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Sample records for human homeobox gene

  1. Comprehensive comparative homeobox gene annotation in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Boychenko, Veronika; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of genes coding for transcription factors with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix structure called a homeodomain and which play a crucial role in pattern formation during embryogenesis. Many homeobox genes are located in clusters and some of these, most notably the HOX genes, are known to have antisense or opposite strand long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes that play a regulatory role. Because automated annotation of both gene clusters and non-coding genes is fraught with difficulty (over-prediction, under-prediction, inaccurate transcript structures), we set out to manually annotate all homeobox genes in the mouse and human genomes. This includes all supported splice variants, pseudogenes and both antisense and flanking lncRNAs. One of the areas where manual annotation has a significant advantage is the annotation of duplicated gene clusters. After comprehensive annotation of all homeobox genes and their antisense genes in human and in mouse, we found some discrepancies with the current gene set in RefSeq regarding exact gene structures and coding versus pseudogene locus biotype. We also identified previously un-annotated pseudogenes in the DUX, Rhox and Obox gene clusters, which helped us re-evaluate and update the gene nomenclature in these regions. We found that human homeobox genes are enriched in antisense lncRNA loci, some of which are known to play a role in gene or gene cluster regulation, compared to their mouse orthologues. Of the annotated set of 241 human protein-coding homeobox genes, 98 have an antisense locus (41%) while of the 277 orthologous mouse genes, only 62 protein coding gene have an antisense locus (22%), based on publicly available transcriptional evidence. PMID:26412852

  2. Lineage-restricted expression of homeobox-containing genes in human hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W F; Largman, C; Lowney, P; Corral, J C; Detmer, K; Hauser, C A; Simonitch, T A; Hack, F M; Lawrence, H J

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the role of homeobox-containing genes in human hematopoiesis because homeobox genes (i) control cell fate in the Drosophila embryo, (ii) are expressed in specific patterns in human embryos, and (iii) appear to function as transcription factors that control cell phenotype in other mammalian organs. Using four homeobox probes from the HOX2 locus and a previously undescribed homeobox cDNA (PL1), we screened mRNAs from 18 human leukemic cell lines representing erythroid, myeloid, and T- and B-cell lineages. Complex patterns of lineage-restricted expression are observed: some are restricted to a single lineage, while others are expressed in multiple lineages. No single homeobox gene is expressed in all types of hematopoietic cells, but each cell type exhibits homeobox gene expression. HOX2.2 and -2.3 homeobox-containing cDNAs were cloned from an erythroleukemia cell (HEL) cDNA library, while the homeobox cDNA PL1 was isolated from a monocytic cell (U-937) library. Differentiation of HEL and K-562 cells with various inducers results in modulation of specific homeobox transcripts. In addition, HOX2.2 is expressed in normal bone marrow cells. We have demonstrated (i) lineage-restricted expression of five homeobox genes in erythroid and monocytic cell lines; (ii) expression of additional homeobox genes in other cell lineages (HL-60 and lymphoid cells); (iii) expression of one homeobox gene in normal marrow cells; and (iv) modulation of expression during differentiation. These data suggest that these genes play a role in human hematopoietic development and lineage commitment. Images PMID:2573064

  3. Characterization and target genes of nine human PRD-like homeobox domain genes expressed exclusively in early embryos

    PubMed Central

    Madissoon, Elo; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Töhönen, Virpi; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Petropoulous, Sophie; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Linnarsson, Sten; Lanner, Fredrik; Månsson, Robert; Hovatta, Outi; Bürglin, Thomas R.; Katayama, Shintaro; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    PAIRED (PRD)-like homeobox genes belong to a class of predicted transcription factor genes. Several of these PRD-like homeobox genes have been predicted in silico from genomic sequence but until recently had no evidence of transcript expression. We found recently that nine PRD-like homeobox genes, ARGFX, CPHX1, CPHX2, DPRX, DUXA, DUXB, NOBOX, TPRX1 and TPRX2, were expressed in human preimplantation embryos. In the current study we characterized these PRD-like homeobox genes in depth and studied their functions as transcription factors. We cloned multiple transcript variants from human embryos and showed that the expression of these genes is specific to embryos and pluripotent stem cells. Overexpression of the genes in human embryonic stem cells confirmed their roles as transcription factors as either activators (CPHX1, CPHX2, ARGFX) or repressors (DPRX, DUXA, TPRX2) with distinct targets that could be explained by the amino acid sequence in homeodomain. Some PRD-like homeodomain transcription factors had high concordance of target genes and showed enrichment for both developmentally important gene sets and a 36 bp DNA recognition motif implicated in Embryo Genome Activation (EGA). Our data implicate a role for these previously uncharacterized PRD-like homeodomain proteins in the regulation of human embryo genome activation and preimplantation embryo development. PMID:27412763

  4. Epigenetic regulation of the RHOX homeobox gene cluster and its association with human male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Marcy E.; Bleiziffer, Andreas; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Wilkinson, Miles F.

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked RHOX cluster encodes a set of homeobox genes that are selectively expressed in the reproductive tract. Members of the RHOX cluster regulate target genes important for spermatogenesis promote male fertility in mice. Studies show that demethylating agents strongly upregulate the expression of mouse Rhox genes, suggesting that they are regulated by DNA methylation. However, whether this extends to human RHOX genes, whether DNA methylation directly regulates RHOX gene transcription and how this relates to human male infertility are unknown. To address these issues, we first defined the promoter regions of human RHOX genes and performed gain- and loss-of-function experiments to determine whether human RHOX gene transcription is regulated by DNA methylation. Our results indicated that DNA methylation is necessary and sufficient to silence human RHOX gene expression. To determine whether RHOX cluster methylation associates with male infertility, we evaluated the methylation status of RHOX genes in sperm from a large cohort of infertility patients. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between RHOX gene cluster hypermethylation and three independent types of semen abnormalities. Hypermethylation was restricted specifically to the RHOX cluster; we did not observe it in genes immediately adjacent to it on the X chromosome. Our results strongly suggest that human RHOX homeobox genes are under an epigenetic control mechanism that is aberrantly regulated in infertility patients. We propose that hypermethylation of the RHOX gene cluster serves as a marker for idiopathic infertility and that it is a candidate to exert a causal role in male infertility. PMID:23943794

  5. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human homeobox gene Prox 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovieva, R.D.; Duncan, M.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    The genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the human homeobox gene Prox 1 as well as its chromosomal localization have been determined. This gene spans more than 40 kb, consists of at least 5 exons, and encodes an 83-kDa protein. It shows 89% identity with the chicken sequence at the nucleotide level in the coding region, while the human and chicken proteins are 94% identical. Among the embryonic tissues analyzed (lens, brain, lung, liver, and kidney), the human Prox 1 gene is most actively expressed i the developing lens, similar to the expression pattern of the chicken Prox 1 gene. The Prox 1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 1q32.2-q32.3. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  7. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin. PMID:7687426

  8. PBX2 and PBX3, new homeobox genes with extensive homology to the human proto-oncogene PBX1

    SciTech Connect

    Monica, K.; Galili, N.; Nourse, J.; Saltman, D.; Cleary, M.L. )

    1991-12-01

    Two new homeobox genes, PBX2 and PBX3, were isolated on the basis of their extensive homology to PBX1, a novel human homeobox gene involved in t(1;19) translocation in acute pre-B-cell leukemias. The predicted pbx2 and pbx3 proteins are 92 and 94% identical to Pbx1 over a large region of 266 amino acids within and flanking their homeodomains, but all three proteins diverge significantly near their amino and carboxy termini. Chromosome in situ hybridizations demonstrated that the PBX genes are not clustered but map to separate chromosomal loci: PBX1, 1q23; PBX2, 3q22-23; PBX3, 9q33-34. Expression of PBX2 or PBX3 was not restricted to particular states of differentiation or development, as mRNA transcripts of these genes were detected in most fetal and adult tissues and all cell lines, unlike PBX1, which is not expressed in lymphoid cell lines. Similar to PBX1RNA, PBX3 RNA is alternatively spliced to yield two translation products with different carboxy termini, a feature not observed for PBX2. Their extensive sequence similarity and widespread expression suggest a generalized, overlapping role for Pbx proteins in most cell types. Differences in their amino and carboxy termini may modulate their activities, mediated in part by differential splicing and, for PBX1, protein fusion following t(1;19) chromosomal translocation.

  9. Molecular cloning of the human homeobox gene goosecoid (GSC) and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 14q32. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, M.; De Robertis, E.M.; Geissert, D. ); Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Klisak, I.; Sparkes, R.S. )

    1994-05-15

    Goosecoid is a homeobox gene first isolated from a Xenopus dorsal lip cDNA library. Homologous genes have been isolated from mouse, zebrafish, and chick. In all species examined, the gene is expressed and plays an important role during the process of gastrulation in early embryonic development. The authors report here the cloning of the human goosecoid (GSC) from a genomic library and the sequence of its encoded protein. The genomic organization and protein sequence of the human gene are highly conserved with respect to those of its Xenopus and mouse counterparts: all three genes consist of three exons, with conserved exon-intron boundaries. The sequence of the homeo-domain is 100% conserved in most vertebrates. Using somatic cell hybrid and chromosomal in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. An EG-VEGF-Dependent Decrease in Homeobox Gene NKX3.1 Contributes to Cytotrophoblast Dysfunction: A Possible Mechanism in Human Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Padma; Brouillet, Sophie; Pratt, Anita; Borg, Anthony; Kalionis, Bill; Goffin, Frederic; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Munaut, Carine; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Benharouga, Mohamed; Fournier, Thierry; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic fetal growth restriction (FGR) is frequently associated with placental insufficiency. Previous reports have provided evidence that endocrine gland–derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF), a placental secreted protein, is expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy, controls both trophoblast proliferation and invasion, and its increased expression is associated with human FGR. In this study, we hypothesize that EG-VEGF-dependent changes in placental homeobox gene expressions contribute to trophoblast dysfunction in idiopathic FGR. The changes in EG-VEGF-dependent homeobox gene expressions were determined using a homeobox gene cDNA array on placental explants of 8–12 wks gestation after stimulation with EG-VEGF in vitro for 24 h. The homeobox gene array identified a greater-than-five-fold increase in HOXA9, HOXC8, HOXC10, HOXD1, HOXD8, HOXD9 and HOXD11, while NKX 3.1 showed a greater-than-two-fold decrease in mRNA expression compared with untreated controls. Homeobox gene NKX3.1 was selected as a candidate because it is a downstream target of EG-VEGF and its expression and functional roles are largely unknown in control and idiopathic FGR-affected placentae. Real-time PCR and immunoblotting showed a significant decrease in NKX3.1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, in placentae from FGR compared with control pregnancies. Gene inactivation in vitro using short-interference RNA specific for NKX3.1 demonstrated an increase in BeWo cell differentiation and a decrease in HTR-8/SVneo proliferation. We conclude that the decreased expression of homeobox gene NKX3.1 downstream of EG-VEGF may contribute to the trophoblast dysfunction associated with idiopathic FGR pregnancies. PMID:26208047

  11. HOXB homeobox gene expression in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, R; Garrido, E; Piña, P; Hidalgo, A; Lazos, M; Ochoa, R; Salcedo, M

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences in target genes regulating gene expression. Thirty-nine HOX genes have been mapped in four conserved clusters: A, B, C, and D; they act as master genes regulating the identity of body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. The role played by HOX genes in adult cell differentiation is unclear to date, but growing evidence suggests that they may play an important role in the development of cancer. To study the role played by HOX genes in cervical cancer, in the present work, we analyzed the expression of HOXB genes and the localization of their transcripts in human cervical tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization were used to detect HOXB expression in 11 normal cervical tissues and 17 cervical carcinomas. It was determined that HOXB1, B3, B5, B6, B7, B8, and B9 genes are expressed in normal adult cervical epithelium and squamous cervical carcinomas. Interestingly, HOXB2, HOXB4, and HOXB13 gene expression was found only in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that the new expression of HOXB2, HOXB4, and B13 genes is involved in cervical cancer. PMID:16445654

  12. PCR cloning of the human homeobox-containing cognate of the Drosophila `caudal` gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morosov, G.; Gindilis, V.; Rechitsky, S.

    1994-09-01

    A new homeoprotein evolutionary systematics predicts that there are approximately 50 undiscovered orthologous cognates among murine and human homeotic genes (HOMs). For example, the `caudal` family contains 4 Cdx murine HOMs but no known Cdx-orthologues have been identified in humans. The murine Cdx-genes contain an intron cutting the HOM region in the most conservative segment commonly used for 3{prime}-primer designs. Considering this fact, we designed 5{prime}- and 3{prime}-primers outside the intron region of the murine Cdx-1 HOM domain. A 633 bp PCR product obtained using these primers annealed with human genomic DNA was cloned and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence of the coding regions of the cloned insertion was identical to the murine Cdx-1 HOM, while 16 nt differences in 172 nt of the n2 and n3 exons were observed. Experiments regarding a chromosome localization of the cloned human CDX-1 gene is in a process.

  13. Isolation of the human MOX2 homeobox gene and localization to chromosome 7p22.1-p21.3

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriou, M.; Theodorakis, K.; Mankoo, B.

    1995-04-10

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA clones encoding a novel human homeobox gene, MOX2, the homologue of the murine mox-2 gene. The MOX2 protein contains all of the characteristic features of Mox-2 proteins of other vertebrate species, namely the homeobox, the polyhistidine stretch, and a number of potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. The homeodomain of MOX2 protein is identical to all other vertebrate species reported so far (rodents and amphibians). Outside the homeodomain, Mox-2 proteins share a high degree of identity, except for a few amino acid differences encountered between the human and the rodent polypeptides. A polyhistidine stretch of 12 amino acids in the N terminal region of the protein is also conserved among humans, rodents, and (only partly) amphibians. The chromosomal position of MOX2 was assigned to 7p22.1-p21.3. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Homeobox genes expressed during echinoderm arm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Said, Khaled; Thorndyke, Michael; Martinez, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration in echinoderms has proved to be more amenable to study in the laboratory than the more classical vertebrate models, since the smaller genome size and the absence of multiple orthologs for different genes in echinoderms simplify the analysis of gene function during regeneration. In order to understand the role of homeobox-containing genes during arm regeneration in echinoderms, we isolated the complement of genes belonging to the Hox class that are expressed during this process in two major echinoderm groups: asteroids (Echinaster sepositus and Asterias rubens) and ophiuroids (Amphiura filiformis), both of which show an extraordinary capacity for regeneration. By exploiting the sequence conservation of the homeobox, putative orthologs of several Hox genes belonging to the anterior, medial, and posterior groups were isolated. We also report the isolation of a few Hox-like genes expressed in the same systems. PMID:24309817

  15. Role of homeobox genes in the patterning, specification, and differentiation of ectodermal appendages in mammals.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Morasso, Maria I

    2008-08-01

    Homeobox genes are an evolutionarily conserved class of transcription factors that are key regulators during developmental processes such as regional specification, patterning, and differentiation. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern, loss- and/or gain-of-function mouse models, and naturally occurring mouse and human mutations of known homeobox genes required for the development of ectodermal appendages. PMID:18459147

  16. Role of homeobox genes in the patterning, specification and differentiation of ectodermal appendages in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Morasso, Maria I.

    2008-01-01

    Homeobox genes are an evolutionarily conserved class of transcription factors that are key regulators during developmental processes such as regional specification, patterning and differentiation. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern, loss-and/or gain-of-function mouse models, and naturally occurring mouse and human mutations of known homeobox genes required for the development of ectodermal appendages. PMID:18459147

  17. Homeobox Gene Deregulation: Impact on the Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haria, Dhwani; Naora, Honami

    2014-01-01

    Homeobox genes comprise a super-family of evolutionarily conserved genes that play essential roles in controlling body plan specification and cell fate determination. Substantial evidence indicates that leukemogenesis is driven by abnormal expression of homeobox genes that control hematopoiesis. In solid tumors, aberrant expression of homeobox genes has been increasingly found to modulate diverse processes such as cell proliferation, cell death, metastasis, angiogenesis and DNA repair. This review discusses how homeobox genes are deregulated in solid tumors and the functional significance of this deregulation in the hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24761365

  18. A novel, tissue-specific, Drosophila homeobox gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barad, M; Jack, T; Chadwick, R; McGinnis, W

    1988-01-01

    The homeobox gene family of Drosophila appears to control a variety of position-specific patterning decisions during embryonic and imaginal development. Most of these patterning decisions determine groups of cells on the anterior-posterior axis of the Drosophila germ band. We have isolated a novel homeobox gene from Drosophila, designated H2.0. H2.0 has the most diverged homeobox so far characterized in metazoa, and, in contrast to all previously isolated homeobox genes, H2.0 exhibits a tissue-specific pattern of expression. The cells that accumulate transcripts for this novel gene correspond to the visceral musculature and its anlagen. Images PMID:2901348

  19. The six family of homeobox genes in development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kimberly L; Patrick, Aaron N; McCoy, Erica L; Ford, Heide L

    2008-01-01

    The homeobox gene superfamily encodes transcription factors that act as master regulators of development through their ability to activate or repress a diverse range of downstream target genes. Numerous families exist within the homeobox gene superfamily, and are classified on the basis of conservation of their homeodomains as well as additional motifs that contribute to DNA binding and to interactions with other proteins. Members of one such family, the Six family, form a transcriptional complex with Eya and Dach proteins, and together these proteins make up part of the retinal determination network first identified in Drosophila. This network is highly conserved in both invertebrate and vertebrate species, where it influences the development of numerous organs in addition to the eye, primarily through regulation of cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Mutations in Six, Eya, and Dach genes have been identified in a variety of human genetic disorders, demonstrating their critical role in human development. In addition, aberrant expression of Six, Eya, and Dach occurs in numerous human tumors, and Six1, in particular, plays a causal role both in tumor initiation and in metastasis. Emerging evidence for the importance of Six family members and their cofactors in numerous human tumors suggests that targeting of this complex may be a novel and powerful means to inhibit both tumor growth and progression. PMID:19055944

  20. Evolutionary Change of the Numbers of Homeobox Genes in Bilateral Animals

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jongmin; Nei, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    It has been known that the conservation or diversity of homeobox genes is responsible for the similarity and variability of some of the morphological or physiological characters among different organisms. To gain some insights into the evolutionary pattern of homeobox genes in bilateral animals, we studied the change of the numbers of these genes during the evolution of bilateral animals. We analyzed 2,031 homeodomain sequences compiled from 11 species of bilateral animals ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. Our phylogenetic analysis using a modified reconciled-tree method suggested that there were at least about 88 homeobox genes in the common ancestor of bilateral animals. About 50–60 genes of them have left at least one descendant gene in each of the 11 species studied, suggesting that about 30–40 genes were lost in a lineage-specific manner. Although similar numbers of ancestral genes have survived in each species, vertebrate lineages gained many more genes by duplication than invertebrate lineages, resulting in more than 200 homeobox genes in vertebrates and about 100 in invertebrates. After these gene duplications, a substantial number of old duplicate genes have also been lost in each lineage. Because many old duplicate genes were lost, it is likely that lost genes had already been differentiated from other groups of genes at the time of gene loss. We conclude that both gain and loss of homeobox genes were important for the evolutionary change of phenotypic characters in bilateral animals. PMID:16079247

  1. Classification and expression analyses of homeobox genes from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Himanshu; Saran, Shweta

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes are compared between genomes in an attempt to understand the evolution of animal development. The ability of the protist, Dictyostelium discoideum, to shift between uni- and multicellularity makes this group ideal for studying the genetic changes that may have occurred during this transition. We present here the first genome-wide classification and comparative genomic analysis of the 14 homeobox genes present in D. discoideum. Based on the structural alignment of the homeodomains, they can be broadly divided into TALE and non-TALE classes. When individual homeobox genes were compared with members of known class or family, we could further classify them into 3 groups, namely, TALE, OTHER and NOVEL classes, but no HOX family was found. The 5 members of TALE class could be further divided into PBX, PKNOX, IRX and CUP families; 4 homeobox genes classified as NOVEL did not show any similarity to any known homeobox genes; while the remaining 5 were classified as OTHERS as they did show certain degree of similarity to few known homeobox genes. No unique RNA expression pattern during development of D. discoideum emerged for members of an individual group. Putative promoter analysis revealed binding sites for few homeobox transcription factors among many probable factors. PMID:25963254

  2. Rapid evolution of mammalian X-linked testis-expressed homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2004-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors that function in various developmental processes and are usually evolutionarily conserved in their sequences. However, two X-chromosome-linked testis-expressed homeobox genes, one from rodents and the other from fruit flies, are known to evolve rapidly under positive Darwinian selection. Here we report yet another case, from primates. TGIFLX is an X-linked homeobox gene that originated by retroposition of the autosomal gene TGIF2, most likely in a common ancestor of rodents and primates. While TGIF2 is ubiquitously expressed, TGIFLX is exclusively expressed in adult testis. A comparison of the TGIFLX sequences among 16 anthropoid primates revealed a significantly higher rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) than synonymous substitution (d(S)), strongly suggesting the action of positive selection. Although the high d(N)/d(S) ratio is most evident outside the homeobox, the homeobox has a d(N)/d(S) of approximately 0.89 and includes two codons that are likely under selection. Furthermore, the rate of radical amino acid substitutions that alter amino acid charge is significantly greater than that of conservative substitutions, suggesting that the selection promotes diversity of the protein charge profile. More interestingly, an analysis of 64 orthologous homeobox genes from humans and mice shows substantially higher rates of amino acid substitution in X-linked testis-expressed genes than in other genes. These results suggest a general pattern of rapid evolution of mammalian X-linked testis-expressed homeobox genes. Although the physiological function of and the exact selective agent on TGIFLX and other rapidly evolving homeobox genes are unclear, the common expression pattern of these transcription factor genes led us to conjecture that the selection is related to one or more aspects of male reproduction and may contribute to speciation. PMID:15238536

  3. The Homeobox Genes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Insights into Their Spatio-Temporal Expression Dynamics during Embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hench, Jürgen; Henriksson, Johan; Abou-Zied, Akram M; Lüppert, Martin; Dethlefsen, Johan; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Tong, Yong Guang; Tang, Lois; Gangishetti, Umesh; Baillie, David L; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes play crucial roles for the development of multicellular eukaryotes. We have generated a revised list of all homeobox genes for Caenorhabditis elegans and provide a nomenclature for the previously unnamed ones. We show that, out of 103 homeobox genes, 70 are co-orthologous to human homeobox genes. 14 are highly divergent, lacking an obvious ortholog even in other Caenorhabditis species. One of these homeobox genes encodes 12 homeodomains, while three other highly divergent homeobox genes encode a novel type of double homeodomain, termed HOCHOB. To understand how transcription factors regulate cell fate during development, precise spatio-temporal expression data need to be obtained. Using a new imaging framework that we developed, Endrov, we have generated spatio-temporal expression profiles during embryogenesis of over 60 homeobox genes, as well as a number of other developmental control genes using GFP reporters. We used dynamic feedback during recording to automatically adjust the camera exposure time in order to increase the dynamic range beyond the limitations of the camera. We have applied the new framework to examine homeobox gene expression patterns and provide an analysis of these patterns. The methods we developed to analyze and quantify expression data are not only suitable for C. elegans, but can be applied to other model systems or even to tissue culture systems. PMID:26024448

  4. The Homeobox Genes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Insights into Their Spatio-Temporal Expression Dynamics during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Zied, Akram M.; Lüppert, Martin; Dethlefsen, Johan; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Tong, Yong Guang; Tang, Lois; Gangishetti, Umesh; Baillie, David L.; Bürglin, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes play crucial roles for the development of multicellular eukaryotes. We have generated a revised list of all homeobox genes for Caenorhabditis elegans and provide a nomenclature for the previously unnamed ones. We show that, out of 103 homeobox genes, 70 are co-orthologous to human homeobox genes. 14 are highly divergent, lacking an obvious ortholog even in other Caenorhabditis species. One of these homeobox genes encodes 12 homeodomains, while three other highly divergent homeobox genes encode a novel type of double homeodomain, termed HOCHOB. To understand how transcription factors regulate cell fate during development, precise spatio-temporal expression data need to be obtained. Using a new imaging framework that we developed, Endrov, we have generated spatio-temporal expression profiles during embryogenesis of over 60 homeobox genes, as well as a number of other developmental control genes using GFP reporters. We used dynamic feedback during recording to automatically adjust the camera exposure time in order to increase the dynamic range beyond the limitations of the camera. We have applied the new framework to examine homeobox gene expression patterns and provide an analysis of these patterns. The methods we developed to analyze and quantify expression data are not only suitable for C. elegans, but can be applied to other model systems or even to tissue culture systems. PMID:26024448

  5. Expression of homeobox genes in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Marta; Chang, Isabelle; Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; Omura, Masayo

    2016-10-01

    Homeobox genes constitute a large family of genes widely studied because of their role in the establishment of the body pattern. However, they are also involved in many other events during development and adulthood. The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) is an excellent model to study neurogenesis in the adult nervous system. Analyses of homeobox genes during development show that some of these genes are involved in the formation and establishment of cell diversity in the MOE. Moreover, the mechanisms of expression of odorant receptors (ORs) constitute one of the biggest enigmas in the field. Analyses of OR promoters revealed the presence of homeodomain binding sites in their sequences. Here we characterize the expression patterns of a set of 49 homeobox genes in the MOE with in situ hybridization. We found that seven of them (Dlx3, Dlx5, Dlx6, Msx1, Meis1, Isl1, and Pitx1) are zonally expressed. The homeobox gene Emx1 is expressed in three guanylate cyclase(+) populations, two located in the MOE and the third one in an olfactory subsystem known as Grüneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nasal cavity. The homeobox gene Tshz1 is expressed in a unique patchy pattern across the MOE. Our findings provide new insights to guide functional studies that aim to understand the complexity of transcription factor expression and gene regulation in the MOE. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2713-2739, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27243442

  6. Pancreatic beta cells express a diverse set of homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, A; Ling, T Y; Odagiri, H; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes, which are found in all eukaryotic organisms, encode transcriptional regulators involved in cell-type differentiation and development. Several homeobox genes encoding homeodomain proteins that bind and activate the insulin gene promoter have been described. In an attempt to identify additional beta-cell homeodomain proteins, we designed primers based on the sequences of beta-cell homeobox genes cdx3 and lmx1 and the Drosophila homeodomain protein Antennapedia and used these primers to amplify inserts by PCR from an insulinoma cDNA library. The resulting amplification products include sequences encoding 10 distinct homeodomain proteins; 3 of these proteins have not been described previously. In addition, an insert was obtained encoding a splice variant of engrailed-2, a homeodomain protein previously identified in the central nervous system. Northern analysis revealed a distinct pattern of expression for each homeobox gene. Interestingly, the PCR-derived clones do not represent a complete sampling of the beta-cell library because no inserts encoding cdx3 or lmx1 protein were obtained. Beta cells probably express additional homeobox genes. The abundance and diversity of homeodomain proteins found in beta cells illustrate the remarkable complexity and redundancy of the machinery controlling beta-cell development and differentiation. Images PMID:7991607

  7. Homeobox genes in the Ctenophora: identification of paired-type and Hox homologues in the atentaculate ctenophore, Beroë ovata.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, J R; Master, V A; Irvine, S; Kourakis, M J; Warriner, S; Martindale, M Q

    1996-12-01

    Homeobox-containing genes are a phylogenetically widespread family of transcription factors that can regulate cell fates during embryogenesis. Two distinct homeobox gene sequences are described for the atentaculate ctenophore Beroë, the first homeoboxes to be identified in this phylum. Beroë homeobox fragments were cloned in a survey of genomic DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Parsimony, neighbor-joining, and maximum likelihood methods were used to infer the orthology of the ctenophore sequences to specific homeoboxes from higher metazoans including Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and humans. Cteno-paired appears most closely related to paired-typed homeoboxes. This is the first evidence of a paired-type homeobox in one of the so-called diploblastic animals. Cteno-Hoxl appears most closely related to members of the Hox class, particularly Antennapedia. PMID:8983194

  8. Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Dogs Enables Identification of the Homeobox Gene, NKX2-8, as a Genetic Component of Neural Tube Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Safra, Noa; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Aguilar, Miriam; Coulson, Rochelle L.; Thomas, Nicholas; Hitchens, Peta L.; Dickinson, Peter J.; Vernau, Karen M.; Wolf, Zena T.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome = 3.0×10−5), after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525) were found to be significantly over-represented (p = 0.036). This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs. PMID:23874236

  9. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy. PMID:26606454

  10. Conservation of Gbx genes from EHG homeobox in bivalve molluscs.

    PubMed

    Mesías-Gansbiller, Crimgilt; Sánchez, José L; Pazos, Antonio J; Lozano, Vanessa; Martínez-Escauriaza, Roi; Luz Pérez-Parallé, M

    2012-04-01

    Homeobox-containing genes encode a set of transcription factors that have been shown to control spatial patterning mechanisms in bilaterian organism development. The homeobox gene Gbx, included in the EHGbox cluster, is implicated in the development of the nervous system. In this study, we surveyed five different families of Bivalvia for the presence of Gbx genes by means of PCR with degenerate primers. We were able to recover seven Gbx gene fragments from five bivalve species: Solen marginatus, Mimachlamys varia, Venerupis pullastra, Ostrea edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis (the derived amino acid sequence were designated Sma-Gbx, Cva-Gbx, Vpu-Gbx, Oed-Gbx and Mga-Gbx, respectively). These genes are orthologous to various Gbx genes present in bilaterian genomes. The Gbx genes in four Bivalvia families, namely Solenidae, Veneridae, Ostreidae and Mytilidae, are newly reported here and we also showed additional information of the Gbx genes of Pectinidae. The phylogenetic analyses by neighbour-joining, UPGMA, maximum parsimony and Bayesian analysis clearly indicated that the Gbx sequences formed a well supported clade and assigned these Gbx genes to the Gbx family. These data permit to confirm that the homeodomain of the Gbx family is highly conserved among these five distinct families of bivalve molluscs. PMID:22245384

  11. Aberrant expression of homeobox gene SIX1 in Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A.F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently identified deregulated expression of homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 which are physiologically involved in development of the embryonal neural plate border region. Here, we examined in HL homeobox gene SIX1 an additional regulator of this embryonal region mediating differentiation of placodal precursors. SIX1 was aberrantly activated in 12 % of HL patient samples in silico, indicating a pathological role in a subset of this B-cell malignancy. In addition, SIX1 expression was detected in HL cell lines which were used as models to reveal upstream factors and target genes of this basic developmental regulator. We detected increased copy numbers of the SIX1 locus at chromosome 14q23 correlating with enhanced expression while chromosomal translocations were absent. Moreover, comparative expression profiling data and pertinent gene modulation experiments indicated that the WNT-signalling pathway and transcription factor MEF2C regulate SIX1 expression. Genes encoding the transcription factors GATA2, GATA3, MSX1 and SPIB – all basic lymphoid regulators - were identified as targets of SIX1 in HL. In addition, cofactors EYA1 and TLE4, respectively, contrastingly mediated activation and suppression of SIX1 target gene expression. Thus, the protein domain interfaces may represent therapeutic targets in SIX1-positive HL subsets. Collectively, our data reveal a gene regulatory network with SIX1 centrally deregulating lymphoid differentiation and support concordance of lymphopoiesis/lymphomagenesis and developmental processes in the neural plate border region. PMID:26473286

  12. Early evolution of the LIM homeobox gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Mansi; Larroux, Claire; Lu, Daniel R; Mohanty, Kareshma; Chapman, Jarrod; Degnan, Bernard M; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-01-01

    LIM homeobox (Lhx) transcription factors are unique to the animal lineage and have patterning roles during embryonic development in flies, nematodes and vertebrates, with a conserved role in specifying neuronal identity. Though genes of this family have been reported in a sponge and a cnidarian, the expression patterns and functions of the Lhx family during development in non-bilaterian phyla are not known. We identified Lhx genes in two cnidarians and a placozoan and report the expression of Lhx genes during embryonic development in Nematostella and the demosponge Amphimedon. Members of the six major LIM homeobox subfamilies are represented in the genomes of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The hydrozoan cnidarian, Hydra magnipapillata, has retained four of the six Lhx subfamilies, but apparently lost two others. Only three subfamilies are represented in the haplosclerid demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. A tandem cluster of three Lhx genes of different subfamilies and a gene containing two LIM domains in the genome of T. adhaerens (an animal without any neurons) indicates that Lhx subfamilies were generated by tandem duplication. This tandem cluster in Trichoplax is likely a remnant of the original chromosomal context in which Lhx subfamilies first appeared. Three of the six Trichoplax Lhx genes are expressed in animals in laboratory culture, as are all Lhx genes in Hydra. Expression patterns of Nematostella Lhx genes correlate with neural territories in larval and juvenile polyp stages. In the aneural demosponge, A. queenslandica, the three Lhx genes are expressed widely during development, including in cells that are associated with the larval photosensory ring. The Lhx family expanded and diversified early in animal evolution, with all six subfamilies already diverged prior to the cnidarian-placozoan-bilaterian last common ancestor. In Nematostella, Lhx gene expression is correlated with neural

  13. Meis1, a PBX1-related homeobox gene involved in myeloid leukemia in BXH-2 mice.

    PubMed

    Moskow, J J; Bullrich, F; Huebner, K; Daar, I O; Buchberg, A M

    1995-10-01

    Leukemia results from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations that disrupt the control mechanisms of normal growth and differentiation. The use of inbred mouse strains that develop leukemia has greatly facilitated the identification of genes that contribute to the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. BXH-2 mice develop myeloid leukemia as a result of the expression of an ecotropic murine leukemia virus that acts as an insertional mutagen to alter the expression of cellular proto-oncogenes. We report the isolation of a new locus, Meis1, that serves as a site of viral integration in 15% of the tumors arising in BXH-2 mice. Meis1 was mapped to a distinct location on proximal mouse chromosome 11, suggesting that it represents a novel locus. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes allowed localization of MEIS1 to human chromosome 2p23-p12, in a region known to contain translocations found in human leukemias. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated that a Meis1 probe detected a 3.8-kb mRNA present in all BXH-2 tumors, whereas tumors containing integrations at the Meis1 locus expressed an additional truncated transcript. A Meis1 cDNA clone that encoded a novel member of the homeobox gene family was identified. The homeodomain of Meis1 is most closely related to those of the PBX/exd family of homeobox protein-encoding genes, suggesting that Meis1 functions in a similar fashion by cooperative binding to a distinct subset of HOX proteins. Collectively, these results indicate that altered expression of the homeobox gene Meis1 may be one of the events that lead to tumor formation in BXH-2 mice. PMID:7565694

  14. Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?

    PubMed

    Holland, Peter W H

    2015-01-01

    The Cambrian explosion describes an apparently rapid increase in the diversity of bilaterian animals around 540-515 million years ago. Bilaterian animals explore the world in three-dimensions deploying forward-facing sense organs, a brain, and an anterior mouth; they possess muscle blocks enabling efficient crawling and burrowing in sediments, and they typically have an efficient 'through-gut' with separate mouth and anus to process bulk food and eject waste, even when burrowing in sediment. A variety of ecological, environmental, genetic, and developmental factors have been proposed as possible triggers and correlates of the Cambrian explosion, and it is likely that a combination of factors were involved. Here, I focus on a set of developmental genetic changes and propose these are part of the mix of permissive factors. I describe how ANTP-class homeobox genes, which encode transcription factors involved in body patterning, increased in number in the bilaterian stem lineage and earlier. These gene duplications generated a large array of ANTP class genes, including three distinct gene clusters called NK, Hox, and ParaHox. Comparative data supports the idea that NK genes were deployed primarily to pattern the bilaterian mesoderm, Hox genes coded position along the central nervous system, and ParaHox genes most likely originally specified the mouth, midgut, and anus of the newly evolved through-gut. It is proposed that diversification of ANTP class genes played a role in the Cambrian explosion by contributing to the patterning systems used to build animal bodies capable of high-energy directed locomotion, including active burrowing. PMID:26605046

  15. Identification of a conserved family of Meis1-related homeobox genes.

    PubMed

    Steelman, S; Moskow, J J; Muzynski, K; North, C; Druck, T; Montgomery, J C; Huebner, K; Daar, I O; Buchberg, A M

    1997-02-01

    Meis1 locus was isolated as a common site of viral integration involved in myeloid leukemia in BXH-2 mice. Meis1 encodes a novel homeobox protein belonging to the TALE (three amino acid loop extension) family of homeodomain-containing proteins. The homeodomain of Meis1 is the only known motif within the entire 390-amino-acid protein. Southern blot analyses using the Meis1 homeodomain as a probe revealed the existence family of Meis1-related genes (Mrgs) in several diverged species. In addition, the 3' untranslated region (UTR) Meis1 was remarkably conserved in evolution. To gain a further understanding of the role Meis1 plays in leukemia and development, as well as to identify conserved regions of the protein that might reveal function, we cloned and characterized Mrgs from the mouse and human genomes. We report the sequence of Mrg1 and MRG2 as well as their chromosomal locations in murine and human genomes. Both Mrgs share a high degree of sequence identity with the protein coding region of Meis1. We have also cloned the Xenopus laevis ortholog of (XMeis1). Sequence comparison of the murine and Xenopus clones reveals that Meis1 is highly conserved throughout its coding sequence as well as the 3' UTR. Finally, comparison of Meis1 and the closely related Mrgs to known homeoproteins suggests that Meis1 represents a new subfamily of TALE homeobox genes. PMID:9049632

  16. Hox-1.11 and Hox-4.9 homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Nazarali, A; Kim, Y; Nirenberg, M

    1992-01-01

    Mouse Hox-1.11 and Hox-4.9 genes were cloned, and the nucleotide sequences of the homeobox regions were determined. In addition, nucleotide sequence analysis of the homeobox regions of cloned Hox-4.3 and Hox-4.2 genomic DNA revealed some differences in nucleotide sequences and in the deduced homeodomain amino acid sequences compared with the sequences that have been reported. Images PMID:1348361

  17. Evidence for regulation of cartilage differentiation by the homeobox gene Hoxc-8

    PubMed Central

    Yueh, Y. Gloria; Gardner, David P.; Kappen, Claudia

    1998-01-01

    Homeobox genes of the Hox class are required for proper patterning of skeletal elements, but how they regulate the differentiation of specific tissues is unclear. We show here that overexpression of a Hoxc-8 transgene causes cartilage defects whose severity depends on transgene dosage. The abnormal cartilage is characterized by an accumulation of proliferating chondrocytes and reduced maturation. Since Hoxc-8 is normally expressed in chondrocytes, these results suggest that Hoxc-8 continues to regulate skeletal development well beyond pattern formation in a tissue-specific manner, presumably by controlling the progression of cells along the chondrocyte differentiation pathway. The comparison to Hoxd-4 and Isl-1 indicates that this role in chondrogenesis is specific to proteins of the Hox class. Their capacity for regulation of cartilage differentiation suggests that Hox genes could also be involved in human chondrodysplasias or other cartilage disorders. PMID:9707582

  18. The function of homeobox genes and lncRNAs in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingchao; Dang, Yuan; Liu, Jingfeng; Ouyang, Xiaojuan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the homeobox (HOX) gene family has been reported as a factor in tumorigenesis. In the human genome, the HOX gene family contains 4 clusters with 39 genes and multiple transcripts. Mutation or abnormal expression of genes is responsible for developmental disorders. In addition, changes in the levels and activation of certain HOX genes has been associated with the development of cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have also been identified to serve critical functions in cancer. Although a limited number of lncRNAs have been previously investigated, the list of functional lncRNA genes has recently grown. Two of the most important and well-studied lncRNAs and HOX transcript genes are HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) and HOXA distal transcript antisense RNA (HOTTIP). The present study aimed to review not only the function of the HOTAIR and HOTTIP genes in certain forms of cancer, but also to review other HOX genes and protein functions in cancer, particularly HOX family genes associated with lncRNAs. PMID:27588114

  19. Position dependent expression of a homeobox gene transcript in relation to amphibian limb regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Savard, P; Gates, P B; Brockes, J P

    1988-01-01

    Adult urodele amphibians such as the newt Notophthalmus viridescens are capable of regenerating their limbs and tail by formation of a blastema, a growth zone of mesenchymal progenitor cells. In an attempt to identify genes implicated in specification of the regenerate, we screened a newt forelimb blastema cDNA library with homeobox probes, and isolated and sequenced clones that identify a 1.8 kb polyadenylated transcript containing a homeobox. The transcript is derived from a single gene called NvHbox 1, the newt homologue of XIHbox 1 (Xenopus), HHO.c8 (human) and Hox-6.1 (mouse). The cDNA for the 1.8 kb transcript has two exons as determined by isolation and partial sequencing of a genomic clone. The expression of the transcript shows several interesting features in relation to limb regeneration: (i) Hybridization of Northern blots of poly(A)+ RNA from limb and tail and their respective blastemas shows that the transcript in limb tissues has exons 1 and 2, whereas a 1.8 kb transcript in tail tissues has only exon 2. (ii) The transcript is expressed in limbs of adult newt but not of adult Xenopus, raising the possibility that this contributes to an explanation of the loss of regenerative ability with maturation in adult anurans. (iii) The transcript is expressed at a higher level in a proximal (mid-humerus) blastema than in a distal one (mid-radius). When distal blastemas were proximalized by treatment with retinoic acid, no change in the level of the transcript was detected by Northern analysis at a single time point after amputation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2907476

  20. Identification of planarian homeobox sequences indicates the antiquity of most Hox/homeotic gene subclasses.

    PubMed Central

    Balavoine, G; Telford, M J

    1995-01-01

    The homeotic gene complex (HOM-C) is a cluster of genes involved in the anteroposterior axial patterning of animal embryos. It is composed of homeobox genes belonging to the Hox/HOM superclass. Originally discovered in Drosophila, Hox/HOM genes have been identified in organisms as distantly related as arthropods, vertebrates, nematodes, and cnidarians. Data obtained in parallel from the organization of the complex, the domains of gene expression during embryogenesis, and phylogenetic relationships allow the subdivision of the Hox/HOM superclass into five classes (lab, pb/Hox3, Dfd, Antp, and Abd-B) that appeared early during metazoan evolution. We describe a search for homologues of these genes in platyhelminths, triploblast metazoans emerging as an outgroup to the great coelomate ensemble. A degenerate PCR screening for Hox/HOM homeoboxes in three species of triclad planarians has revealed 10 types of Antennapedia-like genes. The homeobox-containing sequences of these PCR fragments allowed the amplification of the homeobox-coding exons for five of these genes in the species Polycelis nigra. A phylogenetic analysis shows that two genes are clear orthologues of Drosophila labial, four others are members of a Dfd/Antp superclass, and a seventh gene, although more difficult to classify with certainty, may be related to the pb/Hox3 class. Together with previously identified Hox/HOM genes in other flatworms, our analyses demonstrate the existence of an elaborate family of Hox/HOM genes in the ancestor of all triploblast animals. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7638172

  1. Molecular phylogeny of four homeobox genes from the purple sea star Pisaster ochraceus.

    PubMed

    Matassi, Giorgio; Imai, Janice Hitomi; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Homeobox genes cloned from the purple sea star Pisaster ochraceus (Phylum Echinodermata/Class Asteroidea) were used along with related sequences available from members of other representative animal phyla to generate molecular phylogenies for Distal-less/Dlx, Hox5, Hox7, and Hox9/10 homeobox genes. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred based on the predicted 60 amino acid homeodomain, using amino acid (AA) and nucleotide (NT) models as well as the recently developed codon substitution models of sequence evolution. The resulting phylogenetic trees were mostly congruent with the consensus species-tree, grouping these newly identified genes with those isolated from other Asteroidea. This analysis also allowed a preliminary comparison of the performance of codon models with that of NT and AA evolutionary models in the inference of homeobox phylogeny. We found that, overall, the NT models displayed low reliability in recovering major clades at the Superphylum/Phylum level, and that codon models were slightly more dependable than AA models. Remarkably, in the majority of cases, codon substitution models seemed to outperform both AA and NT models at both the Class level and homeobox paralogy-group level of classification. PMID:26432455

  2. The Dlx5 and Dlx6 homeobox genes are essential for craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Raymond F; Rajan, Lakshmi; Li, Xue; Lufkin, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    Dlx homeobox genes are mammalian homologs of the Drosophila Distal-less (Dll) gene. The Dlx/Dll gene family is of ancient origin and appears to play a role in appendage development in essentially all species in which it has been identified. In Drosophila, Dll is expressed in the distal portion of the developing appendages and is critical for the development of distal structures. In addition, human Dlx5 and Dlx6 homeobox genes have been identified as possible candidate genes for the autosomal dominant form of the split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM), a heterogeneous limb disorder characterized by missing central digits and claw-like distal extremities. Targeted inactivation of Dlx5 and Dlx6 genes in mice results in severe craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeletal abnormalities, leading to perinatal lethality. For the first time, Dlx/Dll gene products are shown to be critical regulators of mammalian limb development, as combined loss-of-function mutations phenocopy SHFM. Furthermore, spatiotemporal-specific transgenic overexpression of Dlx5, in the apical ectodermal ridge of Dlx5/6 null mice can fully rescue Dlx/Dll function in limb outgrowth. PMID:12000792

  3. A homeobox gene with potential developmental control function in the meristem of the conifer Picea abies

    PubMed Central

    Sundås-Larsson, A.; Svenson, M.; Liao, H.; Engström, P.

    1998-01-01

    Many homeobox genes control essential developmental processes in animals and plants. In this report, we describe the first cDNA corresponding to a homeobox gene isolated from a gymnosperm, the HBK1 gene from the conifer Picea abies (L.) Karst (Norway spruce). The sequence shows distinct similarities specifically to the KNOX (knotted-like homeobox) class of homeobox genes known from different angiosperm plants. The deduced amino acid sequence of HBK1 is strikingly similar within the homeodomain (84% identical) to the maize gene Knotted1 (Kn1), which acts to regulate cell differentiation in the shoot meristem. This similarity suggested that the phylogenetic association of HBK1 with the KNOX genes might be coupled to a conservation of gene function. In support of this suggestion, we have found HBK1 to be expressed in the apical meristem in the central population of nondifferentiated stem cells, but not in organ primordia developing at the flanks of the meristem. This pattern of expression is similar to that of Kn1 in the maize meristem. We show further that HBK1, when expressed ectopically in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, causes aberrations in leaf development that are similar to the effects of ectopic expression of angiosperm KNOX genes on Arabidopsis development. Taken together, these data suggest that HBK1 has a role, similar to the KNOX genes in angiosperms, in the control of cellular differentiation in the apical meristem of spruce. The data also indicate that KNOX-gene regulation of vegetative development is an ancient feature of seed plants that was present in the last common ancestor of conifers and angiosperms. PMID:9844025

  4. Analysis of TALE superclass homeobox genes (MEIS, PBC, KNOX, Iroquois, TGIF) reveals a novel domain conserved between plants and animals.

    PubMed Central

    Bürglin, T R

    1997-01-01

    A new Caenorhabditis elegans homeobox gene, ceh-25, is described that belongs to the TALE superclass of atypical homeodomains, which are characterized by three extra residues between helix 1 and helix 2. ORF and PCR analysis revealed a novel type of alternative splicing within the homeobox. The alternative splicing occurs such that two different homeodomains can be generated, which differ in their first 25 amino acids. ceh-25 is an orthologue of the vertebrate Meis genes and it shares a new conserved domain of 130 amino acids with them. A thorough analysis of all TALE homeobox genes was performed and a new classification is presented. Four TALE classes are identified in animals: PBC, MEIS, TGIF and IRO (Iroquois); two types in fungi: the mating type genes (M-ATYP) and the CUP genes; and two types in plants: KNOX and BEL. The IRO class has a new conserved motif downstream of the homeodomain. For the KNOX class, a conserved domain, the KNOX domain, was defined upstream of the homeodomain. Comparison of the KNOX domain and the MEIS domain shows significant sequence similarity revealing the existence of an archetypal group of homeobox genes that encode two associated conserved domains. Thus TALE homeobox genes were already present in the common ancestor of plants, fungi and animals and represent a branch distinct from the typical homeobox genes. PMID:9336443

  5. Fighting the force: potential of homeobox genes for tumor microenvironment regulation

    PubMed Central

    Northcott, Josette M.; Northey, Jason J.; Barnes, J. Matthew; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells exist in a constantly evolving stromal microenvironment composed of vasculature, immune cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts, all residing within a dynamic extracellular matrix. In this review, we examine the biochemical and biophysical interactions between these various stromal cells and their matrix microenvironment. While the stroma can alter tumor progression via multiple mechanisms, we emphasize the role of homeobox genes in detecting and modulating the mechanical changes in the microenvironment during tumor progression. PMID:25818365

  6. Biological role and clinical implications of homeobox genes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Katherine R; Patel, Jai N; Ganapathi, Mahrukh K; Tait, David L; Ganapathi, Ram N

    2016-06-01

    Homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that are essential regulators of development. HOX genes play important roles in normal reproductive physiology, as well as in the development and progression of serous carcinomas, the predominant and most aggressive subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This review discusses aberrant HOX gene expression in serous EOC and its impact on tumor development and progression. Further identification of HOX target genes may facilitate the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to improve the prognosis of patients with serous EOC. PMID:26957480

  7. Hematopoietic Immortalizing Function of the NKL-Subclass Homeobox Gene TLX1

    PubMed Central

    Zweier-Renn, Lynnsey A.; Hawley, Teresa S.; Burkett, Sandra; Ramezani, Ali; Riz, Irene; Adler, Rima L.; Hickstein, Dennis D.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Translocations resulting in ectopic expression of the TLX1 homeobox gene (previously known as HOX11) are recurrent events in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Transduction of primary murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with retroviral vectors expressing TLX1 readily yields immortalized hematopoietic progenitor cell lines. Understanding the processes involved in TLX1-mediated cellular immortalization should yield insights into the growth and differentiation pathways altered by TLX1 during the development of T-ALL. In recent clinical gene therapy trials, hematopoietic clonal dominance or T-ALL-like diseases have occurred as a direct consequence of insertional activation of the EVI1, PRDM16 or LMO2 proto-oncogenes by the retroviral vectors used to deliver the therapeutic genes. Additionally, the generation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cell lines due to retroviral integrations into Evi1 or Prdm16 has also been recently reported. Here we determined by linker-mediated nested polymerase chain reaction the integration sites in 8 TLX1-immortalized hematopoietic cell lines. Notably, no common integration site was observed among the cell lines. Moreover, no insertions into the Evi1 or Prdm16 genes were identified although insertion near Lmo2 was observed in one instance. However, neither Lmo2 nor any of the other genes examined surrounding the integration sites showed differential vector-influenced expression compared to the cell lines lacking such insertions. While we cannot exclude the possibility that insertional side effects transiently provided a selective growth/survival advantage to the hematopoietic progenitor populations, our results unequivocally rule out insertions into Evi1 and Prdm16 as being integral to the TLX1-initiated immortalization process. PMID:19862821

  8. Differential DNA methylation patterns of homeobox genes in proximal and distal colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Barnicle, Alan; Seoighe, Cathal; Golden, Aaron; Greally, John M; Egan, Laurence J

    2016-04-01

    Region and cell-type specific differences in the molecular make up of colon epithelial cells have been reported. Those differences may underlie the region-specific characteristics of common colon epithelial diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. DNA methylation is a cell-type specific epigenetic mark, essential for transcriptional regulation, silencing of repetitive DNA and genomic imprinting. Little is known about any region-specific variations in methylation patterns in human colon epithelial cells. Using purified epithelial cells and whole biopsies (n= 19) from human subjects, we generated epigenome-wide DNA methylation data (using the HELP-tagging assay), comparing the methylation signatures of the proximal and distal colon. We identified a total of 125 differentially methylated sites (DMS) mapping to transcription start sites of protein-coding genes, most notably several members of the homeobox (HOX) family of genes. Patterns of differential methylation were validated with MassArray EpiTYPER. We also examined DNA methylation in whole biopsies, applying a computational technique to deconvolve variation in methylation within cell types and variation in cell-type composition across biopsies. Including inferred epithelial proportions as a covariate in differential methylation analysis applied to the whole biopsies resulted in greater overlap with the results obtained from purified epithelial cells compared with when the covariate was not included. Results obtained from both approaches highlight region-specific methylation patterns ofHOXgenes in colonic epithelium. Regional variation in methylation patterns has implications for the study of diseases that exhibit regional expression patterns in the human colon, such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. PMID:26812987

  9. Aberrantly Expressed OTX Homeobox Genes Deregulate B-Cell Differentiation in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently reported that deregulated homeobox gene MSX1 mediates repression of the B-cell specific transcription factor ZHX2. In this study we investigated regulation of MSX1 in this B-cell malignancy. Accordingly, we analyzed expression and function of OTX homeobox genes which activate MSX1 transcription during embryonal development in the neural plate border region. Our data demonstrate that OTX1 and OTX2 are aberrantly expressed in both HL patients and cell lines. Moreover, both OTX loci are targeted by genomic gains in overexpressing cell lines. Comparative expression profiling and subsequent pathway modulations in HL cell lines indicated that aberrantly enhanced FGF2-signalling activates the expression of OTX2. Downstream analyses of OTX2 demonstrated transcriptional activation of genes encoding transcription factors MSX1, FOXC1 and ZHX1. Interestingly, examination of the physiological expression profile of ZHX1 in normal hematopoietic cells revealed elevated levels in T-cells and reduced expression in B-cells, indicating a discriminatory role in lymphopoiesis. Furthermore, two OTX-negative HL cell lines overexpressed ZHX1 in correlation with genomic amplification of its locus at chromosomal band 8q24, supporting the oncogenic potential of this gene in HL. Taken together, our data demonstrate that deregulated homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 respectively impact transcriptional inhibition of (B-cell specific) ZHX2 and activation of (T-cell specific) ZHX1. Thus, we show how reactivation of a specific embryonal gene regulatory network promotes disturbed B-cell differentiation in HL. PMID:26406991

  10. Activation of the cytotactin promoter by the homeobox-containing gene Evx-1.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, F S; Chalepakis, G; Gruss, P; Edelman, G M

    1992-01-01

    Cytotactin is a morphoregulatory molecule of the extracellular matrix affecting cell shape, division, and migration that appears in a characteristic and complex site-restricted pattern during embryogenesis. The promoter region of the gene that encodes chicken cytotactin contains a variety of potential regulatory sequences. These include putative binding sites for homeodomain proteins and a phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate 13-acetate response element (TRE)/AP-1 element, a potential target for transcription factors thought to be involved in growth-factor signal transduction. To determine the effects of homeobox-containing genes on cytotactin promoter activity, we conducted a series of cotransfection experiments on NIH 3T3 cells using cytotactin promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene constructs and plasmids driving the expression of mouse homeobox genes Evx-1 and Hox-1.3. cotransfection with Evx-1 stimulated cytotactin promoter activity whereas cotransfection in control experiments with Hox-1.3 had no effect. To localize the sequences required for Evx-1 activation, we tested a series of deletions in the cytotactin promoter. An 89-base-pair region containing a consensus TRE/AP-1 element was found to be required for activation. An oligonucleotide segment containing this TRE/AP-1 site was found to confer Evx-1 inducibility on a simian virus 40 minimal promoter; mutation of the TRE/AP-1 site abolished this activity. To explore the potential role of growth factors in cytotactin promoter activation, chicken embryo fibroblasts, which are known to synthesize cytotactin, were first transfected with cytotactin promoter constructs and cultured under minimal conditions in 1% fetal bovine serum. Although the cells exhibited only low levels of CAT activity under these conditions, cells exposed for 12 h to 10% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum showed a marked increase in CAT activity. Cotransfection with Evx-1 and cytotactin promoter constructs of cells cultured in 1

  11. Homeobox gene expression profile indicates HOXA5 as a candidate prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rodini, Camila Oliveira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Paiva, Katiúcia Batista Silva; De Souza Setúbal Destro, Maria Fernanda; Moyses, Raquel Ajub; Michaluarte, Pedro; Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; Fukuyama, Erica Erina; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

    2012-04-01

    The search for molecular markers to improve diagnosis, individualize treatment and predict behavior of tumors has been the focus of several studies. This study aimed to analyze homeobox gene expression profile in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as well as to investigate whether some of these genes are relevant molecular markers of prognosis and/or tumor aggressiveness. Homeobox gene expression levels were assessed by microarrays and qRT-PCR in OSCC tissues and adjacent non-cancerous matched tissues (margin), as well as in OSCC cell lines. Analysis of microarray data revealed the expression of 147 homeobox genes, including one set of six at least 2-fold up-regulated, and another set of 34 at least 2-fold down-regulated homeobox genes in OSCC. After qRT-PCR assays, the three most up-regulated homeobox genes (HOXA5, HOXD10 and HOXD11) revealed higher and statistically significant expression levels in OSCC samples when compared to margins. Patients presenting lower expression of HOXA5 had poorer prognosis compared to those with higher expression (P=0.03). Additionally, the status of HOXA5, HOXD10 and HOXD11 expression levels in OSCC cell lines also showed a significant up-regulation when compared to normal oral keratinocytes. Results confirm the presence of three significantly upregulated (>4-fold) homeobox genes (HOXA5, HOXD10 and HOXD11) in OSCC that may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Moreover, since lower levels of HOXA5 predict poor prognosis, this gene may be a novel candidate for development of therapeutic strategies in OSCC. PMID:22227861

  12. Homeobox gene expression profile indicates HOXA5 as a candidate prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    RODINI, CAMILA OLIVEIRA; XAVIER, FLÁVIA CALÓ AQUINO; PAIVA, KATIÚCIA BATISTA SILVA; DE SOUZA SETÚBAL DESTRO, MARIA FERNANDA; MOYSES, RAQUEL AJUB; MICHALUARTE, PEDRO; CARVALHO, MARCOS BRASILINO; FUKUYAMA, ERICA ERINA; TAJARA, ELOIZA HELENA; OKAMOTO, OSWALDO KEITH; NUNES, FABIO DAUMAS

    2012-01-01

    The search for molecular markers to improve diagnosis, individualize treatment and predict behavior of tumors has been the focus of several studies. This study aimed to analyze homeobox gene expression profile in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as well as to investigate whether some of these genes are relevant molecular markers of prognosis and/or tumor aggressiveness. Homeobox gene expression levels were assessed by microarrays and qRT-PCR in OSCC tissues and adjacent non-cancerous matched tissues (margin), as well as in OSCC cell lines. Analysis of microarray data revealed the expression of 147 homeobox genes, including one set of six at least 2-fold up-regulated, and another set of 34 at least 2-fold down-regulated homeobox genes in OSCC. After qRT-PCR assays, the three most up-regulated homeobox genes (HOXA5, HOXD10 and HOXD11) revealed higher and statistically significant expression levels in OSCC samples when compared to margins. Patients presenting lower expression of HOXA5 had poorer prognosis compared to those with higher expression (P=0.03). Additionally, the status of HOXA5, HOXD10 and HOXD11 expression levels in OSCC cell lines also showed a significant up-regulation when compared to normal oral keratinocytes. Results confirm the presence of three significantly upregulated (>4-fold) homeobox genes (HOXA5, HOXD10 and HOXD11) in OSCC that may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Moreover, since lower levels of HOXA5 predict poor prognosis, this gene may be a novel candidate for development of therapeutic strategies in OSCC. PMID:22227861

  13. The Mohawk homeobox gene is a critical regulator of tendon differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshiaki; Toriuchi, Naoya; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Ueno-Kudoh, Hiroe; Sato, Tempei; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Nishida, Keiichiro; Akimoto, Takayuki; Takahashi, Michiko; Miyaki, Shigeru; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Mohawk (Mkx) is a member of the Three Amino acid Loop Extension superclass of atypical homeobox genes that is expressed in developing tendons. To investigate the in vivo functions of Mkx, we generated Mkx(-/-) mice. These mice had hypoplastic tendons throughout the body. Despite the reduction in tendon mass, the cell number in tail tendon fiber bundles was similar between wild-type and Mkx(-/-) mice. We also observed small collagen fibril diameters and a down-regulation of type I collagen in Mkx(-/-) tendons. These data indicate that Mkx plays a critical role in tendon differentiation by regulating type I collagen production in tendon cells. PMID:20498044

  14. Antagonizing the Spemann organizer: role of the homeobox gene Xvent-1.

    PubMed Central

    Gawantka, V; Delius, H; Hirschfeld, K; Blumenstock, C; Niehrs, C

    1995-01-01

    We have identified a novel homeobox gene, Xvent-1, that is differentially expressed in the ventral marginal zone of the early Xenopus gastrula. Evidence is presented from mRNA microinjection experiments for a role for this gene in dorsoventral patterning of mesoderm. First, Xvent-1 is induced by BMP-4, a gene known to be a key regulator of ventral mesoderm development. Second, Xvent-1 and the organizer-specific gene goosecoid are able to interact, directly or indirectly, in a cross-regulatory loop suppressing each other's expression, consistent with their mutually exclusive expression in the marginal zone. Third, microinjection of Xvent-1 mRNA ventralizes dorsal mesoderm. The results suggest that Xvent-1 functions in a ventral signaling pathway that maintains the ventral mesodermal state and antagonizes the Spemann organizer. Images PMID:8557046

  15. Repressed BMP signaling reactivates NKL homeobox gene MSX1 in a T-ALL subset.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2015-02-01

    In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), several members of the NK-like (NKL) homeobox genes are aberrantly expressed. Here, we have analyzed the activity of NKL homeobox gene MSX1 using pediatric T-ALL in silico data, detecting overexpression in 11% of patients. Quantification of MSX1 transcripts in a panel of 24 T-ALL cell lines demonstrated overexpression in two examples. Comparative expression profiling indicated inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, which was shown to inhibit MSX1 transcription. In the LOUCY cell line we identified conspicuous expression of CHRDL1 encoding a BMP inhibitor which mediated activation of MSX1. Promoter analyses demonstrated activation of CHRDL1 by oncogenic PITX1. Furthermore, knockdown and overexpression studies of hematopoietic transcription factors demonstrated that GATA2 and FOXC1 mediate activation and GATA3, LEF1, TAL1 and TOX repression of MSX1 transcription. Collectively, our findings suggest that MSX1 is physiologically restricted to lymphoid progenitors. The identification of deregulated BMP signaling may provide novel therapeutic options for the treatment of T-ALL. PMID:24844359

  16. ANTHOCYANINLESS2, a homeobox gene affecting anthocyanin distribution and root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, H; Peeters, A J; Aarts, M G; Pereira, A; Koornneef, M

    1999-01-01

    The ANTHOCYANINLESS2 (ANL2) gene was isolated from Arabidopsis by using the maize Enhancer-Inhibitor transposon tagging system. Sequencing of the ANL2 gene showed that it encodes a homeodomain protein belonging to the HD-GLABRA2 group. As we report here, this homeobox gene is involved in the accumulation of anthocyanin and in root development. Histological observations of the anl2 mutant revealed that the accumulation of anthocyanin was greatly suppressed in subepidermal cells but only slightly reduced in epidermal cells. Furthermore, the primary roots of the anl2 mutant showed an aberrant cellular organization. We discuss a possible role of ANL2 in the accumulation of anthocyanin and cellular organization of the primary root. PMID:10402424

  17. Six family of homeobox genes and related mechanisms in tumorigenesis protocols.

    PubMed

    Armat, Marzieh; Ramezani, Fatemeh; Molavi, Ommoleila; Sabzichi, Mehdi; Samadi, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the homeobox gene superfamily has been introduced as a master regulator in downstream target genes related to cell development and proliferation. An indispensable role of this family involved in organogenesis development has been widely demonstrated since expression of Six family led to a distinct increase in development of various organs. These functions of Six family genes are primarily based on structure as well as regulatory role in response to external or internal stimuli. In addition to these roles, mutation or aberrant expression of Six family plays a fundamental role in initiation of carcinogenesis, a multistep process including transformation, proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, and metastasis. This suggests that the Six superfamily members can be considered as novel target molecules to inhibit tumor growth and progression. This review focuses on the structure, function, and mechanisms of the Six family in cancer processes and possible strategies to apply these family members for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27056337

  18. Connectivity of vertebrate genomes: Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) genes in spotted gar, basal teleosts, and tetrapods□

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Guiguen, Yann; Loker, Ryan; Letaw, John H.; Ferrara, Allyse; Bobe, Julien; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish are important models for human biology, health, and disease. Because genome duplication in a teleost ancestor (TGD) impacts the evolution of teleost genome structure and gene repertoires, we must discriminate gene functions that are shared and ancestral from those that are lineage-specific in teleosts or tetrapods to accurately apply inferences from teleost disease models to human health. Generalizations must account both for the TGD and for divergent evolution between teleosts and tetrapods after the likely two rounds of genome duplication shared by all vertebrates. Progress in sequencing techniques provides new opportunities to generate genomic and transcriptomic information from a broad range of phylogenetically informative taxa that facilitate detailed understanding of gene family and gene function evolution. We illustrate here the use of new sequence resources from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a rayfin fish that diverged from teleosts before the TGD, as well as RNA-Seq data from gar and multiple teleost lineages to reconstruct the evolution of the Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) transcription factor gene family, which is involved in the development of mesoderm and neural crest-derived mesenchyme. We show that for Prrx genes, the spotted gar genome and gene expression patterns mimic mammals better than teleosts do. Analyses force the seemingly paradoxical conclusion that regulatory mechanisms for the limb expression domains of Prrx genes existed before the evolution of paired appendages. Detailed evolutionary analyses like those reported here are required to identify fish species most similar to the human genome to optimally connect fish models to human gene functions in health and disease. PMID:24486528

  19. Twilight-zone and canopy shade induction of the Athb-2 homeobox gene in green plants.

    PubMed Central

    Carabelli, M; Morelli, G; Whitelam, G; Ruberti, I

    1996-01-01

    We present evidence that a novel phytochrome (other than phytochromes A and B, PHYA and PHYB) operative in green plants regulates the "twilight-inducible" expression of a plant homeobox gene (Athb-2). Light regulation of the Athb-2 gene is unique in that it is not induced by red (R)-rich daylight or by the light-dark transition but is instead induced by changes in the ratio of R to far-red (FR) light. These changes, which normally occur at dawn and dusk (end-of-day FR), also occur during the daytime under the canopy (shade avoidance). By using pure light sources and phyA/phyB null mutants, we demonstrated that the induction of Athb-2 by changes in the R/FR ratio is mediated for the most part by a novel phytochrome operative in green plants. Furthermore, PHYB plays a negative role in repressing the accumulation of Athb-2 mRNA in the dark and a minor role in the FR response. The strict correlation of Athb-2 expression with FR-induced growth phenomena suggests a role for the Athb-2 gene in mediating cell elongation. This interpretation is supported by the finding that the Athb-2 gene is expressed at high levels in rapidly elongating etiolated seedlings. Furthermore, as either R or FR light inhibits cell elongation in etiolated tissues, they also down-regulate the expression of Athb-2 mRNA. Thus, these data support the notion that changes in light quality perceived by a novel phytochrome regulate plant development through the action of the Athb-2 homeobox gene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:11607652

  20. Twilight-zone and canopy shade induction of the Athb-2 homeobox gene in green plants.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, M; Morelli, G; Whitelam, G; Ruberti, I

    1996-04-16

    We present evidence that a novel phytochrome (other than phytochromes A and B, PHYA and PHYB) operative in green plants regulates the "twilight-inducible" expression of a plant homeobox gene (Athb-2). Light regulation of the Athb-2 gene is unique in that it is not induced by red (R)-rich daylight or by the light-dark transition but is instead induced by changes in the ratio of R to far-red (FR) light. These changes, which normally occur at dawn and dusk (end-of-day FR), also occur during the daytime under the canopy (shade avoidance). By using pure light sources and phyA/phyB null mutants, we demonstrated that the induction of Athb-2 by changes in the R/FR ratio is mediated for the most part by a novel phytochrome operative in green plants. Furthermore, PHYB plays a negative role in repressing the accumulation of Athb-2 mRNA in the dark and a minor role in the FR response. The strict correlation of Athb-2 expression with FR-induced growth phenomena suggests a role for the Athb-2 gene in mediating cell elongation. This interpretation is supported by the finding that the Athb-2 gene is expressed at high levels in rapidly elongating etiolated seedlings. Furthermore, as either R or FR light inhibits cell elongation in etiolated tissues, they also down-regulate the expression of Athb-2 mRNA. Thus, these data support the notion that changes in light quality perceived by a novel phytochrome regulate plant development through the action of the Athb-2 homeobox gene. PMID:11607652

  1. A genomewide survey of homeobox genes and identification of novel structure of the Hox cluster in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chun-Li; Zhang, Ze; Huang, Fei-Fei; Wang, Xian-Yan; Yu, Quan-You; Liu, Bin-Bin; Tian, Tian; Xia, Qing-You; Lu, Cheng; Xiang, Zhong-Huai

    2008-12-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcriptional factors that play crucial roles in a variety of developmental pathways from unicellular to multicellular eukaryotes. We have identified 102 homeobox genes in the typical insect of Lepidoptera, Bombyx mori, based on the newly assembled genome sequence with 9X coverage. These identified homeobox genes were categorized into nine classes including at least 74 families. The available ESTs and microarray data at present confirmed that more than half of them were expressed during silkworm developmental processes. Orthologs of pb, zen and ftz were newly identified in the Bombyx Hox cluster on chromosome 6. Interestingly, a special group of 12 tandemly duplicated homeobox genes was found located between Bmpb and Bmzen in the Bombyx Hox cluster, suggesting that Hox cluster might have experienced a lineage-specific expansion in the silkworm. A detailed analysis on genome data reveals that a split exists between Bmlab and Bmpb. Our data provide valuable information for future research on the development and evolution of silkworm. PMID:19280701

  2. Human teneurin-1 is a direct target of the homeobox transcription factor EMX2 at a novel alternate promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teneurin-1 is a member of a family of type II transmembrane proteins conserved from C.elegans to vertebrates. Teneurin expression in vertebrates is best studied in mouse and chicken, where the four members teneurin-1 to -4 are predominantly expressed in the developing nervous system in area specific patterns. Based on their distinct, complementary expression a possible function in the establishment of proper connectivity in the brain was postulated. However, the transcription factors contributing to these distinctive expression patterns are largely unknown. Emx2 is a homeobox transcription factor, known to be important for area specification in the developing cortex. A study of Emx2 knock-out mice suggested a role of Emx2 in regulating patterned teneurin expression. Results 5'RACE of human teneurin-1 revealed new alternative untranslated exons that are conserved in mouse and chicken. Closer analysis of the conserved region around the newly identified transcription start revealed promoter activity that was induced by EMX2. Mutation of a predicted homeobox binding site decreased the promoter activity in different reporter assays in vitro and in vivo in electroporated chick embryos. We show direct in vivo binding of EMX2 to the newly identified promoter element and finally confirm that the endogenous alternate transcript is specifically upregulated by EMX2. Conclusions We found that human teneurin-1 is directly regulated by EMX2 at a newly identified and conserved promoter region upstream of the published transcription start site, establishing teneurin-1 as the first human EMX2 target gene. We identify and characterize the EMX2 dependent promoter element of human teneurin-1. PMID:21651764

  3. Homeobox gene Sax2 deficiency causes an imbalance in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ruth; Lufkin, Thomas; Bergemann, Andrew D

    2007-10-01

    The brain, in particular the hypothalamus and the brainstem, plays a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis by incorporating signals from the periphery and translating them into feeding behavior. Here we show that the homeobox gene Sax2, which is expressed predominantly in the brainstem, in the vicinity of serotonergic neurons, contributes to this physiological balance. Sax2 deficiency results in a decrease of fat and glycogen storage, reduced blood glucose levels, and raised serotonin levels in the hindbrain. Surprisingly, in the brainstem the expression levels of pro-opiomelanocortin and neuropeptide Y were indicative of a fasting condition, opposed to the observed high serotonin levels implying satiation. Furthermore, Sax2-directed lacZ expression reveals a dramatic change of the distribution of Sax2-expressing cells in the null mutant occurring during perinatal development. These data strongly suggest that Sax2 is required for the coordinated crosstalk of factors involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. PMID:17879320

  4. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems.

    PubMed

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. PMID:26623515

  5. A gene fusion at a homeobox locus: alterations in leaf shape and implications for morphological evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J J; Janssen, B J; Williams, A; Sinha, N

    1997-01-01

    Compound leaves are seen in many angiosperm genera and are thought to be either fundamentally different from simple leaves or elaborations of simple leaves. The knotted1-like homeobox (knox) genes are known to regulate plant development. When overexpressed in homologous or heterologous species, this family of genes can cause changes in leaf morphology, including excessive leaf compounding in tomato. We describe here an instance of a spontaneously arisen fusion between a gene encoding a metabolic enzyme and a homeodomain protein. We show that the fusion results in overexpression of the homeodomain protein and a change in morphology that approximates the changes caused by overexpression of the same gene under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in transgenic plants. Exon-shuffling events can account for the modularity of proteins. If the shuffled exons are associated with altered promoters, changes in gene expression patterns can result. Our results show that gene fusions of this nature can cause changes in expression patterns that lead to altered morphology. We suggest that such phenomena may have played a role in the evolution of form. PMID:9286107

  6. Regulation of dorsal-ventral patterning: the ventralizing effects of the novel Xenopus homeobox gene Vox.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J E; von Dassow, G; Kimelman, D

    1996-06-01

    The formation of the dorsal-ventral axis in Xenopus laevis is elicited by a signaling cascade on the dorsal side of the embryo initiated by cortical rotation. These early developmental events impart an initial axial polarity to the embryo. By the time gastrulation occurs, the embryo has established opposing dorsal and ventral regulatory regions. Through a dynamic process, the embryo acquires a definitive pattern that reflects the distribution of future cell fates. Here we present a novel homeobox gene, Vox, whose expression reflects this dynamic process. Vox is first expressed throughout the embryo and subsequently eliminated from the notochord and neural plate. Ectopic expression of Vox demonstrates that the normal function of this gene may be to suppress dorsal genes such as Xnot and chordin, and induce ventral and paraxial genes such as Bmp-4 and MyoD. Ectopic expression of BMP-4 ventralizes embryos and positively regulates the expression of Vox, suggesting that these genes are components of a reciprocal regulatory network. PMID:8674411

  7. The homeobox gene Distal-less induces ventral appendage development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gorfinkiel, Nicole; Morata, Ginés; Guerrero, Isabel

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the homeobox gene Distal-less (Dll) in the development of the legs, antennae, and wings of Drosophila. Lack of Dll function causes a change in the identity of ventral appendage cells (legs and antennae) that often results in the loss of the appendage. Ectopic Dll expression in the proximal region of ventral appendages induces nonautonomous duplication of legs and antennae by the activation of wingless and decapentaplegic. Ectopic Dll expression in dorsal appendages produces transformation into corresponding ventral appendages; wings and halteres develop ectopic legs and the head–eye region develops ectopic antennae. In the wing, the exogenous Dll product induces this transformation by activating the endogenous Dll gene and repressing the wing determinant gene vestigial. It is proposed that Dll induces the development of ventral appendages and also participates in a genetic address that specifies the identity of ventral appendages and discriminates the dorsal versus the ventral appendages in the adult. However, unlike other homeotic genes, Dll expression and function is not defined by a cell lineage border. Dll also performs a secondary and late function required for the normal patterning of the wing. PMID:9303541

  8. A new role for muscle segment homeobox genes in mammalian embryonic diapause.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Bartos, Amanda; Fenelon, Jane; Lefèvre, Pavine; Daikoku, Takiko; Shaw, Geoff; Maxson, Robert; Murphy, Bruce D; Renfree, Marilyn B; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian embryonic diapause is a phenomenon defined by the temporary arrest in blastocyst growth and metabolic activity within the uterus which synchronously becomes quiescent to blastocyst activation and implantation. This reproductive strategy temporally uncouples conception from parturition until environmental or maternal conditions are favourable for the survival of the mother and newborn. The underlying molecular mechanism by which the uterus and embryo temporarily achieve quiescence, maintain blastocyst survival and then resume blastocyst activation with subsequent implantation remains unknown. Here, we show that uterine expression of Msx1 or Msx2, members of an ancient, highly conserved homeobox gene family, persists in three unrelated mammalian species during diapause, followed by rapid downregulation with blastocyst activation and implantation. Mice with uterine inactivation of Msx1 and Msx2 fail to achieve diapause and reactivation. Remarkably, the North American mink and Australian tammar wallaby share similar expression patterns of MSX1 or MSX2 as in mice-it persists during diapause and is rapidly downregulated upon blastocyst activation and implantation. Evidence from mouse studies suggests that the effects of Msx genes in diapause are mediated through Wnt5a, a known transcriptional target of uterine Msx. These studies provide strong evidence that the Msx gene family constitutes a common conserved molecular mediator in the uterus during embryonic diapause to improve female reproductive fitness. PMID:23615030

  9. A new role for muscle segment homeobox genes in mammalian embryonic diapause

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Bartos, Amanda; Fenelon, Jane; Lefèvre, Pavine; Daikoku, Takiko; Shaw, Geoff; Maxson, Robert; Murphy, Bruce D.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian embryonic diapause is a phenomenon defined by the temporary arrest in blastocyst growth and metabolic activity within the uterus which synchronously becomes quiescent to blastocyst activation and implantation. This reproductive strategy temporally uncouples conception from parturition until environmental or maternal conditions are favourable for the survival of the mother and newborn. The underlying molecular mechanism by which the uterus and embryo temporarily achieve quiescence, maintain blastocyst survival and then resume blastocyst activation with subsequent implantation remains unknown. Here, we show that uterine expression of Msx1 or Msx2, members of an ancient, highly conserved homeobox gene family, persists in three unrelated mammalian species during diapause, followed by rapid downregulation with blastocyst activation and implantation. Mice with uterine inactivation of Msx1 and Msx2 fail to achieve diapause and reactivation. Remarkably, the North American mink and Australian tammar wallaby share similar expression patterns of MSX1 or MSX2 as in mice—it persists during diapause and is rapidly downregulated upon blastocyst activation and implantation. Evidence from mouse studies suggests that the effects of Msx genes in diapause are mediated through Wnt5a, a known transcriptional target of uterine Msx. These studies provide strong evidence that the Msx gene family constitutes a common conserved molecular mediator in the uterus during embryonic diapause to improve female reproductive fitness. PMID:23615030

  10. The Caenorhabditis elegans Homeobox Gene ceh-19 Is Required for MC Motorneuron Function

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huiyun; Hope, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Simplicity has made C. elegans pharyngeal development a particularly well-studied subject. Nevertheless, here we add the previously uncharacterized homeobox gene F20D12.6/ceh-19 to the set of transcription factor genes involved. GFP reporter assays revealed that ceh-19 is expressed in three pairs of neurons, the pharyngeal pace-maker neurons MC, the amphid neurons ADF and the phasmid neurons PHA. ceh-19(tm452) mutants are viable and fertile, but grow slightly slower, produce less progeny over a prolonged period, and live longer than the wild type. These phenotypes are likely due to the moderately reduced pharyngeal pumping speed arising from the impairment of MC activity. MC neurons are still born in the ceh-19 mutants but display various morphological defects. ceh-19 expression in MC is completely lost in progeny from animals subject to RNAi for pha-4, which encodes an organ-specifying forkhead transcription factor. CEH-19 is required for the activation in MCs of the excitatory FMRFamide-like neuropeptide-encoding gene flp-2. A regulatory pathway from pha-4 through ceh-19 to flp-2 is thereby defined. The resilience of MC identity in the absence of CEH-19 may reflect the buffering qualities of transcription factor regulatory networks. genesis 51:163–178, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23315936

  11. Suppression of Homeobox Transcription Factor VentX Promotes Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem/Multipotent Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong; Wu, Xiaoming; Sun, Yan; Zhou, Shuanhu; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Zhu, Zhenglun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate proliferation and expansion of human hematopoietic stem/multipotent progenitor cells (HSC/MPPs) are targets of intensive investigations. Several cell intrinsic factors and signaling pathways have been implicated in the proliferation and differentiation of human HSC/MPPs. Nevertheless, expansion of human HSC/MPPs for clinical application remains a critical challenge. VentX is a human homeobox transcription factor that was recently identified as an anti-proliferation and pro-differentiation factor in human hematopoietic cells. Here, we report that VentX expression is up-regulated during ontogenesis of human hematopoietic cells. Strikingly, suppression of VentX expression led to significant expansion of HSC/MPPs ex vivo and a 20-fold increase in engraftment potential in the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ2null mouse model. VentX suppression helped preserve the HSC/MPP pools and promote clonogenicity of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Mechanistically, we show that VentX regulates critical cell cycle regulators and Wnt downstream genes previously implicated in HSC/MPP proliferation and expansion. PMID:22791709

  12. Common genetic variation in the GAD1 gene and the entire family of DLX homeobox genes and autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Pauls, David L.; Lange, Christoph; Sasanfar, Roksana; Santangelo, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological and positional evidence supports the involvement of the GAD1 and distal-less homeobox genes (DLXs) in the etiology of autism. We investigated 42 SNPs in these genes as risk factors for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in a large family-based association study of 715 nuclear families. No single marker showed significant association after correction for multiple testing. A rare haplotype in the DLX1 promoter was associated with ASD (p-value = 0.001). Given the importance of rare variants to the etiology of autism revealed in recent studies, the observed rare haplotype may be relevant to future investigations. Our observations, when taken together with previous findings, suggest that common genetic variation in the GAD1 and DLX genes is unlikely to play a critical role in ASD susceptibility. PMID:21302352

  13. Regulation, overexpression, and target gene identification of Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) - a class-I KNOX gene in potato.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ameya S; Kondhare, Kirtikumar R; Rajabhoj, Mohit P; Kumar, Amit; Ghate, Tejashree; Ravindran, Nevedha; Habib, Farhat; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Banerjee, Anjan K

    2016-07-01

    Potato Homeobox 15 (POTH15) is a KNOX-I (Knotted1-like homeobox) family gene in potato that is orthologous to Shoot Meristemless (STM) in Arabidopsis. Despite numerous reports on KNOX genes from different species, studies in potato are limited. Here, we describe photoperiodic regulation of POTH15, its overexpression phenotype, and identification of its potential targets in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena). qRT-PCR analysis showed a higher abundance of POTH15 mRNA in shoot tips and stolons under tuber-inducing short-day conditions. POTH15 promoter activity was detected in apical and axillary meristems, stolon tips, tuber eyes, and meristems of tuber sprouts, indicating its role in meristem maintenance and leaf development. POTH15 overexpression altered multiple morphological traits including leaf and stem development, leaflet number, and number of nodes and branches. In particular, the rachis of the leaf was completely reduced and leaves appeared as a bouquet of leaflets. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of 35S::GUS and two POTH15 overexpression lines identified more than 6000 differentially expressed genes, including 2014 common genes between the two overexpression lines. Functional analysis of these genes revealed their involvement in responses to hormones, biotic/abiotic stresses, transcription regulation, and signal transduction. qRT-PCR of selected candidate target genes validated their differential expression in both overexpression lines. Out of 200 randomly chosen POTH15 targets, 173 were found to have at least one tandem TGAC core motif, characteristic of KNOX interaction, within 3.0kb in the upstream sequence of the transcription start site. Overall, this study provides insights to the role of POTH15 in controlling diverse developmental processes in potato. PMID:27217546

  14. Overexpression of a Homeobox Gene, LeT6, Reveals Indeterminate Features in the Tomato Compound Leaf1

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Bart-Jan; Lund, Lance; Sinha, Neelima

    1998-01-01

    The cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) has a unipinnate compound leaf. In the developing leaf primordium, major leaflet initiation is basipetal, and lobe formation and early vascular differentiation are acropetal. We show that engineered alterations in the expression of a tomato homeobox gene, LeT6, can cause dramatic changes in leaf morphology. The morphological states are variable and unstable and the phenotypes produced indicate that the tomato leaf has an inherent level of indeterminacy. This is manifested by the production of multiple orders of compounding in the leaf, by numerous shoot, inflorescence, and floral meristems on leaves, and by the conversion of rachis-petiolule junctions into “axillary” positions where floral buds can arise. Overexpression of a heterologous homeobox transgene, kn1, does not produce such phenotypic variability. This indicates that LeT6 may differ from the heterologous kn1 gene in the effects manifested on overexpression, and that 35S-LeT6 plants may be subject to alterations in expression of both the introduced and endogenous LeT6 genes. The expression patterns of LeT6 argue in favor of a fundamental role for LeT6 in morphogenesis of leaves in tomato and also suggest that variability in homeobox gene expression may account for some of the diversity in leaf form seen in nature. PMID:9662520

  15. A single homeobox gene triggers phase transition, embryogenesis and asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Horst, Nelly A; Katz, Aviva; Pereman, Idan; Decker, Eva L; Ohad, Nir; Reski, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Plants characteristically alternate between haploid gametophytic and diploid sporophytic stages. Meiosis and fertilization respectively initiate these two different ontogenies(1). Genes triggering ectopic embryo development on vegetative sporophytic tissues are well described(2,3); however, a genetic control of embryo development from gametophytic tissues remains elusive. Here, in the moss Physcomitrella patens we show that ectopic overexpression of the homeobox gene BELL1 induces embryo formation and subsequently reproductive diploid sporophytes from specific gametophytic cells without fertilization. In line with this, BELL1 loss-of-function mutants have a wild-type phenotype, except that their egg cells are bigger and unable to form embryos. Our results identify BELL1 as a master regulator for the gametophyte-to-sporophyte transition in P. patens and provide mechanistic insights into the evolution of embryos that can generate multicellular diploid sporophytes. This developmental innovation facilitated the colonization of land by plants about 500 million years ago(4) and thus shaped our current ecosystems. PMID:27250874

  16. Expression of one sponge Iroquois homeobox gene in primmorphs from Suberites domuncula during canal formation.

    PubMed

    Perović, Sanja; Schröder, Heinz C; Sudek, Sebastian; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A; Batel, Renato; Stifanić, Mauro; Müller, Isabel M; Müller, Werner E G

    2003-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) represent the evolutionary oldest multicellular animals. They are provided with the basic molecules involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We report here the isolation and characterization of a complementary DNA from the sponge Suberites domuncula coding for the sponge homeobox gene, SUBDOIRX-a. The deduced polypeptide with a predicted Mr of 44,375 possesses the highly conserved Iroquois-homeodomain. We applied in situ hybridization to localize Iroquois in the sponge. The expression of this gene is highest in cells adjacent to the canals of the sponge in the medulla region. To study the expression of Iroquois during development, the in vitro primmorph system from S. domuncula was used. During the formation of these three-dimensional aggregates composed of proliferating cells, the expression of Iroquois depends on ferric iron and water current. An increased expression in response to water current is paralleled with the formation of canal-like pores in the primmorphs. It is suggested that Iroquois expression is involved in the formation of the aquiferous system, the canals in sponges and the canal-like structures in primmorphs. PMID:12752763

  17. Increased copy number of the DLX4 homeobox gene in breast axillary lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Torresan, Clarissa; Oliveira, Márcia M C; Pereira, Silma R F; Ribeiro, Enilze M S F; Marian, Catalin; Gusev, Yuriy; Lima, Rubens S; Urban, Cicero A; Berg, Patricia E; Haddad, Bassem R; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Cavalli, Luciane R

    2014-05-01

    DLX4 is a homeobox gene strongly implicated in breast tumor progression and invasion. Our main objective was to determine the DLX4 copy number status in sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis to assess its involvement in the initial stages of the axillary metastatic process. A total of 37 paired samples of SLN metastasis and primary breast tumors (PBT) were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and array comparative genomic hybridization assays. DLX4 increased copy number was observed in 21.6% of the PBT and 24.3% of the SLN metastasis; regression analysis demonstrated that the DLX4 alterations observed in the SLN metastasis were dependent on the ones in the PBT, indicating that they occur in the primary tumor cell populations and are maintained in the early axillary metastatic site. In addition, regression analysis demonstrated that DLX4 alterations (and other DLX and HOXB family members) occurred independently of the ones in the HER2/NEU gene, the main amplification driver on the 17q region. Additional studies evaluating DLX4 copy number in non-SLN axillary lymph nodes and/or distant breast cancer metastasis are necessary to determine if these alterations are carried on and maintained during more advanced stages of tumor progression and if could be used as a predictive marker for axillary involvement. PMID:24947980

  18. A Rosa canina WUSCHEL-related homeobox gene, RcWOX1, is involved in auxin-induced rhizoid formation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Wen, Chao; Fan, Lusheng; Kou, Yaping; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Liangjun

    2014-12-01

    Homeobox (HB) proteins are important transcription factors that regulate the developmental decisions of eukaryotes. WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) transcription factors, known as a plant-specific HB family, play a key role in plant developmental processes. Our previous work has indicated that rhizoids are induced by auxin in rose (Rosa spp.), which acts as critical part of an efficient plant regeneration system. However, the function of WOX genes in auxin-induced rhizoid formation remains unclear. Here, we isolated and characterized a WUSCHEL-related homeobox gene from Rosa canina, RcWOX1, containing a typical homeodomain with 65 amino acid residues. Real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that RcWOX1 was expressed in the whole process of callus formation and in the early stage of rhizoid formation. Moreover, its expression was induced by auxin treatment. In Arabidopsis transgenic lines expressing the RcWOX1pro::GUS and 35S::GFP-RcWOX1, RcWOX1 was specifically expressed in roots and localized to the nucleus. Overexpression of RcWOX1 in Arabidopsis increased lateral root density and induced upregulation of PIN1 and PIN7 genes. Therefore, we postulated that RcWOX1 is a functional transcription factor that plays an essential role in auxin-induced rhizoid formation. PMID:25301174

  19. Spatiotemporal distribution of caudal-type homeobox proteins during development of the hindgut and anorectum in human embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Bing; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Wei Lin; Yuan, Zheng Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatiotemporal distribution of human caudal-type homeobox proteins CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 during development of the hindgut and anorectum in the embryo and to explore the possible roles of CDX genes during morphogenesis of the hindgut and anorectum. Methods. Embryos (89) were cut into sections serially and sagittally. From gestation weeks 4–9, CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 proteins were detected on the caudal midline by immunohistochemical staining. Results. During week 4, extensive immunoreactivity of CDX1, CDX2 and CDX4 was detected in the dorsal urorectal septum, urogenital sinus and hindgut. From weeks 5–7, CDX1-, CDX2- and CDX4- positive cells were detected mainly in the mesenchyme of the urorectal septum and hindgut. The levels of CDX2 and CDX4 immunoreactivity were lower compared to CDX1. During weeks 8 and 9, the anorectal epithelium stained positive for CDX1 and CDX4, and the anal epithelium was positive for CDX2. Conclusions. The CDX proteins are constantly distributed during development of the hindgut and anorectum and exhibit overlapping distribution patterns in the cloaca/hindgut, suggesting they are important in the morphogenesis of the human hindgut and anorectum. CDX genes might be involved in development of the anorectal epithelium after the rectum has separated from the urorectal septum. PMID:27042391

  20. The Prx1 Homeobox Gene is Critical for Molar Tooth Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J.M.; Hicklin, D.M.; Doughty, P.M.; Hicklin, J.H.; Dickert, J.W.; Tolbert, S.M.; Peterkova, R.; Kern, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The paired-related homeobox genes, Prx1 and Prx2, encode transcription factors critical for orofacial development. Prx1-/-/Prx2-/- neonates have mandibular hypoplasia and malformed mandibular incisors. Although the mandibular incisor phenotype has been briefly described (ten Berge et al., 1998, 2001; Lu et al., 1999), very little is known about the role of Prx proteins during tooth morphogenesis. Since the posterior mandibular region was relatively normal, we examined molar tooth development in Prx1-/-/Prx2-/- embryos to determine whether the tooth malformation is primary to the loss of Prx protein or secondary to defects in surrounding tissues. Three-dimensional (3D) morphological reconstructions demonstrated that Prx1-/-/Prx2-/- embryos had molar malformations, including cuspal changes and ectopic epithelial projections. Although we demonstrate that Prx1 protein is expressed only mesenchymally, 3D reconstructions showed important morphological defects in epithelial tissues at the cap and bell stages. Analysis of these data suggests that the Prx homeoproteins are critical for mesenchymal-epithelial signaling during tooth morphogenesis. PMID:16998126

  1. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems

    PubMed Central

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07811.001 PMID:26623515

  2. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    PubMed

    Felix, Daniel A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2010-04-01

    Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi) leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi) animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation) to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is required for

  3. Dysregulation of the homeobox transcription factor gene HOXB13: role in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Brennan; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common noncutaneous cancer in men, and epidemiological studies suggest that about 40% of PC risk is heritable. Linkage analyses in hereditary PC families have identified multiple putative loci. However, until recently, identification of specific risk alleles has proven elusive. Cooney et al used linkage mapping and segregation analysis to identify a putative risk locus on chromosome 17q21-22. In search of causative variant(s) in genes from the candidate region, a novel, potentially deleterious G84E substitution in homeobox transcription factor gene HOXB13 was observed in multiple hereditary PC families. In follow-up testing, the G84E allele was enriched in cases, especially those with an early diagnosis or positive family history of disease. This finding was replicated by others, confirming HOXB13 as a PC risk gene. The HOXB13 protein plays diverse biological roles in embryonic development and terminally differentiated tissue. In tumor cell lines, HOXB13 participates in a number of biological functions, including coactivation and localization of the androgen receptor and FOXA1. However, no consensus role has emerged and many questions remain. All HOXB13 variants with a proposed role in PC risk are predicted to damage the protein and lie in domains that are highly conserved across species. The G84E variant has the strongest epidemiological support and lies in a highly conserved MEIS protein-binding domain, which binds cofactors required for activation. On the basis of epidemiological and biological data, the G84E variant likely modulates the interaction between the HOXB13 protein and the androgen receptor, as well as affecting FOXA1-mediated transcriptional programming. However, further studies of the mutated protein are required to clarify the mechanisms by which this translates into PC risk. PMID:25206306

  4. Lim homeobox genes in the Ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi: the evolution of neural cell type specification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nervous systems are thought to be important to the evolutionary success and diversification of metazoans, yet little is known about the origin of simple nervous systems at the base of the animal tree. Recent data suggest that ctenophores, a group of macroscopic pelagic marine invertebrates, are the most ancient group of animals that possess a definitive nervous system consisting of a distributed nerve net and an apical statocyst. This study reports on details of the evolution of the neural cell type specifying transcription factor family of LIM homeobox containing genes (Lhx), which have highly conserved functions in neural specification in bilaterian animals. Results Using next generation sequencing, the first draft of the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been generated. The Lhx genes in all animals are represented by seven subfamilies (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, Islet, Lhx2/9, Lhx6/8, and LMO) of which four were found to be represented in the ctenophore lineage (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, and Islet). Interestingly, the ctenophore Lhx gene complement is more similar to the sponge complement (sponges do not possess neurons) than to either the cnidarian-bilaterian or placozoan Lhx complements. Using whole mount in situ hybridization, the Lhx gene expression patterns were examined and found to be expressed around the blastopore and in cells that give rise to the apical organ and putative neural sensory cells. Conclusion This research gives us a first look at neural cell type specification in the ctenophore M. leidyi. Within M. leidyi, Lhx genes are expressed in overlapping domains within proposed neural cellular and sensory cell territories. These data suggest that Lhx genes likely played a conserved role in the patterning of sensory cells in the ancestor of sponges and ctenophores, and may provide a link to the expression of Lhx orthologs in sponge larval photoreceptive cells. Lhx genes were later co-opted into patterning more diversified complements of

  5. A role of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in the regulation of pituitary development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yangu; Mailloux, Christina M.; Hermesz, Edit; Palkovits, Miklos; Westphal, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian pituitary gland originates from two separate germinal tissues during embryonic development. The anterior and intermediate lobes of the pituitary are derived from Rathke's pouch, a pocket formed by an invagination of the oral ectoderm. The posterior lobe is derived from the infundibulum, which is formed by evagination of the neuroectoderm in the ventral diencephalon. Previous studies have shown that development of Rathke's pouch and the generation of distinct populations of hormone-producing endocrine cell lineages in the anterior/intermediate pituitary lobes is regulated by a number of transcription factors expressed in the pouch and by inductive signals from the ventral diencephalon/infundibulum. However, little is known about factors that regulate the development of the posterior pituitary lobe. In this study, we show that the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 is extensively expressed in the developing ventral diencephalon, including the infundibulum and the posterior lobe of the pituitary. Deletion of Lhx2 gene results in persistent cell proliferation, a complete failure of evagination of the neuroectoderm in the ventral diencephalon, and defects in the formation of the distinct morphological features of the infundibulum and the posterior pituitary lobe. Rathke's pouch is formed and endocrine cell lineages are generated in the anterior/intermediate pituitary lobes of the Lhx2 mutant. However, the shape and organization of the pouch and the anterior/intermediate pituitary lobes are severely altered due to the defects in development of the infundibulum and the posterior lobe. Our study thus reveals an essential role for Lhx2 in the regulation of posterior pituitary development and suggests a mechanism whereby development of the posterior lobe may affect the development of the anterior and intermediate lobes of the pituitary gland. PMID:19900438

  6. Muscle segment homeobox genes direct embryonic diapause by limiting inflammation in the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jeeyeon; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Bartos, Amanda; Li, Yingju; Baker, Erin Shammel; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jegga, Anil; Murata, Shigeo; Hirota, Yasushi; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2015-06-11

    Embryonic diapause (delayed implantation) is a reproductive strategy widespread in the animal kingdom. Under this condition, embryos at the blastocyst stage become dormant simultaneously with uterine quiescence until environmental or physiological conditions are favorable for the survival of the mother and newborn. Under favorable conditions, activation of the blastocyst and uterus ensues with implantation and progression of pregnancy. Although endocrine factors are known to participate in this process, the underlying molecular mechanism coordinating this phenomenon is not clearly understood. We recently found that uterine muscle segment homeobox (Msx) transcription factors are critical for the initiation and maintenance of delayed implantation in mice. To better understand why Msx genes are critical for delayed implantation, we compared uterine proteomics profiles between littermate floxed (Msx1/Msx2f/f) mice and mice with uterine deletion of Msx genes (Msx1/Msx2d/d) under delayed conditions. In Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri, pathways including protein translation, ubiquitin-proteasome system, inflammation, chaperone-mediated protein folding, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were enriched, and computational modeling showed intersection of these pathways on inflammatory responses. Indeed, increases in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and inflammation conformed to proteotoxic and ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri under delayed conditions. Interestingly, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor bortezomib further exacerbated ER stress in Msx1/Msx2d/d uteri with aggravated inflammatory response, deteriorating rate of blastocyst recovery and failure to sustain delayed implantation. This study highlights a previously unrecognized role for Msx in preventing proteotoxic stress and inflammatory responses to coordinate embryo dormancy and uterine quiescence during embryonic diapause.

  7. LIM-homeobox gene Lhx5 is required for normal development of Cajal-Retzius cells.

    PubMed

    Miquelajáuregui, Amaya; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Ceci, M Laura; García-Moreno, Fernando; Ricaño, Itzel; Hoang, Kimmi; Frade-Pérez, Daniela; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos; Tamariz, Elisa; De Carlos, Juan A; Westphal, Heiner; Zhao, Yangu

    2010-08-01

    Cajal-Retzius (C-R) cells play important roles in the lamination of the mammalian cortex via reelin secretion. The genetic mechanisms underlying the development of these neurons have just begun to be unraveled. Here, we show that two closely related LIM-homeobox genes Lhx1 and Lhx5 are expressed in reelin+ cells in various regions in the mouse telencephalon at or adjacent to sites where the C-R cells are generated, including the cortical hem, the mantle region of the septal/retrobulbar area, and the ventral pallium. Whereas Lhx5 is expressed in all of these reelin-expressing domains, Lhx1 is preferentially expressed in the septal area and in a continuous domain spanning from lateral olfactory region to caudomedial territories. Genetic ablation of Lhx5 results in decreased reelin+ and p73+ cells in the neocortical anlage, in the cortical hem, and in the septal, olfactory, and caudomedial telencephalic regions. The overall reduction in number of C-R cells in Lhx5 mutants is accompanied by formation of ectopic reelin+ cell clusters at the caudal telencephalon. Based on differential expression of molecular markers and by fluorescent cell tracing in cultured embryos, we located the origin of reelin+ ectopic cell clusters at the caudomedial telencephalic region. We also confirmed the existence of a normal migration stream of reelin+ cells from the caudomedial area to telencephalic olfactory territories in wild-type embryos. These results reveal a complex role for Lhx5 in regulating the development and normal distribution of C-R cells in the developing forebrain. PMID:20685998

  8. Identification of a putative nuclear export signal motif in human NANOG homeobox domain

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Huh, Sun-Hyung; Sung, Boreum; Uhm, Sang-Jun; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found the putative nuclear export signal motif within human NANOG homeodomain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leucine-rich residues are important for human NANOG homeodomain nuclear export. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM1-specific inhibitor LMB blocked the potent human NANOG NES-mediated nuclear export. -- Abstract: NANOG is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays an important role in pluripotent stem cells and tumorigenic cells. To understand how nuclear localization of human NANOG is regulated, the NANOG sequence was examined and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif ({sup 125}MQELSNILNL{sup 134}) was found in the homeodomain (HD). To functionally validate the putative NES motif, deletion and site-directed mutants were fused to an EGFP expression vector and transfected into COS-7 cells, and the localization of the proteins was examined. While hNANOG HD exclusively localized to the nucleus, a mutant with both NLSs deleted and only the putative NES motif contained (hNANOG HD-{Delta}NLSs) was predominantly cytoplasmic, as observed by nucleo/cytoplasmic fractionation and Western blot analysis as well as confocal microscopy. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of the putative NES motif in a partial hNANOG HD only containing either one of the two NLS motifs led to localization in the nucleus, suggesting that the NES motif may play a functional role in nuclear export. Furthermore, CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor LMB blocked the hNANOG potent NES-mediated export, suggesting that the leucine-rich motif may function in CRM1-mediated nuclear export of hNANOG. Collectively, a NES motif is present in the hNANOG HD and may be functionally involved in CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  9. Pinin modulates expression of an intestinal homeobox gene, Cdx2, and plays an essential role for small intestinal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jeong-Hoon; Taxter, Timothy J.; Munguba, Gustavo C.; Kim, Yong H.; Dhaduvai, Kanthi; Dunn, Nicholas W.; Degan, William J.; Oh, S. Paul; Sugrue, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Pinin (Pnn), a nuclear speckle-associated protein, has been shown to function in maintenance of epithelial integrity through altering expression of several key adhesion molecules. Here we demonstrate that Pnn plays a crucial role in small intestinal development by influencing expression of an intestinal homeobox gene, Cdx2. Conditional inactivation of Pnn within intestinal epithelia resulted in significant downregulation of a caudal type homeobox gene, Cdx2, leading to obvious villus dysmorphogenesis and severely disrupted epithelial differentiation. Additionally, in Pnn-deficient small intestine, we observed upregulated Tcf/Lef reporter activity, as well as misregulated expression/distribution of β-catenin and Tcf4. Since regulation of Cdx gene expression has been closely linked to Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, we explored the possibility of Pnn’s interaction with β-catenin, a major effector of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Pnn, together with its interaction partner CtBP2, a transcriptional co-repressor, was in a complex with β-catenin. Moreover, both of these proteins were found to be recruited to the proximal promoter area of Cdx2. Taken together, our results suggest that Pnn is essential for tight regulation of Wnt signaling and Cdx2 expression during small intestinal development. PMID:20637749

  10. The spatial and temporal dynamics of Sax1 (CHox3) homeobox gene expression in the chick's spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Spann, P; Ginsburg, M; Rangini, Z; Fainsod, A; Eyal-Giladi, H; Gruenbaum, Y

    1994-07-01

    Sax1 (previously CHox3) is a chicken homeobox gene belonging to the same homeobox gene family as the Drosophila NK1 and the honeybee HHO genes. Sax1 transcripts are present from stage 2 H&H until at least 5 days of embryonic development. However, specific localization of Sax1 transcripts could not be detected by in situ hybridization prior to stage 8-, when Sax1 transcripts are specifically localized in the neural plate, posterior to the hindbrain. From stages 8- to 15 H&H, Sax1 continues to be expressed only in the spinal part of the neural plate. The anterior border of Sax1 expression was found to be always in the transverse plane separating the youngest somite from the yet unsegmented mesodermal plate and to regress with similar dynamics to that of the segregation of the somites from the mesodermal plate. The posterior border of Sax1 expression coincides with the posterior end of the neural plate. In order to study a possible regulation of Sax1 expression by its neighboring tissues, several embryonic manipulation experiments were performed. These manipulations included: removal of somites, mesodermal plate or notochord and transplantation of a young ectopic notochord in the vicinity of the neural plate or transplantation of neural plate sections into the extraembryonic area. The results of these experiments revealed that the induction of the neural plate by the mesoderm has already occurred in full primitive streak embryos, after which Sax1 is autonomously regulated within the spinal part of the neural plate. PMID:7924989

  11. The WUSCHEL-related homeobox gene WOX11 is required to activate shoot-borne crown root development in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Hu, Yongfeng; Dai, Mingqiu; Huang, Limin; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2009-03-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa), the shoot-borne crown roots are the major root type and are initiated at lower stem nodes as part of normal plant development. However, the regulatory mechanism of crown root development is poorly understood. In this work, we show that a WUSCHEL-related Homeobox (WOX) gene, WOX11, is involved in the activation of crown root emergence and growth. WOX11 was found to be expressed in emerging crown roots and later in cell division regions of the root meristem. The expression could be induced by exogenous auxin or cytokinin. Loss-of-function mutation or downregulation of the gene reduced the number and the growth rate of crown roots, whereas overexpression of the gene induced precocious crown root growth and dramatically increased the root biomass by producing crown roots at the upper stem nodes and the base of florets. The expressions of auxin- and cytokinin-responsive genes were affected in WOX11 overexpression and RNA interference transgenic plants. Further analysis showed that WOX11 directly repressed RR2, a type-A cytokinin-responsive regulator gene that was found to be expressed in crown root primordia. The results suggest that WOX11 may be an integrator of auxin and cytokinin signaling that feeds into RR2 to regulate cell proliferation during crown root development. PMID:19258439

  12. Transcriptional Dynamics of Homeobox C11 Gene in Water Buffalo Bubalus bubalis

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Leena; Pathak, Deepali; Sehgal, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    The Hox complex contains 39 genes clustered into four groups involved in cell differentiation and development. We cloned full-length sequence of Hoxc11 gene from water buffalo Bubalus bubalis, assessed its copy number, localized the same onto the chromosome 5, and studied its evolutionary conservation across the species. Northern hybridization of Hoxc11 showed a 2.2 kb band in the tissues analyzed. Real-Time PCR showed highest expression of Hoxc11 gene in lung followed by spleen, spermatozoa, and testis. Six interacting partners of this gene showed higher expression in spleen, lung, testis, and spermatozoa. During the early stages of development, Hoxc11 and its interacting partners both showed lower expression, which then became prominent during the age of 1–3 years, regressed drastically thereafter, and remained so until the animal's life time (∼20 years). The high expression of Hoxc11 and its interacting partners in spermatozoa and testis during the onset of puberty suggests its likely role in the differentiation of gonads and subsequent reproductive activities. Additional work on Hoxc11 especially, in the context of respiratory, immunological, and in/fertility in other species, including humans would be useful for establishing its broader biological significance towards the enrichment of functional and comparative genomics. PMID:25760398

  13. The rice WUSCHEL-related homeobox genes are involved in reproductive organ development, hormone signaling and abiotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Saifeng; Huang, Yulan; Zhu, Ning; Zhao, Yu

    2014-10-10

    The WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) genes are important transcription regulators participated in plant development processes. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome encodes at least 13 WOX members. In this study, a systematic microarray-based gene expression profiling of eleven WOX genes was performed for the whole life cycle of rice at 16 different tissues/organs of MH63 (rice indica cultivar), which included eight reproductive organs and eight vegetative tissues. The results demonstrated that four genes (OsWUS, OsNS1/OsNS2, OsWOX3 and OsWOX9A) were specifically expressed in panicle and endosperm development, and six genes (OsWOX5, OsWOX9B, OsWOX9D, OsWOX11, OsWOX12A and OsWOX12B) were preferentially expressed in seeds (72h after imbibitions) during root emergence or growth. In situ hybridization analysis revealed differential transcript levels of OsWOX4, OsWOX5, OsWOX9A and OsWOX12B during panicle development and embryogenesis. Results of qRT-PCR showed that expression of four rice WOX genes (OsWOX5, OsWOX11, OsWOX12B and OsWOX12A) was up- or down-regulated by plant hormones (auxin, cytokinin and gibberellin). More interestingly, most WOX genes were responsive to abiotic stress stimuli of drought, salt and cold. The molecular studies presented here will further provide insight in understanding the functions of rice WOX gene family in rice development, hormone signaling, and abiotic stress response. PMID:25106855

  14. The homeobox gene Mohawk represses transcription by recruiting the sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas M; Beres, Brian J; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Rawls, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Mohawk is an atypical homeobox gene expressed in embryonic progenitor cells of skeletal muscle, tendon, and cartilage. We demonstrate that Mohawk functions as a transcriptional repressor capable of blocking the myogenic conversion of 10T1/2 fibroblasts. The repressor activity is located in three small, evolutionarily conserved domains (MRD1-3) in the carboxy-terminal half of the protein. Point mutation analysis revealed six residues in MRD1 are sufficient for repressor function. The carboxy-terminal half of Mohawk is able to recruit components of the Sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex (Sin3A, Hdac1, and Sap18) and a subset of Polymerase II general transcription factors (Tbp, TFIIA1 and TFIIB). Furthermore, Sap18, a protein that bridges the Sin3A/HDAC complex to DNA-bound transcription factors, is co-immunoprecipitated by MRD1. These data predict that Mohawk can repress transcription through recruitment of the Sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex, and as a result, repress target genes required for the differentiation of cells to the myogenic lineage. PMID:19235719

  15. A Homeobox Gene Related to Drosophila Distal-Less Promotes Ovarian Tumorigenicity by Inducing Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Fumikata; Samuel, Shaija; Liu, Jinsong; Rosen, Daniel; Langley, Robert R.; Naora, Honami

    2007-01-01

    Homeobox genes control developmental patterning and are increasingly being found to be deregulated in tumors. The DLX4 homeobox gene maps to the 17q21.3-q22 region that is amplified in some epithelial ovarian cancers. Because amplification of this region correlates with poor prognosis, we investigated whether DLX4 overexpression contributes to aggressive behavior of this disease. DLX4 was not detected in normal ovary and cystadenomas, whereas its expression in ovarian carcinomas was strongly associated with high tumor grade and advanced disease stage. Overexpression of DLX4 in ovarian cancer cells promoted growth in low serum and colony formation. Imaging of mice bearing intraperitoneal tumors revealed that DLX4 overexpression substantially increased tumor burden. Tumors that overexpressed DLX4 were more vascularized than vector-control tumors. Conditioned medium of DLX4-overexpressing tumor cells was more effective than medium conditioned by vector-control cells in stimulating endothelial cell growth. These observations were associated with the ability of DLX4 to induce expression of vascular endothelial growth factor as well as intracellular and secreted isoforms of fibroblast growth factor-2. Moreover, increased levels of these fibroblast growth factor-2 isoforms induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression in tumor cells. This study reveals a novel role for a homeobox gene in ovarian tumorigenicity by its induction of a proangiogenic, growth-stimulatory molecular program. PMID:17456765

  16. A homeobox gene related to Drosophila distal-less promotes ovarian tumorigenicity by inducing expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor-2.

    PubMed

    Hara, Fumikata; Samuel, Shaija; Liu, Jinsong; Rosen, Daniel; Langley, Robert R; Naora, Honami

    2007-05-01

    Homeobox genes control developmental patterning and are increasingly being found to be deregulated in tumors. The DLX4 homeobox gene maps to the 17q21.3-q22 region that is amplified in some epithelial ovarian cancers. Because amplification of this region correlates with poor prognosis, we investigated whether DLX4 overexpression contributes to aggressive behavior of this disease. DLX4 was not detected in normal ovary and cystadenomas, whereas its expression in ovarian carcinomas was strongly associated with high tumor grade and advanced disease stage. Overexpression of DLX4 in ovarian cancer cells promoted growth in low serum and colony formation. Imaging of mice bearing intraperitoneal tumors revealed that DLX4 overexpression substantially increased tumor burden. Tumors that overexpressed DLX4 were more vascularized than vector-control tumors. Conditioned medium of DLX4-overexpressing tumor cells was more effective than medium conditioned by vector-control cells in stimulating endothelial cell growth. These observations were associated with the ability of DLX4 to induce expression of vascular endothelial growth factor as well as intracellular and secreted isoforms of fibroblast growth factor-2. Moreover, increased levels of these fibroblast growth factor-2 isoforms induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression in tumor cells. This study reveals a novel role for a homeobox gene in ovarian tumorigenicity by its induction of a proangiogenic, growth-stimulatory molecular program. PMID:17456765

  17. Asymmetric Lower-Limb Malformations in Individuals with Homeobox PITX1 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gurnett, Christina A.; Alaee, Farhang; Kruse, Lisa M.; Desruisseau, David M.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Wise, Carol A.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Dobbs, Matthew B.

    2008-01-01

    Clubfoot is one of the most common severe musculoskeletal birth defects, with a worldwide incidence of 1 in 1000 live births. In the present study, we describe a five-generation family with asymmetric right-sided predominant idiopathic clubfoot segregating as an autosomal-dominant condition with incomplete penetrance. Other lower-limb malformations, including patellar hypoplasia, oblique talus, tibial hemimelia, developmental hip dysplasia, and preaxial polydactyly, were also present in some family members. Genome-wide linkage analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping 10K mapping data from 13 members of this family revealed a multipoint LODmax of 3.31 on chromosome 5q31. A single missense mutation (c.388G→A) was identified in PITX1, a bicoid-related homeodomain transcription factor critical for hindlimb development, and segregated with disease in this family. The PITX1 E130K mutation is located in the highly conserved homeodomain and reduces the ability of PITX1 to transactivate a luciferase reporter. The PITX1 E130K mutation also suppresses wild-type PITX1 activity in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting dominant-negative effects on transcription. The propensity for right-sided involvement in tibial hemimelia and clubfoot suggests that PITX1, or pathways involving PITX1, may be involved in their etiology. Implication of a gene involved in early limb development in clubfoot pathogenesis also suggests additional pathways for future investigations of idiopathic clubfoot etiology in humans. PMID:18950742

  18. Tbx4 Interacts With the Short Stature Homeobox Gene Shox2 in Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Anne; Arora, Ripla; Hoffmann, Sandra; Li, Li; Gretz, Norbert; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Rappold, Gudrun A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The short stature homeodomain transcription factors SHOX and SHOX2 play key roles in limb formation. To gain more insight into genes regulated by Shox2 during limb development, we analyzed expression profiles of WT and Shox2−/− mouse embryonic limbs and identified the T-Box transcription factor Tbx4 as a potential downstream target. Tbx4 is known to exert essential functions in skeletal and muscular hindlimb development. In humans, haploinsufficiency of TBX4 causes small patella syndrome, a skeletal dysplasia characterized by anomalies of the knee, pelvis, and foot. Results Here, we demonstrate an inhibitory regulatory effect of Shox2 on Tbx4 specifically in the forelimbs. We also show that Tbx4 activates Shox2 expression in fore- and hindlimbs, suggesting Shox2 as a feedback modulator of Tbx4. Using EMSA studies, we find that Tbx4/TBX4 is able to bind to distinct T-box binding sites within the mouse and human Shox2/SHOX2 promoter. Conclusions Our data identifies Tbx4 as a novel transcriptional activator of Shox2 during murine fore- and hindlimb development. Tbx4 is also regulated by Shox2 specifically in the forelimb bud possibly via a feedback mechanism. These data extend our understanding of the role and regulation of Tbx4 and Shox2 in limb development and limb associated diseases. PMID:24347445

  19. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value < 0.05; β-difference > 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9–16.9%; P-value < 0.0001) independent of the MTHFR 667C>T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways. PMID:25565354

  20. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value < 0.05; β-difference > 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9-16.9%; P-value < 0.0001) independent of the MTHFR 667C>T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways. PMID:25565354

  1. Characterization of chicken octamer-binding proteins demonstrates that POU domain-containing homeobox transcription factors have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Petryniak, B.; Postema, C.E.; McCormack, W.T.; Thompson, C.B. ); Staudt, L.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The DNA sequence motif ATTTGCAT (octamer) or its inverse complement has been identified as an evolutionarily conserved element in the promoter region of immunoglobulin genes. Two major DNA-binding proteins that bind in a sequence-specific manner to the octamer DNA sequence have been identified in mammalian species--a ubiquitously expressed protein (Oct-1) and a lymphoid-specific protein (Oct-2). During characterization of the promoter region of the chicken immunoglobulin light chain gene, the authors identified two homologous octamer-binding proteins in chicken B cells. when the cloning of the human gene for Oct-2 revealed it to be a member of a distinct family of homeobox genes, they sought to determine if the human Oct-2 cDNA could be used to identify homologous chicken homeobox genes. Using a human Oct-2 homeobox-specific DNA probe, they were able to identify 6-10 homeobox-containing genes in the chicken genome, demonstrating that the Oct-2-related subfamily of homeobox genes exists in avian species. DNA sequence analysis revealed it to be the chicken homologue of the human Oct-1 gene. Together, the data show that the POU-containing subfamily of homeobox genes have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution, apparently as a result of selection for their DNA-binding and transcriptional regulatory properties.

  2. The WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 3 gene PaWOX3 regulates lateral organ formation in Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, José M; Sohlberg, Joel; Engström, Peter; Zhu, Tianqing; Englund, Marie; Moschou, Panagiotis N; von Arnold, Sara

    2015-12-01

    In angiosperms, WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 3 (WOX3) genes are required for the recruitment of founder cells from the lateral domains of shoot meristems that form lateral regions of leaves. However, the regulation of the formation of lateral organs in gymnosperms remains unknown. By using somatic embryos of Norway spruce (Picea abies) we have studied the expression and function of PaWOX3 during embryo development. The mRNA abundance of PaWOX3 was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and the spatial expression of PaWOX3 was analysed by histochemical β-glucuronidase (GUS) assays and in situ mRNA hybridization. To investigate the function of PaWOX3, we analysed how downregulation of PaWOX3 in RNA interference lines affected embryo development and morphology. PaWOX3 was highly expressed in mature embryos at the base of each cotyledon close to the junction between the cotyledons, and in the lateral margins of cotyledons and needles, separating them into an adaxial and an abaxial side. Downregulation of the expression of PaWOX3 caused defects in lateral margin outgrowth in cotyledons and needles, and reduced root elongation. Our data suggest that the WOX3 function in margin outgrowth in lateral organs is conserved among the seed plants, whereas its function in root elongation may be unique to gymnosperms. PMID:26115363

  3. The homeobox gene Six3 is a potential regulator of anterior segment formation in the chick eye.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Zhang, Xiang-Mei; Lin, Eddie; Oliver, Guillermo; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2002-08-15

    The anterior segment of the vertebrate eye consists of highly organized and specialized ocular tissues critical for normal vision. The periocular mesenchyme, originating from the neural crest, contributes extensively to the anterior segment. During chick eye morphogenesis, the homeobox gene Six3 is expressed in a subset of periocular mesenchymal cells and in differentiating anterior segment tissues. Retrovirus-mediated misexpression of Six3 causes eye anterior segment malformation, including corneal protrusion and opacification, ciliary body and iris hypoplasia, and trabecular meshwork dysgenesis. Histological and molecular marker analyses demonstrate that Six3 misexpression disrupts the integrity of the corneal endothelium and the expression of extracellular matrix components critical for corneal transparency. Six3 misexpression also leads to a reduction of the periocular mesenchymal cell population expressing Lmx1b, Pitx2, and Pax6, transcription factors critical for eye anterior segment morphogenesis. Moreover, elevated levels of Six3 attenuate proliferation of periocular mesenchymal cells in vitro and differentiating anterior segment tissues in vivo. These results suggest that, in addition to its function in eye primordium determination, Six3 plays a role in regulating the development of the vertebrate eye anterior segment. PMID:12167403

  4. Bisphenol-A induces expression of HOXC6, an estrogen-regulated homeobox-containing gene associated with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Imran; Bhan, Arunoday; Ansari, Khairul I.; Deb, Paromita; Bobzean, Samara A. M.; Perrotti, Linda I.; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2015-01-01

    HOXC6 is a homeobox-containing gene associated with mammary gland development and is overexpressed in variety of cancers including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we have examined the expression of HOXC6 in breast cancer tissue, investigated its transcriptional regulation via estradiol (E2) and bisphenol-A (BPA, an estrogenic endocrine disruptor) in vitro and in vivo. We observed that HOXC6 is differentially over-expressed in breast cancer tissue. E2 induces HOXC6 expression in cultured breast cancer cells and in mammary glands of Sprague Dawley rats. HOXC6 expression is also induced upon exposure to BPA both in vitro and in vivo. Estrogen-receptor-alpha (ERα) and ER-coregulators such as MLL-histone methylases are bound to the HOXC6 promoter upon exposure to E2 or BPA and that resulted in increased histone H3K4-trimethylation, histone acetylation, and recruitment of RNA polymerase II at the HOXC6 promoter. HOXC6 overexpression induces expression of tumor growth factors and facilitates growth 3D-colony formation, indicating its potential roles in tumor growth. Our studies demonstrate that HOXC6, which is a critical player in mammary gland development, is upregulated in multiple cases of breast cancer, and is transcriptionally regulated by E2 and BPA, in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25725483

  5. Identification of Hox genes and rearrangements within the single homeobox (Hox) cluster (192.8 kb) of the cyclopoid copepod (Paracyclopina nana).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Su; Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Bo-Young; Souissi, Sami; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-03-01

    We report the first identification of the entire complement of the eight typical homeobox (hox) genes (lab, pb, Dfd, scr, antp, ubx, Abd-A, and Abd-B) and the ftz gene in a 192.8 kb region in the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana. A Hox3 gene ortholog was not present in the P. nana hox gene cluster, while the P. nana Dfd gene was transcribed in the opposite direction to the Daphnia pulex Dfd gene, but in the same direction as the Dfd genes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. The location of the lab and pb genes was switched in the P. nana hox cluster, while the order of the remaining hox genes was generally conserved with those of other arthropods. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833546

  6. WUSCHEL-related Homeobox genes in Populus tomentosa: diversified expression patterns and a functional similarity in adventitious root formation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background WUSCHEL (WUS)-related homeobox (WOX) protein family members play important roles in the maintenance and proliferation of the stem cell niche in the shoot apical meristem (SAM), root apical meristem (RAM), and cambium (CAM). Although the roles of some WOXs in meristematic cell regulation have been well studied in annual plants such as Arabidopsis and rice, the expression and function of WOX members in woody plant poplars has not been systematically investigated. Here, we present the identification and comprehensive analysis of the expression and function of WOXs in Populus tomentosa. Results A genome-wide survey identified 18 WOX encoding sequences in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa (PtrWOXs). Phylogenetic and gene structure analysis revealed that these 18 PtrWOXs fall into modern/WUS, intermediate, and ancient clades, but that the WOX genes in P. trichocarpa may have expanded differently from the WOX genes in Arabidopsis. In the P. trichocarpa genome, no WOX members could be closely classified as AtWOX3, AtWOX6, AtWOX7, AtWOX10, and AtWOX14, but there were two copies of WOX genes that could be classified as PtrWUS, PtrWOX2, PtrWOX4, PtrWOX5, PtrWOX8/9, and PtrWOX11/12, and three copies of WOX genes that could be classified as PtrWOX1 and PtrWOX13. The use of primers specific for each PtrWOX gene allowed the identification and cloning of 18 WOX genes from P. tomentosa (PtoWOXs), a poplar species physiologically close to P. trichocarpa. It was found that PtoWOXs and PtrWOXs shared very high amino acid sequence identity, and that PtoWOXs could be classified identically to PtrWOXs. We revealed that the expression patterns of some PtoWOXs were different to their Arabidopsis counterparts. When PtoWOX5a and PtoWOX11/12a, as well as PtoWUSa and PtoWOX4a were ectopically expressed in transgenic hybrid poplars, the regeneration of adventitious root (AR) was promoted, indicating a functional similarity of these four WOXs in AR regeneration. Conclusions

  7. microRNA-309 targets the Homeobox gene SIX4 and controls ovarian development in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Kokoza, Vladimir A; Li, Ming; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2016-08-16

    Obligatory blood-triggered reproductive strategy is an evolutionary adaptation of mosquitoes for rapid egg development. It contributes to the vectorial capacity of these insects. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying reproductive processes is of particular importance. Here, we report that microRNA-309 (miR-309) plays a critical role in mosquito reproduction. A spatiotemporal expression profile of miR-309 displayed its blood feeding-dependent onset and ovary-specific manifestation in female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Antagomir silencing of miR-309 impaired ovarian development and resulted in nonsynchronized follicle growth. Furthermore, the genetic disruption of miR-309 by CRISPR/Cas9 system led to the developmental failure of primary follicle formation. Examination of genomic responses to miR-309 depletion revealed that several pathways associated with ovarian development are down-regulated. Comparative analysis of genes obtained from the high-throughput RNA sequencing of ovarian tissue from the miR-309 antagomir-silenced mosquitoes with those from the in silico computation target prediction identified that the gene-encoding SIX homeobox 4 protein (SIX4) is a putative target of miR-309. Reporter assay and RNA immunoprecipitation confirmed that SIX4 is a direct target of miR-309. RNA interference of SIX4 was able to rescue phenotypic manifestations caused by miR-309 depletion. Thus, miR-309 plays a critical role in mosquito reproduction by targeting SIX4 in the ovary and serves as a regulatory switch permitting a stage-specific degradation of the ovarian SIX4 mRNA. In turn, this microRNA (miRNA)-targeted degradation is required for appropriate initiation of a blood feeding-triggered phase of ovarian development, highlighting involvement of this miRNA in mosquito reproduction. PMID:27489347

  8. The Xenopus homologue of Otx2 is a maternal homeobox gene that demarcates and specifies anterior body regions.

    PubMed

    Pannese, M; Polo, C; Andreazzoli, M; Vignali, R; Kablar, B; Barsacchi, G; Boncinelli, E

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we study Xotx2, a Xenopus homeobox gene related to orthodenticle, a gene expressed in the developing head of Drosophila. The murine cognate, Otx2, is first expressed in the entire epiblast of prestreak embryos and later in very anterior regions of late-gastrulae, including the neuroectoderm of presumptive fore- and mid-brain. In Xenopus, RNase protection experiments reveal that Xotx2 is expressed at low levels throughout early development from unfertilized egg to late blastula, when its expression level significantly increases. Whole-mount in situ hybridization shows a localized expression in the dorsal region of the marginal zone at stage 9.5. At stage 10.25 Xotx2 is expressed in dorsal bottle cells and in cells of the dorsal deep zone fated to give rise to prechordal mesendoderm, suggesting a role in the specification of very anterior structures. In stage 10.5 gastrulae, Xotx2 transcripts start to be detectable also in presumptive anterior neuroectoderm, where they persist in subsequent stages. Various treatments of early embryos cause a general reorganization of Xotx2 expression. In particular, retinoic acid treatment essentially abolishes Xotx2 expression in neuroectoderm. Microinjection of Xotx2 mRNA in 1-, 2- and 4-cell stage embryos causes the appearance of secondary cement glands and partial secondary axes in embryos with reduced trunk and tail structures. The presence of the Xotx2 homeodomain is required to produce these effects. In particular, this homeodomain contains a specific lysine residue at position 9 of the recognition helix. Microinjected transcripts of Xotx2 constructs containing a homeodomain where this lysine is substituted by a glutamine or a glutamic acid residue fail to cause these effects. PMID:7720578

  9. Distal-less homeobox genes of insects and spiders: genomic organization, function, regulation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Piel, William H; Monteiro, Antónia

    2016-06-01

    The Distal-less (Dll) genes are homeodomain transcription factors that are present in most Metazoa and in representatives of all investigated arthropod groups. In Drosophila, the best studied insect, Dll plays an essential role in forming the proximodistal axis of the legs, antennae and analia, and in specifying antennal identity. The initiation of Dll expression in clusters of cells in mid-lateral regions of the Drosophila embryo represents the earliest genetic marker of limbs. Dll genes are involved in the development of the peripheral nervous system and sensitive organs, and they also function as master regulators of black pigmentation in some insect lineages. Here we analyze the complete genomes of six insects, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Homo sapiens, as well as multiple Dll sequences available in databases in order to examine the structure and protein features of these genes. We also review the function, expression, regulation and evolution of arthropod Dll genes with emphasis on insects and spiders. PMID:26898323

  10. Functional and hierarchical interactions among zebrafish vox/vent homeobox genes.

    PubMed

    Gilardelli, Claudio N; Pozzoli, Ombretta; Sordino, Paolo; Matassi, Giorgio; Cotelli, Franco

    2004-07-01

    The vertebrate Vox/Vent family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in the establishment of the dorsoventral (DV) axis, by repressing organizer genes such as bozozok/dharma, goosecoid, and chordino. In Danio rerio (zebrafish), members of the vox/vent gene family (vox/vega1, vent/vega2, and ved) are thought to share expression patterns and functional properties. Bringing novel insights in the differential activity of the zebrafish vox/vent genes, we propose a critical role for the ved gene in DV patterning of vertebrate embryos. ved is not only expressed as a maternal gene, but it also appears to function as a repressor of dorsal factors involved in organizer formation. At early- and mid-gastrula stage, ved appears to be finely controlled by antagonist crosstalks in a complex regulatory network, involving gradients of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activity, dorsal factors, and vox/vent family members. We show that ved transcripts are ventrally restricted by BMP factors such as bmp2b, bmp7, smad5, and alk8, and by dorsal factors (chd and gsc). Alteration of ved expression in both vox and vent deletion mutants and vox and vent mRNAs-injected embryos, suggests that vox and vent function downstream of BMP signaling to negatively regulate ved expression. This inhibitory role is emphasized by a vox and vent redundant activity, compared with single gene effects. PMID:15188434

  11. The homeobox genes vox and vent are redundant repressors of dorsal fates in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Gates, M A; Melby, A E; Kimelman, D; Schier, A F; Talbot, W S

    2001-06-01

    Ventralizing transcriptional repressors in the Vox/Vent family have been proposed to be important regulators of dorsoventral patterning in the early embryo. While the zebrafish genes vox (vega1) and vent (vega2) both have ventralizing activity in overexpression assays, loss-of-function studies are needed to determine whether these genes have distinct or redundant functions in dorsoventral patterning and to provide critical tests of the proposed regulatory interactions among vox, vent and other genes that act to establish the dorsoventral axis. We show that vox and vent are redundant repressors of dorsal fates in zebrafish. Mutants that lack vox function have little or no dorsoventral patterning defect, and inactivation of either vox or vent by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides has little or no effect on the embryo. In contrast, embryos that lack both vox and vent function have a dorsalized phenotype. Expression of dorsal mesodermal genes, including chordin, goosecoid and bozozok, is strongly expanded in embryos that lack vox and vent function, indicating that the redundant action of vox and vent is required to restrict dorsal genes to their appropriate territories. Our genetic analysis indicates that the dorsalizing transcription factor Bozozok promotes dorsal fates indirectly, by antagonizing the expression of vox and vent. In turn, vox and vent repress chordin expression, restricting its function as an antagonist of ventral fates to the dorsal side of the embryo. Our results support a model in which BMP signaling induces the expression of ventral genes, while vox and vent act redundantly to prevent the expression of chordin, goosecoid and other dorsal genes in the lateral and ventral mesendoderm. PMID:11493559

  12. The murine Otp homeobox gene plays an essential role in the specification of neuronal cell lineages in the developing hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Lufkin, T

    2000-11-15

    Hypothalamic nuclei, including the anterior periventricular (aPV), paraventricular (PVN), and supraoptic (SON) nuclei strongly express the homeobox gene Orthopedia (Otp) during embryogenesis. Targeted inactivation of Otp in the mouse results in the loss of these nuclei in the homozygous null neonates. The Otp null hypothalamus fails to secrete neuropeptides somatostatin, arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in an appropriate spatial and temporal fashion, and leads to the death of Otp null pups shortly after birth. Failure to produce these neuropeptide hormones is evident prior to E15.5, indicating a failure in terminal differentiation of the aPV/PVN/SON neurons. Absence of elevated apoptotic activity, but reduced cell proliferation together with the ectopic activation of Six3 expression in the presumptive PVN, indicates a critical role for Otp in terminal differentiation and maturation of these neuroendocrine cell lineages. Otp employs distinct regulatory mechanisms to modulate the expression of specific molecular markers in the developing hypothalamus. At early embryonic stages, expression of Sim2 is immediately downregulated as a result of the absence of Otp, indicating a potential role for Otp as an upstream regulator of Sim2. In contrast, the regulation of Brn4 which is also expressed in the SON and PVN is independent of Otp function. Hence no strong evidence links Otp and Brn4 in the same regulatory pathway. The involvement of Otp and Sim1 in specifying specific hypothalamic neurosecretory cell lineages is shown to operate via distinct signaling pathways that partially overlap with Brn2. PMID:11071765

  13. The Homeobox Gene MEIS1 Is Methylated in BRAFp.V600E Mutated Colon Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dihal, Ashwin A.; Boot, Arnoud; van Roon, Eddy H.; Schrumpf, Melanie; Fariña-Sarasqueta, Arantza; Fiocco, Marta; Zeestraten, Eliane C. M.; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom; Boer, Judith M.

    2013-01-01

    Development of colorectal cancer (CRC) can occur both via gene mutations in tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as via epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation. Site-specific methylation in CRC regulates expression of tumor-associated genes. Right-sided colon tumors more frequently have BRAFp.V600E mutations and have higher methylation grades when compared to left-sided malignancies. The aim of this study was to identify DNA methylation changes associated with BRAFp.V600E mutation status. We performed methylation profiling of colon tumor DNA, isolated from frozen sections enriched for epithelial cells by macro-dissection, and from paired healthy tissue. Single gene analyses comparing BRAFp.V600E with BRAF wild type revealed MEIS1 as the most significant differentially methylated gene (log2 fold change: 0.89, false discovery rate-adjusted P-value 2.8*10-9). This finding was validated by methylation-specific PCR that was concordant with the microarray data. Additionally, validation in an independent cohort (n=228) showed a significant association between BRAFp.V600E and MEIS1 methylation (OR: 13.0, 95% CI: 5.2 - 33.0, P<0.0001). MEIS1 methylation was associated with decreased MEIS1 gene expression in both patient samples and CRC cell lines. The same was true for gene expression of a truncated form of MEIS1, MEIS1D27, which misses exon 8 and has a proposed tumor suppression function. To trace the origin of MEIS1 promoter methylation, 14 colorectal tumors were flow-sorted. Four out of eight BRAFp.V600E tumor epithelial fractions (50%) showed MEIS1 promoter methylation, as well as three out of eight BRAFp.V600E stromal fractions (38%). Only one out of six BRAF wild type showed MEIS1 promoter methylation in both the epithelial tumor and stromal fractions (17%). In conclusion, BRAFp.V600E colon tumors showed significant MEIS1 promoter methylation, which was associated with decreased MEIS1 gene expression. PMID:24244575

  14. vox homeobox gene: a novel regulator of midbrain-hindbrain boundary development in medaka fish?

    PubMed

    Fabian, Peter; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula N; Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-03-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is one of the key organizing centers of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). Its patterning is governed by a well-described gene regulatory network (GRN) involving several transcription factors, namely, pax, gbx, en, and otx, together with signaling molecules of the Wnt and Fgf families. Here, we describe the onset of these markers in Oryzias latipes (medaka) early brain development in comparison to previously known zebrafish expression patterns. Moreover, we show for the first time that vox, a member of the vent gene family, is expressed in the developing neural tube similarly to CNS markers. Overexpression of vox leads to profound changes in the gene expression patterns of individual components of MHB-specific GRN, most notably of fgf8, a crucial organizer molecule of MHB. Our data suggest that genes from the vent family, in addition to their crucial role in body axis formation, may play a role in regionalization of vertebrate CNS. PMID:26965282

  15. A Role for the Transcription Factor Nk2 Homeobox 1 in Schizophrenia: Convergent Evidence from Animal and Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Malt, Eva A; Juhasz, Katalin; Malt, Ulrik F; Naumann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with diverse mental and somatic symptoms. The molecular mechanisms leading from genes to disease pathology in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with specific diseases are enriched in the recognition sequences of transcription factors that regulate physiological processes relevant to the disease. We have used a "bottom-up" approach and tracked a developmental trajectory from embryology to physiological processes and behavior and recognized that the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1) possesses properties of particular interest for schizophrenia. NKX2-1 is selectively expressed from prenatal development to adulthood in the brain, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, lungs, skin, and enteric ganglia, and has key functions at the interface of the brain, the endocrine-, and the immune system. In the developing brain, NKX2-1-expressing progenitor cells differentiate into distinct subclasses of forebrain GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. The transcription factor is highly expressed in mature limbic circuits related to context-dependent goal-directed patterns of behavior, social interaction and reproduction, fear responses, responses to light, and other homeostatic processes. It is essential for development and mature function of the thyroid gland and the respiratory system, and is involved in calcium metabolism and immune responses. NKX2-1 interacts with a number of genes identified as susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. We suggest that NKX2-1 may lie at the core of several dose dependent pathways that are dysregulated in schizophrenia. We correlate the symptoms seen in schizophrenia with the temporal and spatial activities of NKX2-1 in order to highlight promising future research areas. PMID:27064909

  16. A Role for the Transcription Factor Nk2 Homeobox 1 in Schizophrenia: Convergent Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Malt, Eva A.; Juhasz, Katalin; Malt, Ulrik F.; Naumann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with diverse mental and somatic symptoms. The molecular mechanisms leading from genes to disease pathology in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with specific diseases are enriched in the recognition sequences of transcription factors that regulate physiological processes relevant to the disease. We have used a “bottom-up” approach and tracked a developmental trajectory from embryology to physiological processes and behavior and recognized that the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1) possesses properties of particular interest for schizophrenia. NKX2-1 is selectively expressed from prenatal development to adulthood in the brain, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, lungs, skin, and enteric ganglia, and has key functions at the interface of the brain, the endocrine-, and the immune system. In the developing brain, NKX2-1-expressing progenitor cells differentiate into distinct subclasses of forebrain GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. The transcription factor is highly expressed in mature limbic circuits related to context-dependent goal-directed patterns of behavior, social interaction and reproduction, fear responses, responses to light, and other homeostatic processes. It is essential for development and mature function of the thyroid gland and the respiratory system, and is involved in calcium metabolism and immune responses. NKX2-1 interacts with a number of genes identified as susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. We suggest that NKX2-1 may lie at the core of several dose dependent pathways that are dysregulated in schizophrenia. We correlate the symptoms seen in schizophrenia with the temporal and spatial activities of NKX2-1 in order to highlight promising future research areas. PMID:27064909

  17. Activation of enhancer elements by the homeobox gene Cdx2 is cell line specific.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J K; Levy, T; Suh, E R; Traber, P G

    1997-01-01

    Cdx2 is a caudal-related homeodomain transcription factor that is expressed in complex patterns during mouse development and at high levels in the intestinal epithelium of adult mice. Cdx2 activates transcription of intestinal gene promoters containing specific binding sites. Moreover, Cdx2 has been shown to induce intestinal differentiation in cell lines. In this study, we show that Cdx2 is able to bind to two well defined enhancer elements in the HoxC8 gene. We then demonstrate that Cdx2 is able to activate transcription of heterologous promoters when its DNA binding element is placed in an enhancer context. Furthermore, the ability to activate enhancer elements is cell-line dependent. When the Cdx2 activation domain was linked to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, the chimeric protein was able to activate Gal4 enhancer constructs in an intestinal cell line, but was unable to activate transcription in NIH3T3 cells. These data suggest that there are cell-specific factors that allow the Cdx2 activation domain to function in the activation of enhancer elements. We hypothesize that either a co-activator protein or differential phosphorylation of the activation domain may be the mechanism for intestinal cell line-specific function of Cdx2 and possibly in other tissues in early development. PMID:9171078

  18. The homeobox gene BREVIPEDICELLUS is a key regulator of inflorescence architecture in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Venglat, S. P.; Dumonceaux, T.; Rozwadowski, K.; Parnell, L.; Babic, V.; Keller, W.; Martienssen, R.; Selvaraj, G.; Datla, R.

    2002-01-01

    Flowering plants display a remarkable range of inflorescence architecture, and pedicel characteristics are one of the key contributors to this diversity. However, very little is known about the genes or the pathways that regulate pedicel development. The brevipedicellus (bp) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana displays a unique phenotype with defects in pedicel development causing downward-pointing flowers and a compact inflorescence architecture. Cloning and molecular analysis of two independent mutant alleles revealed that BP encodes the homeodomain protein KNAT1, a member of the KNOX family. bp-1 is a null allele with deletion of the entire locus, whereas bp-2 has a point mutation that is predicted to result in a truncated protein. In both bp alleles, the pedicels and internodes were compact because of fewer cell divisions; in addition, defects in epidermal and cortical cell differentiation and elongation were found in the affected regions. The downward-pointing pedicels were produced by an asymmetric effect of the bp mutation on the abaxial vs. adaxial sides. Cell differentiation, elongation, and growth were affected more severely on the abaxial than adaxial side, causing the change in the pedicel growth angle. In addition, bp plants displayed defects in cell differentiation and radial growth of the style. Our results show that BP plays a key regulatory role in defining important aspects of the growth and cell differentiation of the inflorescence stem, pedicel, and style in Arabidopsis. PMID:11917137

  19. The Xenopus homeobox gene pitx3 impinges upon somitogenesis and laterality.

    PubMed

    Smoczer, Cristine; Hooker, Lara; Brode, Sarah; Wolanski, Marian; KhosrowShahian, Farhad; Crawford, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Pitx3 has been identified as the causative locus in a developmental eye mutation associated with mammalian anterior segment dysgenesis, congenital cataracts, and aphakia. In recent studies of frog eye development we discovered that pitx3 expresses symmetrically in the somites and lateral plate mesoderm and asymmetrically during cardiac and gut looping. We report that disruption of pitx3 activity on one side of an embryo relative to the other, either by over- or underexpression of pitx3, elicits a crooked dorsal axis in embryos that is a consequence of a retarded progression through somitogenesis. Unlike in amniotes, Xenopus somites form as cohorts of presomitic cells that rotate perpendicular to the dorsal axis. Since no vertebral anomalies have been reported in mouse and human Pitx3 mutants, we attempt to distinguish whether the segmentation clock is uniquely affected in frog or if the pitx3 perturbation inhibits the cellular changes that are necessary to rotation of presomitic cells. In Xenopus, pitx3 appears to inhibit the rotation of presomitic cell cohorts and to be necessary to the bilaterally symmetric expression of pitx2 in somites. PMID:23527636

  20. Functional Investigation of a Non-coding Variant Associated with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Zebrafish: Elevated Expression of the Ladybird Homeobox Gene Causes Body Axis Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Long; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kou, Ikuyo; Takimoto, Aki; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-ichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Miura, Shigenori; Adachi, Taiji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis susceptibility locus near human ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1) and FLJ41350 by a genome-wide association study. Here, we characterized the associated non-coding variant and investigated the function of these genes. A chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that the genome region with the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11190870) physically interacted with the promoter region of LBX1-FLJ41350. The promoter in the direction of LBX1, combined with a 590-bp region including rs11190870, had higher transcriptional activity with the risk allele than that with the non-risk allele in HEK 293T cells. The ubiquitous overexpression of human LBX1 or either of the zebrafish lbx genes (lbx1a, lbx1b, and lbx2), but not FLJ41350, in zebrafish embryos caused body curvature followed by death prior to vertebral column formation. Such body axis deformation was not observed in transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated knockout zebrafish of lbx1b or lbx2. Mosaic expression of lbx1b driven by the GATA2 minimal promoter and the lbx1b enhancer in zebrafish significantly alleviated the embryonic lethal phenotype to allow observation of the later onset of the spinal curvature with or without vertebral malformation. Deformation of the embryonic body axis by lbx1b overexpression was associated with defects in convergent extension, which is a component of the main axis-elongation machinery in gastrulating embryos. In embryos overexpressing lbx1b, wnt5b, a ligand of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, was significantly downregulated. Injection of mRNA for wnt5b or RhoA, a key downstream effector of Wnt/PCP signaling, rescued the defective convergent extension phenotype and attenuated the lbx1b-induced curvature of the body axis. Thus, our study presents a novel pathological feature of LBX1 and its zebrafish homologs in body axis deformation at various stages of

  1. Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1: its clinical significance and functional role in human thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Gang; Wu, Shihe; Jiang, Futing; Xie, Jiangping; Wang, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcription factor zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), as one of the key inducers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, has been reported to be regulated by microRNA-144 and Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3, which both promote thyroid cancer cell invasion. However, the involvement of ZEB1 in thyroid cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and clinical implication of ZEB1 in this disease. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the subcellular localization and the expression level of ZEB1 protein in 82 self-pairs of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent noncancerous tissues obtained from patients with thyroid cancer. The roles of ZEB1 in thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion, and proliferation were also detected by transwell and MTT analyses, respectively. Results Immunohistochemistry showed that ZEB1 was predominantly localized in the nucleus of thyroid cancer cells. Its immunoreactive score in thyroid cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in adjacent noncancerous tissues (P=0.01). In addition, ZEB1 overexpression was significantly associated with the advanced tumor node metastasis staging (P=0.008), the positive lymph node metastasis (P=0.01) and distant metastasis (P=0.02). Furthermore, ZEB1 knockdown by siRNA could efficiently inhibit the migration, invasion, and proliferation abilities of thyroid cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion These findings indicated that ZEB1 might function as an oncogene, the overexpression of which was associated with the aggressive tumor progression of human thyroid cancer. Interestingly, ZEB1 also could promote thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion, and proliferation, suggesting that the inhibition of this protein might be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this malignancy. PMID:27099512

  2. Hahb-10, a sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene, is regulated by light quality and quantity, and promotes early flowering when expressed in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Eva C; Dezar, Carlos A; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Chan, Raquel L

    2005-12-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper proteins constitute a family of transcription factors found only in plants. Expression patterns of the sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene Hahb-10 (Helianthus annuus homeobox-10), that belongs to the HD-Zip II subfamily, were analysed. Northern blots showed that Hahb-10 is expressed primarily in mature leaves, although expression is clearly detectable in younger leaves and also in stems. Considerably higher expression levels were detected in etiolated seedlings compared with light-grown seedlings. Induction of Hahb-10 expression was observed when seedlings were subjected to treatment with gibberellins. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express Hahb-10 under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter show special phenotypic characteristics such as darker cotyledons and planar leaves. A reduction in the life cycle of about 25% allowing earlier seed collection was also observed, and this phenomenon is clearly related to a shortened flowering time. When the number of plants per pot increased, the difference in developmental rate between transgenic and non-transformed individuals became larger. After gibberellin treatment, the relative difference in life cycle duration was considerably reduced. Several light-regulated genes have been tested as possible target genes of Hahb-10. One of them, PsbS, shows a different response to illumination conditions in transgenic plants compared with the response in wild-type plants while the other genes behave similarly in both genotypes. We propose that Hahb-10 functions in a signalling cascade(s) that control(s) plant responses to light quality and quantity, and may also be involved in gibberellin transduction pathways. PMID:16215272

  3. Pre-B cell leukemia homeobox 1 is associated with lupus susceptibility in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Carla M.; Li, Shiwu; Liang, Shujuan; Yin, Yiming; Potula, Hari Hara S.K.; Xu, Zhiwei; Sengupta, Mayami; Chen, Yifang; Butfiloski, Edward; Baker, Henry; Chang, Lung-Ji; Dozmorov, Igor; Sobel, Eric S.; Morel, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Sle1a.1 is part of the Sle1 susceptibility locus, which has the strongest association with lupus nephritis in the NZM2410 mouse model. Here we show that Sle1a.1 results in the production of activated and autoreactive CD4+ T cells. In addition, Sle1a.1 expression reduces the peripheral regulatory T cell (Treg) pool, as well as induces a defective response of CD4+ T cells to the retinoic acid (RA) expansion of TGFβ-induced Tregs. At the molecular level, Sle1a.1 corresponds to an increased expression of a novel splice isoform of Pbx1, Pbx1-d. Pbx1-d over-expression is sufficient to induce an activated/inflammatory phenotype in Jurkat T cells, and to decrease their apoptotic response to RA. PBX1-d is expressed more frequently in the CD4+ T cells from lupus patients than from healthy controls, and its presence correlates with an increased central memory T cell population. These findings indicate that Pbx1 is a novel lupus susceptibility gene that regulates T cell activation and tolerance. PMID:22180614

  4. Characterization of Rice Homeobox Genes, OsHOX22 and OsHOX24, and Over-expression of OsHOX24 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Suggest Their Role in Abiotic Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox transcription factors are well known regulators of plant growth and development. In this study, we carried out functional analysis of two candidate stress-responsive HD-ZIP I class homeobox genes from rice, OsHOX22, and OsHOX24. These genes were highly up-regulated under various abiotic stress conditions at different stages of rice development, including seedling, mature and reproductive stages. The transcript levels of these genes were enhanced significantly in the presence of plant hormones, including abscisic acid (ABA), auxin, salicylic acid, and gibberellic acid. The recombinant full-length and truncated homeobox proteins were found to be localized in the nucleus. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay established the binding of these homeobox proteins with specific DNA sequences, AH1 (CAAT(A/T)ATTG) and AH2 (CAAT(C/G)ATTG). Transactivation assays in yeast revealed the transcriptional activation potential of full-length OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 proteins. Homo- and hetero-dimerization capabilities of these proteins have also been demonstrated. Further, we identified putative novel interacting proteins of OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 via yeast-two hybrid analysis. Over-expression of OsHOX24 imparted higher sensitivity to stress hormone, ABA, and abiotic stresses in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants as revealed by various physiological and phenotypic assays. Microarray analysis revealed differential expression of several stress-responsive genes in transgenic lines as compared to wild-type. Many of these genes were found to be involved in transcriptional regulation and various metabolic pathways. Altogether, our results suggest the possible role of OsHOX22/OsHOX24 homeobox proteins as negative regulators in abiotic stress responses. PMID:27242831

  5. Characterization of Rice Homeobox Genes, OsHOX22 and OsHOX24, and Over-expression of OsHOX24 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Suggest Their Role in Abiotic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Khurana, Jitendra P; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox transcription factors are well known regulators of plant growth and development. In this study, we carried out functional analysis of two candidate stress-responsive HD-ZIP I class homeobox genes from rice, OsHOX22, and OsHOX24. These genes were highly up-regulated under various abiotic stress conditions at different stages of rice development, including seedling, mature and reproductive stages. The transcript levels of these genes were enhanced significantly in the presence of plant hormones, including abscisic acid (ABA), auxin, salicylic acid, and gibberellic acid. The recombinant full-length and truncated homeobox proteins were found to be localized in the nucleus. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay established the binding of these homeobox proteins with specific DNA sequences, AH1 (CAAT(A/T)ATTG) and AH2 (CAAT(C/G)ATTG). Transactivation assays in yeast revealed the transcriptional activation potential of full-length OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 proteins. Homo- and hetero-dimerization capabilities of these proteins have also been demonstrated. Further, we identified putative novel interacting proteins of OsHOX22 and OsHOX24 via yeast-two hybrid analysis. Over-expression of OsHOX24 imparted higher sensitivity to stress hormone, ABA, and abiotic stresses in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants as revealed by various physiological and phenotypic assays. Microarray analysis revealed differential expression of several stress-responsive genes in transgenic lines as compared to wild-type. Many of these genes were found to be involved in transcriptional regulation and various metabolic pathways. Altogether, our results suggest the possible role of OsHOX22/OsHOX24 homeobox proteins as negative regulators in abiotic stress responses. PMID:27242831

  6. The leucine twenty homeobox (LEUTX) gene, which lacks a histone acetyltransferase domain, is fused to KAT6A in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;19)(p11;q13).

    PubMed

    Chinen, Yoshiaki; Taki, Tomohiko; Tsutsumi, Yasuhiko; Kobayashi, Satoru; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Sakamoto, Natsumi; Kuroda, Junya; Horiike, Shigeo; Nishida, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Hirofumi; Uike, Naokuni; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    The monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein KAT6A (formerly MOZ) gene is recurrently rearranged by chromosomal translocations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). KAT6A is known to be fused to several genes, all of which have histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity and interact with a number of transcription factors as a transcriptional coactivator. The present study shows that the leucine twenty homeobox (LEUTX) gene on 19q13 is fused to the KAT6A gene on 8p11 in a therapy-related AML with t(8;19)(p11;q13) using the cDNA bubble PCR method. The fusion transcripts contained 83 nucleotides upstream of the first ATG of LEUTX and are presumed to create in-frame fusion proteins. LEUTX is known to have a homeobox domain. Expression of the LEUTX gene was only detected in placenta RNA by RT-PCR, but not in any tissues by Northern blot analysis. The putative LEUTX protein does not contain any HAT domain, and this is the first study to report that KAT6A can fuse to the homeobox gene. The current study, with identification of a new partner gene to KAT6A in a therapy-related AML, does not elucidate the mechanisms of leukemogenesis in KAT6A-related AML but describes a new gene with a different putative function. PMID:24446090

  7. The WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox Gene WOX11 Is Required to Activate Shoot-Borne Crown Root Development in Rice[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Hu, Yongfeng; Dai, Mingqiu; Huang, Limin; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2009-01-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa), the shoot-borne crown roots are the major root type and are initiated at lower stem nodes as part of normal plant development. However, the regulatory mechanism of crown root development is poorly understood. In this work, we show that a WUSCHEL-related Homeobox (WOX) gene, WOX11, is involved in the activation of crown root emergence and growth. WOX11 was found to be expressed in emerging crown roots and later in cell division regions of the root meristem. The expression could be induced by exogenous auxin or cytokinin. Loss-of-function mutation or downregulation of the gene reduced the number and the growth rate of crown roots, whereas overexpression of the gene induced precocious crown root growth and dramatically increased the root biomass by producing crown roots at the upper stem nodes and the base of florets. The expressions of auxin- and cytokinin-responsive genes were affected in WOX11 overexpression and RNA interference transgenic plants. Further analysis showed that WOX11 directly repressed RR2, a type-A cytokinin-responsive regulator gene that was found to be expressed in crown root primordia. The results suggest that WOX11 may be an integrator of auxin and cytokinin signaling that feeds into RR2 to regulate cell proliferation during crown root development. PMID:19258439

  8. A 20 bp Duplication in Exon 2 of the Aristaless-Like Homeobox 4 Gene (ALX4) Is the Candidate Causative Mutation for Tibial Hemimelia Syndrome in Galloway Cattle.

    PubMed

    Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard; Hardt, Michael; Scheuermann, Petra; Freick, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (ALX4) gene is an important transcription regulator in skull and limb development. In humans and mice ALX4 mutations or loss of function result in a number of skeletal and organ malformations, including polydactyly, tibial hemimelia, omphalocele, biparietal foramina, impaired mammary epithelial morphogenesis, alopecia, coronal craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge and ridge, bifid nasal tip, hypogonadism, and body agenesis. Here we show that a complex skeletal malformation of the hind limb in Galloway cattle together with other developmental anomalies is a recessive autosomal disorder most likely caused by a duplication of 20 bp in exon 2 of the bovine ALX4 gene. A second duplication of 34 bp in exon 4 of the same gene has no known effect, although both duplications result in a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. Genotyping of 1,688 Black/Red/Belted/Riggit Galloway (GA) and 289 White Galloway (WGA) cattle showed that the duplication in exon 2 has allele frequencies of 1% in GA and 6% in WGA and the duplication in exon 4 has frequencies of 23% in GA and 38% in WGA. Both duplications were not detected in 876 randomly selected German Holstein Friesian and 86 cattle of 21 other breeds. Hence, we have identified a candidate causative mutation for tibial hemimelia syndrome in Galloway cattle and selection against this mutation can be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the breed. PMID:26076463

  9. A 20 bp Duplication in Exon 2 of the Aristaless-Like Homeobox 4 Gene (ALX4) Is the Candidate Causative Mutation for Tibial Hemimelia Syndrome in Galloway Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard; Hardt, Michael; Scheuermann, Petra; Freick, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (ALX4) gene is an important transcription regulator in skull and limb development. In humans and mice ALX4 mutations or loss of function result in a number of skeletal and organ malformations, including polydactyly, tibial hemimelia, omphalocele, biparietal foramina, impaired mammary epithelial morphogenesis, alopecia, coronal craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge and ridge, bifid nasal tip, hypogonadism, and body agenesis. Here we show that a complex skeletal malformation of the hind limb in Galloway cattle together with other developmental anomalies is a recessive autosomal disorder most likely caused by a duplication of 20 bp in exon 2 of the bovine ALX4 gene. A second duplication of 34 bp in exon 4 of the same gene has no known effect, although both duplications result in a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. Genotyping of 1,688 Black/Red/Belted/Riggit Galloway (GA) and 289 White Galloway (WGA) cattle showed that the duplication in exon 2 has allele frequencies of 1% in GA and 6% in WGA and the duplication in exon 4 has frequencies of 23% in GA and 38% in WGA. Both duplications were not detected in 876 randomly selected German Holstein Friesian and 86 cattle of 21 other breeds. Hence, we have identified a candidate causative mutation for tibial hemimelia syndrome in Galloway cattle and selection against this mutation can be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the breed. PMID:26076463

  10. Primary structure and developmental expression pattern of Hox 3.1, a member of the murine Hox 3 homeobox gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Breier, G; Dressler, G R; Gruss, P

    1988-01-01

    The murine Hox 3.1 gene maps to a cluster of homeobox-containing genes on chromosome 15. We report the primary structure of the Hox 3.1 protein, as deduced from cDNA sequences, and the expression of Hox 3.1 mRNA during embryogenesis. In addition, a second member of the gene cluster, Hox 3.2, is characterized. The predicted Hox 3.1 protein consists of 242 amino acid residues and has a calculated mol. wt of 28 kd. Besides the homeodomain, it shares with other murine homeodomain proteins a conserved hexapeptide, a region rich in glutamic acid residues at the carboxy terminus and homology at the amino terminus. During embryogenesis, Hox 3.1 transcripts are detected first in the posterior neural tube of 9.5 days post-coital embryos. At later developmental stages, a ventral-dorsal gradient of Hox 3.1 transcript accumulation is established. Hox 3.1 transcripts also are detected in the thoracic sclerotomes from the 6th to the 10th thoracic pre-vertebrae. The data support the hypothesis that the Hox 3.1 gene specifies positional information during murine embryogenesis. Images PMID:2900757

  11. Overexpression of HOXB7 homeobox gene in oral cancer induces cellular proliferation and is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    De Souza Setubal Destro, Maria Fernanda; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcanti; Zecchin, Karina G; Graner, Edgard; Lopes, Marcio A; Kowalski, Luis Paulo; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has confirmed the involvement of dysregulated expression of HOX genes in cancer. HOX genes are a family of 39 transcription factors, divided in 4 clusters (HOXA to HOXD), that during normal development regulate cell proliferation and specific cell fate. In the present study it was investigated whether genes of the HOXB cluster play a role in oral cancer. We showed that most of the genes in the HOXB network are inactive in oral tissues, with exception of HOXB2, HOXB7 and HOXB13. Expression of HOXB7 was significantly higher in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) compared to normal oral mucosas. We further demonstrated that HOXB7 overexpression in HaCAT human epithelial cell line promoted proliferation, whereas downregulation of HOXB7 endogenous levels in human oral carcinoma cells (SCC9 cells) decreased proliferation. In OSCCs, expression of HOXB7 and Ki67, a marker of proliferation, correlate strongly with each other (rs=0.79, p<0.006). High immunohistochemical expression of HOXB7 was correlated with T stage (p=0.06), N stage (p=0.07), disease stage (p=0.09) and Ki67 expression (p=0.01), and patients with tumors showing high number of HOXB7-positive cells had shorter overall survival (p=0.08) and shorter disease-free survival after treatment (p=0.10) compared with patients with tumors exhibiting low amount of HOXB7-positive cells. Our data suggest that HOXB7 may contribute to oral carcinogenesis by increasing tumor cell proliferation, and imply that HOXB7 may be an important determinant of OSCC patient prognosis. PMID:19956843

  12. BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 and 2 regulate Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture in conjunction with homeobox genes KNAT6 and ATH1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Madiha; Tabb, Paul; Hepworth, Shelley R.

    2012-01-01

    Inflorescence architecture varies widely among flowering plants, serving to optimize the display of flowers for reproductive success. In Arabidopsis thaliana, internode elongation begins at the floral transition, generating a regular spiral arrangement of upwardly-oriented flowers on the primary stem. Post-elongation, differentiation of lignified interfascicular fibers in the stem provides mechanical support. Correct inflorescence patterning requires two interacting homeodomain transcription factors: the KNOTTED1-like protein BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) and its BEL1-like interaction partner PENNYWISE (PNY). Mutations in BP and PNY cause short internodes, irregular spacing and/or orientation of lateral organs, and altered lignin deposition in stems. Recently, we showed that these defects are caused by the misexpression of lateral organ boundary genes, BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2, which function downstream of BP-PNY in an antagonistic fashion. BOP1/2 gain-of-function in stems promotes expression of the boundary gene KNOTTED1-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA6 (KNAT6) and shown here, ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX GENE1 (ATH1), providing KNAT6 with a BEL1-like co-factor. Our further analyses show that defects caused by BOP1/2 gain-of-function require both KNAT6 and ATH1. These data reveal how BOP1/2-dependent activation of a boundary module in stems exerts changes in inflorescence architecture. PMID:22751300

  13. Involvement of Pax6 and Otx2 in the forebrain-specific regulation of the vertebrate homeobox gene ANF/Hesx1.

    PubMed

    Spieler, Derek; Bäumer, Nicole; Stebler, Jürg; Köprunner, Marion; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Teichmann, Ulrike; Raz, Erez; Kessel, Michael; Wittler, Lars

    2004-05-15

    During early vertebrate development, ANF homeobox genes are expressed in the prospective forebrain. Their regulation is essential for correct morphogenesis and function of the prosencephalon. We identified a 1-kb fragment upstream of the chicken GANF gene sufficient to drive lacZ expression in the endogenous expression domain. Concordant with the high conservation of this sequence in five investigated species, this element is also active in the corresponding expression domain of the zebrafish orthologue. In vivo analysis of two in vitro-identified Otx2 binding sites in this conserved sequence revealed their necessity for activation of the chicken ANF promoter. In addition, we identified a Pax6-binding site close to the transcriptional start site that is occupied in vivo by Pax6 protein. Pax6 and GANF exhibit mutually exclusive expression domains in the anterior embryonic region. Overexpression of Pax6 in chick embryos inhibited the endogenous GANF expression, and in Pax6(-/-) mice the expression domain of the murine ANF orthologue Hesx1 was expanded and sustained, indicating inhibitory effects of Pax6 on GANF. However, a mutation of the Pax6 site did not abolish reporter activity from an electroporated vector. We conclude that Otx2 and Pax6 are key molecules involved in conserved mechanisms of ANF gene regulation. PMID:15110720

  14. Expression patterns of the homeobox gene, Hox-8, in the mouse embryo suggest a role in specifying tooth initiation and shape.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, A; Ferguson, M W; Sharpe, P T

    1992-06-01

    We have studied the expression patterns of the newly isolated homeobox gene, Hox-8 by in situ hybridisation to sections of the developing heads of mouse embryos between E9 and E17.5, and compared them to Hox-7 expression patterns in adjacent sections. This paper concentrates on the interesting expression patterns of Hox-8 during initiation and development of the molar and incisor teeth. Hox-8 expression domains are present in the neural crest-derived mesenchyme beneath sites of future tooth formation, in a proximo-distal gradient. Tooth development is initiated in the oral epithelium which subsequently thickens in discrete sites and invaginates to form the dental lamina. Hox-8 expression in mouse oral epithelium is first evident at the sites of the dental placodes, suggesting a role in the specification of tooth position. Subsequently, in molar teeth, this patch of Hox-8 expressing epithelium becomes incorporated within the buccal aspect of the invaginating dental lamina to form part of the external enamel epithelium of the cap stage tooth germ. This locus of Hox-8 expression becomes continuous with new sites of Hox-8 expression in the enamel navel, septum, knot and internal enamel epithelium. The transitory enamel knot, septum and navel were postulated, long ago, to be involved in specifying tooth shape, causing the inflection of the first buccal cusp, but this theory has been largely ignored. Interestingly, in the conical incisor teeth, the enamel navel, septum and knot are absent, and Hox-8 has a symmetrical expression pattern. Our demonstration of the precise expression patterns of Hox-8 in the early dental placodes and their subsequent association with the enamel knot, septum and navel provide the first molecular clues to the basis of patterning in the dentition and the association of tooth position with tooth shape: an association all the more intriguing in view of the evolutionary robustness of the patterning mechanism, and the known role of homeobox genes

  15. Does homeobox-related "positional" genomic information contribute to implantation of metastatic cancer cells at non-random sites?

    PubMed

    Anderson, K M; Darweesh, M; Jajah, A; Tsui, P; Guinan, P; Rubenstein, M

    2007-01-01

    Reasons for the lodgment of metastases from several types of solid cancer at apparently non-random sites have not been established. Recently, a group of genes expressed in human fibroblasts obtained from different anatomic locations was implicated in "positional" genomic information. Essentially, a Cartesian coordinate system identifying fibroblasts originally resident at anterior or more posterior, proximal or distal and dermal or non-dermal (heart, lung, etc.) locations was proposed. The determinants used for these identifications included HOX genes, central to embryonic segmental development, some of which are expressed in differentiated, post-embryonic cells. To the extent that HOX or other homeobox genes are expressed in ectodermal, mesodermal or endodermally-derived, malignantly transformed cells, they might contribute "positional" information to nidation of specific malignant clones at non-random sites. As understood in the past, interdiction of HOX or homeobox-related gene expression might reduce the probability of cancer cell implantation or alter their destinations in complex ways. Ideally, by interfering with HOX or other homeobox gene-related expression of antigenic determinants potentially contributing to their "homing" and nidation, reduced implantation of circulating cancer cells could render them more susceptible to systemic chemotherapy or immunotherapy, as demonstrated in mice. Furthermore, HOX or other homeobox genes or their products could provide novel intra- or extracellular targets for therapy. PMID:17695497

  16. Expression of the Homeobox Gene HOXA9 in Ovarian Cancer Induces Peritoneal Macrophages to Acquire an M2 Tumor-Promoting Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Song Yi; Ladanyi, Andras; Lengyel, Ernst; Naora, Honami

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) exhibit an M2 macrophage phenotype that suppresses anti-tumor immune responses and often correlates with poor outcomes in patients with cancer. Patients with ovarian cancer frequently present with peritoneal carcinomatosis, but the mechanisms that induce naïve peritoneal macrophages into TAMs are poorly understood. In this study, we found an increased abundance of TAMs in mouse i.p. xenograft models of ovarian cancer that expressed HOXA9, a homeobox gene that is associated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. HOXA9 expression in ovarian cancer cells stimulated chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages and induced macrophages to acquire TAM-like features. These features included induction of the M2 markers, CD163 and CD206, and the immunosuppressive cytokines, IL-10 and chemokine ligand 17, and down-regulation of the immunostimulatory cytokine, IL-12. HOXA9-mediated induction of TAMs was primarily due to the combinatorial effects of HOXA9-induced, tumor-derived transforming growth factor-β2 and chemokine ligand 2 levels. High HOXA9 expression in clinical specimens of ovarian cancer was strongly associated with increased abundance of TAMs and intratumoral T-regulatory cells and decreased abundance of CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Levels of immunosuppressive cytokines were also elevated in ascites fluid of patients with tumors that highly expressed HOXA9. HOXA9 may, therefore, stimulate ovarian cancer progression by promoting an immunosuppressive microenvironment via paracrine effects on peritoneal macrophages. PMID:24332016

  17. Ancient Expansion of the Hox Cluster in Lepidoptera Generated Four Homeobox Genes Implicated in Extra-Embryonic Tissue Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, William R.; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J.; Holland, Peter W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplications within the conserved Hox cluster are rare in animal evolution, but in Lepidoptera an array of divergent Hox-related genes (Shx genes) has been reported between pb and zen. Here, we use genome sequencing of five lepidopteran species (Polygonia c-album, Pararge aegeria, Callimorpha dominula, Cameraria ohridella, Hepialus sylvina) plus a caddisfly outgroup (Glyphotaelius pellucidus) to trace the evolution of the lepidopteran Shx genes. We demonstrate that Shx genes originated by tandem duplication of zen early in the evolution of large clade Ditrysia; Shx are not found in a caddisfly and a member of the basally diverging Hepialidae (swift moths). Four distinct Shx genes were generated early in ditrysian evolution, and were stably retained in all descendent Lepidoptera except the silkmoth which has additional duplications. Despite extensive sequence divergence, molecular modelling indicates that all four Shx genes have the potential to encode stable homeodomains. The four Shx genes have distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns in early development of the Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria), with ShxC demarcating the future sites of extraembryonic tissue formation via strikingly localised maternal RNA in the oocyte. All four genes are also expressed in presumptive serosal cells, prior to the onset of zen expression. Lepidopteran Shx genes represent an unusual example of Hox cluster expansion and integration of novel genes into ancient developmental regulatory networks. PMID:25340822

  18. Wuschel-related homeobox5 gene expression and interaction of CLE peptides with components of the systemic control add two pieces to the puzzle of autoregulation of nodulation.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Maria A; Mortier, Virginie; Demchenko, Kirill N; Tsyganov, Victor E; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Lutova, Ludmila A; Dolgikh, Elena A; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2012-03-01

    In legumes, the symbiotic nodules are formed as a result of dedifferentiation and reactivation of cortical root cells. A shoot-acting receptor complex, similar to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CLAVATA1 (CLV1)/CLV2 receptor, regulating development of the shoot apical meristem, is involved in autoregulation of nodulation (AON), a mechanism that systemically controls nodule number. The targets of CLV1/CLV2 in the shoot apical meristem, the WUSCHEL (WUS)-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX) family transcription factors, have been proposed to be important regulators of apical meristem maintenance and to be expressed in apical meristem "organizers." Here, we focus on the role of the WOX5 transcription factor upon nodulation in Medicago truncatula and pea (Pisum sativum) that form indeterminate nodules. Analysis of temporal WOX5 expression during nodulation with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and promoter-reporter fusion revealed that the WOX5 gene was expressed during nodule organogenesis, suggesting that WOX genes are common regulators of cell proliferation in different systems. Furthermore, in nodules of supernodulating mutants, defective in AON, WOX5 expression was higher than that in wild-type nodules. Hence, a conserved WUS/WOX-CLV regulatory system might control cell proliferation and differentiation not only in the root and shoot apical meristems but also in nodule meristems. In addition, the link between nodule-derived CLE peptides activating AON in different legumes and components of the AON system was investigated. We demonstrate that the identified AON component, NODULATION3 of pea, might act downstream from or beside the CLE peptides during AON. PMID:22232385

  19. Transcription of follicle-stimulating hormone subunit genes is modulated by porcine LIM homeobox transcription factors, LHX2 and LHX3

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, Saishu; KATO, Takako; NISHIMURA, Naoto; KANNO, Naoko; CHEN, Mo; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Hiroto; KATO, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The LIM-homeobox transcription factors LHX2 and LHX3s (LHX3a and LHX3b) are thought to be involved in regulating the pituitary glycoprotein hormone subunit genes Cga and Fshβ. These two factors show considerable differences in their amino acid sequences for DNA binding and protein-protein interactions and in their vital function in pituitary development. Hence, we compared the DNA binding properties and transcriptional activities of Cga and Fshβ between LHX2 and LHX3s. A gel mobility shift assay for approximately 1.1 kb upstream of Cga and 2.0 kb upstream of Fshβ varied in binding profiles between LHX2 and LHX3s. DNase I footprinting revealed DNA binding sites in 8 regions of the Cga promoter for LHX2 and LHX3s with small differences in the binding range and strength. In the Fshβ promoter, 14 binding sites were identified for LHX2 and LHX3, respectively. There were alternative binding sites to either gene in addition to similar differences observed in the Cga promoter. The transcriptional activities of LHX2 and LHX3s according to a reporter assay showed cell-type dependent activity with repression in the pituitary gonadotrope lineage LβT2 cells and stimulation in Chinese hamster ovary lineage CHO cells. Reactivity of LHX2 and LHX3s was observed in all regions, and differences were observed in the 5'-upstream region of Fshβ. However, immunohistochemistry showed that LHX2 resides in a small number of gonadotropes in contrast to LHX3. Thus, LHX3 mainly controls Cga and Fshβ expression. PMID:26853788

  20. Transcription of follicle-stimulating hormone subunit genes is modulated by porcine LIM homeobox transcription factors, LHX2 and LHX3.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saishu; Kato, Takako; Nishimura, Naoto; Kanno, Naoko; Chen, Mo; Ueharu, Hiroki; Nishihara, Hiroto; Kato, Yukio

    2016-06-17

    The LIM-homeobox transcription factors LHX2 and LHX3s (LHX3a and LHX3b) are thought to be involved in regulating the pituitary glycoprotein hormone subunit genes Cga and Fshβ. These two factors show considerable differences in their amino acid sequences for DNA binding and protein-protein interactions and in their vital function in pituitary development. Hence, we compared the DNA binding properties and transcriptional activities of Cga and Fshβ between LHX2 and LHX3s. A gel mobility shift assay for approximately 1.1 kb upstream of Cga and 2.0 kb upstream of Fshβ varied in binding profiles between LHX2 and LHX3s. DNase I footprinting revealed DNA binding sites in 8 regions of the Cga promoter for LHX2 and LHX3s with small differences in the binding range and strength. In the Fshβ promoter, 14 binding sites were identified for LHX2 and LHX3, respectively. There were alternative binding sites to either gene in addition to similar differences observed in the Cga promoter. The transcriptional activities of LHX2 and LHX3s according to a reporter assay showed cell-type dependent activity with repression in the pituitary gonadotrope lineage LβT2 cells and stimulation in Chinese hamster ovary lineage CHO cells. Reactivity of LHX2 and LHX3s was observed in all regions, and differences were observed in the 5'-upstream region of Fshβ. However, immunohistochemistry showed that LHX2 resides in a small number of gonadotropes in contrast to LHX3. Thus, LHX3 mainly controls Cga and Fshβ expression. PMID:26853788

  1. A LIM-homeobox gene is required for differentiation of Wnt-expressing cells at the posterior end of the planarian body.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Motoishi, Minako; Yazawa, Shigenobu; Itomi, Kazu; Tanegashima, Chiharu; Nishimura, Osamu; Agata, Kiyokazu; Tarui, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Planarians have high regenerative ability, which is dependent on pluripotent adult somatic stem cells called neoblasts. Recently, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling was shown to be required for posterior specification, and Hedgehog signaling was shown to control anterior-posterior polarity via activation of the Djwnt1/P-1 gene at the posterior end of planarians. Thus, various signaling molecules play an important role in planarian stem cell regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms directly involved in stem cell differentiation have remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that one of the planarian LIM-homeobox genes, Djislet, is required for the differentiation of Djwnt1/P-1-expressing cells from stem cells at the posterior end. RNA interference (RNAi)-treated planarians of Djislet [Djislet(RNAi)] show a tail-less phenotype. Thus, we speculated that Djislet might be involved in activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the posterior blastema. When we carefully examined the expression pattern of Djwnt1/P-1 by quantitative real-time PCR during posterior regeneration, we found two phases of Djwnt1/P-1 expression: the first phase was detected in the differentiated cells in the old tissue in the early stage of regeneration and then a second phase was observed in the cells derived from stem cells in the posterior blastema. Interestingly, Djislet is expressed in stem cell-derived DjPiwiA- and Djwnt1/P-1-expressing cells, and Djislet(RNAi) only perturbed the second phase. Thus, we propose that Djislet might act to trigger the differentiation of cells expressing Djwnt1/P-1 from stem cells. PMID:21828095

  2. A novel role of BELL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH, in floral patterning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lifeng; Patibanda, Varun; Smith, Harley M S

    2009-02-01

    Flowers are determinate shoots comprised of perianth and reproductive organs displayed in a whorled phyllotactic pattern. Floral organ identity genes display region-specific expression patterns in the developing flower. In Arabidopsis, floral organ identity genes are activated by LEAFY (LFY), which functions with region-specific co-regulators, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) and WUSCHEL (WUS), to up-regulate homeotic genes in specific whorls of the flower. PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) are redundant functioning BELL1-like homeodomain proteins that are expressed in shoot and floral meristems. During flower development, PNY functions with a co-repressor complex to down-regulate the homeotic gene, AGAMOUS (AG), in the outer whorls of the flower. However, the function of PNY as well as PNF in regulating floral organ identity in the central whorls of the flower is not known. In this report, we show that combining mutations in PNY and PNF enhance the floral patterning phenotypes of weak and strong alleles of lfy, indicating that these BELL1-like homeodomain proteins play a role in the specification of petals, stamens and carpels during flower development. Expression studies show that PNY and PNF positively regulate the homeotic genes, APETALA3 and AG, in the inner whorls of the flower. Moreover, PNY and PNF function in parallel with LFY, UFO and WUS to regulate homeotic gene expression. Since PNY and PNF interact with the KNOTTED1-like homeodomain proteins, SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM) and KNOTTED-LIKE from ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA2 (KNAT2) that regulate floral development, we propose that PNY/PNF-STM and PNY/PNF-KNAT2 complexes function in the inner whorls to regulate flower patterning events. PMID:19082619

  3. Even-skipped homeobox 1 is frequently hypermethylated in prostate cancer and predicts PSA recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Truong, M; Yang, B; Wagner, J; Kobayashi, Y; Rajamanickam, V; Brooks, J; Jarrard, D F

    2012-01-01

    Background: DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Given the role of even-skipped homeobox 1 (EVX1) in the regulation of multiple genes during embryogenesis, we postulated that EVX1 methylation is altered in PCa progression. Methods: Bisulphite sequencing and quantitative MethyLight were used to assess methylation in human prostate epithelial cells, four PCa cell lines, liver, lung, spleen, kidney, 35 paired tumour and tumour-associated benign tissues, and 11 normal prostate tissues. Prostate cancer cell lines were treated with 5-azacytidine (AzaC) or trichostatin A (TSA), and expression of EVX1 transcript and variants was assessed by qPCR. Hypermethylation was compared with clinicopathological features in a validation set of 58 patients using microarray. Results: Even-skipped homeobox 1 hypermethylation was observed in all four PCa cell lines and 57% of tumours. High-grade tumours exhibited increased methylation compared with intermediate-grade tumours. Even-skipped homeobox 1 expression was induced in PCa cell lines after treatment with AzaC or TSA. In the validation set, 83% of tumours were hypermethylated and hypermethylation was associated with worse recurrence-free survival. Conclusion: In this first evaluation of EVX1 methylation in human cancer, EVX1 is one of the most commonly hypermethylated genes observed in PCa and predicted treatment failure in moderate risk patients. PMID:22596233

  4. Aristaless Related Homeobox Gene, Arx, Is Implicated in Mouse Fetal Leydig Cell Differentiation Possibly through Expressing in the Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyabayashi, Kanako; Katoh-Fukui, Yuko; Ogawa, Hidesato; Baba, Takashi; Shima, Yuichi; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Kitamura, Kunio; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2013-01-01

    Development of the testis begins with the expression of the SRY gene in pre-Sertoli cells. Soon after, testis cords containing Sertoli and germ cells are formed and fetal Leydig cells subsequently develop in the interstitial space. Studies using knockout mice have indicated that multiple genes encoding growth factors and transcription factors are implicated in fetal Leydig cell differentiation. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arx gene is implicated in this process. However, how ARX regulates Leydig cell differentiation remained unknown. In this study, we examined Arx KO testes and revealed that fetal Leydig cell numbers largely decrease throughout the fetal life. Since our study shows that fetal Leydig cells rarely proliferate, this decrease in the KO testes is thought to be due to defects of fetal Leydig progenitor cells. In sexually indifferent fetal gonads of wild type, ARX was expressed in the coelomic epithelial cells and cells underneath the epithelium as well as cells at the gonad-mesonephros border, both of which have been described to contain progenitors of fetal Leydig cells. After testis differentiation, ARX was expressed in a large population of the interstitial cells but not in fetal Leydig cells, raising the possibility that ARX-positive cells contain fetal Leydig progenitor cells. When examining marker gene expression, we observed cells as if they were differentiating into fetal Leydig cells from the progenitor cells. Based on these results, we propose that ARX acts as a positive factor for differentiation of fetal Leydig cells through functioning at the progenitor stage. PMID:23840809

  5. Homeobox genes d11–d13 and a13 control mouse autopod cortical bone and joint formation

    PubMed Central

    Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo; Kuss, Pia; Friedrich, Julia; Haupt, Julia; Farooq, Muhammed; Türkmen, Seval; Duboule, Denis; Hecht, Jochen; Mundlos, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that govern bone and joint formation are complex, involving an integrated network of signaling pathways and gene regulators. We investigated the role of Hox genes, which are known to specify individual segments of the skeleton, in the formation of autopod limb bones (i.e., the hands and feet) using the mouse mutant synpolydactyly homolog (spdh), which encodes a polyalanine expansion in Hoxd13. We found that no cortical bone was formed in the autopod in spdh/spdh mice; instead, these bones underwent trabecular ossification after birth. Spdh/spdh metacarpals acquired an ovoid shape and developed ectopic joints, indicating a loss of long bone characteristics and thus a transformation of metacarpals into carpal bones. The perichondrium of spdh/spdh mice showed abnormal morphology and decreased expression of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which was identified as a direct Hoxd13 transcriptional target. Hoxd11–/–Hoxd12–/–Hoxd13–/– triple-knockout mice and Hoxd13–/–Hoxa13+/– mice exhibited similar but less severe defects, suggesting that these Hox genes have similar and complementary functions and that the spdh allele acts as a dominant negative. This effect was shown to be due to sequestration of other polyalanine-containing transcription factors by the mutant Hoxd13 in the cytoplasm, leading to their degradation. These data indicate that Hox genes not only regulate patterning but also directly influence bone formation and the ossification pattern of bones, in part via Runx2. PMID:20458143

  6. Suppression of the homeobox gene HDTF1 enhances resistance to Verticillium dahliae and Botrytis cinerea in cotton.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Xu, Li; Lindsey, Keith; Zhang, Xianlong; Zhu, Longfu

    2016-05-01

    Development of pathogen-resistant crops, such as fungus-resistant cotton, has significantly reduced chemical application and improved crop yield and quality. However, the mechanism of resistance to cotton pathogens such as Verticillium dahliae is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterized a cotton gene (HDTF1) that was isolated following transcriptome profiling during the resistance response of cotton to V. dahliae. HDTF1 putatively encodes a homeodomain transcription factor, and its expression was found to be down-regulated in cotton upon inoculation with V. dahliae and Botrytis cinerea. To characterise the involvement of HDTF1 in the response to these pathogens, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to generate HDTF1-silenced cotton. VIGS reduction in HDTF1 expression significantly enhanced cotton plant resistance to both pathogens. HDTF1 silencing resulted in activation of jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling and JA accumulation. However, the silenced plants were not altered in the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) or the expression of marker genes associated with SA signaling. These results suggest that HDTF1 is a negative regulator of the JA pathway, and resistance to V. dahliae and B. cinerea can be engineered by activation of JA signaling. PMID:26407676

  7. Analysis of two distinct retinoic acid response elements in the homeobox gene Hoxb1 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danyang; Chen, Siming W; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2002-03-01

    Expression of vertebrate Hox genes is regulated by retinoids such as retinoic acid (RA) in cell culture and in early embryonic development. Retinoic acid response elements (RAREs) have been identified in Hox gene regulatory regions, suggesting that endogenous retinoids may be involved in the direct control of Hox gene patterning functions. Previously, two RAREs located 3' of the murine Hoxb1 gene, a DR(2) RARE and a DR(5) RARE, have been shown to regulate Hoxb1 mRNA expression in the neural epithelium and the foregut region, respectively; the foregut develops into the esophagus, liver, pancreas, lungs, and stomach. We have now examined the functional roles of these two types of 3' RAREs in regulating Hoxb1 expression at different stages of gestation, from embryonic day 7.5 to 13.5, in transgenic mice carrying specific RARE mutations. We demonstrate that the DR(5) RARE is required for the regulation of Hoxb-1 transgene region-specific expression in the gut and extraembryonic tissues, as well as for the RA-induced anteriorization of Hoxb-1 transgene expression in the gut. In contrast, expression of the Hoxb1 transgene in the neural epithelium requires only the DR(2) RARE. By in situ hybridization, we have identified a new site of Hoxb1 expression in the developing forelimbs at approximately day 12.5, and we show that, in transgenic embryos, expression in the forelimb buds requires that either the DR(2) or the DR(5) RARE is functional. Attainment of a high level of Hoxb1 transgene expression in other regions, such as in rhombomere 4 (r4) and in the somites, requires that both the DR(2) and DR(5) RAREs are functional. In addition, our transgenic data indicate that the Hoxb1 gene is expressed in other tissues such as the hernia gut, genital eminence, and lung. Our analysis shows that endogenous retinoids act through individual DR(2) and DR(5) RAREs to regulate Hoxb1 expression in different regions of the embryo and that functional redundancy between these DR(2) and DR(5

  8. Malformation of cortical and vascular development in one family with parietal foramina determined by an ALX4 homeobox gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Valente, Marcelo; Valente, Kette D; Sugayama, Sofia S M; Kim, Chong Ae

    2004-01-01

    Vascular and cortical anomalies have been found in a family with parietal foramina type 2 (PFM2), which is determined by the ALX4 gene. It is believed that ALX4 has a bone-restricted expression. We report a case of PFM with age-related size variation in a 4-year-old boy, as well as in his mother, aunt and grandfather. MR imaging of the child demonstrates prominent malformations of cortical (polymicrogyric cortex with an unusual infolding pattern) and vascular development (persistence median prosencephalic vein), associated with high tentorial incisure periatrial white matter changes. PMID:15569759

  9. LOOSE FLOWER, a WUSCHEL-like Homeobox gene, is required for lateral fusion of floral organs in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lifang; Lin, Hao; Zhang, Fei; Watira, Tezera W; Li, Guifen; Tang, Yuhong; Wen, Jiangqi; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Tadege, Million

    2015-02-01

    The Medicago truncatula WOX gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), and its orthologs in Petunia, pea, and Nicotiana sylvestris are required for leaf blade outgrowth and floral organ development as demonstrated by severe phenotypes in single mutants. But the Arabidopsis wox1 mutant displays a narrow leaf phenotype only when combined with the prs/wox3 mutant. In maize and rice, WOX3 homologs are major regulators of leaf blade development. Here we investigated the role of WOX3 in M. truncatula development by isolating the lfl/wox3 loss-of-function mutant and performing genetic crosses with the stf mutant. Lack of WOX3 function in M. truncatula leads to a loose-flower (lfl) phenotype, where defects are observed in sepal and petal development, but leaf blades are apparently normal. The stf lfl double mutant analysis revealed that STF and LFL act mainly independently with minor redundant functions in flower development, but LFL has no obvious role in leaf blade outgrowth in M. truncatula on its own or in combination with STF. Interestingly, LFL acts as a transcriptional repressor by recruiting TOPLESS in the same manner as STF does, and can substitute for STF function in leaf blade and flower development if expressed under the STF promoter. STF also complements the lfl mutant phenotype in the flower if expressed under the LFL promoter. Our data suggest that the STF/WOX1 and LFL/WOX3 genes of M. truncatula employ a similar mechanism of action in organizing cell proliferation for lateral outgrowth but may have evolved different cis elements to acquire distinct functions. PMID:25492397

  10. WUSCHEL-related homeobox gene WOX11 increases rice drought resistance by controlling root hair formation and root system development

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Saifeng; Zhou, Dao-Xiu; Zhao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Roots are essential organs for anchoring plants, exploring and exploiting soil resources, and establishing plant-microorganisms communities in vascular plants. Rice has a complex root system architecture consisting of several root types, including primary roots, lateral roots, and crown roots. Crown roots constitute the major part of the rice root system and play important roles during the growing period. Recently, we have refined a mechanism that involves ERF3/WOX11 interaction is required to regulate the expression of genes in the cytokinin signaling pathway during the different stages of crown roots development in rice. In this study, we further analyzed the root phenotypes of WOX11 transgenic plants and revealed that WOX11 also acts in controlling root hair development and enhancing rice drought resistance, in addition to its roles in regulating crown root and lateral root development. Based on this new finding, we proposed the mechanism of that WOX11 is involved in drought resistance by modulating rice root system development. PMID:26689769

  11. Human HOXB cluster and the nerve growth factor receptor gene: Comparison with an orthologous chromosomal domain in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, K.L.; Bradshaw, M.S.; Ruddle, F.H.

    1995-11-01

    The structural organization and nucleotide sequence similarity of mammalian Antennapedia-class homeobox genes support the view that the four homeobox clusters (HOXA, B,C, and D on human chromosomes 7, 17, 12 and 2, respectively) arose through a combination of gene duplication and divergence to form a cluster, followed by several cluster duplications. The duplication events that gave rise to the four clusters appear to have involved chromosomal domains extending well beyond the borders of the clusters in either direction. This evidence arises from the observation that many genes closely linked to the homeobox clusters on different chromosomes show sequence similarity. Here, we present a continuation of physical mapping studies to determine the extent and organization of the duplicated regions surrounding the four homeobox clusters in human. Southern blots prepared from pulsed-field gels of human DNA were probed with cloned segments of human HOXB genes and the nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) gene on chromosome 17q21-q22. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed the close physical linkage of these genes within 100 kb. Two yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), 220 and 380 kb in size, were isolated using oligonucleotide primers specific for NGFR. Both YACs contained the entire HOXB cluster. Restriction mapping of the clones indicated that the distance separating these loci could not be greater than 50 kb. This result confirms and extends previous information on the proximity of these genes as determined by genetic linkage analysis and closely parallels the orthologous loci in the mouse. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The human insulin receptor substrate-1 gene (IRS1) is localized on 2q36

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Masaki; Matsufuji, Senya; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Furusaka, Akihiro; Tanaka, Teruji ); Inazawa, J.; Nakamura, Yusuke ); Ariyama, Takeshi ); Wands, J.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The chromosomal localization of some of the genes participating in the insulin signaling pathway is known. The insulin and insulin receptor genes have been mapped to chromosomes 11 and 19, respectively. To identify the chromosomal localization of the human IRS1 gene, the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was employed with Genomic Clone B-10. A total of 50 metaphase cells exhibiting either single or double spots of hybridization signals were examined. Among them, 32 showed the specific signals on 2q36. Therefore, the authors assigned the human IRS1 gene to 2q36. The genes for homeobox sequence (HOX4), fibronectin 1, alkaline phosphatase (intestinal), transition protein 1, villin 1, collagen (type IV), Waardenburg syndrome (type 1), alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and glucagon have been localized in the vicinity of the IRS1 gene.

  13. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  14. Early embryonic expression of a LIM-homeobox gene Cs-lhx3 is downstream of beta-catenin and responsible for the endoderm differentiation in Ciona savignyi embryos.

    PubMed

    Satou, Y; Imai, K S; Satoh, N

    2001-09-01

    In early Ciona embryos, nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin is most probably the first step of endodermal cell specification. If beta-catenin is mis- and/or overexpressed, presumptive notochord cells and epidermal cells change their fates into endodermal cells, whereas if beta-catenin nuclear localization is downregulated by the overexpression of cadherin, the endoderm differentiation is suppressed, accompanied with the differentiation of extra epidermal cells ( Imai, K., Takada, N., Satoh, N. and Satou, Y. (2000) Development 127, 3009-3020). Subtractive hybridization screens of mRNAs between beta-catenin overexpressed embryos and cadherin overexpressed embryos were conducted to identify potential beta-catenin target genes that are responsible for endoderm differentiation in Ciona savignyi embryos. We found that a LIM-homeobox gene (Cs-lhx3), an otx homolog (Cs-otx) and an NK-2 class gene (Cs-ttf1) were among beta-catenin downstream genes. In situ hybridization signals for early zygotic expression of Cs-lhx3 were evident only in the presumptive endodermal cells as early as the 32-cell stage, those of Cs-otx in the mesoendodermal cells at the 32-cell stage and those of Cs-ttf1 in the endodermal cells at the 64-cell stage. Later, Cs-lhx3 was expressed again in a set of neuronal cells in the tailbud embryo, while Cs-otx was expressed in the anterior nervous system of the embryo. Expression of all three genes was upregulated in beta-catenin overexpressed embryos and downregulated in cadherin overexpressed embryos. Injection of morpholino oligonucleotides against Cs-otx did not affect the embryonic endoderm differentiation, although the formation of the central nervous system was suppressed. Injection of Cs-ttf1 morpholino oligonucleotides also failed to suppress the endoderm differentiation, although injection of its synthetic mRNAs resulted in ectopic development of endoderm differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase. By contrast, injection of Cs-lhx3 morpholino

  15. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  16. The Homeobox Gene Gsx2 Regulates the Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells and the Cell Fate of Postnatal Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R.; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The Genetic screened homeobox 2 (Gsx2) transcription factor is required for the development of olfactory bulb (OB) and striatal neurons, and for the regional specification of the embryonic telencephalon. Although Gsx2 is expressed abundantly by progenitor cells in the ventral telencephalon, its precise function in the generation of neurons from neural stem cells (NSCs) is not clear. Similarly, the role of Gsx2 in regulating the self-renewal and multipotentiality of NSCs has been little explored. Using retroviral vectors to express Gsx2, we have studied the effect of Gsx2 on the growth of NSCs isolated from the OB and ganglionic eminences (GE), as well as its influence on the proliferation and cell fate of progenitors in the postnatal mouse OB. Expression of Gsx2 reduces proliferation and the self-renewal capacity of NSCs, without significantly affecting cell death. Furthermore, Gsx2 overexpression decreases the differentiation of NSCs into neurons and glia, and it maintains the cells that do not differentiate as cycling progenitors. These effects were stronger in GESCs than in OBSCs, indicating that the actions of Gsx2 are cell-dependent. In vivo, Gsx2 produces a decrease in the number of Pax6+ cells and doublecortin+ neuroblasts, and an increase in Olig2+ cells. In summary, our findings show that Gsx2 inhibits the ability of NSCs to proliferate and self-renew, as well as the capacity of NSC-derived progenitors to differentiate, suggesting that this transcription factor regulates the quiescent and undifferentiated state of NSCs and progenitors. Furthermore, our data indicate that Gsx2 negatively regulates neurogenesis from postnatal progenitor cells. PMID:22242181

  17. A knotted1-like homeobox protein regulates abscission in tomato by modulating the auxin pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KD1, a gene encoding a KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX transcription factor is known to be involved, in tomato, in ontogeny of the compound leaf. KD1 is also highly expressed in both leaf and flower abscission zones. Reducing abundance of transcripts of this gene in tomato, using both virus induced gene sile...

  18. Regional assignment of the human homebox-containing gene EN1 to chromosome 2q13-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, A.; Muenke, M. ); Logan, C. ); Joyner, A.L. Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto )

    1993-01-01

    The human homeobox-containing genes EN1 and EN2 are closely related to the Drosophila pattern formation gene engrailed (en), which may be important in brain development, as shown by gene expression studies during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we have refined the localization of EN1 to human chromosome 2q13-q21 using a mapping panel of rodent/human cell hybrids containing different regions of chromosome 2 and a lymphoblastoid cell line with an interstitial deletion, del(2) (q21-q23.2). This regional assignment of EN1 increases to 22 the number of currently known genes on human chromosome 2q that have homologs on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. The ocular retardation (or{sup J}) mouse has an ochre mutation in the homeobox gene Chx10: Direct evidence for Chx10 as a major determinant of retinal development

    SciTech Connect

    McInnes, R.R.; Novak, J.; Ploder, L.

    1994-09-01

    The recessive mutation or causes microphthalmia, progressive destruction of the retina, and absence of the optic nerve. There is a significant disruption of neuroretinal differentiation and layer formation, and the number of proliferating retinal progenitor cells is dramatically reduced (by 45% at E10 & 90% at E16). To identify the or gene, we localized the or{sup J} allele (in strain 129 mice) to chromosome 12. We then positioned or by a backcross between or{sup J} and Mus castaneus, defining the distances D12Mit91-14cM-or-4cM-D12Mit6, and placing or in the same interval of chromosome 12 as Chx10. No recombinants were obtained between or and Chx10 in 170 informative progeny, establishing close linkage and making Chx10 a candidate gene for or. On the basis of its expression pattern, we proposed that Chx10 confers neuroretinal identity on the early retinal progenitors of the developing eye, and participates in retinal lamination. To allow mutation analysis of Chx10, we cloned the strain 129 Chx10 gene (5 coding exons over {approximately}30 kb). Multiple PCR amplifications and direct sequencing of axon 3 of or{sup J} mice revealed a homozygous mutation (TAC {yields} TAA) (not present in strain 129 controls) that converts Tyr 29 of the homeobox to a premature stop; this result was confirmed by restriction analysis of the PCR products, since the mutation destroys an Accl site. We conclude that (1) mutations in Chx10 cause murine ocular retardation, (2) the Chx10 homeodomain protein has a critical role in mammalian retinal formation, possibly as a transcription regulator of neuroblast differentiation and division, and (3) CHx10 mutations may cause microphthalmia in man.

  20. Hexabromocyclododecane exposure induces cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia by inhibiting miR-1 expression via up-regulation of the homeobox gene Nkx2.5.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meifang; Wu, Di; Wang, Chonggang; Guo, Zhizhun; Li, Bowen; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2016-01-25

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants. Although studies have reported that HBCD can cause a wide range of toxic effects on animals including humans, limited information can be found about its cardiac toxicity. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to HBCD at low concentrations of 0, 2, 20 and 200 nM. The results showed that HBCD exposure could induce cardiac hypertrophy and increased deposition of collagen. In addition, disordered calcium (Ca(2+)) handling was observed in H9C2 rat cardiomyocyte cells exposed to HBCD. Using small RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative PCR, HBCD exposure was shown to induce significant changes in the miRNA expression profile associated with the cardiovascular system. Further findings indicated that miR-1, which was depressed by Nkx2.5, might play a fundamental role in mediating cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia via its target genes Mef2a and Irx5 after HBCD treatment. HBCD exposure induced an arrhythmogenic disorder, which was triggered by the imbalance of Ryr2, Serca2a and Ncx1 expression, inducing Ca(2+) overload in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and high Ca(2+)-ATPase activities in the H9C2 cells. PMID:26476318

  1. Isolation and characterization of the human CDX1 gene: A candidate gene for diastrophic dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, C.; Loftus, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, dislocation of the joints, spinal deformities and malformation of the hands and feet. Multipoint linkage analysis places the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) locus in 5q31-5q34. Linkage disequilibrium mapping places the DTD locus near CSFIR in the direction of PDGFRB (which is tandem to CSFIR). This same study tentatively placed PDGFRB and DTD proximal to CSFIR. Our results, as well as recently reported work from other laboratories, suggest that PDGFRB (and possibly DTD) is distal rather than proximal to CSFIR. We have constructed a cosmid contig covering approximately 200 kb of the region containing CSFIR. Several exons have been {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} from these cosmids using exon amplification. One of these exons was trapped from a cosmid isolated from a walk from PDGFRB, approximately 80 kb from CSFIR. This exon was sequenced and was determined to be 89% identical to the nucleotide sequence of exon two of the murine CDX1 gene (100% amino acid identity). The exon was used to isolate the human CDX gene. Sequence analysis of the human CDX1 gene indicates a very high degree of homology to the murine gene. CDX1 is a caudal type homeobox gene expressed during gastrulation. In the mouse, expression during gastrulation begins in the primitive streak and subsequently localizes to the ectodermal and mesodermal cells of the primitive streak, neural tube, somites, and limb buds. Later in gastrulation, CDX1 expression becomes most prominent in the mesoderm of the forelimbs, and, to a lesser extent, the hindlimbs. CDX1 is an intriguing candidate gene for diastrophic dysplasia. We are currently screening DNA from affected individuals and hope to shortly determine whether CDX1 is involved in this disorder.

  2. Genes, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Mark V.; Cutter, Mary Ann; Davidson, Ronald; Dougherty, Michael J.; Drexler, Edward; Gelernter, Joel; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Vogler, George P.; Zola, John

    This curriculum module explores genes, environment, and human behavior. This book provides materials to teach about the nature and methods of studying human behavior, raise some of the ethical and public policy dilemmas emerging from the Human Genome Project, and provide professional development for teachers. An extensive Teacher Background…

  3. An Orthologous Epigenetic Gene Expression Signature Derived from Differentiating Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Regulators of Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Busser, Brian W.; Lin, Yongshun; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Guokai; Michelson, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we used predictive gene expression signatures within a multi-species framework to identify the genes that underlie cardiac cell fate decisions in differentiating embryonic stem cells. We show that the overlapping orthologous mouse and human genes are the most accurate candidate cardiogenic genes as these genes identified the most conserved developmental pathways that characterize the cardiac lineage. An RNAi-based screen of the candidate genes in Drosophila uncovered numerous novel cardiogenic genes. shRNA knockdown combined with transcriptome profiling of the newly-identified transcription factors zinc finger protein 503 and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 and the well-known cardiac regulatory factor NK2 homeobox 5 revealed that zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 activates terminal differentiation genes required for cardiomyocyte structure and function whereas zinc finger protein 503 and NK2 homeobox 5 are required for specification of the cardiac lineage. We further demonstrated that an essential role of NK2 homeobox 5 and zinc finger protein 503 in specification of the cardiac lineage is the repression of gene expression programs characteristic of alternative cell fates. Collectively, these results show that orthologous gene expression signatures can be used to identify conserved cardiogenic pathways. PMID:26485529

  4. GA3 stimulates the formation and germination of somatic embryos and the expression of a KNOTTED-like homeobox gene of Cocos nucifera (L.).

    PubMed

    Montero-Córtes, M; Sáenz, Luis; Córdova, I; Quiroz, A; Verdeil, J-L; Oropeza, C

    2010-09-01

    The micropropagation of coconut palm has progressed rapidly; yet, there are constraints with regard to the number of somatic embryos formed and their germination. To overcome these, we tested the effect of gibberellic acid and characterized genes of the KNOX family. Gibberellic acid at 0.5 muM increased 1.5-fold the number of calli forming somatic embryos and twofold the number of somatic embryos per callus, calli with germinating embryos and the number of germinating somatic embryos per callus. With regard to the study of KNOX family genes, the complete sequences of two KNOX-like genes were obtained for CnKNOX1 and CnKNOX2. The deduced amino acid sequence of both showed highly conserved domains characteristic of KNOX genes. CnKNOX1 showed high homology with KNOX class I proteins. CnKNOX1 expression was detected throughout the embryogenesis process except in somatic embryos at the pro-globular stage, and was highest in somatic embryos at the coleoptilar stage. No detection of CnKNOX1 expression occurred in calli with aberrant embryos. The addition of gibberellic acid stimulated the expression of CnKNOX1 earlier and the relative expression at all stages was higher. CnKNOX2 expression occurred at all stages peaking at the globular stage, but gibberellic acid treatment decreased the expression. Gene expression was also analyzed in tissues of different organs of adult palms. With CnKNOX1, high level of expression was found in tissues of organs with, but not in those without, meristem, whereas CnKNOX2 expression was detected in tissues with and also in those without meristem. PMID:20582418

  5. The cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor possessed at least 56 homeoboxes: evidence from the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joseph F; Burton, Patrick M; Mazza, Maureen E; Kwong, Grace K; Mullikin, James C; Finnerty, John R

    2006-01-01

    Background Homeodomain transcription factors are key components in the developmental toolkits of animals. While this gene superclass predates the evolutionary split between animals, plants, and fungi, many homeobox genes appear unique to animals. The origin of particular homeobox genes may, therefore, be associated with the evolution of particular animal traits. Here we report the first near-complete set of homeodomains from a basal (diploblastic) animal. Results Phylogenetic analyses were performed on 130 homeodomains from the sequenced genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis along with 228 homeodomains from human and 97 homeodomains from Drosophila. The Nematostella homeodomains appear to be distributed among established homeodomain classes in the following fashion: 72 ANTP class; one HNF class; four LIM class; five POU class; 33 PRD class; five SINE class; and six TALE class. For four of the Nematostella homeodomains, there is disagreement between neighbor-joining and Bayesian trees regarding their class membership. A putative Nematostella CUT class gene is also identified. Conclusion The homeodomain superclass underwent extensive radiations prior to the evolutionary split between Cnidaria and Bilateria. Fifty-six homeodomain families found in human and/or fruit fly are also found in Nematostella, though seventeen families shared by human and fly appear absent in Nematostella. Homeodomain loss is also apparent in the bilaterian taxa: eight homeodomain families shared by Drosophila and Nematostella appear absent from human (CG13424, EMXLX, HOMEOBRAIN, MSXLX, NK7, REPO, ROUGH, and UNC4), and six homeodomain families shared by human and Nematostella appear absent from fruit fly (ALX, DMBX, DUX, HNF, POU1, and VAX). PMID:16867185

  6. Gene losses during human origins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Grus, Wendy E; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2006-03-01

    Pseudogenization is a widespread phenomenon in genome evolution, and it has been proposed to serve as an engine of evolutionary change, especially during human origins (the "less-is-more" hypothesis). However, there has been no comprehensive analysis of human-specific pseudogenes. Furthermore, it is unclear whether pseudogenization itself can be selectively favored and thus play an active role in human evolution. Here we conduct a comparative genomic analysis and a literature survey to identify 80 nonprocessed pseudogenes that were inactivated in the human lineage after its separation from the chimpanzee lineage. Many functions are involved among these genes, with chemoreception and immune response being outstandingly overrepresented, suggesting potential species-specific features in these aspects of human physiology. To explore the possibility of adaptive pseudogenization, we focus on CASPASE12, a cysteinyl aspartate proteinase participating in inflammatory and innate immune response to endotoxins. We provide population genetic evidence that the nearly complete fixation of a null allele at CASPASE12 has been driven by positive selection, probably because the null allele confers protection from severe sepsis. We estimate that the selective advantage of the null allele is about 0.9% and the pseudogenization started shortly before the out-of-Africa migration of modern humans. Interestingly, two other genes related to sepsis were also pseudogenized in humans, possibly by selection. These adaptive gene losses might have occurred because of changes in our environment or genetic background that altered the threat from or response to sepsis. The identification and analysis of human-specific pseudogenes open the door for understanding the roles of gene losses in human origins, and the demonstration that gene loss itself can be adaptive supports and extends the "less-is-more" hypothesis. PMID:16464126

  7. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-08-19

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  8. H2.0-like homeobox 1 acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Shuai; Lei, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    H2.0-like homeobox 1 (HLX1) is a homeobox transcription factor gene expressed primarily in cytotrophoblast cell types in the early pregnancy human placenta and involved in the development of enteric nervous system. However, the biological function of HLX1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In the present study, semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative real-time RT-PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemical staining were used to examine the expression level of HLX1 in a total of 125 cases of HCC tissues and their matched adjacent nontumorous tissues (ANLTs), and its correlation with clinical features of HCC patients was analyzed. Our findings showed that the expression level of HLX1 was significantly reduced in HCCs compared to ANLTs. Besides, it was also remarkably downregulated in HCC cell lines compared to normal liver cell line. We further found that the HLX1 level was significantly associated with the tumor size (p = 0.016), tumor number (p = 0.004), vascular invasion (p = 0.031), Edmondson-Steiner grade (p = 0.041), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (p < 0.001), and Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) stage (p = 0.008). Moreover, HLX1 was an independent risk factor for overall survival (OS, p = 0.020) and disease-free survival (DFS, p = 0.024) of HCC patients. In vitro experiments showed that overexpression of HLX1 markedly suppressed the invasion, migration, proliferation, and colony formation of HCC cells; in contrast, downregulation of HLX1 significantly promoted the invasion, migration, proliferation, and colony formation of HCC cells. In vivo study indicated that overexpression of HLX1 significantly inhibited the tumorigenic capacity of HCC cells in nude mice. Based on these findings, we suggest that HLX1 acts as a tumor suppressor in HCC. PMID:26631039

  9. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  10. Homeobox Protein Hop Functions in the Adult Cardiac Conduction System

    PubMed Central

    Ismat, Fraz A.; Zhang, Maozhen; Kook, Hyun; Huang, Bin; Zhou, Rong; Ferrari, Victor A.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2006-01-01

    Hop is an unusual homeobox gene expressed in the embryonic and adult heart. Hop acts downstream of Nkx2–5 during development, and Nkx2–5 mutations are associated with cardiac conduction system (CCS) defects. Inactivation of Hop in the mouse is lethal in half of the expected null embryos. Here, we show that Hop is expressed strongly in the adult CCS. Hop−/− adult mice display conduction defects below the atrioventricular node (AVN) as determined by invasive electrophysiological testing. These defects are associated with decreased expression of connexin40. Our results suggest that Hop functions in the adult CCS and demonstrate conservation of molecular hierarchies between embryonic myocardium and the specialized conduction tissue of the mature heart. PMID:15790958

  11. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Labadorf, Adam; Hoss, Andrew G.; Lagomarsino, Valentina; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Bregu, Joli; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Akbarian, Schahram; Weng, Zhiping; Myers, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480) of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05) and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes), that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD. PMID:26636579

  12. The human BARX2 gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Hjalt, T A; Murray, J C

    1999-12-15

    The BARX genes 1 and 2 are Bar class homeobox genes expressed in craniofacial structures during development. In this report, we present the genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and polymorphic markers in BARX2. The gene has four exons, ranging in size from 85 to 1099 bp. BARX2 is localized on human chromosome 11q25, as determined by radiation hybrid mapping. In the mouse, Barx2 is coexpressed with Pitx2 in several tissues. Based on the coexpression, BARX2 was assumed to be a candidate gene for those cases of Rieger syndrome that cannot be associated with mutations of PITX2. Mutations in PITX2 cause some cases of Rieger syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder affecting eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. DNA from Rieger patients was subjected to single-strand conformation polymorphism screening of the BARX2 coding region. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in a normal population, although no etiologic mutations were detectable in over 100 cases of Rieger syndrome or in individuals with related ocular disorders. PMID:10644443

  13. Adenoviral Delivery of the EMX2 Gene Suppresses Growth in Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Mo, Minli; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Zhe; Sheng, Qing; Mu, Hang; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Li, Hui; He, Biao; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2012-01-01

    Background EMX2 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila empty spiracles homeobox gene that has been implicated in embryogenesis. Recent studies suggest possible involvement of EMX2 in human cancers; however, the role of EMX2 in carcinogenesis needs further exploration. Results In this study, we reported that down-regulation of EMX2 expression was significantly correlated with EMX2 promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer. Restoring EMX2 expression using an adenovirus delivery system in gastric cancer cell lines lacking endogenous EMX2 expression led to inhibition of cell proliferation and Wnt signaling pathway both in vitro and in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo. In addition, we observed that animals treated with the adenoviral EMX2 expression vector had significantly better survival than those treated with empty adenoviral vector. Conclusion Our study suggests that EMX2 is a putative tumor suppressor in human gastric cancer. The adenoviral-EMX2 may have potential as a novel gene therapy for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:23029345

  14. Molecular evolution analysis of WUSCHEL-related homeobox transcription factor family reveals functional divergence among clades in the homeobox region.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Ana Lúcia A; Thompson, Claudia E; Freitas, Loreta B

    2016-07-01

    Gene families have been shown to play important roles in plant evolution and are associated with diversification and speciation. Genes of WUSCHEL-related homeobox family of transcription factors have important functions in plant development and are correlated with the appearance of evolutionary novelties. There are several published studies related to this family, but little is known about the relationships among the main clades in the phylogeny and the molecular evolution of the family. In this study, we obtained a well-resolved Bayesian phylogenetic tree establishing the relationships among the main clades and determining the position of Selaginella moellendorffii WOX genes. Moreover, a correlation was identified between the number of genes in the genomes and the events of whole-genome duplications. The intron-exon structure is more consistent across the modern clade, which appeared more recently in the WOX evolutionary history, and coincides with the development of higher complexity in plant species. No positive selection was detected among sites through the branches in the tree. However, with regard to the main clades, functional divergence among certain amino acids in the homeodomain region was found. Relaxed purifying selection could be the main driving force in the evolution of these genes and in agreement with some genes have been demonstrated to be functionally redundant. PMID:27150824

  15. PDX1 regulation of FABP1 and novel target genes in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin; Fang, Rixun; Chou, Lin-Chiang; Lowe, Anson W.; Sibley, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) plays an essential role in pancreatic development and in maintaining proper islet function via target gene regulation. Few intestinal PDX1 targets, however, have been described. We sought to define novel PDX1-regulated intestinal genes. Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells were engineered to overexpress PDX1 and gene expression profiles relative to control cells were assessed. Expression of 80 genes significantly increased while that of 49 genes significantly decreased more than 4-fold following PDX1 overexpression in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Analysis of the differentially regulated genes with known functional annotations revealed genes encoding transcription factors, growth factors, kinases, digestive glycosidases, nutrient transporters, nutrient binding proteins, and structural components. The gene for fatty acid binding protein 1, liver, FABP1, is repressed by PDX1 in Caco-2 cells. PDX1 overexpression in Caco-2 cells also results in repression of promoter activity driven by the 0.6 kb FABP1 promoter. PDX1 regulation of promoter activity is consistent with the decrease in FABP1 RNA abundance resulting from PDX1 overexpression and identifies FABP1 as a candidate PDX1 target. PDX1 repression of FABP1, LCT, and SI suggests a role for PDX1 in patterning anterior intestinal development. PMID:22640736

  16. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database

  17. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73 000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards’ unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene’s functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite

  18. Zebrafish orthologs of human muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Leta S; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Vogel, Emily D; Beltre, Rosanna; Pusack, Timothy J; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Background Human muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders which cause decreased muscle strength and often result in premature death. There is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, nor have all causative genes been identified. Recent work in the small vertebrate zebrafish Danio rerio suggests that mutation or misregulation of zebrafish dystrophy orthologs can also cause muscular degeneration phenotypes in fish. To aid in the identification of new causative genes, this study identifies and maps zebrafish orthologs for all known human muscular dystrophy genes. Results Zebrafish sequence databases were queried for transcripts orthologous to human dystrophy-causing genes, identifying transcripts for 28 out of 29 genes of interest. In addition, the genomic locations of all 29 genes have been found, allowing rapid candidate gene discovery during genetic mapping of zebrafish dystrophy mutants. 19 genes show conservation of syntenic relationships with humans and at least two genes appear to be duplicated in zebrafish. Significant sequence coverage on one or more BAC clone(s) was also identified for 24 of the genes to provide better local sequence information and easy updating of genomic locations as the zebrafish genome assembly continues to evolve. Conclusion This resource supports zebrafish as a dystrophy model, suggesting maintenance of all known dystrophy-associated genes in the zebrafish genome. Coupled with the ability to conduct genetic screens and small molecule screens, zebrafish are thus an attractive model organism for isolating new dystrophy-causing genes/pathways and for use in high-throughput therapeutic discovery. PMID:17374169

  19. Molecular cloning and in situ localization of the human contactin gene (CNTN1) on chromosome 12q11-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, E.O.; Ranscht, B.

    1994-06-01

    Chick contactin/F11 (also known as F3 in mouse) is a neuronal cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin (Ig) gene family that is implicated in playing a role in the formation of axon connections in the developing nervous system. In human brain, contactin was first identified by amino terminal and peptide sequencing of the lentil-lectin-binding glycoprotein Gp135. The authors now report the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding human contactin. Human contactin is composed of six C2 Ig-domains and four fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats and is anchored to the membrane via a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol moiety, as shown by PI-PLC treatment of cells transfected with contactin cDNA and metabolic labeling with [{sup 3}H]-ethanolamine. At the amino acid level, h-contactin is 78% identical to chick contactin/F11 and 94% to mouse F3. Independent cDNAs encoding two putative contactin 1 cDNA encodes a protein with the amino-terminal sequence of purified Gp135, while the putative h-contactin 2 gene has a deletion of 33 nucleotides that predicts a protein with a shortened amino terminus. Northern analysis with a probe common for both isoforms detects one mRNA species of approximately 6.6 kb in adult human brain. Fluorescence in situ hybridization maps the gene for human contactin to human chromosome 12q11-q12. The h-contactin gene locus is thus in close proximity to homeobox 3, integrin subunit {alpha}5, several proto-oncogene genes, a chromosomal breakpoint associated with various tumors, and the gene locus for Stickler syndrome. The cloning of human contactin now permits the study of its role in disorder of the human nervous system. 56 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Gene expression profiling in developing human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mei, Pinchao; Lou, Rong; Zhang, Michael Q; Wu, Guanyun; Qiang, Boqin; Zhang, Zhengguo; Shen, Yan

    2002-10-15

    The gene expression profile of developing human hippocampus is of particular interest and importance to neurobiologists devoted to development of the human brain and related diseases. To gain further molecular insight into the developmental and functional characteristics, we analyzed the expression profile of active genes in developing human hippocampus. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were selected by sequencing randomly selected clones from an original 3'-directed cDNA library of 150-day human fetal hippocampus, and a digital expression profile of 946 known genes that could be divided into 16 categories was generated. We also used for comparison 14 other expression profiles of related human neural cells/tissues, including human adult hippocampus. To yield more confidence regarding differential expression, a method was applied to attach normalized expression data to genes with a low false-positive rate (<0.05). Finally, hierarchical cluster analysis was used to exhibit related gene expression patterns. Our results are in accordance with anatomical and physiological observations made during the developmental process of the human hippocampus. Furthermore, some novel findings appeared to be unique to our results. The abundant expression of genes for cell surface components and disease-related genes drew our attention. Twenty-four genes are significantly different from adult, and 13 genes might be developing hippocampus-specific candidate genes, including wnt2b and some Alzheimer's disease-related genes. Our results could provide useful information on the ontogeny, development, and function of cells in the human hippocampus at the molecular level and underscore the utility of large-scale, parallel gene expression analyses in the study of complex biological phenomena. PMID:12271469

  1. cDNA cloning and mRNA expression of canine pancreatic and duodenum homeobox 1 (Pdx-1).

    PubMed

    Takemitsu, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Ichiro; Lee, Peter; Ohta, Taizo; Mori, Nobuko; Arai, Toshiro

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx-1) is a critical insulin transcription factor expressed by pancreatic β-cells, and is crucial in the early stage of pancreas development. Unfortunately, nothing concerning Pdx-1 in canine has been elucidated yet. In this study, full length canine Pdx-1 cDNA was cloned and it was 1498 bp in length, consisting of a 99 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 849 bp coding region, and a 550 bp 3'-UTR region. A deduced 282 amino acid sequence of canine PDX-1 displayed high overall sequence identity with human, bovine, and mouse PDX-1. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that a high level of Pdx1 mRNA expression is exists in the duodenum and pancreas of canines. In addition, functional canine insulin promoter-luciferase reporter constructs with various canine insulin promoter region fragments revealed that our Pdx-1 isolated cDNA sequence encodes for a functionally active PDX-1 protein. Significant promoter activity was observed within the -583 bp 5'-upstream region of canine insulin gene with Chinese hamster ovary cells. In addition, Pdx-1 appears to have a synergistic effect with beta cell transactivator 2 (BETA2) and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA), which also have important roles in the activation of the insulin gene promoter. Our results confirm that similar to humans, Pdx1 plays an important role in expression of insulin gene in canines. PMID:22172402

  2. Gene Conversion in Human Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Gene conversion is a specific type of homologous recombination that involves the unidirectional transfer of genetic material from a ‘donor’ sequence to a highly homologous ‘acceptor’. We have recently reviewed the molecular mechanisms underlying gene conversion, explored the key part that this process has played in fashioning extant human genes, and performed a meta-analysis of gene-conversion events known to have caused human genetic disease. Here we shall briefly summarize some of the latest developments in the study of pathogenic gene conversion events, including (i) the emerging idea of minimal efficient sequence homology (MESH) for homologous recombination, (ii) the local DNA sequence features that appear to predispose to gene conversion, (iii) a mechanistic comparison of gene conversion and transient hypermutability, and (iv) recently reported examples of pathogenic gene conversion events. PMID:24710102

  3. The Gene Wiki: community intelligence applied to human gene annotation.

    PubMed

    Huss, Jon W; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martone, Michael; Roberts, Donabel; Pizarro, Angel; Valafar, Faramarz; Hogenesch, John B; Su, Andrew I

    2010-01-01

    Annotating the function of all human genes is a critical, yet formidable, challenge. Current gene annotation efforts focus on centralized curation resources, but it is increasingly clear that this approach does not scale with the rapid growth of the biomedical literature. The Gene Wiki utilizes an alternative and complementary model based on the principle of community intelligence. Directly integrated within the online encyclopedia, Wikipedia, the goal of this effort is to build a gene-specific review article for every gene in the human genome, where each article is collaboratively written, continuously updated and community reviewed. Previously, we described the creation of Gene Wiki 'stubs' for approximately 9000 human genes. Here, we describe ongoing systematic improvements to these articles to increase their utility. Moreover, we retrospectively examine the community usage and improvement of the Gene Wiki, providing evidence of a critical mass of users and editors. Gene Wiki articles are freely accessible within the Wikipedia web site, and additional links and information are available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Gene_Wiki. PMID:19755503

  4. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  5. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  6. Human protein kinase CK2 genes.

    PubMed

    Wirkner, U; Voss, H; Lichter, P; Pyerin, W

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the genomic structure of human protein kinase CK2. Of the presumably four genes, the gene encoding the regulatory subunit beta and a processed (pseudo)gene of the catalytic subunit alpha have been characterized completely. In addition, a 18.9 kb-long central part of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit alpha has been characterized. The subunit beta gene spans 4.2 kb and is composed of seven exons. Its promoter region shows several features of a "housekeeping gene" and shares common features with the promoter of the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Conforming to the genomic structure, the beta gene transcripts form a band around 1.1 kb. The central part of the subunit alpha gene contains eight exons comprising bases 102 to 824 of the translated region. Within the introns, 16 Alu repeats were identified, some of which arranged in tandems. The structure of both human CK2 coding genes, alpha and beta, is highly conserved. Several introns are located at corresponding positions in the respective genes of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The processed alpha (pseudo)gene has a complete open reading frame and is 99% homologous to the coding region of the CK2 alpha cDNA. Although the gene has a promoter-like upstream region, no transcript could be identified so far. The genomic clones were used for localization in the human genome. The beta gene was mapped to locus 6p21, the alpha gene to locus 20p13 and the alpha (pseudo)gene to locus 11p15. There is no evidence for additional alpha or beta loci in the human genome. PMID:7735323

  7. Gene Insertion Into Genomic Safe Harbors for Human Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Schambach, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Genomic safe harbors (GSHs) are sites in the genome able to accommodate the integration of new genetic material in a manner that ensures that the newly inserted genetic elements: (i) function predictably and (ii) do not cause alterations of the host genome posing a risk to the host cell or organism. GSHs are thus ideal sites for transgene insertion whose use can empower functional genetics studies in basic research and therapeutic applications in human gene therapy. Currently, no fully validated GSHs exist in the human genome. Here, we review our formerly proposed GSH criteria and discuss additional considerations on extending these criteria, on strategies for the identification and validation of GSHs, as well as future prospects on GSH targeting for therapeutic applications. In view of recent advances in genome biology, gene targeting technologies, and regenerative medicine, gene insertion into GSHs can potentially catalyze nearly all applications in human gene therapy. PMID:26867951

  8. PDX1 binds and represses hepatic genes to ensure robust pancreatic commitment in differentiating human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Tsuneyoshi, Norihiro; Hoon, Shawn; Tan, Ee Kim; Stanton, Lawrence W; Wright, Christopher V E; Dunn, N Ray

    2015-04-14

    Inactivation of the Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox 1 (PDX1) gene causes pancreatic agenesis, which places PDX1 high atop the regulatory network controlling development of this indispensable organ. However, little is known about the identity of PDX1 transcriptional targets. We simulated pancreatic development by differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into early pancreatic progenitors and subjected this cell population to PDX1 chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq). We identified more than 350 genes bound by PDX1, whose expression was upregulated on day 17 of differentiation. This group included known PDX1 targets and many genes not previously linked to pancreatic development. ChIP-seq also revealed PDX1 occupancy at hepatic genes. We hypothesized that simultaneous PDX1-driven activation of pancreatic and repression of hepatic programs underlie early divergence between pancreas and liver. In HepG2 cells and differentiating hESCs, we found that PDX1 binds and suppresses expression of endogenous liver genes. These findings rebrand PDX1 as a context-dependent transcriptional repressor and activator within the same cell type. PMID:25843046

  9. Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes With Adipose Tissue–Derived Stem Cells Expressing Pancreatic Duodenal Homeobox 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2009-01-01

    Due to the limited supply of donor pancreas, it is imperative that we identify alternative cell sources that can be used to treat diabetes mellitus (DM). Multipotent adipose tissue–derived stem cells (ADSC) can be abundantly and safely isolated for autologous transplantation and therefore are an ideal candidate. Here, we report the derivation of insulin-producing cells from human or rat ADSC by transduction with the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene. RT-PCR analyses showed that native ADSC expressed insulin, glucagon, and NeuroD genes that were up-regulated following Pdx1 transduction. ELISA analyses showed that the transduced cells secreted increasing amount of insulin in response to increasing concentration of glucose. Transplantation of these cells under the renal capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats resulted in lowered blood glucose, higher glucose tolerance, smoother fur, and less cataract. Histological examination showed that the transplanted cells formed tissue-like structures and expressed insulin. Thus, ADSC-expressing Pdx1 appear to be suitable for treatment of DM. PMID:19245309

  10. The retinoblastoma gene in human pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, V.L.; Arnold, A.; Alexander, J.M.; Klibanski, A. )

    1993-09-01

    Functional inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor gene is important in the pathogenesis of many human tumors. Recently, the frequent occurrence of pituitary tumors was reported in mice genetically engineered to have one defective RB allele, a genetic background analogous to that of patients with familial retinoblastoma. The molecular pathogenesis of human pituitary tumors is largely unknown, and the potential role of RB gene inactivation in these neoplasms has not been examined. Consequently, the authors studied 20 human pituitary tumors (12 clinically nonfunctioning tumors, 4 somatotroph adenomas, 2 prolactinomas, and 2 corticotrophy adenomas) for tumor-specific allelic loss of the RB gene using a highly informative polymorphic locus within the gene. Control leukocyte DNA samples from 18 of these 20 patients were heterozygous at this locus, permitting genetic evaluation of their paired tumor specimens. In contrast to the pituitary tumors in the mouse model, none of these 18 human tumors exhibited RB allelic loss. These findings indicate that RB gene inactivation probably does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of common types of human pituitary tumors. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  13. Homeobox family Hoxc localization during murine palate formation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Azumi; Katayama, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takehito; Imura, Hideto; Natsume, Nagato; Sugahara, Toshio; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2016-07-01

    Homeobox genes play important roles in craniofacial morphogenesis. However, the characteristics of the transcription factor Hoxc during palate formation remain unclear. We examined the immunolocalization patterns of Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 in palatogenesis of cleft palate (Eh/Eh) mice. On the other hand, mutations in the FGF/FGFR pathway are exclusively associated with syndromic forms of cleft palate. We also examined the immunolocalization of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 to clarify their relationships with Hoxc in palatogenesis. Some palatal epithelial cells showed Hoxc5 labeling, while almost no labeling of mesenchymal cells was observed in +/+ mice. As palate formation progressed in +/+ mice, Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6 were observed in medial epithelial seam cells. Hoxc5 and Hoxc6 were detected in the oral epithelium. The palatal mesenchyme also showed intense staining for Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 with progression of palate formation. In contrast, the palatal shelves of Eh/Eh mice exhibited impaired horizontal growth and failed to fuse, resulting in a cleft. Hoxc5 was observed in a few epithelial cells and diffusely in the mesenchyme of Eh/Eh palatal shelves. No or little labeling of Fgfr1 and Erk1/2 was detected in the cleft palate of Eh/Eh mice. These findings suggest that Hoxc genes are involved in palatogenesis. Furthermore, there may be the differences in the localization pattern between Hoxc5, Hoxc4, and Hoxc6. Additionally, Hoxc distribution in palatal cells during palate development may be correlated with FGF signaling. (228/250 words) © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society. PMID:26718736

  14. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  15. Chromosomal localization of the human fibromodulin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Roughley, P.J.; Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.

    1994-09-01

    The identification and mapping of genes is a fundamental step in understanding inherited diseases. This study reports the chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding fibromodulin, a collagen-binding proteoglycan which exhibits a wide distribution in connective tissue extracellular matrices. Attempts to localize the gene utilizing a probe covering the published coding region of the human fibromodulin cDNA were unsuccessful. Thus, in order to obtain an alternate probe, the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNA was cloned utilizing the 3{prime}-RACE protocol. Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA with probes covering either the coding sequence or the 3{prime}-untranslated region revealed simple patterns, indicative of a single-copy gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the 3{prime}-untranslated region probe resulted in hybridization at two chromosomal regions. The majority of signals were observed at 1q32, but some signals were also observed at 9q34.1. The localization of the fibromodulin gene to chromosome 1 was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction analysis of genomic DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrid lines. In addition to allowing the gene localization, cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region demonstrates that the human fibromodulin cDNA possesses an insert of approximately 160 base pairs which is not present in the published bovine sequence. The human sequence also possesses a single polyadenylation signal, yielding a 3 kb mRNA which was observed in Northern blotting experiments. These results now provide the necessary information to evaluate the potential role of fibromodulin in genetic disorders of connective tissues.

  16. Transcriptional analysis of human survivin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F; Altieri, D C

    1999-01-01

    The preservation of tissue and organ homoeostasis depends on the regulated expression of genes controlling apoptosis (programmed cell death). In this study, we have investigated the basal transcriptional requirements of the survivin gene, an IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) prominently up-regulated in cancer. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the human survivin gene revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter containing a canonical CpG island of approximately 250 nt, three cell cycle dependent elements, one cell cycle homology region and numerous Sp1 sites. PCR-based analysis of human genomic DNA, digested with methylation-sensitive and -insensitive restriction enzymes, indicated that the CpG island was unmethylated in both normal and neoplastic tissues. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping of the human survivin gene identified two main transcription start sites at position -72 and within -57/-61 from the initiating ATG. Transfection of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells with truncated or nested survivin promoter-luciferase constructs revealed the presence of both enhancer and repressor sequences and identified a minimal promoter region within the proximal -230 nt of the human survivin gene. Unbiased mutagenesis analysis of the human survivin promoter revealed that targeting the Sp1 sequences at position -171 and -151 abolished basal transcriptional activity by approximately 63-82%. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay with DNA oligonucleotides confirmed formation of a DNA-protein complex between the survivin Sp1 sequences and HeLa cell extracts in a reaction abolished by mutagenesis of the survivin Sp1 sites. These findings identify the basal transcriptional requirements of survivin gene expression. PMID:10567210

  17. Conservation of the TGFβ/Labial Homeobox Signaling Loop in Endoderm-Derived Cells between Drosophila and Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Lomberk, Gwen A.; Imoto, Issei; Gebelein, Brian; Urrutia, Raul; Cook, Tiffany A.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Midgut formation in Drosophila melanogaster is dependent upon the integrity of a signaling loop in the endoderm which requires the TGFβ-related peptide, Decapentaplegic, and the Hox transcription factor, Labial. Interestingly, although Labial-like homeobox genes are present in mammals, their participation in endoderm morphogenesis is not clearly understood. Methods We report the cloning, expression, localization, TGFβ inducibility, and biochemical properties of the mammalian Labial-like homeobox, HoxA1, in exocrine pancreatic cells that are embryologically derived from the gut endoderm. Results HoxA1 is expressed in pancreatic cell populations as two alternatively spliced messages, encoding proteins that share their N-terminal domain, but either lack or include the homeobox at the C-terminus. Transcriptional regulatory assays demonstrate that the shared N-terminal domain behaves as a strong transcriptional activator in exocrine pancreatic cells. HoxA1 is an early response gene for TGFβ1 in pancreatic epithelial cell populations and HoxA1 protein co-localizes with TGFβ1 receptors in the embryonic pancreatic epithelium at a time when exocrine pancreatic morphogenesis occurs (days E16 and E17). Conclusions These results report a role for HoxA1 in linking TGFβ-mediated signaling to gene expression in pancreatic epithelial cell populations, thus suggesting a high degree of conservation for a TGFβ/labial signaling loop in endoderm-derived cells between Drosophila and mammals. PMID:20339309

  18. A KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX protein regulates abscission in tomato by modulating the auxin pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Meir, Shimon; Xiao, Langtao; Tong, Jianhua; Liu, Qing; Reid, Michael S; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2015-03-01

    A gene encoding a KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX PROTEIN1 (KD1) is highly expressed in both leaf and flower abscission zones. Reducing the abundance of transcripts of this gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) by both virus-induced gene silencing and stable transformation with a silencing construct driven by an abscission-specific promoter resulted in a striking retardation of pedicel and petiole abscission. In contrast, Petroselinum, a semidominant KD1 mutant, showed accelerated pedicel and petiole abscission. Complementary DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that regulation of abscission by KD1 was associated with changed abundance of genes related to auxin transporters and signaling components. Measurement of auxin content and activity of a DR5::β-glucuronidase auxin reporter assay showed that changes in KD1 expression modulated the auxin concentration and response gradient in the abscission zone. PMID:25560879

  19. Gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Jansson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Studies in primary human trophoblasts provide critical insights into placental function in normal and complicated pregnancies. Mechanistic studies in these cells require experimental tools to modulate gene expression. Lipid-based methods to transfect primary trophoblasts are fairly simple to use and allow for the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, but potential toxic effects limit these methods. Viral vectors are versatile transfection tools of native trophoblastic or foreign cDNAs, providing high transfection efficiency, low toxicity and stable DNA integration into the trophoblast genome. RNA interference (RNAi), using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA, constitutes a powerful approach to silence trophoblast genes. However, off-target effects, such as regulation of unintended complementary transcripts, inflammatory responses and saturation of the endogenous RNAi machinery, are significant concerns. Strategies to minimize off-target effects include using multiple individual siRNAs, elimination of pro-inflammatory sequences in the siRNA construct and chemical modification of a nucleotide in the guide strand or of the ribose moiety. Tools for efficient gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts are currently available, albeit not yet extensively validated. These methods are critical for exploring the function of human trophoblast genes and may provide a foundation for the future application of gene therapy that targets placental trophoblasts. PMID:22831880

  20. Differentiation of PDX1 gene-modified human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    He, Dongmei; Wang, Juan; Gao, Yangjun; Zhang, Yuan

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have significant advantages over other stem cell types, and greater potential for immediate clinical application. MSCs would be an interesting cellular source for treatment of type 1 diabetes. In this study, MSCs from human umbilical cord were differentiated into functional insulin-producing cells in vitro by introduction of the pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor 1 (PDX1) and in the presence of induction factors. The expressions of cell surface antigens were detected by flow cytometry. After induction in an adipogenic medium or an osteogenic medium, the cells were observed by Oil Red O staining and alkaline phosphatase staining. Recombinant adenovirus carrying the PDX1 gene was constructed and MSCs were infected by the recombinant adenovirus, then treated with several inducing factors for differentiation into islet β-like cells. The expression of the genes and protein related to islet β-cells was detected by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Insulin and C-peptide secretion were assayed. Our results show that the morphology and immunophenotype of MSCs from human umbilical cord were similar to those present in human bone marrow. The MSCs could be induced to differentiate into osteocytes and adipocytes. After induction by recombined adenovirus vector with induction factors, MSCs were aggregated and presented islet-like bodies. Dithizone staining of these cells was positive. The genes' expression related to islet β-cells was found. After induction, insulin and C-peptide secretion in the supernatant were significantly increased. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that PDX1 gene-modified human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells could be differentiated into insulin-producing cells in vitro. PMID:21837359

  1. Human pigmentation genes under environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and comparative genomics have established major loci and specific polymorphisms affecting human skin, hair and eye color. Environmental changes have had an impact on selected pigmentation genes as populations have expanded into different regions of the globe. PMID:23110848

  2. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Sarah

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  3. European approach to the Human Gene Project.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1991-01-01

    In the history of gene mapping, which extends through most of the present century, Europe has played an important role. This has continued during the evolution of the 10 International Human Gene Mapping Workshops that have been held in seven different countries since 1973. Nationally coordinated programs have been a recent development, and several European countries, including the United Kingdom and Italy, have followed the lead of the United States in investing substantial sums of money in research on the human genome. In addition, the European Community has launched a multinational program of research on Human Genome Analysis to complement the various national initiatives. The particular approach in Europe has been to support those in the field by establishing resource centers for distributing biomaterials and accessing databases, by assisting in the training of scientists, and by funding programs of research directed at present needs in both physical and genetic mapping. PMID:1991586

  4. Cloning of the human DNA methyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchanani, S.K.; Rouleau, J.; Szyf, M.

    1994-09-01

    During the process of carcinogenesis it has been observed that DNA methylation is deregulated. At least two levels of regulation of the mouse DNA MeTase have been shown: at the transcriptional level, via its promoter, and at the post transcriptional level in a cell cycle dependent fashion. The sequence of the complete DNA MeTase gene and identification of the promoter has not yet been reported. Using a probe generated by PCR of the human DNA MeTase cDNA, a human genomic library was screened and a clone of approximately 22 kilobases (kb) was isolated. It was found that this clone contains the complete coding sequence of the DNA MeTase enzyme. Sequence analysis along with restriction enzyme digests have allowed us to construct a partial map of the physical structure of the human DNA MeTase gene. This partial structure has already revealed some interesting aspects related to the genetic evolution of the human DNA MeTase. First, the proposed catalytic domain of the human DNA MeTase is extremely homologous to all other cytosine DNA MeTases, even to those that are found in bacteria, and this catalytic domain is conserved within one complete exon in the human gene. This is very different from the structure of the 5{prime} region of the gene, which is fragmented into numerous little introns and exons. Within one of the small introns that have been identified, a trinucleotide repeat of ATG occurs (9 times in a row), and this repeat is upstream of the proposed start site of translation. Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been shown to be a genetic hot spot for mutation, but even more interesting is the nature of the repeat, ATG, which is the translation start codon; this repeat appears to be in frame with the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} coding sequence, the implications being that possible alternative methyltransferases may be translated under certain conditions such as cancer.

  5. Controlled expression of Drosophila homeobox loci using the Hostile takeover system

    PubMed Central

    Javeed, Naureen; Tardi, Nicholas J.; Maher, Maggie; Singari, Swetha; Edwards, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hostile takeover (Hto) is a Drosophila protein trapping system that allows the investigator to both induce a gene and tag its product. The Hto transposon carries a GAL4-regulated promoter expressing an exon encoding a FLAG-mCherry tag. Upon expression, the Hto exon can splice to a downstream genomic exon, generating a fusion transcript and tagged protein. Results Using rough-eye phenotypic screens, Hto inserts were recovered at eight homeobox or Pax loci: cut, Drgx/CG34340, Pox neuro, araucan, shaven/D-Pax2, Zn finger homeodomain 2, Sex combs reduced (Scr), and the abdominal-A region. The collection yields diverse misexpression phenotypes. Ectopic Drgx was found to alter the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion in ovary follicle cells. Hto expression of cut, araucan or shaven gives phenotypes similar to those of the corresponding UAS-cDNA constructs. The cut and Pox neuro phenotypes are suppressed by the corresponding RNAi constructs. The Scr and abdominal-A inserts do not make fusion proteins, but may act by chromatin- or RNA-based mechanisms. Conclusions Hto can effectively express tagged homeodomain proteins from their endogenous loci; the Minos vector allows inserts to be obtained even in transposon cold-spots. Hto screens may recover homeobox genes at high rates because they are particularly sensitive to misexpression. PMID:25820349

  6. Homeobox Is Pivotal for OsWUS Controlling Tiller Development and Female Fertility in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mjomba, Fredrick Mwamburi; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Huaqing; Tang, Weiqi; Hong, Zonglie; Wang, Feng; Wu, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    OsWUS has recently been shown to be a transcription factor gene critical for tiller development and fertility in rice. The OsWUS protein consists of three conserved structural domains, but their biological functions are still unclear. We discovered a new rice mutant resulting from tissue culture, which hardly produced tillers and exhibited complete female sterility. The male and female floral organs of the mutant were morphologically indistinguishable from those of the wild type. We named the mutant srt1 for completely sterile and reduced tillering 1. Map-based cloning revealed that the mutant phenotypes were caused by a mutation in OsWUS. Compared with the two previously reported null allelic mutants of OsWUS (tab1-1 and moc3-1), which could produce partial N-terminal peptides of OsWUS, the srt1 protein contained a deletion of only seven amino acids within the conserved homeobox domain of OsWUS. However, the mutant phenotypes (monoculm and female sterility) displayed in srt1 were as typical and severe as those in tab1-1 and moc3-1. This indicates that the homeobox domain of SRT1 is essential for the regulation of tillering and sterility in rice. In addition, srt1 showed an opposite effect on panicle development to that of the two null allelic mutants, implying that the srt1 protein might still have partial or even new functions on panicle development. The results of this study suggest that the homeobox domain is pivotal for OsWUS function. PMID:27194802

  7. Homeobox Is Pivotal for OsWUS Controlling Tiller Development and Female Fertility in Rice.

    PubMed

    Mjomba, Fredrick Mwamburi; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Huaqing; Tang, Weiqi; Hong, Zonglie; Wang, Feng; Wu, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    OsWUS has recently been shown to be a transcription factor gene critical for tiller development and fertility in rice. The OsWUS protein consists of three conserved structural domains, but their biological functions are still unclear. We discovered a new rice mutant resulting from tissue culture, which hardly produced tillers and exhibited complete female sterility. The male and female floral organs of the mutant were morphologically indistinguishable from those of the wild type. We named the mutant srt1 for completely sterile and reduced tillering 1. Map-based cloning revealed that the mutant phenotypes were caused by a mutation in OsWUS Compared with the two previously reported null allelic mutants of OsWUS (tab1-1 and moc3-1), which could produce partial N-terminal peptides of OsWUS, the srt1 protein contained a deletion of only seven amino acids within the conserved homeobox domain of OsWUS. However, the mutant phenotypes (monoculm and female sterility) displayed in srt1 were as typical and severe as those in tab1-1 and moc3-1 This indicates that the homeobox domain of SRT1 is essential for the regulation of tillering and sterility in rice. In addition, srt1 showed an opposite effect on panicle development to that of the two null allelic mutants, implying that the srt1 protein might still have partial or even new functions on panicle development. The results of this study suggest that the homeobox domain is pivotal for OsWUS function. PMID:27194802

  8. Timing and Scope of Genomic Expansion within Annelida: Evidence from Homeoboxes in the Genome of the Earthworm Eisenia fetida

    PubMed Central

    Zwarycz, Allison S.; Nossa, Carlos W.; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Ryan, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    Annelida represents a large and morphologically diverse group of bilaterian organisms. The recently published polychaete and leech genome sequences revealed an equally dynamic range of diversity at the genomic level. The availability of more annelid genomes will allow for the identification of evolutionary genomic events that helped shape the annelid lineage and better understand the diversity within the group. We sequenced and assembled the genome of the common earthworm, Eisenia fetida. As a first pass at understanding the diversity within the group, we classified 363 earthworm homeoboxes and compared them with those of the leech Helobdella robusta and the polychaete Capitella teleta. We inferred many gene expansions occurring in the lineage connecting the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Capitella and Eisenia to the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA. Likewise, the lineage leading from the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to the leech H. robusta has experienced substantial gains and losses. However, the lineage leading from Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to E. fetida is characterized by extraordinary levels of homeobox gain. The evolutionary dynamics observed in the homeoboxes of these lineages are very likely to be generalizable to all genes. These genome expansions and losses have likely contributed to the remarkable biology exhibited in this group. These results provide a new perspective from which to understand the diversity within these lineages, show the utility of sub-draft genome assemblies for understanding genomic evolution, and provide a critical resource from which the biology of these animals can be studied. PMID:26659921

  9. Timing and Scope of Genomic Expansion within Annelida: Evidence from Homeoboxes in the Genome of the Earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Zwarycz, Allison S; Nossa, Carlos W; Putnam, Nicholas H; Ryan, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Annelida represents a large and morphologically diverse group of bilaterian organisms. The recently published polychaete and leech genome sequences revealed an equally dynamic range of diversity at the genomic level. The availability of more annelid genomes will allow for the identification of evolutionary genomic events that helped shape the annelid lineage and better understand the diversity within the group. We sequenced and assembled the genome of the common earthworm, Eisenia fetida. As a first pass at understanding the diversity within the group, we classified 363 earthworm homeoboxes and compared them with those of the leech Helobdella robusta and the polychaete Capitella teleta. We inferred many gene expansions occurring in the lineage connecting the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Capitella and Eisenia to the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA. Likewise, the lineage leading from the Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to the leech H. robusta has experienced substantial gains and losses. However, the lineage leading from Eisenia/Helobdella MRCA to E. fetida is characterized by extraordinary levels of homeobox gain. The evolutionary dynamics observed in the homeoboxes of these lineages are very likely to be generalizable to all genes. These genome expansions and losses have likely contributed to the remarkable biology exhibited in this group. These results provide a new perspective from which to understand the diversity within these lineages, show the utility of sub-draft genome assemblies for understanding genomic evolution, and provide a critical resource from which the biology of these animals can be studied. PMID:26659921

  10. Switch from Stress Response to Homeobox Transcription Factors in Adipose Tissue After Profound Fat Loss

    PubMed Central

    Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Stansberg, Christine; Holdhus, Rita; Hoang, Tuyen; Veum, Vivian L.; Christensen, Bjørn Jostein; Våge, Villy; Sagen, Jørn V.; Steen, Vidar M.; Mellgren, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Background In obesity, impaired adipose tissue function may promote secondary disease through ectopic lipid accumulation and excess release of adipokines, resulting in systemic low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and organ dysfunction. However, several of the genes regulating adipose tissue function in obesity are yet to be identified. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to identify novel candidate genes that may regulate adipose tissue function, we analyzed global gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue before and one year after bariatric surgery (biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, BPD/DS) (n = 16). Adipose tissue from lean healthy individuals was also analyzed (n = 13). Two different microarray platforms (AB 1700 and Illumina) were used to measure the differential gene expression, and the results were further validated by qPCR. Surgery reduced BMI from 53.3 to 33.1 kg/m2. The majority of differentially expressed genes were down-regulated after profound fat loss, including transcription factors involved in stress response, inflammation, and immune cell function (e.g., FOS, JUN, ETS, C/EBPB, C/EBPD). Interestingly, a distinct set of genes was up-regulated after fat loss, including homeobox transcription factors (IRX3, IRX5, HOXA5, HOXA9, HOXB5, HOXC6, EMX2, PRRX1) and extracellular matrix structural proteins (COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, COL5A1, COL6A3). Conclusions/Significance The data demonstrate a marked switch of transcription factors in adipose tissue after profound fat loss, providing new molecular insight into a dichotomy between stress response and metabolically favorable tissue development. Our findings implicate homeobox transcription factors as important regulators of adipose tissue function. PMID:20543949

  11. Structure of the human progesterone receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Misrahi, M; Venencie, P Y; Saugier-Veber, P; Sar, S; Dessen, P; Milgrom, E

    1993-11-16

    The complete organization of the human progesterone receptor (hPR) gene has been determined. It spans over 90 kbp and contains eight exons. The first exon encodes the N-terminal part of the receptor. The DNA binding domain is encoded by two exons, each exon corresponding to one zinc finger. The steroid binding domain is encoded by five exons. The nucleotide sequence of 1144 bp of the 5' flanking region has been determined. PMID:8241270

  12. Structure of the human hexabrachion (tenascin) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gulcher, J R; Nies, D E; Alexakos, M J; Ravikant, N A; Sturgill, M E; Marton, L S; Stefansson, K

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the gene encoding human hexabrachion (tenascin) has been determined from overlapping clones isolated from a human genomic bacteriophage library. The genomic inserts were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blot analysis, PCR, and DNA sequencing. The coding region of the hexabrachion gene spans approximately 80 kilobases of DNA and consists of 27 exons separated by 26 introns. The exon-intron structure supports a hypothesis based on the cDNA sequence that the hexabrachion gene is an assembly of DNA modules that are also found elsewhere in the genome. Single exons may encode a module, a portion of a module, or a group of modules. The 15 type III units similar to those found in fibronectin are each encoded either by a single exon or by two exons interrupted by an intron. All type III units known to be spliced out of the smaller forms of the protein are encoded by one exon. The fibrinogen-like domain of 210 amino acids is encoded by five exons. The 14.5 epidermal growth factor-like repeats are all encoded by a single exon. Images PMID:1719530

  13. Two human relaxin genes are on chromosome 9.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R J; Hudson, P; Shine, J; Niall, H D; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    We have recently cloned two different human relaxin gene sequences. One of these (H1) was isolated from a human genomic clone bank and the other (H2) from a cDNA library prepared from human pregnant ovarian tissue. Southern gel analysis of the relaxin genes within the genomes of several unrelated individuals showed that all genomes contained both relaxin genes. Hence it is unlikely (p less than 0.001) that the two relaxin gene sequences are alleles. Rather, it is probable that there are two relaxin genes within the human genome. It is likely that relaxin and insulin genes have evolved from a common ancestral gene by gene duplication, since structural similarities between insulin and relaxin are evident at both the peptide and gene level. To investigate the evolutionary relationship between the two human relaxin genes and the insulin gene, we have determined the chromosomal position of the relaxin genes using mouse/human cell hybrids. We found that the human insulin and relaxin genes are on different chromosomes. Both human relaxin genes are located on the short arm region of chromosome 9. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6548703

  14. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  15. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    PubMed

    Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Petrunia, Igor V; Komarova, Tatiana V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S; Kiryanov, Gleb I; Dorokhov, Yuri L

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  16. Zinc-fingers and homeoboxes 1 (ZHX1) binds DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3B to enhance DNMT3B-mediated transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Hak; Park, Jinah; Choi, Moon-Chang; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Yeonjoo; Lee, Ju-Hee; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Tae-You; E-mail: kimty@snu.ac.kr

    2007-04-06

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 3B is a de novo DNMT that represses transcription independent of DNMT activity. In order to gain a better insight into DNMT3B-mediated transcriptional repression, we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis using DNMT3B as a bait. Of the various binding candidates, ZHX1, a member of zinc-finger and homeobox protein, was found to interact with DNMT3B in vivo and in vitro. N-terminal PWWP domain of DNMT3B was required for its interaction with homeobox motifs of ZHX1. ZHX1 contains nuclear localization signal at C-terminal homeobox motif, and both ZHX1 and DNMT3B were co-localized in nucleus. Furthermore, we found that ZHX1 enhanced the transcriptional repression mediated by DNMT3B when DNMT3B is directly targeted to DNA. These results showed for First the direct linkage between DNMT and zinc-fingers homeoboxes protein, leading to enhanced gene silencing by DNMT3B.

  17. Structure of the human retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, F.D.; Huang, Hueijen S.; To, Hoang; Young, Lihjiuan S.; Oro, A.; Bookstein, R.; Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, Wenhwa )

    1989-07-01

    Complete inactivation of the human retinoblastoma gene (RB) is believed to be an essential step in tumorigenesis of several different cancers. To provide a framework for understanding inactivation mechanisms, the structure of RB was delineated. The RB transcript is encoded in 27 exons dispersed over about 200 kilobases (kb) of genomic DNA. The length of individual exons ranges from 31 to 1,889 base pairs (bp). The largest intron spans >60 kb and the smallest one has only 80 bp. Deletion of exons 13-17 is frequently observed in various types of tumors, including retinoblastoma, breast cancer, and osteosarcoma, and the presence of a potential hot spot for recombination in the region is predicted. A putative leucine-zipper motif is exclusively encoded by exon 20. The detailed RB structure presented should prove useful in defining potential functional domains of its encoded protein. Transcription of RB is initiated at multiple positions and the sequences surrounding the initiation sites have a high G+C content. A typical upstream TATA box is not present. Localization of the RB promoter region was accomplished by utilizing a heterologous expression system containing a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Deletion analysis revealed that a region as small as 70 bp is sufficient for RB promoter activity, similar to other previously characterized G+C-rich gene promoters. Several direct repeats and possible stem-and-loop structures are found in the promoter region.

  18. Monoallelic expression of the human FOXP2 speech gene.

    PubMed

    Adegbola, Abidemi A; Cox, Gerald F; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Hafler, David A; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Chess, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The recent descriptions of widespread random monoallelic expression (RMAE) of genes distributed throughout the autosomal genome indicate that there are more genes subject to RMAE on autosomes than the number of genes on the X chromosome where X-inactivation dictates RMAE of X-linked genes. Several of the autosomal genes that undergo RMAE have independently been implicated in human Mendelian disorders. Thus, parsing the relationship between allele-specific expression of these genes and disease is of interest. Mutations in the human forkhead box P2 gene, FOXP2, cause developmental verbal dyspraxia with profound speech and language deficits. Here, we show that the human FOXP2 gene undergoes RMAE. Studying an individual with developmental verbal dyspraxia, we identify a deletion 3 Mb away from the FOXP2 gene, which impacts FOXP2 gene expression in cis. Together these data suggest the intriguing possibility that RMAE impacts the haploinsufficiency phenotypes observed for FOXP2 mutations. PMID:25422445

  19. Structure of the human retinoblastoma gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, F D; Huang, H J; To, H; Young, L J; Oro, A; Bookstein, R; Lee, E Y; Lee, W H

    1989-01-01

    Complete inactivation of the human retinoblastoma gene (RB) is believed to be an essential step in tumorigenesis of several different cancers. To provide a framework for understanding inactivation mechanisms, the structure of RB was delineated. The RB transcript is encoded in 27 exons dispersed over about 200 kilobases (kb) of genomic DNA. The length of individual exons ranges from 31 to 1889 base pairs (bp). The largest intron spans greater than 60 kb and the smallest one has only 80 bp. Deletion of exons 13-17 is frequently observed in various types of tumors, including retinoblastoma, breast cancer, and osteosarcoma, and the presence of a potential "hot spot" for recombination in the region is predicted. A putative "leucine-zipper" motif is exclusively encoded by exon 20. The detailed RB structure presented here should prove useful in defining potential functional domains of its encoded protein. Transcription of RB is initiated at multiple positions and the sequences surrounding the initiation sites have a high G + C content. A typical upstream TATA box is not present. Localization of the RB promoter region was accomplished by utilizing a heterologous expression system containing a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Deletion analysis revealed that a region as small as 70 bp is sufficient for RB promoter activity, similar to other previously characterized G + C-rich gene promoters. Several direct repeats and possible stem-and-loop structures are found in the promoter region. No enhancer element was detected within the 7.3 kb of upstream sequence studied. Several features of the RB promoter are reminiscent of the characteristics associated with many "housekeeping" genes, consistent with its ubiquitous expression pattern. Images PMID:2748600

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the human biglycan gene.

    PubMed

    Ungefroren, H; Krull, N B

    1996-06-28

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan is involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes through the ability of its core protein to interact with other extracellular matrix molecules and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). To learn more about the regulation of biglycan core protein expression, we have cloned and sequenced 1218 base pairs from the 5'-flanking region of the human biglycan gene, demonstrated functional promoter activity, and investigated the molecular mechanisms through which various agents modulate its transcriptional activity. Sequencing revealed the presence of several cis-acting elements including multiple AP-2 sites and interleukin-6 response elements, a NF-kappaB site, a TGF-beta negative element, and an E-box. The TATA and CAAT box-lacking promoter possesses many features of a growth-related gene, e.g. a GC-rich immediate 5' region, many Sp1 sites, and the use of multiple transcriptional start sites. Transient transfections of the tumor cell lines MG-63, SK-UT-1, and T47D with various biglycan 5'-flanking region-luciferase reporter gene constructs showed that the proximal 78 base pairs are sufficient for full promoter activity. Several agents among them interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. were capable of altering biglycan promoter activity. However, in MG-63 cells, TGF-beta1 failed to increase either activity of the biglycan promoter constructs or specific transcription from the endogenous biglycan gene. Since TGF-beta1 also did not alter the stability of cytoplasmic biglycan mRNA as determined from Northern analysis after inhibition of transcription with 5,6-dichloro-1beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, an as yet unidentified nuclear post-transcriptional mechanism was considered responsible for the TGF-beta effect in this cell type. These results might help to elucidate the molecular pathways leading to pathological alterations of biglycan expression observed in atherosclerosis, glomerulonephritis

  1. Genomic structure of the human caldesmon gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, K; Yano, H; Hashida, T; Takeuchi, R; Takeda, O; Asada, K; Takahashi, E; Kato, I; Sobue, K

    1992-01-01

    The high molecular weight caldesmon (h-CaD) is predominantly expressed in smooth muscles, whereas the low molecular weight caldesmon (l-CaD) is widely distributed in nonmuscle tissues and cells. The changes in CaD isoform expression are closely correlated with the phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells. During a search for isoform diversity of human CaDs, l-CaD cDNAs were cloned from HeLa S3 cells. HeLa l-CaD I is composed of 558 amino acids, whereas 26 amino acids (residues 202-227 for HeLa l-CaD I) are deleted in HeLa l-CaD II. The short amino-terminal sequence of HeLa l-CaDs is different from that of fibroblast (WI-38) l-CaD II and human aorta h-CaD. We have also identified WI-38 l-CaD I, which contains a 26-amino acid insertion relative to WI-38 l-CaD II. To reveal the molecular events of the expressional regulation of the CaD isoforms, the genomic structure of the human CaD gene was determined. The human CaD gene is composed of 14 exons and was mapped to a single locus, 7q33-q34. The 26-amino acid insertion is encoded in exon 4 and is specifically spliced in the mRNAs for both h-CaD and l-CaDs I. Exon 3 is the exon that encodes the central repeating domain specific to h-CaD (residues 208-436) together with the common domain in all CaD (residues 73-207 for h-CaD and WI-38 l-CaDs, and residues 68-201 for HeLa l-CaDs). The regulation of h- and l-CaD expression is thought to depend on selection of the two 5' splice sites within exon 3. Thus, the change in expression between l-CaD and h-CaD might be caused by this splicing pathway. Images PMID:1465449

  2. The economics of human gene patents.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Frederic M

    2002-12-01

    The author examines patents on DNA sequences, including data on gene sequence grants issued by the PTO during a 33-month period from 1998 to 2001. Policy supporting patents on DNA sequences and other elemental information that are far "upstream" in the product development pathway is contrasted with the economic bases and rationale for patents to pharmaceuticals, which require a protracted and expensive process of development and testing but that can be relatively cheaply and competitively imitated once they are approved and disclosed. How to allocate appropriately the economic returns among the upstream and downstream inventors is a challenging problem for economic theory, as well as for contemporary biomedical research, and is perhaps most familiarly embodied in licensing and cross-licensing disputes involving "reach-through" and "reach-back" rights. Such disputes can generate enormous transaction costs. They may become increasingly frequent and vexing with respect to the scope and overlap of patent claims on human gene sequences. On the basis of his analyses, the author argues that genome patent claims should be interpreted narrowly. He is particularly concerned with ensuring that the development of new (therapeutic) products is not blocked or retarded by a multiplicity of prior patent claims, but he is pessimistic that the diversity of participants in biotechnology will provide a "sufficient community of interest to organize comprehensive low-royalty cross-licensing" regimes. Accordingly, he suggests mandatory arbitration as one mechanism for resolving such problems. PMID:12480645

  3. Improved human disease candidate gene prioritization using mouse phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Huan; Aronow, Bruce J; Jegga, Anil G

    2007-01-01

    Background The majority of common diseases are multi-factorial and modified by genetically and mechanistically complex polygenic interactions and environmental factors. High-throughput genome-wide studies like linkage analysis and gene expression profiling, tend to be most useful for classification and characterization but do not provide sufficient information to identify or prioritize specific disease causal genes. Results Extending on an earlier hypothesis that the majority of genes that impact or cause disease share membership in any of several functional relationships we, for the first time, show the utility of mouse phenotype data in human disease gene prioritization. We study the effect of different data integration methods, and based on the validation studies, we show that our approach, ToppGene , outperforms two of the existing candidate gene prioritization methods, SUSPECTS and ENDEAVOUR. Conclusion The incorporation of phenotype information for mouse orthologs of human genes greatly improves the human disease candidate gene analysis and prioritization. PMID:17939863

  4. A KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX Protein Regulates Abscission in Tomato by Modulating the Auxin Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Meir, Shimon; Xiao, Langtao; Tong, Jianhua; Liu, Qing; Reid, Michael S.; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    A gene encoding a KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX PROTEIN1 (KD1) is highly expressed in both leaf and flower abscission zones. Reducing the abundance of transcripts of this gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) by both virus-induced gene silencing and stable transformation with a silencing construct driven by an abscission-specific promoter resulted in a striking retardation of pedicel and petiole abscission. In contrast, Petroselinum, a semidominant KD1 mutant, showed accelerated pedicel and petiole abscission. Complementary DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that regulation of abscission by KD1 was associated with changed abundance of genes related to auxin transporters and signaling components. Measurement of auxin content and activity of a DR5::β-glucuronidase auxin reporter assay showed that changes in KD1 expression modulated the auxin concentration and response gradient in the abscission zone. PMID:25560879

  5. Transcriptome Dynamics of Developing Photoreceptors in Three-Dimensional Retina Cultures Recapitulates Temporal Sequence of Human Cone and Rod Differentiation Revealing Cell Surface Markers and Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Brooks, Matthew; Homma, Kohei; Zou, Jizhong; Chaitankar, Vijender; Rao, Mahendra; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-12-01

    The derivation of three-dimensional (3D) stratified neural retina from pluripotent stem cells has permitted investigations of human photoreceptors. We have generated a H9 human embryonic stem cell subclone that carries a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter under the control of the promoter of cone-rod homeobox (CRX), an established marker of postmitotic photoreceptor precursors. The CRXp-GFP reporter replicates endogenous CRX expression in vitro when the H9 subclone is induced to form self-organizing 3D retina-like tissue. At day 37, CRX+ photoreceptors appear in the basal or middle part of neural retina and migrate to apical side by day 67. Temporal and spatial patterns of retinal cell type markers recapitulate the predicted sequence of development. Cone gene expression is concomitant with CRX, whereas rod differentiation factor neural retina leucine zipper protein (NRL) is first observed at day 67. At day 90, robust expression of NRL and its target nuclear receptor NR2E3 is evident in many CRX+ cells, while minimal S-opsin and no rhodopsin or L/M-opsin is present. The transcriptome profile, by RNA-seq, of developing human photoreceptors is remarkably concordant with mRNA and immunohistochemistry data available for human fetal retina although many targets of CRX, including phototransduction genes, exhibit a significant delay in expression. We report on temporal changes in gene signatures, including expression of cell surface markers and transcription factors; these expression changes should assist in isolation of photoreceptors at distinct stages of differentiation and in delineating coexpression networks. Our studies establish the first global expression database of developing human photoreceptors, providing a reference map for functional studies in retinal cultures. PMID:26235913

  6. Birth of 'human-specific' genes during primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Jean-Louis

    2003-07-01

    Humans and other Anthropoids share very similar chromosome structure and genomic sequence as seen in the 98.5% homology at the DNA level between us and Great Apes. However, anatomical and behavioral traits distinguish Homo sapiens from his closest relatives. I review here several recent studies that address the issue by using different approaches: large-scale sequence comparison (first release) between human and chimpanzee, characterization of recent segmental duplications in the human genome and analysis of exemplary gene families. As a major breakthrough in the field, the heretical concept of 'human-specific' genes has recently received some supporting data. In addition, specific chromosomal regions have been mapped that display all the features of 'gene nurseries' and could have played a major role in gene innovation and speciation during primate evolution. A model is proposed that integrates all known molecular mechanisms that can create new genes in the human lineage. PMID:12868609

  7. In-silico human genomics with GeneCards

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the bioinformatics, systems biology, genomics and medical communities have enjoyed a synergistic relationship with the GeneCards database of human genes (http://www.genecards.org). This human gene compendium was created to help to introduce order into the increasing chaos of information flow. As a consequence of viewing details and deep links related to specific genes, users have often requested enhanced capabilities, such that, over time, GeneCards has blossomed into a suite of tools (including GeneDecks, GeneALaCart, GeneLoc, GeneNote and GeneAnnot) for a variety of analyses of both single human genes and sets thereof. In this paper, we focus on inhouse and external research activities which have been enabled, enhanced, complemented and, in some cases, motivated by GeneCards. In turn, such interactions have often inspired and propelled improvements in GeneCards. We describe here the evolution and architecture of this project, including examples of synergistic applications in diverse areas such as synthetic lethality in cancer, the annotation of genetic variations in disease, omics integration in a systems biology approach to kidney disease, and bioinformatics tools. PMID:22155609

  8. Injury, inflammation and the emergence of human-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew; Costantini, Todd; Coimbra, Raul; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2016-05-01

    In light of the central role of inflammation in normal wound repair and regeneration, we hypothesize that the preponderance of human-specific genes expressed in human inflammatory cells is commensurate with the genetic versatility of inflammatory response and the emergence of injuries associated with uniquely hominid behaviors, like a bipedal posture and the use of tools, weapons and fire. The hypothesis underscores the need to study human-specific signaling pathways in experimental models of injury and infers that a selection of human-specific genes, driven in part by the response to injury, may have facilitated the emergence of multifunctional genes expressed in other tissues. PMID:26874655

  9. Human metallothionein genes are clustered on chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Karin, M; Eddy, R L; Henry, W M; Haley, L L; Byers, M G; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    The metallothioneins are a family of heavy-metal binding proteins of low molecular weight. They function in the regulation of trace metal metabolism and in the protection against toxic heavy metal ions. In man, the metallothioneins are encoded by at least 10-12 genes separated into two groups, MT-I and MT-II. To understand the genomic organization of these genes and their involvement in hereditary disorders of trace metal metabolism, we have determined their chromosomal location. Using human-mouse cell hybrids and hybridization probes derived from cloned and functional human MT1 and MT2 genes, we show that the functional human genes are clustered on human chromosome 16. Analysis of RNA from somatic cell hybrids indicated that hybrids that contained human chromosome 16 expressed both human MT1 and MT2 mRNA, and this expression is regulated by both heavy metal ions and glucocorticoid hormones. Images PMID:6089206

  10. Down-regulation of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2 releases GLI1 from the nuclear repressor complex to restore its transcriptional activity during mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Miho; Inaguma, Shingo; Ito, Hideaki; Tsunoda, Takumi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kasai, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Although breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies, the molecular mechanisms underlying its development and progression are not fully understood. To identify key molecules involved, we screened publicly available microarray datasets for genes differentially expressed between breast cancers and normal mammary glands. We found that three of the genes predicted in this analysis were differentially expressed among human mammary tissues and cell lines. Of these genes, we focused on the role of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2, which is down-regulated in breast cancer cells. We found that TSHZ2 is a nuclear protein harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal, and we confirmed its function as a C-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-dependent transcriptional repressor. Through comprehensive screening, we identified TSHZ2-suppressing genes such as AEBP1 and CXCR4, which are conversely up-regulated by GLI1, the downstream transcription factor of Hedgehog signaling. We found that GLI1 forms a ternary complex with CtBP2 in the presence of TSHZ2 and that the transcriptional activity of GLI1 is suppressed by TSHZ2 in a CtBP-dependent manner. Indeed, knockdown of TSHZ2 increases the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 in TSHZ2-expressing immortalized mammary duct epithelium. Concordantly, immunohistochemical staining of mammary glands revealed that normal duct cells expresses GLI1 in the nucleus along with TSHZ2 and CtBP2, whereas invasive ductal carcinoma cells, which does not express TSHZ2, show the increase in the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 and in the cytoplasmic localization of GLI1. Thus, we propose that down-regulation of TSHZ2 is crucial for mammary tumorigenesis via the activation of GLI1. PMID:26744317

  11. Down-regulation of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2 releases GLI1 from the nuclear repressor complex to restore its transcriptional activity during mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Riku, Miho; Inaguma, Shingo; Ito, Hideaki; Tsunoda, Takumi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kasai, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Although breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies, the molecular mechanisms underlying its development and progression are not fully understood. To identify key molecules involved, we screened publicly available microarray datasets for genes differentially expressed between breast cancers and normal mammary glands. We found that three of the genes predicted in this analysis were differentially expressed among human mammary tissues and cell lines. Of these genes, we focused on the role of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2, which is down-regulated in breast cancer cells. We found that TSHZ2 is a nuclear protein harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal, and we confirmed its function as a C-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-dependent transcriptional repressor. Through comprehensive screening, we identified TSHZ2-suppressing genes such as AEBP1 and CXCR4, which are conversely up-regulated by GLI1, the downstream transcription factor of Hedgehog signaling. We found that GLI1 forms a ternary complex with CtBP2 in the presence of TSHZ2 and that the transcriptional activity of GLI1 is suppressed by TSHZ2 in a CtBP-dependent manner. Indeed, knockdown of TSHZ2 increases the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 in TSHZ2-expressing immortalized mammary duct epithelium. Concordantly, immunohistochemical staining of mammary glands revealed that normal duct cells expresses GLI1 in the nucleus along with TSHZ2 and CtBP2, whereas invasive ductal carcinoma cells, which does not express TSHZ2, show the increase in the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 and in the cytoplasmic localization of GLI1. Thus, we propose that down-regulation of TSHZ2 is crucial for mammary tumorigenesis via the activation of GLI1. PMID:26744317

  12. Reconstruction of a Functional Human Gene Network, with an Application for Prioritizing Positional Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Lude; Bakel, Harm van; Fokkens, Like; de Jong, Edwin D.; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2006-01-01

    Most common genetic disorders have a complex inheritance and may result from variants in many genes, each contributing only weak effects to the disease. Pinpointing these disease genes within the myriad of susceptibility loci identified in linkage studies is difficult because these loci may contain hundreds of genes. However, in any disorder, most of the disease genes will be involved in only a few different molecular pathways. If we know something about the relationships between the genes, we can assess whether some genes (which may reside in different loci) functionally interact with each other, indicating a joint basis for the disease etiology. There are various repositories of information on pathway relationships. To consolidate this information, we developed a functional human gene network that integrates information on genes and the functional relationships between genes, based on data from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database, Reactome, the Human Protein Reference Database, the Gene Ontology database, predicted protein-protein interactions, human yeast two-hybrid interactions, and microarray coexpressions. We applied this network to interrelate positional candidate genes from different disease loci and then tested 96 heritable disorders for which the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database reported at least three disease genes. Artificial susceptibility loci, each containing 100 genes, were constructed around each disease gene, and we used the network to rank these genes on the basis of their functional interactions. By following up the top five genes per artificial locus, we were able to detect at least one known disease gene in 54% of the loci studied, representing a 2.8-fold increase over random selection. This suggests that our method can significantly reduce the cost and effort of pinpointing true disease genes in analyses of disorders for which numerous loci have been reported but for which

  13. Loss of gene function and evolution of human phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hye Ji; Choi, Dongjin; Goh, Chul Jun; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2015-01-01

    Humans have acquired many distinct evolutionary traits after the human-chimpanzee divergence. These phenotypes have resulted from genetic changes that occurred in the human genome and were retained by natural selection. Comparative primate genome analyses reveal that loss-of-function mutations are common in the human genome. Some of these gene inactivation events were revealed to be associated with the emergence of advantageous phenotypes and were therefore positively selected and fixed in modern humans (the “less-ismore” hypothesis). Representative cases of human gene inactivation and their functional implications are presented in this review. Functional studies of additional inactive genes will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying acquisition of various human-specific traits. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 373-379] PMID:25887751

  14. Characterization of the DNA-binding properties of the Mohawk homeobox transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas M; George, Rajani; Noyes, Marcus B; Rowton, Megan; Liu, Wenjin; Jiang, Rulang; Wolfe, Scot A; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Rawls, Alan

    2012-10-12

    The homeobox transcription factor Mohawk (Mkx) is a potent transcriptional repressor expressed in the embryonic precursors of skeletal muscle, cartilage, and bone. MKX has recently been shown to be a critical regulator of musculoskeletal tissue differentiation and gene expression; however, the genetic pathways through which MKX functions and its DNA-binding properties are currently unknown. Using a modified bacterial one-hybrid site selection assay, we determined the core DNA-recognition motif of the mouse monomeric Mkx homeodomain to be A-C-A. Using cell-based assays, we have identified a minimal Mkx-responsive element (MRE) located within the Mkx promoter, which is composed of a highly conserved inverted repeat of the core Mkx recognition motif. Using the minimal MRE sequence, we have further identified conserved MREs within the locus of Sox6, a transcription factor that represses slow fiber gene expression during skeletal muscle differentiation. Real-time PCR and immunostaining of in vitro differentiated muscle satellite cells isolated from Mkx-null mice revealed an increase in the expression of Sox6 and down-regulation of slow fiber structural genes. Together, these data identify the unique DNA-recognition properties of MKX and reveal a novel role for Mkx in promoting slow fiber type specification during skeletal muscle differentiation. PMID:22923612

  15. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human renal kallikrein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.A.; Yun, Z.X.; Close, J.A.; Tregear, G.W.; Kitamura, N.; Nakanish, S.; Callen, D.F.; Baker, E.; Hyland, V.J.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I.

    1988-05-03

    Glandular kallikreins are a family of proteases encoded by a variable number of genes in different mammalian species. In all species examined, however, one particular kallikrein is functionally conserved in its capacity to release the vasoactive peptide, Lys-bradykinin, from low molecular weight kininogen. This kallikrein is found in the kidney, pancreas, and salivary gland, showing a unique pattern of tissue-specific expression relative to other members of the family. The authors have isolated a genomic clone carrying the human renal kallikrein gene and compared the nucleotide sequence of its promoter region with those of the mouse renal kallikrein gene and another mouse kallikrein gene expressed in a distinct cell type. They find four sequence elements conserved between renal kallikrein genes from the two species. They have also shown that the human gene is localized to 19q13, a position analogous to that of the kallikrein gene family on mouse chromosome 7.

  16. Elevated gene expression levels distinguish human from non-human primate brains

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mario; Lachuer, Joel; Zapala, Matthew A.; Redmond, John C.; Kudo, Lili; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Lockhart, David J.; Preuss, Todd M.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about how the human brain differs from that of our closest relatives. To investigate the genetic basis of human specializations in brain organization and cognition, we compared gene expression profiles for the cerebral cortex of humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques by using several independent techniques. We identified 169 genes that exhibited expression differences between human and chimpanzee cortex, and 91 were ascribed to the human lineage by using macaques as an outgroup. Surprisingly, most differences between the brains of humans and non-human primates involved up-regulation, with ≈90% of the genes being more highly expressed in humans. By contrast, in the comparison of human and chimpanzee heart and liver, the numbers of up- and down-regulated genes were nearly identical. Our results indicate that the human brain displays a distinctive pattern of gene expression relative to non-human primates, with higher expression levels for many genes belonging to a wide variety of functional classes. The increased expression of these genes could provide the basis for extensive modifications of cerebral physiology and function in humans and suggests that the human brain is characterized by elevated levels of neuronal activity. PMID:14557539

  17. Hotspots of Biased Nucleotide Substitutions in Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Jonas; Pollard, Katherine S; Webster, Matthew T

    2009-01-01

    Genes that have experienced accelerated evolutionary rates on the human lineage during recent evolution are candidates for involvement in human-specific adaptations. To determine the forces that cause increased evolutionary rates in certain genes, we analyzed alignments of 10,238 human genes to their orthologues in chimpanzee and macaque. Using a likelihood ratio test, we identified protein-coding sequences with an accelerated rate of base substitutions along the human lineage. Exons evolving at a fast rate in humans have a significant tendency to contain clusters of AT-to-GC (weak-to-strong) biased substitutions. This pattern is also observed in noncoding sequence flanking rapidly evolving exons. Accelerated exons occur in regions with elevated male recombination rates and exhibit an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the genomic average. We next analyzed genes with significantly elevated ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous rates of base substitution (dN/dS) along the human lineage, and those with an excess of amino acid replacement substitutions relative to human polymorphism. These genes also show evidence of clusters of weak-to-strong biased substitutions. These findings indicate that a recombination-associated process, such as biased gene conversion (BGC), is driving fixation of GC alleles in the human genome. This process can lead to accelerated evolution in coding sequences and excess amino acid replacement substitutions, thereby generating significant results for tests of positive selection. PMID:19175294

  18. Patenting human genes: when economic interests trump logic and ethics.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Eike-Henner W

    2003-06-01

    To date, over 5,000 applications have been filed with United States Patent Office for patents on human genes. More than 1,500 of these applications have been granted. Other jurisdictions are experiencing a similar rush to mine and protect genomic gold. This paper argues that although many jurisdictions allow the patenting of human genes, this is ethically indefensible and amounts to an unjustified appropriation of a general human heritage. Economic and legal arguments in favour of patenting are considered and rejected. Reference is made to the Wellcome Trust Consortium's initiative and the Merck Gene Index Project, which place patented genetic information into the public domain. PMID:14567475

  19. Differential gene expression in anatomical compartments of the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Diehn, Jennifer J; Diehn, Maximilian; Marmor, Michael F; Brown, Patrick O

    2005-01-01

    Background The human eye is composed of multiple compartments, diverse in form, function, and embryologic origin, that work in concert to provide us with our sense of sight. We set out to systematically characterize the global gene expression patterns that specify the distinctive characteristics of the various eye compartments. Results We used DNA microarrays representing approximately 30,000 human genes to analyze gene expression in the cornea, lens, iris, ciliary body, retina, and optic nerve. The distinctive patterns of expression in each compartment could be interpreted in relation to the physiology and cellular composition of each tissue. Notably, the sets of genes selectively expressed in the retina and in the lens were particularly large and diverse. Genes with roles in immune defense, particularly complement components, were expressed at especially high levels in the anterior segment tissues. We also found consistent differences between the gene expression patterns of the macula and peripheral retina, paralleling the differences in cell layer densities between these regions. Based on the hypothesis that genes responsible for diseases that affect a particular eye compartment are likely to be selectively expressed in that compartment, we compared our gene expression signatures with genetic mapping studies to identify candidate genes for diseases affecting the cornea, lens, and retina. Conclusion Through genome-scale gene expression profiling, we were able to discover distinct gene expression 'signatures' for each eye compartment and identified candidate disease genes that can serve as a reference database for investigating the physiology and pathophysiology of the eye. PMID:16168081

  20. Graphical Features of Functional Genes in Human Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao; Lü, Jinhu; Wang, Qingyun; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-06-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, it is feasible to investigate large-scale human protein interaction network (HPIN) with complex networks theory. Proteins are encoded by genes. Essential, viable, disease, conserved, housekeeping (HK) and tissue-enriched (TE) genes are functional genes, which are organized and functioned via interaction networks. Based on up-to-date data from various databases or literature, two large-scale HPINs and six subnetworks are constructed. We illustrate that the HPINs and most of the subnetworks are sparse, small-world, scale-free, disassortative and with hierarchical modularity. Among the six subnetworks, essential, disease and HK subnetworks are more densely connected than the others. Statistical analysis on the topological structures of the HPIN reveals that the lethal, the conserved, the HK and the TE genes are with hallmark graphical features. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that the essential genes can be distinguished from the viable ones with accuracy as high as almost 70%. Closeness, semi-local and eigenvector centralities can distinguish the HK genes from the TE ones with accuracy around 82%. Furthermore, the Venn diagram, cluster dendgrams and classifications of disease genes reveal that some classes of disease genes are with hallmark graphical features, especially for cancer genes, HK disease genes and TE disease genes. The findings facilitate the identification of some functional genes via topological structures. The investigations shed some light on the characteristics of the compete interactome, which have potential implications in networked medicine and biological network control. PMID:26841412

  1. Structure and evolution of the human IKBA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, C.Y.; Bautch, V.L.; Baldwin, A.S. Jr.

    1995-09-20

    I{kappa}B{alpha} belongs to a gene family whose members are characterized by their 6-7 Ankyrin repeats, which allow them to interact with members of the Rel family of transcription factors. We have sequenced a human I{kappa}B{alpha} genomic clone to determine its gene structure. The human I{kappa}B{alpha} gene (IKBA) has six exons and five introns that span approximately 3.5 kb. This genomic organization is similiar to that of other members of the Ankyrin gene family. The human IKBA gene shares similiar intron/exon boundaries with the human BCL3 and NFKB2 genes, which is consistent with their conserved Ankyrin repeats. To examine further the evolutionary relationship between human I{kappa}B{alpha} and other members of its gene family, we performed a phylogenetic analysis. Although the resulting phylogenetic tree does not identify a common ancestor of the I{kappa}B{alpha} gene family, it indicates that this family diverges into two groups based on structure and function. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the gene for human prothrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Degen, S.J.F.; Davie, E.W.

    1987-09-22

    A human genomic DNA library was screened for the gene coding for human prothrombin with a cDNA coding for the human protein. Eighty-one positive lambda phage were identified, and three were chosen for further characterization. These three phage hybridized with 5' and/or 3' probes prepared from the prothrombin cDNA. The complete DNA sequence of 21 kilobases of the human prothrombin gene was determined and included a 4.9-kilobase region that was previously sequenced. The gene for human prothrombin contains 14 exons separated by 13 intervening sequences. The exons range in size from 25 to 315 base pairs, while the introns range from 84 to 9447 base pairs. Ninety percent of the gene is composed of intervening sequence. All the intron splice junctions are consistent with sequences found in other eukaryotic genes, except for the presence of GC rather than GT on the 5' end of intervening sequence L. Thirty copies of Alu repetitive DNA and two copies of partial KpnI repeats were identified in clusters within several of the intervening sequences, and these repeats represent 40% of the DNA sequence of the gene. The size, distribution, and sequence homology of the introns within the gene were the compared to those of the genes for the other vitamin K dependent proteins and several other serine proteases.

  3. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1. PMID:23226257

  4. Genic insights from integrated human proteomics in GeneCards.

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Simon; Zimmerman, Shahar; Kohn, Asher; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Olender, Tsviya; Kolker, Eugene; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2016-01-01

    GeneCards is a one-stop shop for searchable human gene annotations (http://www.genecards.org/). Data are automatically mined from ∼120 sources and presented in an integrated web card for every human gene. We report the application of recent advances in proteomics to enhance gene annotation and classification in GeneCards. First, we constructed the Human Integrated Protein Expression Database (HIPED), a unified database of protein abundance in human tissues, based on the publically available mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics sources ProteomicsDB, Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database, Protein Abundance Across Organisms and The MaxQuant DataBase. The integrated database, residing within GeneCards, compares favourably with its individual sources, covering nearly 90% of human protein-coding genes. For gene annotation and comparisons, we first defined a protein expression vector for each gene, based on normalized abundances in 69 normal human tissues. This vector is portrayed in the GeneCards expression section as a bar graph, allowing visual inspection and comparison. These data are juxtaposed with transcriptome bar graphs. Using the protein expression vectors, we further defined a pairwise metric that helps assess expression-based pairwise proximity. This new metric for finding functional partners complements eight others, including sharing of pathways, gene ontology (GO) terms and domains, implemented in the GeneCards Suite. In parallel, we calculated proteome-based differential expression, highlighting a subset of tissues that overexpress a gene and subserving gene classification. This textual annotation allows users of VarElect, the suite's next-generation phenotyper, to more effectively discover causative disease variants. Finally, we define the protein-RNA expression ratio and correlation as yet another attribute of every gene in each tissue, adding further annotative information. The results constitute a significant enhancement of several Gene

  5. Genic insights from integrated human proteomics in GeneCards

    PubMed Central

    Fishilevich, Simon; Zimmerman, Shahar; Kohn, Asher; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Olender, Tsviya; Kolker, Eugene; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2016-01-01

    GeneCards is a one-stop shop for searchable human gene annotations (http://www.genecards.org/). Data are automatically mined from ∼120 sources and presented in an integrated web card for every human gene. We report the application of recent advances in proteomics to enhance gene annotation and classification in GeneCards. First, we constructed the Human Integrated Protein Expression Database (HIPED), a unified database of protein abundance in human tissues, based on the publically available mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics sources ProteomicsDB, Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database, Protein Abundance Across Organisms and The MaxQuant DataBase. The integrated database, residing within GeneCards, compares favourably with its individual sources, covering nearly 90% of human protein-coding genes. For gene annotation and comparisons, we first defined a protein expression vector for each gene, based on normalized abundances in 69 normal human tissues. This vector is portrayed in the GeneCards expression section as a bar graph, allowing visual inspection and comparison. These data are juxtaposed with transcriptome bar graphs. Using the protein expression vectors, we further defined a pairwise metric that helps assess expression-based pairwise proximity. This new metric for finding functional partners complements eight others, including sharing of pathways, gene ontology (GO) terms and domains, implemented in the GeneCards Suite. In parallel, we calculated proteome-based differential expression, highlighting a subset of tissues that overexpress a gene and subserving gene classification. This textual annotation allows users of VarElect, the suite’s next-generation phenotyper, to more effectively discover causative disease variants. Finally, we define the protein–RNA expression ratio and correlation as yet another attribute of every gene in each tissue, adding further annotative information. The results constitute a significant enhancement of several Gene

  6. Recellularized human dermis for testing gene electrotransfer ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bulysheva, Anna A; Burcus, Nina; Lundberg, Cathryn; Edelblute, Chelsea M; Francis, Michael P; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer (GET) is a proven and valuable tool for in vivo gene delivery to a variety of tissues such as skin, cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, and tumors, with controllable gene delivery and expression levels. Optimizing gene expression is a challenging hurdle in preclinical studies, particularly for skin indications, due to differences in electrical conductivity of animal compared to human dermis. Therefore, the goal of this study was to develop an ex vivo model for GET using recellularized human dermis to more closely mimic human skin. Decellularized human dermis (DermACELL(®)) was cultured with human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes for 4 weeks. After one week of fibroblast culture, fibroblasts infiltrated and dispersed throughout the dermis. Air-liquid interface culture led to epithelial cell proliferation, stratification and terminal differentiation with distinct basal, spinous, granular and cornified strata. Firefly luciferase expression kinetics were evaluated after GET of recellularized constructs for testing gene delivery parameters to skin in vitro. Elevated luciferase expression persisted up to a week following GET compared to controls without electrotransfer. In summary, recellularized dermis structurally and functionally resembled native human skin in tissue histological organization and homeostasis, proving an effective 3D human skin model for preclinical gene delivery studies. PMID:27121769

  7. Characterization of the human rod transducin alpha-subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fong, S L

    1992-01-01

    The human rod transducin alpha subunit (Tr alpha) gene has been cloned. A cDNA clone, HG14, contained a 1.1 kb insertion when compared with the human Tr alpha cDNA published by Van Dop et al. (1). Based on two overlapping clones isolated from a human genomic library, the human Tr alpha gene is 4.9 kb in length and consists of nine exons interrupted by eight introns. Northern blots of human retina total RNA showed that the gene is transcribed by rod photoreceptors into two species of mRNA, 1.3 kb and 2.4 kb in size. Apparently, this is the result of alternative splicing. Two putative transcription initiation sites were determined by primer extension and S1 nuclease protection assays. The putative promoter regions of the human and mouse Tr alpha genes have an identity of 78.1%. As found in the mouse gene (2), no TATA consensus sequence is present in the human gene. Images PMID:1614872

  8. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) functions as a novel modulator of retinoic acid-related orphan receptors α- and γ-mediated transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Jetten, Anton M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identify Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) as a novel co-repressor of the retinoic acid-related orphan receptors, RORα and RORγ. Prox1 interacts directly with RORγ and RORα and negatively regulates their transcriptional activity. The AF2 domain of RORs is essential for the interaction, whereas Prox1 interacts with RORs through either its 28 amino acids N-terminal region or its C-terminal prospero-like domain. RORγ antagonists stabilize the interaction between RORγ and Prox1. The homeodomain and the interaction through the prospero-like domain of Prox1 are critical for its repression of ROR transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that in liver, Prox1 is recruited to the ROR response element sites of the clock genes, brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (Bmal1), neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (Npas2) and cryptochrome 1 (Cry1), as part of the same complex as RORs. Knockdown of Prox1 by siRNAs in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells increased the expression of RORγ and several ROR-target genes, along with increased histone acetylation at these ROR response element sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis suggests that Prox1 is a potential ROR target gene in liver, which is supported by the regulation of the rhythmic expression of Prox1 by RORγ. Our data suggest that Prox1 is part of a feedback loop that negatively regulates the transcriptional control of clock and metabolic networks by RORs. PMID:23723244

  9. The smaller human VH gene families display remarkably little polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, I; Kelly, P; Williams, C; Scholl, S; Tucker, P; Capra, J D

    1989-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of 30 distinct human VH gene segments from the VHIV, VHV and VHVI gene families. When these sequences were compared to previously published sequences from these smaller human VH families a surprisingly low level of polymorphism was noted. Two VHIV gene segments from unrelated individuals were identical to two previously published VHIV sequences. Five VHV sequences were identical and seven VHVI gene segments were identical. Where differences were found between the sequences, allele specific oligonucleotide probes were used to verify the germline nature of the change and to test for segregation in several large kindreds. These data provide evidence that at least some human VH gene segments are remarkably stable. Images PMID:2511001

  10. Evolutionary and Topological Properties of Genes and Community Structures in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Szedlak, Anthony; Smith, Nicholas; Liu, Li; Paternostro, Giovanni; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    The diverse, specialized genes present in today's lifeforms evolved from a common core of ancient, elementary genes. However, these genes did not evolve individually: gene expression is controlled by a complex network of interactions, and alterations in one gene may drive reciprocal changes in its proteins' binding partners. Like many complex networks, these gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are composed of communities, or clusters of genes with relatively high connectivity. A deep understanding of the relationship between the evolutionary history of single genes and the topological properties of the underlying GRN is integral to evolutionary genetics. Here, we show that the topological properties of an acute myeloid leukemia GRN and a general human GRN are strongly coupled with its genes' evolutionary properties. Slowly evolving ("cold"), old genes tend to interact with each other, as do rapidly evolving ("hot"), young genes. This naturally causes genes to segregate into community structures with relatively homogeneous evolutionary histories. We argue that gene duplication placed old, cold genes and communities at the center of the networks, and young, hot genes and communities at the periphery. We demonstrate this with single-node centrality measures and two new measures of efficiency, the set efficiency and the interset efficiency. We conclude that these methods for studying the relationships between a GRN's community structures and its genes' evolutionary properties provide new perspectives for understanding evolutionary genetics. PMID:27359334