibited by noggin, in contrast to rhBMP-2 induced ALP activity, which was. Phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 in human PDL fibroblasts was induced by addition of rhBMP-9. Recombinant human BMP-9-induced ALP activity was suppressed by SB203580, SP600125, and U0126, which are inhibitors of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), respectively. Our data suggest that rhBMP-9 is a potent inducer of the differentiation of human PDL fibroblasts into osteoblast-like cells and that this may be mediated by the SMAD and mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38, ERK1/2, and JNK) pathways. PMID:26879145

  2. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; You, Zongbing

    2008-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma) on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands), epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin), oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain, hepatocytes, or lymphocytes

  3. Engineered cell-laden human protein-based elastomer

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Weiss, Anthony S.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Elastic tissue equivalence is a vital requirement of synthetic materials proposed for many resilient, soft tissue engineering applications. Here we present a bioelastomer made from tropoelastin, the human protein that naturally facilitates elasticity and cell interactions in all elastic tissues. We combined this protein’s innate versatility with fast non-toxic fabrication techniques to make highly extensible, cell compatible hydrogels. These hydrogels can be produced in less than a minute through photocrosslinking of methacrylated tropoelastin (MeTro) in an aqueous solution. The fabricated MeTro gels exhibit high extensibility (up to 400%) and superior mechanical properties that outperform other photocrosslinkable hydrogels. MeTro gels were used to encapsulate cells within a flexible 3D environment and to manufacture highly elastic 2D films for cell attachment, growth, and proliferation. In addition, the physical properties of this fabricated bioelastomer such as elasticity, stiffness, and pore characteristics were tuned through manipulation of the methacrylation degree and protein concentration. This photocrosslinkable, functional tissue mimetic gel benefits from the innate biological properties of a human elastic protein and opens new opportunities in tissue engineering. PMID:23639533

  4. Stimulus-dependent secretion of plasma proteins from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, N; Kjeldsen, L; Rygaard, K; Bastholm, L; Nielsen, M H; Sengeløv, H; Bjerrum, O W; Johnsen, A H

    1992-01-01

    In search for matrix proteins released from secretory vesicles of human neutrophils, a prominent 67-kD protein was identified in the extracellular medium of neutrophils stimulated by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity and partially sequenced. The sequence of the first 32 NH2-terminal amino acids was identical to the sequence of albumin. mRNA for human albumin could not be detected in bone marrow cells, nor could biosynthetic labeling of albumin be demonstrated in bone marrow cells during incubation with [14C]leucine. Immunofluorescence studies on single cells demonstrated the presence of intracellular albumin in fixed permeabilized neutrophils. Light microscopy of immunogold-silver-stained cryosections visualized albumin in cytoplasmic "granules." The morphology of these was determined by immunoelectron microscopy as vesicles of varying form and size. Subcellular fractionation studies on unstimulated neutrophils demonstrated the presence of albumin in the low density pre-gamma and gamma-regions that contain secretory vesicles, but are devoid of specific granules and azurophil granules. Albumin was readily released from these structures during activation of neutrophils with inflammatory mediators. Immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of immunoglobulin and transferrin along with albumin in exocytosed material from stimulated neutrophils. This indicates that secretory vesicles are unique endocytic vesicles that can be triggered to exocytose by inflammatory stimuli. Images PMID:1378856

  5. Human recombinant neutralizing antibodies against hantaan virus G2 protein.

    PubMed

    Koch, Joachim; Liang, Mifang; Queitsch, Iris; Kraus, Annette A; Bautz, Ekkehard K F

    2003-03-30

    Old world hantaviruses, causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), still present a public health problem in Asia and Eastern Europe. The majority of cases has been recorded in China. The aim of our study was to generate human recombinant neutralizing antibodies to a hantavirus by phage display technology. To preserve the structural identity of viral protein, the panning procedure was performed on native Hantaan (HTN) (76-118) virus propagated in Vero-E6 cells. In total, five complete human recombinant IgG antibodies were produced in a baculovirus expression system. All of them were able to completely neutralize HTN, and Seoul (SEO) virus in a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Three of these antibodies could also completely neutralize Dobrava (DOB) virus but not Puumala (PUU) virus. All antibodies bind to Hantaan virus G2 protein localized in the virus envelope. The sequence areas within the HTN (76-118)-G2 protein detected by five selected antibodies were mapped using peptide scans. Two partial epitopes, 916-KVMATIDSF-924 and 954-LVTKDIDFD-963, were recognized, which presumably are of paramount importance for docking of the virus to host cell receptors. A consensus motif 916-KVXATIXSF-924 could be identified by mutational analysis. The neutralizing antibodies to the most widely distributed hantaviruses causing HFRS might be promising candidates for the development of an agent for prevention and treatment of HFRS in patients. PMID:12706090

  6. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    PubMed

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  7. Human FGF-21 Is a Substrate of Fibroblast Activation Protein

    PubMed Central

    Coppage, Andrew L.; Heard, Kathryn R.; DiMare, Matthew T.; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2016-01-01

    FGF-21 is a key regulator of metabolism and potential drug candidate for the treatment of type II diabetes and other metabolic disorders. However, the half-life of active, circulating, human FGF-21 has recently been shown to be limited in mice and monkeys by a proteolytic cleavage between P171 and S172. Here, we show that fibroblast activation protein is the enzyme responsible for this proteolysis by demonstrating that purified FAP cleaves human FGF-21 at this site in vitro, and that an FAP-specific inhibitor, ARI-3099, blocks the activity in mouse, monkey and human plasma and prolongs the half-life of circulating human FGF-21 in mice. Mouse FGF-21, however, lacks the FAP cleavage site and is not cleaved by FAP. These findings indicate FAP may function in the regulation of metabolism and that FAP inhibitors may prove useful in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic disorders in humans, but pre-clinical proof of concept studies in rodents will be problematic. PMID:26962859

  8. Human FGF-21 Is a Substrate of Fibroblast Activation Protein.

    PubMed

    Coppage, Andrew L; Heard, Kathryn R; DiMare, Matthew T; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W

    2016-01-01

    FGF-21 is a key regulator of metabolism and potential drug candidate for the treatment of type II diabetes and other metabolic disorders. However, the half-life of active, circulating, human FGF-21 has recently been shown to be limited in mice and monkeys by a proteolytic cleavage between P171 and S172. Here, we show that fibroblast activation protein is the enzyme responsible for this proteolysis by demonstrating that purified FAP cleaves human FGF-21 at this site in vitro, and that an FAP-specific inhibitor, ARI-3099, blocks the activity in mouse, monkey and human plasma and prolongs the half-life of circulating human FGF-21 in mice. Mouse FGF-21, however, lacks the FAP cleavage site and is not cleaved by FAP. These findings indicate FAP may function in the regulation of metabolism and that FAP inhibitors may prove useful in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic disorders in humans, but pre-clinical proof of concept studies in rodents will be problematic. PMID:26962859

  9. Proteins of human semen. I. Two-dimensional mapping of human seminal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.J.; Tollaksen, S.L.; Anderson, N.G.

    1981-08-01

    The proteins in human seminal plasma were mapped by high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (ISO-DALT and BASO-DALT systems). When analyzed under dissociating conditions, samples from normal fertile males revealed a pattern of over 200 proteins, ranging in mass from 10,000 to 100,000 daltons. Comparison of the mapped proteins from these males and those who had undergone vasectomy allowed us to identify one series of glycoproteins as missing from the semen from vasectomized individuals. Glycoproteins isolated by affinity chromatography with use of concanavalin A were also mapped. Some of the protein spots were identified either by coelectrophoresis with purified proteins or by the electrophoretic transfer of proteins to nitrocellulose sheets and subsequent detection by immunological procedures. The proteins identified include a number of serum proteins as well as prostatic acid phosphatase and creatine kinase. Proteolytic events shown to occur during the liquefaction of semen that occurs early after collection indicate the importance of carefully controlled collection and preparation methods for clinical evaluation of seminal plasma. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride inhibit this proteolysis.

  10. Proteins of human semen. I. Two-dimensional mapping of human seminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J J; Tollaksen, S L; Anderson, N G

    1981-08-01

    The proteins in human seminal plasma were mapped by high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (ISO-DALT and BASO-DALT systems). When analyzed under dissociating conditions, samples from normal fertile males revealed a pattern of over 200 proteins, ranging in mass from 10 000 to 100 000 daltons. Comparison of the mapped proteins from these males and those who had undergone vasectomy allowed us to identify one series of glycoproteins as missing from the semen from vasectomized individuals. Glycoproteins isolated by affinity chromatography with use of concanavalin A were also mapped. Some of the protein spots were identified either by co-electrophoresis with purified proteins or by the electrophoretic transfer of proteins to nitrocellulose sheets and subsequent detection by immunological procedures. The proteins identified include a number of serum proteins as well as prostatic acid phosphatase and creatine kinase. Proteolytic events shown to occur during the liquefaction of semen that occurs early after collection indicate the importance of carefully controlled collection and preparation methods for clinical evaluation of seminal plasma. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride inhibit this proteolysis. PMID:7273394

  11. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury. PMID:26765958

  12. Purification and characterization of HIV–human protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Stefanie; Gulbahce, Natali; Cimermancic, Peter; Kane, Joshua; He, Nanhai; Chou, Seemay; D’Orso, Iván; Fernandes, Jason; Jang, Gwendolyn; Frankel, Alan D.; Alber, Tom; Zhou, Qiang; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2011-01-01

    To fully understand how pathogens infect their host and hijack key biological processes, systematic mapping of intra-pathogenic and pathogen–host protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is crucial. Due to the relatively small size of viral genomes (usually around 10–100 proteins), generation of comprehensive host–virus PPI maps using different experimental platforms, including affinity tag purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) approaches, can be achieved. Global maps such as these provide unbiased insight into the molecular mechanisms of viral entry, replication and assembly. However, to date, only two-hybrid methodology has been used in a systematic fashion to characterize viral–host protein–protein interactions, although a deluge of data exists in databases that manually curate from the literature individual host–pathogen PPIs. We will summarize this work and also describe an AP-MS platform that can be used to characterize viral-human protein complexes and discuss its application for the HIV genome. PMID:20708689

  13. Diffusion of human Replication Protein A along single stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Sokoloski, Joshua; Galletto, Roberto; Elson, Elliot L.; Wold, Marc S.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single stranded (ss) DNA binding protein that plays critical roles in most aspects of genome maintenance, including replication, recombination and repair. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, destabilizes DNA secondary structure and facilitates binding of other proteins to ssDNA. However, RPA must be removed from or redistributed along ssDNA during these processes. To probe the dynamics of RPA-DNA interactions, we combined ensemble and single molecule fluorescence approaches to examine human RPA diffusion along ssDNA and find that an hRPA hetero-trimer can diffuse rapidly along ssDNA. Diffusion of hRPA is functional in that it provides the mechanism by which hRPA can transiently disrupt DNA hairpins by diffusing in from ssDNA regions adjacent to the DNA hairpin. hRPA diffusion was also monitored by the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity of a Cy3 fluorophore attached to the end of ssDNA. Using a novel method to calibrate the Cy3 fluorescence intensity as a function of hRPA position on the ssDNA, we estimate a one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of hRPA on ssDNA of D1 ~5000 nucleotide2s−1 at 37°C. Diffusion of hRPA while bound to ssDNA enables it to be readily repositioned to allow other proteins access to ssDNA. PMID:25058683

  14. Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Richard N.; Green, Jordan; Wang, Zhongliang; Deng, Youlin; Qiao, Min; Peabody, Michael; Zhang, Qian; Ye, Jixing; Yan, Zhengjian; Denduluri, Sahitya; Idowu, Olumuyiwa; Li, Melissa; Shen, Christine; Hu, Alan; Haydon, Rex C.; Kang, Richard; Mok, James; Lee, Michael J.; Luu, Hue L.; Shi, Lewis L.

    2014-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of signaling molecules that belongs to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins. Initially discovered for their ability to induce bone formation, BMPs are now known to play crucial roles in all organ systems. BMPs are important in embryogenesis and development, and also in maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Mouse knockout models of various components of the BMP signaling pathway result in embryonic lethality or marked defects, highlighting the essential functions of BMPs. In this review, we first outline the basic aspects of BMP signaling and then focus on genetically manipulated mouse knockout models that have helped elucidate the role of BMPs in development. A significant portion of this review is devoted to the prominent human pathologies associated with dysregulated BMP signaling. PMID:25401122

  15. Putative protein partners for the human CPI-17 protein revealed by bacterial two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-mi; Adyshev, Djanybek M; Kása, Anita; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Kolosova, Irina A; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2013-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein of protein phosphatase-1 (CPI-17) is expressed in lung endothelium. CPI-17, a specific inhibitor of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), is involved in the endothelial cytoskeletal and barrier regulation. In this paper, we report the identification of fourteen putative CPI-17 interacting proteins in the lung using BacterioMatch Two-Hybrid System. Five of them: plectin 1 isoform 1, alpha II spectrin, OK/SW-CL.16, gelsolin isoform a, and junction plakoglobin are involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell adhesion, suggesting possible significance of these binding partners in CPI-17-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the specific interaction between plakoglobin and CPI-17, which is affected by the phosphorylation status of CPI-17 in human lung microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:23583905

  16. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Moore, R.; Cardaman, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10/sup -6/ M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml) significantly enhanced (P < 100) /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal /sup 22/P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10/sup -6/ M, /sup 32/P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 /sup +/g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 ..mu..g/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10/sup -6/ M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question.

  17. Therapeutics Targeting Protein Acetylation Perturb Latency of Human Viruses.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie

    2016-03-18

    Persistent viral infections are widespread and represent significant public health burdens. Some viruses endure in a latent state by co-opting the host epigenetic machinery to manipulate viral gene expression. Small molecules targeting epigenetic pathways are now in the clinic for certain cancers and are considered as potential treatment strategies to reverse latency in HIV-infected individuals. In this review, we discuss how drugs interfering with one epigenetic pathway, protein acetylation, perturb latency of three families of pathogenic human viruses-retroviruses, herpesviruses, and papillomaviruses. PMID:26845514

  18. Protein digestibility of the same protein preparations by human and rat assays and by in vitro enzymic digestion methods.

    PubMed

    Bodwell, C E; Satterlee, L D; Hackler, L R

    1980-03-01

    The apparent and true digestibilities of the same preparations of six proteins (spray dried whole egg, cottage cheese, canned tuna, peanut flour, soy isolate, and wheat gluten) were estimated in four to five men and in rats and compared to estimates of digestibility from three different in vitro enzymic digestion procedures. For all six proteins, the correlation coefficient was 0.46 between true digestibility in humans and in rats; with values for tuna excluded, r = 0.96. With all six proteins, none of the in vitro values was significantly correlated with values from humans or rats. However, with either the three animal proteins alone or the three plant proteins alone, correlations were high (r greater than 0.90) between one or more of the in vitro estimates and the observed true or apparent human and rat digestibilities. The differences in the relationship between enzymic digestion estimates and the human digestibility estimates for plant or animal proteins suggest that for accurate prediction of protein digestibility in humans by these enzymic methods, different equations would have to be used for plant and animal proteins. For protein sources containing both plant and animal protein, use of the in vitro enzymic procedures would give only an approximate estimate of digestibility in humans. PMID:6986763

  19. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 mediates human embryonic germ cell derivation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Marc; Liu, Cyndi; Blumenthal, Paul D; Gearhart, John D; Kerr, Candace L

    2011-02-01

    Human primordial germ cells (PGCs) have proven to be a source of pluripotent stem cells called embryonic germ cells (EGCs). Unlike embryonic stem cells, virtually little is known regarding the factors that regulate EGC survival and maintenance. In mice, the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has been shown to be required for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells, and disruptions in this gene lead to defects in mouse PGC specification. Here, we sought to determine whether recombinant human BMP4 could influence EGC derivation and/or human PGC survival. We found that the addition of recombinant BMP4 increased the number of human PGCs after 1 week of culture in a dose-responsive manner. The efficiency of EGC derivation and maintenance in culture was also enhanced by the presence of recombinant BMP4 based on alkaline phosphatase and OCT4 staining. In addition, an antagonist of the BMP4 pathway, Noggin, decreased PGC proliferation and led to an increase in cystic embryoid body formation. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-polymerase chain reaction analyses and immunostaining confirmed that the constituents of the BMP4 pathway were upregulated in EGCs versus PGCs. Downstream activators of the BMP4 pathway such as ID1 and phosphorylated SMADs 1 and 5 were also expressed, suggesting a role of this growth factor in EGC pluripotency. PMID:20486775

  20. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  1. Human Rad54 protein stimulates human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Olga M.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Rad54, a key protein of homologous recombination, physically interacts with a DNA structure-specific endonuclease, Mus81–Eme1. Genetic data indicate that Mus81–Eme1 and Rad54 might function together in the repair of damaged DNA. In vitro, Rad54 promotes branch migration of Holliday junctions, whereas the Mus81–Eme1 complex resolves DNA junctions by endonucleolytic cleavage. Here, we show that human Rad54 stimulates Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity on various Holliday junction-like intermediates. This stimulation is the product of specific interactions between the human Rad54 (hRad54) and Mus81 proteins, considering that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad54 protein does not stimulate human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity. Stimulation of Mus81–Eme1 cleavage activity depends on formation of specific Rad54 complexes on DNA substrates occurring in the presence of ATP and, to a smaller extent, of other nucleotide cofactors. Thus, our results demonstrate a functional link between the branch migration activity of hRad54 and the structure-specific endonuclease activity of hMus81–Eme1, suggesting that the Rad54 and Mus81–Eme1 proteins may cooperate in the processing of Holliday junction-like intermediates during homologous recombination or DNA repair. PMID:19017809

  2. Dissecting the Human Protein-Protein Interaction Network via Phylogenetic Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cho-Yi; Ho, Andy; Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network offers a conceptual framework for better understanding the functional organization of the proteome. However, the intricacy of network complexity complicates comprehensive analysis. Here, we adopted a phylogenic grouping method combined with force-directed graph simulation to decompose the human PPI network in a multi-dimensional manner. This network model enabled us to associate the network topological properties with evolutionary and biological implications. First, we found that ancient proteins occupy the core of the network, whereas young proteins tend to reside on the periphery. Second, the presence of age homophily suggests a possible selection pressure may have acted on the duplication and divergence process during the PPI network evolution. Lastly, functional analysis revealed that each age group possesses high specificity of enriched biological processes and pathway engagements, which could correspond to their evolutionary roles in eukaryotic cells. More interestingly, the network landscape closely coincides with the subcellular localization of proteins. Together, these findings suggest the potential of using conceptual frameworks to mimic the true functional organization in a living cell. PMID:25412639

  3. Fine specificity of cellular immune responses in humans to human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Alp, N J; Allport, T D; Van Zanten, J; Rodgers, B; Sissons, J G; Borysiewicz, L K

    1991-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is important in maintaining the virus-host equilibrium in persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The HCMV 72-kDa major immediate early 1 protein (IE1) is a target for CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in humans, as is the equivalent 89-kDa protein in mouse. Less is known about responses against this protein by CD4+ T cells, which may be important as direct effector cells or helper cells for antibody and CD8+ responses. Proliferative-T-cell responses to HCMV IE1 were studied in normal seropositive subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 85% of seropositive subjects proliferated in response to HCMV from infected fibroblasts, and of these, 73% responded to recombinant baculovirus IE1. Responding cells were predominantly CD3+ CD4+. IE1 antigen preparations, including baculovirus recombinant protein, transfected rat cell nuclei, and synthetic peptides, induced IE1-specific T-cell lines which cross-reacted between the preparations. The fine specificity of these IE1-specific T-cell lines was studied by using overlapping synthetic peptides encompassing the entire sequence of the IE1 protein. The regions of the IE1 molecule recognized were identified and these varied between individuals, possibly reflecting differences in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II haplotype. In one subject, the peptide specificities of proliferative and MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic determinants on IE1 were spatially distinct. Thus, no single immunodominant T-cell determinant within HCMV IE1 was identified, suggesting that multiple peptides or a region of the 72-kDa IE1 protein would be required to induce specific T-cell responses in humans. PMID:1714519

  4. Graphical Features of Functional Genes in Human Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao; Lü, Jinhu; Wang, Qingyun; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-06-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, it is feasible to investigate large-scale human protein interaction network (HPIN) with complex networks theory. Proteins are encoded by genes. Essential, viable, disease, conserved, housekeeping (HK) and tissue-enriched (TE) genes are functional genes, which are organized and functioned via interaction networks. Based on up-to-date data from various databases or literature, two large-scale HPINs and six subnetworks are constructed. We illustrate that the HPINs and most of the subnetworks are sparse, small-world, scale-free, disassortative and with hierarchical modularity. Among the six subnetworks, essential, disease and HK subnetworks are more densely connected than the others. Statistical analysis on the topological structures of the HPIN reveals that the lethal, the conserved, the HK and the TE genes are with hallmark graphical features. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that the essential genes can be distinguished from the viable ones with accuracy as high as almost 70%. Closeness, semi-local and eigenvector centralities can distinguish the HK genes from the TE ones with accuracy around 82%. Furthermore, the Venn diagram, cluster dendgrams and classifications of disease genes reveal that some classes of disease genes are with hallmark graphical features, especially for cancer genes, HK disease genes and TE disease genes. The findings facilitate the identification of some functional genes via topological structures. The investigations shed some light on the characteristics of the compete interactome, which have potential implications in networked medicine and biological network control. PMID:26841412

  5. All kinesin superfamily protein, KIF, genes in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Miki, H; Setou, M; Kaneshiro, K; Hirokawa, N

    2001-06-19

    Intracellular transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell. The kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) have been shown to transport membranous organelles and protein complexes in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner. More than 30 KIFs have been reported in mice. However, the nomenclature of KIFs has not been clearly established, resulting in various designations and redundant names for a single KIF. Here, we report the identification and classification of all KIFs in mouse and human genome transcripts. Previously unidentified murine KIFs were found by a PCR-based search. The identification of all KIFs was confirmed by a database search of the total human genome. As a result, there are a total of 45 KIFs. The nomenclature of all KIFs is presented. To understand the function of KIFs in intracellular transport in a single tissue, we focused on the brain. The expression of 38 KIFs was detected in brain tissue by Northern blotting or PCR using cDNA. The brain, mainly composed of highly differentiated and polarized cells such as neurons and glia, requires a highly complex intracellular transport system as indicated by the increased number of KIFs for their sophisticated functions. It is becoming increasingly clear that the cell uses a number of KIFs and tightly controls the direction, destination, and velocity of transportation of various important functional molecules, including mRNA. This report will set the foundation of KIF and intracellular transport research. PMID:11416179

  6. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Affects Global Protein Synthesis in Dividing Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J.; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement—a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  7. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  8. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24706108

  9. Evolution and organization of the human protein C gene

    SciTech Connect

    Plutzky, J.; Hoskins, J.A.; Long, G.L.; Crabtree, G.R.

    1986-02-01

    The authors have isolated overlapping phage genomic clones covering an area of 21 kilobases that encodes the human protein C gene. The gene is at least 11.2 kilobases long and is made up of nine exons and eight introns. Two regions homologous to epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor are encoded by amino acids 46-91 and 92-136 and are precisely delimited by introns, as is a similar sequence in the genes for coagulation factor IX and tissue plasminogen activator. When homologous amino acids of factor IX and protein C are aligned, the positions of all eight introns correspond precisely, suggesting that these genes are the product of a relatively recent gene duplication. Nevertheless, the two genes are sufficiently distantly related that no nucleic acid homology remains in the intronic regions and that the size of the introns varies dramatically between the two genes. The similarity of the genes for factor IX and protein C suggests that they may be the most closely related members of the serine protease gene family involved in coagulation and fibrinolysis.

  10. Structure of human Niemann-Pick C1 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Coutavas, Elias; Shi, Hang; Hao, Qi; Blobel, Günter

    2016-07-19

    Niemann-Pick C1 protein (NPC1) is a late-endosomal membrane protein involved in trafficking of LDL-derived cholesterol, Niemann-Pick disease type C, and Ebola virus infection. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs), five of which are thought to represent a "sterol-sensing domain" (SSD). Although present also in other key regulatory proteins of cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and signaling, the structure and mechanism of action of the SSD are unknown. Here we report a crystal structure of a large fragment of human NPC1 at 3.6 Å resolution, which reveals internal twofold pseudosymmetry along TM 2-13 and two structurally homologous domains that protrude 60 Å into the endosomal lumen. Strikingly, NPC1's SSD forms a cavity that is accessible from both the luminal bilayer leaflet and the endosomal lumen; computational modeling suggests that this cavity is large enough to accommodate one cholesterol molecule. We propose a model for NPC1 function in cholesterol sensing and transport. PMID:27307437

  11. Structure of human Niemann–Pick C1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Coutavas, Elias; Shi, Hang; Hao, Qi; Blobel, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick C1 protein (NPC1) is a late-endosomal membrane protein involved in trafficking of LDL-derived cholesterol, Niemann–Pick disease type C, and Ebola virus infection. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs), five of which are thought to represent a “sterol-sensing domain” (SSD). Although present also in other key regulatory proteins of cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and signaling, the structure and mechanism of action of the SSD are unknown. Here we report a crystal structure of a large fragment of human NPC1 at 3.6 Å resolution, which reveals internal twofold pseudosymmetry along TM 2–13 and two structurally homologous domains that protrude 60 Å into the endosomal lumen. Strikingly, NPC1's SSD forms a cavity that is accessible from both the luminal bilayer leaflet and the endosomal lumen; computational modeling suggests that this cavity is large enough to accommodate one cholesterol molecule. We propose a model for NPC1 function in cholesterol sensing and transport. PMID:27307437

  12. Differential regulation of actin microfilaments by human MICAL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Rohn, Jennifer L.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster MICAL protein is essential for the neuronal growth cone machinery that functions through plexin- and semaphorin-mediated axonal signaling. Drosophila MICAL is also involved in regulating myofilament organization and synaptic structures, and serves as an actin disassembly factor downstream of plexin-mediated axonal repulsion. In mammalian cells there are three known isoforms, MICAL1, MICAL2 and MICAL3, as well as the MICAL-like proteins MICAL-L1 and MICAL-L2, but little is known of their function, and information comes almost exclusively from neural cells. In this study we show that in non-neural cells human MICALs are required for normal actin organization, and all three MICALs regulate actin stress fibers. Moreover, we provide evidence that the generation of reactive oxygen species by MICAL proteins is crucial for their actin-regulatory function. However, although MICAL1 is auto-inhibited by its C-terminal coiled-coil region, MICAL2 remains constitutively active and affects stress fibers. These data suggest differential but complementary roles for MICAL1 and MICAL2 in actin microfilament regulation. PMID:22331357

  13. Structural Plasticity in Human Heterochromatin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Francesca; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Xiang, Shengqi; Fischle, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-01-01

    As essential components of the molecular machine assembling heterochromatin in eukaryotes, HP1 (Heterochromatin Protein 1) proteins are key regulators of genome function. While several high-resolution structures of the two globular regions of HP1, chromo and chromoshadow domains, in their free form or in complex with recognition-motif peptides are available, less is known about the conformational behavior of the full-length protein. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy in combination with small angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering to characterize the dynamic and structural properties of full-length human HP1β (hHP1β) in solution. We show that the hinge region is highly flexible and enables a largely unrestricted spatial search by the two globular domains for their binding partners. In addition, the binding pockets within the chromo and chromoshadow domains experience internal dynamics that can be useful for the versatile recognition of different binding partners. In particular, we provide evidence for the presence of a distinct structural propensity in free hHP1β that prepares a binding-competent interface for the formation of the intermolecular β-sheet with methylated histone H3. The structural plasticity of hHP1β supports its ability to bind and connect a wide variety of binding partners in epigenetic processes. PMID:23585859

  14. Hexabrachion proteins in embryonic chicken tissues and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Erickson, H P; Taylor, H C

    1987-09-01

    Cell cultures of chicken embryo and human fibroblasts produce a large extracellular matrix molecule with a six-armed structure that we called a hexabrachion (Erickson, H. P., and J. L. Iglesias, 1984, Nature (Lond.), 311:267-269. In the present work we have determined that the myotendinous (M1) antigen described by M. Chiquet and D. M. Fambrough in chicken tissues (1984, J. Cell Biol., 98:1926-1936), and the glioma mesenchymal extracellular matrix protein described by Bourdon et al. in human tumors (Bourdon, M. A., C. J. Wikstrand, H. Furthmayr, T. J. Matthews, and D. D. Bigner, 1983, Cancer Res. 43:2796-2805) have the structure of hexabrachions. We also demonstrate that the M1 antigen is present in embryonic brain, where it was previously reported absent, and have purified hexabrachions from brain homogenates. The recently described cytotactin (Grumet, M., S. Hoffman, K. L. Crossin, and G. M. Edelman, 1985, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 82:8075-8079) now appears to be identical to the chicken hexabrachion protein. In a search for functional roles, we looked for a possible cell attachment activity. A strong, fibronectin-like attachment activity was present in (NH4)2SO4 precipitates of cell supernatant and sedimented with hexabrachions in glycerol gradients. Hexabrachions purified by antibody adsorption, however, had lost this activity, suggesting that it was due to a separate factor associated with hexabrachions in the gradient fractions. The combined information in the several, previously unrelated studies suggests that hexabrachions may play a role in organizing localized regions of extracellular matrix. The protein is prominently expressed at specific times and locations during embryonic development, is retained in certain adult tissues, and is reexpressed in a variety of tumors. PMID:3654758

  15. Calcium buffer proteins are specific markers of human retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kántor, Orsolya; Mezey, Szilvia; Adeghate, Jennifer; Naumann, Angela; Nitschke, Roland; Énzsöly, Anna; Szabó, Arnold; Lukáts, Ákos; Németh, János; Somogyvári, Zoltán; Völgyi, Béla

    2016-07-01

    Ca(2+)-buffer proteins (CaBPs) modulate the temporal and spatial characteristics of transient intracellular Ca(2+)-concentration changes in neurons in order to fine-tune the strength and duration of the output signal. CaBPs have been used as neurochemical markers to identify and trace neurons of several brain loci including the mammalian retina. The CaBP content of retinal neurons, however, varies between species and, thus, the results inferred from animal models cannot be utilised directly by clinical ophthalmologists. Moreover, the shortage of well-preserved human samples greatly impedes human retina studies at the cellular and network level. Our purpose has therefore been to examine the distribution of major CaBPs, including calretinin, calbindin-D28, parvalbumin and the recently discovered secretagogin in exceptionally well-preserved human retinal samples. Based on a combination of immunohistochemistry, Neurolucida tracing and Lucifer yellow injections, we have established a database in which the CaBP marker composition can be defined for morphologically identified cell types of the human retina. Hence, we describe the full CaBP make-up for a number of human retinal neurons, including HII horizontal cells, AII amacrine cells, type-1 tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing amacrine cells and other lesser known neurons. We have also found a number of unidentified cells whose morphology remains to be characterised. We present several examples of the colocalisation of two or three CaBPs with slightly different subcellular distributions in the same cell strongly suggesting a compartment-specific division of labour of Ca(2+)-buffering by CaBPs. Our work thus provides a neurochemical framework for future ophthalmological studies and renders new information concerning the cellular and subcellular distribution of CaBPs for experimental neuroscience. PMID:26899253

  16. Expression of proteoglycan core proteins in human bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, K P; Gallagher, J T; David, G

    1999-01-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) present on the surface of bone marrow stromal cells and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have important roles in the control of adhesion and growth of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The two main groups of proteoglycans which contain heparan sulphate chains are members of the syndecan and glypican families. In this study we have identified the main surface membrane and matrix-associated HSPGs present in normal human bone marrow stroma formed in long-term culture. Proteoglycans were extracted from the adherent stromal layers and treated with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC. The core proteins were detected by Western blotting using antibodies directed against syndecans-1-4, glypican-1 and the ECM HSPG, perlecan. Stromal cell expression at the RNA level was detected by Northern blotting and by reverse transcription PCR. Glypican-1, syndecan-3 and syndecan-4 were the major cell-membrane HSPG species and perlecan was the major ECM proteoglycan. There was no evidence for expression of syndecan-1 protein. Syndecan-3 was expressed mainly as a variant or processed 50-55 kDa core protein and in lower amounts as the characteristic 125 kDa core protein. These results suggest that syndecan-3, syndecan-4 and glypican-1 present on the surface of marrow stromal cells, together with perlecan in the ECM, may be responsible for creating the correct stromal 'niche' for the maintenance and development of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The detection of a variant form of syndecan-3 as a major stromal HSPG suggests a specific role for this syndecan in haemopoiesis. PMID:10527946

  17. Protein Stability and Dynamics Modulation: The Case of Human Frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mariana; Salvay, Andres G.; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is an α/β protein that plays an essential role in iron homeostasis. Apparently, the function of human FXN (hFXN) depends on the cooperative formation of crucial interactions between helix α1, helix α2, and the C-terminal region (CTR) of the protein. In this work we quantitatively explore these relationships using a purified recombinant fragment hFXN90–195. This variant shows the hydrodynamic behavior expected for a monomeric globular domain. Circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies show that hFXN90–195 presents native-like secondary and tertiary structure. However, chemical and temperature induced denaturation show that CTR truncation significantly destabilizes the overall hFXN fold. Accordingly, limited proteolysis experiments suggest that the native-state dynamics of hFXN90–195 and hFXN90–210 are indeed different, being the former form much more sensitive to the protease at specific sites. The overall folding dynamics of hFXN fold was further explored with structure-based protein folding simulations. These suggest that the native ensemble of hFXN can be decomposed in at least two substates, one with consolidation of the CTR and the other without consolidation of the CTR. Explicit-solvent all atom simulations identify some of the proteolytic target sites as flexible regions of the protein. We propose that the local unfolding of CTR may be a critical step for the global unfolding of hFXN, and that modulation of the CTR interactions may strongly affect hFXN physiological function. PMID:23049850

  18. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  19. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  20. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development. PMID:26586228

  1. Human complement protein C9 is a calcium binding protein. Structural and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Thielens, N M; Lohner, K; Esser, A F

    1988-05-15

    Human complement protein C9 is shown to be a metalloprotein that binds 1 mol of Ca2+/mol of C9 with a dissociation constant of 3 micron as measured by equilibrium dialysis. Incubation with EDTA removes the bound calcium, resulting in a apoprotein with decreased thermal stability. This loss in stability leads to aggregation and, therefore, to loss of hemolytic activity upon heating to a few degrees above the physiological temperature. Heat-induced aggregation of apoC9 can be prevented by salts that stabilize proteins according to the Hofmeister series of lyotropic ions, suggesting that the ion in native C9 may ligand with more than one structural element or domain of the protein. Ligand blotting indicates that the calcium binding site is located in the amino-terminal half of the protein. Removal of calcium by inclusion of EDTA in assay mixtures has no effect on the hemolytic activity of C9, and its capacity to bind to C8 in solution, or to small unilamellar lipid vesicles at temperatures at or below the physiological range. Although we do not know yet the precise structural and functional role of the bound calcium, it is clear that it provides thermal stability to C9 and it may have a function in regulation of membrane insertion. PMID:3360798

  2. P53 protein expression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Kusenda, J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of p53 protein overexpression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells. We examined PB and/or BM samples on a series of 111 patients with immunophenotypically defined hematological malignancies at diagnosis, in remission and in relapsed disease comparing to 20 control samples of healthy individuals. p53 protein has been studied by flow cytometry using three monoclonal antibodies specific for epitopes on N-terminus (Bp53-12, DO-1) and central region (DO-11) of p53 protein. Our findigs showed, that p53 expression may contribute to phenotype of leukemic cells and that overexpression of this protein is often associated with progression of disease. All samples of early B-ALL patients and samples of patients with immunophenotypically defined T- cell disorders examined at diagnosis of disease were p53 positive. Eleven of 19 patient samples from AML at diagnosis showed also increased expression of p53 protein. The cells of all patients who responded to therapy with complete immunophenotypically defined remission were p53 negative. Relapsed T-, B- ALL and AML develop p53 alteration. We reported positive p53 expression in cells of patients with advanced stages of CLL in comparison to them with initial stage of disease at examination. As well as in the group of B- cell lymphomas only samples of patients with generalized FCC lymphoma at diagnosis were p53 positive. We detected p53 positive cells in immunologically defined myeloid blast crisis of CML opposite to p53 negativity in chronic phase of disease. The finding of p53 positive BM cells without immunophenotypic blast markers in two of followed cases documented the contributing value of p53 detection in their characterization. On the basis of above findings we conclude, that cytofluorometric determination of p53 expression may contribute to the better definition of leukemic phenotype. Loss of the normal p53 function may be important in the genesis of some leukemias

  3. The role of human bone morphogenetic proteins in spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, D A; Vaccaro, A R; Salamon, M L; Albert, T J

    2000-01-01

    The attainment of a stable arthrodesis is critical to the successful management of some types of spinal disorders. Autologous iliac-crest bone graft has been the most commonly utilized substance associated with predictable healing in spinal fusion applications. Although alternative graft substances exist, these have not been shown to be as uniformly effective in achieving spinal fusion. Because of the morbidity associated with bone autograft harvest, there is increasing interest in alternative graft substances and especially in the osteoinductive abilities of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Several animal models have demonstrated that BMP-containing allograft or synthetic carrier medium is as effective as or superior to autograft bone in promoting spinal fusion. Furthermore, the limited number of human trials utilizing BMPs to treat nonunions in the appendicular skeleton indicate that the results found in animal models will be reproducible in the clinical setting. PMID:10666648

  4. The human cytomegalovirus UL97 protein is a protein kinase that autophosphorylates on serines and threonines.

    PubMed Central

    He, Z; He, Y S; Kim, Y; Chu, L; Ohmstede, C; Biron, K K; Coen, D M

    1997-01-01

    The product of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) UL97 gene, which controls ganciclovir phosphorylation in virus-infected cells, is homologous to known protein kinases but diverges from them at a number of positions that are functionally important. To investigate UL97, we raised an antibody against it and overexpressed it in baculovirus-infected insect cells. Recombinant baculovirus expressing full-length UL97 directed the phosphorylation of ganciclovir in insect cells, which was abolished by a four-codon deletion that confers ganciclovir resistance to CMV. When incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, full-length UL97 was phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues. Phosphorylation was severely impaired by a point mutation that alters lysine-355 in a motif that aligns with subdomain II of protein kinases. However, phosphorylation was impaired much less severely by the four-codon deletion. A UL97 fusion protein expressed from recombinant baculovirus was purified to near homogeneity. It too was phosphorylated upon incubation with [gamma-32P]ATP in vitro. This phosphorylation, which was abolished by the lysine 355 mutation, was optimal at high NaCl and high pH. The activity required either Mn2+ or Mg2+, with a preference for Mn2+, and utilized either ATP or GTP as a phosphate donor, with Kms of 2 and 4 microM, respectively. The phosphorylation rate was first order with protein concentration, consistent with autophosphorylation. These data strongly argue that UL97 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that autophosphorylates and suggest that the four-codon deletion affects its substrate specificity. PMID:8985364

  5. Considerations in meeting protein needs of the human milk-fed preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Hanson, Corrine; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2014-08-01

    Preterm infants provided with sufficient nutrition to achieve intrauterine growth rates have the greatest potential for optimal neurodevelopment. Although human milk is the preferred feeding for preterm infants, unfortified human milk provides insufficient nutrition for the very low-birth-weight infant. Even after fortification with human milk fortifier, human milk often fails to meet the high protein needs of the smallest preterm infants, and additional protein supplementation must be provided. Although substantial evidence exists to support quantitative protein goals for human milk-fed preterm infants, the optimal type of protein for use in human milk fortification remains uncertain. This question was addressed through a PubMed literature search of prospective clinical trials conducted since 1990 in preterm or low-birth-weight infant populations. The following 3 different aspects of protein quality were evaluated: whey-to-casein ratio, hydrolyzed versus intact protein, and bovine milk protein versus human milk protein. Because of a scarcity of current studies conducted with fortified human milk, studies examining protein quality using preterm infant formulas were included to address certain components of the clinical question. Twenty-six studies were included in the review study. No definite advantage was found for any specific whey-to-casein ratio. Protein hydrolyzate products with appropriate formulations can support adequate growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status and may reduce gastrointestinal transit time, gastroesophageal reflux events, and later incidence of atopic dermatitis in some infants. Plasma amino acid levels similar to those of infants fed exclusive human milk-based diets can be achieved with products composed of a mixture of bovine proteins, peptides, and amino acids formulated to replicate the amino acid composition of human milk. Growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status are similar for infants fed human milk

  6. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  7. Speciated Human High Density Lipoprotein Protein Proximity Profiles†

    PubMed Central

    Gauthamadasa, Kekulawalage; Rosales, Corina; Pownall, Henry J.; Macha, Stephen; Jerome, W. Gray; Huang, Rong; Silva, R. A.Gangani. D.

    2010-01-01

    It is expected that the attendant structural heterogeneity of human high density lipoprotein (HDL) complexes is a determinant of its varied metabolic functions. To determine structural heterogeneity of HDL, major apolipoprotein stoichiometry profiles in human HDL were determined. First, HDL was separated into two main populations, with and without apolipoprotein (apo) A-II, LpA-I and LpA-I/A-II respectively. Each main population was further separated into six individual subfractions using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Protein proximity profiles (PPP) of major apolipoproteins in each individual subfraction was determined by optimally cross-linking apolipoproteins within individual particles with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3), a bifunctional cross linker, followed by molecular weight determination by MALDI-MS. The PPPs of LpA-I subfractions indicated that the number of apoA-I molecules increased from two to three to four upon increase in the LpA-I particle size. On the other hand, the entire population of LpA-I/A-II demonstrated the presence of only two proximal apoA-I molecules per particle, while the number of apoA-II molecules varied from one dimeric apoA-II to two and then to three. For most of the above PPP profiles, an additional population that contained a single molecule of apoC-III in addition to apoA-I and/or apoA-II was detected. Upon composition analyses of individual subpopulations, LpA-I/A-II displayed comparable proportions for total protein (~58%), phospholipids (~21%) total cholesterol (~16%), triglycerides (~5%) and free cholesterol (~4%) across subfractions. LpA-I components, on the other hand, showed significant variability. This novel information on HDL subfractions will form a basis for better understanding particle specific functions of HDL. PMID:21073165

  8. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Richard B

    2002-03-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma. PMID:11906839

  9. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  10. Unfolded protein response in Gaucher disease: from human to Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Gaucher disease (GD), resulting from mutations in the GBA gene, mutant β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) molecules are recognized as misfolded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). They are retrotranslocated to the cytoplasm, where they are ubiquitinated and undergo proteasomal degradation in a process known as the ER Associated Degradation (ERAD). We have shown in the past that the degree of ERAD of mutant GCase correlates with GD severity. Persistent presence of mutant, misfolded protein molecules in the ER leads to ER stress and evokes the unfolded protein response (UPR). Methods We investigated the presence of UPR in several GD models, using molecular and behavioral assays. Results Our results show the existence of UPR in skin fibroblasts from GD patients and carriers of GD mutations. We could recapitulate UPR in two different Drosophila models for carriers of GD mutations: flies heterozygous for the endogenous mutant GBA orthologs and flies expressing the human N370S or L444P mutant GCase variants. We encountered early death in both fly models, indicating the deleterious effect of mutant GCase during development. The double heterozygous flies, and the transgenic flies, expressing mutant GCase in dopaminergic/serotonergic cells developed locomotion deficit. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that mutant GCase induces the UPR in GD patients as well as in carriers of GD mutations and leads to development of locomotion deficit in flies heterozygous for GD mutations. PMID:24020503

  11. Structural and Dynamic Properties of the Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; van der Kamp, Marc W.; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases involve the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to its misfolded pathogenic form (PrPSc). To better understand the structural mechanism of this conversion, we performed extensive all-atom, explicit-solvent molecular-dynamics simulations for three structures of the wild-type human PrP (huPrP) at different pH values and temperatures. Residue 129 is polymorphic, being either Met or Val. Two of the three structures have Met in position 129 and the other has Val. Lowering the pH or raising the temperature induced large conformational changes of the C-terminal globular domain and increased exposure of its hydrophobic core. In some simulations, HA and its preceding S1-HA loop underwent large displacements. The C-terminus of HB was unstable and sometimes partially unfolded. Two hydrophobic residues, Phe-198 and Met-134, frequently became exposed to solvent. These conformational changes became more dramatic at lower pH or higher temperature. Furthermore, Tyr-169 and the S2-HB loop, or the X-loop, were different in the starting structures but converged to common conformations in the simulations for the Met-129, but not the Val-129, protein. α-Strands and β-strands formed in the initially unstructured N-terminus. α-Strand propensity in the N-terminus was different between the Met-129 and Val129 proteins, but β-strand propensity was similar. This study reveals detailed structural and dynamic properties of huPrP, providing insight into the mechanism of the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. PMID:24606939

  12. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  13. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Benjamin P.; Robertson, David L.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity. PMID:25538735

  14. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  15. A role for heterochromatin protein 1γ at human telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Canudas, Silvia; Houghtaling, Benjamin R.; Bhanot, Monica; Sasa, Ghadir; Savage, Sharon A.; Bertuch, Alison A.; Smith, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Human telomere function is mediated by shelterin, a six-subunit complex that is required for telomere replication, protection, and cohesion. TIN2, the central component of shelterin, has binding sites to three subunits: TRF1, TRF2, and TPP1. Here we identify a fourth partner, heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ), that binds to a conserved canonical HP1-binding motif, PXVXL, in the C-terminal domain of TIN2. We show that HP1γ localizes to telomeres in S phase, where it is required to establish/maintain cohesion. We further demonstrate that the HP1-binding site in TIN2 is required for sister telomere cohesion and can impact telomere length maintenance by telomerase. Remarkably, the PTVML HP1-binding site is embedded in the recently identified cluster of mutations in TIN2 that gives rise to dyskeratosis congenita (DC), an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by defects in telomere maintenance. We show that DC-associated mutations in TIN2 abrogate binding to HP1γ and that DC patient cells are defective in sister telomere cohesion. Our data indicate a novel requirement for HP1γ in the establishment/maintenance of cohesion at human telomeres and, furthermore, may provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenesis in TIN2-mediated DC. PMID:21865325

  16. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres.

    PubMed

    Glass, Joshua J; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P R; Parton, Robert G; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells-an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:27031090

  17. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  18. Protein kinase C translocation in human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hoauyan; Friedman, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and translocation in response to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), serotonin (5-HT) and thrombin was assessed in human platelets. Stimulation with PMA and 5-HT for 10 minutes or thrombin for 1 minute elicited platelet PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. The catecholamines, norepinephrine or epinephrine at 10 {mu}M concentrations did not induce redistribution of platelet PKC. Serotonin and the specific 5-HT{sub 2} receptor agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-amino-propane (DOI) but not the 5-HT{sub 1A} or 5-HT{sub 1B} agonists, ({plus minus}) 8-hydroxy-dipropylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or 5-methoxy-3-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridin) 1H-indole succinate (RU 24969) induced dose-dependent PKC translocations. Serotonin-evoked PKC translocation was blocked by selective 5-HT{sub 2} receptor antagonists, ketanserin and spiroperidol. These results suggest that, in human platelets, PMA, thrombin and 5-HT can elicit PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. Serotonin-induced PKC translocation in platelets is mediated via 5-HT{sub 2} receptors.

  19. Interaction and localization diversities of global and local hubs in human protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Kiran, M; Nagarajaram, H A

    2016-08-16

    Hubs, the highly connected nodes in protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs), are associated with several characteristic properties and are known to perform vital roles in cells. We defined two classes of hubs, global (housekeeping) and local (tissue-specific) hubs. These two categories of hubs are distinct from each other with respect to their abundance, structure and function. However, how distinct are the spatial expression pattern and other characteristics of their interacting partners is still not known. Our investigations revealed that the partners of the local hubs compared with those of global hubs are conserved across the tissues in which they are expressed. Partners of local hubs show diverse subcellular localizations as compared with the partners of global hubs. We examined the nature of interacting domains in both categories of hubs and found that they are promiscuous in global hubs but not so in local hubs. Deletion of some of the local and global hubs has an impact on the characteristic path length of the network indicating that those hubs are inter-modular in nature. Our present study has, therefore, shed further light on the characteristic features of the local and global hubs in human PPIN. This knowledge of different topological aspects of hubs with regard to their types and subtypes is essential as it helps in better understanding of roles of hub proteins in various cellular processes under various conditions including those caused by host-pathogen interactions and therefore useful in prioritizing targets for drug design and repositioning. PMID:27400769

  20. The importance of selecting a proper biological milieu for protein corona analysis in vitro: Human plasma versus human serum.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) exposure to biological fluids in the body results in protein binding to the NP surface, which forms a protein coating that is called the "protein corona". To simplify studies of protein-NP interactions and protein corona formation, NPs are incubated with biological solutions, such as human serum or human plasma, and the effects of this exposure are characterized in vitro. Yet, how NP exposure to these two different biological milieus affects protein corona composition and cell response has not been investigated. Here, we explore the differences between the protein coronas that form when NPs are incubated in human serum versus human plasma. NP characterization indicated that NPs that were exposed to human plasma had higher amounts of proteins bound to their surfaces, and were slightly larger in size than those exposed to human serum. In addition, significant differences in corona composition were also detected with gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, where a higher fraction of coagulation proteins and complement factors were found on the plasma-exposed NPs. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the uptake of plasma-exposed NPs was higher than that of serum-exposed NPs by RAW 264.7 macrophage immune cells, but not by NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. This difference is likely due to the elevated amounts of opsonins, such as fibrinogen, on the surfaces of the NPs exposed to plasma, but not serum, because these components trigger NP internalization by immune cells. As the human plasma better mimics the composition of the in vivo environment, namely blood, in vitro protein corona studies should employ human plasma, and not human serum, so the biological phenomena that is observed is more similar to that occurring in vivo. PMID:26643610

  1. Genome-wide analysis of high risk human papillomavirus E2 proteins in human primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Pang, Chai Ling; Thierry, Francoise; Teissier, Sebastien; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2014-12-01

    The E2 protein is expressed in the early stage of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection that is associated with cervical lesions. This protein plays important roles in regulation of viral replication and transcription. To characterize the role of E2 protein in modulation of cellular gene expression in HPV infected cells, genome-wide expression profiling of human primary keratinocytes (HPK) harboring HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 was investigated using microarray. The Principle Components Analysis (PCA) revealed that the expression data of HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2-transduced HPKs were rather closely clustered. The Venn diagram of modulated genes showed an overlap of 10 common genes in HPV16 E2 expressing HPK and HPV18 E2 expressing HPK. These genes were expressed with significant difference by comparison with control cells. In addition, the distinct sets of modulated genes were detected 14 and 34 genes in HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 expressing HPKs, respectively. PMID:26484085

  2. Multi-step Loading of Human Minichromosome Maintenance Proteins in Live Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Symeonidou, Ioanna-Eleni; Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Roukos, Vassilis; Rapsomaniki, Maria-Anna; Grecco, Hernán E.; Bastiaens, Philippe; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi

    2013-01-01

    Once-per-cell cycle replication is regulated through the assembly onto chromatin of multisubunit protein complexes that license DNA for a further round of replication. Licensing consists of the loading of the hexameric MCM2–7 complex onto chromatin during G1 phase and is dependent on the licensing factor Cdt1. In vitro experiments have suggested a two-step binding mode for minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins, with transient initial interactions converted to stable chromatin loading. Here, we assess MCM loading in live human cells using an in vivo licensing assay on the basis of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of GFP-tagged MCM protein subunits through the cell cycle. We show that, in telophase, MCM2 and MCM4 maintain transient interactions with chromatin, exhibiting kinetics similar to Cdt1. These are converted to stable interactions from early G1 phase. The immobile fraction of MCM2 and MCM4 increases during G1 phase, suggestive of reiterative licensing. In late G1 phase, a large fraction of MCM proteins are loaded onto chromatin, with maximal licensing observed just prior to S phase onset. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching experiments show subnuclear concentrations of MCM-chromatin interactions that differ as G1 phase progresses and do not colocalize with sites of DNA synthesis in S phase. PMID:24158436

  3. Pharmaceutical excipients influence the function of human uptake transporting proteins.

    PubMed

    Engel, Anett; Oswald, Stefan; Siegmund, Werner; Keiser, Markus

    2012-09-01

    Although pharmaceutical excipients are supposed to be pharmacologically inactive, solubilizing agents like Cremophor EL have been shown to interact with cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent drug metabolism as well as efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (ABCC2). However, knowledge about their influence on the function of uptake transporters important in drug disposition is very limited. In this study we investigated the in vitro influence of polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD), Solutol HS 15 (SOL), and Cremophor EL (CrEL) on the organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1A2, OATP2B1, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 and the Na(+)/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP). In stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells we analyzed the competition of the excipients with the uptake of bromosulfophthalein in OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1, and NTCP, estrone-3-sulfate (E(3)S) in OATP1A2, OATP1B1, and OATP2B1, estradiol-17β-glucuronide in OATP1B3, and taurocholate (TA) in OATP1A2 and NTCP cells. SOL and CrEL were the most potent inhibitors of all transporters with the strongest effect on OATP1A2, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1 (IC(50) < 0.01%). HPCD also strongly inhibited all transport proteins but only for substrates containing a sterane-backbone. Finally, PEG seems to be a selective and potent modulator of OATP1A2 with IC(50) values of 0.05% (TA) and 0.14% (E(3)S). In conclusion, frequently used solubilizing agents were shown to interact substantially with intestinal and hepatic uptake transporters which should be considered in drug development. However, the clinical relevance of these findings needs to be evaluated in further in vivo studies. PMID:22808947

  4. HPLC-DAD protein kinase inhibitor analysis in human serum.

    PubMed

    Dziadosz, Marek; Lessig, Rüdiger; Bartels, Heidemarie

    2012-04-15

    We here describe an HPLC-DAD method to analyse different protein kinase inhibitors. Potential applications of this method are pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring. Optimised chromatography conditions resulted in a very good separation of seven inhibitors (vatalanib, bosutinib, canertinib, tandutinib, pazopanib, dasatinib - internal standard and erlotinib). The good sensitivity makes this method competitive with LC/MS/MS. The separation was performed with a Lichrospher 100-5 RP8, 250 mm × 4 mm column maintained at 30 ± 1 °C, and with a mobile phase of 0.05 M H(3)PO(4)/KH(2)PO(4) (pH=2.3)-acetonitrile (7:3, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. A simple and fast sample preparation sequence with liquid-liquid extraction led to good recoveries (73-90%) of all analytes. The recovery hardly reached 50% only for pazopanib. This method can also be used for targeted protein kinase inhibitor quantification. A perfect linearity in the validated range (20-10,000 ng/mL) and an LOQ of 20 ng/mL were achieved. The relative standard deviations and accuracies of all examined drug concentrations gave values much lower than 15% both for between- and within-batch calculations. All analysed PKIs were stable for 6 months in a 1mg/mL dimethyl sulfoxide stock solution. Vatalanib, bosutinib and erlotinib were also stable in human serum in the whole examined concentration range. PMID:22425385

  5. Production of tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry staining and digitalization within the human protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Olsson, Ingmarie; Ryberg, Urban; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Pontén, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides the means for high-throughput analysis of multiple tissues and cells. The technique is used within the Human Protein Atlas project for global analysis of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, cancer and cell lines. Here we present the assembly of 1 mm cores, retrieved from microscopically selected representative tissues, into a single recipient TMA block. The number and size of cores in a TMA block can be varied from approximately forty 2 mm cores to hundreds of 0.6 mm cores. The advantage of using TMA technology is that large amount of data can rapidly be obtained using a single immunostaining protocol to avoid experimental variability. Importantly, only limited amount of scarce tissue is needed, which allows for the analysis of large patient cohorts (1 2). Approximately 250 consecutive sections (4 μm thick) can be cut from a TMA block and used for immunohistochemical staining to determine specific protein expression patterns for 250 different antibodies. In the Human Protein Atlas project, antibodies are generated towards all human proteins and used to acquire corresponding protein profiles in both normal human tissues from 144 individuals and cancer tissues from 216 different patients, representing the 20 most common forms of human cancer. Immunohistochemically stained TMA sections on glass slides are scanned to create high-resolution images from which pathologists can interpret and annotate the outcome of immunohistochemistry. Images together with corresponding pathology-based annotation data are made publically available for the research community through the Human Protein Atlas portal (www.proteinatlas.org) (Figure 1) (3 4). The Human Protein Atlas provides a map showing the distribution and relative abundance of proteins in the human body. The current version contains over 11 million images with protein expression data for 12.238 unique proteins, corresponding to more than 61% of all proteins

  6. Albumin-Like Protein is the Major Protein Constituent of Luminal Fluid in the Human Endolymphatic Sac

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Kim, Un-Kyoung; Lee, Won-Sang; Bok, Jinwoong; Song, Jung-Whan; Seong, Je Kyung; Choi, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The endolymphatic sac (ES) is an inner ear organ that is connected to the cochleo-vestibular system through the endolymphatic duct. The luminal fluid of the ES contains a much higher concentration of proteins than any other compartment of the inner ear. This high protein concentration likely contributes to inner ear fluid volume regulation by creating an osmotic gradient between the ES lumen and the interstitial fluid. We characterized the protein profile of the ES luminal fluid of patients (n = 11) with enlarged vestibular aqueducts (EVA) by proteomics. In addition, we investigated differences in the protein profiles between patients with recent hearing deterioration and patients without hearing deterioration. The mean total protein concentration of the luminal fluid was 554.7±94.6 mg/dl. A total of 58 out of 517 spots detected by 2-DE were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. The protein profile of the luminal fluid was different from the profile of plasma. Proteins identified from 29 of the spots were also present in the MARC-filtered human plasma; however, the proteins identified from the other 25 spots were not detected in the MARC-filtered human plasma. The most abundant protein in the luminal fluid was albumin-like proteins, but most of them were not detected in MARC-filtered human plasma. The concentration of albumin-like proteins was higher in samples from patients without recent hearing deterioration than in patients with recent hearing deterioration. Consequently, the protein of ES luminal fluid is likely to be originated from both the plasma and the inner ear and considering that inner ear fluid volumes increase abnormally in patients with EVA following recent hearing deterioration, it is tempting to speculate that albumin-like proteins may be involved in the regulation of inner ear fluid volume through creation of an osmotic gradient during pathological conditions such as endolymphatic hydrops. PMID:21738753

  7. Conversion of human choriogonadotropin into a follitropin by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R K; Dean-Emig, D M; Moyle, W R

    1991-02-01

    Human reproduction is dependent upon the actions of follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH), luteinizing hormone (hLH), and chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). While the alpha subunits of these heterodimeric proteins can be interchanged without effect on receptor-binding specificity, their beta subunits differ and direct hormone binding to either LH/CG or FSH receptors. Previous studies employing chemical modifications of the hormones, monoclonal antibodies, or synthetic peptides have implicated hCG beta-subunit residues between Cys-38 and Cys-57 and corresponding regions of hLH beta and hFSH beta in receptor recognition and activation. Since the beta subunits of hCG or hLH and hFSH exhibit very little sequence similarity in this region, we postulated that these residues might contribute to hormone specificity. To test this hypothesis we constructed chimeric hCG/hFSH beta subunits, coexpressed them with the human alpha subunit, and examined their ability to interact with LH and FSH receptors and hormone-specific monoclonal antibodies. Surprisingly, substitution of hFSH beta residues 33-52 for hCG beta residues 39-58 had no effect on receptor binding or stimulation. However, substitution of hFSH beta residues 88-108 in place of the carboxyl terminus of hCG beta (residues 94-145) resulted in a hormone analog identical to hFSH in its ability to bind and stimulate FSH receptors. The altered binding specificity displayed by this analog is not attributable solely to the replacement of hCG beta residues 108-145 or substitution of residues in the "determinant loop" located between hCG beta residues 93 and 100. PMID:1899483

  8. Conversion of human choriogonadotropin into a follitropin by protein engineering.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R K; Dean-Emig, D M; Moyle, W R

    1991-01-01

    Human reproduction is dependent upon the actions of follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH), luteinizing hormone (hLH), and chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). While the alpha subunits of these heterodimeric proteins can be interchanged without effect on receptor-binding specificity, their beta subunits differ and direct hormone binding to either LH/CG or FSH receptors. Previous studies employing chemical modifications of the hormones, monoclonal antibodies, or synthetic peptides have implicated hCG beta-subunit residues between Cys-38 and Cys-57 and corresponding regions of hLH beta and hFSH beta in receptor recognition and activation. Since the beta subunits of hCG or hLH and hFSH exhibit very little sequence similarity in this region, we postulated that these residues might contribute to hormone specificity. To test this hypothesis we constructed chimeric hCG/hFSH beta subunits, coexpressed them with the human alpha subunit, and examined their ability to interact with LH and FSH receptors and hormone-specific monoclonal antibodies. Surprisingly, substitution of hFSH beta residues 33-52 for hCG beta residues 39-58 had no effect on receptor binding or stimulation. However, substitution of hFSH beta residues 88-108 in place of the carboxyl terminus of hCG beta (residues 94-145) resulted in a hormone analog identical to hFSH in its ability to bind and stimulate FSH receptors. The altered binding specificity displayed by this analog is not attributable solely to the replacement of hCG beta residues 108-145 or substitution of residues in the "determinant loop" located between hCG beta residues 93 and 100. PMID:1899483

  9. The Hexameric Structures of Human Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Ta-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood. Principal Findings Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90. Conclusions While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis. PMID:21647436

  10. Conversion of human choriogonadotropin into a follitropin by protein engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.K.; Dean-Emig, D.M.; Moyle, W.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Human reproduction is dependent upon the action of follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH), luteinizing hormone (hLH), and chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). While the {alpha} subunits of these heterodimeric proteins can be interchanged without effect on receptor-binding specificity, their {beta} subunits differ and direct hormone binding to either LH/CG or FSH receptors. Previous studies employing chemical modifications of the hormones, monoclonal antibodies, or synthetic peptides have implicated hCG {beta}-subunit residues between Cys-38 and Cys-57 and corresponding regions of hLH{beta} and hFSH{beta} in receptor recognition and activation. Since the {beta} subunits of hCG or hLH and hFSH exhibit very little sequence similarity in this region, the authors postulated that these residues might contribute to hormone specificity. To test this hypothesis the authors constructed chimeric hCG/hFSH {beta} subunits, coexpressed them with the human {alpha} subunit, and examined their ability to interact with LH and FSH receptors and hormone-specific monoclonal antibodies. Surprisingly, substitution of hFSH{beta} residues 33-52 for hCG{beta} residues 39-58 had no effect on receptor binding or stimulation. However, substitution of hFSH{beta} residues 88-108 in place of the carboxyl terminus of hCG{beta} (residues 94-145) resulted in a hormone analog identical to hFSH in its ability to bind and stimulate FSH receptors. The altered binding specificity displayed by this analog is not attributable solely to the replacement of hCG{beta} residues 108-145 or substitution of residues in the determinant loop located between hCD{beta} residues 93 and 100.

  11. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen. PMID:26410104

  12. Protein structure. Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-01-30

    The 18-kilodalton translocator protein (TSPO), proposed to be a key player in cholesterol transport into mitochondria, is highly expressed in steroidogenic tissues, metastatic cancer, and inflammatory and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. TSPO ligands, including benzodiazepine drugs, are implicated in regulating apoptosis and are extensively used in diagnostic imaging. We report crystal structures (at 1.8, 2.4, and 2.5 angstrom resolution) of TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and a mutant that mimics the human Ala(147)→Thr(147) polymorphism associated with psychiatric disorders and reduced pregnenolone production. Crystals obtained in the lipidic cubic phase reveal the binding site of an endogenous porphyrin ligand and conformational effects of the mutation. The three crystal structures show the same tightly interacting dimer and provide insights into the controversial physiological role of TSPO and how the mutation affects cholesterol binding. PMID:25635101

  13. LON is the master protease that protects against protein aggregation in human mitochondria through direct degradation of misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Brodie, Erica J.; Dougan, David A.; Truscott, Kaye N.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial protein homeostasis is critical for proper cellular function. Under normal conditions resident molecular chaperones and proteases maintain protein homeostasis within the organelle. Under conditions of stress however, misfolded proteins accumulate leading to the activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). While molecular chaperone assisted refolding of proteins in mammalian mitochondria has been well documented, the contribution of AAA+ proteases to the maintenance of protein homeostasis in this organelle remains unclear. To address this gap in knowledge we examined the contribution of human mitochondrial matrix proteases, LONM and CLPXP, to the turnover of OTC-∆, a folding incompetent mutant of ornithine transcarbamylase, known to activate UPRmt. Contrary to a model whereby CLPXP is believed to degrade misfolded proteins, we found that LONM, and not CLPXP is responsible for the turnover of OTC-∆ in human mitochondria. To analyse the conformational state of proteins that are recognised by LONM, we examined the turnover of unfolded and aggregated forms of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and OTC. This analysis revealed that LONM specifically recognises and degrades unfolded, but not aggregated proteins. Since LONM is not upregulated by UPRmt, this pathway may preferentially act to promote chaperone mediated refolding of proteins. PMID:26627475

  14. Enhanced Selectivity for Sulfatide by Engineered Human Glycolipid Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Samygina, Valeria R.; Popov, Alexander N.; Cabo-Bilbao, Aintzane; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Goni-de-Cerio, Felipe; Zhai, Xiuhong; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Malinina, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Human glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) fold represents a novel structural motif for lipid binding/transfer and reversible membrane translocation. GLTPs transfer glycosphingolipids (GSLs) which are key regulators of cell growth, division, surface adhesion, and neurodevelopment. Herein, we report structure-guided engineering of the lipid binding features of GLTP. New crystal structures of wild-type GLTP and two mutants (D48V and A47D||D48V), each containing bound N-nervonoyl-sulfatide, reveal the molecular basis for selective anchoring of sulfatide (3-O-sulfo-galactosylceramide) by D48V-GLTP. Directed point mutations of ‘portal entrance’ residues, A47 and D48, reversibly regulate sphingosine access to the hydrophobic pocket via a mechanism that could involve homo-dimerization. ‘Door-opening’ conformational changes by phenylalanines within the hydrophobic pocket are revealed during lipid encapsulation by new crystal structures of bona fide apo-GLTP and GLTP complexed with N-oleoyl-glucosylceramide. The development of ‘engineered GLTPs’ with enhanced specificity for select GSLs provides a potential new therapeutic approach for targeting GSL-mediated pathologies. PMID:22078563

  15. Sustained release emphasizing recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Hollinger; Uludag; Winn

    1998-05-01

    Bone homeostasis is a dynamic process involving a myriad of cells and substrates modulated by regulatory signals such as hormones, growth and differentiating factors. When this environment is damaged, the regenerative sequalae follows a programmed pattern, and the capacity for successful recovery is often dependent on the extent of the injury. Many bony deficits that are excessively traumatic will not result in complete recovery and require therapeutic intervention(s) such as autografting or grafting from banked bone. However, for numerous reasons, an unacceptably high rate of failure is associated with these conventional therapies. Thus, alternative approaches are under investigation. A class of osteogenic regulatory molecules, the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), have been isolated, cloned and characterized as potent supplements to augment bone regeneration. Optimizing a therapeutic application for BMPs may be dependent upon localized sustained release which in kind relies on a safe and well characterized carrier system. This review will discuss the current status of BMPs in bone regeneration and specifically will present the potential for a clinical therapeutic role of recombinant human BMP-2 sustained release carrier systems. PMID:10837631

  16. C-Reactive Protein in Human Atherogenesis: Facts and Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kefei; Zaczkiewicz, Myron; Liu, Zhongmin; Torzewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in atherosclerosis is controversially discussed. Whereas initial experimental studies suggested a pathogenic role for CRP in atherogenesis, more recent genetic data from Mendelian randomization trials failed to provide evidence for a causative role of CRP in cardiovascular disease. Also, experimental results from laboratories all over the world were indeed contradictory, partly because of species differences in CRP biology and partly because data were not accurately evaluated. Here we summarize the published data from experimental work with mainly human material in order to avoid confusion based on species differences in CRP biology. Experimental work needs to be reevaluated after reconsideration of some traditional rules in research: (1) in order to understand a molecule's role in disease it may be helpful to be aware of its role in physiology; (2) it is necessary to define the disease entity that experimental CRP research deals with; (3) the scientific consensus is as follows: do not try to prove your hypothesis. Specific CRP inhibition followed by use of CRP inhibitors in controlled clinical trials may be the only way to prove or disprove a causative role for CRP in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24799767

  17. Protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum as a conduit to human disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Kaufman, Randal J

    2016-01-21

    In eukaryotic cells, the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for the folding and trafficking of proteins that enter the secretory pathway. Environmental insults or increased protein synthesis often lead to protein misfolding in the organelle, the accumulation of misfolded or unfolded proteins - known as endoplasmic reticulum stress - and the activation of the adaptive unfolded protein response to restore homeostasis. If protein misfolding is not resolved, cells die. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the unfolded protein response help to determine cell fate and function. Furthermore, endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to the aetiology of many human diseases. PMID:26791723

  18. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-05-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better prediction of protein yield, demonstrates the effect of the different types of N-glycosylation of protein yield, and can be used to predict potential targets for strain improvement. The model represents a step towards a more complete description of protein production in P. pastoris, which is required for using these models to understand and optimize protein production processes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 961-969. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26480251

  19. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Express and Secrete Human Surfactant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Worlitzsch, Dieter; Bensel, Tobias; Sawers, R. Gary; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP), originally known from human lung surfactant, are essential to proper respiratory function in that they lower the surface tension of the alveoli. They are also important components of the innate immune system. The functional significance of these proteins is currently reflected by a very large and growing number of publications. The objective goal of this study was to elucidate whether Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to express surfactant proteins. 10 different strains of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were analyzed by means of RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, ELISA, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. The unexpected and surprising finding revealed in this study is that different strains of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa express and secrete proteins that react with currently commercially available antibodies to known human surfactant proteins. Our results strongly suggest that the bacteria are either able to express ‘human-like’ surfactant proteins on their own or that commercially available primers and antibodies to human surfactant proteins detect identical bacterial proteins and genes. The results may reflect the existence of a new group of bacterial surfactant proteins and DNA currently lacking in the relevant sequence and structure databases. At any rate, our knowledge of human surfactant proteins obtained from immunological and molecular biological studies may have been falsified by the presence of bacterial proteins and DNA and therefore requires critical reassessment. PMID:23349731

  20. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa express and secrete human surfactant proteins.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Lars; Schicht, Martin; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Bensel, Tobias; Sawers, R Gary; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP), originally known from human lung surfactant, are essential to proper respiratory function in that they lower the surface tension of the alveoli. They are also important components of the innate immune system. The functional significance of these proteins is currently reflected by a very large and growing number of publications. The objective goal of this study was to elucidate whether Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to express surfactant proteins. 10 different strains of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were analyzed by means of RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, ELISA, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. The unexpected and surprising finding revealed in this study is that different strains of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa express and secrete proteins that react with currently commercially available antibodies to known human surfactant proteins. Our results strongly suggest that the bacteria are either able to express 'human-like' surfactant proteins on their own or that commercially available primers and antibodies to human surfactant proteins detect identical bacterial proteins and genes. The results may reflect the existence of a new group of bacterial surfactant proteins and DNA currently lacking in the relevant sequence and structure databases. At any rate, our knowledge of human surfactant proteins obtained from immunological and molecular biological studies may have been falsified by the presence of bacterial proteins and DNA and therefore requires critical reassessment. PMID:23349731

  1. Robust microarray production of freshly expressed proteins in a human milieu

    PubMed Central

    Festa, Fernanda; Rollins, Sean M.; Vattem, Krishna; Hathaway, Margarita; Lorenz, Phillip; Mendoza, Eliseo Alejandro; Yu, Xiaobo; Qiu, Ji; Kilmer, Greg; Jensen, Penny; Webb, Brian; Ryan, Ed T.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) systems are widely used in proteomics. For clinical applications, mammalian systems are preferred for protein folding and activity; however, the level of protein obtained is low. A new system extracted from human cells (1-Step Human Coupled IVT) has the potential to overcome this problem and deliver high yields of protein expressed in a human milieu. Experimental design Western blots and self-assembled protein microarrays were used to test the efficiency of protein synthesis by 1-Step Human Coupled IVT (HCIVT) compared to rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL). The arrays were also used to measure the immune response obtained from serum of patients exposed to pathogens or vaccine. Results HCIVT performed better than RRL in all experiments. The yield of protein synthesized in HCIVT is more than 10 times higher than RRL, in both western blot and protein microarrays. Moreover, HCIVT showed a robust lot-to-lot reproducibility. In immune assays, the signals of many antigens were detected only in HCIVT-expressed arrays, mainly due to the reduction in the background signal and the increased levels of protein on the array. Conclusion and clinical relevance HCIVT is a robust IVTT system that yields high levels of protein produced in a human milieu. It can be used in applications where protein expression in a mammalian system and high yields are needed. The increased immunogenic response of HCIVT-expressed proteins will be critical for biomarker discovery in many diseases, including cancer. PMID:23027544

  2. A zinc protein isolated from human parotid saliva.

    PubMed Central

    Henkin, R I; Lippoldt, R E; Bilstad, J; Edelhoch, H

    1975-01-01

    A zinc protein has been isolated and purified to apparent homogeneity from subjects with normal taste acuity by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The protein has a molecular weight of 37,000 and does not appear to have subunits. It is composed of 8% histidine residues and has 2 moles of zinc per mole of protein. Images PMID:1054831

  3. Fractionation of Plasmodium-infected human red blood cells to study protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Bittl, Verena; Przyborski, Jude M

    2015-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation is a valuable tool to follow protein traffic between cellular compartments. Here we detail a procedure for fractionating erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite P. falciparum using the bacterial pore-forming protein Streptolysin O (SLO). Additionally we describe an experimental protocol to determine protein topology by carrying out a protease protection assay on SLO-lysed infected erythrocytes. PMID:25702109

  4. Development of Human Muscle Protein Measurement with MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chen; Evans, Harlan; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that micro-gravity has a strong influence on the human musculoskeletal system. A number of studies have shown that significant changes in skeletal muscles occur in both space flight and bedrest simulation. In our 5 week bedrest study, the cross-sectional area of soleus-gastrocnemius decreased about 12% while the cross-sectional area of anterior calf muscles decreased about 4%. Using volume measurements, these losses increased after 17 weeks to approximately 30% and 21% respectively. Significant muscle atrophy was also found on the SL-J crew members after only 8 days in space. It is important that these effects are fully understood so that countermeasures can be developed. The same knowledge might also be useful in preventing muscle atrophy related to other medical problems. A major problem with anatomical measurements of muscle during bed rest and microgravity is the influence of fluid shifts and water balance on the measurement of muscle volume, especially when the exposure duration is short and the atrophy is relatively small. Fluid shifts were documented in Skylab by visual observations of blood vessel distention, rapid changes in limb volume, center of mass measurements and subjective descriptions such as puffy faces and head fullness. It has been reported that the muscle water content of biopsied soleus muscles decreased following 8 hours of head down tilt bed rest. Three aspects of fluid shifts that can affect volume measurements are: first, the shift of fluid that occurs whenever there is a change from upright to a recumbent position and vice versa; second, the potential for fluid accumulation in the lower limbs resulting from muscle damage caused by overextending atrophied muscle or swelling caused by deconditioned precapillary sphincter muscles during reambulation; third, the net change of hydration level during and after bed rest or spaceflight. Because of these transitory fluid shifts, muscle protein is expected to represent muscle capacity

  5. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. PMID:25847157

  6. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Trichohyalin-like 1 protein is a member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. ► Specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein were generated. ► TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. ► TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in tumor nests of BCC and SCC. ► The expression of TCHHL1 proteins increased in epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris. - Abstract: Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes.

  7. Skeletal ligament healing using the recombinant human amelogenin protein.

    PubMed

    Hanhan, Salem; Ejzenberg, Ayala; Goren, Koby; Saba, Faris; Suki, Yarden; Sharon, Shay; Shilo, Dekel; Waxman, Jacob; Spitzer, Elad; Shahar, Ron; Atkins, Ayelet; Liebergall, Meir; Blumenfeld, Anat; Deutsch, Dan; Haze, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Injuries to ligaments are common, painful and debilitating, causing joint instability and impaired protective proprioception sensation around the joint. Healing of torn ligaments usually fails to take place, and surgical replacement or reconstruction is required. Previously, we showed that in vivo application of the recombinant human amelogenin protein (rHAM(+)) resulted in enhanced healing of the tooth-supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether amelogenin might also enhance repair of skeletal ligaments. The rat knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) was chosen to prove the concept. Full thickness tear was created and various concentrations of rHAM(+), dissolved in propylene glycol alginate (PGA) carrier, were applied to the transected MCL. 12 weeks after transection, the mechanical properties, structure and composition of transected ligaments treated with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) were similar to the normal un-transected ligaments, and were much stronger, stiffer and organized than control ligaments, treated with PGA only. Furthermore, the proprioceptive free nerve endings, in the 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) treated group, were parallel to the collagen fibres similar to their arrangement in normal ligament, while in the control ligaments the free nerve endings were entrapped in the scar tissue at different directions, not parallel to the axis of the force. Four days after transection, treatment with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) increased the amount of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers at the injured site. In conclusion application of rHAM(+) dose dependently induced mechanical, structural and sensory healing of torn skeletal ligament. Initially the process involved recruitment and proliferation of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers. PMID:26917487

  8. The human mitochondrial genome may code for more than 13 proteins.

    PubMed

    Capt, Charlotte; Passamonti, Marco; Breton, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The human mitochondrial (mt) DNA is commonly described as a small, maternally inherited molecule that encodes 13 protein components of the oxidative phosphorylation system and 24 structural RNAs required for their translation. However, recent studies indicate that the human mtDNA has a larger functional repertoire than previously believed. This paper briefly summarizes these studies, which suggest to reconsider our way to describe the human mitochondrial DNA as it may code for more than 13 proteins. PMID:25630734

  9. CD19xCD3 DART protein mediates human B-cell depletion in vivo in humanized BLT mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Perry; Thayer, William O; Liu, Liqin; Silvestri, Guido; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic strategies are needed for the treatment of hematologic malignancies; and bispecific antibody-derived molecules, such as dual-affinity re-targeting (DART) proteins, are being developed to redirect T cells to kill target cells expressing tumor or viral antigens. Here we present our findings of specific and systemic human B-cell depletion by a CD19xCD3 DART protein in humanized BLT mice. Administration of the CD19xCD3 DART protein resulted in a dramatic sustained depletion of human CD19+ B cells from the peripheral blood, as well as a dramatic systemic reduction of human CD19+ B-cell levels in all tissues (bone marrow, spleen, liver, lung) analyzed. When human CD8+ T cells were depleted from the mice, no significant B-cell depletion was observed in response to CD19xCD3 DART protein treatment, confirming that human CD8+ T cells are the primary effector cells in this in vivo model. These studies validate the use of BLT humanized mice for the in vivo evaluation and preclinical development of bispecific molecules that redirect human T cells to selectively deplete target cells. PMID:27119115

  10. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in