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Sample records for human host defence

  1. Myeloperoxidase in human neutrophil host defence.

    PubMed

    Nauseef, William M

    2014-08-01

    Human neutrophils represent the predominant leucocyte in circulation and the first responder to infection. Concurrent with ingestion of microorganisms, neutrophils activate and assemble the NADPH oxidase at the phagosome, thereby generating superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. Concomitantly, granules release their contents into the phagosome, where the antimicrobial proteins and enzymes synergize with oxidants to create an environment toxic to the captured microbe. The most rapid and complete antimicrobial action by human neutrophils against many organisms relies on the combined efforts of the azurophilic granule protein myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide from the NADPH oxidase to oxidize chloride, thereby generating hypochlorous acid and a host of downstream reaction products. Although individual components of the neutrophil antimicrobial response exhibit specific activities in isolation, the situation in the environment of the phagosome is far more complicated, a consequence of multiple and complex interactions among oxidants, proteins and their by-products. In most cases, the cooperative interactions among the phagosomal contents, both from the host and the microbe, culminate in loss of viability of the ingested organism. PMID:24844117

  2. Allergic host defences.

    PubMed

    Palm, Noah W; Rosenstein, Rachel K; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2012-04-26

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macroparasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity has an important role in host defence against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, haematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  3. Iron homeostasis in host defence and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element for multicellular organisms and nearly all microorganisms. Although iron is abundant in the environment, common forms of iron are minimally soluble and therefore poorly accessible to biological organisms. Microorganisms entering a mammalian host face multiple mechanisms that further restrict their ability to obtain iron and thereby limit their pathogenicity. Iron levels also modulate host defence, as iron content in macrophages regulates their cytokine production. Here, we review recent advances that highlight the role of systemic and cellular iron-regulating mechanisms in protecting hosts from infection, emphasizing aspects that are applicable to human health and disease. PMID:26160612

  4. Host defences against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Romero, G; Quintero, J; Astiazarán-García, H; Velazquez, C

    2015-08-01

    Giardia spp. is a protozoan parasite that inhabits the upper small intestine of mammals and other species and is the aetiological agent of giardiasis. It has been demonstrated that nitric oxide, mast cells and dendritic cells are the first line of defence against Giardia. IL-6 and IL-17 play an important role during infection. Several cytokines possess overlapping functions in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. IgA and CD4(+) T cells are fundamental to the process of Giardia clearance. It has been suggested that CD4(+) T cells play a double role during the anti-Giardia immune response. First, they activate and stimulate the differentiation of B cells to generate Giardia-specific antibodies. Second, they act through a B-cell-independent mechanism that is probably mediated by Th17 cells. Several Giardia proteins that stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses have been described. Variant surface proteins, α-1 giardin, and cyst wall protein 2 can induce host protective responses to future Giardia challenges. The characterization and evaluation of the protective potential of the immunogenic proteins that are associated with Giardia will offer new insights into host-parasite interactions and may aid in the development of an effective vaccine against the parasite. PMID:26072999

  5. Host defence mediates interspecific competition in ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Bush, Sarah E; Malenke, Jael R

    2008-05-01

    1. Interspecific competition influences which, how many and where species coexist in biological communities. Interactions between species in different trophic levels can mediate interspecific competition; e.g. predators are known to reduce competition between prey species by suppressing their population sizes. A parallel phenomenon may take place in host-parasite systems, with host defence mediating competition between parasite species. 2. We experimentally investigated the impact of host defence (preening) on competitive interactions between two species of feather-feeding lice: 'wing' lice Columbicola columbae and 'body' lice Campanulotes compar. Both species are host-specific parasites that co-occur on rock pigeons Columba livia. 3. We show that wing lice and body lice compete and that host defence mediates the magnitude of this competitive interaction. 4. Competition is asymmetrical; wing louse populations are negatively impacted by body lice, but not vice versa. This competitive asymmetry is consistent with the fact that body lice predominate in microhabitats on the host's body that offer the most food and the most space. 5. Our results indicate that host-defence-mediated competition can influence the structure of parasite communities and may play a part in the evolution of parasite diversity. PMID:18194262

  6. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27573580

  7. Neutrophils: Between Host Defence, Immune Modulation, and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Philipp; Saffarzadeh, Mona; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Rieber, Nikolaus; Radsak, Markus; von Bernuth, Horst; Benarafa, Charaf; Roos, Dirk; Skokowa, Julia; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant human immune cells, are rapidly recruited to sites of infection, where they fulfill their life-saving antimicrobial functions. While traditionally regarded as short-lived phagocytes, recent findings on long-term survival, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, heterogeneity and plasticity, suppressive functions, and tissue injury have expanded our understanding of their diverse role in infection and inflammation. This review summarises our current understanding of neutrophils in host-pathogen interactions and disease involvement, illustrating the versatility and plasticity of the neutrophil, moving between host defence, immune modulation, and tissue damage. PMID:25764063

  8. An ancestral host defence peptide within human β-defensin 3 recapitulates the antibacterial and antiviral activity of the full-length molecule

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Ersilia; Colavita, Irene; Sarnataro, Daniela; Scudiero, Olga; Zambrano, Gerardo; Granata, Vincenzo; Daniele, Aurora; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Galdiero, Stefania; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Urbanowicz, Richard A.; Ball, Jonathan K.; Salvatore, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are critical components of innate immunity. Despite their diversity, they share common features including a structural signature, designated “γ-core motif”. We reasoned that for each HDPs evolved from an ancestral γ-core, the latter should be the evolutionary starting point of the molecule, i.e. it should represent a structural scaffold for the modular construction of the full-length molecule, and possess biological properties. We explored the γ-core of human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) and found that it: (a) is the folding nucleus of HBD3; (b) folds rapidly and is stable in human serum; (c) displays antibacterial activity; (d) binds to CD98, which mediates HBD3 internalization in eukaryotic cells; (e) exerts antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus; and (f) is not toxic to human cells. These results demonstrate that the γ-core within HBD3 is the ancestral core of the full-length molecule and is a viable HDP per se, since it is endowed with the most important biological features of HBD3. Notably, the small, stable scaffold of the HBD3 γ-core can be exploited to design disease-specific antimicrobial agents. PMID:26688341

  9. The immunology of host defence peptides: beyond antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Robert E W; Haney, Evan F; Gill, Erin E

    2016-05-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are short, cationic amphipathic peptides with diverse sequences that are produced by various cells and tissues in all complex life forms. HDPs have important roles in the body's response to infection and inflammation. This Review focuses on human HDPs and explores the diverse immunomodulatory effects of HDPs from a systems biology perspective, which highlights the interconnected nature of the effect (or effects) of HDPs on the host. Studies have demonstrated that HDPs are expressed throughout the body and mediate a broad range of activities, which explains their association with various inflammatory diseases and autoimmune disorders. The diverse actions of HDPs, such as their roles in wound healing and in the maintenance of the microbiota, are also explored, in addition to potential therapeutic applications. PMID:27087664

  10. Evolution of hosts paying manifold costs of defence

    PubMed Central

    Cressler, Clayton E.; Graham, Andrea L.; Day, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Hosts are expected to incur several physiological costs in defending against parasites. These include constitutive energetic (or other resource) costs of a defence system, facultative resource costs of deploying defences when parasites strike, and immunopathological costs of collateral damage. Here, we investigate the evolution of host recovery rates, varying the source and magnitude of immune costs. In line with previous work, we find that hosts paying facultative resource costs evolve faster recovery rates than hosts paying constitutive costs. However, recovery rate is more sensitive to changes in facultative costs, potentially explaining why constitutive costs are hard to detect empirically. Moreover, we find that immunopathology costs which increase with recovery rate can erode the benefits of defence, promoting chronicity of infection. Immunopathology can also lead to hosts evolving low recovery rate in response to virulent parasites. Furthermore, when immunopathology reduces fecundity as recovery rate increases (e.g. as for T-cell responses to urogenital chlamydiosis), then recovery and reproductive rates do not covary as predicted in eco-immunology. These results suggest that immunopathological and resource costs have qualitatively different effects on host evolution and that embracing the complexity of immune costs may be essential for explaining variability in immune defence in nature. PMID:25740895

  11. Supramolecular amphipathicity for probing antimicrobial propensity of host defence peptides.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Jascindra; Bella, Angelo; Correia, Ana J V; Lamarre, Baptiste; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2015-06-28

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are effector components of innate immunity that provide defence against pathogens. These are small-to-medium sized proteins which fold into amphipathic conformations toxic to microbial membranes. Here we explore the concept of supramolecular amphipathicity for probing antimicrobial propensity of HDPs using elementary HDP-like amphiphiles. Such amphiphiles are individually inactive, but when ordered into microscopic micellar assemblies, respond to membrane binding according to the orthogonal type of their primary structure. The study demonstrates that inducible supramolecular amphipathicity can discriminate against bacterial growth and colonisation thereby offering a physico-chemical rationale for tuneable targeting of biological membranes. PMID:25966444

  12. Brood parasitism selects for no defence in a cuckoo host.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Oliver

    2011-09-22

    In coevolutionary arms races, like between cuckoos and their hosts, it is easy to understand why the host is under selection favouring anti-parasitism behaviour, such as egg rejection, which can lead to parasites evolving remarkable adaptations to 'trick' their host, such as mimetic eggs. But what about cases where the cuckoo egg is not mimetic and where the host does not act against it? Classically, such apparently non-adaptive behaviour is put down to evolutionary lag: given enough time, egg mimicry and parasite avoidance strategies will evolve. An alternative is that absence of egg mimicry and of anti-parasite behaviour is stable. Such stability is at first sight highly paradoxical. I show, using both field and experimental data to parametrize a simulation model, that the absence of defence behaviour by Cape bulbuls (Pycnonotus capensis) against parasitic eggs of the Jacobin cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus) is optimal behaviour. The cuckoo has evolved massive eggs (double the size of bulbul eggs) with thick shells, making it very hard or impossible for the host to eject the cuckoo egg. The host could still avoid brood parasitism by nest desertion. However, higher predation and parasitism risks later in the season makes desertion more costly than accepting the cuckoo egg, a strategy aided by the fact that many cuckoo eggs are incorrectly timed, so do not hatch in time and hence do not reduce host fitness to zero. Selection will therefore prevent the continuation of any coevolutionary arms race. Non-mimetic eggs and absence of defence strategies against cuckoo eggs will be the stable, if at first sight paradoxical, result. PMID:21288944

  13. Investigations of host defence in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, S H; Wright, G; Webster, A D; Segal, A W

    1985-03-01

    Parameters of host defence were investigated in 30 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). A newly devised perfusion system was used to study the kinetics in whole blood of leucocyte adherence, phagocytosis, killing and solubilization of a mixture of Staph. aureus and Str. pneumoniae, and secretion of lactoferrin. A skin window technique was used to examine the accumulation of leucocytes at inflammatory foci and their subsequent rate of movement through a filter. Serum concentrations of C3, C4, total haemolytic complement and immunoglobulins were also measured. The rate of neutrophil migration into filters was slightly reduced in patients with SCD. The proportion of monocytes that emigrated from the skin windows and their rate of migration were markedly diminished. The adhesion of neutrophils and their ability to kill staphylococci were also reduced, particularly in patients of the haemoglobin (Hb) SS and Hb S-beta-thalassaemia genotypes. Neutrophil function was mostly impaired in patients with the greatest frequency of bacterial infection. The rate of clearance of pneumococci was related to the concentration of type specific immunoglobulin G but not M. Serum concentrations of immunoglobulins and complement were normal. We were unable to define a defect of host defence of sufficient magnitude to explain the susceptibility of these patients to severe infection. PMID:3882140

  14. Collective defence portfolios of ant hosts shift with social parasite pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jongepier, Evelien; Kleeberg, Isabelle; Job, Sylwester; Foitzik, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Host defences become increasingly costly as parasites breach successive lines of defence. Because selection favours hosts that successfully resist parasitism at the lowest possible cost, escalating coevolutionary arms races are likely to drive host defence portfolios towards ever more expensive strategies. We investigated the interplay between host defence portfolios and social parasite pressure by comparing 17 populations of two Temnothorax ant species. When successful, collective aggression not only prevents parasitation but also spares host colonies the cost of searching for and moving to a new nest site. However, once parasites breach the host's nest defence, host colonies should resort to flight as the more beneficial resistance strategy. We show that under low parasite pressure, host colonies more likely responded to an intruding Protomognathus americanus slavemaker with collective aggression, which prevented the slavemaker from escaping and potentially recruiting nest-mates. However, as parasite pressure increased, ant colonies of both host species became more likely to flee rather than to fight. We conclude that host defence portfolios shift consistently with social parasite pressure, which is in accordance with the degeneration of frontline defences and the evolution of subsequent anti-parasite strategies often invoked in hosts of brood parasites. PMID:25100690

  15. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six 'effector' proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen. PMID:27347390

  16. Yersinia virulence factors - a sophisticated arsenal for combating host defences

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogens Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica cause enterocolitis, while Yersinia pestis is responsible for pneumonic, bubonic, and septicaemic plague. All three share an infection strategy that relies on a virulence factor arsenal to enable them to enter, adhere to, and colonise the host while evading host defences to avoid untimely clearance. Their arsenal includes a number of adhesins that allow the invading pathogens to establish a foothold in the host and to adhere to specific tissues later during infection. When the host innate immune system has been activated, all three pathogens produce a structure analogous to a hypodermic needle. In conjunction with the translocon, which forms a pore in the host membrane, the channel that is formed enables the transfer of six ‘effector’ proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. These proteins mimic host cell proteins but are more efficient than their native counterparts at modifying the host cell cytoskeleton, triggering the host cell suicide response. Such a sophisticated arsenal ensures that yersiniae maintain the upper hand despite the best efforts of the host to counteract the infecting pathogen. PMID:27347390

  17. The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Shenoy, Avinash R.

    2016-01-01

    Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton — actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and movement — have important functions in innate immunity and cellular self-defence. Investigations using cellular and animal models have shown that these cytoskeletal proteins are crucial for sensing bacteria and for mobilizing effector mechanisms to eliminate them. In this Review, we highlight the emerging roles of the cytoskeleton as a structural determinant of cell-autonomous host defence. PMID:26292640

  18. The role of ecological feedbacks in the evolution of host defence: what does theory tell us?

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Michael; Best, Alex; Miller, Martin R.; White, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Hosts have evolved a diverse range of defence mechanisms in response to challenge by infectious organisms (parasites and pathogens). Whether defence is through avoidance of infection, control of the growth of the parasite once infected, clearance of the infection, tolerance to the disease caused by infection or innate and/or acquired immunity, it will have important implications for the population ecology (epidemiology) of the host–parasite interaction. As a consequence, it is important to understand the evolutionary dynamics of defence in the light of the ecological feedbacks that are intrinsic to the interaction. Here, we review the theoretical models that examine how these feedbacks influence the nature and extent of the defence that will evolve. We begin by briefly comparing different evolutionary modelling approaches and discuss in detail the modern game theoretical approach (adaptive dynamics) that allows ecological feedbacks to be taken into account. Next, we discuss a number of models of host defence in detail and, in particular, make a distinction between ‘resistance’ and ‘tolerance’. Finally, we discuss coevolutionary models and the potential use of models that include genetic and game theoretical approaches. Our aim is to review theoretical approaches that investigate the evolution of defence and to explain how the type of defence and the costs associated with its acquisition are important in determining the level of defence that evolves. PMID:18930880

  19. Air pollution and epigenetics: effects on SP-A and innate host defence in the lung.

    PubMed

    Silveyra, Patricia; Floros, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    An appropriate immune and inflammatory response is key to defend against harmful agents present in the environment, such as pathogens, allergens and inhaled pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter. Air pollution is a serious public health concern worldwide, and cumulative evidence has revealed that air pollutants contribute to epigenetic variation in several genes, and this in turn can contribute to disease susceptibility. Several groups of experts have recently reviewed findings on epigenetics and air pollution [1-6]. Surfactant proteins play a central role in pulmonary host defence by mediating pathogen clearance, modulating allergic responses and facilitating the resolution of lung inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that surfactant proteins are subject to epigenetic regulation under hypoxia and other conditions. Oxidative stress caused by ozone, and exposure to particulate matter have been shown to affect the expression of surfactant protein A (SP-A), an important lung host defence molecule, as well as alter its functions. In this review, we discuss recent findings in the fields of epigenetics and air pollution effects on innate immunity, with the focus on SP-A, and the human SP-A variants in particular. Their function may be differentially affected by pollutants and specifically by ozone-induced oxidative stress, and this in turn may differentially affect susceptibility to lung disease. PMID:22553125

  20. Immigration of susceptible hosts triggers the evolution of alternative parasite defence strategies.

    PubMed

    Chabas, Hélène; van Houte, Stineke; Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R

    2016-08-31

    Migration of hosts and parasites can have a profound impact on host-parasite ecological and evolutionary interactions. Using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 and its phage DMS3vir, we here show that immigration of naive hosts into coevolving populations of hosts and parasites can influence the mechanistic basis underlying host defence evolution. Specifically, we found that at high levels of bacterial immigration, bacteria switched from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) to surface modification-mediated defence. This effect emerges from an increase in the force of infection, which tips the balance from CRISPR to surface modification-based defence owing to the induced and fixed fitness costs associated with these mechanisms, respectively. PMID:27581884

  1. Innate immune defences in the human endometrium

    PubMed Central

    King, Anne E; Critchley, Hilary OD; Kelly, Rodney W

    2003-01-01

    The human endometrium is an important site of innate immune defence, giving protection against uterine infection. Such protection is critical to successful implantation and pregnancy. Infection is a major cause of preterm birth and can also cause infertility and ectopic pregnancy. Natural anti-microbial peptides are key mediators of the innate immune system. These peptides, between them, have anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral activity and are expressed at epithelial surfaces throughout the female genital tract. Two families of natural anti-microbials, the defensins and the whey acidic protein (WAP) motif proteins, appear to be prominent in endometrium. The human endometrial epithelium expresses beta-defensins 1–4 and the WAP motif protein, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor. Each beta-defensin has a different expression profile in relation to the stage of the menstrual cycle, providing potential protection throughout the cycle. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor is expressed during the secretory phase of the cycle and has a range of possible roles including anti-protease and anti-microbial activity as well as having effects on epithelial cell growth. The leukocyte populations in the endometrium are also a source of anti-microbial production. Neutrophils are a particularly rich source of alpha-defensins, lactoferrin, lysozyme and the WAP motif protein, elafin. The presence of neutrophils during menstruation will enhance anti-microbial protection at a time when the epithelial barrier is disrupted. Several other anti-microbials including the natural killer cell product, granulysin, are likely to have a role in endometrium. The sequential production of natural anti-microbial peptides by the endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle and at other sites in the female genital tract will offer protection from many pathogens, including those that are sexually transmitted. PMID:14641912

  2. LC3-associated phagocytosis: a crucial mechanism for antifungal host defence against Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Sprenkeler, Evelien G G; Gresnigt, Mark S; van de Veerdonk, Frank L

    2016-09-01

    LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) is a non-canonical autophagy pathway involved in the maturation of single-membrane phagosomes and subsequent killing of ingested pathogens by phagocytes. This pathway is initiated following recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors and leads to the recruitment of LC3 into the phagosomal membrane. This form of phagocytosis is utilized for the antifungal host defence and is required for an efficient fungal killing. Here, we provide an overview of the LAP pathway and review the role of LAP in anti-Aspergillus host defence, as well as mechanisms induced by Aspergillus that modulate LAP to promote its survival in the host. PMID:27185357

  3. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M; Kinder, Jeremy M; Jiang, Tony T; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S; Qualls, Joseph E; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Kalfa, Theodosia A; Shaaban, Aimen F; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71(+) erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71(+) cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71(+) cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71(+) cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71(+) cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71(+) cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that

  4. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2014-01-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions1–7. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with l-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli8,9. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition10,11.Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that

  5. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that these

  6. Wolbachia infection suppresses both host defence and parasitoid counter-defence.

    PubMed

    Fytrou, Anastasia; Schofield, Peter G; Kraaijeveld, Alex R; Hubbard, Stephen F

    2006-04-01

    Endosymbiotic bacteria in the genus Wolbachia have been linked to several types of reproductive parasitism, which enhance their own transmission, while their direct effects on the host vary from beneficial to neutral or detrimental. Here, we report negative effects of infection on immunity-related traits of Drosophila simulans and the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. Infected D. simulans showed a reduced ability to encapsulate parasitoid eggs, compared to a tetracycline-treated, bacterium-free line. Challenging the two lines with a fungal pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, on the other hand, revealed no differences in survival. Moreover, elimination of Wolbachia was beneficial for the parasitoid wasp, as eggs laid by uninfected females suffered significantly lower encapsulation rates. We discuss possible origins of these fitness costs and their implications for infection dynamics and the interactions between host species. PMID:16618671

  7. Symbiotic bacteria enable olive fly larvae to overcome host defences

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yosef, Michael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Yuval, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    Ripe fruit offer readily available nutrients for many animals, including fruit fly larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their associated rot-inducing bacteria. Yet, during most of their ontogeny, fruit remain chemically defended and effectively suppress herbivores and pathogens by high levels of secondary metabolites. Olive flies (Bactrocera oleae) are uniquely able to develop in unripe olives. Unlike other frugivorous tephritids, the larvae maintain bacteria confined within their midgut caeca. We examined the interaction between larvae, their associated bacteria, and fruit chemical defence, hypothesizing that bacterial contribution to larval development is contingent on the phenology of fruit defensive chemistry. We demonstrate that larvae require their natural complement of bacteria (Candidatus Erwinia dacicola: Enterobacteriaceae) in order to develop in unripe olives. Conversely, when feeding on ripe fruit, larval development proceeds independently of these bacteria. Our experiments suggest that bacteria counteract the inhibitory effect of oleuropein—the principal phenolic glycoside in unripe olives. In light of these results, we suggest that the unique symbiosis in olive flies, compared with other frugivorous tephritids, is understood by considering the relationship between the fly, bacteria and fruit chemistry. When applied in an evolutionary context, this approach may also point out the forces which shaped symbioses across the Tephritidae. PMID:26587275

  8. Cellular basis of host defence in pyelonephritis. III. Deletion of individual components.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, T. E.; Findon, G.; Cawley, S.

    1987-01-01

    Hosts were depleted of individual cellular components to determine the effects of these manipulations on cellular defence mechanisms in acute and chronic pyelonephritis. T-lymphocytes were found to have little or no involvement in host protection but cyclosporin A administration had a dramatic effect on the gross pathology and bacteriological status of experimentally induced pyelonephritis. This change represented a major depression of host defence status. Cyclosporin A also activated resolved lesions in chronic pyelonephritis, associated with an increase in bacterial numbers. Administration of antineutrophil serum also led to a 1000-fold increase in bacterial numbers in the acute phase but had little effect on the host-parasite balance in chronic pyelonephritis. Macrophage blockade, on the other hand, did not affect the course of either acute or chronic infection. These studies have provided additional information on the immunobiology of experimental pyelonephritis and have focussed attention on the role of neutrophils, and an unidentified mechanism, affected by cyclosporin A, in host defence to renal infection. PMID:3040066

  9. Simulation, human factors and defence anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S J; Whittle, C; Siggers, B; Frazer, R S

    2010-12-01

    Simulation in healthcare has come a long way since it's beginnings in the 1960s. Not only has the sophistication of simulator design increased, but the educational concepts of simulation have become much clearer. One particularly important area is that of non-technical skills (NTS) which has been developed from similar concepts in the aviation and nuclear industries. NTS models have been developed for anaesthetists and more recently for surgeons too. This has clear value for surgical team working and the recently developed Military Operational Surgical Training (MOST) course uses simulation and NTS to improve such team working. The scope for simulation in Defence medicine and anaesthesia does not stop here. Uses of simulation include pre-deployment training of hospital teams as well as Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT) and Critical Care Air Support Team (CCAST) staff. Future projects include developing Role 1 pre-deployment training. There is enormous scope for development in this important growth area of education and training. PMID:21302658

  10. Host defence related responses in bovine milk during an experimentally induced Streptococcus uberis infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Milk contains a range of proteins of moderate or low abundance that contribute to host defence. Characterisation of these proteins, the extent to which their abundance is regulated by pathogenic stimuli, and the variability of their response between and within individual animals would facilitate a better understanding of the molecular basis for this important function of milk. Results We have characterised the host defence proteins in bovine milk and their responses to intra-mammary infection by a common Gram positive mastitis pathogen, Streptococcus uberis, using a combination of 2D gel electrophoresis and GeLC mass spectrometry. In total, 68 host defence-associated proteins were identified, 18 of which have a direct antimicrobial function, 23 of which have a pathogen-recognition function, and 27 of which have a role in modulating inflammatory or immune signalling. The responsiveness of seven proteins was quantified by western blotting; validating the proteomic analyses, quantifying the within- and between animal variability of the responses, and demonstrating the complexity and specificity of the responses to this pathogen. Conclusions These data provide a foundation for understanding the role of milk in host-microbe interaction. Furthermore they provide candidate biomarkers for mastitis diagnosis, and will inform efforts to develop dairy products with improved health-promoting properties. PMID:24721702

  11. A serpin mutant links Toll activation to melanization in the host defence of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ligoxygakis, Petros; Pelte, Nadège; Ji, Chuanyi; Leclerc, Vincent; Duvic, Bernard; Belvin, Marcia; Jiang, Haobo; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2002-01-01

    A prominent response during the Drosophila host defence is the induction of proteolytic cascades, some of which lead to localized melanization of pathogen surfaces, while others activate one of the major players in the systemic antimicrobial response, the Toll pathway. Despite the fact that gain-of-function mutations in the Toll receptor gene result in melanization, a clear link between Toll activation and the melanization reaction has not been firmly established. Here, we present evidence for the coordination of hemolymph-borne melanization with activation of the Toll pathway in the Drosophila host defence. The melanization reaction requires Toll pathway activation and depends on the removal of the Drosophila serine protease inhibitor Serpin27A. Flies deficient for this serpin exhibit spontaneous melanization in larvae and adults. Microbial challenge induces its removal from the hemolymph through Toll-dependent transcription of an acute phase immune reaction component. PMID:12456640

  12. Cytokine gene expression--part of host defence in pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Matthias; Delaleu, Nicolas; Du, Yunling; Bickel, Matthias

    2003-05-01

    Analyses of cytokines mediating inflammatory reactions are key to understanding the etiopathology of various diseases. This study investigated differences in cytokine gene expression between pulps from healthy virgin teeth and from symptomatic vital teeth with severe caries lesions in a group of young, healthy individuals. The mRNA levels of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-18 were measured concomitantly by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. IL-1alpha and IL-1beta were not expressed at significantly higher levels in symptomatic versus clinically healthy pulps, while the difference was significant for the other cytokines (log-rank test, P<0.05). A concordance test for independence revealed significant correlation between IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, and between IL-6, IL-8, and IL-18 mRNA levels (P<0.05). The cytokine-specific differences revealed a differential significance of gene expression in cytokine regulation. The hypothesis that increase of cytokine mRNA expression is part of host reaction in pulpitis was corroborated by our observation. PMID:12849707

  13. Tick salivary compounds: their role in modulation of host defences and pathogen transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kazimírová, Mária; Štibrániová, Iveta

    2013-01-01

    Ticks require blood meal to complete development and reproduction. Multifunctional tick salivary glands play a pivotal role in tick feeding and transmission of pathogens. Tick salivary molecules injected into the host modulate host defence responses to the benefit of the feeding ticks. To colonize tick organs, tick-borne microorganisms must overcome several barriers, i.e., tick gut membrane, tick immunity, and moulting. Tick-borne pathogens co-evolved with their vectors and hosts and developed molecular adaptations to avoid adverse effects of tick and host defences. Large gaps exist in the knowledge of survival strategies of tick-borne microorganisms and on the molecular mechanisms of tick-host-pathogen interactions. Prior to transmission to a host, the microorganisms penetrate and multiply in tick salivary glands. As soon as the tick is attached to a host, gene expression and production of salivary molecules is upregulated, primarily to facilitate feeding and avoid tick rejection by the host. Pathogens exploit tick salivary molecules for their survival and multiplication in the vector and transmission to and establishment in the hosts. Promotion of pathogen transmission by bioactive molecules in tick saliva was described as saliva-assisted transmission (SAT). SAT candidates comprise compounds with anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions, but the molecular mechanisms by which they mediate pathogen transmission are largely unknown. To date only a few tick salivary molecules associated with specific pathogen transmission have been identified and their functions partially elucidated. Advanced molecular techniques are applied in studying tick-host-pathogen interactions and provide information on expression of vector and pathogen genes during pathogen acquisition, establishment and transmission. Understanding the molecular events on the tick-host-pathogen interface may lead to development of new strategies to control tick-borne diseases. PMID

  14. HVEM signalling at mucosal barriers provides host defence against pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jr-Wen; Larange, Alexandre; Kim, Gisen; Vela, Jose Luis; Zahner, Sonja; Cheroutre, Hilde; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2012-08-01

    The herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM), a member of the tumour-necrosis factor receptor family, has diverse functions, augmenting or inhibiting the immune response. HVEM was recently reported as a colitis risk locus in patients, and in a mouse model of colitis we demonstrated an anti-inflammatory role for HVEM, but its mechanism of action in the mucosal immune system was unknown. Here we report an important role for epithelial HVEM in innate mucosal defence against pathogenic bacteria. HVEM enhances immune responses by NF-κB-inducing kinase-dependent Stat3 activation, which promotes the epithelial expression of genes important for immunity. During intestinal Citrobacter rodentium infection, a mouse model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection, Hvem−/− mice showed decreased Stat3 activation, impaired responses in the colon, higher bacterial burdens and increased mortality. We identified the immunoglobulin superfamily molecule CD160 (refs 7 and 8), expressed predominantly by innate-like intraepithelial lymphocytes, as the ligand engaging epithelial HVEM for host protection. Likewise, in pulmonary Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, HVEM is also required for host defence. Our results pinpoint HVEM as an important orchestrator of mucosal immunity, integrating signals from innate lymphocytes to induce optimal epithelial Stat3 activation, which indicates that targeting HVEM with agonists could improve host defence. PMID:22801499

  15. Epichloë Endophytes Alter Inducible Indirect Defences in Host Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Blande, James D.; Gundel, Pedro E.; Helander, Marjo; Saikkonen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Epichloë endophytes are common symbionts living asymptomatically in pooid grasses and may provide chemical defences against herbivorous insects. While the mechanisms underlying these fungal defences have been well studied, it remains unknown whether endophyte presence affects the host's own defences. We addressed this issue by examining variation in the impact of Epichloë on constitutive and herbivore-induced emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), a well-known indirect plant defence, between two grass species, Schedonorus phoenix (ex. Festuca arundinacea; tall fescue) and Festuca pratensis (meadow fescue). We found that feeding by a generalist aphid species, Rhopalosiphum padi, induced VOC emissions by uninfected plants of both grass species but to varying extents, while mechanical wounding failed to do so in both species after one day of damage. Interestingly, regardless of damage treatment, Epichloë uncinata-infected F. pratensis emitted significantly lower quantities of VOCs than their uninfected counterparts. In contrast, Epichloë coenophiala-infected S. phoenix did not differ from their uninfected counterparts in constitutive VOC emissions but tended to increase VOC emissions under intense aphid feeding. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status imposed stronger differences in VOC profiles of F. pratensis than damage treatment, while the reverse was true for S. phoenix. Additionally, both endophytes inhibited R. padi population growth as measured by aphid dry biomass, with the inhibition appearing greater in E. uncinata-infected F. pratensis. Our results suggest, not only that Epichloë endophytes may play important roles in mediating host VOC responses to herbivory, but also that the magnitude and direction of such responses may vary with the identity of the Epichloë–grass symbiosis. Whether Epichloë-mediated host VOC responses will eventually translate into effects on higher trophic levels merits future investigation. PMID:24978701

  16. In defence of utility: the medical humanities and medical education.

    PubMed

    Blease, Charlotte

    2016-06-01

    The idea that a study of the humanities helps to humanise doctors has become a leitmotif within the field. It is argued that the humanities (especially, literature) help to foster insights beyond those provided by biomedical training. Healthy young medics, it is claimed, can thereby gain significant insights into patienthood, and obtain important skills that may be valuable for their professional life. But the instrumentality of the humanities is not the only justification proffered for its inclusion in medical curricula. In this paper I critically examine the two overarching justifications recurrently cited in the mainstream literature-namely, (1) the instrumental worth and (2) the intrinsic value of the medical humanities in educating doctors. Examining these theses (and focusing on the views of a leading medical humanities scholar) I show that the bifurcation into instrumental versus non-instrumental justifications is not supported by the argumentation. Instead, I find that the particulars of the supposedly intrinsic justifications amount to an unambiguously instrumental defence of the humanities. Contextualizing the present investigation to probe further, I describe a long history of debate about the role of the humanities in British education and find that it rests on unsupported dichotomies (utility vs non-utility, theoretical vs applied, educated vs trained). I conclude that the medical humanities' manifesto would be more intellectually honest and coherent, and provide a more robust defence of its value in medical education, if it chose to embrace a wholly instrumental rationale for its role. PMID:26842744

  17. Lessons from the battlefield: human factors in defence anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S J; Whittle, C L; Mahoney, P F

    2010-07-01

    Anaesthetists in the Defence Medical Services spend most of their clinical time in the National Health Service and deploy on military operations every 6-18 months. The deployed operational environment has a number of key differences particularly as there is more severe trauma than an average UK hospital and injury patterns are mainly due to blast or ballistics. Equipment may also be unfamiliar and there is an expectation to be conversant with specific standard operating procedures. Anaesthetists must be ready to arrive and work in an established team and effective non-technical skills (or human factors) are important to ensure success. This article looks at some of the ways that the Department of Military Anaesthesia, Pain and Critical Care prepares Defence Anaesthetists to work in the deployed environment and focuses on the importance of human factors. This includes current work in the field hospital in Afghanistan and also preparing to work for the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy. We highlight the importance of human factors with reference to the type of case mix seen in the field hospital. We also detail the current pre-deployment training package, which employs multiple educational tools including high-fidelity simulation. PMID:20551025

  18. Combining personal with social information facilitates host defences and explains why cuckoos should be secretive.

    PubMed

    Thorogood, Rose; Davies, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Individuals often vary defences in response to local predation or parasitism risk. But how should they assess threat levels when it pays their enemies to hide? For common cuckoo hosts, assessing parasitism risk is challenging: cuckoo eggs are mimetic and adult cuckoos are secretive and resemble hawks. Here, we show that egg rejection by reed warblers depends on combining personal and social information of local risk. We presented model cuckoos or controls at a pair's own nest (personal information of an intruder) and/or on a neighbouring territory, to which they were attracted by broadcasts of alarm calls (social information). Rejection of an experimental egg was stimulated only when hosts were alerted by both social and personal information of cuckoos. However, pairs that rejected eggs were not more likely to mob a cuckoo. Therefore, while hosts can assess risk from the sight of a cuckoo, a cuckoo cannot gauge if her egg will be accepted from host mobbing. Our results reveal how hosts respond rapidly to local variation in parasitism, and why it pays cuckoos to be secretive, both to avoid alerting their targets and to limit the spread of social information in the local host neighbourhood. PMID:26794435

  19. Combining personal with social information facilitates host defences and explains why cuckoos should be secretive

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, Rose; Davies, Nicholas B.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals often vary defences in response to local predation or parasitism risk. But how should they assess threat levels when it pays their enemies to hide? For common cuckoo hosts, assessing parasitism risk is challenging: cuckoo eggs are mimetic and adult cuckoos are secretive and resemble hawks. Here, we show that egg rejection by reed warblers depends on combining personal and social information of local risk. We presented model cuckoos or controls at a pair’s own nest (personal information of an intruder) and/or on a neighbouring territory, to which they were attracted by broadcasts of alarm calls (social information). Rejection of an experimental egg was stimulated only when hosts were alerted by both social and personal information of cuckoos. However, pairs that rejected eggs were not more likely to mob a cuckoo. Therefore, while hosts can assess risk from the sight of a cuckoo, a cuckoo cannot gauge if her egg will be accepted from host mobbing. Our results reveal how hosts respond rapidly to local variation in parasitism, and why it pays cuckoos to be secretive, both to avoid alerting their targets and to limit the spread of social information in the local host neighbourhood. PMID:26794435

  20. Evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult brood parasitic bird, and generalized defences in its host.

    PubMed

    Feeney, W E; Troscianko, J; Langmore, N E; Spottiswoode, C N

    2015-07-01

    Mimicry of a harmless model (aggressive mimicry) is used by egg, chick and fledgling brood parasites that resemble the host's own eggs, chicks and fledglings. However, aggressive mimicry may also evolve in adult brood parasites, to avoid attack from hosts and/or manipulate their perception of parasitism risk. We tested the hypothesis that female cuckoo finches (Anomalospiza imberbis) are aggressive mimics of female Euplectes weavers, such as the harmless, abundant and sympatric southern red bishop (Euplectes orix). We show that female cuckoo finch plumage colour and pattern more closely resembled those of Euplectes weavers (putative models) than Vidua finches (closest relatives); that their tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) hosts were equally aggressive towards female cuckoo finches and southern red bishops, and more aggressive to both than to their male counterparts; and that prinias were equally likely to reject an egg after seeing a female cuckoo finch or bishop, and more likely to do so than after seeing a male bishop near their nest. This is, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult bird, and suggests that host-parasite coevolution can select for aggressive mimicry by avian brood parasites, and counter-defences by hosts, at all stages of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26063850

  1. Gastrointestinal host defence: importance of gut closure in control of macromolecular transport.

    PubMed

    Walker, W A

    enterocolitis, sepsis and hepatitis. Fortunately, 'nature' has provided a means for passively protecting the 'vulnerable' newborn against dangers of a deficient intestinal defence system, namely human milk. It is now increasingly apparent that human milk contains not only antibodies and viable leucocytes but many other substances which can interfere with bacterial colonization and prevent antigen penetration. PMID:261521

  2. Endophytic Bacillus spp. produce antifungal lipopeptides and induce host defence gene expression in maize.

    PubMed

    Gond, Surendra K; Bergen, Marshall S; Torres, Mónica S; White, James F

    2015-03-01

    Endophytes are mutualistic symbionts within healthy plant tissues. In this study we isolated Bacillus spp. from seeds of several varieties of maize. Bacillus amyloliquifaciens or Bacillus subtilis were found to be present in all maize varieties examined in this study. To determine whether bacteria may produce antifungal compounds, generally lipopeptides in Bacillus spp., bacterial cultures were screened for production of lipopeptides. Lipopeptides were extracted by acid precipitation from liquid cultures of Bacillus spp. Lipopeptide extracts from Bacillus spp. isolated from Indian popcorn and yellow dent corn showed inhibitory activity against Fusarium moniliforme at 500μg per disk. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry we detected the presence of antifungal iturin A, fengycin and bacillomycin in these isolates. PCR amplification also showed the presence of genes for iturin A and fengycin. B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) isolated from Indian popcorn showed strong inhibition of Arabidopsis seed mycoflora and enhanced seedling growth. We tested for the induction of defence gene expression in the host plant after treatment of plants with B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) and its lipopeptide extract using RT-qPCR. Roots of Indian popcorn seedlings treated with a suspension of B. subtilis (SG_JW.03) showed the induction of pathogenesis-related genes, including PR-1 and PR-4, which relate to plant defence against fungal pathogens. The lipopeptide extract alone did not increase the expression of these pathogenesis-related genes. Based on our study of maize endophytes, we hypothesize that, bacterial endophytes that naturally occur in many maize varieties may function to protect hosts by secreting antifungal lipopeptides that inhibit pathogens as well as inducing the up-regulation of pathogenesis-related genes of host plants (systemic acquired resistance). PMID:25497916

  3. Evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult brood parasitic bird, and generalized defences in its host

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, W. E.; Troscianko, J.; Langmore, N. E.; Spottiswoode, C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Mimicry of a harmless model (aggressive mimicry) is used by egg, chick and fledgling brood parasites that resemble the host's own eggs, chicks and fledglings. However, aggressive mimicry may also evolve in adult brood parasites, to avoid attack from hosts and/or manipulate their perception of parasitism risk. We tested the hypothesis that female cuckoo finches (Anomalospiza imberbis) are aggressive mimics of female Euplectes weavers, such as the harmless, abundant and sympatric southern red bishop (Euplectes orix). We show that female cuckoo finch plumage colour and pattern more closely resembled those of Euplectes weavers (putative models) than Vidua finches (closest relatives); that their tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) hosts were equally aggressive towards female cuckoo finches and southern red bishops, and more aggressive to both than to their male counterparts; and that prinias were equally likely to reject an egg after seeing a female cuckoo finch or bishop, and more likely to do so than after seeing a male bishop near their nest. This is, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult bird, and suggests that host–parasite coevolution can select for aggressive mimicry by avian brood parasites, and counter-defences by hosts, at all stages of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26063850

  4. Parasitic scabies mites and associated bacteria joining forces against host complement defence.

    PubMed

    Swe, P M; Reynolds, S L; Fischer, K

    2014-11-01

    Scabies is a ubiquitous and contagious skin disease caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei Epidemiological studies have identified scabies as a causative agent for secondary skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. This is an important notion, as such bacterial infections can lead to serious downstream life-threatening complications. As the complement system is the first line of host defence that confronts invading pathogens, both the mite and bacteria produce a large array of molecules that inhibit the complement cascades. It is hypothesised that scabies mite complement inhibitors may play an important role in providing a favourable micro-environment for the establishment of secondary bacterial infections. This review aims to bring together the current literature on complement inhibition by scabies mites and bacteria associated with scabies and to discuss the proposed molecular link between scabies and bacterial co-infections. PMID:25081184

  5. Host defence versus intraspecific competition in the regulation of infrapopulations of the flea Xenopsylla conformis on its rodent host Meriones crassus.

    PubMed

    Hawlena, Hadas; Abramsky, Zvika; Krasnov, Boris R; Saltz, David

    2007-07-01

    Mechanisms that regulate parasite populations may influence the evolution of hosts and parasites, as well as the stability of host-parasite dynamics but are still poorly understood. A manipulation experiment on the grooming ability of rodent hosts (Meriones crassus) and flea (Xenopsylla conformis) densities on these hosts successfully disentangled two possible regulating mechanisms: (i) behavioural defence of the host and (ii) intraspecific competition among parasites, and revealed their importance in suppressing the feeding of fleas. Moreover, the results suggest that flea competition is direct and is not mediated by host grooming, immune response, or parasite-induced damage to the host. These mechanisms, together with interspecific competition and density-dependent parasite-induced host damage, may limit the parasite burden on an individual host and may prevent parasites from overexploiting their host population. PMID:17362966

  6. Does the acanthocephalan parasite Polymorphus minutus modify the energy reserves and antitoxic defences of its intermediate host Gammarus roeseli?

    PubMed

    Gismondi, E; Cossu-Leguille, C; Beisel, J-N

    2012-07-01

    In disturbed environments, infected organisms have to face both parasitic and chemical stresses. Although this situation is common, few studies have been devoted to the effects of infection on hosts' energy reserves and antitoxic defence capacities, while parasite survival depends on host survival. In this study, we tested the consequences of an infection by Polymorphus minutus on the energy reserves (protein, lipid and glycogen) and antioxidant defence capacities (reduced glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteine ligase activity) of Gammarus roeseli males and females, in the absence of chemical stress. Moreover, malondialdehyde concentration was used as a toxicity biomarker. The results revealed that in infected G. roeseli, whatever their gender and the sampling month, protein and lipid contents were lower, but glycogen contents were higher. This could be explained by the fact that the parasite diverts part of the host's energy for its own development. Moreover, glutathione concentrations and γ-glutamylcysteine ligase activity were both lower, which could lead to lower antitoxic defence in the host. These results suggest negative effects on individuals in the case of additional stress (e.g. pollutant exposure). In the absence of chemical stress, the lower malondialdehyde level in infected gammarids could imply a probable protective effect of the parasite. PMID:22405348

  7. A long-awaited merger of the pathways mediating host defence and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Blander, J Magarian

    2014-09-01

    Historically, cell death and inflammation have been closely linked, but the necessary divergence of the fields in the past few decades has enriched our molecular understanding of the signalling pathways that mediate various programmes of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. The fields have now come together again demonstrating a surprising level of integration. Intimate interconnections at multiple levels are revealed between the cell death and inflammatory signal transduction pathways that are mobilized in response to the engagement of pattern recognition receptors during microbial infection. Molecules such as receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), RIPK3, FAS-associated death domain protein (FADD), FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP) and caspase 8 - which are associated with different forms of cell death - are incorporated into compatible and exceedingly dynamic Toll-like receptor, NOD-like receptor and RIG-I-like receptor signalling modules. These signalling modules have a high capacity to switch from inflammation to cell death, or a programmed execution of both, all in an orchestrated battle for host defence and survival. PMID:25145756

  8. The gut microbiota plays a protective role in the host defence against pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schuijt, Tim J; Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Scicluna, Brendon P; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Roelofs, Joris J T H; de Boer, J Daan; Hoogendijk, Arjan J; de Beer, Regina; de Vos, Alex; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pneumonia accounts for more deaths than any other infectious disease worldwide. The intestinal microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of the systemic immune system. The precise role of the gut microbiota in bacterial pneumonia, however, is unknown. Here, we investigate the function of the gut microbiota in the host defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. Design We depleted the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infected them intranasally with S. pneumoniae. We then performed survival and faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) experiments and measured parameters of inflammation and alveolar macrophage whole-genome responses. Results We found that the gut microbiota protects the host during pneumococcal pneumonia, as reflected by increased bacterial dissemination, inflammation, organ damage and mortality in microbiota-depleted mice compared with controls. FMT in gut microbiota-depleted mice led to a normalisation of pulmonary bacterial counts and tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 levels 6 h after pneumococcal infection. Whole-genome mapping of alveolar macrophages showed upregulation of metabolic pathways in the absence of a healthy gut microbiota. This upregulation correlated with an altered cellular responsiveness, reflected by a reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from gut microbiota-depleted mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose S. pneumoniae. Conclusions This study identifies the intestinal microbiota as a protective mediator during pneumococcal pneumonia. The gut microbiota enhances primary alveolar macrophage function. Novel therapeutic strategies could exploit the gut–lung axis in bacterial infections. PMID:26511795

  9. Cell adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of and host defence against microbial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, J R

    1999-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are used by various cells and extracellular molecules in host defence against infection. They are involved in many processes including recognition by circulating phagocytes of a site of inflammation, transmigration through the endothelial barrier, diapedesis through basement membrane and extracellular matrix, and release of effector mechanisms at the infected site. CAMs involved in leucocyte-endothelial cell interaction include the selectins, integrins, and members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, CAMs are also used by various microorganisms (protozoa, fungi, bacteria, and viruses) during their pathogenesis. For example, bacteria that utilise CAMs include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia spp, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella spp, Neisseria spp, Bordetella spp, and Borrelia burgdorferi. In addition, CAMs are involved in the pathogenetic effects of the RTX toxins of Pasteurella haemolytica, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and the superantigen exotoxins of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A recurrent and topical theme of potential importance within the bacterial group is the intimate relation between CAMs, bacterial protein receptors, and type III secretion systems. For example, the IpaBCD protein complex is secreted by the type III system of Shigella flexneri and interacts with alpha 5 beta 1 integrin on the eukaryotic cell surface, followed by Rho mediated internalisation; this illustrates the relevance of cellular microbiology. CAMs might prove to be novel therapeutic targets. Comparative genomics has provided the knowledge of shared virulence determinants among diverse bacterial genera, and will continue to deepen our understanding of microbial pathogenesis, particularly in the context of the interaction of prokaryotic and eukaryotic molecules. PMID:10694943

  10. BAY 41-2272 activates host defence against local and disseminated Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vítor; Falcai, Angela; Kubo, Christina Arslanian; Antunes, Edson; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    In our previous study, we have found that 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272), a guanylate cyclase agonist, activates human monocytes and the THP-1 cell line to produce the superoxide anion, increasing in vitro microbicidal activity, suggesting that this drug can be used to modulate immune functioning in primary immunodeficiency patients. In the present work, we investigated the potential of the in vivo administration of BAY 41-2272 for the treatment of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus infections introduced via intraperitoneal and subcutaneous inoculation. We found that intraperitoneal treatment with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased macrophage-dependent cell influx to the peritoneum in addition to macrophage functions, such as spreading, zymosan particle phagocytosis and nitric oxide and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 was highly effective in reducing the death rate due to intraperitoneal inoculation of C. albicans, but not S. aureus. However, we found that in vitro stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased microbicidal activities against both pathogens. Our results show that the prevention of death by the treatment of C. albicans-infected mice with BAY 41-2272 might occur primarily by the modulation of the host immune response through macrophage activation. PMID:25742266

  11. BAY 41-2272 activates host defence against local and disseminated Candida albicans infections

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vítor; Falcai, Angela; Kubo, Christina Arslanian; Antunes, Edson; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272), a guanylate cyclase agonist, activates human monocytes and the THP-1 cell line to produce the superoxide anion, increasing in vitro microbicidal activity, suggesting that this drug can be used to modulate immune functioning in primary immunodeficiency patients. In the present work, we investigated the potential of the in vivo administration of BAY 41-2272 for the treatment of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus infections introduced via intraperitoneal and subcutaneous inoculation. We found that intraperitoneal treatment with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased macrophage-dependent cell influx to the peritoneum in addition to macrophage functions, such as spreading, zymosan particle phagocytosis and nitric oxide and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 was highly effective in reducing the death rate due to intraperitoneal inoculation of C. albicans, but not S. aureus. However, we found that in vitro stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with BAY 41-2272 markedly increased microbicidal activities against both pathogens. Our results show that the prevention of death by the treatment of C. albicans-infected mice with BAY 41-2272 might occur primarily by the modulation of the host immune response through macrophage activation. PMID:25742266

  12. Human selection and the relaxation of legume defences against ineffective rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Kiers, E Toby; Hutton, Mark G; Denison, R Ford

    2007-12-22

    Enforcement mechanisms are thought to be important in maintaining mutualistic cooperation between species. A clear example of an enforcement mechanism is how legumes impose sanctions on rhizobial symbionts that fail to provide sufficient fixed N2. However, with domestication and breeding in high-soil-N environments, humans may have altered these natural legume defences and reduced the agricultural benefits of the symbiosis. Using six genotypes of soya beans, representing 60 years of breeding, we show that, as a group, older cultivars were better able to maintain fitness than newer cultivars (seed production) when infected with a mixture of effective and ineffective rhizobial strains. Additionally, we found small differences among cultivars in the ratio of effective:ineffective rhizobia released from their nodules, an indicator of future rhizobial strain fitness. When infected by symbionts varying in quality, legume defences against poor-quality partners have apparently worsened under decades of artificial selection. PMID:17939985

  13. [Up-to-date findings in the host defence mechanism to cryptococcus infection].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Keiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a medically important opportunistic fungal pathogen with a polysaccharide capsule surrounding the yeast-like cells. In hosts with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as AIDS, uncontrolled infection causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis. In immunocompetent individuals, the host immune response usually limits the growth of the fungal pathogen at the primary infected site, where it may persist, without completely eradicated, in a latent state because of its ability to escape from killing by macrophages. Th1 response in adaptive immunity is essential for the host defense to cryptococcal infection, in which interferon (IFN)-γ polarizes innate macrophages into fungicidal M1 macrophages. Recently, we found that caspase recruitment domain family member (CARD9), an adaptor protein in a signal transduction triggered by C-type lectin receptors, plays a key role in the early production of IFN-γ at the site of infection by recruiting NK cells and CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory-phenotype T cells. We also found that IL-4 produced by Th2 cells stimulates broncoepithelial cells to secrete mucin, which may lead to promotion in the mucociliary clearance of C. neoformans. Here, we summarize the up-to-date findings in the host defense mechanism to this infection with focusing on our recent data. PMID:25231225

  14. Innate immune defences in the human uterus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    King, A E; Kelly, R W; Sallenave, J-M; Bocking, A D; Challis, J R G

    2007-01-01

    The prevention of uterine infection is critical to appropriate fetal development and term delivery. The innate immune system is one component of the uterine environment and has a role in prevention of uterine infection. Natural antimicrobials are innate immune molecules with anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal activity. We discuss two groups of natural antimicrobials in relation to pregnancy: (i) the defensins; and (ii) the whey acidic protein motif containing proteins, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and elafin. Human beta-defensins (HBD) 1-3 are expressed by placental and chorion trophoblast, amnion epithelium and decidua in term and preterm pregnancy. Elafin shows a similar pattern of localisation while SLPI is produced only by amnion epithelium and decidua. Evidence suggests that there is aberrant production of some natural antimicrobials in pathologic conditions of pregnancy. In preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) levels of SLPI and elafin are reduced in amniotic fluid and fetal membranes, respectively. Elafin and HBD3 increase in chorioamnionitis and levels of the alpha-defensins, HNP1-3, increase in maternal plasma and amniotic fluid in women affected by microbial invasion of the uterus. In vitro culture studies have suggested a mechanism for increased production of natural antimicrobials in chorioamnionitis. Elafin, SLPI, HBD2 and 3 are all upregulated by inflammatory molecules in cells derived from gestational tissues. In summary, production of natural antimicrobials at key sites within the pregnant uterus suggests an important role in prevention of uterine infection during pregnancy and labour. Aberrant production of these molecules in PPROM and chorioamnionitis suggests that they also have a role in pathologic conditions. In particular, upregulation of these molecules by inflammatory molecules present in chorioamnionitis will ensure a robust response to infection. PMID:17664005

  15. The influence of viral RNA secondary structure on interactions with innate host cell defences

    PubMed Central

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Blundell, Richard; Maarleveld, Joris J.; McFadden, Nora; Evans, David J.; Simmonds, Peter

    2014-01-01

    RNA viruses infecting vertebrates differ fundamentally in their ability to establish persistent infections with markedly different patterns of transmission, disease mechanisms and evolutionary relationships with their hosts. Although interactions with host innate and adaptive responses are complex and persistence mechanisms likely multi-factorial, we previously observed associations between bioinformatically predicted RNA secondary formation in genomes of positive-stranded RNA viruses with their in vivo fitness and persistence. To analyse this interactions functionally, we transfected fibroblasts with non-replicating, non-translated RNA transcripts from RNA viral genomes with differing degrees of genome-scale ordered RNA structure (GORS). Single-stranded RNA transcripts induced interferon-β mediated though RIG-I and PKR activation, the latter associated with rapid induction of antiviral stress granules. A striking inverse correlation was observed between induction of both cellular responses with transcript RNA structure formation that was independent of both nucleotide composition and sequence length. The consistent inability of cells to recognize RNA transcripts possessing GORS extended to downstream differences from unstructured transcripts in expression of TNF-α, other interferon-stimulated genes and induction of apoptosis. This functional association provides novel insights into interactions between virus and host early after infection and provides evidence for a novel mechanism for evading intrinsic and innate immune responses. PMID:24335283

  16. BcGs1, a glycoprotein from Botrytis cinerea, elicits defence response and improves disease resistance in host plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yunhua; Qiu, Dewen; Zeng, Hongmei; Guo, Lihua; Yang, Xiufen

    2015-02-20

    In this study, a necrosis-inducing protein was purified from the culture filtrate of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea BC-98 strain. Secreted proteins were collected and fractionated by liquid chromatography. The fraction with the highest necrosis-inducing activity was further purified. A glycoprotein named BcGs1 was identified by 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The BcGs1 protein consisted of 672 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 70.487 kDa. Functional domain analysis indicated that BcGs1 was a glucan 1,4-alpha-glucosidase, a cell wall-degrading enzyme, with a Glyco_hydro_15 domain and a CBM20_glucoamylase domain. The BcGs1 protein caused necrotic lesions that mimicked a typical hypersensitive response and H2O2 production in tomato and tobacco leaves. BcGs1-treated plants exhibited resistance to B. cinerea, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and tobacco mosaic virus in systemic leaves. In addition, BcGs1 triggered elevation of the transcript levels of the defence-related genes PR-1a, TPK1b and Prosystemin. This is the first report of a Botrytis glucan 1,4-alpha-glucosidase triggering host plant immunity as an elicitor. These results lay a foundation for further study of the comprehensive interaction between plants and necrotrophic fungi. PMID:25613865

  17. A study of host defence peptide beta-defensin 3 in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Boniotto, Michele; Antcheva, Nikolinka; Zelezetsky, Igor; Tossi, Alessandro; Palumbo, Valeria; Verga Falzacappa, Maria Vittoria; Sgubin, Silvia; Braida, Laura; Amoroso, Antonio; Crovella, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the molecular evolution of the gene coding for beta-defensin 3 (DEFB103) in 17 primate species including humans. Unlike the DEFB4 genes (coding for beta-defensin 2) [Boniotto, Tossi, Del Pero, Sgubin, Antcheva, Santon and Masters (2003) Genes Immun. 4, 251-257], DEFB103 shows a marked degree of conservation in humans, Great Apes and New and Old World monkeys. Only the Hylobates concolor defensin hcBD3 showed an amino acid variation Arg17-->Trp17 that could have a functional implication, as it disrupts an intramolecular salt bridge with Glu27, which locally decreases the charge and may favour dimerization in the human congener hBD3. This is thought to involve the formation of an intermolecular salt bridge between Glu28 and Lys32 on another monomer [Schibli, Hunter, Aseyev, Starner, Wiencek, McCray, Tack and Vogel (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 8279-8289]. To test the role of dimerization in mediating biological activity, we synthesized hBD3, hcBD3 and an artificial peptide in which the Lys26-Glu27-Glu28 stretch was replaced by the equivalent Phe-Thr-Lys stretch from human beta-defensin 1 and we characterized their structure and anti-microbial activity. Although the structuring and dimerization of these peptides were found to differ significantly, this did not appear to affect markedly the anti-microbial potency, the broad spectrum of activity or the insensitivity of the anti-microbial action to the salinity of the medium. PMID:12795637

  18. Midkine in host defence

    PubMed Central

    Gela, A; Jovic, S; Nordin, S L; Egesten, A

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MK) shares several features in common with antibacterial proteins of the innate immune system. These include growth factor properties, heparin-binding regions and effects on immune cells, such as recruitment and activation of neutrophils and macrophages. Indeed, recent research has demonstrated potent bactericidal and fungicidal activities of MK. This protein is constitutively expressed at relevant concentrations at barriers of the body, such as the skin and the large airways, where the body first encounters potential pathogens. The antibacterial properties of MK orthologues are preserved during evolution, as exemplified by miple2 of Drosophila. In addition to retinoic acid, promoters of MK gene expression include factors present at sites of infection, reactive oxygen species, activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and hypoxia. In the light of the development of resistance in pathogenic bacteria to conventional antibiotics, MK is an interesting molecule that could serve as a template in developing novel therapeutic strategies against bacterial and fungal infections, either alone or in combination with conventional antibiotics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024937

  19. Host-Salmonella interaction: human trials.

    PubMed

    Levine, M M; Tacket, C O; Sztein, M B

    2001-01-01

    Human clinical trials, including experimental challenges of volunteers with pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, small phase I and II trials that monitor the immune responses to vaccines, and large-scale controlled field trials that assess vaccine efficacy under conditions of natural challenge, have helped elucidate the interactions between Salmonella typhi and human hosts. PMID:11755415

  20. Human polyomavirus in pregnancy. A model for the study of defence mechanisms to virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D V; Gardner, S D; Mulholland, C; Fridiksdottir, V; Porter, A A; Lilford, R; Valdimarsson, H

    1983-08-01

    We have carried out a longitudinal study of human polyomavirus infection in 71 pregnant women and correlated the virological findings with changes in the defence system in the same patients. As reactivation of human polyomaviruses generally occurred late in the second trimester it was possible to distinguish between the immunological changes which preceded the onset of reactivation and those which were secondary to the infection. Evidence of reactivation was detected in 26 women; all had high or rising antibody titres against BK or JC virus, but only five of these developed viruria. A positive correlation was observed between a high monocyte count in early pregnancy and subsequent virus reactivation. The virus excretors had significantly lower neutrophil counts than the women who had no evidence of virus reactivation. In contrast, women with serological evidence of virus activity but no viruria has significantly higher neutrophil counts than the non-activators. They also had stronger lymphocyte responses to PHA than the virus excretors. Virus activators were found to have a significant lymphopenia in the third trimester compared to the non-activators. High antibody levels did not appear to inhibit virus excretion. These findings suggest that monocytosis may predispose to reactivation of human polyomaviruses in pregnancy. On the other hand, ability to contain the virus once it has been activated, was associated with neutrophilia, and relatively vigorous in vitro reactivity of lymphocytes to PHA. Persistent lymphopenia was probably secondary to virus reactivation. The model on which this study is based could be adapted to investigate the causes of reactivation of other viruses. It may also help to identify risk factors in patients who are particularly susceptible to infection with opportunistic viruses. PMID:6309442

  1. Effects of in vivo administration of anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody on the host defence mechanism against murine Salmonella infection.

    PubMed Central

    Arai, T; Hiromatsu, K; Nishimura, H; Kimura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Ishida, H; Nimura, Y; Yoshikai, Y

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine that regulates various macrophage functions. To elucidate the involvement of endogenous IL-10 in the early stage of murine salmonellosis, we examined the effect of anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration on the host defence mechanism against Salmonella choleraesuis infection. The in vivo administration of anti-IL-10 mAb significantly enhanced host resistance at the early stage of Salmonella infection, as assessed by bacterial growth in the peritoneal cavity and the liver. Enhanced levels of monokine mRNA, including IL-1 alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-12, were observed from day 1 after infection in the peritoneal macrophages in anti-IL-10 mAb-treated mice compared with those in control mAb-treated mice. Mice treated with anti-IL-10 mAb exhibited significantly higher levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the peritoneal exudates and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression on the peritoneal macrophages on days 3 and 5 after infection. Notably, in vivo anti-IL-10 mAb brought about an increment of gamma delta T cells in the peritoneal cavity at the early phase of infection, which was correlated with the expression of endogenous heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60), which is implicated as a potential ligand for gamma delta T cells, in the infected macrophages. Our results suggest that the neutralization of endogenous IL-10 accelerates some macrophage functions and, consequently, the activation of immunocompetent cells, including gamma delta T cells, at the early stage of infection, resulting in an enhanced host defence against Salmonella infection. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7558125

  2. HOST-SWITCHING DOES NOT CIRCUMVENT THE NI-BASED DEFENCE OF THE NI HYPERACCUMULATOR STREPTANTHUS POLYGALOIDES (BRASSICACEAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar concentration of heavy metals, such as nickel, may help defend metal --hyperaccumulating plants against both herbivores and pathogens. Host switching by generalist herbivores might be one strategy by which they can dilute lifetime consumption of toxic nickel. We examined the effects of host...

  3. Bacterial strategies to overcome insect defences.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Lemaitre, Bruno; Boccard, Frédéric

    2008-04-01

    Recent genetic and molecular analyses have revealed how several strategies enable bacteria to persist and overcome insect immune defences. Genetic and genomic tools that can be used with Drosophila melanogaster have enabled the characterization of the pathways that are used by insects to detect bacterial invaders and combat infection. Conservation of bacterial virulence factors and insect immune repertoires indicates that there are common strategies of host invasion and pathogen eradication. Long-term interactions of bacteria with insects might ensure efficient dissemination of pathogens to other hosts, including humans. PMID:18327270

  4. Host-pathogen coevolution in human tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gagneux, Sebastien

    2012-03-19

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease of antiquity. Yet TB today still causes more adult deaths than any other single infectious disease. Recent studies show that contrary to the common view postulating an animal origin for TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), the causative agent of TB, emerged as a human pathogen in Africa and colonized the world accompanying the Out-of-Africa migrations of modern humans. More recently, evolutionarily 'modern' lineages of MTBC expanded as a consequence of the global human population increase, and spread throughout the world following waves of exploration, trade and conquest. While epidemiological data suggest that the different phylogenetic lineages of MTBC might have adapted to different human populations, overall, the phylogenetically 'modern' MTBC lineages are more successful in terms of their geographical spread compared with the 'ancient' lineages. Interestingly, the global success of 'modern' MTBC correlates with a hypo-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages, possibly reflecting higher virulence, and a shorter latency in humans. Finally, various human genetic variants have been associated with different MTBC lineages, suggesting an interaction between human genetic diversity and MTBC variation. In summary, the biology and the epidemiology of human TB have been shaped by the long-standing association between MTBC and its human host. PMID:22312052

  5. Larval excretory-secretory products from the parasite Schistosoma mansoni modulate HSP70 protein expression in defence cells of its snail host, Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Zahoor, Zahida; Davies, Angela J.; Kirk, Ruth S.; Rollinson, David

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) following cellular stress is a response shared by many organisms. Amongst the HSP family, the ∼70 kDa HSPs are the most evolutionarily conserved with intracellular chaperone and extracellular immunoregulatory functions. This study focused on the effects of larval excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from the parasite Schistosoma mansoni on HSP70 protein expression levels in haemocytes (defence cells) from its snail intermediate host Biomphalaria glabrata. S. mansoni larval stage ESPs are known to interfere with haemocyte physiology and behaviour. Haemocytes from two different B. glabrata strains, one which is susceptible to S. mansoni infection and one which is resistant, both showed reduced HSP70 protein levels following 1 h challenge with S. mansoni ESPs when compared to unchallenged controls; however, the reduction observed in the resistant strain was less marked. The decline in intracellular HSP70 protein persisted for at least 5 h in resistant snail haemocytes only. Furthermore, in schistosome-susceptible snails infected by S. mansoni for 35 days, haemocytes possessed approximately 70% less HSP70. The proteasome inhibitor, MG132, partially restored HSP70 protein levels in ESP-challenged haemocytes, demonstrating that the decrease in HSP70 was in part due to intracellular degradation. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway appears to regulate HSP70 protein expression in these cells, as the mitogen-activated protein-ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor, U0126, significantly reduced HSP70 protein levels. Disruption of intracellular HSP70 protein expression in B. glabrata haemocytes by S. mansoni ESPs may be a strategy employed by the parasite to manipulate the immune response of the intermediate snail host. PMID:20182834

  6. The human cathelicidin LL-37 - A pore-forming antibacterial peptide and host-cell modulator.

    PubMed

    Xhindoli, Daniela; Pacor, Sabrina; Benincasa, Monica; Scocchi, Marco; Gennaro, Renato; Tossi, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    The human cathelicidin hCAP18/LL-37 has become a paradigm for the pleiotropic roles of peptides in host defence. It has a remarkably wide functional repertoire that includes direct antimicrobial activities against various types of microorganisms, the role of 'alarmin' that helps to orchestrate the immune response to infection, the capacity to locally modulate inflammation both enhancing it to aid in combating infection and limiting it to prevent damage to infected tissues, the promotion of angiogenesis and wound healing, and possibly also the elimination of abnormal cells. LL-37 manages to carry out all its reported activities with a small and simple, amphipathic, helical structure. In this review we consider how different aspects of its primary and secondary structures, as well as its marked tendency to form oligomers under physiological solution conditions and then bind to molecular surfaces as such, explain some of its cytotoxic and immunomodulatory effects. We consider its modes of interaction with bacterial membranes and capacity to act as a pore-forming toxin directed by our organism against bacterial cells, contrasting this with the mode of action of related peptides from other species. We also consider its different membrane-dependent effects on our own cells, which underlie many of its other activities in host defence. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. PMID:26556394

  7. In Defence of the Human in Education. European University Studies. Series 11: Education. Volume 1024

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Isolde

    2012-01-01

    The title incorporates the assumption that the "human" in education is being threatened by certain processes. The guiding questions are: What are these processes and what constitutes the "human" in education? Which activities characteristically performed by human beings are so central that they seem definitive of a life that is truly human and…

  8. Essentialism Regarding Human Nature in the Defence of Gender Equality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holma, Katariina

    2007-01-01

    In this article I consider contemporary philosophical conceptions of human nature from the point of view of the ideal of gender equality. My main argument is that an essentialist account of human nature, unlike what I take to be its two main alternatives (the subjectivist account and the cultural account), is able coherently to justify the…

  9. Molecular basis of host specificity in human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria display various levels of host specificity or tropism. While many bacteria can infect a wide range of hosts, certain bacteria have strict host selectivity for humans as obligate human pathogens. Understanding the genetic and molecular basis of host specificity in pathogenic bacteria is important for understanding pathogenic mechanisms, developing better animal models and designing new strategies and therapeutics for the control of microbial diseases. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial host specificity are much less understood than those of viral pathogens, in part due to the complexity of the molecular composition and cellular structure of bacterial cells. However, important progress has been made in identifying and characterizing molecular determinants of bacterial host specificity in the last two decades. It is now clear that the host specificity of bacterial pathogens is determined by multiple molecular interactions between the pathogens and their hosts. Furthermore, certain basic principles regarding the host specificity of bacterial pathogens have emerged from the existing literature. This review focuses on selected human pathogenic bacteria and our current understanding of their host specificity. PMID:26038515

  10. Behavioural defences in animals against pathogens and parasites: parallels with the pillars of medicine in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Benjamin L.

    2011-01-01

    No other theme in animal biology seems to be more central than the concept of employing strategies to survive and successfully reproduce. In nature, controlling or avoiding pathogens and parasites is an essential fitness strategy because of the ever-present disease-causing organisms. The disease-control strategies discussed here are: physical avoidance and removal of pathogens and parasites; quarantine or peripheralization of conspecifics that could be carrying potential pathogens; herbal medicine, animal style, to prevent or treat an infection; potentiation of the immune system; and care of sick or injured group members. These strategies are seen as also encompassing the pillars of human medicine: (i) quarantine; (ii) immune-boosting vaccinations; (iii) use of medicinal products; and (iv) caring or nursing. In contrast to animals, in humans, the disease-control strategies have been consolidated into a consistent and extensive medical system. A hypothesis that explains some of this difference between animals and humans is that humans are sick more often than animals. This increase in sickness in humans leading to an extensive, cognitively driven medical system is attributed to an evolutionary dietary transition from mostly natural vegetation to a meat-based diet, with an increase in health-eroding free radicals and a dietary reduction of free-radical-scavenging antioxidants. PMID:22042917

  11. Swooping in the Suburbs; Parental Defence of an Abundant Aggressive Urban Bird against Humans.

    PubMed

    Lees, Daniel; Sherman, Craig D H; Maguire, Grainne S; Dann, Peter; Cardilini, Adam P A; Weston, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Masked Lapwings, Vanellus miles, often come into 'conflict' with humans, because they often breed in close proximity to humans and actively defend their ground nests through aggressive behaviour, which typically involves swooping. This study examined whether defensive responses differed when nesting birds were confronted with different human stimuli ('pedestrian alone' vs. 'person pushing a lawn mower' approaches to nests) and tested the effectiveness of a commonly used deterrent (mock eyes positioned on the top or back of a person's head) on the defensive response. Masked Lapwings did not swoop closer to a person with a lawn mower compared with a pedestrian, but flushed closer and remained closer to the nest in the presence of a lawn mower. The presence of eye stickers decreased (pedestrians) and increased (lawn mowers) swooping behaviour. Masked Lapwings can discriminate between different human activities and adjust their defensive behaviour accordingly. We also conclude that the use of eye stickers is an effective method to mitigate the human-lapwing 'conflict' in some, but not all, circumstances. PMID:26479532

  12. The Importance of Direct Experience: A Philosophical Defence of Fieldwork in Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Max

    2009-01-01

    Human geography fieldwork is important. Research has shown that when students "see it for themselves" their enjoyment and understanding is enhanced. In addition it helps develop subject-specific and transferable skills, promotes 'active learning' and links theory to "real world" examples in a "spiral of learning". Stressing the socially…

  13. The role of glycans in immune evasion: the human fetoembryonic defence system hypothesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that mechanisms to evade the human immune system may be shared by the conceptus, tumour cells, persistent pathogens and viruses. It is therefore timely to revisit the human fetoembryonic defense system (Hu-FEDS) hypothesis that was proposed in two papers in the 1990s. The initial paper suggested that glycoconjugates expressed in the human reproductive system inhibited immune responses directed against gametes and the developing human by employing their carbohydrate sequences as functional groups. These glycoconjugates were proposed to block specific binding interactions and interact with lectins linked to signal transduction pathways that modulated immune cell functions. The second article suggested that aggressive tumour cells and persistent pathogens (HIV, H. pylori, schistosomes) either mimicked or acquired the same carbohydrate functional groups employed in this system to evade immune responses. This subterfuge enabled these pathogens and tumour cells to couple their survival to the human reproductive imperative. The Hu-FEDS model has been repeatedly tested since its inception. Data relevant to this model have also been obtained in other studies. Herein, the Hu-FEDS hypothesis is revisited in the context of these more recent findings. Far more supportive evidence for this model now exists than when it was first proposed, and many of the original predictions have been validated. This type of subterfuge by pathogens and tumour cells likely applies to all sexually reproducing metazoans that must protect their gametes from immune responses. Intervention in these pathological states will likely remain problematic until this system of immune evasion is fully understood and appreciated. PMID:24043694

  14. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent onmore » its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.« less

  15. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent on its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

  16. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens within the Human Host

    PubMed Central

    Bliven, Kimberly A.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies which emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche, and discuss the resulting co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between these organisms. In bacterial pathogens, many of the genes responsible for these strategies are encoded on mobile pathogenicity islands (PAIs) or plasmids, underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the emergence of virulent microbial species. PMID:26999399

  17. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Matias Rodrigues, João F.; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y.; Tito, Raul Y.; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars; Samaniego Castruita, José Alfredo; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian; Olsen, Jesper V.; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M.; Collins, Matthew J.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize: (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) the first evidence of ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, “red-complex” pathogens, and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity, and diet, thereby extending the direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  18. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y; Tito, Raul Y; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars H; Castruita, José Alfredo Samaniego; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M; Collins, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  19. Inheritance of DNA Transferred from American Trypanosomes to Human Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Mariana M.; Nitz, Nadjar; Araujo, Perla F.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; de Cássia Rosa, Ana; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Teixeira, Antonio R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Interspecies DNA transfer is a major biological process leading to the accumulation of mutations inherited by sexual reproduction among eukaryotes. Lateral DNA transfer events and their inheritance has been challenging to document. In this study we modified a thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR by using additional targeted primers, along with Southern blots, fluorescence techniques, and bioinformatics, to identify lateral DNA transfer events from parasite to host. Instances of naturally occurring human infections by Trypanosoma cruzi are documented, where mitochondrial minicircles integrated mainly into retrotransposable LINE-1 of various chromosomes. The founders of five families show minicircle integrations that were transferred vertically to their progeny. Microhomology end-joining of 6 to 22 AC-rich nucleotide repeats in the minicircles and host DNA mediates foreign DNA integration. Heterogeneous minicircle sequences were distributed randomly among families, with diversity increasing due to subsequent rearrangement of inserted fragments. Mosaic recombination and hitchhiking on retrotransposition events to different loci were more prevalent in germ line as compared to somatic cells. Potential new genes, pseudogenes, and knockouts were identified. A pathway of minicircle integration and maintenance in the host genome is suggested. Thus, infection by T. cruzi has the unexpected consequence of increasing human genetic diversity, and Chagas disease may be a fortuitous share of negative selection. This demonstration of contemporary transfer of eukaryotic DNA to the human genome and its subsequent inheritance by descendants introduces a significant change in the scientific concept of evolutionary biology and medicine. PMID:20169193

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Host Defense in the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Charles, Tysheena P; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-04-01

    Immunosuppression associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection impacts all components of host defense against pulmonary infection. Cells within the lung have altered immune function and are important reservoirs for HIV infection. The host immune response to infected lung cells further compromises responses to a secondary pathogenic insult. In the upper respiratory tract, mucociliary function is impaired and there are decreased levels of salivary immunoglobulin A. Host defenses in the lower respiratory tract are controlled by alveolar macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. As HIV infection progresses, lung CD4 T cells are reduced in number causing a lack of activation signals from CD4 T cells and impaired defense by macrophages. CD8 T cells, on the other hand, are increased in number and cause lymphocytic alveolitis. Specific antibody responses by B-lymphocytes are decreased and opsonization of microorganisms is impaired. These observed defects in host defense of the respiratory tract explain the susceptibility of HIV-infected persons for oropharyngeal candidiasis, bacterial pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and other opportunistic infections. PMID:26974294

  1. Modulation of the host response in human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, M.; Poindexter, R. W.; Ruiz-Tiben, E.; Ottesen, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanisms for modulating the host's immune response in human Schistosomiasis mansoni have been described for delayed hypersensitivity responsiveness and antibody production. Since clinical symptoms of immediate hypersensitivity (i.e. allergic reactivity) are rare in schistosomiasis despite the presence of parasite-specific immunoglobulin E, circulating parasite antigen, and normal numbers of basophils and mast cells in infected patients, it seemed likely that there was host modulation of immediate hypersensitivity responsiveness as well. Using an in vitro basophil histamine release assay we have shown that basophils from fifteen patients with S. mansoni infections are sensitized with schistosome-specific immunoglobulin E and will release histamine in an antigen-dose-dependent manner when challenged with a soluble adult worm antigen. This histamine release was suppressed by autologus, but not normal serum. Fractionation of the serum over staphylococcal protein A and antigen affinity columns identified an immunoglobulin G parasite-specific `blocking antibody', analogous to blocking antibodies elicited during immunotherapy of atopic patients, as being responsible for the modulation of this immediate hypersensitivity responsiveness in vitro. Blocking antibody specificity varied from patient to patient, an observation suggesting that different allergens were being recognized by different individuals. These studies demonstrate that in addition to the immunoregulatory mechanisms previously described in patients with schistosome infections, there is host modulation of immediate hypersensitivity responsiveness that appears to involve specific immunoglobulin G blocking antibodies. PMID:6179857

  2. Host defence against C. albicans infections in IgH transgenic mice with V(H) derived from a natural anti-keratin antibody.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fu, Meng; An, Jin-Gang; Xing, Ying; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Yao-Chun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Tian, Rong; Su, Wen-Jing; Guan, Hai-Hong; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tian-Wen; Han, Hua; Liu, Yu-Feng

    2007-02-01

    Fungal infections have been increasing and life-threatening in recent years, but host immune responses, especially the humoral immunity, to fungi have not been fully understood. In the present study, we report that natural antibodies from unimmunized mice bind to Candida albicans. We established a monoclonal natural antibody, 3B4, which recognized a surface antigen located at germ tubes of C. albicans. The 3B4 antibody protected mice from C. albicans-induced death in passive immunization, by mechanisms involving suppressing germ tube formation and modulating phagocytosis. Interestingly, 3B4 also bound to a self-antigen keratin. To further study the generation and anti-C. albicans activities of natural antibodies in vivo, we constructed a mu chain transgenic mouse (TgV(H)3B4) using the V(H) gene from 3B4. TgV(H)3B4 had elevated serum anti-keratin/C. albicans IgM, and were resistant to C. albicans infections. Analyses of B cell development showed that in TgV(H)3B4, B cells secreting the anti-keratin/C. albicans antibodies were enriched in the B1 B cell compartment. Our findings reveal an important role of keratin-reactive natural antibodies in anti-C. albicans immune responses, and suggest that keratin may function in selecting B cells into the B1 B cell compartment, where natural antibodies are made to fight fungal infections. PMID:16925788

  3. Do strigolactones contribute to plant defence?

    PubMed

    Torres-Vera, Rocío; García, Juan M; Pozo, María J; López-Ráez, Juan A

    2014-02-01

    Strigolactones are multifunctional molecules involved in several processes outside and within the plant. As signalling molecules in the rhizosphere, they favour the establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, but they also act as host detection cues for root parasitic plants. As phytohormones, they are involved in the regulation of plant architecture, adventitious rooting, secondary growth and reproductive development, and novel roles are emerging continuously. In the present study, the possible involvement of strigolactones in plant defence responses was investigated. For this purpose, the resistance/susceptibility of the strigolactone-deficient tomato mutant Slccd8 against the foliar fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria alternata was assessed. Slccd8 was more susceptible to both pathogens, pointing to a new role for strigolactones in plant defence. A reduction in the content of the defence-related hormones jasmonic acid, salicylic acid and abscisic acid was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in the Slccd8 mutant, suggesting that hormone homeostasis is altered in the mutant. Moreover, the expression level of the jasmonate-dependent gene PinII, involved in the resistance of tomato to B. cinerea, was lower than in the corresponding wild-type. We propose here that strigolactones play a role in the regulation of plant defences through their interaction with other defence-related hormones, especially with the jasmonic acid signalling pathway. PMID:24112811

  4. The human host as active agent in malaria epidemiology.

    PubMed

    MacCormack, C P

    1987-09-01

    The literature on malaria epidemiology tends to view the human host as a passive or constant factor. However, for at least 2000 years people have been an active factor, causing vast changes in epidemiological patterns. They have cut forest and increased the breeding area of An. gambiae, or changed salinity in rice swamps causing a different change in the dominant vector. Human activity not only increases risk, but influences control by killing mosquito larvae, killing adult mosquitos or preventing mosquitos from feeding. For example, people prefer chloroquine or other anti-malarials to traditional herbal remedies that do not kill parasites, and in some areas introduce larvivorous fish into swamp rice fields and cattle ponds. Bed nets impregnated with residual insecticide simultaneously prevent mosquitos from feeding on people and kill adult mosquitos. Preferences and practices in bed net use in the Gambia are described. PMID:3432961

  5. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  6. Multi-Cue Integration: How Female Mosquitoes Locate a Human Host.

    PubMed

    Cardé, Ring T

    2015-09-21

    To reproduce, the female yellow fever mosquito has to find a human host. There are many potential cues available to guide such navigation: exhaled carbon dioxide, a plethora of skin odors, the host's visual and heat signatures and, close by, moisture. Recent work is shedding new light on how these are integrated by the mosquito in targeting a human host. PMID:26394099

  7. Modulation of Host Immunity by the Human Metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Pablo F; Palavecino, Christian E; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2016-10-01

    Globally, as a leading agent of acute respiratory tract infections in children <5 years of age and the elderly, the human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has gained considerable attention. As inferred from studies comparing vaccinated and experimentally infected mice, the acquired immune response elicited by this pathogen fails to efficiently clear the virus from the airways, which leads to an exaggerated inflammatory response and lung damage. Furthermore, after disease resolution, there is a poor development of T and B cell immunological memory, which is believed to promote reinfections and viral spread in the community. In this article, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that shape the interactions of HMPV with host tissues that lead to pulmonary pathology and to the development of adaptive immunity that fails to protect against natural infections by this virus. PMID:27413096

  8. Human Intestinal Enteroids: a New Model To Study Human Rotavirus Infection, Host Restriction, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Blutt, Sarah E.; Ettayebi, Khalil; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Broughman, James R.; Crawford, Sue E.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Graham, David Y.; Qureshi, Waqar; Sherman, Vadim; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human gastrointestinal tract research is limited by the paucity of in vitro intestinal cell models that recapitulate the cellular diversity and complex functions of human physiology and disease pathology. Human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures contain multiple intestinal epithelial cell types that comprise the intestinal epithelium (enterocytes and goblet, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cells) and are physiologically active based on responses to agonists. We evaluated these nontransformed, three-dimensional HIE cultures as models for pathogenic infections in the small intestine by examining whether HIEs from different regions of the small intestine from different patients are susceptible to human rotavirus (HRV) infection. Little is known about HRVs, as they generally replicate poorly in transformed cell lines, and host range restriction prevents their replication in many animal models, whereas many animal rotaviruses (ARVs) exhibit a broader host range and replicate in mice. Using HRVs, including the Rotarix RV1 vaccine strain, and ARVs, we evaluated host susceptibility, virus production, and cellular responses of HIEs. HRVs infect at higher rates and grow to higher titers than do ARVs. HRVs infect differentiated enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells, and viroplasms and lipid droplets are induced. Heterogeneity in replication was seen in HIEs from different patients. HRV infection and RV enterotoxin treatment of HIEs caused physiological lumenal expansion detected by time-lapse microscopy, recapitulating one of the hallmarks of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. These results demonstrate that HIEs are a novel pathophysiological model that will allow the study of HRV biology, including host restriction, cell type restriction, and virus-induced fluid secretion. IMPORTANCE Our research establishes HIEs as nontransformed cell culture models to understand human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the epithelial response, including host restriction of

  9. Immunologic resolution of human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Mahadeo, Kris M; Masinsin, Bernadette; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami J; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Parkman, Robertson

    2014-10-01

    To determine the role of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) in the pathogenesis of human chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and its clinical resolution, we evaluated long-term recipients of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Seventy-one recipients were evaluated, 30 of whom had a history of chronic GVHD, including 16 with active chronic GVHD and 14 with resolved chronic GVHD. There were no significant clinical differences and no differences in the frequency of Tregs (CD4(+), CD127(-), CD25(+)) between the recipients with active chronic GVHD and those with resolved chronic GVHD. Using the Miyara/Sakaguchi classification scheme to identify functional Tregs, a decreased frequency of functional resting Tregs (rTregs) was identified in recipients with active chronic GVHD (P = .009 compared with normal donors; P = .001 compared with HSCT recipients without history of chronic GVHD; P = .005 compared with recipients with resolved chronic GVHD). The frequency and number of recent thymic emigrants in rTregs were normal in recipients with resolved chronic GVHD, but persistently decreased in recipients with active chronic GVHD. These results support the hypothesis that the reestablishment of normal numbers of functional rTregs is required for the clinical resolution of chronic GVHD. PMID:24979733

  10. Diurnal variations in the human host response to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Pollmächer, T; Mullington, J; Korth, C; Schreiber, W; Hermann, D; Orth, A; Galanos, C; Holsboer, F

    1996-11-01

    To investigate diurnal variations in the host response to endotoxin, Salmonella abortus equi endotoxin (0.8 ng/kg) was given intravenously to healthy men in a placebo-controlled design at 0900 or 1900 h. The time course of rectal temperature and the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor- alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and cortisol were monitored for 11 h following the injections. The time of day did not affect the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TNF-alpha or IL-6. However, subjects who received endotoxin in the evening, when endogenous glucocorticoid levels were low, showed about twice the increases in rectal temperature and plasma ACTH and cortisol levels as those who received endotoxin in the morning, when endogenous glucocorticoid levels were high. These results demonstrate diurnal variations in the human susceptibility to endotoxin that may be due to a suppression of the biologic effects of TNF-alpha and IL-6 by endogenous glucocorticoids. PMID:8896506

  11. The significance of the host inflammatory response on the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapies utilising human adult stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Melba; Pu, Fanrong; Hunt, John A.

    2012-02-15

    Controlling the fate of implanted hMSCs is one of the major drawbacks to be overcome to realize tissue engineering strategies. In particular, the effect of the inflammatory environment on hMSCs behaviour is poorly understood. Studying and mimicking the inflammatory process in vitro is a very complex and challenging task that involves multiple variables. This research addressed the questions using in vitro co-cultures of primary derived hMSCs together with human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs); the latter are key agents in the inflammatory process. This work explored the in vitro phenotypic changes of hMSCs in co-culture direct contact with monocytes and lymphocytes isolated from blood using both basal and osteogenic medium. Our findings indicated that hMSCs maintained their undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency despite the contact with PBMCs. Moreover, hMSCs demonstrated increased proliferation and were able to differentiate specifically down the osteogenic lineage pathway. Providing significant crucial evidence to support the hypothesis that inflammation and host defence mechanisms could be utilised rather than avoided and combated to provide for the successful therapeutic application of stem cell therapies.

  12. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  13. Fighting the Monster: Applying the Host Damage Framework to Human Central Nervous System Infections

    PubMed Central

    Panackal, Anil A.; Williamson, Kim C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Boulware, David R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The host damage-response framework states that microbial pathogenesis is a product of microbial virulence factors and collateral damage from host immune responses. Immune-mediated host damage is particularly important within the size-restricted central nervous system (CNS), where immune responses may exacerbate cerebral edema and neurological damage, leading to coma and death. In this review, we compare human host and therapeutic responses in representative nonviral generalized CNS infections that induce archetypal host damage responses: cryptococcal menigoencephalitis and tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, pneumococcal meningitis, and cerebral malaria. Consideration of the underlying patterns of host responses provides critical insights into host damage and may suggest tailored adjunctive therapeutics to improve disease outcome. PMID:26814182

  14. Wild felids as hosts for human plague, Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bevins, S.N.; Tracey, J.A.; Franklin, S.P.; Schmit, V.L.; MacMillan, M.L.; Gage, K.L.; Schriefer, M.E.; Logan, K.A.; Sweanor, L.L.; Alldredge, M.W.; Krumm, C.; Boyce, W.M.; Vickers, W.; Riley, S.P.D.; Lyren, L.M.; Boydston, E.E.; Fisher, R.N.; Roelke, M.E.; Salman, M.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2009-01-01

    Plague seroprevalence was estimated in populations pumas and bobcats in the western United States. High levels of exposure in plague-endemic regions indicate the need to consider the ecology and pathobiology of plague nondomestic felid hosts to better understand the role of these species in disease persistence and transmission.

  15. HUMAN DISPERSAL OF A WIDESPREAD ZOONOSIS IN A DOMESTICATED HOST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the evolutionary consequences of swine husbandry for Trichinella spiralis, a food borne parasite that causes severe muscular disease. We find far less genetic diversity in parasites of domesticated pigs than in related parasites of wildlife hosts. In particular, pigs of European origin...

  16. Herbivory: Caterpillar saliva beats plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musser, Richard O.; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Eichenseer, Herb; Peiffer, Michelle; Ervin, Gary; Murphy, J. Brad; Felton, Gary W.

    2002-04-01

    Blood-feeding arthropods secrete special salivary proteins that suppress the defensive reaction they induce in their hosts. This is in contrast to herbivores, which are thought to be helpless victims of plant defences elicited by their oral secretions. On the basis of the finding that caterpillar regurgitant can reduce the amount of toxic nicotine released by the tobacco plant Nicotiana tabacum, we investigate here whether specific salivary components from the caterpillar Helicoverpa zea might be responsible for this suppression. We find that the enzyme glucose oxidase counteracts the production of nicotine induced by the caterpillar feeding on the plant.

  17. Resource conflict and cooperation between human host and gut microbiota: implications for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Wasielewski, Helen; Alcock, Joe; Aktipis, Athena

    2016-05-01

    Diet has been known to play an important role in human health since at least the time period of the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates. In the last decade, research has revealed that microorganisms inhabiting the digestive tract, known as the gut microbiota, are critical factors in human health. This paper draws on concepts of cooperation and conflict from ecology and evolutionary biology to make predictions about host-microbiota interactions involving nutrients. To optimally extract energy from some resources (e.g., fiber), hosts require cooperation from microbes. Other nutrients can be utilized by both hosts and microbes (e.g., simple sugars, iron) in their ingested form, which may lead to greater conflict over these resources. This framework predicts that some negative health effects of foods are driven by the direct effects of these foods on human physiology and by indirect effects resulting from microbiome-host competition and conflict (e.g., increased invasiveness and inflammation). Similarly, beneficial effects of some foods on host health may be enhanced by resource sharing and other cooperative behaviors between host and microbes that may downregulate inflammation and virulence. Given that some foods cultivate cooperation between hosts and microbes while others agitate conflict, host-microbe interactions may be novel targets for interventions aimed at improving nutrition and human health. PMID:27270755

  18. Effects of basic human values on host community acculturation orientations.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Irene; Hichy, Zira; Guarnera, Maria; Nuovo, Santo Di

    2010-08-01

    Although literature provides evidence for the relationship between values and acculturation, the relationship between host community acculturation orientations has not yet been investigated. In this study we tested the effects of four high-order values (openness to change, self-transcendence, conservation, and self-enhancement, devised according to Schwartz's model) on host community acculturation orientations towards immigrants (devised according the interactive acculturation model) in the public domain of employment and the private domain of endogamy/exogamy. Participants were 264 Italian University students, who completed a questionnaire containing the Portrait Values Questionnaire, a measure of personal values, and the Host Community Acculturation Scale, aimed at measuring Italian acculturation strategies towards three groups of immigrants: Immigrants (the general category), Chinese (the valued immigrant group), and Albanians (the devalued immigrant group). Results showed that personal values are related to the adoption of acculturation orientations: In particular, the values that mostly impacted on acculturation orientations were self-transcendence and conservation. Values concerning self-transcendence encourage the adoption of integrationism, integrationism-transformation, and individualism and reduce the adoption of assimilationism, segregationism, and exclusionism. Values concerning conservation encourage the adoption of assimilation, segregation and exclusion orientations and reduce the adoption of both types of integrationism and individualism. Minor effects were found regarding self-enhancement and openness to change. PMID:22044017

  19. Modulation of host CD59 expression by varicella-zoster virus in human xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Yang, Lianwei; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ye, Jianghui; Zhao, Qinjian; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the causative agent of both chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). VZV survives host defenses, even with an intact immune system, and disseminates in the host before causing disease. To date, several diverse immunomodulatory strategies used by VZV to undermine host immunity have been identified; however, few studies have addressed the complement evasion strategies used by this virus. Here, we show that expression of CD59, which is a key member of host regulators of complement activation (RCA), is significantly upregulated in response to VZV infection in human T cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but not in human skin xenografts in SCID-hu mice in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating that VZV infection upregulates host CD59 expression in a tissue-specific manner in vivo, which may aid VZV in complement evasion and pathogenesis. PMID:26891237

  20. Coordinated defence and the liver.

    PubMed

    Elias, Elwyn; Mills, Charles O

    2007-04-01

    The liver is strategically placed to protect the body against a vast array of potentially harmful compounds. The steps involved include phase I metabolism which makes molecules more reactive and phase II reactions which generally enhance solubility in bile or urine. Recent discoveries have shown how regulation of these reactions is also closely allied to expression of membrane transporters which excrete the products of biotransformation into bile and prevent their reabsorption via the intestine. The coordinated activity of these various functions is orchestrated by orphan nuclear receptors which, in response to an encounter with a potential toxin, are able to induce expression of the genes involved in its biotransformation and excretion. Lithocholic acid (LCA) is routinely produced in our intestine by bacterial deconjugation of chenodeoxycholic acid a major bile acid in humans. In human liver the presence of LCA is sensed by the pregnane X receptor (PXR) which has the potential to switch on all the genes required for safe metabolism and elimination of LCA from the body. These include cytochrome P450 3A which hydroxylates LCA to more soluble forms and sulfotransferase (SULT2A1) which by sulphation of LCA makes it more readily solublein bile and enhances its faecal excretion. Similarly, PXR exposure to LCA produces up-regulated expression of the membrane transporters MDR1 and MRP2 which excrete metabolites of LCA. Evidence is accumulating in support of the hypothesis that deficiencies in these defence mechanisms underlie susceptibility to primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. PMID:17491508

  1. Tracking Dengue Virus Intra-host Genetic Diversity during Human-to-Mosquito Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Shuzhen; Aw, Pauline P. K.; Wilm, Andreas; Teoh, Garrett; Hue, Kien Duong Thi; Nguyen, Nguyet Minh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Simmons, Cameron P.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection of an individual human or mosquito host produces a dynamic population of closely-related sequences. This intra-host genetic diversity is thought to offer an advantage for arboviruses to adapt as they cycle between two very different host species, but it remains poorly characterized. To track changes in viral intra-host genetic diversity during horizontal transmission, we infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by allowing them to feed on DENV2-infected patients. We then performed whole-genome deep-sequencing of human- and matched mosquito-derived DENV samples on the Illumina platform and used a sensitive variant-caller to detect single nucleotide variants (SNVs) within each sample. >90% of SNVs were lost upon transition from human to mosquito, as well as from mosquito abdomen to salivary glands. Levels of viral diversity were maintained, however, by the regeneration of new SNVs at each stage of transmission. We further show that SNVs maintained across transmission stages were transmitted as a unit of two at maximum, suggesting the presence of numerous variant genomes carrying only one or two SNVs each. We also present evidence for differences in selection pressures between human and mosquito hosts, particularly on the structural and NS1 genes. This analysis provides insights into how population drops during transmission shape RNA virus genetic diversity, has direct implications for virus evolution, and illustrates the value of high-coverage, whole-genome next-generation sequencing for understanding viral intra-host genetic diversity. PMID:26325059

  2. Hemocytes from Pediculus humanus humanus are hosts for human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Coulaud, Pierre-Julien; Lepolard, Catherine; Bechah, Yassina; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Ghigo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Pediculus humanus humanus is an human ectoparasite which represents a serious public health threat because it is vector for pathogenic bacteria. It is important to understand and identify where bacteria reside in human body lice to define new strategies to counterstroke the capacity of vectorization of the bacterial pathogens by body lice. It is known that phagocytes from vertebrates can be hosts or reservoirs for several microbes. Therefore, we wondered if Pediculus humanus humanus phagocytes could hide pathogens. In this study, we characterized the phagocytes from Pediculus humanus humanus and evaluated their contribution as hosts for human pathogens such as Rickettsia prowazekii, Bartonella Quintana, and Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:25688336

  3. Hemocytes from Pediculus humanus humanus are hosts for human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Coulaud, Pierre-Julien; Lepolard, Catherine; Bechah, Yassina; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Ghigo, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pediculus humanus humanus is an human ectoparasite which represents a serious public health threat because it is vector for pathogenic bacteria. It is important to understand and identify where bacteria reside in human body lice to define new strategies to counterstroke the capacity of vectorization of the bacterial pathogens by body lice. It is known that phagocytes from vertebrates can be hosts or reservoirs for several microbes. Therefore, we wondered if Pediculus humanus humanus phagocytes could hide pathogens. In this study, we characterized the phagocytes from Pediculus humanus humanus and evaluated their contribution as hosts for human pathogens such as Rickettsia prowazekii, Bartonella Quintana, and Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:25688336

  4. Malignant Transformation of Hymenolepis nana in a Human Host.

    PubMed

    Muehlenbachs, Atis; Bhatnagar, Julu; Agudelo, Carlos A; Hidron, Alicia; Eberhard, Mark L; Mathison, Blaine A; Frace, Michael A; Ito, Akira; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Rollin, Dominique C; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Pham, Cau D; Jones, Tara L; Greer, Patricia W; Vélez Hoyos, Alejandro; Olson, Peter D; Diazgranados, Lucy R; Zaki, Sherif R

    2015-11-01

    Neoplasms occur naturally in invertebrates but are not known to develop in tapeworms. We observed nests of monomorphic, undifferentiated cells in samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies in a man infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The morphologic features and invasive behavior of the cells were characteristic of cancer, but their small size suggested a nonhuman origin. A polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay targeting eukaryotes identified Hymenolepis nana DNA. Although the cells were unrecognizable as tapeworm tissue, immunohistochemical staining and probe hybridization labeled the cells in situ. Comparative deep sequencing identified H. nana structural genomic variants that are compatible with mutations described in cancer. Invasion of human tissue by abnormal, proliferating, genetically altered tapeworm cells is a novel disease mechanism that links infection and cancer. PMID:26535513

  5. Bats as reservoir hosts of human bacterial pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis.

    PubMed

    Veikkolainen, Ville; Vesterinen, Eero J; Lilley, Thomas M; Pulliainen, Arto T

    2014-06-01

    A plethora of pathogenic viruses colonize bats. However, bat bacterial flora and its zoonotic threat remain ill defined. In a study initially conducted as a quantitative metagenomic analysis of the fecal bacterial flora of the Daubenton's bat in Finland, we unexpectedly detected DNA of several hemotrophic and ectoparasite-transmitted bacterial genera, including Bartonella. Bartonella spp. also were either detected or isolated from the peripheral blood of Daubenton's, northern, and whiskered bats and were detected in the ectoparasites of Daubenton's, northern, and Brandt's bats. The blood isolates belong to the Candidatus-status species B. mayotimonensis, a recently identified etiologic agent of endocarditis in humans, and a new Bartonella species (B. naantaliensis sp. nov.). Phylogenetic analysis of bat-colonizing Bartonella spp. throughout the world demonstrates a distinct B. mayotimonensis cluster in the Northern Hemisphere. The findings of this field study highlight bats as potent reservoirs of human bacterial pathogens. PMID:24856523

  6. Biofilm and Helicobacter pylori: From environment to human host

    PubMed Central

    García, Apolinaria; Salas-Jara, María José; Herrera, Carolina; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram negative pathogen that selectively colonizes the human gastric epithelium. Over 50% of the world population is infected with H. pylori reaching up to 90% of infected individuals in developing countries. Nonetheless the increased impact upon public health care, its reservoir and the transmission pathway of the species has not been clearly established yet. Molecular studies allowed the detection of H. pylori in various aquatic environments, even forming biofilm in tap water distribution systems in several countries, suggesting a role of water as a possible reservoir of the pathogen. The persistence of human infection with H. pylori and the resistance of clinical isolates to commonly used antibiotics in eradication therapy have been related to the genetic variability of the species and its ability to develop biofilm, demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Thus, during the last years, experimental work with this pathogen has been focused in the search for biofilm inhibitors and biofilm destabilizing agents. However, only two anti- H. pylori biofilm disrupting agents have been successfully used: Curcumin - a natural dye - and N-acetyl cysteine - a mucolytic agent used in respiratory diseases. The main goal of this review was to discuss the evidences available in the literature supporting the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm upon various surfaces in aquatic environments, both in vivo and in vitro. The results published and our own observations suggest that the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm may be important for surviving under stress conditions or in the spread of the infection among humans, mainly through natural water sources and water distribution systems. PMID:24914322

  7. Rapid host switching in generalist Campylobacter strains erodes the signal for tracing human infections.

    PubMed

    Dearlove, Bethany L; Cody, Alison J; Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Wilson, Daniel J; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2016-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the biggest causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world, with human infections typically arising from zoonotic transmission associated with infected meat. Because Campylobacter is not thought to survive well outside the gut, host-associated populations are genetically isolated to varying degrees. Therefore, the likely origin of most strains can be determined by host-associated variation in the genome. This is instructive for characterizing the source of human infection. However, some common strains, notably isolates belonging to the ST-21, ST-45 and ST-828 clonal complexes, appear to have broad host ranges, hindering source attribution. Here whole-genome sequencing has the potential to reveal fine-scale genetic structure associated with host specificity. We found that rates of zoonotic transmission among animal host species in these clonal complexes were so high that the signal of host association is all but obliterated, estimating one zoonotic transmission event every 1.6, 1.8 and 12 years in the ST-21, ST-45 and ST828 complexes, respectively. We attributed 89% of clinical cases to a chicken source, 10% to cattle and 1% to pig. Our results reveal that common strains of C. jejuni and C. coli infectious to humans are adapted to a generalist lifestyle, permitting rapid transmission between different hosts. Furthermore, they show that the weak signal of host association within these complexes presents a challenge for pinpointing the source of clinical infections, underlining the view that whole-genome sequencing, powerful though it is, cannot substitute for intensive sampling of suspected transmission reservoirs. PMID:26305157

  8. Mapping Protein Interactions between Dengue Virus and Its Human and Insect Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, Janet M.; Gomez, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is an increasingly significant arthropod-borne viral disease, with at least 50 million cases per year worldwide. As with other viral pathogens, dengue virus is dependent on its host to perform the bulk of functions necessary for viral survival and replication. To be successful, dengue must manipulate host cell biological processes towards its own ends, while avoiding elimination by the immune system. Protein-protein interactions between the virus and its host are one avenue through which dengue can connect and exploit these host cellular pathways and processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We implemented a computational approach to predict interactions between Dengue virus (DENV) and both of its hosts, Homo sapiens and the insect vector Aedes aegypti. Our approach is based on structural similarity between DENV and host proteins and incorporates knowledge from the literature to further support a subset of the predictions. We predict over 4,000 interactions between DENV and humans, as well as 176 interactions between DENV and A. aegypti. Additional filtering based on shared Gene Ontology cellular component annotation reduced the number of predictions to approximately 2,000 for humans and 18 for A. aegypti. Of 19 experimentally validated interactions between DENV and humans extracted from the literature, this method was able to predict nearly half (9). Additional predictions suggest specific interactions between virus and host proteins relevant to interferon signaling, transcriptional regulation, stress, and the unfolded protein response. Conclusions/Significance Dengue virus manipulates cellular processes to its advantage through specific interactions with the host's protein interaction network. The interaction networks presented here provide a set of hypothesis for further experimental investigation into the DENV life cycle as well as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:21358811

  9. The Integrative Human Microbiome Project: dynamic analysis of microbiome-host omics profiles during periods of human health and disease.

    PubMed

    2014-09-10

    Much has been learned about the diversity and distribution of human-associated microbial communities, but we still know little about the biology of the microbiome, how it interacts with the host, and how the host responds to its resident microbiota. The Integrative Human Microbiome Project (iHMP, http://hmp2.org), the second phase of the NIH Human Microbiome Project, will study these interactions by analyzing microbiome and host activities in longitudinal studies of disease-specific cohorts and by creating integrated data sets of microbiome and host functional properties. These data sets will serve as experimental test beds to evaluate new models, methods, and analyses on the interactions of host and microbiome. Here we describe the three models of microbiome-associated human conditions, on the dynamics of preterm birth, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 2 diabetes, and their underlying hypotheses, as well as the multi-omic data types to be collected, integrated, and distributed through public repositories as a community resource. PMID:25211071

  10. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Hyotylainen, Tuulia; Nielsen, Trine; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Prifti, Edi; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Mattila, Ismo; Plichta, Damian R; Pöhö, Päivi; Hellgren, Lars I; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Jørgensen, Torben; Holm, Jacob Bak; Trošt, Kajetan; Kristiansen, Karsten; Brix, Susanne; Raes, Jeroen; Wang, Jun; Hansen, Torben; Bork, Peer; Brunak, Søren; Oresic, Matej; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Pedersen, Oluf

    2016-07-21

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus are identified as the main species driving the association between biosynthesis of BCAAs and insulin resistance, and in mice we demonstrate that P. copri can induce insulin resistance, aggravate glucose intolerance and augment circulating levels of BCAAs. Our findings suggest that microbial targets may have the potential to diminish insulin resistance and reduce the incidence of common metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27409811

  11. Human and Host Species Transferrin Receptor 1 Use by North American Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Min; Fofana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least five New World (NW) arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in South America. These pathogenic clade B viruses, as well as nonpathogenic arenaviruses of the same clade, use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) of their host species to enter cells. Pathogenic viruses are distinguished from closely related nonpathogenic ones by their additional ability to utilize human TfR1 (hTfR1). Here, we investigate the receptor usage of North American arenaviruses, whose entry proteins share greatest similarity with those of the clade B viruses. We show that all six North American arenaviruses investigated utilize host species TfR1 orthologs and present evidence consistent with arenavirus-mediated selection pressure on the TfR1 of the North American arenavirus host species. Notably, one of these viruses, AV96010151, closely related to the prototype Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV), entered cells using hTfR1, consistent with a role for a WWAV-like virus in three fatal human infections whose causative agent has not been identified. In addition, modest changes were sufficient to convert hTfR1 into a functional receptor for most of these viruses, suggesting that a minor alteration in virus entry protein may allow these viruses to use hTfR1. Our data establish TfR1 as a cellular receptor for North American arenaviruses, highlight an “arms race” between these viruses and their host species, support the association of North American arenavirus with fatal human infections, and suggest that these viruses have a higher potential to emerge and cause human diseases than has previously been appreciated. IMPORTANCE hTfR1 use is a key determinant for a NW arenavirus to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. All known pathogenic NW arenaviruses are transmitted in South America by their host rodents. North American arenaviruses are generally considered nonpathogenic, but some of these viruses have been tentatively implicated in human fatalities. We show that these North American

  12. The Gut Microbiota and Immune System Relationship in Human Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Laterza, Lucrezia; Rizzatti, Gianenrico; Gaetani, Eleonora; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota has gained increasing interest in the pathogenesis of immune-related diseases. In this context, graft-versus-host disease is a condition characterized by an immune response which frequently complicates and limits the outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. Past studies, carried mostly in animals, already supported a relationship between gut microbiota and graft-versus-host disease. However, the possible mechanisms underlying this connection remain elusory. Moreover, strategies to prevent graft-versus-host disease are of great interest as well as the potential role of gut microbiota modulation. We reviewed the role of gut microbiota in the development of immune system and its involvement in the graft-versus-host disease, focusing on data available on humans. PMID:27158438

  13. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas D; Rayner, Julian C; Böhme, Ulrike; Pain, Arnab; Spottiswoode, Natasha; Sanders, Mandy; Quail, Michael; Ollomo, Benjamin; Renaud, François; Thomas, Alan W; Prugnolle, Franck; Conway, David J; Newbold, Chris; Berriman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host-parasite interface may have mediated host switching. PMID:25203297

  14. Human Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Host Factors That Modulate Intracellular Salmonella Growth

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Hundley, Tom; Valdivia, Raphael; Worley, Micah J.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen of humans that can proliferate within epithelial cells as well as professional phagocytes of the immune system. While much has been learned about the microbial genes that influence the infectious process through decades of intensive research, relatively little is known about the host factors that affect infection. We performed a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host genes that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) utilizes to facilitate growth within human epithelial cells. In this screen, with siRNAs targeting every predicted gene in the human genome, we identified 252 new human-host-susceptibility factors (HSFs) for S. typhimurium. We also identified 39 genes whose silencing results in increased intracellular growth of S. typhimurium. The HSFs identified are regulated most centrally by NFκB and associate with each other through an extremely dense network of interactions that center around a group of kinases. Most genes identified were not previously appreciated as playing roles in the intracellular lifecycle of S. enterica. Numerous HSFs identified with interesting characteristics that could play plausible roles in mediating intracellular microbial growth are discussed. Importantly, this study reveals significant overlap between the host network that supports S. typhimurium growth within human epithelial cells and the one that promotes the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages. In addition to providing much new information about the molecular mechanisms underlying S. enterica-host cell interplay, all 252 HSFs identified are candidates for new anti-microbial targets for controlling S. enterica infections, and some may provide broad-spectrum anti-microbial activity. PMID:22701604

  15. Host mitochondrial association evolved in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii via neofunctionalization of a gene duplicate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other warm-blooded animals, the ability to associate with host mitochondria (HMA) is driven by a locally expanded gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. The importance of copy number in the e...

  16. Human carbonic anhydrase II as a host for piano-stool complexes bearing a sulfonamide anchor.

    PubMed

    Monnard, Fabien W; Heinisch, Tillmann; Nogueira, Elisa S; Schirmer, Tilman; Ward, Thomas R

    2011-08-01

    d(6)-piano-stool complexes bearing an arylsulfonamide anchor display sub-micromolar affinity towards human Carbonic Anhydrase II (hCA II). The 1.3 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of [(η(6)-C(6)Me(6))Ru(bispy 3)Cl](+)⊂ hCA II highlights the nature of the host-guest interactions. PMID:21706094

  17. The Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum Is Not Dependent on Host Coenzyme A Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Spry, Christina; Saliba, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Pantothenate, a precursor of the fundamental enzyme cofactor coenzyme A (CoA), is essential for growth of the intraerythrocytic stage of human and avian malaria parasites. Avian malaria parasites have been reported to be incapable of de novo CoA synthesis and instead salvage CoA from the host erythrocyte; hence, pantothenate is required for CoA biosynthesis within the host cell and not the parasite itself. Whether the same is true of the intraerythrocytic stage of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, remained to be established. In this study we investigated the metabolic fate of [14C]pantothenate within uninfected and P. falciparum-infected human erythrocytes. We provide evidence consistent with normal human erythrocytes, unlike rat erythrocytes (which have been reported to possess an incomplete CoA biosynthesis pathway), being capable of CoA biosynthesis from pantothenate. We also show that CoA biosynthesis is substantially higher in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes and that P. falciparum, unlike its avian counterpart, generates most of the CoA synthesized in the infected erythrocyte, presumably necessitated by insufficient CoA biosynthesis in the host erythrocyte. Our data raise the possibility that malaria parasites rationalize their biosynthetic activity depending on the capacity of their host cell to synthesize the metabolites they require. PMID:19584050

  18. Human immunoglobulin production in immunodeficient mice: enhancement by immunosuppression of host and in vitro activation of human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cavacini, L A; Kennel, M; Lally, E V; Posner, M R; Quinn, A

    1992-01-01

    The affect of host and donor related factors on successful engraftment of human cells into mice was examined to minimize the variability that has been observed in successful development of human-mouse chimera for the study of human disease and immune physiology and regulation. Human immunoglobulin production in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was augmented by immunosuppressing recipient mice and activating donor PBMC. Immunosuppression of recipient mice with 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation induced a 10-fold increase in human IgG in the sera of engrafted SCID mice. Variation in production of human IgG in recipient mice correlated with preinjection phenotype and activation status of injected PBMC. Mice injected with PBMC with a low CD4/CD8 ratio (less than 0.5) produced no detectable circulating human immunoglobulin. When the CD4/CD8 ratio was greater than 1.5, human IgG was detected in sera of PBMC-recipient SCID mice. Serum IgG increased 10-fold following in vitro activation of donor PBMC with anti-CD3, IL-2 and Staphylococcus aureus. Successful engraftment and serum IgG production was evidenced by an increase in the recovery of activated human IgG+ cells in the spleens of mice with maximal IgG production. Optimization of functional engraftment required modification of both the host (SCID mice) and the donor cells. PMID:1395094

  19. Host gene constraints and genomic context impact the expression and evolution of human microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    França, Gustavo S.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Galante, Pedro A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that recent miRNAs tend to emerge within coding genes. Here we conjecture that human miRNA evolution is tightly influenced by the genomic context, especially by host genes. Our findings show a preferential emergence of intragenic miRNAs within old genes. We found that miRNAs within old host genes are significantly more broadly expressed than those within young ones. Young miRNAs within old genes are more broadly expressed than their intergenic counterparts, suggesting that young miRNAs have an initial advantage by residing in old genes, and benefit from their hosts' expression control and from the exposure to diverse cellular contexts and target genes. Our results demonstrate that host genes may provide stronger expression constraints to intragenic miRNAs in the long run. We also report associated functional implications, highlighting the genomic context and host genes as driving factors for the expression and evolution of human miRNAs. PMID:27109497

  20. In Defence of the Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  1. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments. PMID:26597205

  2. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  3. At a crossroads: human DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Pavel A; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-07-01

    Human DNA tumor viruses induce host cell proliferation in order to establish the necessary cellular milieu to replicate viral DNA. The consequence of such viral-programmed induction of proliferation coupled with the introduction of foreign replicating DNA structures makes these viruses particularly sensitive to the host DNA damage response machinery. In fact, sensors of DNA damage are often activated and modulated by DNA tumor viruses in both latent and lytic infection. This article focuses on the role of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human DNA tumor viruses, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the DNA damage response in EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human papillomavirus infection. PMID:21927617

  4. Functional genomics approach for the identification of human host factors supporting dengue viral propagation

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, Nicholas J.; Jamison, Sharon F.; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Le Sommer, Caroline; Kim, So Young; Pearson, James; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is endemic throughout tropical regions around the world and there are no approved treatments or anti-transmission agents currently available. Consequently, there exists an enormous unmet need to treat the human diseases caused by DENV and block viral transmission by the mosquito vector. RNAi screening represents an efficient method to expand the pool of known host factors that could become viable targets for treatments or provide rationale to consider available drugs as anti-DENV treatments. We developed a high throughput siRNA-based screening protocol that can identify human DENV host factors. The protocol herein describes the materials and the procedures necessary to screen a human cell line in order to identify genes which are either necessary for or restrict DENV propagation at any stage in the viral life cycle. PMID:24696344

  5. Volatile semiochemical-conditioned attraction of the male yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, to human hosts.

    PubMed

    da Silva Paixão, Kelly; de Castro Pereira, Iuri; Lopes Alves Bottini, Lucilene; Eduardo Eiras, Álvaro

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the olfactory responses of male mosquitoes to kairomones of vertebrate hosts in a dual-port olfactometer. The behavioral responses of unmated and mated male and female mosquitoes from one to ten days old to human odors were compared to the odors of different human hosts. To evaluate the relationship between the age of male mosquitoes and their responses, we performed experiments with males at different ages. Unmated Ae. aegypti males, one to two days old, did not fly upwind to human odor, whereas between three and ten days old they exhibited increased flight activity. The results showed that unmated and mated females were attracted by human odor, but those mated were more attracted by human odor than when unmated. Mated males were, in general, attracted by human odor, while the unmated males were not attracted but showed increased flight activity in the presence of human odor, suggesting swarming behavior. Further studies should be carried out in order to determine the role of human odors on male Ae. aegypti behavior. PMID:26047178

  6. Leaf Colour as a Signal of Chemical Defence to Insect Herbivores in Wild Cabbage (Brassica oleracea)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Lucas; Osorio, Daniel; Hartley, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf colour has been proposed to signal levels of host defence to insect herbivores, but we lack data on herbivory, leaf colour and levels of defence for wild host populations necessary to test this hypothesis. Such a test requires measurements of leaf spectra as they would be sensed by herbivore visual systems, as well as simultaneous measurements of chemical defences and herbivore responses to leaf colour in natural host-herbivore populations. In a large-scale field survey of wild cabbage (Brassica oleracea) populations, we show that variation in leaf colour and brightness, measured according to herbivore spectral sensitivities, predicts both levels of chemical defences (glucosinolates) and abundance of specialist lepidopteran (Pieris rapae) and hemipteran (Brevicoryne brassicae) herbivores. In subsequent experiments, P. rapae larvae achieved faster growth and greater pupal mass when feeding on plants with bluer leaves, which contained lower levels of aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucosinolate-mediated effects on larval performance may thus contribute to the association between P. rapae herbivory and leaf colour observed in the field. However, preference tests found no evidence that adult butterflies selected host plants based on leaf coloration. In the field, B. brassicae abundance varied with leaf brightness but greenhouse experiments were unable to identify any effects of brightness on aphid preference or performance. Our findings suggest that although leaf colour reflects both levels of host defences and herbivore abundance in the field, the ability of herbivores to respond to colour signals may be limited, even in species where performance is correlated with leaf colour. PMID:26353086

  7. Objections to nuclear defence

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, N.; Pole, K.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear deterrence. Topics considered include nuclear warfare, nuclear deterrence and the use of the just war doctrine, political aspects, human survival, moral aspects, the nuclear arms race, the ideology of nuclear deterrence, arms control, proliferation, and public opinion.

  8. Cross-host evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in palm civet and human

    PubMed Central

    Song, Huai-Dong; Tu, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Guo-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zheng, Kui; Lei, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Qiu-Xia; Gao, Yu-Wei; Zhou, Hui-Qiong; Xiang, Hua; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Chern, Shur-Wern Wang; Cheng, Feng; Pan, Chun-Ming; Xuan, Hua; Chen, Sai-Juan; Luo, Hui-Ming; Zhou, Duan-Hua; Liu, Yu-Fei; He, Jian-Feng; Qin, Peng-Zhe; Li, Ling-Hui; Ren, Yu-Qi; Liang, Wen-Jia; Yu, Ye-Dong; Anderson, Larry; Wang, Ming; Xu, Rui-Heng; Wu, Xin-Wei; Zheng, Huan-Ying; Chen, Jin-Ding; Liang, Guodong; Gao, Yang; Liao, Ming; Fang, Ling; Jiang, Li-Yun; Li, Hui; Chen, Fang; Di, Biao; He, Li-Juan; Lin, Jin-Yan; Tong, Suxiang; Kong, Xiangang; Du, Lin; Hao, Pei; Tang, Hua; Bernini, Andrea; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Spiga, Ottavia; Guo, Zong-Ming; Pan, Hai-Yan; He, Wei-Zhong; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Fontanet, Arnaud; Danchin, Antoine; Niccolai, Neri; Li, Yi-Xue; Wu, Chung-I; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    The genomic sequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses from human and palm civet of the 2003/2004 outbreak in the city of Guangzhou, China, were nearly identical. Phylogenetic analysis suggested an independent viral invasion from animal to human in this new episode. Combining all existing data but excluding singletons, we identified 202 single-nucleotide variations. Among them, 17 are polymorphic in palm civets only. The ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide substitution in palm civets collected 1 yr apart from different geographic locations is very high, suggesting a rapid evolving process of viral proteins in civet as well, much like their adaptation in the human host in the early 2002–2003 epidemic. Major genetic variations in some critical genes, particularly the Spike gene, seemed essential for the transition from animal-to-human transmission to human-to-human transmission, which eventually caused the first severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak of 2002/2003. PMID:15695582

  9. Comparative Host Specificity of Human- and Pig- Associated Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Arshnee; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Nielsen, Søren S.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a crucial step in colonization of the skin. In this study, we investigated the differential adherence to human and pig corneocytes of six Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to three human-associated [ST8 (CC8), ST22 (CC22) and ST36(CC30)] and two pig-associated [ST398 (CC398) and ST433(CC30)] clonal lineages, and their colonization potential in the pig host was assessed by in vivo competition experiments. Corneocytes were collected from 11 humans and 21 pigs using D-squame® adhesive discs, and bacterial adherence to corneocytes was quantified by a standardized light microscopy assay. A previously described porcine colonization model was used to assess the potential of the six strains to colonize the pig host. Three pregnant, S. aureus-free sows were inoculated intravaginally shortly before farrowing with different strain mixes [mix 1) human and porcine ST398; mix 2) human ST36 and porcine ST433; and mix 3) human ST8, ST22, ST36 and porcine ST398] and the ability of individual strains to colonize the nasal cavity of newborn piglets was evaluated for 28 days after birth by strain-specific antibiotic selective culture. In the corneocyte assay, the pig-associated ST433 strain and the human-associated ST22 and ST36 strains showed significantly greater adhesion to porcine and human corneocytes, respectively (p<0.0001). In contrast, ST8 and ST398 did not display preferential host binding patterns. In the in vivo competition experiment, ST8 was a better colonizer compared to ST22, ST36, and ST433 prevailed over ST36 in colonizing the newborn piglets. These results are partly in agreement with previous genetic and epidemiological studies indicating the host specificity of ST22, ST36 and ST433 and the broad-host range of ST398. However, our in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed an unexpected ability of ST8 to adhere to porcine corneocytes and persist in the nasal cavity of pigs. PMID:23166643

  10. The Impact of Fusarium Mycotoxins on Human and Animal Host Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Verbrugghe, Elin; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Li, Shaoji; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of food and feed with mycotoxins is a worldwide problem. At present, acute mycotoxicosis caused by high doses is rare in humans and animals. Ingestion of low to moderate amounts of Fusarium mycotoxins is common and generally does not result in obvious intoxication. However, these low amounts may impair intestinal health, immune function and/or pathogen fitness, resulting in altered host pathogen interactions and thus a different outcome of infection. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the impact of Fusarium mycotoxin exposure on human and animal host susceptibility to infectious diseases. On the one hand, exposure to deoxynivalenol and other Fusarium mycotoxins generally exacerbates infections with parasites, bacteria and viruses across a wide range of animal host species. Well-known examples include coccidiosis in poultry, salmonellosis in pigs and mice, colibacillosis in pigs, necrotic enteritis in poultry, enteric septicemia of catfish, swine respiratory disease, aspergillosis in poultry and rabbits, reovirus infection in mice and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus infection in pigs. However, on the other hand, T-2 toxin has been shown to markedly decrease the colonization capacity of Salmonella in the pig intestine. Although the impact of the exposure of humans to Fusarium toxins on infectious diseases is less well known, extrapolation from animal models suggests possible exacerbation of, for instance, colibacillosis and salmonellosis in humans, as well. PMID:24476707

  11. The impact of Fusarium mycotoxins on human and animal host susceptibility to infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Verbrugghe, Elin; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Li, Shaoji; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska

    2014-02-01

    Contamination of food and feed with mycotoxins is a worldwide problem. At present, acute mycotoxicosis caused by high doses is rare in humans and animals. Ingestion of low to moderate amounts of Fusarium mycotoxins is common and generally does not result in obvious intoxication. However, these low amounts may impair intestinal health, immune function and/or pathogen fitness, resulting in altered host pathogen interactions and thus a different outcome of infection. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the impact of Fusarium mycotoxin exposure on human and animal host susceptibility to infectious diseases. On the one hand, exposure to deoxynivalenol and other Fusarium mycotoxins generally exacerbates infections with parasites, bacteria and viruses across a wide range of animal host species. Well-known examples include coccidiosis in poultry, salmonellosis in pigs and mice, colibacillosis in pigs, necrotic enteritis in poultry, enteric septicemia of catfish, swine respiratory disease, aspergillosis in poultry and rabbits, reovirus infection in mice and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus infection in pigs. However, on the other hand, T-2 toxin has been shown to markedly decrease the colonization capacity of Salmonella in the pig intestine. Although the impact of the exposure of humans to Fusarium toxins on infectious diseases is less well known, extrapolation from animal models suggests possible exacerbation of, for instance, colibacillosis and salmonellosis in humans, as well. PMID:24476707

  12. Heterogeneous Feeding Patterns of the Dengue Vector, Aedes aegypti, on Individual Human Hosts in Rural Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Laura C.; Fleisher, Andrew; Ruiz-Moreno, Diego; Vermeylen, Francoise; Wa, Chrystal V.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Edman, John D.; Clark, John M.; Jones, James W.; Kitthawee, Sangvorn; Scott, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mosquito biting frequency and how bites are distributed among different people can have significant epidemiologic effects. An improved understanding of mosquito vector-human interactions would refine knowledge of the entomological processes supporting pathogen transmission and could reveal targets for minimizing risk and breaking pathogen transmission cycles. Methodology and principal findings We used human DNA blood meal profiling of the dengue virus (DENV) vector, Aedes aegypti, to quantify its contact with human hosts and to infer epidemiologic implications of its blood feeding behavior. We determined the number of different people bitten, biting frequency by host age, size, mosquito age, and the number of times each person was bitten. Of 3,677 engorged mosquitoes collected and 1,186 complete DNA profiles, only 420 meals matched people from the study area, indicating that Ae. aegypti feed on people moving transiently through communities to conduct daily business. 10–13% of engorged mosquitoes fed on more than one person. No biting rate differences were detected between high- and low-dengue transmission seasons. We estimate that 43–46% of engorged mosquitoes bit more than one person within each gonotrophic cycle. Most multiple meals were from residents of the mosquito collection house or neighbors. People ≤25 years old were bitten less often than older people. Some hosts were fed on frequently, with three hosts bitten nine times. Interaction networks for mosquitoes and humans revealed biologically significant blood feeding hotspots, including community marketplaces. Conclusion and significance High multiple-feeding rates and feeding on community visitors are likely important features in the efficient transmission and rapid spread of DENV. These results help explain why reducing vector populations alone is difficult for dengue prevention and support the argument for additional studies of mosquito feeding behavior, which when integrated with a

  13. Lipid composition and fluidity of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope and host cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Aloia, R C; Tian, H; Jensen, F C

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is enclosed with a lipid envelope similar in composition to cell plasma membranes and to other viruses. Further, the fluidity, as measured by spin resonance spectroscopy, is low and the viral envelope is among the most highly ordered membranes analyzed. However, the relationship between viral envelope lipids and those of the host cell is not known. Here we demonstrate that the phospholipids within the envelopes of HIV-1RF and HIV-2-L are similar to each other but significantly different from their respective host cell surface membranes. Further, we demonstrate that the cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio of the viral envelope is approximately 2.5 times that of the host cell surface membranes. Consistent with the elevated cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio, the viral envelopes of HIV-1RF and HIV-2-L were shown to be 7.5% and 10.5% more ordered than the plasma membranes of their respective host cells. These data demonstrate that HIV-1 and HIV-2-L select specific lipid domains within the surface membrane of their host cells through which to emerge during viral maturation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8389472

  14. Host Response to Respiratory Bacterial Pathogens as Identified by Integrated Analysis of Human Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven B.; Magid-Slav, Michal; Brown, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory bacterial pathogens are one of the leading causes of infectious death in the world and a major health concern complicated by the rise of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Therapeutics that modulate host genes essential for pathogen infectivity could potentially avoid multi-drug resistance and provide a wider scope of treatment options. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of published human gene expression data generated under challenges from the gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae, respectively. We applied a previously described differential gene and pathway enrichment analysis pipeline to publicly available host mRNA GEO datasets resulting from exposure to bacterial infection. We found 72 canonical human pathways common between four GEO datasets, representing P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae. Although the majority of these pathways are known to be involved with immune response, we found several interesting new interactions such as the SUMO1 pathway that might have a role in bacterial infections. Furthermore, 36 host-bacterial pathways were also shared with our previous results for respiratory virus host gene expression. Based on our pathway analysis we propose several drug-repurposing opportunities supported by the literature. PMID:24086587

  15. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Thomas D.; Rayner, Julian C.; Böhme, Ulrike; Pain, Arnab; Spottiswoode, Natasha; Sanders, Mandy; Quail, Michael; Ollomo, Benjamin; Renaud, François; Thomas, Alan W.; Prugnolle, Franck; Conway, David J.; Newbold, Chris; Berriman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host–parasite interface may have mediated host switching. PMID:25203297

  16. HIV Interaction With Human Host: HIV-2 As a Model of a Less Virulent Infection.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 are the causal agents of AIDS. While similar in many ways, a significant amount of data suggests that HIV-2 is less virulent than HIV-1. In fact, HIV-2 infection is characterized by a longer asymptomatic stage and lower transmission rate, and the majority of HIV-2-infected patients can be classified as long-term non-progressors or elite controllers. The mechanisms underlying the ability of human host to naturally control HIV-2 infection are far from being completely understood. The identification of the differences between HIV-1 and HIV-2 interactions with human host cells could provide important insights into several aspects of retroviral pathogenesis that remain elusive, with significant implications for HIV vaccine development and therapy. In this review, we delve into some of the differences that notably distinguish HIV-2 from HIV-1, highlighting possible consequences in the pathogenesis and natural history of both infections. PMID:26936760

  17. Host switching of human lice to new world monkeys in South America.

    PubMed

    Drali, Rezak; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Boutellis, Amina; Djossou, Félix; Barker, Stephen C; Raoult, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The coevolution between a host and its obligate parasite is exemplified in the sucking lice that infest primates. In the context of close lice-host partnerships and cospeciation, Pediculus mjobergi, the louse of New World primates, has long been puzzling because its morphology resembles that of human lice. To investigate the possibility that P. mjobergi was transmitted to monkeys from the first humans who set foot on the American continent thousands of years ago, we obtained and compared P. mjobergi lice collected from howler monkeys from Argentina to human lice gathered from a remote and isolated village in Amazonia that has escaped globalization. Morphological examinations were first conducted and verified the similarity between the monkey and human lice. The molecular characterization of several nuclear and mitochondrial genetic markers in the two types of lice revealed that one of the P. mjobergi specimens had a unique haplotype that clustered with the haplotypes of Amazonian head lice that are prevalent in tropical regions in the Americas, a natural habitat of New World monkeys. Because this phylogenetic group forms a separate branch within the clade of lice from humans that were of American origin, this finding indicates that human lice have transferred to New World monkeys. PMID:26867815

  18. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  19. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  20. Antimicrobial proteins and peptides in human lung diseases: A friend and foe partnership with host proteases.

    PubMed

    Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Andrault, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Lung antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are major sentinels of innate immunity by preventing microbial colonization and infection. Nevertheless bactericidal activity of AMPs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is compromised in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF) and asthma. Evidence is accumulating that expression of harmful human serine proteases, matrix metalloproteases and cysteine cathepsins is markedely increased in these chronic lung diseases. The local imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors compromises lung tissue integrity and function, by not only degrading extracellular matrix components, but also non-matrix proteins. Despite the fact that AMPs are somewhat resistant to proteolytic degradation, some human proteases cleave them efficiently and impair their antimicrobial potency. By contrast, certain AMPs may be effective as antiproteases. Host proteases participate in concert with bacterial proteases in the degradation of key innate immunity peptides/proteins and thus may play immunomodulatory activities during chronic lung diseases. In this context, the present review highlights the current knowledge and recent discoveries on the ability of host enzymes to interact with AMPs, providing a better understanding of the role of human proteases in innate host defense. PMID:26341472

  1. Restless Genomes: Humans as a Model Organism for Understanding Host-Retrotransposable Element Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, Dale J.; Belancio, Victoria P.

    2015-01-01

    Since their initial discovery in maize, there have been various attempts to categorize the relationship between transposable elements (TEs) and their host organisms. These have ranged from TEs being selfish parasites to their role as essential, functional components of organismal biology. Research over the past several decades has, in many respects, only served to complicate the issue even further. On the one hand, investigators have amassed substantial evidence concerning the negative effects that TE-mutagenic activity can have on host genomes and organismal fitness. On the other hand, we find an increasing number of examples, across several taxa, of TEs being incorporated into functional biological roles for their host organism. Some 45% of our own genomes are comprised of TE copies. While many of these copies are dormant, having lost their ability to mobilize, several lineages continue to actively proliferate in modern human populations. With its complement of ancestral and active TEs, the human genome exhibits key aspects of the host–TE dynamic that has played out since early on in organismal evolution. In this review, we examine what insights the particularly well-characterized human system can provide regarding the nature of the host–TE interaction. PMID:21310298

  2. Human cytomegalovirus RL13 protein interacts with host NUDT14 protein affecting viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanping; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the host and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is important in determining the outcome of a viral infection. The HCMV RL13 gene product exerts independent, inhibitory effects on viral growth in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. At present, there are few reports on the interactions between the HCMV RL13 protein and human host proteins. The present study provided direct evidence for the specific interaction between HCMV RL13 and host nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)‑type motif 14 (NUDT14), a UDP‑glucose pyrophosphatase, using two‑hybrid screening, an in vitro glutathione S‑transferase pull‑down assay, and co‑immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Additionally, the RL13 protein was shown to co‑localize with the NUDT14 protein in the HEK293 cell membrane and cytoplasm, demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Decreasing the expression level of NUDT14 via NUDT14‑specific small interfering RNAs increased the number of viral DNA copies in the HCMV‑infected cells. However, the overexpression of NUDT14 in a stably expressing cell line did not affect viral DNA levels significantly in the HCMV infected cells. Based on the known functions of NUDT14, the results of the present study suggested that the interaction between the RL13 protein and NUDT14 protein may be involved in HCMV DNA replication, and that NUDT14 may offer potential in the modulation of viral infection. PMID:26781650

  3. Complement in disease: a defence system turning offensive.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2016-07-01

    Although the complement system is primarily perceived as a host defence system, a more versatile, yet potentially more harmful side of this innate immune pathway as an inflammatory mediator also exists. The activities that define the ability of the complement system to control microbial threats and eliminate cellular debris - such as sensing molecular danger patterns, generating immediate effectors, and extensively coordinating with other defence pathways - can quickly turn complement from a defence system to an aggressor that drives immune and inflammatory diseases. These host-offensive actions become more pronounced with age and are exacerbated by a variety of genetic factors and autoimmune responses. Complement can also be activated inappropriately, for example in response to biomaterials or transplants. A wealth of research over the past two decades has led to an increasingly finely tuned understanding of complement activation, identified tipping points between physiological and pathological behaviour, and revealed avenues for therapeutic intervention. This Review summarizes our current view of the key activating, regulatory, and effector mechanisms of the complement system, highlighting important crosstalk connections, and, with an emphasis on kidney disease and transplantation, discusses the involvement of complement in clinical conditions and promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:27211870

  4. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Osnat; Cohen, Yifat; Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  5. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  6. Mechanisms and ecological consequences of plant defence induction and suppression in herbivore communities

    PubMed Central

    Kant, M. R.; Jonckheere, W.; Knegt, B.; Lemos, F.; Liu, J.; Schimmel, B. C. J.; Villarroel, C. A.; Ataide, L. M. S.; Dermauw, W.; Glas, J. J.; Egas, M.; Janssen, A.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Schuurink, R. C.; Sabelis, M. W.; Alba, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plants are hotbeds for parasites such as arthropod herbivores, which acquire nutrients and energy from their hosts in order to grow and reproduce. Hence plants are selected to evolve resistance, which in turn selects for herbivores that can cope with this resistance. To preserve their fitness when attacked by herbivores, plants can employ complex strategies that include reallocation of resources and the production of defensive metabolites and structures. Plant defences can be either prefabricated or be produced only upon attack. Those that are ready-made are referred to as constitutive defences. Some constitutive defences are operational at any time while others require activation. Defences produced only when herbivores are present are referred to as induced defences. These can be established via de novo biosynthesis of defensive substances or via modifications of prefabricated substances and consequently these are active only when needed. Inducibility of defence may serve to save energy and to prevent self-intoxication but also implies that there is a delay in these defences becoming operational. Induced defences can be characterized by alterations in plant morphology and molecular chemistry and are associated with a decrease in herbivore performance. These alterations are set in motion by signals generated by herbivores. Finally, a subset of induced metabolites are released into the air as volatiles and function as a beacon for foraging natural enemies searching for prey, and this is referred to as induced indirect defence. Scope The objective of this review is to evaluate (1) which strategies plants have evolved to cope with herbivores and (2) which traits herbivores have evolved that enable them to counter these defences. The primary focus is on the induction and suppression of plant defences and the review outlines how the palette of traits that determine induction/suppression of, and resistance/susceptibility of herbivores to, plant defences can

  7. Modulation of host defense peptide-mediated human mast cell activation by LPS

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kshitij; Subramanian, Hariharan; Ali, Hydar

    2016-01-01

    Human β-defensin3 (hBD3) and the cathelicidin LL-37 are host defense peptides (HDPs) that directly kill microbes and display immunomodulatory/wound healing properties via the activation of chemokine, formylpeptide and epidermal growth factor receptors on monocytes and epithelial cells. A C-terminal 14 amino acid hBD3 peptide with all Cys residues replaced with Ser (CHRG01) and an LL-37 peptide consisting of residues 17-29 (FK-13) display antimicrobial activity but lack immunomodulatory property. Surprisingly, we found that CHRG01 and FK-13 caused Ca2+ mobilization and degranulation in human mast cells via a novel G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) known as Mas-related gene-X2 (MrgX2). At local sites of bacterial infection, the negatively charged LPS likely interacts with cationic HDPs to inhibit their activity and thus providing a mechanism for pathogens to escape the host defense mechanisms. We found that LPS caused almost complete inhibition of hBD3 and LL-37-induced Ca2+ mobilization and mast cell degranulation. In contrast, it had no effect on CHRG01 and FK-13-induced mast cell responses. These findings suggest that HDP derivatives that kill microbes, harness mast cell’s host defense and wound healing properties via the activation of MrgX2 but are resistant to inhibition by LPS could be utilized for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant microbial infections. PMID:26511058

  8. IL-36γ Augments Host Defense and Immune Responses in Human Female Reproductive Tract Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Sean M.; Throop, Andrea L.; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    IL-36γ is a proinflamatory cytokine which belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines. It is expressed in the skin and by epithelial cells (ECs) lining lung and gut tissue. We used human 3-D organotypic cells, that recapitulate either in vivo human vaginal or cervical tissue, to explore the possible role of IL-36γ in host defense against pathogens in the human female reproductive tract (FRT). EC were exposed to compounds derived from virus or bacterial sources and induction and regulation of IL-36γ and its receptor was determined. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flagellin, and synthetic lipoprotein (FSL-1) significantly induced expression of IL-36γ in a dose-dependent manner, and appeared to be TLR-dependent. Recombinant IL-36γ treatment resulted in self-amplification of IL-36γ and its receptor (IL-36R) via increased gene expression, and promoted other inflammatory signaling pathways. This is the first report to demonstrate that the IL-36 receptor and IL-36γ are present in the human FRT EC and that they are differentially induced by microbial products at this site. We conclude that IL-36γ is a driver for epithelial and immune activation following microbial insult and, as such, may play a critical role in host defense in the FRT. PMID:27379082

  9. Host-Pathogen Interaction Profiling Using Self-Assembling Human Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; Decker, Kimberly B.; Barker, Kristi; Neunuebel, M. Ramona; Saul, Justin; Graves, Morgan; Westcott, Nathan; Hang, Howard; LaBaer, Joshua; Qiu, Ji; Machner, Matthias P.

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen protein interactions are fundamental to every microbial infection, yet their identification has remained challenging due to the lack of simple detection tools that avoid abundance biases while providing an open format for experimental modifications. Here, we applied the Nucleic Acid-Programmable Protein Array and a HaloTag-Halo ligand detection system to determine the interaction network of Legionella pneumophila effectors (SidM and LidA) with 10,000 unique human proteins. We identified known targets of these L. pneumophila proteins and potentially novel interaction candidates. In addition, we applied our Click chemistry-based NAPPA platform to identify the substrates for SidM, an effector with an adenylyl transferase domain that catalyzes AMPylation (adenylylation), the covalent addition of adenosine monophosphate (AMP). We confirmed a subset of the novel SidM and LidA targets in independent in vitro pull-down and in vivo cell-based assays, and provided further insight into how these effectors may discriminate between different host Rab GTPases. Our method circumvents the purification of thousands of human and pathogen proteins, and does not require antibodies against or pre-labeling of query proteins. This system is amenable to high-throughput analysis of effectors from a wide variety of human pathogens that may bind to and/or post-translationally modify targets within the human proteome. PMID:25739981

  10. Comparative genomics reveals distinct host-interacting traits of three major human-associated propionibacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propionibacteria are part of the human microbiota. Many studies have addressed the predominant colonizer of sebaceous follicles of the skin, Propionibacterium acnes, and investigated its association with the skin disorder acne vulgaris, and lately with prostate cancer. Much less is known about two other propionibacterial species frequently found on human tissue sites, Propionibacterium granulosum and Propionibacterium avidum. Here we analyzed two and three genomes of P. granulosum and P. avidum, respectively, and compared them to two genomes of P. acnes; we further highlight differences among the three cutaneous species with proteomic and microscopy approaches. Results Electron and atomic force microscopy revealed an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-like structure surrounding P. avidum cells, that is absent in P. acnes and P. granulosum. In contrast, P. granulosum possesses pili-like appendices, which was confirmed by surface proteome analysis. The corresponding genes were identified; they are clustered with genes encoding sortases. Both, P. granulosum and P. avidum lack surface or secreted proteins for predicted host-interacting factors of P. acnes, including several CAMP factors, sialidases, dermatan-sulphate adhesins, hyaluronidase and a SH3 domain-containing lipoprotein; accordingly, only P. acnes exhibits neuraminidase and hyaluronidase activities. These functions are encoded on previously unrecognized island-like regions in the genome of P. acnes. Conclusions Despite their omnipresence on human skin little is known about the role of cutaneous propionibacteria. All three species are associated with a variety of diseases, including postoperative and device-related abscesses and infections. We showed that the three organisms have evolved distinct features to interact with their human host. Whereas P. avidum and P. granulosum produce an EPS-like surface structure and pili-like appendices, respectively, P. acnes possesses a number of unique surface

  11. Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Reveals Human Host-Microbiota Signatures of Crohn's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Alison L; Cantarel, Brandi; Lamendella, Regina; Darzi, Youssef; Mongodin, Emmanuel; Pan, Chongle; Shah, Manesh B; Halfvarsson, J; Tysk, C; Henrissat, Bernard; Raes, Jeroen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Fraser-Liggett, C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Jansson, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  12. Protective host defense against disseminated candidiasis is impaired in mice expressing human interleukin-37.

    PubMed

    van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Gresnigt, Mark S; Oosting, Marije; van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-37 (IL-37) on host defense against Candida infections remains unknown. We assessed the role of IL-37 in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis using mice transgenic for human IL-37 (hIL-37Tg). Upon exposure to Candida albicans pseudohyphae, macrophages from hIL-37Tg mice release 39% less TNFα compared to cells from wild-type (WT) mice (p = 0.01). In vivo, hIL-37Tg mice displayed a decreased capacity to recruit neutrophils to the site of infection. These defects were associated with increased mortality and organ fungal growth in hIL-37Tg compared to WT mice. We conclude that IL-37 interferes with the innate protective anti-Candida host response by reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and suppressing neutrophil recruitment in response to Candida, resulting in an increased susceptibility to disseminated candidiasis. PMID:25620965

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  14. Evolution of behavioural and cellular defences against parasitoid wasps in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Z R; Schlenke, T A; de Roode, J C

    2016-05-01

    It may be intuitive to predict that host immune systems will evolve to counter a broad range of potential challenges through simultaneous investment in multiple defences. However, this would require diversion of resources from other traits, such as growth, survival and fecundity. Therefore, ecological immunology theory predicts that hosts will specialize in only a subset of possible defences. We tested this hypothesis through a comparative study of a cellular immune response and a putative behavioural defence used by eight fruit fly species against two parasitoid wasp species (one generalist and one specialist). Fly larvae can survive infection by melanotically encapsulating wasp eggs, and female flies can potentially reduce infection rates in their offspring by laying fewer eggs when wasps are present. The strengths of both defences varied significantly but were not negatively correlated across our chosen host species; thus, we found no evidence for a trade-off between behavioural and cellular immunity. Instead, cellular defences were significantly weaker against the generalist wasp, whereas behavioural defences were similar in strength against both wasps and positively correlated between wasps. We investigated the adaptive significance of wasp-induced oviposition reduction behaviour by testing whether wasp-exposed parents produce offspring with stronger cellular defences, but we found no support for this hypothesis. We further investigated the sensory basis of this behaviour by testing mutants deficient in either vision or olfaction, both of which failed to reduce their oviposition rates in the presence of wasps, suggesting that both senses are necessary for detecting and responding to wasps. PMID:26859227

  15. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanpin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns.Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer inHCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis. PMID:27240978

  16. Host gene expression for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Park, Hongtae; Park, Hyun-Eui; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, which causes considerable economic loss in the dairy industry and has a possible relationship to Crohn's disease (CD) in humans. As MAP has been detected in retail pasteurized milk samples, its transmission via milk is of concern. Despite its possible role in the etiology of CD, there have been few studies examining the interactions between MAP and human cells. In the current study, we applied Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to the transcription profiles generated from a murine model with MAP infection as part of a previously conducted study. Twenty-one genes were selected as potential host immune responses, compared with the transcriptional profiles in naturally MAP-infected cattle, and validated in MAP-infected human monocyte-derived macrophage THP-1 cells. Of these, the potential host responses included up-regulation of genes related to immune response (CD14, S100A8, S100A9, LTF, HP and CHCIL3), up-regulation of Th1-polarizing factor (CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10), down-regulation of genes related to metabolism (ELANE, IGF1, TCF7L2 and MPO) and no significant response of other genes (GADD45a, GPNMB, HMOX1, IFNG and NQO1) in THP-1 cells infected with MAP. PMID:25877879

  17. Host cellular annexin II is associated with cytomegalovirus particles isolated from cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J F; Kurosky, A; Pryzdial, E L; Wasi, S

    1995-01-01

    A significant amount of host cellular annexin II was found to be associated with human cytomegalovirus isolated from cultured human fibroblasts (approximately 1,160 molecules per virion). This composition was established by four different analytical approaches that included (i) Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of gradient-purified virions with a monoclonal antibody specific for annexin II, (ii) peptide mapping and sequence analysis of virus-associated proteins and proteins dissociated from virus following EDTA treatment, (iii) electron microscopic immunocytochemistry of gradient-purified virions, and (iv) labeling of virus-associated proteins by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination. These results indicated that annexin II was primarily localized to the viral surface, where it bound in a divalent cation-dependent manner. In functional experiments, a rabbit antiserum raised against annexin II inhibited cytomegalovirus plaque formation in human foreskin fibroblast monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner. Cumulatively, these studies demonstrate an association of host annexin II with cytomegalovirus particles and provide evidence for the involvement of this cellular protein in virus infectivity. PMID:7609045

  18. Host-microbe interactions in the neonatal intestine: role of human milk oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Sharon M; Wang, Mei; Li, Min; Friedberg, Iddo; Schwartz, Scott L; Chapkin, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    The infant intestinal microbiota is shaped by genetics and environment, including the route of delivery and early dietary intake. Data from germ-free rodents and piglets support a critical role for the microbiota in regulating gastrointestinal and immune development. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) both directly and indirectly influence intestinal development by regulating cell proliferation, acting as prebiotics for beneficial bacteria and modulating immune development. We have shown that the gut microbiota, the microbial metatranscriptome, and metabolome differ between porcine milk-fed and formula-fed (FF) piglets. Our goal is to define how early nutrition, specifically HMO, shapes host-microbe interactions in breast-fed (BF) and FF human infants. We an established noninvasive method that uses stool samples containing intact sloughed epithelial cells to quantify intestinal gene expression profiles in human infants. We hypothesized that a systems biology approach, combining i) HMO composition of the mother's milk with the infant's gut gene expression and fecal bacterial composition, ii) gene expression, and iii short-chain fatty acid profiles would identify important mechanistic pathways affecting intestinal development of BF and FF infants in the first few months of life. HMO composition was analyzed by HLPC Chip/time-of-flight MS and 3 HMO clusters were identified using principle component analysis. Initial findings indicated that both host epithelial cell mRNA expression and the microbial phylogenetic profiles provided strong feature sets that distinctly classified the BF and FF infants. Ongoing analyses are designed to integrate the host transcriptome, bacterial phylogenetic profiles, and functional metagenomic data using multivariate statistical analyses. PMID:22585924

  19. Gnotobiotic mouse model of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alejandro; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Rohwer, Forest L.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (phages) are the most abundant biological group on Earth and are more genetically diverse than their bacterial prey/hosts. To characterize their role as agents shaping gut microbial community structure, adult germ-free mice were colonized with a consortium of 15 sequenced human bacterial symbionts, 13 of which harbored one or more predicted prophages. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, was represented by a library of isogenic transposon mutants that covered 90% of its genes. Once assembled, the community was subjected to a staged phage attack with a pool of live or heat-killed virus-like particles (VLPs) purified from the fecal microbiota of five healthy humans. Shotgun sequencing of DNA from the input pooled VLP preparation plus shotgun sequencing of gut microbiota samples and purified fecal VLPs from the gnotobiotic mice revealed a reproducible nonsimultaneous pattern of attack extending over a 25-d period that involved five phages, none described previously. This system allowed us to (i) correlate increases in specific phages present in the pooled VLPs with reductions in the representation of particular bacterial taxa, (ii) provide evidence that phage resistance occurred because of ecological or epigenetic factors, (iii) track the origin of each of the five phages among the five human donors plus the extent of their genome variation between and within recipient mice, and (iv) establish the dramatic in vivo fitness advantage that a locus within a B. cellulosilyticus prophage confers upon its host. Together, these results provide a defined community-wide view of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the gut. PMID:24259713

  20. Host-Microbe Interactions in the Neonatal Intestine: Role of Human Milk Oligosaccharides123

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Sharon M.; Wang, Mei; Li, Min; Friedberg, Iddo; Schwartz, Scott L.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The infant intestinal microbiota is shaped by genetics and environment, including the route of delivery and early dietary intake. Data from germ-free rodents and piglets support a critical role for the microbiota in regulating gastrointestinal and immune development. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) both directly and indirectly influence intestinal development by regulating cell proliferation, acting as prebiotics for beneficial bacteria and modulating immune development. We have shown that the gut microbiota, the microbial metatranscriptome, and metabolome differ between porcine milk–fed and formula-fed (FF) piglets. Our goal is to define how early nutrition, specifically HMO, shapes host-microbe interactions in breast-fed (BF) and FF human infants. We an established noninvasive method that uses stool samples containing intact sloughed epithelial cells to quantify intestinal gene expression profiles in human infants. We hypothesized that a systems biology approach, combining i) HMO composition of the mother’s milk with the infant’s gut gene expression and fecal bacterial composition, ii) gene expression, and iii short-chain fatty acid profiles would identify important mechanistic pathways affecting intestinal development of BF and FF infants in the first few months of life. HMO composition was analyzed by HLPC Chip/time-of-flight MS and 3 HMO clusters were identified using principle component analysis. Initial findings indicated that both host epithelial cell mRNA expression and the microbial phylogenetic profiles provided strong feature sets that distinctly classified the BF and FF infants. Ongoing analyses are designed to integrate the host transcriptome, bacterial phylogenetic profiles, and functional metagenomic data using multivariate statistical analyses. PMID:22585924

  1. Gnotobiotic mouse model of phage-bacterial host dynamics in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alejandro; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P; Rohwer, Forest L; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2013-12-10

    Bacterial viruses (phages) are the most abundant biological group on Earth and are more genetically diverse than their bacterial prey/hosts. To characterize their role as agents shaping gut microbial community structure, adult germ-free mice were colonized with a consortium of 15 sequenced human bacterial symbionts, 13 of which harbored one or more predicted prophages. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, was represented by a library of isogenic transposon mutants that covered 90% of its genes. Once assembled, the community was subjected to a staged phage attack with a pool of live or heat-killed virus-like particles (VLPs) purified from the fecal microbiota of five healthy humans. Shotgun sequencing of DNA from the input pooled VLP preparation plus shotgun sequencing of gut microbiota samples and purified fecal VLPs from the gnotobiotic mice revealed a reproducible nonsimultaneous pattern of attack extending over a 25-d period that involved five phages, none described previously. This system allowed us to (i) correlate increases in specific phages present in the pooled VLPs with reductions in the representation of particular bacterial taxa, (ii) provide evidence that phage resistance occurred because of ecological or epigenetic factors, (iii) track the origin of each of the five phages among the five human donors plus the extent of their genome variation between and within recipient mice, and (iv) establish the dramatic in vivo fitness advantage that a locus within a B. cellulosilyticus prophage confers upon its host. Together, these results provide a defined community-wide view of phage-bacterial host dynamics in the gut. PMID:24259713

  2. Admixture in Humans of Two Divergent Plasmodium knowlesi Populations Associated with Different Macaque Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Divis, Paul C. S.; Singh, Balbir; Anderios, Fread; Hisam, Shamilah; Matusop, Asmad; Kocken, Clemens H.; Assefa, Samuel A.; Duffy, Craig W.; Conway, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Human malaria parasite species were originally acquired from other primate hosts and subsequently became endemic, then spread throughout large parts of the world. A major zoonosis is now occurring with Plasmodium knowlesi from macaques in Southeast Asia, with a recent acceleration in numbers of reported cases particularly in Malaysia. To investigate the parasite population genetics, we developed sensitive and species-specific microsatellite genotyping protocols and applied these to analysis of samples from 10 sites covering a range of >1,600 km within which most cases have occurred. Genotypic analyses of 599 P. knowlesi infections (552 in humans and 47 in wild macaques) at 10 highly polymorphic loci provide radical new insights on the emergence. Parasites from sympatric long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and pig-tailed macaques (M. nemestrina) were very highly differentiated (FST = 0.22, and K-means clustering confirmed two host-associated subpopulations). Approximately two thirds of human P. knowlesi infections were of the long-tailed macaque type (Cluster 1), and one third were of the pig-tailed-macaque type (Cluster 2), with relative proportions varying across the different sites. Among the samples from humans, there was significant indication of genetic isolation by geographical distance overall and within Cluster 1 alone. Across the different sites, the level of multi-locus linkage disequilibrium correlated with the degree of local admixture of the two different clusters. The widespread occurrence of both types of P. knowlesi in humans enhances the potential for parasite adaptation in this zoonotic system. PMID:26020959

  3. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Hoellsberg, Per . E-mail: ph@microbiology.au.dk

    2006-12-20

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction.

  4. Host-specific driving force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolution in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Diaz, R S; Ho, D D; Mosley, J W; Busch, M P; Mayer, A

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the process of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution in vivo, a total of 179 HIV-1 V3 sequences derived from cell-free plasma were determined from serial samples in three epidemiologically linked individuals (one infected blood donor and two transfusion recipients) over a maximum period of 8 years. A systematic analysis of pairwise comparisons of intrapatient sequences, both within and between each sample time point, revealed a preponderance and accumulation of nonsynonymous rather than synonymous substitutions in the V3 loop and flanking regions as they diverged over time. This strongly argues for the dominant role that positive selection for amino acid change plays in governing the pattern and process of HIV-1 env V3 evolution in vivo and nullifies hypotheses of purely neutral or mutation-driven evolution or completely chance events. In addition, different rates of evolution of HIV-1 were observed in these three different individuals infected with the same viral strain, suggesting that the degree of positive pressure for HIV-1 amino acid change is host dependent. Finally, the observed similar rate of accumulation in divergence within and between infected individuals suggests that the process of genetic divergence in the HIV epidemic proceeds regardless of host-to-host transmission events, i.e., that transmission does not reset the evolutionary clock. PMID:9032400

  5. Mechanism and function of type IV secretion during infection of the human host

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rivera, Christian; Bhatty, Minny; Christie, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) for various purposes to aid in survival and proliferation in eukaryotic host. One large T4SS subfamily, the conjugation systems, confers a selective advantage to the invading pathogen in clinical settings through dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence traits. Besides their intrinsic importance as principle contributors to the emergence of multiply drug-resistant ‘superbugs’, detailed studies of these highly tractable systems have generated important new insights into the mode of action and architectures of paradigmatic T4SSs as a foundation for future efforts aimed at suppressing T4SS machine function. Over the past decade, extensive work on the second large T4SS subfamily, the effector translocators, has identified a myriad of mechanisms employed by pathogens to subvert, subdue, or bypass cellular processes and signaling pathways of the host cell. An overarching theme in the evolution of many effectors is that of molecular mimicry. These effectors carry domains similar to those of eukaryotic proteins and exert their effects through stealthy interdigitation of cellular pathways, often with the outcome not of inducing irreversible cell damage but rather of reversibly modulating cellular functions. This chapter summarizes the major developments for the actively studied pathogens with an emphasis on the structural and functional diversity of the T4SSs and the emerging common themes surrounding effector function in the human host. PMID:27337453

  6. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ‘HPV’, ‘cervical’, ‘CIN’, ‘polymorphism(s)’, ‘cervical’+ *the name of the gene* and ‘HPV’+ *the name of the gene*. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals. PMID:22345983

  7. Effector-triggered defence against apoplastic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stotz, Henrik U; Mitrousia, Georgia K; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Fitt, Bruce D L

    2014-08-01

    R gene-mediated host resistance against apoplastic fungal pathogens is not adequately explained by the terms pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) or effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Therefore, it is proposed that this type of resistance is termed 'effector-triggered defence' (ETD). Unlike PTI and ETI, ETD is mediated by R genes encoding cell surface-localised receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that engage the receptor-like kinase SOBIR1. In contrast to this extracellular recognition, ETI is initiated by intracellular detection of pathogen effectors. ETI is usually associated with fast, hypersensitive host cell death, whereas ETD often triggers host cell death only after an elapsed period of endophytic pathogen growth. In this opinion, we focus on ETD responses against foliar fungal pathogens of crops. PMID:24856287

  8. M062 Is a Host Range Factor Essential for Myxoma Virus Pathogenesis and Functions as an Antagonist of Host SAMD9 in Human Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Zhang, Leiliang; McFadden, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) M062R is a functional homolog of the C7L family of host range genes from orthopoxviruses. We constructed a targeted M062R-knockout-MYXV (vMyxM062-KO) and characterized its properties in vitro and in vivo. In European rabbits, infection by vMyxM062-KO was completely asymptomatic. The surviving rabbits did not gain full protection against the subsequent lethal-dose challenge with wild-type MYXV. We also looked for cellular tropism defects in a variety of cultured cells. In all of the rabbit cells tested, vMyxM062-KO conducts an abortive infection, although it initiates viral DNA replication. In many, but not all, human cancer cells that are permissive for wild-type MYXV, vMyxM062-KO exhibited a profound replication defect. We categorized human cells tested into two groups: (i) type A, which support productive replication for wild-type MYXV but are unable to produce significant levels of progeny virus by vMyxM062-KO, and (ii) type B, which are permissive to infections by both wild-type MYXV and vMyxM062-KO. Furthermore, using proteomic strategies, we identified sterile α motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9), an interferon-regulated cellular protein implicated in human inflammatory disorders, as a unique host binding partner of M062 in human cells. Significantly, knocking down SAMD9 in type A human cancer cells led to a substantial rescue of vMyxM062-KO infection. In summary, M062 is a novel host range factor that controls productive MYXV replication in rabbit cells and in a wide variety of human cells. M062 also binds and antagonizes cellular SAMD9 in human cells, suggesting that SAMD9 is a novel innate antiviral factor against poxviruses. PMID:21248034

  9. Insects had it first: surfactants as a defence against predators

    PubMed Central

    Rostás, Michael; Blassmann, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    Insects have evolved an astonishing array of defences to ward off enemies. Well known and widespread is the regurgitation of oral secretion (OS), fluid that repels attacking predators. In herbivores, the effectiveness of OS has been ascribed so far to the presence of deterrent secondary metabolites sequestered from the host plant. This notion implies, however, that generalists experience less protection on plants with low amounts of secondary metabolites or with compounds ineffective against potential enemies. Resolving the dilemma, we describe a novel defence mechanism that is independent of deterrents as it relies on the intrinsic detergent properties of the OS. The OS of Spodoptera exigua (and other species) was found to be highly amphiphilic and well capable of wetting the hydrophobic cuticle of predatory ants. As a result, affected ants stopped attacking and engaged in extensive cleansing. The presence of surfactants was sufficient to explain the defensive character of herbivore OS. We hypothesize that detergency is a common but unrecognized mode of defence, which provides a base level of protection that may or may not be further enhanced by plant-derived deterrents. Our study also proves that insects ‘invented’ the use of defensive surfactants long before modern agriculture had started applying them as insecticides. PMID:18986976

  10. Defence electro-optics: European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Jari

    2011-11-01

    In 2009 the United States invested in defence R&T 3,6 times and in defence research and development 6,8 times as much as all member states of the European Defence Agency (EDA) combined while the ratio in the total defence expenditure was 2,6 in the US' favour. The European lack of investments in defence research and development has a negative impact on the competitiveness of European defence industry and on the European non-dependence. In addition, the efficiency of investment is reduced due to duplication of work in different member states. The Lisbon Treaty tasks EDA to support defence technology research, and coordinate and plan joint research activities and the study of technical solutions meeting future operational needs. This paper gives an overview how EDA meets the challenge of improving the efficiency of European defence R&T investment with an emphasis on electro-optics and describes shortly the ways that governmental and industrial partners can participate in the EDA cooperation. Examples of joint R&T projects addressing electro-optics are presented.

  11. Plant defences against herbivore and insect attack

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants deploy a number of defences against attack by insects and other herbivores. Direct defence is conferred by plant products and structures that deter or kill the herbivores. Chemical toxins and deterrents vary widely among plant species, and some typical toxins include alkaloids, terpenoids, st...

  12. Exploring the Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Reservoir Hosts, Vectors, and Human Hosts of West Nile Virus: A Review of the Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ozdenerol, Esra; Taff, Gregory N.; Akkus, Cem

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades West Nile Virus (WNV) has been responsible for significant disease outbreaks in humans and animals in many parts of the World. Its extremely rapid global diffusion argues for a better understanding of its geographic extent. The purpose of this inquiry was to explore spatio-temporal patterns of WNV using geospatial technologies to study populations of the reservoir hosts, vectors, and human hosts, in addition to the spatio-temporal interactions among these populations. Review of the recent literature on spatial WNV disease risk modeling led to the conclusion that numerous environmental factors might be critical for its dissemination. New Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based studies are monitoring occurrence at the macro-level, and helping pinpoint areas of occurrence at the micro-level, where geographically-targeted, species-specific control measures are sometimes taken and more sophisticated methods of surveillance have been used. PMID:24284356

  13. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection protects human endocervical epithelial cells from apoptosis via expression of host antiapoptotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Follows, S A; Murlidharan, J; Massari, P; Wetzler, L M; Genco, C A

    2009-09-01

    Several microbial pathogens can modulate the host apoptotic response to infection, which may contribute to immune evasion. Various studies have reported that infection with the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae can either inhibit or induce apoptosis. N. gonorrhoeae infection initiates at the mucosal epithelium, and in women, cells from the ectocervix and endocervix are among the first host cells encountered by this pathogen. In this study, we defined the antiapoptotic effect of N. gonorrhoeae infection in human endocervical epithelial cells (End/E6E7 cells). We first established that N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090B failed to induce cell death in End/E6E7 cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated that stimulation with N. gonorrhoeae protected these cells from staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. Importantly, only End/E6E7 cells incubated with live bacteria and in direct association with N. gonorrhoeae were protected from STS-induced apoptosis, while heat-killed and antibiotic-killed bacteria failed to induce protection. Stimulation of End/E6E7 cells with live N. gonorrhoeae induced NF-kappaB activation and resulted in increased gene expression of the NF-kappaB-regulated antiapoptotic genes bfl-1, cIAP-2, and c-FLIP. Furthermore, cIAP-2 protein levels also increased in End/E6E7 cells incubated with gonococci. Collectively, our results indicate that the antiapoptotic effect of N. gonorrhoeae in human endocervical epithelial cells results from live infection via expression of host antiapoptotic proteins. Securing an intracellular niche through the inhibition of apoptosis may be an important mechanism utilized by N. gonorrhoeae for microbial survival and immune evasion in cervical epithelial cells. PMID:19546192

  14. Global divergence of the human follicle mite Demodex folliculorum: Persistent associations between host ancestry and mite lineages

    PubMed Central

    Palopoli, Michael F.; Fergus, Daniel J.; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy T.; Simison, W. Brian; Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Thoemmes, Megan S.; Dunn, Robert R.; Trautwein, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic mites of the genus Demodex live within the hair follicles of mammals and are ubiquitous symbionts of humans, but little molecular work has been done to understand their genetic diversity or transmission. Here we sampled mite DNA from 70 human hosts of diverse geographic ancestries and analyzed 241 sequences from the mitochondrial genome of the species Demodex folliculorum. Phylogenetic analyses recovered multiple deep lineages including a globally distributed lineage common among hosts of European ancestry and three lineages that primarily include hosts of Asian, African, and Latin American ancestry. To a great extent, the ancestral geography of hosts predicted the lineages of mites found on them; 27% of the total molecular variance segregated according to the regional ancestries of hosts. We found that D. folliculorum populations are stable on an individual over the course of years and that some Asian and African American hosts maintain specific mite lineages over the course of years or generations outside their geographic region of birth or ancestry. D. folliculorum haplotypes were much more likely to be shared within families and between spouses than between unrelated individuals, indicating that transmission requires close contact. Dating analyses indicated that D. folliculorum origins may predate modern humans. Overall, D. folliculorum evolution reflects ancient human population divergences, is consistent with an out-of-Africa dispersal hypothesis, and presents an excellent model system for further understanding the history of human movement. PMID:26668374

  15. Global divergence of the human follicle mite Demodex folliculorum: Persistent associations between host ancestry and mite lineages.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Michael F; Fergus, Daniel J; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy T; Simison, W Brian; Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Thoemmes, Megan S; Dunn, Robert R; Trautwein, Michelle

    2015-12-29

    Microscopic mites of the genus Demodex live within the hair follicles of mammals and are ubiquitous symbionts of humans, but little molecular work has been done to understand their genetic diversity or transmission. Here we sampled mite DNA from 70 human hosts of diverse geographic ancestries and analyzed 241 sequences from the mitochondrial genome of the species Demodex folliculorum. Phylogenetic analyses recovered multiple deep lineages including a globally distributed lineage common among hosts of European ancestry and three lineages that primarily include hosts of Asian, African, and Latin American ancestry. To a great extent, the ancestral geography of hosts predicted the lineages of mites found on them; 27% of the total molecular variance segregated according to the regional ancestries of hosts. We found that D. folliculorum populations are stable on an individual over the course of years and that some Asian and African American hosts maintain specific mite lineages over the course of years or generations outside their geographic region of birth or ancestry. D. folliculorum haplotypes were much more likely to be shared within families and between spouses than between unrelated individuals, indicating that transmission requires close contact. Dating analyses indicated that D. folliculorum origins may predate modern humans. Overall, D. folliculorum evolution reflects ancient human population divergences, is consistent with an out-of-Africa dispersal hypothesis, and presents an excellent model system for further understanding the history of human movement. PMID:26668374

  16. Human Macrophage SCN5A Activates an Innate Immune Signaling Pathway for Antiviral Host Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexis; Kainz, Danielle; Khan, Faatima; Lee, Cara; Carrithers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors contain a binding domain for pathogen-associated molecular patterns coupled to a signaling domain that regulates transcription of host immune response genes. Here, a novel mechanism that links pathogen recognition to channel activation and downstream signaling is proposed. We demonstrate that an intracellular sodium channel variant, human macrophage SCN5A, initiates signaling and transcription through a calcium-dependent isoform of adenylate cyclase, ADCY8, and the transcription factor, ATF2. Pharmacological stimulation with a channel agonist or treatment with cytoplasmic poly(I:C), a mimic of viral dsRNA, activates this pathway to regulate expression of SP100-related genes and interferon β. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that the SCN5A variant mediates nonselective outward currents and a small, but detectable, inward current. Intracellular poly(I:C) markedly augments an inward voltage-sensitive sodium current and inhibits the outward nonselective current. These results suggest human macrophage SCN5A initiates signaling in an innate immune pathway relevant to antiviral host defense. It is postulated that SCN5A is a novel pathogen sensor and that this pathway represents a channel activation-dependent mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:25368329

  17. Transgenic nude mouse with ubiquitous green fluorescent protein expression as a host for human tumors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Jiang, Ping; Li, Lingna; Moossa, Abdool R; Hoffman, Robert M

    2004-12-01

    We report here the development of the transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous GFP expression. The GFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives GFP expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu GFP male mice and nu/+ GFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced green. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were GFP nude mice. Newborn mice and adult mice fluoresced very bright green and could be detected with a simple blue-light-emitting diode flashlight with a central peak of 470 nm and a bypass emission filter. In the adult mice, the organs all brightly expressed GFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. The following systems were dissected out and shown to have brilliant GFP fluorescence: the entire digestive system from tongue to anus; the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed GFP. Pancreatic islets showed GFP fluorescence. The spleen cells were also GFP positive. Red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing human cancer cell lines, including PC-3-RFP prostate cancer, HCT-116-RFP colon cancer, MDA-MB-435-RFP breast cancer, and HT1080-RFP fibrosarcoma were transplanted to the transgenic GFP nude mice. All of these human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic GFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh and frozen tissues. The GFP mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of human tumor-host interaction. PMID:15574773

  18. Domain switching and host recognition.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaoying; Day, Brad

    2006-09-01

    The collective function of secreted pathogen effector molecules is to enhance the virulence and avirulence activity of the pathogen during the infection of its host. While the activity of a majority of pathogen effectors is unknown, several classes of effector molecules have been well characterized. Among these include proteins which function to modulate host defences either through proteolysis, post-translational modifications, or by directly manipulating the host transcriptional machinery that regulates the induction of defence responses. In recent years, several key advances have been made in the characterization of the latter class of effector molecules. Among these include research characterizing the processes associated with host nuclear import and the targeting of host transcriptional defences. While current research is beginning to reveal the biochemical and genetic mechanisms controlling the induction of host resistance, the signalling events that control host specificity remain largely unknown. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, work by Nissan et al. sheds light onto the molecular-genetic patterns involved in determining host specificity and pathogen virulence in the Pantoea-gypsophila interaction. PMID:16879410

  19. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L.; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P.; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A.; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Murphy, William J.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Antin, Joseph H.; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow–specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86+ dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  20. Migration of human lymphocytes. I. A model using the mouse as host.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K; Holt, P J

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of radioactivity after the intravenous injection of 51Cr-labelled human lymphocytes has been examined in normal mice, irradiated mice, mice treated with anti-platelet antiserum and in mice treated with colloidal carbon. Pre-treatment with carbon and anti-platelet antiserum appears to protect the human lymphocytes from uptake by the host's reticuloendothelial system (RES). Comparison of tissue radioactivity in carbon-treated mice after the injection of viable human lymphocytes with that found after the injection of dead cells and soluble or insoluble cell debris showed that radioactivity recovered in the spleen and lymph nodes is primarily due to the migration of viable lymphocytes into these tissues. Thus the measurement of radioactivity in lymph nodes of carbon-treated mice after the injection of 51Cr-labelled human lymphocytes can be used as a model of these lymphocytes' ability to migrate into the lymph nodes during recirculation and to study factors influencing this migration. PMID:721139

  1. Human Neoplasms Elicit Multiple Specific Immune Responses in the Autologous Host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ugur; Tureci, Ozlem; Schmitt, Holger; Cochlovius, Bjorn; Johannes, Thomas; Schmits, Rudolf; Stenner, Frank; Luo, Guorong; Schobert, Ingrid; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    1995-12-01

    Expression of cDNA libraries from human melanoma, renal cancer, astrocytoma, and Hodgkin disease in Escherichia coli and screening for clones reactive with high-titer IgG antibodies in autologous patient serum lead to the discovery of at least four antigens with a restricted expression pattern in each tumor. Besides antigens known to elicit T-cell responses, such as MAGE-1 and tyrosinase, numerous additional antigens that were overexpressed or specifically expressed in tumors of the same type were identified. Sequence analyses suggest that many of these molecules, besides being the target of a specific immune response, might be of relevance for tumor growth. Antibodies to a given antigen were usually confined to patients with the same tumor type. The unexpected frequency of human tumor antigens, which can be readily defined at the molecular level by the serological analysis of autologous tumor cDNA expression cloning, indicates that human neoplasms elicit multiple specific immune responses in the autologous host and provides diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to human cancer.

  2. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A; Poe, Jonathan C; Serody, Jonathan S; Murphy, William J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J; Clynes, Raphael A; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-06-25

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow-specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86(+) dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  3. Recognition of HIV-1 Peptides by Host CTL Is Related to HIV-1 Similarity to Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Morgane; Nickle, David C.; Deng, Wenjie; Frahm, Nicole; Brander, Christian; Learn, Gerald H.; Heckerman, David; Jojic, Nebosja; Jojic, Vladimir; Walker, Bruce D.; Mullins, James I.

    2007-01-01

    Background While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes preferentially target specific regions of the viral proteome, HIV-1 features that contribute to immune recognition are not well understood. One hypothesis is that similarities between HIV and human proteins influence the host immune response, i.e., resemblance between viral and host peptides could preclude reactivity against certain HIV epitopes. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the extent of similarity between HIV-1 and the human proteome. Proteins from the HIV-1 B consensus sequence from 2001 were dissected into overlapping k-mers, which were then probed against a non-redundant database of the human proteome in order to identify segments of high similarity. We tested the relationship between HIV-1 similarity to host encoded peptides and immune recognition in HIV-infected individuals, and found that HIV immunogenicity could be partially modulated by the sequence similarity to the host proteome. ELISpot responses to peptides spanning the entire viral proteome evaluated in 314 individuals showed a trend indicating an inverse relationship between the similarity to the host proteome and the frequency of recognition. In addition, analysis of responses by a group of 30 HIV-infected individuals against 944 overlapping peptides representing a broad range of individual HIV-1B Nef variants, affirmed that the degree of similarity to the host was significantly lower for peptides with reactive epitopes than for those that were not recognized. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that antigenic motifs that are scarcely represented in human proteins might represent more immunogenic CTL targets not selected against in the host. This observation could provide guidance in the design of more effective HIV immunogens, as sequences devoid of host-like features might afford superior immune reactivity. PMID:17786195

  4. [Role of Neuromediators in the Functioning of the Human Microbiota: "Business Talks" among Microorganisms and the Microbiota-Host Dialogue].

    PubMed

    Oleskin, A V; El'-registan, G I; Shenderov, B A

    2016-01-01

    Current concepts concerning social behavior of the microorganisms inhabiting human gastrointestinal tract, as well as their role in the formation of integrated supracellular structures and in intercellular communication in the host-microbiota system are reviewed. Analysis of the literature data and the results obtained by the authors indicate an important role of neuromediators (biogenic amines, amino acids, peptides, and nitric oxide) in the intra- and interspecies microbial communication, as well as in the microbiota-host dialogue. The role of this dialogue for human health, its effect on human psyche and social behavior, and the possibility of construction of probiotic preparations with a goal-directed neurochemical effect are discussed. PMID:27301124

  5. Scabies Mite Peritrophins Are Potential Targets of Human Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Deborah C.; Kemp, Dave J.; Fischer, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Background Pruritic scabies lesions caused by Sarcoptes scabiei burrowing in the stratum corneum of human skin facilitate opportunistic bacterial infections. Emerging resistance to current therapeutics emphasizes the need to identify novel targets for protective intervention. We have characterized several protein families located in the mite gut as crucial factors for host-parasite interactions. Among these multiple proteins inhibit human complement, presumably to avoid complement-mediated damage of gut epithelial cells. Peritrophins are major components of the peritrophic matrix often found in the gut of arthropods. We hypothesized that a peritrophin, if abundant in the scabies mite gut, could be an activator of complement. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel full length scabies mite peritrophin (SsPTP1) was identified in a cDNA library from scabies mites. The amino acid sequence revealed four putative chitin binding domains (CBD). Recombinant expression of one CBD of the highly repetitive SsPTP1 sequence as TSP-hexaHis-fusion protein resulted in soluble protein, which demonstrated chitin binding activity in affinity chromatography assays. Antibodies against a recombinant SsPTP1 fragment were used to immunohistochemically localize native SsPTP1 in the mite gut and in fecal pellets within the upper epidermis, co-localizing with serum components such as host IgG and complement. Enzymatic deglycosylation confirmed strong N- and O-glycosylation of the native peritrophin. Serum incubation followed by immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody against mannan binding lectin (MBL), the recognition molecule of the lectin pathway of human complement activation, indicated that MBL may specifically bind to glycosylated SsPTP1. Conclusions/Significance This study adds a new aspect to the accumulating evidence that complement plays a major role in scabies mite biology. It identifies a novel peritrophin localized in the mite gut as a potential target of the lectin pathway of

  6. Evidence for Within-Host Genetic Recombination among the Human Pegiviral Strains in HIV Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoming; Padhi, Abinash; Xu, Junqiang; Gong, Xiaoyan; Tien, Po

    2016-01-01

    The non-pathogenic Human Pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C/HGV), the most prevalent RNA virus worldwide, is known to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Although previous studies documented its ubiquity and important role in HIV-infected individuals, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms that maintain high genetic diversity of HPgV within the HIV-infected individuals. To assess the within-host genetic diversity of HPgV and forces that maintain such diversity within the co-infected hosts, we performed phylogenetic analyses taking into account 229 HPgV partial E1-E2 clonal sequences representing 15 male and 8 female co-infected HIV patients from Hubei province of central China. Our results revealed the presence of eleven strongly supported clades. While nine clades belonged to genotype 3, two clades belonged to genotype 2. Additionally, four clades that belonged to genotype 3 exhibited inter-clade recombination events. The presence of clonal sequences representing multiple clades within the HIV-infected individual provided the evidence of co-circulation of HPgV strains across the region. Of the 23 patients, six patients (i.e., five males and one female) were detected to have HPgV recombinant sequences. Our results also revealed that while male patients shared the viral strains with other patients, viral strains from the female patients had restricted dispersal. Taken together, the present study revealed that multiple infections with divergent HPgV viral strains may have caused within-host genetic recombination, predominantly in male patients, and therefore, could be the major driver in shaping genetic diversity of HPgV. PMID:27560699

  7. Human Host Defense Peptide LL-37 Stimulates Virulence Factor Production and Adaptive Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Strempel, Nikola; Neidig, Anke; Nusser, Michael; Geffers, Robert; Vieillard, Julien; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Overhage, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), elastase and rhamnolipids) and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor. PMID:24349231

  8. Human host defense peptide LL-37 stimulates virulence factor production and adaptive resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Strempel, Nikola; Neidig, Anke; Nusser, Michael; Geffers, Robert; Vieillard, Julien; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Overhage, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), elastase and rhamnolipids) and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor. PMID:24349231

  9. Evidence for Within-Host Genetic Recombination among the Human Pegiviral Strains in HIV Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoming; Padhi, Abinash; Xu, Junqiang; Gong, Xiaoyan; Tien, Po

    2016-01-01

    The non-pathogenic Human Pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C/HGV), the most prevalent RNA virus worldwide, is known to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Although previous studies documented its ubiquity and important role in HIV-infected individuals, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms that maintain high genetic diversity of HPgV within the HIV-infected individuals. To assess the within-host genetic diversity of HPgV and forces that maintain such diversity within the co-infected hosts, we performed phylogenetic analyses taking into account 229 HPgV partial E1-E2 clonal sequences representing 15 male and 8 female co-infected HIV patients from Hubei province of central China. Our results revealed the presence of eleven strongly supported clades. While nine clades belonged to genotype 3, two clades belonged to genotype 2. Additionally, four clades that belonged to genotype 3 exhibited inter-clade recombination events. The presence of clonal sequences representing multiple clades within the HIV-infected individual provided the evidence of co-circulation of HPgV strains across the region. Of the 23 patients, six patients (i.e., five males and one female) were detected to have HPgV recombinant sequences. Our results also revealed that while male patients shared the viral strains with other patients, viral strains from the female patients had restricted dispersal. Taken together, the present study revealed that multiple infections with divergent HPgV viral strains may have caused within-host genetic recombination, predominantly in male patients, and therefore, could be the major driver in shaping genetic diversity of HPgV. PMID:27560699

  10. Influenza virus reservoirs and intermediate hosts: dogs, horses, and new possibilities for influenza virus exposure of humans.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-03-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infections in hosts outside the main aquatic bird reservoirs occur periodically. Although most such cross-species transmission events result in limited onward transmission in the new host, sustained influenza outbreaks have occurred in poultry and in a number of mammalian species, including humans, pigs, horses, seals, and mink. Recently, two distinct strains of IAV have emerged in domestic dogs, with each circulating widely for several years. Here, we briefly outline what is known about the role of intermediate hosts in influenza emergence, summarize our knowledge of the new canine influenza viruses (CIVs) and how they provide key new information on the process of host adaptation, and assess the risk these viruses pose to human populations. PMID:25540375

  11. Influenza Virus Reservoirs and Intermediate Hosts: Dogs, Horses, and New Possibilities for Influenza Virus Exposure of Humans

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Pablo R.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infections in hosts outside the main aquatic bird reservoirs occur periodically. Although most such cross-species transmission events result in limited onward transmission in the new host, sustained influenza outbreaks have occurred in poultry and in a number of mammalian species, including humans, pigs, horses, seals, and mink. Recently, two distinct strains of IAV have emerged in domestic dogs, with each circulating widely for several years. Here, we briefly outline what is known about the role of intermediate hosts in influenza emergence, summarize our knowledge of the new canine influenza viruses (CIVs) and how they provide key new information on the process of host adaptation, and assess the risk these viruses pose to human populations. PMID:25540375

  12. Direct in vivo assessment of human stem cell graft-host neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Byers, Blake; Lee, Hyun Joo; Liu, Jia; Weitz, Andrew J; Lin, Peter; Zhang, Pengbo; Shcheglovitov, Aleksandr; Dolmetsch, Ricardo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2015-07-01

    Despite the potential of stem cell-derived neural transplants for treating intractable neurological diseases, the global effects of a transplant's electrical activity on host circuitry have never been measured directly, preventing the systematic optimization of such therapies. Here, we overcome this problem by combining optogenetics, stem cell biology, and neuroimaging to directly map stem cell-driven neural circuit formation in vivo. We engineered human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to express channelrhodopsin-2 and transplanted resulting neurons to striatum of rats. To non-invasively visualize the function of newly formed circuits, we performed high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during selective stimulation of transplanted cells. fMRI successfully detected local and remote neural activity, enabling the global graft-host neural circuit function to be assessed. These results demonstrate the potential of a novel neuroimaging-based platform that can be used to identify how a graft's electrical activity influences the brain network in vivo. PMID:25936696

  13. Two Human Host Defense Ribonucleases against Mycobacteria, the Eosinophil Cationic Protein (RNase 3) and RNase 7

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, David; Torrent, Marc; Andreu, David; Nogués, M. Victoria

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new agents against mycobacterial infections, such as tuberculosis and other respiratory tract or skin affections. In this study, we have tested two human antimicrobial RNases against mycobacteria. RNase 3, also called the eosinophil cationic protein, and RNase 7 are two small cationic proteins secreted by innate cells during host defense. Both proteins are induced upon infection displaying a wide range of antipathogen activities. In particular, they are released by leukocytes and epithelial cells, contributing to tissue protection. Here, the two RNases have been proven effective against Mycobacterium vaccae at a low micromolar level. High bactericidal activity correlated with their bacterial membrane depolarization and permeabilization activities. Further analysis on both protein-derived peptides identified for RNase 3 an N-terminus fragment that is even more active than the parental protein. Also, a potent bacterial agglutinating activity was unique to RNase 3 and its derived peptide. The particular biophysical properties of the RNase 3 active peptide are envisaged as a suitable reference for the development of novel antimycobacterial drugs. The results support the contribution of secreted RNases to the host immune response against mycobacteria. PMID:23716047

  14. The diversity and host interactions of Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophages on human skin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jared; Yan, Riceley; Zhong, Qiao; Ngo, Sam; Bangayan, Nathanael J; Nguyen, Lin; Lui, Timothy; Liu, Minghsun; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Tomida, Shuta; Li, Huiying

    2015-01-01

    The viral population, including bacteriophages, is an important component of the human microbiota, yet is poorly understood. We aim to determine whether bacteriophages modulate the composition of the bacterial populations, thus potentially playing a role in health or disease. We investigated the diversity and host interactions of the bacteriophages of Propionibacterium acnes, a major human skin commensal implicated in acne pathogenesis. By sequencing 48 P. acnes phages isolated from acne patients and healthy individuals and by analyzing the P. acnes phage populations in healthy skin metagenomes, we revealed that P. acnes phage populations in the skin microbial community are often dominated by one strain. We also found phage strains shared among both related and unrelated individuals, suggesting that a pool of common phages exists in the human population and that transmission of phages may occur between individuals. To better understand the bacterium–phage interactions in the skin microbiota, we determined the outcomes of 74 genetically defined Propionibacterium strains challenged by 15 sequenced phages. Depending on the Propionibacterium lineage, phage infection can result in lysis, pseudolysogeny, or resistance. In type II P. acnes strains, we found that encoding matching clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat spacers is insufficient to confer phage resistance. Overall, our findings suggest that the prey–predator relationship between bacteria and phages may have a role in modulating the composition of the microbiota. Our study also suggests that the microbiome structure of an individual may be an important factor in the design of phage-based therapy. PMID:25848871

  15. The diversity and host interactions of Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophages on human skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jared; Yan, Riceley; Zhong, Qiao; Ngo, Sam; Bangayan, Nathanael J; Nguyen, Lin; Lui, Timothy; Liu, Minghsun; Erfe, Marie C; Craft, Noah; Tomida, Shuta; Li, Huiying

    2015-09-01

    The viral population, including bacteriophages, is an important component of the human microbiota, yet is poorly understood. We aim to determine whether bacteriophages modulate the composition of the bacterial populations, thus potentially playing a role in health or disease. We investigated the diversity and host interactions of the bacteriophages of Propionibacterium acnes, a major human skin commensal implicated in acne pathogenesis. By sequencing 48 P. acnes phages isolated from acne patients and healthy individuals and by analyzing the P. acnes phage populations in healthy skin metagenomes, we revealed that P. acnes phage populations in the skin microbial community are often dominated by one strain. We also found phage strains shared among both related and unrelated individuals, suggesting that a pool of common phages exists in the human population and that transmission of phages may occur between individuals. To better understand the bacterium-phage interactions in the skin microbiota, we determined the outcomes of 74 genetically defined Propionibacterium strains challenged by 15 sequenced phages. Depending on the Propionibacterium lineage, phage infection can result in lysis, pseudolysogeny, or resistance. In type II P. acnes strains, we found that encoding matching clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat spacers is insufficient to confer phage resistance. Overall, our findings suggest that the prey-predator relationship between bacteria and phages may have a role in modulating the composition of the microbiota. Our study also suggests that the microbiome structure of an individual may be an important factor in the design of phage-based therapy. PMID:25848871

  16. Host adaptation of a bacterial toxin from the human pathogen Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lingquan; Song, Jeongmin; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Jiawei; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Nissi; Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Galán, Jorge E; Varki, Ajit

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella Typhi is an exclusive human pathogen that causes typhoid fever. Typhoid toxin is a S. Typhi virulence factor that can reproduce most of the typhoid fever symptoms in experimental animals. Toxicity depends on toxin binding to terminally sialylated glycans on surface glycoproteins. Human glycans are unusual because of the lack of CMAH, which in other mammals converts N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Here, we report that typhoid toxin binds to and is toxic toward cells expressing glycans terminated in Neu5Ac (expressed by humans) over glycans terminated in Neu5Gc (expressed by other mammals). Mice constitutively expressing CMAH thus displaying Neu5Gc in all tissues are resistant to typhoid toxin. The atomic structure of typhoid toxin bound to Neu5Ac reveals the structural bases for its binding specificity. These findings provide insight into the molecular bases for Salmonella Typhi's host specificity and may help the development of therapies for typhoid fever. PMID:25480294

  17. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota. PMID:26916597

  18. Symbiotic Human Gut Bacteria with Variable Metabolic Priorities for Host Mucosal Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Urs, Karthik; Kumar, Supriya Suresh; German, J. Bruce; Mills, David A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many symbiotic gut bacteria possess the ability to degrade multiple polysaccharides, thereby providing nutritional advantages to their hosts. Like microorganisms adapted to other complex nutrient environments, gut symbionts give different metabolic priorities to substrates present in mixtures. We investigated the responses of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a common human intestinal bacterium that metabolizes more than a dozen different polysaccharides, including the O-linked glycans that are abundant in secreted mucin. Experiments in which mucin glycans were presented simultaneously with other carbohydrates show that degradation of these host carbohydrates is consistently repressed in the presence of alternative substrates, even by B. thetaiotaomicron previously acclimated to growth in pure mucin glycans. Experiments with media containing systematically varied carbohydrate cues and genetic mutants reveal that transcriptional repression of genes involved in mucin glycan metabolism is imposed by simple sugars and, in one example that was tested, is mediated through a small intergenic region in a transcript-autonomous fashion. Repression of mucin glycan-responsive gene clusters in two other human gut bacteria, Bacteroides massiliensis and Bacteroides fragilis, exhibited variable and sometimes reciprocal responses compared to those of B. thetaiotaomicron, revealing that these symbionts vary in their preference for mucin glycans and that these differences occur at the level of controlling individual gene clusters. Our results reveal that sensing and metabolic triaging of glycans are complex processes that vary among species, underscoring the idea that these phenomena are likely to be hidden drivers of microbiota community dynamics and may dictate which microorganisms preferentially commit to various niches in a constantly changing nutritional environment. PMID:26556271

  19. The chemical interactome space between the human host and the genetically defined gut metabotypes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Hildebrand, Falk; Raes, Jeroen; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    The bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of mammals represent a highly selected microbiome that has a profound influence on human physiology by shaping the host's metabolic and immune system activity. Despite the recent advances on the biological principles that underlie microbial symbiosis in the gut of mammals, mechanistic understanding of the contributions of the gut microbiome and how variations in the metabotypes are linked to the host health are obscure. Here, we mapped the entire metabolic potential of the gut microbiome based solely on metagenomics sequencing data derived from fecal samples of 124 Europeans (healthy, obese and with inflammatory bowel disease). Interestingly, three distinct clusters of individuals with high, medium and low metabolic potential were observed. By illustrating these results in the context of bacterial population, we concluded that the abundance of the Prevotella genera is a key factor indicating a low metabolic potential. These metagenome-based metabolic signatures were used to study the interaction networks between bacteria-specific metabolites and human proteins. We found that thirty-three such metabolites interact with disease-relevant protein complexes several of which are highly expressed in cells and tissues involved in the signaling and shaping of the adaptive immune system and associated with squamous cell carcinoma and bladder cancer. From this set of metabolites, eighteen are present in DrugBank providing evidence that we carry a natural pharmacy in our guts. Furthermore, we established connections between the systemic effects of non-antibiotic drugs and the gut microbiome of relevance to drug side effects and health-care solutions. PMID:23178670

  20. Human adenovirus-host cell interactions: comparative study with members of subgroups B and C.

    PubMed Central

    Defer, C; Belin, M T; Caillet-Boudin, M L; Boulanger, P

    1990-01-01

    Host cell interactions of human adenovirus serotypes belonging to subgroups B (adenovirus type 3 [Ad3] and Ad7) and C (Ad2 and Ad5) were comparatively analyzed at three levels: (i) binding of virus particles with host cell receptors; (ii) cointernalization of macromolecules with adenovirions; and (iii) adenovirus-induced cytoskeletal alterations. The association constants with human cell receptors were found to be similar for Ad2 and Ad3 (8 x 10(9) to 9 x 10(9) M-1), and the number of receptor sites per cell ranged from 5,000 (Ad2) to 7,000 (Ad3). Affinity blottings, competition experiments, and immunofluorescence stainings suggested that the receptor sites for adenovirus were distinct for members of subgroups B and C. Adenovirions increased the permeability of cells to macromolecules. We showed that this global effect could be divided into two distinct events: (i) cointernalization of macromolecules and virions into endocytotic vesicles, a phenomenon that occurred in a serotype-independent way, and (ii) release of macromolecules into the cytoplasm upon adenovirus-induced lysis of endosomal membranes. The latter process was found to be type specific and to require unaltered and infectious virus particles of serotype 2 or 5. Perinuclear condensation of the vimentin filament network was observed at early stages of infection with Ad2 or Ad5 but not with Ad3, Ad7, and noninfectious particles of Ad2 or Ad5, obtained by heat inactivation of wild-type virions or with the H2 ts1 mutant. This phenomenon appeared to be a cytological marker for cytoplasmic transit of infectious virions within adenovirus-infected cells. It could be experimentally dissociated from vimentin proteolysis, which was found to be serotype dependent, occurring only with members of subgroup C, regardless of the infectivity of the input virus. Images PMID:2196380

  1. Characterization of Host and Microbial Determinants in Individuals with Latent Tuberculosis Infection Using a Human Granuloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Mbawuike, Uchenna; Keiser, Tracy L.; Arcos, Jesus; Azad, Abul K.; Wang, Shu-Hua

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Granulomas sit at the center of tuberculosis (TB) immunopathogenesis. Progress in biomarkers and treatment specific to the human granuloma environment is hindered by the lack of a relevant and tractable infection model that better accounts for the complexity of the host immune response as well as pathogen counterresponses that subvert host immunity in granulomas. Here we developed and characterized an in vitro granuloma model derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and autologous serum. Importantly, we interrogated this model for its ability to discriminate between host and bacterial determinants in individuals with and without latent TB infection (LTBI). By the use of this model, we provide the first evidence that granuloma formation, bacterial survival, lymphocyte proliferation, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid body accumulation are significantly altered in LTBI individuals. Moreover, we show a specific transcriptional signature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with survival within human granuloma structures depending on the host immune status. Our report provides fundamentally new information on how the human host immune status and bacterial transcriptional signature may dictate early granuloma formation and outcome and provides evidence for the validity of the granuloma model and its potential applications. PMID:25691598

  2. Sexual misbehaviour in the Australian Defence Force.

    PubMed

    Williams, Angela; Ranson, David

    2013-12-01

    It is clear from recent media reporting that serious issues have come to light regarding sexual misbehaviour matters within the Australian Defence Force. Subsequent reviews have indicated that these behaviours appear to have been more widespread than the initial media reports suggested and a number of reviews have been undertaken to better understand the problem and address the concerns of victims, Defence command, government and the community. If these problems are not addressed, there is a risk that recruitment to the Defence Forces may become problematic. The strong command structures within the Defence Forces can both exacerbate these misbehaviours through entrenching secrecy and at the same time have the capacity to provide a powerful leadership message that can change attitudes and reduce such misbehaviours. PMID:24597372

  3. The mechanical defence advantage of small seeds.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Evan C; Wright, S Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Seed size and toughness affect seed predators, and size-dependent investment in mechanical defence could affect relationships between seed size and predation. We tested how seed toughness and mechanical defence traits (tissue density and protective tissue content) are related to seed size among tropical forest species. Absolute toughness increased with seed size. However, smaller seeds had higher specific toughness both within and among species, with the smallest seeds requiring over 2000 times more energy per gram to break than the largest seeds. Investment in mechanical defence traits varied widely but independently of the toughness-mass allometry. Instead, a physical scaling relationship confers a toughness advantage on small seeds independent of selection on defence traits and without a direct cost. This scaling relationship may contribute to seed size diversity by decreasing fitness differences among large and small seeds. Allometric scaling of toughness reconciles predictions and conflicting empirical relationships between seed size and predation. PMID:27324185

  4. Evaluation of two novel leptospiral proteins for their interaction with human host components.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucas P; Fernandes, Luis G V; Vieira, Monica L; de Souza, Gisele O; Heinemann, Marcos B; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-07-01

    Pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira are the etiological agents of leptospirosis, the most widespread zoonosis. Mechanisms involved in leptospiral pathogenesis are not well understood. By data mining the genome sequences of Leptospira interrogans we have identified two proteins predicted to be surface exposed, LIC10821 and LIC10064. Immunofluorescence and proteinase K assays confirmed that the proteins are exposed. Reactivity of the recombinant proteins with human sera has shown that rLIC10821, but not rLIC10064, is recognized by antibodies in confirmed leptospirosis serum samples, suggesting its expression during infection. The rLIC10821 was able to bind laminin, in a dose-dependent fashion, and was called Lsa37 (leptospiral surface adhesin of 37 kDa). Studies with human plasma components demonstrated that rLIC10821 interacts with plasminogen (PLG) and fibrinogen (Fg). The binding of Lsa37 with PLG generates plasmin when PLG activator was added. Fibrin clotting reduction was observed in a thrombin-catalyzed reaction, when Fg was incubated with Lsa37, suggesting that this protein may interfere in the coagulation cascade during the disease. Although LIC10064 protein is more abundant than the corresponding Lsa37, binding activity with all the components tested was not detected. Thus, Lsa37 is a novel versatile adhesin that may mediate Leptospira-host interactions. PMID:27129366

  5. Viral immune modulators perturb the human molecular network by common and unique strategies.

    PubMed

    Pichlmair, Andreas; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Alvisi, Gualtiero; Mulhern, Orla; Sacco, Roberto; Habjan, Matthias; Binder, Marco; Stefanovic, Adrijana; Eberle, Carol-Ann; Goncalves, Adriana; Bürckstümmer, Tilmann; Müller, André C; Fauster, Astrid; Holze, Cathleen; Lindsten, Kristina; Goodbourn, Stephen; Kochs, Georg; Weber, Friedemann; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Bowie, Andrew G; Bennett, Keiryn L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2012-07-26

    Viruses must enter host cells to replicate, assemble and propagate. Because of the restricted size of their genomes, viruses have had to evolve efficient ways of exploiting host cell processes to promote their own life cycles and also to escape host immune defence mechanisms. Many viral open reading frames (viORFs) with immune-modulating functions essential for productive viral growth have been identified across a range of viral classes. However, there has been no comprehensive study to identify the host factors with which these viORFs interact for a global perspective of viral perturbation strategies. Here we show that different viral perturbation patterns of the host molecular defence network can be deduced from a mass-spectrometry-based host-factor survey in a defined human cellular system by using 70 innate immune-modulating viORFs from 30 viral species. The 579 host proteins targeted by the viORFs mapped to an unexpectedly large number of signalling pathways and cellular processes, suggesting yet unknown mechanisms of antiviral immunity. We further experimentally verified the targets heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase, the WNK (with-no-lysine) kinase family and USP19 (ubiquitin-specific peptidase 19) as vulnerable nodes in the host cellular defence system. Evaluation of the impact of viral immune modulators on the host molecular network revealed perturbation strategies used by individual viruses and by viral classes. Our data are also valuable for the design of broad and specific antiviral therapies. PMID:22810585

  6. Human and Animal Isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica Show Significant Serotype-Specific Colonization and Host-Specific Immune Defense Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schaake, Julia; Kronshage, Malte; Uliczka, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Knuuti, Tobias; Strauch, Eckhard; Fruth, Angelika; Wos-Oxley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a human pathogen that is ubiquitous in livestock, especially pigs. The bacteria are able to colonize the intestinal tract of a variety of mammalian hosts, but the severity of induced gut-associated diseases (yersiniosis) differs significantly between hosts. To gain more information about the individual virulence determinants that contribute to colonization and induction of immune responses in different hosts, we analyzed and compared the interactions of different human- and animal-derived isolates of serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8, and O:9 with murine, porcine, and human intestinal cells and macrophages. The examined strains exhibited significant serotype-specific cell binding and entry characteristics, but adhesion and uptake into different host cells were not host specific and were independent of the source of the isolate. In contrast, survival and replication within macrophages and the induced proinflammatory response differed between murine, porcine, and human macrophages, suggesting a host-specific immune response. In fact, similar levels of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were secreted by murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with all tested isolates, but the equivalent interleukin-8 (IL-8) response of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages was strongly serotype specific and considerably lower in O:3 than in O:8 strains. In addition, all tested Y. enterocolitica strains caused a considerably higher level of secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by porcine than by murine macrophages. This could contribute to limiting the severity of the infection (in particular of serotype O:3 strains) in pigs, which are the primary reservoir of Y. enterocolitica strains pathogenic to humans. PMID:23959720

  7. Oviposition by Spodoptera exigua on Nicotiana attenuata primes induced plant defence against larval herbivory.

    PubMed

    Bandoly, Michele; Hilker, Monika; Steppuhn, Anke

    2015-08-01

    Plants exhibit multifarious defence traits against herbivory that are constitutively expressed or induced upon attack. Insect egg deposition often precedes impending larval attack, and several plants can increase their resistance against larvae after experiencing the oviposition by an herbivore. The nature of such oviposition-mediated resistance remains unknown, and here we aim to determine plant traits that explain it. We test whether oviposition on a host plant can induce plant defence responses or enhance (prime) the induction of defence traits in response to larval herbivory. We exposed Nicotiana attenuata plants to oviposition by moths of a generalist herbivore, Spodoptera exigua. Its larvae suffered higher mortality, retarded development and inflicted less feeding damage on oviposition-experienced than on oviposition-unexperienced plants. While oviposition alone did not induce any of the examined defence traits, oviposited plants exhibited a stronger inducibility of known defence traits, i.e. caffeoylputrescine (CP) and trypsin protease inhibitors (TPIs). We found no effects of oviposition on phytohormone levels, but on the feeding-inducible accumulation of the transcription factor NaMyb8 that is governing biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid-polyamine conjugates, including CP. Comparison of larval performance on wild-type plants, CP-deficient plants (silenced NaMyb8 gene), and TPI-deficient plants (silenced NaPI gene) revealed that priming of plant resistance to larvae by prior oviposition required NaMyb8-mediated defence traits. Our results show that plants can use insect egg deposition as a warning signal to prime their feeding-induced defence. PMID:26096574

  8. IL-32 is a molecular marker of a host defense network in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Dennis; Inkeles, Megan S.; Liu, Phillip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Teles, Rosane M. B.; Vaidya, Poorva; Munoz, Marcos A.; Schenk, Mirjam; Swindell, William R.; Chun, Rene; Zavala, Kathryn; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Horvath, Steve; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of infectious disease–related death worldwide; however, only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop disease. Factors that contribute to protection could prove to be promising targets for M. tuberculosis therapies. Analysis of peripheral blood gene expression profiles of active tuberculosis patients has identified correlates of risk for disease or pathogenesis. We sought to identify potential human candidate markers of host defense by studying gene expression profiles of macrophages, cells that, upon infection by M. tuberculosis, can mount an antimicrobial response. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis revealed an association between the cytokine interleukin-32 (IL-32) and the vitamin D antimicrobial pathway in a network of interferon-γ– and IL-15–induced “defense response” genes. IL-32 induced the vitamin D–dependent antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and DEFB4 and to generate antimicrobial activity in vitro, dependent on the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. In addition, the IL-15–induced defense response macrophage gene network was integrated with ranked pairwise comparisons of gene expression from five different clinical data sets of latent compared with active tuberculosis or healthy controls and a coexpression network derived from gene expression in patients with tuberculosis undergoing chemotherapy. Together, these analyses identified eight common genes, including IL-32, as molecular markers of latent tuberculosis and the IL-15–induced gene network. As maintaining M. tuberculosis in a latent state and preventing transition to active disease may represent a form of host resistance, these results identify IL-32 as one functional marker and potential correlate of protection against active tuberculosis. PMID:25143364

  9. Host cell deformability is linked to transmission in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Aingaran, Mythili; Zhang, Rou; Law, Sue KaYee; Peng, Zhangli; Undisz, Andreas; Meyer, Evan; Diez-Silva, Monica; Burke, Thomas A.; Spielmann, Tobias; Lim, Chwee Teck; Suresh, Subra; Dao, Ming; Marti, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Gametocyte maturation in Plasmodium falciparum is a critical step in the transmission of malaria. While the majority of parasites proliferate asexually in red blood cells, a small fraction of parasites undergo sexual conversion and mature over two weeks to become competent for transmission to a mosquito vector. Immature gametocytes sequester in deep tissues while mature stages must be able to circulate, pass the spleen and present themselves to the mosquito vector in order to complete transmission. Sequestration of asexual red blood cell stage parasites has been investigated in great detail. These studies have demonstrated that induction of cytoadherence properties through specific receptor-ligand interactions coincides with a significant increase in host cell stiffness. In contrast, the adherence and biophysical properties of gametocyte-infected red blood cells have not been studied systematically. Utilizing a transgenic line for 3D live imaging, in vitro capillary assays and 3D finite element whole cell modeling, we studied the role of cellular deformability in determining the circulatory characteristics of gametocytes. Our analysis shows that the red blood cell deformability of immature gametocytes displays an overall decrease followed by rapid restoration in mature gametocytes. Intriguingly, simulations suggest that along with deformability variations, the morphological changes of the parasite may play an important role in tissue distribution in vivo. Taken together we present a model, which suggests that mature but not immature gametocytes circulate in the peripheral blood for uptake in the mosquito blood meal and transmission to another human host thus ensuring long term survival of the parasite. PMID:22417683

  10. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Expression of Human Rhinovirus-Induced Airway Epithelial Host Defense Genes

    PubMed Central

    Proud, David; Hudy, Magdalena H.; Wiehler, Shahina; Zaheer, Raza S.; Amin, Minaa A.; Pelikan, Jonathan B.; Tacon, Claire E.; Tonsaker, Tabitha O.; Walker, Brandie L.; Kooi, Cora; Traves, Suzanne L.; Leigh, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes. PMID:22808255

  11. Parental risk management in relation to offspring defence: bad news for kids

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Katharina; Riegler, Georg; Hoi, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Do parents defend their offspring whenever necessary, and do self-sacrificing parents really exist? Studies recognized that parent defence is dynamic, mainly depending on the threat predators pose. In this context, parental risk management should consider the threat to themselves and to their offspring. Consequently, the observed defence should be a composite of both risk components. Surprisingly, no study so far has determined the influence of these two threat components on parental decision rules. In a field experiment, we investigated parental risk taking in relation to the threat posed to themselves and their offspring. To disentangle the two threat components, we examined defence behaviours of parent blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus towards three different predators and during different nestling developmental stages. Nest defence strategies in terms of alarm call intensity and nearest predator approach differed between the three predators. Defence intensity was only partly explained by threat level. Most importantly, parental risk management varied in relation to their own, but not offspring risk. Parent defence investment was independent of nestling risk when parents followed a high-risk strategy. However, parents considered nestling as well as parental risk when following a low-risk strategy. Our findings could have general implications for the economy of risk management and decision-making strategies in living beings, including humans. PMID:25392467

  12. Parental risk management in relation to offspring defence: bad news for kids.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Katharina; Riegler, Georg; Hoi, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Do parents defend their offspring whenever necessary, and do self-sacrificing parents really exist? Studies recognized that parent defence is dynamic, mainly depending on the threat predators pose. In this context, parental risk management should consider the threat to themselves and to their offspring. Consequently, the observed defence should be a composite of both risk components. Surprisingly, no study so far has determined the influence of these two threat components on parental decision rules. In a field experiment, we investigated parental risk taking in relation to the threat posed to themselves and their offspring. To disentangle the two threat components, we examined defence behaviours of parent blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus towards three different predators and during different nestling developmental stages. Nest defence strategies in terms of alarm call intensity and nearest predator approach differed between the three predators. Defence intensity was only partly explained by threat level. Most importantly, parental risk management varied in relation to their own, but not offspring risk. Parent defence investment was independent of nestling risk when parents followed a high-risk strategy. However, parents considered nestling as well as parental risk when following a low-risk strategy. Our findings could have general implications for the economy of risk management and decision-making strategies in living beings, including humans. PMID:25392467

  13. Iron acquisition from Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores by human phagocytes: an additional mechanism of host defense through iron sequestration?

    PubMed

    Britigan, B E; Rasmussen, G T; Olakanmi, O; Cox, C D

    2000-03-01

    Chelation of iron to iron-binding proteins is a strategy of host defense. Some pathogens counter this via the secretion of low-molecular-weight iron-chelating agents (siderophores). Human phagocytes possess a high-capacity mechanism for iron acquisition from low-molecular-weight iron chelates. Efficient acquisition and sequestration of iron bound to bacterial siderophores by host phagocytes could provide a secondary mechanism to limit microbial access to iron. In the present work we report that human neutrophils, macrophages, and myeloid cell lines can acquire iron from the two Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores. Analogous to iron acquisition from other low-molecular-weight chelates, iron acquisition from the siderophores is ATP independent, induced by multivalent cationic metals, and unaffected by inhibitors of endocytosis and pinocytosis. In vivo, this process could serve as an additional mechanism of host defense to limit iron availability to invading siderophore-producing microbes. PMID:10678937

  14. Iron Acquisition from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Siderophores by Human Phagocytes: an Additional Mechanism of Host Defense through Iron Sequestration?

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, Bradley E.; Rasmussen, George T.; Olakanmi, Oyebode; Cox, Charles D.

    2000-01-01

    Chelation of iron to iron-binding proteins is a strategy of host defense. Some pathogens counter this via the secretion of low-molecular-weight iron-chelating agents (siderophores). Human phagocytes possess a high-capacity mechanism for iron acquisition from low-molecular-weight iron chelates. Efficient acquisition and sequestration of iron bound to bacterial siderophores by host phagocytes could provide a secondary mechanism to limit microbial access to iron. In the present work we report that human neutrophils, macrophages, and myeloid cell lines can acquire iron from the two Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores. Analogous to iron acquisition from other low-molecular-weight chelates, iron acquisition from the siderophores is ATP independent, induced by multivalent cationic metals, and unaffected by inhibitors of endocytosis and pinocytosis. In vivo, this process could serve as an additional mechanism of host defense to limit iron availability to invading siderophore-producing microbes. PMID:10678937

  15. POU2AF1 Functions in the Human Airway Epithelium To Regulate Expression of Host Defense Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haixia; Brekman, Angelika; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Ou, Xuemei; Shaykhiev, Renat; Agosto-Perez, Francisco J; Wang, Rui; Walters, Matthew S; Salit, Jacqueline; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Staudt, Michelle R; Kaner, Robert J; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G; Wang, Guoqing

    2016-04-01

    In the process of seeking novel lung host defense regulators by analyzing genome-wide RNA sequence data from normal human airway epithelium, we detected expression of POU domain class 2-associating factor 1 (POU2AF1), a known transcription cofactor previously thought to be expressed only in lymphocytes. Lymphocyte contamination of human airway epithelial samples obtained by bronchoscopy and brushing was excluded by immunohistochemistry staining, the observation of upregulation of POU2AF1 in purified airway basal stem/progenitor cells undergoing differentiation, and analysis of differentiating single basal cell clones. Lentivirus-mediated upregulation of POU2AF1 in airway basal cells induced upregulation of host defense genes, including MX1, IFIT3, IFITM, and known POU2AF1 downstream genes HLA-DRA, ID2, ID3, IL6, and BCL6. Interestingly, expression of these genes paralleled changes of POU2AF1 expression during airway epithelium differentiation in vitro, suggesting POU2AF1 helps to maintain a host defense tone even in pathogen-free condition. Cigarette smoke, a known risk factor for airway infection, suppressed POU2AF1 expression both in vivo in humans and in vitro in human airway epithelial cultures, accompanied by deregulation of POU2AF1 downstream genes. Finally, enhancing POU2AF1 expression in human airway epithelium attenuated the suppression of host defense genes by smoking. Together, these findings suggest a novel function of POU2AF1 as a potential regulator of host defense genes in the human airway epithelium. PMID:26927796

  16. Induction of Central Host Signaling Kinases during Pneumococcal Infection of Human THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Thomas P.; Scholz, Annemarie; Kiachludis, Delia; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a widespread colonizer of the mucosal epithelia of the upper respiratory tract of human. However, pneumococci are also responsible for numerous local as well as severe systemic infections, especially in children under the age of five and the elderly. Under certain conditions, pneumococci are able to conquer the epithelial barrier, which can lead to a dissemination of the bacteria into underlying tissues and the bloodstream. Here, specialized macrophages represent an essential part of the innate immune system against bacterial intruders. Recognition of the bacteria through different receptors on the surface of macrophages leads thereby to an uptake and elimination of bacteria. Accompanied cytokine release triggers the migration of leukocytes from peripheral blood to the site of infection, where monocytes differentiate into mature macrophages. The rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis, resulting in the engulfment of bacteria, is thereby tightly regulated by receptor-mediated phosphorylation cascades of different protein kinases. The molecular cellular processes including the modulation of central protein kinases are only partially solved. In this study, the human monocytic THP-1 cell line was used as a model system to examine the activation of Fcγ and complement receptor-independent signal cascades during infection with S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci cultured either in chemically defined or complex medium showed no significant differences in pneumococcal phagocytosis by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 cells. Double immuno-fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays demonstrated a time-dependent uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae 35A inside of macrophages. Infections of THP-1 cells in the presence of specific pharmacological inhibitors revealed a crucial role of actin polymerization and importance of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Protein kinase B (Akt) as well during

  17. Induction of Central Host Signaling Kinases during Pneumococcal Infection of Human THP-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Thomas P; Scholz, Annemarie; Kiachludis, Delia; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a widespread colonizer of the mucosal epithelia of the upper respiratory tract of human. However, pneumococci are also responsible for numerous local as well as severe systemic infections, especially in children under the age of five and the elderly. Under certain conditions, pneumococci are able to conquer the epithelial barrier, which can lead to a dissemination of the bacteria into underlying tissues and the bloodstream. Here, specialized macrophages represent an essential part of the innate immune system against bacterial intruders. Recognition of the bacteria through different receptors on the surface of macrophages leads thereby to an uptake and elimination of bacteria. Accompanied cytokine release triggers the migration of leukocytes from peripheral blood to the site of infection, where monocytes differentiate into mature macrophages. The rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis, resulting in the engulfment of bacteria, is thereby tightly regulated by receptor-mediated phosphorylation cascades of different protein kinases. The molecular cellular processes including the modulation of central protein kinases are only partially solved. In this study, the human monocytic THP-1 cell line was used as a model system to examine the activation of Fcγ and complement receptor-independent signal cascades during infection with S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci cultured either in chemically defined or complex medium showed no significant differences in pneumococcal phagocytosis by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 cells. Double immuno-fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays demonstrated a time-dependent uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae 35A inside of macrophages. Infections of THP-1 cells in the presence of specific pharmacological inhibitors revealed a crucial role of actin polymerization and importance of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Protein kinase B (Akt) as well during

  18. Subcellular proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions using human monocytes exposed to Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C G; Gonzales, A D; Choi, M W; Chromy, B A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2004-05-20

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is of concern to human health both from an infectious disease and a civilian biodefense perspective. While Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis share more than 90% DNA homology, they have significantly different clinical manifestations. Plague is often fatal if untreated, yet Y. pseudotuberculosis causes severe intestinal distress and is rarely fatal. A better understanding of host response to these closely related pathogens may help explain the different mechanisms of virulence and pathogenesis that result in such different clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize host protein expression changes in human monocyte-like U937 cells after exposure to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. In order to gain global proteomic coverage of host response, proteins from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions of host cells were studied by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and relative protein expression differences were quantitated. Differentially expressed proteins, with at least 1.5 fold expression changes and p values of 0.01 or less, were identified by MALDI-MS or LC/MS/MS. With these criteria, differential expression was detected in 16 human proteins after Y. pestis exposure and 13 human proteins after Y. pseudotuberculosis exposure, of which only two of the differentially expressed proteins identified were shared between the two exposures. Proteins identified in this study are reported to be involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions and host defense mechanisms including apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, protein synthesis and degradation, DNA replication and transcription, metabolism, protein folding, and cell signaling. Notably, the differential expression patterns observed can distinguish the two pathogen exposures from each other and from unexposed host cells. The functions of the differentially expressed proteins identified provide insight on the different

  19. Partial blood meal, carbohydrate availability, and blood-feeding postponement effects on human host avidity and DEET repellency in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host avidity and DEET repellency were measured in partially blood fed Aedes albopictus (Skuse) provided 10% sucrose in water, water, or neither when access to a human host was postponed for 1 to 72 h after a partial blood meal. Carbohydrate availability and post-feeding time influenced host avidity...

  20. Host Mitochondrial Association Evolved in the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii via Neofunctionalization of a Gene Duplicate.

    PubMed

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; English, Elizabeth D; Danielson, Jeffrey J; Pernas, Lena F; Parker, Michelle L; Boulanger, Martin J; Dubey, Jitender P; Boyle, Jon P

    2016-05-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other animals, host mitochondrial association (HMA) is driven by a gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. However, the importance of MAF1 gene duplication in the evolution of HMA is not understood, nor is the impact of HMA on parasite biology. Here we used within- and between-species comparative analysis to determine that the MAF1 locus is duplicated in T. gondii and its nearest extant relative Hammondia hammondi, but not another close relative, Neospora caninum Using cross-species complementation, we determined that the MAF1 locus harbors multiple distinct paralogs that differ in their ability to mediate HMA, and that only T. gondii and H. hammondi harbor HMA(+) paralogs. Additionally, we found that exogenous expression of an HMA(+) paralog in T. gondii strains that do not normally exhibit HMA provides a competitive advantage over their wild-type counterparts during a mouse infection. These data indicate that HMA likely evolved by neofunctionalization of a duplicate MAF1 copy in the common ancestor of T. gondii and H. hammondi, and that the neofunctionalized gene duplicate is selectively advantageous. PMID:26920761

  1. Host Mitochondrial Association Evolved in the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii via Neofunctionalization of a Gene Duplicate

    PubMed Central

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; English, Elizabeth D.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Pernas, Lena F.; Parker, Michelle L.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Boyle, Jon P.

    2016-01-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other animals, host mitochondrial association (HMA) is driven by a gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. However, the importance of MAF1 gene duplication in the evolution of HMA is not understood, nor is the impact of HMA on parasite biology. Here we used within- and between-species comparative analysis to determine that the MAF1 locus is duplicated in T. gondii and its nearest extant relative Hammondia hammondi, but not another close relative, Neospora caninum. Using cross-species complementation, we determined that the MAF1 locus harbors multiple distinct paralogs that differ in their ability to mediate HMA, and that only T. gondii and H. hammondi harbor HMA+ paralogs. Additionally, we found that exogenous expression of an HMA+ paralog in T. gondii strains that do not normally exhibit HMA provides a competitive advantage over their wild-type counterparts during a mouse infection. These data indicate that HMA likely evolved by neofunctionalization of a duplicate MAF1 copy in the common ancestor of T. gondii and H. hammondi, and that the neofunctionalized gene duplicate is selectively advantageous. PMID:26920761

  2. Mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein plays an essential role in host immunity against human metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Junfang; Chen, Yu; Liu, Guangliang; Ren, Junping; Go, Caroline; Ivanciuc, Teodora; Deepthi, Kolli; Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a common cause of respiratory tract infection in the paediatrics population. Recently, we and others have shown that retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) are essential for hMPV-induced cellular antiviral signalling. However, the contribution of those receptors to host immunity against pulmonary hMPV infection is largely unexplored. In this study, mice deficient in mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS), an adaptor of RLRs, were used to investigate the role(s) of these receptors in pulmonary immune responses to hMPV infection. MAVS deletion significantly impaired the induction of antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of immune cells to the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by hMPV. Compared with WT mice, mice lacking MAVS demonstrated decreased abilities to activate pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and abnormal primary T-cell responses to hMPV infection. In addition, mice deficient in MAVS had a higher peak of viral load at day 5 post-infection (p.i.) than WT mice, but were able to clear hMPV by day 7 p.i. similarly to WT mice. Taken together, our data indicate a role of MAVS-mediated pathways in the pulmonary immune responses to hMPV infection and the early control of hMPV replication. PMID:25953917

  3. NAD+-Metabolizing Ectoenzymes in Remodeling Tumor–Host Interactions: The Human Myeloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Alberto L.; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Zito, Andrea; Roato, Ilaria; Morandi, Fabio; Marimpietri, Danilo; Bolzoni, Marina; Toscani, Denise; Oldham, Robert J.; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Sasser, A. Kate; Pistoia, Vito; Giuliani, Nicola; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential co-enzyme reported to operate both intra- and extracellularly. In the extracellular space, NAD+ can elicit signals by binding purinergic P2 receptors or it can serve as the substrate for a chain of ectoenzymes. As a substrate, it is converted to adenosine (ADO) and then taken up by the cells, where it is transformed and reincorporated into the intracellular nucleotide pool. Nucleotide-nucleoside conversion is regulated by membrane-bound ectoenzymes. CD38, the main mammalian enzyme that hydrolyzes NAD+, belongs to the ectoenzymatic network generating intracellular Ca2+-active metabolites. Within this general framework, the extracellular conversion of NAD+ can vary significantly according to the tissue environment or pathological conditions. Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor cells exploit such a network for migrating and homing to protected areas and, even more importantly, for evading the immune response. We report on the experience of this lab to exploit human multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplastic expansion of plasma cells, as a model to investigate these issues. MM cells express high levels of surface CD38 and grow in an environment prevalently represented by closed niches hosted in the bone marrow (BM). An original approach of this study derives from the recent use of the clinical availability of therapeutic anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in perturbing tumor viability and enzymatic functions in conditions mimicking what happens in vivo. PMID:26393653

  4. Distinct Proinflammatory Host Responses to Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection in Immortalized Human Cervical and Vaginal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fichorova, Raina Nakova; Desai, Pragnya Jasvantrai; Gibson, Frank C.; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2001-01-01

    In this study we utilized immortalized morphologically and functionally distinct epithelial cell lines from normal human endocervix, ectocervix, and vagina to characterize gonococcal epithelial interactions pertinent to the lower female genital tract. Piliated, but not nonpiliated, N. gonorrhoeae strain F62 variants actively invaded these epithelial cell lines, as demonstrated by an antibiotic protection assay and confocal microscopy. Invasion of these cells by green fluorescent protein-expressing gonococci was characterized by colocalization of gonococci with F actin, which were initially detected 30 min postinfection. In all three cell lines, upregulation of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and IL-6, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54), and the nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (CD66c) were detected 4 h after infection with piliated and nonpiliated gonococci. Furthermore, stimulation of all three cell lines with gonococcal whole-cell lysates resulted in a similar upregulation of IL-6 and IL-8, confirming that bacterial uptake is not essential for this response. Increased levels of IL-1 were first detected 8 h after infection with gonococci, suggesting that the earlier IL-8 and IL-6 responses were not mediated through the IL-1 signaling pathway. The IL-1 response was limited to cultures infected with piliated gonococci and was more vigorous in the endocervical epithelial cells. The ability of gonococci to stimulate distinct proinflammatory host responses in these morphologically and functionally different compartments of the lower female genital tract may contribute directly to the inflammatory signs and symptoms characteristic of disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:11500462

  5. A bacterial regulatory RNA attenuates virulence, spread and human host cell phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Le Pabic, Hélène; Germain-Amiot, Noëlla; Bordeau, Valérie; Felden, Brice

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is directed by regulatory proteins and RNAs. We report the case of an RNA attenuating virulence and host uptake, possibly to sustain commensalism. A S. aureus sRNA, SprC (srn_3610), reduced virulence and bacterial loads in a mouse infection model. S. aureus deleted for sprC became more virulent and increased bacterial dissemination in colonized animals. Conversely, inducing SprC expression lowered virulence and the bacterial load. Without sprC, S. aureus phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages was higher, whereas bacteria were internalized at lower yields when SprC expression was stimulated. Without sprC, higher internalization led to a greater number of extracellular bacteria, facilitating colonization. SprC expression decreased after phagocytosis, concurring with the facilitated growth of bacteria lacking the sRNA in the presence of an oxidant. The major staphylococcal autolysin facilitates S. aureus uptake by human phagocytes. ATL proved to be negatively regulated by SprC. The SprC domains involved in pairing with atl mRNA were analyzed. The addition of ATL reduced phagocytosis of bacteria lacking sprC with no effects on wild-type bacterial uptake, implying that SprC influences phagocytosis, at least in part, by controlling ATL. Since the control of SprC on ATL was modest, other factors must contribute to atl regulation. PMID:26240382

  6. Passive sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants and adaptation in new hosts.

    PubMed

    Frater, A J; Edwards, C T T; McCarthy, N; Fox, J; Brown, H; Milicic, A; Mackie, N; Pillay, T; Drijfhout, J W; Dustan, S; Clarke, J R; Holmes, E C; Zhang, H T; Pfafferott, K; Goulder, P J; McClure, M O; Weber, J; Phillips, R E; Fidler, S

    2006-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity is a major obstacle for the design of a successful vaccine. Certain viral polymorphisms encode human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated immune escape, potentially overcoming limited vaccine protection. Although transmission of immune escape variants has been reported, the overall extent to which this phenomenon occurs in populations and the degree to which it contributes to HIV-1 viral evolution are unknown. Selection on the HIV-1 env gene at transmission favors neutralization-sensitive variants, but it is not known to what degree selection acts on the internal HIV-1 proteins to restrict or enhance the transmission of immune escape variants. Studies have suggested that HLA class I may determine susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, but a definitive role for HLA at transmission remains unproven. Comparing populations of acute seroconverters and chronically infected patients, we found no evidence of selection acting to restrict transmission of HIV-1 variants. We found that statistical associations previously reported in chronic infection between viral polymorphisms and HLA class I alleles are not present in acute infection, suggesting that the majority of viral polymorphisms in these patients are the result of transmission rather than de novo adaptation. Using four episodes of HIV-1 transmission in which the donors and recipients were both sampled very close to the time of infection we found that, despite a transmission bottleneck, genetic variants of HIV-1 infection are transmitted in a frequency-dependent manner. As HIV-1 infections are seeded by unique donor-adapted viral variants, each episode is a highly individual antigenic challenge. Host-specific, idiosyncratic HIV-1 antigenic diversity will seriously tax the efficacy of immunization based on consensus sequences. PMID:16809328

  7. Domestic Animal Hosts Strongly Influence Human-Feeding Rates of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma infestans in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Cecere, María C.; Vázquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Gurevitz, Juan M.; Fernández, María del Pilar; Kitron, Uriel; Cohen, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The host species composition in a household and their relative availability affect the host-feeding choices of blood-sucking insects and parasite transmission risks. We investigated four hypotheses regarding factors that affect blood-feeding rates, proportion of human-fed bugs (human blood index), and daily human-feeding rates of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease. Methods A cross-sectional survey collected triatomines in human sleeping quarters (domiciles) of 49 of 270 rural houses in northwestern Argentina. We developed an improved way of estimating the human-feeding rate of domestic T. infestans populations. We fitted generalized linear mixed-effects models to a global model with six explanatory variables (chicken blood index, dog blood index, bug stage, numbers of human residents, bug abundance, and maximum temperature during the night preceding bug catch) and three response variables (daily blood-feeding rate, human blood index, and daily human-feeding rate). Coefficients were estimated via multimodel inference with model averaging. Findings Median blood-feeding intervals per late-stage bug were 4.1 days, with large variations among households. The main bloodmeal sources were humans (68%), chickens (22%), and dogs (9%). Blood-feeding rates decreased with increases in the chicken blood index. Both the human blood index and daily human-feeding rate decreased substantially with increasing proportions of chicken- or dog-fed bugs, or the presence of chickens indoors. Improved calculations estimated the mean daily human-feeding rate per late-stage bug at 0.231 (95% confidence interval, 0.157–0.305). Conclusions and Significance Based on the changing availability of chickens in domiciles during spring-summer and the much larger infectivity of dogs compared with humans, we infer that the net effects of chickens in the presence of transmission-competent hosts may be more adequately described by zoopotentiation than by zooprophylaxis

  8. Capability engineering: transforming defence acquisition in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagotto, Jack; Walker, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    Capability engineering, a new methodology with the potential to transform defence planning and acquisition, is described. The impact of capability engineering on existing defence business processes and organizations is being explored in Canada during the course of a four-year Technology Demonstration Project called Collaborative Capability Definition, Engineering and Management (CapDEM). Having completed the first of three experimentation spirals within this project, a high-level capability engineering process model has been defined. The process begins by mapping strategic defence guidance onto defence capabilities, using architectural models that articulate the people, process and materiel requirements of each capability when viewed as a system-of-systems. For a selected capability, metrics are rigorously applied to these models to assess their ability to deliver the military capability outcomes required by a set of predefined tasks and force planning scenarios. By programming the modification of these tasks and planning scenarios over time according to evolving capability objectives, quantifiable capability gaps are identified, that in turn drive the process towards options to close these gaps. The implementation plan for these options constitutes a capability evolution roadmap to support defence-investment decisions. Capability engineering is viewed as an essential enabler to meeting the objective of improved capability management, subsuming the functions of capability generation, sustainment and employment.

  9. Influence of Trichobilharzia regenti (Digenea: Schistosomatidae) on the Defence Activity of Radix lagotis (Lymnaeidae) Haemocytes

    PubMed Central

    Skála, Vladimír; Černíková, Alena; Jindrová, Zuzana; Kašný, Martin; Vostrý, Martin; Walker, Anthony J.; Horák, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Radix lagotis is an intermediate snail host of the nasal bird schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti. Changes in defence responses in infected snails that might be related to host-parasite compatibility are not known. This study therefore aimed to characterize R. lagotis haemocyte defence mechanisms and determine the extent to which they are modulated by T. regenti. Histological observations of R. lagotis infected with T. regenti revealed that early phases of infection were accompanied by haemocyte accumulation around the developing larvae 2–36 h post exposure (p.e.) to the parasite. At later time points, 44–92 h p.e., no haemocytes were observed around T. regenti. Additionally, microtubular aggregates likely corresponding to phagocytosed ciliary plates of T. regenti miracidia were observed within haemocytes by use of transmission electron microscopy. When the infection was in the patent phase, haemocyte phagocytic activity and hydrogen peroxide production were significantly reduced in infected R. lagotis when compared to uninfected counterparts, whereas haemocyte abundance increased in infected snails. At a molecular level, protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) were found to play an important role in regulating these defence reactions in R. lagotis. Moreover, haemocytes from snails with patent infection displayed lower PKC and ERK activity in cell adhesion assays when compared to those from uninfected snails, which may therefore be related to the reduced defence activities of these cells. These data provide the first integrated insight into the immunobiology of R. lagotis and demonstrate modulation of haemocyte-mediated responses in patent T. regenti infected snails. Given that immunomodulation occurs during patency, interference of snail-host defence by T. regenti might be important for the sustained production and/or release of infective cercariae. PMID:25372492

  10. The relationships between the burden of adult parasites, host age and the microfilarial density in human onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Duerr, H P; Dietz, K; Schulz-Key, H; Büttner, D W; Eichner, M

    2004-03-29

    We investigate the relationship between the microfilarial density in the skin and the burden of adult female Onchocerca volvulus by analysing pre-control nodulectomy data which allow for a direct approach, independent of exposure. The data of 169 patients in Burkina Faso and 182 patients in Liberia represent savannah and forest onchocerciasis in West Africa, respectively. Whereas in Burkina Faso, a saturating relationship between microfilarial density and worm burden suggests the operation of density-dependent processes within human hosts, the Liberian data show a linear relationship implying no density dependence. The differences may derive from differences between both parasite strains, i.e. the savannah or the forest strain of O. volvulus. Consistently for both parasite strains and independent of the worm burden, the microfilarial density increases with host age emphasising the concept of the acquisition of immunological tolerance. In male hosts in Liberia, the microfilarial density increases stronger with the worm burden than in female hosts, whereas such sex-specific differences cannot be found in Burkina Faso. In the methodological part of this investigation, we suggest the beta-distribution to be most appropriate for describing variability in microfilarial densities and we present an approach to consider the uncertainty in the adult parasite burden which cannot be determined precisely in helminth infections. Implications of density dependence are discussed with respect to immunological processes in the human host and with respect to the success of control programs. The relationships described show that regulatory processes between the parasite and the human host are multi-dimensional, operating within a high degree of biological variability. PMID:15013736

  11. Mutualistic ants as an indirect defence against leaf pathogens.

    PubMed

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Mutualistic ants are commonly considered as an efficient indirect defence against herbivores. Nevertheless, their indirect protective role against plant pathogens has been scarcely investigated. We compared the protective role against pathogens of two different ant partners, a mutualistic and a parasitic ant, on the host plant Acacia hindsii (Fabaceae). The epiphytic bacterial community on leaves was evaluated in the presence and absence of both ant partners by cultivation and by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Pathogen-inflicted leaf damage, epiphytic bacterial abundance (colony-forming units) and number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were significantly higher in plants inhabited by parasitic ants than in plants inhabited by mutualistic ants. Unifrac unweighted and weighted principal component analyses showed that the bacterial community composition on leaves changed significantly when mutualistic ants were removed from plants or when plants were inhabited by parasitic ants. Direct mechanisms provided by ant-associated bacteria would contribute to the protective role against pathogens. The results suggest that the indirect defence of mutualistic ants also covers the protection from bacterial plant pathogens. Our findings highlight the importance of considering bacterial partners in ant-plant defensive mutualisms, which can contribute significantly to ant-mediated protection from plant pathogens. PMID:24392817

  12. Intrinsic host restriction factors of human cytomegalovirus replication and mechanisms of viral escape

    PubMed Central

    Landolfo, Santo; De Andrea, Marco; Dell’Oste, Valentina; Gugliesi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Before a pathogen even enters a cell, intrinsic immune defenses are active. This first-line defense is mediated by a variety of constitutively expressed cell proteins collectively termed “restriction factors” (RFs), and they form a vital element of the immune response to virus infections. Over time, however, viruses have evolved in a variety ways so that they are able to overcome these RF defenses via mechanisms that are specific for each virus. This review provides a summary of the universal characteristics of RFs, and goes on to focus on the strategies employed by some of the most important RFs in their attempt to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. This is followed by a discussion of the counter-restriction mechanisms evolved by viruses to circumvent the host cell’s intrinsic immune defenses. RFs include nuclear proteins IFN-γ inducible protein 16 (IFI16) (a Pyrin/HIN domain protein), Sp100, promyelocytic leukemia, and hDaxx; the latter three being the keys elements of nuclear domain 10 (ND10). IFI16 inhibits the synthesis of virus DNA by down-regulating UL54 transcription - a gene encoding a CMV DNA polymerase; in response, the virus antagonizes IFI16 via a process involving viral proteins UL97 and pp65 (pUL83), which results in the mislocalizing of IFI16 into the cytoplasm. In contrast, viral regulatory proteins, including pp71 and IE1, seek to modify or disrupt the ND10 proteins and thus block or reverse their inhibitory effects upon virus replication. All in all, detailed knowledge of these HCMV counter-restriction mechanisms will be fundamental for the future development of new strategies for combating HCMV infection and for identifying novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27563536

  13. Intrinsic host restriction factors of human cytomegalovirus replication and mechanisms of viral escape.

    PubMed

    Landolfo, Santo; De Andrea, Marco; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Gugliesi, Francesca

    2016-08-12

    Before a pathogen even enters a cell, intrinsic immune defenses are active. This first-line defense is mediated by a variety of constitutively expressed cell proteins collectively termed "restriction factors" (RFs), and they form a vital element of the immune response to virus infections. Over time, however, viruses have evolved in a variety ways so that they are able to overcome these RF defenses via mechanisms that are specific for each virus. This review provides a summary of the universal characteristics of RFs, and goes on to focus on the strategies employed by some of the most important RFs in their attempt to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. This is followed by a discussion of the counter-restriction mechanisms evolved by viruses to circumvent the host cell's intrinsic immune defenses. RFs include nuclear proteins IFN-γ inducible protein 16 (IFI16) (a Pyrin/HIN domain protein), Sp100, promyelocytic leukemia, and hDaxx; the latter three being the keys elements of nuclear domain 10 (ND10). IFI16 inhibits the synthesis of virus DNA by down-regulating UL54 transcription - a gene encoding a CMV DNA polymerase; in response, the virus antagonizes IFI16 via a process involving viral proteins UL97 and pp65 (pUL83), which results in the mislocalizing of IFI16 into the cytoplasm. In contrast, viral regulatory proteins, including pp71 and IE1, seek to modify or disrupt the ND10 proteins and thus block or reverse their inhibitory effects upon virus replication. All in all, detailed knowledge of these HCMV counter-restriction mechanisms will be fundamental for the future development of new strategies for combating HCMV infection and for identifying novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27563536

  14. Identification of TRAPPC8 as a Host Factor Required for Human Papillomavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Tomomi; Kataoka, Michiyo; Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Mori, Seiichiro; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Kukimoto, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped virus composed of a circular DNA genome and two capsid proteins, L1 and L2. Multiple interactions between its capsid proteins and host cellular proteins are required for infectious HPV entry, including cell attachment and internalization, intracellular trafficking and viral genome transfer into the nucleus. Using two variants of HPV type 51, the Ma and Nu strains, we have previously reported that MaL2 is required for efficient pseudovirus (PsV) transduction. However, the cellular factors that confer this L2 dependency have not yet been identified. Here we report that the transport protein particle complex subunit 8 (TRAPPC8) specifically interacts with MaL2. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HeLa cells yielded reduced levels of reporter gene expression when inoculated with HPV51Ma, HPV16, and HPV31 PsVs. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HaCaT cells also showed reduced susceptibility to infection with authentic HPV31 virions, indicating that TRAPPC8 plays a crucial role in native HPV infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the central region of TRAPPC8 was exposed on the cell surface and colocalized with inoculated PsVs. The entry of Ma, Nu, and L2-lacking PsVs into cells was equally impaired in TRAPPC8 knockdown HeLa cells, suggesting that TRAPPC8-dependent endocytosis plays an important role in HPV entry that is independent of L2 interaction. Finally, expression of GFP-fused L2 that can also interact with TRAPPC8 induced dispersal of the Golgi stack structure in HeLa cells, a phenotype also observed by TRAPPC8 knockdown. These results suggest that during viral intracellular trafficking, binding of L2 to TRAPPC8 inhibits its function resulting in Golgi destabilization, a process that may assist HPV genome escape from the trans-Golgi network. PMID:24244674

  15. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  16. Egg phenotype matching by cuckoos in relation to discrimination by hosts and climatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, Jesús M.; Vikan, Johan R.; Fossøy, Frode; Antonov, Anton; Moksnes, Arne; Røskaft, Eivin; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Møller, Anders P.; Stokke, Bård G.

    2012-01-01

    Although parasites and their hosts often coexist in a set of environmentally differentiated populations connected by gene flow, few empirical studies have considered a role of environmental variation in shaping correlations between traits of hosts and parasites. Here, we studied for the first time the association between the frequency of adaptive parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus phenotypes in terms of egg matching and level of defences exhibited by its reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus hosts across seven geographically distant populations in Europe. We also explored the influence of spring climatic conditions experienced by cuckoos and hosts on cuckoo–host egg matching. We found that between-population differences in host defences against cuckoos (i.e. rejection rate) covaried with between-population differences in degree of matching. Between-population differences in host egg phenotype were associated with between-population differences in parasitism rate and spring climatic conditions, but not with host level of defences. Between-population differences in cuckoo egg phenotype covaried with between-population differences in host defences and spring climatic conditions. However, differences in host defences still explained differences in mimicry once differences in climatic conditions were controlled, suggesting that selection exerted by host defences must be strong relative to selection imposed by climatic factors on egg phenotypes. PMID:22237911

  17. A novel video-tracking system to quantify the behaviour of nocturnal mosquitoes attacking human hosts in the field

    PubMed Central

    Abe, M.; Mashauri, F.; Martine, J.

    2016-01-01

    Many vectors of malaria and other infections spend most of their adult life within human homes, the environment where they bloodfeed and rest, and where control has been most successful. Yet, knowledge of peri-domestic mosquito behaviour is limited, particularly how mosquitoes find and attack human hosts or how insecticides impact on behaviour. This is partly because technology for tracking mosquitoes in their natural habitats, traditional dwellings in disease-endemic countries, has never been available. We describe a sensing device that enables observation and recording of nocturnal mosquitoes attacking humans with or without a bed net, in the laboratory and in rural Africa. The device addresses requirements for sub-millimetre resolution over a 2.0 × 1.2 × 2.0 m volume while using minimum irradiance. Data processing strategies to extract individual mosquito trajectories and algorithms to describe behaviour during host/net interactions are introduced. Results from UK laboratory and Tanzanian field tests showed that Culex quinquefasciatus activity was higher and focused on the bed net roof when a human host was present, in colonized and wild populations. Both C. quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae exhibited similar behavioural modes, with average flight velocities varying by less than 10%. The system offers considerable potential for investigations in vector biology and many other fields. PMID:27075002

  18. Differential reproductive success favours strong host preference in a highly specialized brood parasite

    PubMed Central

    De Mársico, María C; Reboreda, Juan C

    2008-01-01

    Obligate avian brood parasites show dramatic variation in the degree to which they are host specialists or host generalists. The screaming cowbird Molothrus rufoaxillaris is one of the most specialized brood parasites, using a single host, the bay-winged cowbird (Agelaioides badius) over most of its range. Coevolutionary theory predicts increasing host specificity the longer the parasite interacts with a particular avian community, as hosts evolve defences that the parasite cannot counteract. According to this view, host specificity can be maintained if screaming cowbirds avoid parasitizing potentially suitable hosts that have developed effective defences against parasitic females or eggs. Specialization may also be favoured, even in the absence of host defences, if the parasite's reproductive success in alternative hosts is lower than that in the main host. We experimentally tested these hypotheses using as alternative hosts two suitable but unparasitized species: house wrens (Troglodytes aedon) and chalk-browed mockingbirds (Mimus saturninus). We assessed host defences against parasitic females and eggs, and reproductive success of the parasite in current and alternative hosts. Alternative hosts did not discriminate against screaming cowbird females or eggs. Egg survival and hatching success were similarly high in current and alternative hosts, but the survival of parasitic chicks was significantly lower in alternative hosts. Our results indicate that screaming cowbirds have the potential to colonize novel hosts, but higher reproductive success in the current host may favour host fidelity. PMID:18647716

  19. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  20. How insects overcome two-component plant chemical defence: plant β-glucosidases as the main target for herbivore adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Rook, Fred; Bak, Søren

    2014-08-01

    Insect herbivory is often restricted by glucosylated plant chemical defence compounds that are activated by plant β-glucosidases to release toxic aglucones upon plant tissue damage. Such two-component plant defences are widespread in the plant kingdom and examples of these classes of compounds are alkaloid, benzoxazinoid, cyanogenic and iridoid glucosides as well as glucosinolates and salicinoids. Conversely, many insects have evolved a diversity of counteradaptations to overcome this type of constitutive chemical defence. Here we discuss that such counter-adaptations occur at different time points, before and during feeding as well as during digestion, and at several levels such as the insects’ feeding behaviour, physiology and metabolism. Insect adaptations frequently circumvent or counteract the activity of the plant β-glucosidases, bioactivating enzymes that are a key element in the plant’s two-component chemical defence. These adaptations include host plant choice, non-disruptive feeding guilds and various physiological adaptations as well as metabolic enzymatic strategies of the insect’s digestive system. Furthermore, insect adaptations often act in combination, may exist in both generalists and specialists, and can act on different classes of defence compounds. We discuss how generalist and specialist insects appear to differ in their ability to use these different types of adaptations: in generalists, adaptations are often inducible, whereas in specialists they are often constitutive. Future studies are suggested to investigate in detail how insect adaptations act in combination to overcome plant chemical defences and to allow ecologically relevant conclusions. PMID:25165798

  1. GENOMIC DIVERSITY OF STREPTOCOCCUS AGALACTIAE FROM FISH, BOVINE AND HUMAN HOSTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Group B Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a cause of infectious disease in multiple poikilothermic and homothermic animal species. Epidemiological and zoonotic considerations necessitate an undertaking of a comparison of S. agalactiae isolates from different phylogenetic hosts and geographical regi...

  2. Emerging Roles of the Host Defense Peptide LL-37 in Human Cancer and its Potential Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, William K.K.; Wang, Guangshun; Coffelt, Seth B.; Betancourt, Aline M.; Lee, Chung W.; Fan, Daiming; Wu, Kaichun; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J.Y.; Cho, Chi H.

    2010-01-01

    Human cathelicidin LL-37, a host defense peptide derived from leukocytes and epithelial cells, plays a crucial role in innate and adaptive immunity. Not only does it eliminate pathogenic microbes directly, LL-37 also modulates host immune responses. Emerging evidence from tumor biology studies indicates that LL-37 plays a prominent and complex role in carcinogenesis. While overexpression of LL-37 has been implicated in the development or progression of many human malignancies, including breast, ovarian and lung cancers, LL-37 suppresses tumorigenesis in gastric cancer. These data are beginning to unveil the intricate and contradictory functions of LL-37. The reasons for the tissue-specific function of LL-37 in carcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. Here, we review the relationship between LL-37, its fragments and cancer progression as well as discuss the potential therapeutic implications of targeting this peptide. PMID:20521250

  3. Emerging roles of the host defense peptide LL-37 in human cancer and its potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, William K K; Wang, Guangshun; Coffelt, Seth B; Betancourt, Aline M; Lee, Chung W; Fan, Daiming; Wu, Kaichun; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y; Cho, Chi H

    2010-10-15

    Human cathelicidin LL-37, a host defense peptide derived from leukocytes and epithelial cells, plays a crucial role in innate and adaptive immunity. Not only does LL-37 eliminate pathogenic microbes directly but also modulates host immune responses. Emerging evidence from tumor biology studies indicates that LL-37 plays a prominent and complex role in carcinogenesis. Although overexpression of LL-37 has been implicated in the development or progression of many human malignancies, including breast, ovarian and lung cancers, LL-37 suppresses tumorigenesis in gastric cancer. These data are beginning to unveil the intricate and contradictory functions of LL-37. The reasons for the tissue-specific function of LL-37 in carcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. Here, we review the relationship between LL-37, its fragments and cancer progression as well as discuss the potential therapeutic implications of targeting this peptide. PMID:20521250

  4. Host choice and human blood index of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis in a village of the Andean valleys of Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Loayza, Paola; Bouchité, Bernard; Chavez, Tamara

    2007-01-01

    Background The Human Blood Index (HBI, proportion of bloodmeals of a mosquito population obtained from man) is relevant to epidemiological assessment and to the modification of measures to interrupt malaria transmission since the vectorial capacity of the vector varies as the square of the HBI. Anopheles pseudopunctipennis is a main malaria vector in South America. Unfortunately, few data exist concerning HBI values in its range of distribution and none from Bolivia where this species is considered as an important malaria vector in the central Andes. Methods The host choice of An. pseudopunctipennis has been studied in Mataral, a characteristic village of the central Andes of Bolivia. Mosquito host feeding preference experiments (equal accessibility to host in homogenous environment) were monitored using baited mosquito nets in latin square designs. Host feeding selection experiments (natural feeding pattern in heterogeneous environment) was measured by bloodmeal analysis, using ELISA to determine the origin of blood. Mosquito bloodmeals were collected on various occasions, using various techniques in a variety of sampling sites. A survey of the possible blood sources has also been carried out in the village. Data were analysed with the forage ratio method. Results An. pseudopunctipennis chooses amongst hosts. Sheep, goats, donkeys and humans are the preferred hosts, while dogs, pigs and chicken are rarely bitten. An. pseudopunctipennis has an opportunistic behaviour, in particular within the preferred hosts. The HBI in Mataral is ≈40% and in the central Andes, may range from 30–50%, in accordance to other findings. A high proportion of mixed meals were encountered (8%), and cryptic meals are likely more numerous. There was no difference amongst the HBI from parous and nulliparous mosquitoes. Conclusion Forage ratio analysis is a powerful tool to interpret mosquito host choices. However, refinements in sampling strategies are still needed to derive accurate and

  5. Malaysian Defence and E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhary, Jowati binti

    2005-01-01

    This paper begins with an analysis of the changing security scenario in the Asian region, with special focus on Malaysian defence strategies and foreign policies. Beginning in the mid 1990s, the Malaysian government shifted its attention away from the counter insurgency strategies of the early decades of independence to focus on wider questions of…

  6. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross

    The man-in-the-middle defence is all about rehabilitating Charlie. For 20 years we’ve worried about this guy in the middle, Charlie, who’s forever intercalating himself into the communications between Alice and Bob, and people have been very judgemental about poor Charlie, saying that Charlie is a wicked person. Well, we’re not entirely convinced.

  7. In Defence of the Classroom Science Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrory, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Science demonstrations are often criticised for their passive nature, their gratuitous exploitation and their limited ability to develop scientific knowledge and understanding. This article is intended to present a robust defence of the use of demonstrations in the classroom by identifying some of their unique and powerful benefits--practical,…

  8. Metagenomic Assembly Reveals Hosts of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and the Shared Resistome in Pig, Chicken, and Human Feces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liping; Xia, Yu; Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Li, Li-Guan; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The risk associated with antibiotic resistance disseminating from animal and human feces is an urgent public issue. In the present study, we sought to establish a pipeline for annotating antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) based on metagenomic assembly to investigate ARGs and their co-occurrence with associated genetic elements. Genetic elements found on the assembled genomic fragments include mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and metal resistance genes (MRGs). We then explored the hosts of these resistance genes and the shared resistome of pig, chicken and human fecal samples. High levels of tetracycline, multidrug, erythromycin, and aminoglycoside resistance genes were discovered in these fecal samples. In particular, significantly high level of ARGs (7762 ×/Gb) was detected in adult chicken feces, indicating higher ARG contamination level than other fecal samples. Many ARGs arrangements (e.g., macA-macB and tetA-tetR) were discovered shared by chicken, pig and human feces. In addition, MGEs such as the aadA5-dfrA17-carrying class 1 integron were identified on an assembled scaffold of chicken feces, and are carried by human pathogens. Differential coverage binning analysis revealed significant ARG enrichment in adult chicken feces. A draft genome, annotated as multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, was retrieved from chicken feces metagenomes and was determined to carry diverse ARGs (multidrug, acriflavine, and macrolide). The present study demonstrates the determination of ARG hosts and the shared resistome from metagenomic data sets and successfully establishes the relationship between ARGs, hosts, and environments. This ARG annotation pipeline based on metagenomic assembly will help to bridge the knowledge gaps regarding ARG-associated genes and ARG hosts with metagenomic data sets. Moreover, this pipeline will facilitate the evaluation of environmental risks in the genetic context of ARGs. PMID:26650334

  9. Regulatory T-Cells at the Interface between Human Host and Pathogens in Infectious Diseases and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Mardi C.; Joosten, Simone A.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) act at the interface of host and pathogen interactions in human infectious diseases. Tregs are induced by a wide range of pathogens, but distinct effects of Tregs have been demonstrated for different pathogens and in different stages of infection. Moreover, Tregs that are induced by a specific pathogen may non-specifically suppress immunity against other microbes and parasites. Thus, Treg effects need to be assessed not only in homologous but also in heterologous infections and vaccinations. Though Tregs protect the human host against excessive inflammation, they probably also increase the risk of pathogen persistence and chronic disease, and the possibility of disease reactivation later in life. Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing leprosy and tuberculosis, respectively, are among the most ancient microbes known to mankind, and are master manipulators of the immune system toward tolerance and pathogen persistence. The majority of mycobacterial infections occur in settings co-endemic for viral, parasitic, and (other) bacterial coinfections. In this paper, we discuss recent insights in the activation and activity of Tregs in human infectious diseases, with emphasis on early, late, and non-specific effects in disease, coinfections, and vaccination. We highlight mycobacterial infections as important models of modulation of host responses and vaccine-induced immunity by Tregs. PMID:26029205

  10. Regulatory T-Cells at the Interface between Human Host and Pathogens in Infectious Diseases and Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Boer, Mardi C; Joosten, Simone A; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) act at the interface of host and pathogen interactions in human infectious diseases. Tregs are induced by a wide range of pathogens, but distinct effects of Tregs have been demonstrated for different pathogens and in different stages of infection. Moreover, Tregs that are induced by a specific pathogen may non-specifically suppress immunity against other microbes and parasites. Thus, Treg effects need to be assessed not only in homologous but also in heterologous infections and vaccinations. Though Tregs protect the human host against excessive inflammation, they probably also increase the risk of pathogen persistence and chronic disease, and the possibility of disease reactivation later in life. Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing leprosy and tuberculosis, respectively, are among the most ancient microbes known to mankind, and are master manipulators of the immune system toward tolerance and pathogen persistence. The majority of mycobacterial infections occur in settings co-endemic for viral, parasitic, and (other) bacterial coinfections. In this paper, we discuss recent insights in the activation and activity of Tregs in human infectious diseases, with emphasis on early, late, and non-specific effects in disease, coinfections, and vaccination. We highlight mycobacterial infections as important models of modulation of host responses and vaccine-induced immunity by Tregs. PMID:26029205

  11. Neutrophil proteases alter the interleukin-22-receptor-dependent lung antimicrobial defence.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Antoine; Jouan, Youenn; Brea, Deborah; Gueugnon, Fabien; Dalloneau, Emilie; Baranek, Thomas; Henry, Clémence; Morello, Eric; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Pichavant, Muriel; Gosset, Philippe; Courty, Yves; Diot, Patrice; Si-Tahar, Mustapha

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is punctuated by episodes of infection-driven acute exacerbations. Despite the life-threatening nature of these exacerbations, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, although a high number of neutrophils in the lungs of COPD patients is known to correlate with poor prognosis. Interleukin (IL)-22 is a cytokine that plays a pivotal role in lung antimicrobial defence and tissue protection. We hypothesised that neutrophils secrete proteases that may have adverse effects in COPD, by altering the IL-22 receptor (IL-22R)-dependent signalling.Using in vitro and in vivo approaches as well as reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR, flow cytometry and/or Western blotting techniques, we first showed that pathogens such as the influenza virus promote IL-22R expression in human bronchial epithelial cells, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bacterial lipopolysaccharide or cigarette smoke do not. Most importantly, neutrophil proteases cleave IL-22R and impair IL-22-dependent immune signalling and expression of antimicrobial effectors such as β-defensin-2. This proteolysis resulted in the release of a soluble fragment of IL-22R, which was detectable both in cellular and animal models as well as in sputa from COPD patients with acute exacerbations.Hence, our study reveals an unsuspected regulation by the proteolytic action of neutrophil enzymes of IL-22-dependent lung host response. This process probably enhances pathogen replication, and ultimately COPD exacerbations. PMID:26250498

  12. Release of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nuclear Import Block Enhances Host Transcription in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Susan C.; Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Schäfer, Alexandra; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Chang, Jean; Luna, Maria L.; Long, Casey E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Bankhead, Armand R.; Burkett, Susan E.; Zornetzer, Gregory; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; Metz, Thomas O.; Pickles, Raymond; McWeeney, Shannon; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus accessory protein ORF6 antagonizes interferon signaling by blocking karyopherin-mediated nuclear import processes. Viral nuclear import antagonists, expressed by several highly pathogenic RNA viruses, likely mediate pleiotropic effects on host gene expression, presumably interfering with transcription factors, cytokines, hormones, and/or signaling cascades that occur in response to infection. By bioinformatic and systems biology approaches, we evaluated the impact of nuclear import antagonism on host expression networks by using human lung epithelial cells infected with either wild-type virus or a mutant that does not express ORF6 protein. Microarray analysis revealed significant changes in differential gene expression, with approximately twice as many upregulated genes in the mutant virus samples by 48 h postinfection, despite identical viral titers. Our data demonstrated that ORF6 protein expression attenuates the activity of numerous karyopherin-dependent host transcription factors (VDR, CREB1, SMAD4, p53, EpasI, and Oct3/4) that are critical for establishing antiviral responses and regulating key host responses during virus infection. Results were confirmed by proteomic and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay analyses and in parallel microarray studies using infected primary human airway epithelial cell cultures. The data strongly support the hypothesis that viral antagonists of nuclear import actively manipulate host responses in specific hierarchical patterns, contributing to the viral pathogenic potential in vivo. Importantly, these studies and modeling approaches not only provide templates for evaluating virus antagonism of nuclear import processes but also can reveal candidate cellular genes and pathways that may significantly influence disease outcomes following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in vivo. PMID:23365422

  13. Identification of Common Biological Pathways and Drug Targets Across Multiple Respiratory Viruses Based on Human Host Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven B.; Dampier, William; Tozeren, Aydin; Brown, James R.; Magid-Slav, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Background Pandemic and seasonal respiratory viruses are a major global health concern. Given the genetic diversity of respiratory viruses and the emergence of drug resistant strains, the targeted disruption of human host-virus interactions is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating multi-viral infections. The availability of large-scale genomic datasets focused on host-pathogen interactions can be used to discover novel drug targets as well as potential opportunities for drug repositioning. Methods/Results In this study, we performed a large-scale analysis of microarray datasets involving host response to infections by influenza A virus, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, SARS-coronavirus, metapneumonia virus, coxsackievirus and cytomegalovirus. Common genes and pathways were found through a rigorous, iterative analysis pipeline where relevant host mRNA expression datasets were identified, analyzed for quality and gene differential expression, then mapped to pathways for enrichment analysis. Possible repurposed drugs targets were found through database and literature searches. A total of 67 common biological pathways were identified among the seven different respiratory viruses analyzed, representing fifteen laboratories, nine different cell types, and seven different array platforms. A large overlap in the general immune response was observed among the top twenty of these 67 pathways, adding validation to our analysis strategy. Of the top five pathways, we found 53 differentially expressed genes affected by at least five of the seven viruses. We suggest five new therapeutic indications for existing small molecules or biological agents targeting proteins encoded by the genes F3, IL1B, TNF, CASP1 and MMP9. Pathway enrichment analysis also identified a potential novel host response, the Parkin-Ubiquitin Proteasomal System (Parkin-UPS) pathway, which is known to be involved in the progression of neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease. Conclusions Our study

  14. Testing the optimal defence hypothesis for two indirect defences: extrafloral nectar and volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Kost, Christian; Bartram, Stefan; Heil, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Many plants respond to herbivory with an increased production of extrafloral nectar (EFN) and/or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to attract predatory arthropods as an indirect defensive strategy. In this study, we tested whether these two indirect defences fit the optimal defence hypothesis (ODH), which predicts the within-plant allocation of anti-herbivore defences according to trade-offs between growth and defence. Using jasmonic acid-induced plants of Phaseolus lunatus and Ricinus communis, we tested whether the within-plant distribution pattern of these two indirect defences reflects the fitness value of the respective plant parts. Furthermore, we quantified photosynthetic rates and followed the within-plant transport of assimilates with 13C labelling experiments. EFN secretion and VOC emission were highest in younger leaves. Moreover, the photosynthetic rate increased with leaf age, and pulse-labelling experiments suggested transport of carbon to younger leaves. Our results demonstrate that the ODH can explain the within-plant allocation pattern of both indirect defences studied. PMID:18493790

  15. Myxozoan infections of caecilians demonstrate broad host specificity and indicate a link with human activity.

    PubMed

    Hartigan, Ashlie; Wilkinson, Mark; Gower, David J; Streicher, Jeffrey W; Holzer, Astrid S; Okamura, Beth

    2016-05-01

    Myxozoans are parasitic cnidarians that infect a wide variety of hosts. Vertebrates typically serve as intermediate hosts whereas definitive hosts are invertebrates, including annelids and bryozoans. Myxozoans are known to exploit species in two of the three extant amphibian orders (Anura: frogs and toads; Caudata: newts and salamanders). Here we use museum collections to determine, to our knowledge for the first time, whether myxozoans also exploit the third amphibian order (Gymnophiona: caecilians). Caecilians are a poorly known group of limbless amphibians, the ecologies of which range from aquatic to fully terrestrial. We examined 12 caecilian species in seven families (148 individuals total) characterised by a diversity of ecologies and life histories. Using morphological and molecular surveys, we discovered the presence of the myxozoan Cystodiscus axonis in two South American species (one of seven examined families) of aquatic caecilians - Typhlonectes natans and Typhlonectes compressicauda. All infected caecilians had been maintained in captivity in the United Kingdom prior to their preservation. Cystodiscus axonis is known from several Australian frog species and its presence in caecilians indicates a capacity for infecting highly divergent amphibian hosts. This first known report of myxozoan infections in caecilians provides evidence of a broad geographic and host range. However, the source of these infections remains unknown and could be related to exposure in South America, the U.K. or to conditions in captivity. PMID:26945641

  16. Pollen feeding, resource allocation and the evolution of chemical defence in passion vine butterflies.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, M Z; Gilbert, L E

    2013-06-01

    Evolution of pollen feeding in Heliconius has allowed exploitation of rich amino acid sources and dramatically reorganized life-history traits. In Heliconius, eggs are produced mainly from adult-acquired resources, leaving somatic development and maintenance to larva effort. This innovation may also have spurred evolution of chemical defence via amino acid-derived cyanogenic glycosides. In contrast, nonpollen-feeding heliconiines must rely almost exclusively on larval-acquired resources for both reproduction and defence. We tested whether adult amino acid intake has an immediate influence on cyanogenesis in Heliconius. Because Heliconius are more distasteful to bird predators than close relatives that do not utilize pollen, we also compared cyanogenesis due to larval input across Heliconius species and nonpollen-feeding relatives. Except for one species, we found that varying the amino acid diet of an adult Heliconius has negligible effect on its cyanide concentration. Adults denied amino acids showed no decrease in cyanide and no adults showed cyanide increase when fed amino acids. Yet, pollen-feeding butterflies were capable of producing more defence than nonpollen-feeding relatives and differences were detectable in freshly emerged adults, before input of adult resources. Our data points to a larger role of larval input in adult chemical defence. This coupled with the compartmentalization of adult nutrition to reproduction and longevity suggests that one evolutionary consequence of pollen feeding, shifting the burden of reproduction to adults, is to allow the evolution of greater allocation of host plant amino acids to defensive compounds by larvae. PMID:23662837

  17. Transferability of Trypanosoma cruzi from mixed human host infection to Triatoma infestans and from insects to axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Sylvia; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Saavedra, Miguel; Solari, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The etiologic agent of Chagas disease is Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan whose life cycle involves obligatory passage through vertebrate and invertebrate hosts in a series of stages. The aim of this study was to explore the transferability of mixed discrete typing units (DTUs) of T. cruzi present in chronic chagasic patients when passed through an invertebrate host during xenodiagnosis (XD) and then when transferred to axenic cultures to obtain T. cruzi isolates. DTUs of T. cruzi present in these two hosts and axenic cultures were identified by kDNA PCR amplification and subsequent hybridization with DTU-specific probes. Mixtures of Tc I, Tc II, Tc V and Tc VI DTUs were detected in blood samples. However as a result of XD and axenic cultures it was possible to identify mostly Tc V. We conclude that the transferability of an isolate of T.cruzi derived from mixed DTUs present in human blood depends upon the starved invertebrate host used for xenodiagnosis. PMID:25240699

  18. Visual mimicry of host nestlings by cuckoos

    PubMed Central

    Langmore, Naomi E.; Stevens, Martin; Maurer, Golo; Heinsohn, Robert; Hall, Michelle L.; Peters, Anne; Kilner, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    Coevolution between antagonistic species has produced instances of exquisite mimicry. Among brood-parasitic cuckoos, host defences have driven the evolution of mimetic eggs, but the evolutionary arms race was believed to be constrained from progressing to the chick stage, with cuckoo nestlings generally looking unlike host young. However, recent studies on bronze-cuckoos have confounded theoretical expectations by demonstrating cuckoo nestling rejection by hosts. Coevolutionary theory predicts reciprocal selection for visual mimicry of host young by cuckoos, although this has not been demonstrated previously. Here we show that, in the eyes of hosts, nestlings of three bronze-cuckoo species are striking visual mimics of the young of their morphologically diverse hosts, providing the first evidence that coevolution can select for visual mimicry of hosts in cuckoo chicks. Bronze-cuckoos resemble their own hosts more closely than other host species, but the accuracy of mimicry varies according to the diversity of hosts they exploit. PMID:21227972

  19. Rusi/Brassey's defence yearbook 1987 97th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This annual review of defence and strategic affairs provides an up-to-date survey of international strategic affairs, contemporary weapons and developments and future trends. For all those involved in defence studies, university and public libraries and the general public. Contents: The Year Ahead; The Middle East; NATO; The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe; UK defence policy; The Issues: What is SDI.; Will SDI help. A military view; SDI-the industrial implications; Conventional defence, a military view; An alternative view; European armaments cooperation; Terrorism; Sri Lanka: the Tamils; Israel 1986; The Iran/Iraq war; Arab view; South Africa; Chronology of conflict; Defence literature; Arms control; Nuclear weapons; Characteristics.

  20. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A

    2015-08-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite's intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village's river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis. PMID:26195752

  1. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; D'Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite’s intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village’s river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis.                            

  2. Human C1-Inhibitor Suppresses Malaria Parasite Invasion and Cytoadhesion via Binding to Parasite Glycosylphosphatidylinositol and Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Pedro; Diez-Silva, Monica; Kamena, Faustin; Lu, Fengxin; Fernandes, Stacey M; Seeberger, Peter H; Davis, Alvin E; Mitchell, James R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-induced severe malaria remains a continuing problem in areas of endemicity, with elevated morbidity and mortality. Drugs targeting mechanisms involved in severe malaria pathology, including cytoadhesion of infected red blood cells (RBCs) to host receptors and production of proinflammatory cytokines, are still necessary. Human C1-inhibitor (C1INH) is a multifunctional protease inhibitor that regulates coagulation, vascular permeability, and inflammation, with beneficial effects in inflammatory disease models, including septic shock. We found that human C1INH, at therapeutically relevant doses, blocks severe malaria pathogenic processes by 2 distinct mechanisms. First, C1INH bound to glycan moieties within P. falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositol (PfGPI) molecules on the parasite surface, inhibiting parasite RBC invasion and proinflammatory cytokine production by parasite-stimulated monocytes in vitro and reducing parasitemia in a rodent model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in vivo. Second, C1INH bound to host CD36 and chondroitin sulfate A molecules, interfering with cytoadhesion of infected RBCs by competitive binding to these receptors in vitro and reducing sequestration in specific tissues and protecting against ECM in vivo. This study reveals that C1INH is a potential therapeutic antimalarial molecule able to interfere with severe-disease etiology at multiple levels through specific interactions with both parasite PfGPIs and host cell receptors. PMID:26347576

  3. Reduced transmission of human schistosomiasis after restoration of a native river prawn that preys on the snail intermediate host

    PubMed Central

    Sokolow, Susanne H.; Huttinger, Elizabeth; Jouanard, Nicolas; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.; Riveau, Gilles; Senghor, Simon; Thiam, Cheikh; N’Diaye, Alassane; Faye, Djibril Sarr; De Leo, Giulio A.

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating human parasitic disease often requires interrupting complex transmission pathways. Even when drugs to treat people are available, disease control can be difficult if the parasite can persist in nonhuman hosts. Here, we show that restoration of a natural predator of a parasite’s intermediate hosts may enhance drug-based schistosomiasis control. Our study site was the Senegal River Basin, where villagers suffered a massive outbreak and persistent epidemic after the 1986 completion of the Diama Dam. The dam blocked the annual migration of native river prawns (Macrobrachium vollenhoveni) that are voracious predators of the snail intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis. We tested schistosomiasis control by reintroduced river prawns in a before-after-control-impact field experiment that tracked parasitism in snails and people at two matched villages after prawns were stocked at one village’s river access point. The abundance of infected snails was 80% lower at that village, presumably because prawn predation reduced the abundance and average life span of latently infected snails. As expected from a reduction in infected snails, human schistosomiasis prevalence was 18 ± 5% lower and egg burden was 50 ± 8% lower at the prawn-stocking village compared with the control village. In a mathematical model of the system, stocking prawns, coupled with infrequent mass drug treatment, eliminates schistosomiasis from high-transmission sites. We conclude that restoring river prawns could be a novel contribution to controlling, or eliminating, schistosomiasis. PMID:26195752

  4. Analysis of the association between host genetics, smoking, and sputum microbiota in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mi Young; Yoon, Hyo Shin; Rho, Mina; Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Ko, GwangPyo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies showing clear differences in the airway microbiota between healthy and diseased individuals shed light on the importance of the airway microbiota in health. Here, we report the associations of host genetics and lifestyles such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity with the composition of the sputum microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequence data generated from 257 sputum samples of Korean twin-family cohort. By estimating the heritability of each microbial taxon, we found that several taxa, including Providencia and Bacteroides, were significantly influenced by host genetic factors. Smoking had the strongest effect on the overall microbial community structure among the tested lifestyle factors. The abundances of Veillonella and Megasphaera were higher in current-smokers, and increased with the pack-year value and the Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score. In contrast, Haemophilus decreased with the pack-year of smoking and the FTND score. Co-occurrence network analysis showed that the taxa were clustered according to the direction of associations with smoking, and that the taxa influenced by host genetics were found together. These results demonstrate that the relationships among sputum microbial taxa are closely associated with not only smoking but also host genetics. PMID:27030383

  5. MicroRNA profile analysis of host cells before and after wild human rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Wu, Jinyuan; Geng, Panpan; Kui, Xiang; Xie, Yuping; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yaling; Yin, Na; Zhang, Guangming; Yi, Shan; Li, Hongjun; Sun, Maosheng

    2016-09-01

    Rotavirus infection is an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in children, but the interaction between rotavirus and host cells is not completely understood. We isolated a wildtype (wt) rotavirus strain, ZTR-68(P [8] G1), which is derived from an infant with diarrhea in southwest China in 2010. In this study, we investigated host cellular miRNA expression profiles changes in response to ZTR-68 in early stage of infection to investigate the role of miRNAs upon rotavirus infection. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified by deep sequencing and qRT-PCR and the function of their targets predicted by Gene Ontology (GO) function and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation. A total of 36 candidate miRNAs were identified. Comparative analysis indicated that 29 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated and 7 were up-regulated after infection. The data were provided contrasting the types of microRNAs in two different permissive cell lines (HT29 and MA104). The target assays results showed that mml-miR-7 and mml-miR-125a are involved in anti-rotavirus and virus-host interaction in host cells. These results offer clues for identifying potential candidates in vector-based antiviral strategies. J. Med. Virol. 88:1497-1510, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890217

  6. Density-Dependent Mortality of the Human Host in Onchocerciasis: Relationships between Microfilarial Load and Excess Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karen S.; Soumbey-Alley, Edoh W.; Boatin, Boakye A.; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Background The parasite Onchocerca volvulus has, until recently, been regarded as the cause of a chronic yet non-fatal condition. Recent analyses, however, have indicated that in addition to blindness, the parasite can also be directly associated with human mortality. Such analyses also suggested that the relationship between microfilarial load and excess mortality might be non-linear. Determining the functional form of such relationship would contribute to quantify the population impact of mass microfilaricidal treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Data from the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP) collected from 1974 through 2001 were used to determine functional relationships between microfilarial load and excess mortality of the human host. The goodness-of-fit of three candidate functional forms (a (log-) linear model and two saturating functions) were explored and a saturating (log-) sigmoid function was deemed to be statistically the best fit. The excess mortality associated with microfilarial load was also found to be greater in younger hosts. The attributable mortality risk due to onchocerciasis was estimated to be 5.9%. Conclusions/Significance Incorporation of this non-linear functional relationship between microfilarial load and excess mortality into mathematical models for the transmission and control of onchocerciasis will have important implications for our understanding of the population biology of O. volvulus, its impact on human populations, the global burden of disease due to onchocerciasis, and the projected benefits of control programmes in both human and economic terms. PMID:22479660

  7. Host responses in human skin after conventional intradermal injection or microneedle administration of virus-like-particle influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Pearton, Marc; Pirri, Daniela; Kang, Sang-Moo; Compans, Richard W; Birchall, James C

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized microneedle devices are being developed for painlessly targeting vaccines to the immune cell populations in skin. As skin immunization studies are generally restricted to animal models however, where skin architecture and immunity is greatly different to human, surprisingly little is known about the local human response to intradermal (ID) vaccines. Here we use surgically excised human skin to explore for the first time the complex molecular and cellular host responses to a candidate influenza vaccine comprising nanoparticulate virus-like-particles (VLPs), administered via conventional hypodermic injection or reduced scale microneedles. Responses at the molecular level are determined by microarray analysis (47,296 discrete transcripts) and validated by quantitative PCR (96 genes). Cellular response is probed through monitoring migration of dendritic cells in viable skin tissue. Gene expression mapping, ontological analysis and qPCR reveal up-regulation of a host of genes responsible for key immunomodulatory processes and host viral response, including cell recruitment, activation, migration and T cell interaction following both ID and microneedle injection of VLPs; the response from the microneedles being more subtle. Significant morphological and migratory changes to skin dendritic cells are also apparent following microneedle VLP delivery. This is the first study displaying the global, multifaceted immunological events that occur at the site of vaccine deposition in human skin and will subsequently influence the degree and nature of innate and adaptive immune responses. An increased understanding of the detailed similarities and differences in response against antigen administered via different delivery modalities will inform the development of improved vaccines and vaccine delivery systems. PMID:23564440

  8. Structural Requirements for Recognition of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Core during Host Restriction in Owl Monkey Cells

    PubMed Central

    Forshey, Brett M.; Shi, Jiong; Aiken, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of simian cells is restricted at an early postentry step by host factors whose mechanism of action is unclear. These factors target the viral capsid protein (CA) and attenuate reverse transcription, suggesting that they bind to the HIV-1 core and interfere with its uncoating. To identify the relevant binding determinants in the capsid, we tested the capacity of viruses containing Gag cleavage site mutations and amino acid substitutions in CA to inhibit restriction of a wild type HIV-1 reporter virus in owl monkey cells. The results demonstrated that a stable, polymeric capsid and a correctly folded amino-terminal CA subunit interface are essential for saturation of host restriction in target cells by HIV-1 cores. We conclude that the owl monkey cellular restriction machinery recognizes a polymeric array of CA molecules, most likely via direct engagement of the HIV-1 capsid in target cells prior to uncoating. PMID:15613315

  9. Immune defence under extreme ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Otto; Jokela, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Owing to global climate change, the extreme weather conditions are predicted to become more frequent, which is suggested to have an even greater impact on ecological interactions than the gradual increase in average temperatures. Here, we examined whether exposure to high ambient temperature affects immune function of the great pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis). We quantified the levels of several immune traits from snails maintained in a non-stressful temperature (15°C) and in an extreme temperature (30°C) that occurs in small ponds during hot summers. We found that snails exposed to high temperature had weaker immune defence, which potentially predisposes them to infections. However, while phenoloxidase and antibacterial activity of snail haemolymph were reduced at high temperature, haemocyte concentration was not affected. This suggests that the effect of high temperature on snail susceptibility to infections may vary across different pathogens because different components of invertebrate immune defence have different roles in resistance. PMID:20610417

  10. Host-feeding patterns of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in relation to availability of human and domestic animals in suburban landscapes of central North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Richards, Stephanie L; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Unnasch, Thomas R; Hassan, Hassan K; Apperson, Charles S

    2006-05-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) is a major nuisance mosquito and a potential arbovirus vector. The host-feeding patterns of Ae. albopictus were investigated during the 2002 and 2003 mosquito seasons in suburban neighborhoods in Wake County, Raleigh, NC. Hosts of blood-fed Ae. albopictus (n = 1,094) were identified with an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, by using antisera made in New Zealand White rabbits to the sera of animals that would commonly occur in peridomestic habitats. Ae. albopictus fed predominantly on mammalian hosts (83%). Common mammalian hosts included humans (24%), cats (21%), and dogs (14%). However, a notable proportion (7%) of bloodmeals also was taken from avian hosts. Some bloodmeals taken from birds were identified to species by a polymerase chain reaction-heteroduplex assay (PCR-HDA). Ae. albopictus fed predominantly on chickens and a northern cardinal. PCR-HDA failed to produce detectable products for 29 (58%) of 50 bloodmeals for which DNA had been amplified, indicating that these mosquitoes took mixed bloodmeals from avian and nonavian hosts. Ae. albopictus preference for humans, dogs, and cats was determined by calculating host-feeding indices for the three host pairs based on the proportion of host specific blood-fed mosquitoes collected in relation to the number of specific hosts per residence as established by a door-to-door survey conducted in 2003. Estimates of the average amount of time that residents and their pets (cats and dogs) spent out of doors were obtained. Host-feeding indices based only on host abundance indicated that Ae. albopictus was more likely to feed on domestic animals. However, when feeding indices were time-weighted, Ae. albopictus fed preferentially upon humans. Ae. albopictus blood feeding on humans was investigated using a STR/PCR-DNA profiling technique that involved amplification of three short tandem repeats loci. Of 40 human bloodmeals, 32 (80%) were from a single human, whereas

  11. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross; Bond, Mike

    Eliminating middlemen from security protocols helps less than one would think. EMV electronic payments, for example, can be made fairer by adding an electronic attorney - a middleman which mediates access to a customer’s card. We compare middlemen in crypto protocols and APIs with those in the real world, and show that a man-in-the-middle defence is helpful in many circumstances. We suggest that the middleman has been unfairly demonised.

  12. The Extended Nutrigenomics – Understanding the Interplay between the Genomes of Food, Gut Microbes, and Human Host

    PubMed Central

    Kussmann, Martin; Van Bladeren, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive investigation of nutritional health effects at the molecular level requires the understanding of the interplay between three genomes, the food, the gut microbial, and the human host genome. Food genomes are researched for discovery and exploitation of macro- and micronutrients as well as specific bioactives, with those genes coding for bioactive proteins and peptides being of central interest. The human gut microbiota encompasses a complex ecosystem in the intestine with profound impact on host metabolism. It is being studied at genomic and, more recently, also at proteomic and metabonomic level. Humans are being characterized at the level of genetic pre-disposition and inter-individual variability in terms of (i) response to nutritional interventions and direction of health trajectories; (ii) epigenetic, metabolic programming at certain life stages with health consequences later in life and even for subsequent generations; and (iii) acute genomic expression as a holistic response to diet, monitored at gene transcript, protein and metabolite level. Modern nutrition science explores health-related aspects of bioactive food components, thereby promoting health, preventing, or delaying the onset of disease, optimizing performance and assessing benefits and risks in individuals and subpopulations. Personalized nutrition means adapting food to individual needs, depending on the human host’s life stage, -style, and -situation. Traditionally, nutrigenomics and nutri(epi)genetics are seen as the key sciences to understand human variability in preferences and requirements for diet as well as responses to nutrition. This article puts the three nutrition and health-relevant genomes into perspective, namely the food, the gut microbial and the human host’s genome, and calls for an “extended nutrigenomics” approach in order to build the future tools for personalized nutrition, health maintenance, and disease prevention. We discuss examples of these genomes

  13. Manipulation of the host protein acetylation network by human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Mark Y.; Ali, Ibraheem; Ott, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, protein acetylation has emerged as a globally important post-translational modification that fine-tunes major cellular processes in many life forms. This dynamic regulatory system is critical both for complex eukaryotic cells and for the viruses that infect them. HIV-1 accesses the host acetylation network by interacting with several key enzymes, thereby promoting infection at multiple steps during the viral life cycle. Inhibitors of host histone deacetylases and bromodomain-containing proteins are now being pursued as therapeutic strategies to enhance current antiretroviral treatment. As more acetylation-targeting compounds are reaching clinical trials, it is timely to review the role of reversible protein acetylation in HIV-infected CD4+ T cells. PMID:26329395

  14. Within-host competition and drug resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Mary; Morton, Lindsay; Duah, Nancy; Quashie, Neils; Abuaku, Benjamin; Koram, Kwadwo A; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Plucinski, Mateusz; Gutman, Julie; Lyaruu, Peter; Kachur, S Patrick; de Roode, Jacobus C; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-03-16

    Infections with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum typically comprise multiple strains, especially in high-transmission areas where infectious mosquito bites occur frequently. However, little is known about the dynamics of mixed-strain infections, particularly whether strains sharing a host compete or grow independently. Competition between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains, if it occurs, could be a crucial determinant of the spread of resistance. We analysed 1341 P. falciparum infections in children from Angola, Ghana and Tanzania and found compelling evidence for competition in mixed-strain infections: overall parasite density did not increase with additional strains, and densities of individual chloroquine-sensitive (CQS) and chloroquine-resistant (CQR) strains were reduced in the presence of competitors. We also found that CQR strains exhibited low densities compared with CQS strains (in the absence of chloroquine), which may underlie observed declines of chloroquine resistance in many countries following retirement of chloroquine as a first-line therapy. Our observations support a key role for within-host competition in the evolution of drug-resistant malaria. Malaria control and resistance-management efforts in high-transmission regions may be significantly aided or hindered by the effects of competition in mixed-strain infections. Consideration of within-host dynamics may spur development of novel strategies to minimize resistance while maximizing the benefits of control measures. PMID:26984625

  15. Sex-dependent liver colonization of human melanoma in SCID mice--role of host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dobos, Judit; Mohos, Anita; Tóvári, József; Rásó, Erzsébet; Lőrincz, Tamás; Zádori, Gergely; Tímár, József; Ladányi, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The possibility that endocrine factors may influence the clinical course of malignant melanoma is suggested by the superior survival data of women. In preclinical models we observed a higher rate of colony formation by human melanoma cells in male compared to female SCID mice, but only in the case of the liver and not in other organs. The gender difference could be seen at an early phase of colony formation. On the other hand, in our human melanoma cell lines we failed to detect steroid receptor protein expression, and treatment with sex hormones did not considerably influence their in vitro behavior. Investigating the possible contribution of host cells to the observed gender difference, we performed in vivo blocking experiments applying pretreatment of the animals with Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride and the NK cell inhibitor anti-asialo GM1 antibody. While Kupffer cell blockade enhanced melanoma liver colonization equally in the two sexes, a more prominent increase was observed in female than in male mice in the case of NK cell inhibition. Further supporting the importance of NK cells in the lower liver colonization efficiency of melanoma cells in females, gender difference in colony formation was lost in NSG mice lacking NK activity. Although in humans no organ selectivity of gender difference in melanoma progression has been observed according to data in the literature, our results possibly indicate a contribution of natural host defense mechanisms to gender difference in survival of patients with melanoma or other tumor types as well. PMID:23203681

  16. The Chlamydia trachomatis Ctad1 invasin exploits the human integrin β1 receptor for host cell entry.

    PubMed

    Stallmann, Sonja; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2016-05-01

    Infection of human cells by the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis requires adhesion and internalization of the infectious elementary body (EB). This highly complex process is poorly understood. Here, we characterize Ctad1 (CT017) as a new adhesin and invasin from C. trachomatis serovar E. Recombinant Ctad1 (rCtad1) binds to human cells via two bacterial SH3 domains located in its N-terminal half. Pre-incubation of host cells with rCtad1 reduces subsequent adhesion and infectivity of bacteria. Interestingly, protein-coated latex beads revealed Ctad1 being an invasin. rCtad1 interacts with the integrin β1 subunit on human epithelial cells, and induces clustering of integrins at EB attachment sites. Receptor activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Accordingly, rCtad1 binding to integrin β1-negative cells is significantly impaired, as is the chlamydial infection. Thus interaction of C. trachomatis Ctad1 with integrin β1 mediates EB adhesion and induces signaling processes that promote host-cell invasion. PMID:26597572

  17. Leptospira Serovars for Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in Humans and Animals in Africa: Common Leptospira Isolates and Reservoir Hosts.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Machang'u, Robert S; Mhamphi, Ginethon G; Katakweba, Abdul; Mulungu, Loth S; Durnez, Lies; Leirs, Herwig; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Belmain, Steven R

    2015-12-01

    The burden of leptospirosis in humans and animals in Africa is higher than that reported from other parts of the world. However, the disease is not routinely diagnosed in the continent. One of major factors limiting diagnosis is the poor availability of live isolates of locally circulating Leptospira serovars for inclusion in the antigen panel of the gold standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for detecting antibodies against leptospirosis. To gain insight in Leptospira serovars and their natural hosts occurring in Tanzania, concomitantly enabling the improvement of the MAT by inclusion of fresh local isolates, a total of 52 Leptospira isolates were obtained from fresh urine and kidney homogenates, collected between 1996 and 2006 from small mammals, cattle and pigs. Isolates were identified by serogrouping, cross agglutination absorption test (CAAT), and molecular typing. Common Leptospira serovars with their respective animal hosts were: Sokoine (cattle and rodents); Kenya (rodents and shrews); Mwogolo (rodents); Lora (rodents); Qunjian (rodent); serogroup Grippotyphosa (cattle); and an unknown serogroup from pigs. Inclusion of local serovars particularly serovar Sokoine in MAT revealed a 10-fold increase in leptospirosis prevalence in Tanzania from 1.9% to 16.9% in rodents and 0.26% to 10.75% in humans. This indicates that local serovars are useful for diagnosis of human and animal leptospirosis in Tanzania and other African countries. PMID:26624890

  18. Leptospira Serovars for Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in Humans and Animals in Africa: Common Leptospira Isolates and Reservoir Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Mgode, Georgies F.; Machang’u, Robert S.; Mhamphi, Ginethon G.; Katakweba, Abdul; Mulungu, Loth S.; Durnez, Lies; Leirs, Herwig; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Belmain, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of leptospirosis in humans and animals in Africa is higher than that reported from other parts of the world. However, the disease is not routinely diagnosed in the continent. One of major factors limiting diagnosis is the poor availability of live isolates of locally circulating Leptospira serovars for inclusion in the antigen panel of the gold standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for detecting antibodies against leptospirosis. To gain insight in Leptospira serovars and their natural hosts occurring in Tanzania, concomitantly enabling the improvement of the MAT by inclusion of fresh local isolates, a total of 52 Leptospira isolates were obtained from fresh urine and kidney homogenates, collected between 1996 and 2006 from small mammals, cattle and pigs. Isolates were identified by serogrouping, cross agglutination absorption test (CAAT), and molecular typing. Common Leptospira serovars with their respective animal hosts were: Sokoine (cattle and rodents); Kenya (rodents and shrews); Mwogolo (rodents); Lora (rodents); Qunjian (rodent); serogroup Grippotyphosa (cattle); and an unknown serogroup from pigs. Inclusion of local serovars particularly serovar Sokoine in MAT revealed a 10-fold increase in leptospirosis prevalence in Tanzania from 1.9% to 16.9% in rodents and 0.26% to 10.75% in humans. This indicates that local serovars are useful for diagnosis of human and animal leptospirosis in Tanzania and other African countries. PMID:26624890

  19. Human neuroblastoma cell growth in xenogeneic hosts: comparison of T cell-deficient and NK-deficient hosts, and subcutaneous or intravenous injection routes.

    PubMed

    Turner, W J; Chatten, J; Lampson, L A

    1990-04-01

    We have examined two features of neuroblastoma cells that had not been well-characterized in a xenogeneic model: The cells display unusual immunologic properties in other experimental systems, and the original tumors display widespread and characteristic patterns of metastasis. To determine the most appropriate immunodeficient host for primary tumor growth, T cell-deficient nude mice, NK-deficient beige mice, beige-nudes, and controls were injected with the well-characterized line CHP-100. To define the pattern of tumor spread, complete autopsies were performed following subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous injections. CHP-100 consistently formed subcutaneous tumors in T cell-deficient mice (nude and beige-nude), but not in T cell-competent mice (beige, heterozygous nu/+ and bg/+, or wild-type). The growth rate and final size of the subcutaneous tumors were not greater in beige-nudes than in nudes. All mice showed early CHP-100 cell death after subcutaneous injection; the nature of the immunodeficiency was more relevant for the surviving subpopulation. Widespread dissemination was seen following intravenous injection, particularly in beige-nudes. Aspects of the growth patterns were appropriate to the tumor of origin. The behavior in immunodeficient mice suggests that T cells can play a role in controlling the growth of these cells; the next steps will be to define the effector mechanisms, and to determine if they can be exploited for human patients. The hematogenous spread following intravenous injection suggests that insights into the control of blood-borne tumor may also come from further study of this model. PMID:2358846

  20. Close encounters: contributions of carbon dioxide and human skin odour to finding and landing on a host in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    LACEY, EMERSON S.; RAY, ANANDASANKAR; CARDÉ, RING T.

    2014-01-01

    In a wind-tunnel study, the upwind flight and source location of female Aedes aegypti to plumes of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas and odour from human feet is tested. Both odour sources are presented singly and in combination. Flight upwind along the plumes is evident for both CO2 and odour from human feet when the odours are presented alone. Likewise, both odour sources are located by more than 70% of mosquitoes in less than 3 min. When both CO2 and odour from human feet are presented simultaneously in two different choice tests (with plumes superimposed or with plumes separated), there is no evidence that females orientate along the plume of CO2 and only a few mosquitoes locate its source. Rather, the foot odour plume is navigated and the source of foot odour is located by over 80% of female Ae. aegypti. When a female is presented a plume of CO2 within a broad plume of human foot odour of relatively low concentration, the source of CO2 is not located; instead, flight is upwind in the diffuse plume of foot odour. Although upwind flight by Ae. aegypti at long range is presumably induced by CO2 and the threshold of response to skin odours is lowered, our findings suggest that once females have arrived near a prospective human host, upwind orientation and landing are largely governed by the suite of odours from a human foot, while orientation is no longer influenced by CO2. PMID:24839345

  1. Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in a Parkinsonian Model Exerts Neuroprotection via Regulation of the Host Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Fu-Xing; Bao, Xin-Jie; Sun, Xi-Cai; Wu, Jun; Bai, Qing-Ran; Chen, Guo; Li, Xue-Yuan; Zhou, Qiang-Yi; Yang, Yuan-Fan; Shen, Qin; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and consequent dopamine (DA) deficit, and current treatment still remains a challenge. Although neural stem cells (NSCs) have been evaluated as appealing graft sources, mechanisms underlying the beneficial phenomena are not well understood. Here, we investigate whether human NSCs (hNSCs) transplantation could provide neuroprotection against DA depletion by recruiting endogenous cells to establish a favorable niche. Adult mice subjected to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were transplanted with hNSCs or vehicle into the striatum. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrated significant neurorescue response observed in hNSCs-treated animals compared with the control mice. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived, proliferated, and migrated within the astrocytic scaffold. Notably, more local astrocytes underwent de-differentiation, acquiring the properties of NSCs or neural precursor cells (NPCs) in mice given hNSCs. Additionally, we also detected significantly higher expression of host-derived growth factors in hNSCs-transplanted mice compared with the control animals, together with inhibition of local microglia and proinflammatory cytokines. Overall, our results indicate that hNSCs transplantation exerts neuroprotection in MPTP-insulted mice via regulating the host niche. Harnessing synergistic interaction between the grafts and host cells may help optimize cell-based therapies for PD. PMID:26556344

  2. The HMI™ module: a new tool to study the Host-Microbiota Interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent scientific developments have shed more light on the importance of the host-microbe interaction, particularly in the gut. However, the mechanistic study of the host-microbe interplay is complicated by the intrinsic limitations in reaching the different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in vivo. In this paper, we present the technical validation of a new device - the Host-Microbiota Interaction (HMI) module - and the evidence that it can be used in combination with a gut dynamic simulator to evaluate the effect of a specific treatment at the level of the luminal microbial community and of the host surface colonization and signaling. Results The HMI module recreates conditions that are physiologically relevant for the GIT: i) a mucosal area to which bacteria can adhere under relevant shear stress (3 dynes cm−2); ii) the bilateral transport of low molecular weight metabolites (4 to 150 kDa) with permeation coefficients ranging from 2.4 × 10−6 to 7.1 × 10−9 cm sec−1; and iii) microaerophilic conditions at the bottom of the growing biofilm (PmO2 = 2.5 × 10−4 cm sec−1). In a long-term study, the host’s cells in the HMI module were still viable after a 48-hour exposure to a complex microbial community. The dominant mucus-associated microbiota differed from the luminal one and its composition was influenced by the treatment with a dried product derived from yeast fermentation. The latter - with known anti-inflammatory properties - induced a decrease of pro-inflammatory IL-8 production between 24 and 48 h. Conclusions The study of the in vivo functionality of adhering bacterial communities in the human GIT and of the localized effect on the host is frequently hindered by the complexity of reaching particular areas of the GIT. The HMI module offers the possibility of co-culturing a gut representative microbial community with enterocyte-like cells up to 48 h and may therefore contribute to the mechanistic understanding of

  3. Role of stress-related hormones in plant defence during early infection of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Radakovic, Zoran; Regis, Jully M A; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Grundler, Florian M W; Siddique, Shahid; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Heterodera schachtii, a plant-parasitic cyst nematode, invades host roots and induces a specific syncytial feeding structure, from which it withdraws all required nutrients, causing severe yield losses. The system H. schachtii–Arabidopsis is an excellent research model for investigating plant defence mechanisms. Such responses are suppressed in well-established syncytia, whereas they are induced during early parasitism. However, the mechanisms by which the defence responses are modulated and the role of phytohormones are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of hormone-based defence responses at the onset of nematode infection. First, concentrations of main phytohormones were quantified and the expression of several hormone-related genes was analysed using quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR or GeneChip. Further, the effects of individual hormones were evaluated via nematode attraction and infection assays using plants with altered endogenous hormone concentrations. Our results suggest a pivotal and positive role for ethylene during nematode attraction, whereas jasmonic acid triggers early defence responses against H. schachtii. Salicylic acid seems to be a negative regulator during later syncytium and female development. We conclude that nematodes are able to impose specific changes in hormone pools, thus modulating hormone-based defence and signal transduction in strict dependence on their parasitism stage. PMID:25825039

  4. Sensitivity of Borrelia genospecies to serum complement from different animals and human: a host-pathogen relationship.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Mangesh R; Travnicek, Milan; Levkutova, Maria; Curlik, Jan; Revajova, Viera; Levkut, Mikulas

    2005-02-01

    Different Borrelia species and serotypes were tested for their sensitivity to serum complement from various animals and human. Complement-mediated Borrelia killing in cattle, European bison and deer was higher irrespective of the Borrelia species whereas in other animals and human it was intermediate and Borrelia species-dependent. Activation of the alternative complement pathway by particular Borrelia strain was in correlation with its sensitivity or resistance. These results support the incompetent reservoir nature of cattle, European bison, red, roe and fallow deer, at the same time present the probable reservoir nature of mouflon, dog, wolf, cat and lynx. In short, this study reviews Borrelia-host relationship and its relevance in reservoir competence nature of animals. PMID:15681146

  5. Prediction of Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Humans by Donor Gene-Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Chantal; Somogyi, Roland; Greller, Larry D; Rineau, Vincent; Wilkinson, Peter; Cho, Carolyn R; Cameron, Mark J; Kelvin, David J; Chagnon, Pierre; Roy, Denis-Claude; Busque, Lambert; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Background Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) results from recognition of host antigens by donor T cells following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT). Notably, histoincompatibility between donor and recipient is necessary but not sufficient to elicit GVHD. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that some donors may be “stronger alloresponders” than others, and consequently more likely to elicit GVHD. Methods and Findings To this end, we measured the gene-expression profiles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from 50 AHCT donors with microarrays. We report that pre-AHCT gene-expression profiling segregates donors whose recipient suffered from GVHD or not. Using quantitative PCR, established statistical tests, and analysis of multiple independent training-test datasets, we found that for chronic GVHD the “dangerous donor” trait (occurrence of GVHD in the recipient) is under polygenic control and is shaped by the activity of genes that regulate transforming growth factor-β signaling and cell proliferation. Conclusions These findings strongly suggest that the donor gene-expression profile has a dominant influence on the occurrence of GVHD in the recipient. The ability to discriminate strong and weak alloresponders using gene-expression profiling could pave the way to personalized transplantation medicine. PMID:17378698

  6. Genome analysis of Daldinia eschscholtzii strains UM 1400 and UM 1020, wood-decaying fungi isolated from human hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-11-18

    Background: Daldinia eschscholtzii is a wood-inhabiting fungus that causes wood decay under certain conditions. It has a broad host range and produces a large repertoire of potentially bioactive compounds. However, there is no extensive genome analysis on this fungal species. Results: Two fungal isolates (UM 1400 and UM 1020) from human specimens were identified as Daldinia eschscholtzii by morphological features and ITS-based phylogenetic analysis. Both genomes were similar in size with 10,822 predicted genes in UM 1400 (35.8 Mb) and 11,120 predicted genes in UM 1020 (35.5 Mb). A total of 751 gene families were shared among both UM isolates, including gene families associated with fungus-host interactions. In the CAZyme comparative analysis, both genomes were found to contain arrays of CAZyme related to plant cell wall degradation. Genes encoding secreted peptidases were found in the genomes, which encode for the peptidases involved in the degradation of structural proteins in plant cell wall. In addition, arrays of secondary metabolite backbone genes were identified in both genomes, indicating of their potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Both genomes also contained an abundance of gene encoding signaling components, with three proposed MAPK cascades involved in cell wall integrity, osmoregulation, and mating/filamentation. Besides genomic evidence for degrading capability, both isolates also harbored an array of genes encoding stress response proteins that are potentially significant for adaptation to living in the hostile environments. In conclusion: Our genomic studies provide further information for the biological understanding of the D. eschscholtzii and suggest that these wood-decaying fungi are also equipped for adaptation to adverse environments in the human host.

  7. Genome analysis of Daldinia eschscholtzii strains UM 1400 and UM 1020, wood-decaying fungi isolated from human hosts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-11-18

    Background: Daldinia eschscholtzii is a wood-inhabiting fungus that causes wood decay under certain conditions. It has a broad host range and produces a large repertoire of potentially bioactive compounds. However, there is no extensive genome analysis on this fungal species. Results: Two fungal isolates (UM 1400 and UM 1020) from human specimens were identified as Daldinia eschscholtzii by morphological features and ITS-based phylogenetic analysis. Both genomes were similar in size with 10,822 predicted genes in UM 1400 (35.8 Mb) and 11,120 predicted genes in UM 1020 (35.5 Mb). A total of 751 gene families were shared among both UM isolates,more » including gene families associated with fungus-host interactions. In the CAZyme comparative analysis, both genomes were found to contain arrays of CAZyme related to plant cell wall degradation. Genes encoding secreted peptidases were found in the genomes, which encode for the peptidases involved in the degradation of structural proteins in plant cell wall. In addition, arrays of secondary metabolite backbone genes were identified in both genomes, indicating of their potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Both genomes also contained an abundance of gene encoding signaling components, with three proposed MAPK cascades involved in cell wall integrity, osmoregulation, and mating/filamentation. Besides genomic evidence for degrading capability, both isolates also harbored an array of genes encoding stress response proteins that are potentially significant for adaptation to living in the hostile environments. In conclusion: Our genomic studies provide further information for the biological understanding of the D. eschscholtzii and suggest that these wood-decaying fungi are also equipped for adaptation to adverse environments in the human host.« less

  8. Host-Specific and Segment-Specific Evolutionary Dynamics of Avian and Human Influenza A Viruses: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiyeon; Omori, Ryosuke; Ueno, Keisuke; Iida, Sayaka; Ito, Kimihito

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of influenza viruses is essential to control both avian and human influenza. Here, we analyze host-specific and segment-specific Tajima’s D trends of influenza A virus through a systematic review using viral sequences registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information. To avoid bias from viral population subdivision, viral sequences were stratified according to their sampling locations and sampling years. As a result, we obtained a total of 580 datasets each of which consists of nucleotide sequences of influenza A viruses isolated from a single population of hosts at a single sampling site within a single year. By analyzing nucleotide sequences in the datasets, we found that Tajima’s D values of viral sequences were different depending on hosts and gene segments. Tajima’s D values of viruses isolated from chicken and human samples showed negative, suggesting purifying selection or a rapid population growth of the viruses. The negative Tajima’s D values in rapidly growing viral population were also observed in computer simulations. Tajima’s D values of PB2, PB1, PA, NP, and M genes of the viruses circulating in wild mallards were close to zero, suggesting that these genes have undergone neutral selection in constant-sized population. On the other hand, Tajima’s D values of HA and NA genes of these viruses were positive, indicating HA and NA have undergone balancing selection in wild mallards. Taken together, these results indicated the existence of unknown factors that maintain viral subtypes in wild mallards. PMID:26760775

  9. Antioxidant defence systems in the protozoan pathogen Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Mastronicola, Daniela; Falabella, Micol; Forte, Elena; Testa, Fabrizio; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The microaerophilic protist Giardia intestinalis is the causative agent of giardiasis, one of the most common intestinal infectious diseases worldwide. The pathogen lacks not only respiratory terminal oxidases (being amitochondriate), but also several conventional antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. In spite of this, since living attached to the mucosa of the proximal small intestine, the parasite should rely on an efficient antioxidant system to survive the oxidative and nitrosative stress conditions found in this tract of the human gut. Here, we review current knowledge on the antioxidant defence systems in G. intestinalis, focusing on the progress made over the last decade in the field. The relevance of this research and future perspectives are discussed. PMID:26672398

  10. Small Hydrophobic Protein of Human Metapneumovirus Does Not Affect Virus Replication and Host Gene Expression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Miranda; Herfst, Sander; Aarbiou, Jamil; Burgers, Peter C.; Zaaraoui-Boutahar, Fatiha; Bijl, Maarten; van IJcken, Wilfred; Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Luider, Theo M.; Scholte, Bob J.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Andeweg, Arno C.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) encodes a small hydrophobic (SH) protein of unknown function. HMPV from which the SH open reading frame was deleted (HMPVΔSH) was viable and displayed similar replication kinetics, cytopathic effect and plaque size compared with wild type HMPV in several cell-lines. In addition, no differences were observed in infection efficiency or cell-to-cell spreading in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HPBEC) cultured at an air-liquid interphase. Host gene expression was analyzed in A549 cells infected with HMPV or HMPVΔSH using microarrays and mass spectrometry (MS) based techniques at multiple time points post infection. Only minor differences were observed in mRNA or protein expression levels. A possible function of HMPV SH as apoptosis blocker, as proposed for several members of the family Paramyxoviridae, was rejected based on this analysis. So far, a clear phenotype of HMPV SH deletion mutants in vitro at the virus and host levels is absent. PMID:23484037

  11. A human in vitro model system for investigating genome-wide host responses to SARS coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lisa FP; Hibberd, Martin L; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Tang, Kin-Fai; Neo, Soek-Ying; Tan, Jenny; Krishna Murthy, Karuturi R; Vega, Vinsensius B; Chia, Jer-Ming; Liu, Edison T; Ren, Ee-Chee

    2004-01-01

    Background The molecular basis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) induced pathology is still largely unclear. Many SARS patients suffer respiratory distress brought on by interstitial infiltration and frequently show peripheral blood lymphopenia and occasional leucopenia. One possible cause of this could be interstitial inflammation, following a localized host response. In this study, we therefore examine the immune response of SARS-CoV in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) over the first 24 hours. Methods PBMCs from normal healthy donors were inoculated in vitro with SARS-CoV and the viral replication kinetics was studied by real-time quantitative assays. SARS-CoV specific gene expression changes were examined by high-density oligonucleotide array analysis. Results We observed that SARS-CoV was capable of infecting and replicating in PBMCs and the kinetics of viral replication was variable among the donors. SARS-CoV antibody binding assays indicated that SARS specific antibodies inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication. Array data showed monocyte-macrophage cell activation, coagulation pathway upregulation and cytokine production together with lung trafficking chemokines such as IL8 and IL17, possibly activated through the TLR9 signaling pathway; that mimicked clinical features of the disease. Conclusions The identification of human blood mononuclear cells as a direct target of SARS-CoV in the model system described here provides a new insight into disease pathology and a tool for investigating the host response and mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:15357874

  12. Characterization of a Leishmania isolate from the rodent host Neotoma micropus collected in Texas and comparison with human isolates.

    PubMed

    Grogl, M; Kreutzer, R D; McHugh, C P; Martin, R K

    1991-12-01

    We report the biological and biochemical parameters of Leishmania parasites (MNEO/US/90/WR972) isolated from a rodent host, Neotoma micropus, collected in Texas. Footpad inoculations of WR972 promastigotes into BALB/c mice and Syrian hamsters resulted in ulcerating lesions six and eight weeks post-inoculation, respectively. Using monoclonal antibody-stained touch preparations, amastigotes were found in the liver of both laboratory hosts. Infection of J774 macrophages with WR972 promastigotes supported the growth of amastigotes for 12 days at 35 degrees C. The WR972 parasite was identified by enzyme electrophoresis as L. mexicana. Isozyme comparison of WR972 with 42 L. mexicana isolates (from humans and rodents) from four different endemic areas, including Texas, suggest that these parasite populations are identical for approximately 97% of their genetic loci. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of WR972 resolved 18 chromosomes with a size range of 300- greater than 2,000 kb. The karyotype strongly resembles that of two other Texas L. mexicana isolates from humans. Taken together, the PFGE, hybridization, and isoenzyme data suggest that the wood rat isolate (WR972) is identical to parasites from human cutaneous lesions isolated in Texas and Central America. In addition, the biological characteristics of WR972, its infectivity of BALB/c mice and the Syrian hamster, and the potential of the isolate to infect, transform, and divide in J774 macrophages indicate that WR972 will be pathogenic in humans if transmission occurs. Health care providers should consider this possibility when studying the epidemiology and control of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Texas. PMID:1763798

  13. Invasion by Neisseria meningitidis varies widely between clones and among nasopharyngeal mucosae derived from adult human hosts.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Robert; Goodwin, Linda; Stevanin, Tania M; Silcocks, Paul B; Parker, Andrew; Maiden, Martin C J; Read, Robert C

    2002-05-01

    Colonization of the human nasopharynx is a feature of some species of Neisseria, and is a prerequisite of invasive meningococcal disease. The likelihood of colonization by Neisseria meningitidis varies widely between humans, and very few develop invasive disease. Explants of nasal mucosa derived from adult patients with non-allergic nasal obstruction were infected experimentally with Neisseria spp. At intervals over 18 h incubation, washed explants were homogenized, and viable bacteria were counted. To estimate bacterial invasion of mucosa, explants were exposed to 0.25% sodium taurocholate for 30 s prior to homogenization. N. meningitidis was recovered from the mucosa and the organism invaded and replicated within the tissue, in contrast to N. lactamica and N. animalis (n=9, P<0.008). N. meningitidis isolates of clones ET-5, ET-37 and lineage III were recovered from and invaded tissue, but strains of clones A4, A:subgroup I, A:subgroup III and A:subgroup IV-1 did not invade (n=6). To measure host variation, survival of N. meningitidis within nasal mucosa of 40 different human donors was measured. Intra-class correlation of replicates was 0.97, but the coefficient of variation of recovered viable counts was 1335% after 4 h and 77% after 18 h incubation. It is concluded that the distinctive colonization and disease potential of Neisseria spp. may be partly a consequence of their ability to invade and survive within human nasopharyngeal mucosa, but that this is influenced greatly by genetic or environmental factors operating on the host mucosa. This is consistent with the unpredictable epidemiology of meningococcal disease. PMID:11988521

  14. Deciphering the Counterplay of Aspergillus fumigatus Infection and Host Inflammation by Evolutionary Games on Graphs.

    PubMed

    Pollmächer, Johannes; Timme, Sandra; Schuster, Stefan; Brakhage, Axel A; Zipfel, Peter F; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Microbial invaders are ubiquitously present and pose the constant risk of infections that are opposed by various defence mechanisms of the human immune system. A tight regulation of the immune response ensures clearance of microbial invaders and concomitantly limits host damage that is crucial for host viability. To investigate the counterplay of infection and inflammation, we simulated the invasion of the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus in lung alveoli by evolutionary games on graphs. The layered structure of the innate immune system is represented by a sequence of games in the virtual model. We show that the inflammatory cascade of the immune response is essential for microbial clearance and that the inflammation level correlates with the infection-dose. At low infection-doses, corresponding to daily inhalation of conidia, the resident alveolar macrophages may be sufficient to clear infections, however, at higher infection-doses their primary task shifts towards recruitment of neutrophils to infection sites. PMID:27291424

  15. Deciphering the Counterplay of Aspergillus fumigatus Infection and Host Inflammation by Evolutionary Games on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmächer, Johannes; Timme, Sandra; Schuster, Stefan; Brakhage, Axel A.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2016-06-01

    Microbial invaders are ubiquitously present and pose the constant risk of infections that are opposed by various defence mechanisms of the human immune system. A tight regulation of the immune response ensures clearance of microbial invaders and concomitantly limits host damage that is crucial for host viability. To investigate the counterplay of infection and inflammation, we simulated the invasion of the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus in lung alveoli by evolutionary games on graphs. The layered structure of the innate immune system is represented by a sequence of games in the virtual model. We show that the inflammatory cascade of the immune response is essential for microbial clearance and that the inflammation level correlates with the infection-dose. At low infection-doses, corresponding to daily inhalation of conidia, the resident alveolar macrophages may be sufficient to clear infections, however, at higher infection-doses their primary task shifts towards recruitment of neutrophils to infection sites.

  16. Deciphering the Counterplay of Aspergillus fumigatus Infection and Host Inflammation by Evolutionary Games on Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Pollmächer, Johannes; Timme, Sandra; Schuster, Stefan; Brakhage, Axel A.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Microbial invaders are ubiquitously present and pose the constant risk of infections that are opposed by various defence mechanisms of the human immune system. A tight regulation of the immune response ensures clearance of microbial invaders and concomitantly limits host damage that is crucial for host viability. To investigate the counterplay of infection and inflammation, we simulated the invasion of the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus in lung alveoli by evolutionary games on graphs. The layered structure of the innate immune system is represented by a sequence of games in the virtual model. We show that the inflammatory cascade of the immune response is essential for microbial clearance and that the inflammation level correlates with the infection-dose. At low infection-doses, corresponding to daily inhalation of conidia, the resident alveolar macrophages may be sufficient to clear infections, however, at higher infection-doses their primary task shifts towards recruitment of neutrophils to infection sites. PMID:27291424

  17. Comparative genomics tools applied to bioterrorism defence.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Tom; Kuczmarski, Tom; Ott, Linda; Torres, Clinton; Medeiros, Dan; Smith, Jason; Truitt, Brian; Mulakken, Nisha; Lam, Marisa; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Zemla, Adam; Zhou, Carol Ecale; Gardner, Shea

    2003-06-01

    Rapid advances in the genomic sequencing of bacteria and viruses over the past few years have made it possible to consider sequencing the genomes of all pathogens that affect humans and the crops and livestock upon which our lives depend. Recent events make it imperative that full genome sequencing be accomplished as soon as possible for pathogens that could be used as weapons of mass destruction or disruption. This sequence information must be exploited to provide rapid and accurate diagnostics to identify pathogens and distinguish them from harmless near-neighbours and hoaxes. The Chem-Bio Non-Proliferation (CBNP) programme of the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a large-scale effort of pathogen detection in early 2000 when it was announced that the DOE would be providing bio-security at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. Our team at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) was given the task of developing reliable and validated assays for a number of the most likely bioterrorist agents. The short timeline led us to devise a novel system that utilised whole-genome comparison methods to rapidly focus on parts of the pathogen genomes that had a high probability of being unique. Assays developed with this approach have been validated by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). They were used at the 2002 Winter Olympics, have entered the public health system, and have been in continual use for non-publicised aspects of homeland defence since autumn 2001. Assays have been developed for all major threat list agents for which adequate genomic sequence is available, as well as for other pathogens requested by various government agencies. Collaborations with comparative genomics algorithm developers have enabled our LLNL team to make major advances in pathogen detection, since many of the existing tools simply did not scale well enough to be of practical use for this application. It is hoped that a discussion of a real-life practical application of

  18. Phylogenetic Characterization of Encephalitozoon Romaleae (Microsporidia) from a Grasshopper Host: Relationship to Encephalitozoon spp. Infecting Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encephalitozoon species are the most common microsporidian pathogens of humans and domesticated animals. We recently discovered a new microsporidium, Encephalitozoon romaleae, infecting the eastern lubber grasshopper Romalea microptera. To understand its evolutionary relationships, we compared par...

  19. No irradiation required: The future of humanized immune system modeling in murine hosts.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Brian E; Brown, Matthew E

    2015-04-01

    Immunocompromised mice are an essential tool for human xenotransplantation studies, including human haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology research. Over the past 35 years, there have been many advances in the development of these mouse models, offering researchers increasingly sophisticated options for creating clinically relevant mouse-human chimeras. This addendum article will focus on our recent development of the "NSGW" mouse, which, among other beneficial traits, is genetically modified to obviate the need for myeloablative irradiation of the animals. Thus, the complicating haematopoietic, gastrointestinal, and neurological side effects associated with irradiation are avoided and investigators without access to radiation sources are enabled to pursue engraftment studies with human HSCs. We will also discuss the topics of transgenics, knock-ins, and other mutants with an overarching goal of enhancing chimerism in these animal models. PMID:27171577

  20. Identification of T. gondii epitopes, adjuvants, & host genetic factors that influence protection of mice & humans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tze Guan; Mui, Ernest; Cong, Hua; Witola, William; Montpetit, Alexandre; Muench, Stephen P.; Sidney, John; Alexander, Jeff; Sette, Alessandro; Grigg, Michael; Maewal, Ajesh; McLeod, Rima

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that causes severe neurologic and ocular disease in immune-compromised and congenitally infected individuals. There is no vaccine protective against human toxoplasmosis. Herein, immunization of Ld mice with HF10 (HPGSVNEFDF) with palmitic acid moieties or a monophosphoryl lipid A derivative elicited potent IFN-γ production from Ld-restricted CD8+ T cells in vitro and protected mice. CD8+ T cell peptide epitopes from T. gondii dense granule proteins GRA 3, 6, 7, and Sag 1, immunogenic in humans for HLA-A02+, HLA-A03+, and HLA-B07+ cells were identified. Since peptide repertoire presented by MHC class I molecules to CD8+ T cells is shaped by endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase (ERAAP), polymorphisms in the human ERAAP gene ERAP1 were studied and associate with susceptibility to human congenital toxoplasmosis (p<0.05). These results have important implications for vaccine development. PMID:20347630

  1. Rapid evolution of antimicrobial peptide genes in an insect host-social parasite system.

    PubMed

    Erler, Silvio; Lhomme, Patrick; Rasmont, Pierre; Lattorff, H Michael G

    2014-04-01

    Selection, as a major driver for evolution in host-parasite interactions, may act on two levels; the virulence of the pathogen, and the hosts' defence system. Effectors of the host defence system might evolve faster than other genes e.g. those involved in adaptation to changes in life history or environmental fluctuations. Host-parasite interactions at the level of hosts and their specific social parasites, present a special setting for evolutionarily driven selection, as both share the same environmental conditions and pathogen pressures. Here, we study the evolution of antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes, in six host bumblebee and their socially parasitic cuckoo bumblebee species. The selected AMP genes evolved much faster than non-immune genes, but only defensin-1 showed significant differences between host and social parasite. Nucleotide diversity and codon-by-codon analyses confirmed that purifying selection is the main selective force acting on bumblebee defence genes. PMID:24530902

  2. Host-specific induction of Escherichia coli fitness genes during human urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Hazen, Tracy H.; Brumbaugh, Ariel R.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Smith, Sara N.; Ernst, Robert D.; Rasko, David A.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the predominant etiological agent of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI), manifested by inflammation of the urinary bladder, in humans and is a major global public health concern. Molecular pathogenesis of UPEC has been primarily examined using murine models of UTI. Translational research to develop novel therapeutics against this major pathogen, which is becoming increasingly antibiotic resistant, requires a thorough understanding of mechanisms involved in pathogenesis during human UTIs. Total RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and comparative transcriptional analysis of UTI samples to the UPEC isolates cultured in human urine and laboratory medium were used to identify novel fitness genes that were specifically expressed during human infection. Evidence for UPEC genes involved in ion transport, including copper efflux, nickel and potassium import systems, as key fitness factors in uropathogenesis were generated using an experimental model of UTI. Translational application of this study was investigated by targeting Cus, a bacterial copper efflux system. Copper supplementation in drinking water reduces E. coli colonization in the urinary bladder of mice. Additionally, our results suggest that anaerobic processes in UPEC are involved in promoting fitness during UTI in humans. In summary, RNA-seq was used to establish the transcriptional signature in UPEC during naturally occurring, community acquired UTI in women and multiple novel fitness genes used by UPEC during human infection were identified. The repertoire of UPEC genes involved in UTI presented here will facilitate further translational studies to develop innovative strategies against UTI caused by UPEC. PMID:25489107

  3. In Defence of Multimodal Re-Signification: A Response to Havard Skaar's "In Defence of Writing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adami, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Responding to "In defence of writing" by Havard Skaar, published in issue 43.1 of this journal (April 2009), the present article argues that (1) compared with text production "from scratch," producing texts through copy-and-paste requires a different type of--rather than less--semiotic work, and that (2) digitally produced writing may involve the…

  4. Influence of the age and sex of human hosts on the distribution of Escherichia coli ECOR groups and virulence traits.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David M; Stern, Steven E; Collignon, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli were isolated from the faeces of 266 individuals living in the Canberra region of Australia. The isolates were characterized for their ECOR group membership (A, B1, B2 or D) and for the presence of 29 virulence-associated traits. Overall, 19.5 % of the strains were members of group A, 12.4 % B1, 45.1 % B2 and 22.9 % D. The frequency with which strains belonging to the four ECOR groups were observed varied with the age and sex of the hosts from which they were isolated. In males, the probability of isolating A or D strains increased with host age, whilst the probability of detecting a group B2 strain declined. In females, the probability of recovering A or B2 strains increased with increasing host age and there was a concomitant decline in the likelihood of isolating B1 or D strains. Of the 29 virulence-associated traits examined, 24 were detected in more than one strain. The likelihood of detecting most traits varied with a strain's ECOR membership, with the exception of afa/draBC, astA, cvaC, eaeA, iss and iutA, for which there was no statistically significant evidence of an association with ECOR group. The frequency with which fimH, iha, eaeA, iroN, hlyD, iss, ompT and K1 were detected in a strain depended on the age or sex of the host from which the strain was isolated. In group B2 strains many of the virulence traits were non-randomly associated, with some co-occurring in a strain less often than expected by chance, whilst others were co-associated. In 17 cases, the extent to which two virulence traits were co-associated was found to depend on host sex and age. The results of this study suggest that the morphological, physiological and dietary differences that occur among human individuals of different sex or age may influence the distribution of E. coli genotypes. PMID:15632421

  5. Effect of Implantation Site and Injury Condition on Host Response to Human-Derived Fascia Lata ECM in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Diane R.; Baker, Andrew R.; Mesiha, Mena; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Tan, Carmela D.; Walker, Esteban; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The host response and remodeling of ECM scaffolds are believed to be critical determinants of success or failure in repair or reconstructive procedures. Host response has been investigated in subcutaneous or abdominal wall implantation models. The extent to which evaluation of the host response to ECM intended for tendon or ligament repair should be performed in an orthotopic site is not known. This study compared the host response to human-derived fascia lata ECM among various implantation sites in the rat model. Results showed that a xenograft in the rat shoulder does not exhibit a different host response at 7 days from xenograft in the body wall, suggesting that either site may be appropriate to study the early host response to biologic grafts as well as the effect of various treatments aimed to modify the early host response. By 28 days, a xenograft in the rat shoulder does elicit a unique host response from that seen in the body wall. Therefore, it may be more appropriate to use an orthotopic shoulder model for investigating the long-term host response and remodeling of biologic grafts to be used for rotator cuff repair. PMID:21858856

  6. KAP1 Is a Host Restriction Factor That Promotes Human Adenovirus E1B-55K SUMO Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Berscheminski, Julia; Kieweg, Lisa; Müncheberg, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Once transported to the replication sites, human adenoviruses (HAdVs) need to ensure decondensation and transcriptional activation of their viral genomes to synthesize viral proteins and initiate steps to reprogram the host cell for viral replication. These early stages during adenoviral infection are poorly characterized but represent a decisive moment in the establishment of a productive infection. Here, we identify a novel host viral restriction factor, KAP1. This heterochromatin-associated transcription factor regulates the dynamic organization of the host chromatin structure via its ability to influence epigenetic marks and chromatin compaction. In response to DNA damage, KAP1 is phosphorylated and functionally inactive, resulting in chromatin relaxation. We discovered that KAP1 posttranslational modification is dramatically altered during HAdV infection to limit the antiviral capacity of this host restriction factor, which represents an essential step required for efficient viral replication. Conversely, we also observed during infection an HAdV-mediated decrease of KAP1 SUMO moieties, known to promote chromatin decondensation events. Based on our findings, we provide evidence that HAdV induces KAP1 deSUMOylation to minimize epigenetic gene silencing and to promote SUMO modification of E1B-55K by a so far unknown mechanism. IMPORTANCE Here we describe a novel cellular restriction factor for human adenovirus (HAdV) that sheds light on very early modulation processes in viral infection. We reported that chromatin formation and cellular SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling play key roles in HAdV transcriptional regulation. We observed that the cellular chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader SPOC1 represses HAdV infection and gene expression. Here, we illustrate the role of the SPOC1-interacting factor KAP1 during productive HAdV growth. KAP1 binds to the viral E1B-55K protein, promoting its SUMO modification, therefore illustrating a crucial step for

  7. Predicting Essential Metabolic Genome Content of Niche-Specific Enterobacterial Human Pathogens during Simulation of Host Environments

    PubMed Central

    Baumler, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms have evolved to occupy certain environmental niches, and the metabolic genes essential for growth in these locations are retained in the genomes. Many microorganisms inhabit niches located in the human body, sometimes causing disease, and may retain genes essential for growth in locations such as the bloodstream and urinary tract, or growth during intracellular invasion of the hosts’ macrophage cells. Strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella spp. are thought to have evolved over 100 million years from a common ancestor, and now cause disease in specific niches within humans. Here we have used a genome scale metabolic model representing the pangenome of E. coli which contains all metabolic reactions encoded by genes from 16 E. coli genomes, and have simulated environmental conditions found in the human bloodstream, urinary tract, and macrophage to determine essential metabolic genes needed for growth in each location. We compared the predicted essential genes for three E. coli strains and one Salmonella strain that cause disease in each host environment, and determined that essential gene retention could be accurately predicted using this approach. This project demonstrated that simulating human body environments such as the bloodstream can successfully lead to accurate computational predictions of essential/important genes. PMID:26885654

  8. Host-derived glycans serve as selected nutrients for the gut microbe: human milk oligosaccharides and bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Takane

    2016-04-01

    Lactation is a common feeding strategy of eutherian mammals, but its functions go beyond feeding the neonates. Ever since Tissier isolated bifidobacteria from the stool of breast-fed infants, human milk has been postulated to contain compounds that selectively stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria in intestines. However, until relatively recently, there have been no reports to link human milk compound(s) with bifidobacterial physiology. Over the past decade, successive studies have demonstrated that infant-gut-associated bifidobacteria are equipped with genetic and enzymatic toolsets dedicated to assimilation of host-derived glycans, especially human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). Among gut microbes, the presence of enzymes required for degrading HMOs with type-1 chains is essentially limited to infant-gut-associated bifidobacteria, suggesting HMOs serve as selected nutrients for the bacteria. In this study, I shortly discuss the research on bifidobacteria and HMOs from a historical perspective and summarize the roles of bifidobacterial enzymes in the assimilation of HMOs with type-1 chains. Based on this overview, I suggest the co-evolution between bifidobacteria and human beings mediated by HMOs. PMID:26838671

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Metruccio, Matteo M. E.; Evans, David J.; Gabriel, Manal M.; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) controls (∼100-fold). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections. PMID:27375592

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus and host cell lipids. Interesting pathways in research for a new HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Raulin, Jeanine

    2002-01-01

    It has been reported in the literature that biological membranes arising from HIV-induced cell fusion, as well as syncytium formation between infected and non-infected cells and those involved in transduction, viral DNA nuclear import and virion budding from the host cell, are all made of proteins, a phospholipid (P) bilayer and cholesterol (C). However, the P/C molar ratio is higher in the retroviral envelope than in the plasma membrane where they originate, and higher than in the nuclear envelope. Mechanisms are described which elucidate this puzzling fact, as well as cholesterol-dependent leakage and pore formation during cell fusion. Fatty acylation of viral and host cell proteins is required to direct them to membranes. Detergent-insoluble microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, termed either DIGs (detergent-insoluble glycolipid-enriched complexes), DRMs (detergent resistant membranes), TIFFs (Triton-insoluble floating fractions) or GEMs (glycolipid-enriched membranes), function as platforms for attachment of proteins in the process of signal transduction. HIV-SUgp120 (HIV-surface glycoprotein), T-cell receptor (TCR)-CD4+ and co-receptors promote aggregation of these lipid "rafts" which concentrate the Src family tyrosine kinases SFKs (PTK, Lyn, Fyn, Lck), GPI (glycosyl phosphatidylinositol)-anchored proteins, and phosphatidylinositol kinases PI(3)K and PI(4)K, inducing cell signalling. HIV-SUgp120 transduces the activation signal and provokes the formation of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites, i.e. the prostaglandin PGE2 suppressor of immune function and inhibitor of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) proliferation, while PGB2 activates SFKs and increases mRNA expression, as well as NFkappaB (nuclear transcription factor) translocation to nucleus. HIV nuclear import, DNA integration, chromatin template capacity may be mediated by the lipid environment. The lipid-enriched microdomains from which HIV-1 buds, may explain the high level of

  11. Subtype analysis of Blastocystis sp. isolates from human and canine hosts in an urban community in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Belleza, Maria Luz B; Reyes, John Carlo B; Tongol-Rivera, Pilarita N; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-06-01

    Blastocystis sp. is a common gut-dwelling protist of both humans and animals. A cross-sectional survey among humans and their dogs was conducted to determine the prevalence of Blastocystis infection and to characterize the subtype (ST) distribution in an urban community in the Philippines. Fecal specimens from 1,271 humans and 145 dogs were collected and inoculated in diphasic culture medium. Prevalence of Blastocystis by culture was 13.0% (95% CI=11.2-15.0) and 14.5% (95% CI=9.6-21.2) for humans and dogs, respectively. A total of 168 culture isolates were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with seven pairs of ST-specific sequence-tagged-site (STS) primers. In humans, the ST present in this study were ST1 with 22.6% (95% CI=17.2-29.0), ST2 with 3.1% (95% CI=1.3-6.7), ST3 with 41.4% (95% CI=34.9-48.6), ST4 with 14.8% (95% CI=10.5-20.6), ST5 with 4.1% (95% CI=2.0-8.0), and unknown ST with 13.9% (95% CI=9.6-19.4). In dogs, the ST present in this study were ST1 with 4.3% (95% CI=0.0-29.0), ST2 with 8.7% (95% CI=1.3-28.0), ST3 with 17.4% (95% CI=6.4-37.7), ST4 with 13.0% (95% CI=3.7-33.0), ST5 with 13.0% (95% CI=3.7-33.0), and unknown ST with 47.8% (95% CI=29.2-67.0). This is the first study that reported Blastocystis ST4 in human and canine hosts in the Philippines. PMID:26902433

  12. Repeated targeting of the same hosts by a brood parasite compromises host egg rejection

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Martin; Troscianko, Jolyon; Spottiswoode, Claire N.

    2013-01-01

    Cuckoo eggs famously mimic those of their foster parents to evade rejection from discriminating hosts. Here we test whether parasites benefit by repeatedly parasitizing the same host nest. This should make accurate rejection decisions harder, regardless of the mechanism that hosts use to identify foreign eggs. Here we find strong support for this prediction in the African tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava), the most common host of the cuckoo finch (Anomalospiza imberbis). We show experimentally that hosts reject eggs that differ from an internal template, but crucially, as the proportion of foreign eggs increases, hosts are less likely to reject them and require greater differences in appearance to do so. Repeated parasitism by the same cuckoo finch female is common in host nests and likely to be an adaptation to increase the probability of host acceptance. Thus, repeated parasitism interacts with egg mimicry to exploit cognitive and sensory limitations in host defences. PMID:24064931

  13. "Up-dating the monograph." [corrected] Cytolytic immune lymphocytes in the armamentarium of the human host.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, J G

    2008-12-01

    The author of the monograph "Cytolytic Immune Lymphocytes..." (published in 2008 by Schenk Buchverlag Campus Dialog, Budapest, Passau, Pécs) proposed several research projects and described certain clinical events that require further elaboration and documentation. In this article the author provides what is required and has since become available. The first subject matter in question concerns the fusogenic viruses. The ancient fusogenic viruses might have created the first eukaryotic cell(s) by uniting archaeabacterial and prokaryotic/protobacterial protospheroplasts. Extant fusogenic viruses either produce tumor cell syncytia and lyse them, thus practicing viral oncolysis. Or, create chimaeric fusion products, the so-called "natural hybridomas", of lymphoma cells exhibiting transmembrane budding of retrovirus particles or envelope proteins, and anti-viral specific antibody-producing plasma cells. The second topic concerns the horizontal-lateral mode of acquisition of those genes, which were "present in the waiting" in the amphioxus, sea urchin, and the agnathans, and met in the primitive gnatostomata sharks to encode in unison the entire adaptive immune system. The consensus of opinion is such that these genes derived from newly acquired transposons/retrotransposons. The author points out that the extant Epstein-Barr virus harbors genes displaying sequence homology with those genes from the sharks up to mammals that regulate the somatic hypermutation of specific antibody production. The author proposes that an ancient herpesvirus might have propagated the V(D)J and RAG genes from sea urchins to sharks. The third area is that of lymphocytes cytotoxic/cytolytic to virally infected or malignantly transformed host cells. This discovery led to the adoptive immune lymphocyte therapy of tumors. Installed in the adaptive immune system are regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells for he protection of "self". Tumor cells masquerading as "self" are protected

  14. Science and outreach for planetary defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2011-10-01

    The recent IAA Planetary Defence Conference held in Romania, focused on a hot topic: from Threat to Action. It is true that we ought to protect the planet but also educate the population in this direction. Increasing rumours about pseudo-scientific issues, such as the impact with asteroids, comets or debris of spatial missions, the effects of the growing solar activity, the displacement of the terrestrial rotation axis following major earthquakes, let alone spreading news about the end-of-the-world, show how crucial it is to prepare people to understand what is going on in the universe and, in particular, on our planet, and how to deal with inevitable events. Another central question is in order: who should be in charge of this education? Perhaps the journalists, but they lack the necessary preparation to present correct and updated information to the public. Or the scientists, but they are extremely busy and concentrated on their projects aimed at defending the planet and at answering the vast array of questions that their research stirs up. Our goal is to answer the following question: to what extent is it the scientist's responsibility and to what extent the journalist's to educate people for the planetary defence? In addition, we shall suggest how they can effectively co-ordinate efforts to solve the current problems of a society submerged in increasingly sophisticated but decreasingly informed technologies.

  15. Induction of virulence factors in Giardia duodenalis independent of host attachment

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Samantha J.; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Vuong, Daniel; Pascovici, Dana; Chick, Joel M.; Lacey, Ernest; Haynes, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is responsible for the majority of parasitic gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Host-parasite interaction models in vitro provide insights into disease and virulence and help us to understand pathogenesis. Using HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) as a model we have demonstrated that initial sensitisation by host secretions reduces proclivity for trophozoite attachment, while inducing virulence factors. Host soluble factors triggered up-regulation of membrane and secreted proteins, including Tenascins, Cathepsin-B precursor, cystatin, and numerous Variant-specific Surface Proteins (VSPs). By comparison, host-cell attached trophozoites up-regulated intracellular pathways for ubiquitination, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification and production of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). We reason that these results demonstrate early pathogenesis in Giardia involves two independent host-parasite interactions. Motile trophozoites respond to soluble secreted signals, which deter attachment and induce expression of virulence factors. Trophozoites attached to host cells, in contrast, respond by up-regulating intracellular pathways involved in clearance of ROS, thus anticipating the host defence response. PMID:26867958

  16. Induction of virulence factors in Giardia duodenalis independent of host attachment.

    PubMed

    Emery, Samantha J; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Vuong, Daniel; Pascovici, Dana; Chick, Joel M; Lacey, Ernest; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is responsible for the majority of parasitic gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Host-parasite interaction models in vitro provide insights into disease and virulence and help us to understand pathogenesis. Using HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) as a model we have demonstrated that initial sensitisation by host secretions reduces proclivity for trophozoite attachment, while inducing virulence factors. Host soluble factors triggered up-regulation of membrane and secreted proteins, including Tenascins, Cathepsin-B precursor, cystatin, and numerous Variant-specific Surface Proteins (VSPs). By comparison, host-cell attached trophozoites up-regulated intracellular pathways for ubiquitination, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification and production of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). We reason that these results demonstrate early pathogenesis in Giardia involves two independent host-parasite interactions. Motile trophozoites respond to soluble secreted signals, which deter attachment and induce expression of virulence factors. Trophozoites attached to host cells, in contrast, respond by up-regulating intracellular pathways involved in clearance of ROS, thus anticipating the host defence response. PMID:26867958

  17. Estimating Hantavirus Risk in Southern Argentina: A GIS-Based Approach Combining Human Cases and Host Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Andreo, Veronica; Neteler, Markus; Rocchini, Duccio; Provensal, Cecilia; Levis, Silvana; Porcasi, Ximena; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Lanfri, Mario; Scavuzzo, Marcelo; Pini, Noemi; Enria, Delia; Polop, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We use a Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) approach along with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques to examine the potential distribution of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) caused by Andes virus (ANDV) in southern Argentina and, more precisely, define and estimate the area with the highest infection probability for humans, through the combination with the distribution map for the competent rodent host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus). Sites with confirmed cases of HPS in the period 1995–2009 were mostly concentrated in a narrow strip (~90 km × 900 km) along the Andes range from northern Neuquén to central Chubut province. This area is characterized by high mean annual precipitation (~1,000 mm on average), but dry summers (less than 100 mm), very low percentages of bare soil (~10% on average) and low temperatures in the coldest month (minimum average temperature −1.5 °C), as compared to the HPS-free areas, features that coincide with sub-Antarctic forests and shrublands (especially those dominated by the invasive plant Rosa rubiginosa), where rodent host abundances and ANDV prevalences are known to be the highest. Through the combination of predictive distribution maps of the reservoir host and disease cases, we found that the area with the highest probability for HPS to occur overlaps only 28% with the most suitable habitat for O. longicaudatus. With this approach, we made a step forward in the understanding of the risk factors that need to be considered in the forecasting and mapping of risk at the regional/national scale. We propose the implementation and use of thematic maps, such as the one built here, as a basic tool allowing public health authorities to focus surveillance efforts and normally scarce resources for prevention and control actions in vast areas like southern Argentina. PMID:24424500

  18. Estimating hantavirus risk in southern Argentina: a GIS-based approach combining human cases and host distribution.

    PubMed

    Andreo, Veronica; Neteler, Markus; Rocchini, Duccio; Provensal, Cecilia; Levis, Silvana; Porcasi, Ximena; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Lanfri, Mario; Scavuzzo, Marcelo; Pini, Noemi; Enria, Delia; Polop, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We use a Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) approach along with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques to examine the potential distribution of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) caused by Andes virus (ANDV) in southern Argentina and, more precisely, define and estimate the area with the highest infection probability for humans, through the combination with the distribution map for the competent rodent host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus). Sites with confirmed cases of HPS in the period 1995-2009 were mostly concentrated in a narrow strip (~90 km × 900 km) along the Andes range from northern Neuquén to central Chubut province. This area is characterized by high mean annual precipitation (~1,000 mm on average), but dry summers (less than 100 mm), very low percentages of bare soil (~10% on average) and low temperatures in the coldest month (minimum average temperature -1.5 °C), as compared to the HPS-free areas, features that coincide with sub-Antarctic forests and shrublands (especially those dominated by the invasive plant Rosa rubiginosa), where rodent host abundances and ANDV prevalences are known to be the highest. Through the combination of predictive distribution maps of the reservoir host and disease cases, we found that the area with the highest probability for HPS to occur overlaps only 28% with the most suitable habitat for O. longicaudatus. With this approach, we made a step forward in the understanding of the risk factors that need to be considered in the forecasting and mapping of risk at the regional/national scale. We propose the implementation and use of thematic maps, such as the one built here, as a basic tool allowing public health authorities to focus surveillance efforts and normally scarce resources for prevention and control actions in vast areas like southern Argentina. PMID:24424500

  19. The innate immune response in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Borel, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Summary M ycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection can be cleared by the innate immune system before the initiation of an adaptive immune response. This innate protection requires a variety of robust cell autonomous responses from many different host immune cell types. However, Mtb has evolved strategies to circumvent some of these defences. In this mini‐review, we discuss these host–pathogen interactions with a focus on studies performed in human cells and/or supported by human genetics studies (such as genome‐wide association studies). PMID:26135005

  20. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice’s brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  1. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice's brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  2. [Metabolic therapy at the edge between human hosts and gut microbes].

    PubMed

    Blasco-Baque, V; Serino, M; Burcelin, R

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is becoming day-after-day more urgent taking into account the great diversity characterizing patients affected by a given pathology, especially metabolic diseases. In fact, antidiabetic/obesity treatments have shown a reduced or no effect at all in some patients, representing a major challenge physicians have to face worldwide. Therefore, efforts have to be put to identify individual factors affecting our susceptibility towards a given medication. In that regard, gut microbiota may stand for the missing piece of the metabolic puzzle regulating host response, since its role in the induction of metabolic diseases has now been achieved. In fact, we firstly provided a bacterial explanation for the low-grade chronic inflammation featuring metabolic diseases, by showing the lipopolysaccharide as a trigger and risk factor of such pathologies. However, despite similar lineages of microbes characterize the gut of people, important differences still remain, which may be responsible for opposite effect of treatments such as pre- or probiotics, whose efficacy seems to be governed by the own gut microbiota of subjects. We have recently shown that gut microbiota is associated to the inclination to resist or not high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetes in mice. In addition, the direct targeting of gut microbes by dietary fibers reversed the observed metabolic phenotype. These results, together with the literature, strongly suggest gut microbiota as a new target for the development of personalized metabolic therapy. PMID:23348854

  3. Modulation of host ubiquitin system genes in human endometrial cell line infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Meenu, S; Thiagarajan, S; Ramalingam, Sudha; Michael, A; Ramalingam, Sankaran

    2016-04-01

    Endometrium is one of the most commonly affected sites in genital tuberculosis. The understanding of its interaction with the tubercle bacilli is of paramount importance for studying the pathogenesis of this disease. The main objective of this work was to study the interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host endometrial epithelial cell lines (Ishikawa cell lines), and to identify the differentially expressed genes upon tuberculosis infection. To study this, suppression subtractive hybridization library was constructed using M. tuberculosis H37Rv-infected Ishikawa cell line harvested 24 h post-infection. The subtracted cDNA library was screened, and 105 differentially expressed genes were identified and grouped based on their functions. Since ubiquitination process has gained importance in targeting M. tuberculosis to xenophagy, ubiquitin system genes obtained in the library were selected, and time course analysis of their gene expression was performed. We observed an upregulation of mkrn1 and cops5 and downregulation of zfp91, ndfip2, ube2f, rnft1, psmb6, and psmd13 at 24 h post-infection. From the results obtained, we surmise that ubiquitination pathway genes may have roles in combating tuberculosis which are yet uncharted. PMID:26403675

  4. Gonococcal porin IB activates NF-kappaB in human urethral epithelium and increases the expression of host antiapoptotic factors.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, Matthew J; Williams, Richard D; Apicella, Michael A

    2004-11-01

    Infection of human urethral epithelial cells (UECs) with Neisseria gonorrhoeae increases the transcription of several host antiapoptotic genes, including bfl-1, cox-2, and c-IAP-2. In order to identify the bacterial factor(s) responsible for eliciting these changes, the transcriptional status of apoptotic machinery was monitored in UECs challenged with certain gonococcal membrane components. Initially, we observed that infection of UECs with gentamicin-killed gonococci increased the expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, bfl-1. This observation indicated that viable, replicating bacteria are not required for induction of antiapoptotic gene expression. Confirming this observation, treatment of UECs with purified gonococcal membrane increased the expression of bfl-1, cox-2, and c-IAP-2. This finding suggested that a factor or multiple factors present in the outer membrane (OM) are responsible for altering UEC antiapoptotic gene expression. Interestingly, treatment of UECs with gonococcal porin IB (PorB IB), a major constituent of the OM, significantly increased the transcription of bfl-1, cox-2, and c-IAP-2. The upregulation of these genes by PorB IB was determined to be dependent on NF-kappaB activation, as inhibiting NF-kappaB blocked induced expression of these genes. This work demonstrates the altered expression of host apoptotic factors in response to gonococcal PorB IB and supports a model whereby UEC cell death may be modulated as a potential mechanism of bacterial survival and proliferation. PMID:15501771

  5. Intra-host competition between nef-defective escape mutants and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Altes, H K; Jansen, V A

    2000-01-01

    Various forms of nef genes with deletions at conserved positions along the sequence have been reported to persist in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients. We investigate the forces maintaining such variants in the proviral population. The main selection pressures are preservation of function and host immune response. The crippled Nef protein might have fewer epitopes, and as such be less visible to the specific immune response, but it will lose some function. Does a trade-off between avoidance of the immune response and loss of function explain the dynamics of the crippled virus found in the patients? To answer this question, we formulated a deterministic model of the virus-host interactions. We found that when the crippled protein presents few epitopes and suffers little loss of function, the two viral types can coexist. Otherwise, the wild-type comes to prevail. The mutant form might initially dominate, but as the selective pressure by the CD84+ T cells decreases over the course of infection, the advantage for the crippled form of losing epitopes disappears. Hence, we go from a situation of coexistence of wild-type and mutant, to a situation of only full-length nef. The results are discussed in the context of the suggested use of live attenuated vaccines having deletions in nef. PMID:10687825

  6. An essential role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in host defense against the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hise, Amy G.; Tomalka, Jeffrey; Ganesan, Sandhya; Patel, Krupen; Hall, Brian A.; Brown, Gordon D.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen causing life-threatening mucosal and systemic infections in immunocompromised humans. Using a murine model of mucosal Candida infection we investigated the role of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β in host-defense to Candida albicans. We find that the synthesis, processing and release of IL-1β in response to Candida are tightly controlled and first require transcriptional induction, followed by a second signal leading to caspase-1 mediated cleavage of the pro-IL1β cytokine. The known fungal pattern recognition receptorsTLR2 and Dectin-1 regulate IL-1β gene transcription, while the NLRP3 containing pro-inflammatory multiprotein complex, the NLRP3 inflammasome, controls caspase-1 mediated cleavage of pro-IL1β. Furthermore, we show that TLR2, Dectin-1 and NLRP3 are essential for defense against dissemination of mucosal infection and mortality in vivo. Therefore, in addition to sensing bacterial and viral pathogens, the NLRP3 inflammasome senses fungal pathogens and is critical in host defense against Candida. PMID:19454352

  7. Ornithodoros (alectorobius) amblus (Acarina: Ixodoidea: Argasidae): identity, marine bird and human hosts, virus infections, and distribution in Peru.

    PubMed

    Clifford, C M; Hoogstraal, H; Radovsky, F J; Stiller, D; Keirans, J E

    1980-04-01

    Ornithodoros (Alectorobius) amblus Chamberlin 1920, adults previously were described inadequately. Practically nothing was known regarding the identity, hosts, distribution, and biology of this species. We redescribe both sexes, describe the nymph and larva, and present criteria for differentiating these stages from those of other members of the O. (A.) capensis group in the Western Hemisphere. Samples were collected from 13 localities on the Pacific coast and on offshore islands of Peru. Hosts recorded are the Peruvian Brown Pelican, Peruvian Booby, Blue-footed Booby, Red-legged Cormorant, Guanay Cormorant, and Inca Tern. These birds are not long-distance migrants and more widely distributed species of the O. (A.) capensis group have not been found parasitizing them. The life cycle is characteristic of the O. (A.) capensis group; the first nymphal instar does or does not feed. Humans are attacked eagerly by O. (A.) amblus and suffer afterward from severe inflammation and "incredible" pruritus, and possibly from more severe illness. Viruses infecting this tick are Punta Salinas (Hughes serogroup, family unclassified) and Huacho (Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, Kemerovo serogroup). Dense tick populations cause breeding birds to desert numerous nests; thus, O. (A.) amblus is economically important to the Peruvian guano industry. Certain spiders and lizards may prey on this tick. PMID:7391872

  8. AhR sensing of bacterial pigments regulates antibacterial defence.

    PubMed

    Moura-Alves, Pedro; Faé, Kellen; Houthuys, Erica; Dorhoi, Anca; Kreuchwig, Annika; Furkert, Jens; Barison, Nicola; Diehl, Anne; Munder, Antje; Constant, Patricia; Skrahina, Tatsiana; Guhlich-Bornhof, Ute; Klemm, Marion; Koehler, Anne-Britta; Bandermann, Silke; Goosmann, Christian; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Hurwitz, Robert; Brinkmann, Volker; Fillatreau, Simon; Daffe, Mamadou; Tümmler, Burkhard; Kolbe, Michael; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Krause, Gerd; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2014-08-28

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly conserved ligand-dependent transcription factor that senses environmental toxins and endogenous ligands, thereby inducing detoxifying enzymes and modulating immune cell differentiation and responses. We hypothesized that AhR evolved to sense not only environmental pollutants but also microbial insults. We characterized bacterial pigmented virulence factors, namely the phenazines from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the naphthoquinone phthiocol from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as ligands of AhR. Upon ligand binding, AhR activation leads to virulence factor degradation and regulated cytokine and chemokine production. The relevance of AhR to host defence is underlined by heightened susceptibility of AhR-deficient mice to both P. aeruginosa and M. tuberculosis. Thus, we demonstrate that AhR senses distinct bacterial virulence factors and controls antibacterial responses, supporting a previously unidentified role for AhR as an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, and identify bacterial pigments as a new class of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PMID:25119038

  9. Prospects for use of microgravity-based bioreactors to study three-dimensional host-tumor interactions in human neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Jessup, J M; Goodwin, T J; Spaulding, G

    1993-03-01

    Microgravity offers unique advantages for the cultivation of mammalian tissues because the lack of gravity-induced sedimentation supports three-dimensional growth in batch culture in aqueous medium. Bioreactors that simulate microgravity but operate in unit gravity provide conditions that permit human epithelial cells to grow to densities approaching 10(7) cells/ml on microcarriers in suspension, in masses up to 1 cm in diameter, and under conditions of low shear stress. While useful for many different applications in tissue culture, this culture system is especially useful for the analysis of the microenvironment in which host matrix and cells interact with infiltrating tumor cells. Growth in the microgravity-based bioreactor has supported morphological differentiation of human colon carcinoma cells when cultured with normal human stromal cells. Furthermore, these co-cultures produced factors that stimulated goblet cell production in normal colon cells in an in vivo bioassay. Early experiments also suggest that the microgravity environment will not alter the ability of epithelial cells to recognize and associate with each other and with constituents of basement membrane and extracellular matrix. These findings suggest that cells grown in bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity or under actual microgravity conditions will produce tissues and substances in sufficient quantity and at high enough concentration to promote characterization of molecules that control differentiation and neoplastic transformation. PMID:8501131

  10. Costs of Inducible Defence along a Resource Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Brönmark, Christer; Lakowitz, Thomas; Nilsson, P. Anders; Ahlgren, Johan; Lennartsdotter, Charlotte; Hollander, Johan

    2012-01-01

    In addition to having constitutive defence traits, many organisms also respond to predation by phenotypic plasticity. In order for plasticity to be adaptive, induced defences should incur a benefit to the organism in, for example, decreased risk of predation. However, the production of defence traits may include costs in fitness components such as growth, time to reproduction, or fecundity. To test the hypothesis that the expression of phenotypic plasticity incurs costs, we performed a common garden experiment with a freshwater snail, Radix balthica, a species known to change morphology in the presence of molluscivorous fish. We measured a number of predator-induced morphological and behavioural defence traits in snails that we reared in the presence or absence of chemical cues from fish. Further, we quantified the costs of plasticity in fitness characters related to fecundity and growth. Since plastic responses may be inhibited under limited resource conditions, we reared snails in different densities and thereby levels of competition. Snails exposed to predator cues grew rounder and thicker shells, traits confirmed to be adaptive in environments with fish. Defence traits were consistently expressed independent of density, suggesting strong selection from predatory molluscivorous fish. However, the expression of defence traits resulted in reduced growth rate and fecundity, particularly with limited resources. Our results suggest full defence in predator related traits regardless of resource availability, and costs of defence consequently paid in traits related to fitness. PMID:22291961

  11. Costs of inducible defence along a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Brönmark, Christer; Lakowitz, Thomas; Nilsson, P Anders; Ahlgren, Johan; Lennartsdotter, Charlotte; Hollander, Johan

    2012-01-01

    In addition to having constitutive defence traits, many organisms also respond to predation by phenotypic plasticity. In order for plasticity to be adaptive, induced defences should incur a benefit to the organism in, for example, decreased risk of predation. However, the production of defence traits may include costs in fitness components such as growth, time to reproduction, or fecundity. To test the hypothesis that the expression of phenotypic plasticity incurs costs, we performed a common garden experiment with a freshwater snail, Radix balthica, a species known to change morphology in the presence of molluscivorous fish. We measured a number of predator-induced morphological and behavioural defence traits in snails that we reared in the presence or absence of chemical cues from fish. Further, we quantified the costs of plasticity in fitness characters related to fecundity and growth. Since plastic responses may be inhibited under limited resource conditions, we reared snails in different densities and thereby levels of competition. Snails exposed to predator cues grew rounder and thicker shells, traits confirmed to be adaptive in environments with fish. Defence traits were consistently expressed independent of density, suggesting strong selection from predatory molluscivorous fish. However, the expression of defence traits resulted in reduced growth rate and fecundity, particularly with limited resources. Our results suggest full defence in predator related traits regardless of resource availability, and costs of defence consequently paid in traits related to fitness. PMID:22291961

  12. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  13. Natural and human induced factors influencing the abundance of Schistosoma host snails in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Monde, Concillia; Syampungani, Stephen; van den Brink, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a global public health problem affecting about 240 million people. In Zambia, 2 million are infected while 3 million live with the risk of getting infected. Research and interventions relating to schistosomiasis are mainly linked to disease epidemiology. Malacological and ecological aspects of the disease are superficially understood. Developing effective control measures requires an understanding of interacting environmental and socioeconomic factors of host snails vis-a-vis schistosomiasis. Therefore, the present work involved collecting social and environmental data in a large field study in two zones in Zambia that are different in terms of temperature and rainfall amounts. Social data collected through questionnaires included demographic, educational and knowledge of schistosomiasis disease dynamics. Environmental data included physicochemical factors, aquatic plants and snails. Gender (P < 0.001) significantly influences livelihood strategies, while age (P = 0.069) and level of education (P = 0.086) have a moderate influence in zone I. In zone III, none of these factors (age, P = 0.378; gender, P = 0.311; education, P = 0.553) play a significant role. Environmental parameters explained 43 and 41 % variation in species composition for zones I and III, respectively. Most respondents' (52 %, 87 %) perception is that there are more cases of bilharzia in hot season than in other seasons (rainy season 23 %, 7 %; cold season 8 %, 0 % and year round 17 %, 6 %) for zone I and zone III, respectively. PMID:27230422

  14. Dysregulation of host cellular genes targeted by human papillomavirus (HPV) integration contributes to HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiyang; Shen, Congle; Zhao, Lijun; Wang, Jianliu; McCrae, Malcolm; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2016-03-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) viral DNA into the human genome has been postulated as an important etiological event during cervical carcinogenesis. Several recent reports suggested a possible role for such integration-targeted cellular genes (ITGs) in cervical carcinogenesis. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of HPV integration events was undertaken using data collected from 14 publications, with 499 integration loci on human chromosomes included. It revealed that HPV DNA preferred to integrate into intragenic regions and gene-dense regions of human chromosomes. Intriguingly, the host cellular genes nearby the integration sites were found to be more transcriptionally active compared with control. Furthermore, analysis of the integration sites in the human genome revealed that there were several integration hotspots although all chromosomes were represented. The ITGs identified were found to be enriched in tumor-related terms and pathways using gene ontology and KEGG analysis. In line with this, three of six ITGs tested were found aberrantly expressed in cervical cancer tissues. Among them, it was demonstrated for the first time that MPPED2 could induce HeLa cell and SiHa cell G1/S transition block and cell proliferation retardation. Moreover, "knocking out" the integrated HPV fragment in HeLa cell line decreased expression of MYC located ∼500 kb downstream of the integration site, which provided the first experimental evidence supporting the hypothesis that integrated HPV fragment influence MYC expression via long distance chromatin interaction. Overall, the results of this comprehensive analysis implicated that dysregulation of ITGs caused by viral integration as possibly having an etiological involvement in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:26417997

  15. Identification of host miRNAs that may limit human rhinovirus replication

    PubMed Central

    Bondanese, Victor Paky; Francisco-Garcia, Ana; Bedke, Nicole; Davies, Donna E; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether the replication of human rhinovirus (HRV) is regulated by microRNAs in human bronchial epithelial cells. METHODS: For the present study, the human cell line BEAS-2B (derived from normal human bronchial epithelial cells) was adopted. DICER knock-down, by siRNA transfection in BEAS-2B cells, was performed in order to inhibit microRNA maturation globally. Alternatively, antisense oligonucleotides (anti-miRs) were transfected to inhibit the activity of specific microRNAs. Cells were infected with HRV-1B. Viral replication was assessed by measuring the genomic viral RNA by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Association between microRNA-induced-silencing-complex and viral RNA was detected by Ago2 co-immunoprecipitation followed by RT-qPCR. Targetscan v.6 was used to predict microRNA target sites on several HRV strains. RESULTS: Here, we show that microRNAs affect replication of HRV-1B. DICER knock-down significantly reduced the expression of mature microRNAs in a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) and in turn, increased the synthesis of HRV-1B RNA. Additionally, HRV-1B RNA co-immunoprecipitated with argonaute 2 protein, an important effector for microRNA activity suggesting that microRNAs bind to viral RNA during infection. In order to identify specific microRNAs involved in this interaction, we employed bioinformatics analysis, and selected a group of microRNAs that have been reported to be under-expressed in asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells and were predicted to target different strains of rhinoviruses (HRV-1B, -16, -14, -27). Our results suggest that, out of this group of microRNAs, miR-128 and miR-155 contribute to the innate defense against HRV-1B: transfection of specific anti-miRs increased viral replication, as anticipated in-silico. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results suggest that pathological changes in microRNA expression, as already reported for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary

  16. Characteristics and Quantities of HIV Host Cells in Human Genital Tract Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Politch, Joseph A.; Marathe, Jai; Anderson, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected leukocytes have been detected in genital secretions from HIV-infected men and women and may play an important role in the sexual transmission of HIV. However, they have been largely overlooked in studies on mechanisms of HIV transmission and in the design and testing of HIV vaccine and microbicide candidates. This article describes the characteristics and quantities of leukocytes in male and female genital secretions under various conditions and also reviews evidence for the involvement of HIV-infected cells in both horizontal and vertical cell-associated HIV transmission. Additional research is needed in this area to better target HIV prevention strategies. PMID:25414414

  17. Interspecies chimeric complementation for the generation of functional human tissues and organs in large animal hosts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The past decade's rapid progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) research has generated hope for meeting the rising demand of organ donation, which remains the only effective cure for end-stage organ failure, a major cause of death worldwide. Despite the potential, generation of transplantable organs from hPSCs using in vitro differentiation is far-fetched. An in vivo interspecies chimeric complementation strategy relying on chimeric-competent hPSCs and zygote genome editing provides an auspicious alternative for providing unlimited organ source for transplantation. PMID:26820411

  18. Immune recognition of Onchocerca volvulus proteins in the human host and animal models of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Manchang, T K; Ajonina-Ekoti, I; Ndjonka, D; Eisenbarth, A; Achukwi, M D; Renz, A; Brattig, N W; Liebau, E; Breloer, M

    2015-05-01

    Onchocerca volvulus is a tissue-dwelling, vector-borne nematode parasite of humans and is the causative agent of onchocerciasis or river blindness. Natural infections of BALB/c mice with Litomosoides sigmodontis and of cattle with Onchocerca ochengi were used as models to study the immune responses to O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins (OvALT-2, OvNLT-1, Ov103 and Ov7). The humoral immune response of O. volvulus-infected humans against OvALT-2, OvNLT-1 and Ov7 revealed pronounced immunoglobulin G (IgG) titres which were, however, significantly lower than against the lysate of O. volvulus adult female worms. Sera derived from patients displaying the hyperreactive form of onchocerciasis showed a uniform trend of higher IgG reactivity both to the single proteins and the O. volvulus lysate. Sera derived from L. sigmodontis-infected mice and from calves exposed to O. ochengi transmission in a hyperendemic area also contained IgM and IgG1 specific for O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins. These results strongly suggest that L. sigmodontis-specific and O. ochengi-specific immunoglobulins elicited during natural infection of mice and cattle cross-reacted with O. volvulus-derived recombinant antigens. Monitoring O. ochengi-infected calves over a 26-month period, provided a comprehensive kinetic of the humoral response to infection that was strictly correlated with parasite load and occurrence of microfilariae. PMID:24721822

  19. Generation of Functional Thymic Epithelium from Human Embryonic Stem Cells that Supports Host T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Audrey V.; Russ, Holger A.; Khan, Imran S.; LaFlam, Taylor N.; Metzger, Todd C.; Anderson, Mark S.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Inducing immune tolerance to prevent rejection is a key step toward successful engraftment of stem-cell-derived tissue in a clinical setting. Using human pluripotent stem cells to generate thymic epithelial cells (TECs) capable of supporting T cell development represents a promising approach to reach this goal; however, progress toward generating functional TECs has been limited. Here, we describe a robust in vitro method to direct differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) by precise regulation of TGFβ, BMP4, RA, Wnt, Shh, and FGF signaling. The hESC-derived TEPs further mature into functional TECs that support T cell development upon transplantation into thymus-deficient mice. Importantly, the engrafted TEPs produce T cells capable of in vitro proliferation as well as in vivo immune responses. Thus, hESC-derived TEP grafts may have broad applications for enhancing engraftment in cell-based therapies as well as restoring age-and stress-related thymic decline. PMID:23684540

  20. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Zhao, Ting; Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  1. Role of primary human alveolar epithelial cells in host defense against Francisella tularensis infection.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-08-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-kappaB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-kappaB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  2. Role of Primary Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells in Host Defense against Francisella tularensis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B.; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-κB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-κB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  3. Human papillomavirus in the HIV-infected host: epidemiology and pathogenesis in the antiretroviral era.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Cristina; Palefsky, Joel M

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with essentially all cervical cancers, 80-90 % of anal cancers, and a high proportion of oropharyngeal, vaginal, penile, and vulvar cancers. Malignancy is preceded by the development of precancerous lesions termed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk of HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of anal cancer in particular has markedly risen during the antiretroviral era due to the increased longevity of patients with HIV and the absence of anal malignancy screening programs. HIV infection may facilitate initial HPV infection by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions. Once infection is established, HIV may promote HSIL development via the up-regulation of HPV oncogene expression and impairment of the immune response needed to clear the lesion. HIV-infected women should be screened for cervical HSIL and cancer, and HIV-infected men and women should be considered for anal screening programs. PMID:25644977

  4. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  5. The single functional blast resistance gene Pi54 activates a complex defence mechanism in rice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Rai, Amit Kumar; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh; Chand, Duni; Singh, Nagendera Kumar; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2012-01-01

    The Pi54 gene (Pi-k(h)) confers a high degree of resistance to diverse strains of the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to understand the genome-wide co-expression of genes in the transgenic rice plant Taipei 309 (TP) containing the Pi54 gene, microarray analysis was performed at 72 h post-inoculation of the M. oryzae strain PLP-1. A total of 1154 differentially expressing genes were identified in TP-Pi54 plants. Of these, 587 were up-regulated, whereas 567 genes were found to be down-regulated. 107 genes were found that were exclusively up-regulated and 58 genes that were down- regulated in the case of TP-Pi54. Various defence response genes, such as callose, laccase, PAL, and peroxidase, and genes related to transcription factors like NAC6, Dof zinc finger, MAD box, bZIP, and WRKY were found to be up-regulated in the transgenic line. The enzymatic activities of six plant defence response enzymes, such as peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, β-glucosidase, β-1,3-glucanase, and chitinase, were found to be significantly high in TP-Pi54 at different stages of inoculation by M. oryzae. The total phenol content also increased significantly in resistant transgenic plants after pathogen inoculation. This study suggests the activation of defence response and transcription factor-related genes and a higher expression of key enzymes involved in the defence response pathway in the rice line TP-Pi54, thus leading to incompatible host-pathogen interaction. PMID:22058403

  6. Serum opsonin ficolin-A enhances host-fungal interactions and modulates cytokine expression from human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils following Aspergillus fumigatus challenge.

    PubMed

    Bidula, Stefan; Sexton, Darren W; Schelenz, Silke

    2016-04-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a devastating invasive fungal disease associated with a high mortality rate in the immunocompromised, such as leukaemia patients, transplant patients and those with HIV/AIDS. The rodent serum orthologue of human L-ficolin, ficolin-A, can bind to and opsonize Aspergillus fumigatus, the pathogen that causes invasive aspergillosis, and may participate in fungal defence. Using human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils isolated from healthy donors, we investigated conidial association and fungal viability by flow cytometry and microscopy. Additionally, cytokine production was measured via cytometric bead arrays. Ficolin-A opsonization was observed to significantly enhance association of conidia, while also inhibiting hyphal growth and contributing to increased fungal killing following incubation with monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils. Additionally, ficolin-A opsonization was capable of manifesting a decrease in IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α production from MDM and IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α from neutrophils 24 h post-infection. In conclusion, rodent ficolin-A is functionally comparable to human L-ficolin and is capable of modulating the innate immune response to A. fumigatus, down-regulating cytokine production and could play an important role in airway immunity. PMID:26337048

  7. Variation in Pseudonocardia antibiotic defence helps govern parasite-induced morbidity in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Michael; Cafaro, Matías J.; Erhardt, Daniel P.; Little, Ainslie E. F.; Gerardo, Nicole M.; Tebbets, Brad; Klein, Bruce S.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Host–parasite associations are potentially shaped by evolutionary reciprocal selection dynamics, in which parasites evolve to overcome host defences and hosts are selected to counteract these through the evolution of new defences. This is expected to result in variation in parasite-defence interactions, and the evolution of resistant parasites causing increased virulence. Fungus-growing ants maintain antibiotic-producing Pseudonocardia (Actinobacteria) that aid in protection against specialized parasites of the ants’ fungal gardens, and current evidence indicates that both symbionts have been associated with the ants for millions of years. Here we examine the extent of variation in the defensive capabilities of the ant–actinobacterial association against Escovopsis (parasite-defence interactions), and evaluate how variation impacts colonies of fungus-growing ants. We focus on five species of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants, crossing 12 strains of Pseudonocardia with 12 strains of Escovopsis in a Petri plate bioassay experiment, and subsequently conduct subcolony infection experiments using resistant and non-resistant parasite strains. Diversity in parasite-defence interactions, including pairings where the parasites are resistant, suggests that chemical variation in the antibiotics produced by different actinobacterial strains are responsible for the observed variation in parasite susceptibility. By evaluating the role this variation plays during infection, we show that infection of ant subcolonies with resistant parasite strains results in significantly higher parasite-induced morbidity with respect to garden biomass loss. Our findings thus further establish the role of Pseudonocardia-derived antibiotics in helping defend the ants’ fungus garden from the parasite Escovopsis, and provide evidence that small molecules can play important roles as antibiotics in a natural system. PMID:22896766

  8. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in Human Breast Milk: Influence of Antibiotherapy and Other Host and Clinical Factors

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ana; Martín, Virginia; Jiménez, Esther; Mader, Isabelle; Rodríguez, Juan M.; Fernández, Leonides

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this work was to study the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria population in human milk of healthy women, and to investigate the influence that several factors (including antibioteraphy during pregnancy and lactation, country and date of birth, delivery mode, or infant age) may exert on such population. Methods: A total of 160 women living in Germany or Austria provided the breast milk samples. Initially, 66 samples were randomly selected and cultured on MRS-Cys agar plates. Then, the presence of DNA from the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and from most of the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species that were isolated, was assessed by qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using genus- and species-specific primers. Results: Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria could be isolated from the milk of 27 (40.91%) and 7 (10.61%), respectively, of the 66 cultured samples. On the contrary, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium sequences were detected by PCR in 108 (67.50%) and 41 (25.62%), respectively, of the 160 samples analyzed. The Lactobacillus species most frequently isolated and detected was L salivarius (35.00%), followed by L fermentum (25.00%) and L gasseri (21.88%), whereas B breve (13.75%) was the bifidobacterial species most commonly recovered and whose DNA was most regularly found. The number of lactobacilli- or bifidobacteria-positive samples was significantly lower in women who had received antibiotherapy during pregnancy or lactation. Conclusions: Our results suggest that either the presence of lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria or their DNA may constitute good markers of a healthy human milk microbiota that has not been altered by the use of antibiotics. PMID:24590211

  9. Infection of Burkholderia cepacia Induces Homeostatic Responses in the Host for Their Prolonged Survival: The Microarray Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Thimma, Jaikumar; Hashim, Onn Haji; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic human pathogen associated with life-threatening pulmonary infections in immunocompromised individuals. Pathogenesis of B. cepacia infection involves adherence, colonisation, invasion, survival and persistence in the host. In addition, B. cepacia are also known to secrete factors, which are associated with virulence in the pathogenesis of the infection. In this study, the host factor that may be the cause of the infection was elucidated in human epithelial cell line, A549, that was exposed to live B. cepacia (mid-log phase) and its secretory proteins (mid-log and early-stationary phases) using the Illumina Human Ref-8 microarray platform. The non-infection A549 cells were used as a control. Expression of the host genes that are related to apoptosis, inflammation and cell cycle as well as metabolic pathways were differentially regulated during the infection. Apoptosis of the host cells and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines were found to be inhibited by both live B. cepacia and its secretory proteins. In contrast, the host cell cycle and metabolic processes, particularly glycolysis/glycogenesis and fatty acid metabolism were transcriptionally up-regulated during the infection. Our microarray analysis provided preliminary insights into mechanisms of B. cepacia pathogenesis. The understanding of host response to an infection would provide novel therapeutic targets both for enhancing the host’s defences and repressing detrimental responses induced by the invading pathogen. PMID:24116227

  10. Role for the Ankyrin eukaryotic-like genes of Legionella pneumophila in parasitism of protozoan hosts and human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Habyarimana, Fabien; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Kalia, Awdhesh; Graham, James E; Price, Christopher T; Garcia, Maria Teresa; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2008-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous organism in the aquatic environment where it is capable of invasion and intracellular proliferation within various protozoan species and is also capable of causing pneumonia in humans. In silico analysis showed that the three sequenced L. pneumophila genomes each contained a common multigene family of 11 ankyrin (ank) genes encoding proteins with approximately 30-35 amino acid tandem Ankyrin repeats that are involved in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic cells. To examine whether the ank genes are involved in tropism of protozoan hosts, we have constructed isogenic mutants of L. pneumophila in ten of the ank genes. Among the mutants, the DeltaankH and DeltaankJ mutants exhibit significant defects in robust intracellular replication within A. polyphaga, Hartmanella vermiformis and Tetrahymena pyriformis. A similar defect is also exhibited in human macrophages. Most of the ank genes are upregulated by L. pneumophila upon growth transition into the post-exponential phase in vitro and within Acanthamoeba polyphaga, and this upregulation is mediated, at least in part, by RpoS. Single-cell analyses have shown that upon co-infection of the wild-type strain with the ankH or ankJ mutant, the replication defect of the mutant is rescued within communal phagosomes harbouring the wild-type strain, similar to dot/icm mutants. Therefore, at least two of the L. pneumophila eukaryotic-like Ank proteins play a role in intracellular replication of L. pneumophila within amoeba, ciliated protozoa and human macrophages. The Ank proteins may not be involved in host tropism in the aquatic environment. Many of the L. pneumophila eukaryotic-like ank genes are triggered upon growth transition into post-exponential phase in vitro as well as within A. polyphaga. Our data suggest a role for AnkH and AnkJ in modulation of phagosome biogenesis by L. pneumophila independent of evasion of lysosomal fusion and recruitment of the rough endoplasmic

  11. Rhodococcus equi--an emerging human pathogen in immunocompromized hosts: a report of four cases from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Puthucheary, S D; Sangkar, V; Hafeez, Asma; Karunakaran, R; Raja, Nadeem S; Hassan, H H

    2006-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, a recognized pathogen in horses, is emerging as a human opportunistic pathogen, especially in immunocompromized hosts. We describe four immunocompromized patients who had serious R. equi infections with an overall mortality of 75%. The natural habitat of R. equi is soil, particularly soil contaminated with animal manure. Necrotizing pneumonia is the commonest form of infection but extrapulmonary infections, such as wound infections and subcutaneous abscess, have also been described in humans. R. equi is cultured easily in ordinary non-selective media. Large, smooth, irregular colonies appear within 48 hours. It is a facultative, intracellular, nonmotile, non-spore forming, gram-positive coccobacillus, which is weakly acid-fast staining and bears a similarity to diphtheroids. It forms a salmon-colored pigment usually after 48 hours incubation. A particular characteristic of this organism is that it undergoes synergistic hemolysis with some bacteria on sheep blood agar. R. equi may be misidentified as diphtheroids, Mycobacterium species, or Nocardia. In vitro R. equi is usually susceptible to erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, aminoglycosides, rifampin, imipenem and meropenem. The organism can be difficult to eradicate, making treatment challenging. Increased awareness of the infection may help with early diagnosis and timely treatment. PMID:16771229

  12. Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M.

    2011-05-25

    The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

  13. Broad host range of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 demonstrated with an improved pseudotyping system.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R E; Littman, D R

    1996-01-01

    Studies of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) have been hampered by the difficulty of achieving high cell-free and cell-associated infectious titers. Current retroviral pseudotyping systems using the HTLV-1 envelope generate titers of less than 200 infectious particles per ml. We describe here an improved system for pseudotyping using a defective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 genome in combination with HTLV-1 env in 293T producer cells. Introduction of additional copies of rev and treatment of cells with sodium butyrate resulted in a cell-associated titer of 10(5)/ml and cell-free titers of greater than 10(4)/ml . By using this system, we found that the host range of HTLV-1 is even greater than previously suspected. Earlier studies which assigned a chromosomal location for the HTLV-1 receptor may therefore reflect cell-to-cell variation in receptor number rather than the absolute presence or absence of a receptor. The generation of higher-titer HIV(HTLV-1) may facilitate identification of the cellular receptor and investigations of the pathophysiology of HTLV-1 infection. PMID:8794391

  14. Host and viral features of human dengue cases shape the population of infected and infectious Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Nguyet, Minh Nguyen; Duong, Thi Hue Kien; Trung, Vu Tuan; Nguyen, Than Ha Quyen; Tran, Chau N B; Long, Vo Thi; Dui, Le Thi; Nguyen, Hoa Lan; Farrar, Jeremy J; Holmes, Edward C; Rabaa, Maia A; Bryant, Juliet E; Nguyen, Truong Thanh; Nguyen, Huong Thi Cam; Nguyen, Lan Thi Hong; Pham, Mai Phuong; Nguyen, Hung The; Luong, Tai Thi Hue; Wills, Bridget; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron P

    2013-05-28

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease of humans. The host and virus variables associated with dengue virus (DENV) transmission from symptomatic dengue cases (n = 208) to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes during 407 independent exposure events was defined. The 50% mosquito infectious dose for each of DENV-1-4 ranged from 6.29 to 7.52 log10 RNA copies/mL of plasma. Increasing day of illness, declining viremia, and rising antibody titers were independently associated with reduced risk of DENV transmission. High early DENV plasma viremia levels in patients were a marker of the duration of human infectiousness, and blood meals containing high concentrations of DENV were positively associated with the prevalence of infectious mosquitoes 14 d after blood feeding. Ambulatory dengue cases had lower viremia levels compared with hospitalized dengue cases but nonetheless at levels predicted to be infectious to mosquitoes. These data define serotype-specific viremia levels that vaccines or drugs must inhibit to prevent DENV transmission. PMID:23674683

  15. Phase variable type III restriction-modification systems of host-adapted bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kate L; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Jennings, Michael P

    2007-09-01

    Phase variation, the high-frequency on/off switching of gene expression, is a common feature of host-adapted bacterial pathogens. Restriction-modification (R-M) systems, which are ubiquitous among bacteria, are classically assigned the role of cellular defence against invasion of foreign DNA. These enzymes are not obvious candidates for phase variable expression, a characteristic usually associated with surface-expressed molecules subject to host immune selection. Despite this, numerous type III R-M systems in bacterial pathogens contain repetitive DNA motifs that suggest the potential for phase variation. Several roles have been proposed for phase variable R-M systems based on DNA restriction function. However, there is now evidence in several important human pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that these systems are 'phasevarions' (phase variable regulons) controlling expression of multiple genes via a novel epigenetic mechanism. PMID:17714447

  16. Influenza A virus nucleoprotein induces apoptosis in human airway epithelial cells: implications of a novel interaction between nucleoprotein and host protein Clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, S; Batra, J; Cao, W; Sharma, K; Patel, J R; Ranjan, P; Kumar, A; Katz, J M; Cox, N J; Lal, R B; Sambhara, S; Lal, S K

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis induction is an antiviral host response, however, influenza A virus (IAV) infection promotes host cell death. The nucleoprotein (NP) of IAV is known to contribute to viral pathogenesis, but its role in virus-induced host cell death was hitherto unknown. We observed that NP contributes to IAV infection induced cell death and heterologous expression of NP alone can induce apoptosis in human airway epithelial cells. The apoptotic effect of IAV NP was significant when compared with other known proapoptotic proteins of IAV. The cell death induced by IAV NP was executed through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. We screened host cellular factors for those that may be targeted by NP for inducing apoptosis and identified human antiapoptotic protein Clusterin (CLU) as a novel interacting partner. The interaction between IAV NP and CLU was highly conserved and mediated through β-chain of the CLU protein. Also CLU was found to interact specifically with IAV NP and not with any other known apoptosis modulatory protein of IAV. CLU prevents induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by binding to Bax and inhibiting its movement into the mitochondria. We found that the expression of IAV NP reduced the association between CLU and Bax in mammalian cells. Further, we observed that CLU overexpression attenuated NP-induced cell death and had a negative effect on IAV replication. Collectively, these findings indicate a new function for IAV NP in inducing host cell death and suggest a role for the host antiapoptotic protein CLU in this process. PMID:23538443

  17. Human calprotectin is an iron-sequestering host-defense protein.

    PubMed

    Nakashige, Toshiki G; Zhang, Bo; Krebs, Carsten; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-10-01

    Human calprotectin (CP) is a metal-chelating antimicrobial protein of the innate immune response. The current working model states that CP sequesters manganese and zinc from pathogens. We report the discovery that CP chelates iron and deprives bacteria of this essential nutrient. Elemental analysis of CP-treated growth medium establishes that CP reduces the concentrations of manganese, iron and zinc. Microbial growth studies reveal that iron depletion by CP contributes to the growth inhibition of bacterial pathogens. Biochemical investigations demonstrate that CP coordinates Fe(II) at an unusual hexahistidine motif, and the Mössbauer spectrum of (57)Fe(II)-bound CP is consistent with coordination of high-spin Fe(II) at this site (δ = 1.20 mm/s, ΔEQ = 1.78 mm/s). In the presence of Ca(II), CP turns on its iron-sequestering function and exhibits subpicomolar affinity for Fe(II). Our findings expand the biological coordination chemistry of iron and support a previously unappreciated role for CP in mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:26302479

  18. Human Calprotectin Is an Iron-Sequestering Host-Defense Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nakashige, Toshiki G.; Zhang, Bo; Krebs, Carsten; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Human calprotectin (CP) is a metal-chelating antimicrobial protein of the innate immune response. The current working model states that CP sequesters manganese and zinc from pathogens. We report the discovery that CP chelates iron and deprives bacteria of this essential nutrient. Elemental analysis of CP-treated growth medium establishes that CP reduces the concentrations of manganese, iron, and zinc. Microbial growth studies reveal that iron depletion by CP contributes to the growth inhibition of bacterial pathogens. Biochemical investigations demonstrate that CP coordinates Fe(II) at an unusual hexahistidine motif, and the Mössbauer spectrum of 57Fe(II)-bound CP is consistent with coordination of high-spin Fe(II) at this site (δ = 1.20 mm/s, ΔEQ = 1.78 mm/s). In the presence of Ca(II), CP turns on its iron-sequestering function and exhibits sub-picomolar affinity for Fe(II). Our findings expand the biological coordination chemistry of iron and support a previously unappreciated role for CP in mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:26302479

  19. Human Transbodies to HCV NS3/4A Protease Inhibit Viral Replication and Restore Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jittavisutthikul, Surasak; Seesuay, Watee; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thueng-in, Kanyarat; Srimanote, Potjanee; Werner, Rolf G.; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective direct acting anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) agent is still needed. In this study, human single chain variable fragments of antibody (scFvs) that bound to HCV NS3/4A protein were produced by phage display technology. The engineered scFvs were linked to nonaarginines (R9) for making them cell penetrable. HCV-RNA-transfected Huh7 cells treated with the transbodies produced from four different transformed E. coli clones had reduced HCV-RNA inside the cells and in the cell spent media, as well as fewer HCV foci in the cell monolayer compared to the transfected cells in culture medium alone. The transbodies-treated transfected cells also had up-expression of the genes coding for the host innate immune response, including TRIF, TRAF3, IRF3, IL-28B, and IFN-β. Computerized homology modeling and intermolecular docking predicted that the effective transbodies interacted with several critical residues of the NS3/4A protease, including those that form catalytic triads, oxyanion loop, and S1 and S6 pockets, as well as a zinc-binding site. Although insight into molecular mechanisms of the transbodies need further laboratory investigation, it can be deduced from the current data that the transbodies blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activities, leading to the HCV replication inhibition and restoration of the virally suppressed host innate immunity. The engineered antibodies should be tested further for treatment of HCV infection either alone, in combination with current therapeutics, or in a mixture with their cognates specific to other HCV proteins. PMID:27617013

  20. The PadR-like transcriptional regulator LftR ensures efficient invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into human host cells.

    PubMed

    Kaval, Karan G; Hahn, Birgitt; Tusamda, Nayana; Albrecht, Dirk; Halbedel, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes into human host cells requires specialized surface molecules for attachment and induction of phagocytosis. However, efficient invasion is also dependent on factors with house-keeping functions, such as SecA2-dependent secretion of autolysins for post-divisional segregation of daughter cells. Mutations in this pathway prevent degradation of peptidoglycan cross-walls, so that long cell chains are formed that cannot be phagocytosed. The extreme chaining of such mutants manifests as rough colony phenotype. One rough clone was isolated from a transposon library with a transposon insertion in the uncharacterized lmo0720 gene (lftS) together with a spontaneous point mutation in the secA2 gene. We separated both mutations and demonstrated that this point mutation in the intramolecular regulator 2 domain of SecA2 was sufficient to inactivate the protein. In contrast, lftS deletion did not cause a ΔsecA2-like phenotype. lftS is located in an operon with lftR (lmo0719), encoding a PadR-like transcriptional regulator, and lftR deletion affected growth, invasion and day-light dependent coordination of swarming. Inactivation of lftS partially suppressed these phenotypes, suggesting a functional relationship between LftR and LftS. However, the invasion defect of the ΔlftR mutant was only marginally suppressed by lftS removal. LftR regulates expression of the lmo0979-0980 (lieAB) operon, encoding a putative multidrug resistance transporter and lieAB transcription was strongly upregulated in the absence of LftR. Deletion of lieAB in the ΔlftR background restores wild type-like invasion levels. Hence, we conclude that tight transcriptional repression of the lieAB operon is essential for efficient listerial host cell invasion. PMID:26284051

  1. Human Transbodies to HCV NS3/4A Protease Inhibit Viral Replication and Restore Host Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Jittavisutthikul, Surasak; Seesuay, Watee; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thueng-In, Kanyarat; Srimanote, Potjanee; Werner, Rolf G; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective direct acting anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) agent is still needed. In this study, human single chain variable fragments of antibody (scFvs) that bound to HCV NS3/4A protein were produced by phage display technology. The engineered scFvs were linked to nonaarginines (R9) for making them cell penetrable. HCV-RNA-transfected Huh7 cells treated with the transbodies produced from four different transformed E. coli clones had reduced HCV-RNA inside the cells and in the cell spent media, as well as fewer HCV foci in the cell monolayer compared to the transfected cells in culture medium alone. The transbodies-treated transfected cells also had up-expression of the genes coding for the host innate immune response, including TRIF, TRAF3, IRF3, IL-28B, and IFN-β. Computerized homology modeling and intermolecular docking predicted that the effective transbodies interacted with several critical residues of the NS3/4A protease, including those that form catalytic triads, oxyanion loop, and S1 and S6 pockets, as well as a zinc-binding site. Although insight into molecular mechanisms of the transbodies need further laboratory investigation, it can be deduced from the current data that the transbodies blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activities, leading to the HCV replication inhibition and restoration of the virally suppressed host innate immunity. The engineered antibodies should be tested further for treatment of HCV infection either alone, in combination with current therapeutics, or in a mixture with their cognates specific to other HCV proteins. PMID:27617013

  2. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    XUE, LUCHEN; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; WANG, SHANG

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the roles played by various genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in neoplasms, including anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). However, the specific regulatory mechanisms involving these genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, associated biological factors (miRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes) from existing studies of human AA were combined methodically through the interactions between genes and miRNAs, as opposed to studying one or several. Three regulatory networks, including abnormally expressed, related and global networks were constructed with the aim of identifying significant gene and miRNA pathways. Each network is composed of three associations between miRNAs targeted at genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs located on their host genes. Among these, the abnormally expressed network, which involves the pathways of previously identified abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs, partially indicated the regulatory mechanism underlying AA. The network contains numerous abnormal regulation associations when AA emerges. By modifying the abnormally expressed network factors to a normal expression pattern, the faulty regulation may be corrected and tumorigenesis of AA may be prevented. Certain specific pathways are highlighted in AA, for example PTEN which is targeted by miR-21 and miR-106b, regulates miR-25 which in turn targets TP53. PTEN and miR-21 have been observed to form feedback loops. Furthermore, by comparing and analyzing the pathway predecessors and successors of abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs in three networks, similarities and differences of regulatory pathways may be identified and proposed. In summary, the present study aids in elucidating the occurrence, mechanism, prevention and treatment of AA. These results may aid further investigation into therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:27347075

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Britta; Krautkrämer, Ellen; Tibroni, Nadine; Munte, Claudia E; Rauch, Susanne; Leibrecht, Iris; Glass, Bärbel; Breuer, Sebastian; Geyer, Matthias; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Wieland, Felix T; Fackler, Oliver T

    2007-01-01

    Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo. PMID:17908312

  4. The PadR-like transcriptional regulator LftR ensures efficient invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into human host cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaval, Karan G.; Hahn, Birgitt; Tusamda, Nayana; Albrecht, Dirk; Halbedel, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes into human host cells requires specialized surface molecules for attachment and induction of phagocytosis. However, efficient invasion is also dependent on factors with house-keeping functions, such as SecA2-dependent secretion of autolysins for post-divisional segregation of daughter cells. Mutations in this pathway prevent degradation of peptidoglycan cross-walls, so that long cell chains are formed that cannot be phagocytosed. The extreme chaining of such mutants manifests as rough colony phenotype. One rough clone was isolated from a transposon library with a transposon insertion in the uncharacterized lmo0720 gene (lftS) together with a spontaneous point mutation in the secA2 gene. We separated both mutations and demonstrated that this point mutation in the intramolecular regulator 2 domain of SecA2 was sufficient to inactivate the protein. In contrast, lftS deletion did not cause a ΔsecA2-like phenotype. lftS is located in an operon with lftR (lmo0719), encoding a PadR-like transcriptional regulator, and lftR deletion affected growth, invasion and day-light dependent coordination of swarming. Inactivation of lftS partially suppressed these phenotypes, suggesting a functional relationship between LftR and LftS. However, the invasion defect of the ΔlftR mutant was only marginally suppressed by lftS removal. LftR regulates expression of the lmo0979–0980 (lieAB) operon, encoding a putative multidrug resistance transporter and lieAB transcription was strongly upregulated in the absence of LftR. Deletion of lieAB in the ΔlftR background restores wild type-like invasion levels. Hence, we conclude that tight transcriptional repression of the lieAB operon is essential for efficient listerial host cell invasion. PMID:26284051

  5. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry)-based Detection of Global Pathogen-host AMPylation on Self-assembled Human Protein Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; Woolery, Andrew R.; Luong, Phi; Hao, Yi Heng; Grammel, Markus; Westcott, Nathan; Park, Jin; Wang, Jie; Bian, Xiaofang; Demirkan, Gokhan; Hang, Howard C.; Orth, Kim; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) is a recently discovered mechanism employed by infectious bacteria to regulate host cell signaling. However, despite significant effort, only a few host targets have been identified, limiting our understanding of how these pathogens exploit this mechanism to control host cells. Accordingly, we developed a novel nonradioactive AMPylation screening platform using high-density cell-free protein microarrays displaying human proteins produced by human translational machinery. We screened 10,000 unique human proteins with Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopS and Histophilus somni IbpAFic2, and identified many new AMPylation substrates. Two of these, Rac2, and Rac3, were confirmed in vivo as bona fide substrates during infection with Vibrio parahaemolyticus. We also mapped the site of AMPylation of a non-GTPase substrate, LyGDI, to threonine 51, in a region regulated by Src kinase, and demonstrated that AMPylation prevented its phosphorylation by Src. Our results greatly expanded the repertoire of potential host substrates for bacterial AMPylators, determined their recognition motif, and revealed the first pathogen-host interaction AMPylation network. This approach can be extended to identify novel substrates of AMPylators with different domains or in different species and readily adapted for other post-translational modifications. PMID:25073739

  6. Clostridium difficile-mediated effects on human intestinal epithelia: Modelling host-pathogen interactions in a vertical diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Nazila V; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel P; Allan, Elaine; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the leading causes of healthcare associated diarrhoea in the developed world. Although the contribution of C. difficile toxins to disease pathogenesis is now well understood, many facets of host-pathogen interactions between the human intestinal epithelia and the C. difficile bacterium that may contribute to asymptomatic carriage and/or clinical disease remain less clear. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that C. difficile strains mediate intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) antimicrobial immunity via toxin dependent and independent means and that the 'anaerobic' environment has a significant impact on bacterial-IEC interactions. Crosstalk between three C. difficile PCR ribotypes (RT) [RT027 (strain R20291), RT012 (strain 630) and RT017 (strains M68 and CF5)] and IEC cell-lines were investigated. All RTs showed significant engagement with human Toll-like receptors (TLR)-5, TLR2-CD14 and TLR2/6 as measured by IL-8 release from TLR-transfected HEK cells. Co-culture studies indicated minimal impact of R20291 and 630 TcdA and TcdB on bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells. An apical anaerobic environment had a major effect on C. difficile-T84 crosstalk as significantly greater cytokine immunity and trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) dysfunction was recorded when co-cultures were performed in an Ussing chamber system compared to standard 5% CO2 conditions. Overall, this study suggests that anaerobic C. difficile engagement with human IECs is a complex interplay that involves bacterial and toxin-mediated cellular events. PMID:26708704

  7. A switch from constitutive chemical defence to inducible innate immune responses in the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Schmidtberg, Henrike; Röhrich, Christian; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-06-23

    The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, has emerged as a model species for invasion biology, reflecting its remarkable capacity to outcompete native ladybird species when introduced into new habitats. This ability may be associated with its prominent resistance to pathogens and intraguild predation. We recently showed that the constitutive antibacterial activity present in the haemolymph of H. axyridis beetles can be attributed to the chemical defence compound harmonine. Here, we demonstrate that H. axyridis differs from other insects, including the native ladybird Coccinella septempunctata, by reducing rather than increasing the antimicrobial activity of its haemolymph following the injection of bacteria. However, both species produce new or more abundant proteins in the haemolymph, indicating that bacterial challenge induces innate immune responses associated with the synthesis of immunity-related proteins. Our results suggest that H. axyridis beetles can switch from constitutive chemical defence to inducible innate immune responses, supporting hypothesis that inducible antimicrobial peptides protect host beetles against pathogens that survive constitutive defences. These alternative antimicrobial defence mechanisms may reflect a trade-off resulting from fitness-related costs associated with the simultaneous synthesis of harmonine and antimicrobial peptides/proteins. PMID:23466480

  8. Specificity in Mesograzer-Induced Defences in Seagrasses.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Arteaga, Pedro; Ueber, Alexandra; Engelen, Aschwin H; Santos, Rui; Molis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Grazing-induced plant defences that reduce palatability to herbivores are widespread in terrestrial plants and seaweeds, but they have not yet been reported in seagrasses. We investigated the ability of two seagrass species to induce defences in response to direct grazing by three associated mesograzers. Specifically, we conducted feeding-assayed induction experiments to examine how mesograzer-specific grazing impact affects seagrass induction of defences within the context of the optimal defence theory. We found that the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes exerted a low-intensity grazing on older blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, which reflects a weak grazing impact that may explain the lack of inducible defences. The isopod Synischia hectica exerted the strongest grazing impact on C. nodosa via high-intensity feeding on young blades with a higher fitness value. This isopod grazing induced defences in C. nodosa as indicated by a consistently lower consumption of blades previously grazed for 5, 12 and 16 days. The lower consumption was maintained when offered tissues with no plant structure (agar-reconstituted food), but showing a reduced size of the previous grazing effect. This indicates that structural traits act in combination with chemical traits to reduce seagrass palatability to the isopod. Increase in total phenolics but not in C:N ratio and total nitrogen of grazed C. nodosa suggests chemical defences rather than a modified nutritional quality as primarily induced chemical traits. We detected no induction of defences in Zostera noltei, which showed the ability to replace moderate losses of young biomass to mesograzers via compensatory growth. Our study provides the first experimental evidence of induction of defences against meso-herbivory that reduce further consumption in seagrasses. It also emphasizes the relevance of grazer identity in determining the level of grazing impact triggering resistance and compensatory

  9. Specificity in Mesograzer-Induced Defences in Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Arteaga, Pedro; Ueber, Alexandra; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Santos, Rui; Molis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Grazing-induced plant defences that reduce palatability to herbivores are widespread in terrestrial plants and seaweeds, but they have not yet been reported in seagrasses. We investigated the ability of two seagrass species to induce defences in response to direct grazing by three associated mesograzers. Specifically, we conducted feeding-assayed induction experiments to examine how mesograzer-specific grazing impact affects seagrass induction of defences within the context of the optimal defence theory. We found that the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes exerted a low-intensity grazing on older blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, which reflects a weak grazing impact that may explain the lack of inducible defences. The isopod Synischia hectica exerted the strongest grazing impact on C. nodosa via high-intensity feeding on young blades with a higher fitness value. This isopod grazing induced defences in C. nodosa as indicated by a consistently lower consumption of blades previously grazed for 5, 12 and 16 days. The lower consumption was maintained when offered tissues with no plant structure (agar-reconstituted food), but showing a reduced size of the previous grazing effect. This indicates that structural traits act in combination with chemical traits to reduce seagrass palatability to the isopod. Increase in total phenolics but not in C:N ratio and total nitrogen of grazed C. nodosa suggests chemical defences rather than a modified nutritional quality as primarily induced chemical traits. We detected no induction of defences in Zostera noltei, which showed the ability to replace moderate losses of young biomass to mesograzers via compensatory growth. Our study provides the first experimental evidence of induction of defences against meso-herbivory that reduce further consumption in seagrasses. It also emphasizes the relevance of grazer identity in determining the level of grazing impact triggering resistance and compensatory

  10. Diving bradycardia: a mechanism of defence against hypoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco; Gianfranchi, Lorella

    2011-06-01

    A feature of all air-breathing vertebrates, diving bradycardia is triggered by apnoea and accentuated by immersion of the face or whole body in cold water. Very little is known about the afferents of diving bradycardia, whereas the efferent part of the reflex circuit is constituted by the cardiac vagal fibres. Diving bradycardia is associated with vasoconstriction of selected vascular beds and a reduction in cardiac output. The diving response appears to be more pronounced in mammals than in birds. In humans, the bradycardic response to diving varies greatly from person to person; the reduction in heart rate generally ranges from 15 to 40%, but a small proportion of healthy individuals can develop bradycardia below 20 beats/min. During prolonged dives, bradycardia becomes more pronounced because of activation of the peripheral chemoreceptors by a reduction in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (O2), responsible for slowing of heart rate. The vasoconstriction is associated with a redistribution of the blood flow, which saves O2 for the O2-sensitive organs, such as the heart and brain. The results of several investigations carried out both in animals and in humans show that the diving response has an O2-conserving effect, both during exercise and at rest, thus lengthening the time to the onset of serious hypoxic damage. The diving response can therefore be regarded as an important defence mechanism for the organism. PMID:21330930

  11. Evolution of separate predation- and defence-evoked venoms in carnivorous cone snails

    PubMed Central

    Dutertre, Sébastien; Jin, Ai-Hua; Vetter, Irina; Hamilton, Brett; Sunagar, Kartik; Lavergne, Vincent; Dutertre, Valentin; Fry, Bryan G.; Antunes, Agostinho; Venter, Deon J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Venomous animals are thought to inject the same combination of toxins for both predation and defence, presumably exploiting conserved target pharmacology across prey and predators. Remarkably, cone snails can rapidly switch between distinct venoms in response to predatory or defensive stimuli. Here, we show that the defence-evoked venom of Conus geographus contains high levels of paralytic toxins that potently block neuromuscular receptors, consistent with its lethal effects on humans. In contrast, C. geographus predation-evoked venom contains prey-specific toxins mostly inactive at human targets. Predation- and defence-evoked venoms originate from the distal and proximal regions of the venom duct, respectively, explaining how different stimuli can generate two distinct venoms. A specialized defensive envenomation strategy is widely evolved across worm, mollusk and fish-hunting cone snails. We propose that defensive toxins, originally evolved in ancestral worm-hunting cone snails to protect against cephalopod and fish predation, have been repurposed in predatory venoms to facilitate diversification to fish and mollusk diets. PMID:24662800

  12. Evolution of separate predation- and defence-evoked venoms in carnivorous cone snails.

    PubMed

    Dutertre, Sébastien; Jin, Ai-Hua; Vetter, Irina; Hamilton, Brett; Sunagar, Kartik; Lavergne, Vincent; Dutertre, Valentin; Fry, Bryan G; Antunes, Agostinho; Venter, Deon J; Alewood, Paul F; Lewis, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Venomous animals are thought to inject the same combination of toxins for both predation and defence, presumably exploiting conserved target pharmacology across prey and predators. Remarkably, cone snails can rapidly switch between distinct venoms in response to predatory or defensive stimuli. Here, we show that the defence-evoked venom of Conus geographus contains high levels of paralytic toxins that potently block neuromuscular receptors, consistent with its lethal effects on humans. In contrast, C. geographus predation-evoked venom contains prey-specific toxins mostly inactive at human targets. Predation- and defence-evoked venoms originate from the distal and proximal regions of the venom duct, respectively, explaining how different stimuli can generate two distinct venoms. A specialized defensive envenomation strategy is widely evolved across worm, mollusk and fish-hunting cone snails. We propose that defensive toxins, originally evolved in ancestral worm-hunting cone snails to protect against cephalopod and fish predation, have been repurposed in predatory venoms to facilitate diversification to fish and mollusk diets. PMID:24662800

  13. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans—understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dühring, Sybille; Germerodt, Sebastian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important human pathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within the human host for a long time. However, alterations in the host environment can render C. albicans virulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and the human innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategies including immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation, pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. Furthermore, Computational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactions are highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. An outlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defense and evasion mechanisms is given. PMID:26175718

  14. Growth anomalies on the coral genera Acropora and Porites are strongly associated with host density and human population size across the Indo-Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aeby, Greta S.; Williams, Gareth J.; Franklin, Erik C.; Haapkyla, Jessica; Harvell, C. Drew; Neale, Stephen; Page, Cathie A.; Raymundo, Laurie; Vargas-Angel, Bernardo; Willis, Bette L.; Work, Thierry M.; Davy, Simon K.

    2011-01-01

    Growth anomalies (GAs) are common, tumor-like diseases that can cause significant morbidity and decreased fecundity in the major Indo-Pacific reef-building coral genera, Acropora and Porites. GAs are unusually tractable for testing hypotheses about drivers of coral disease because of their pan-Pacific distributions, relatively high occurrence, and unambiguous ease of identification. We modeled multiple disease-environment associations that may underlie the prevalence of Acropora growth anomalies (AGA) (n = 304 surveys) and Porites growth anomalies (PGA) (n = 602 surveys) from across the Indo-Pacific. Nine predictor variables were modeled, including coral host abundance, human population size, and sea surface temperature and ultra-violet radiation anomalies. Prevalence of both AGAs and PGAs were strongly host density-dependent. PGAs additionally showed strong positive associations with human population size. Although this association has been widely posited, this is one of the first broad-scale studies unambiguously linking a coral disease with human population size. These results emphasize that individual coral diseases can show relatively distinct patterns of association with environmental predictors, even in similar diseases (growth anomalies) found on different host genera (Acropora vs. Porites). As human densities and environmental degradation increase globally, the prevalence of coral diseases like PGAs could increase accordingly, halted only perhaps by declines in host density below thresholds required for disease establishment.

  15. THE ROLE OF AVIAN HOST DYNAMICS AND ANTHROPOGENIC STRESSORS ON THE TRANSMISSION OF WEST NILE VIRUS AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR HUMAN HEALTH AND BIODIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our multidisciplinary approach will allow for an understanding of how ecological changes affect arbovirus infection and distribution and help determine the impact of WNV on both host and human populations. By comparing models of predicted prevalence to actual changes in WNV tr...

  16. Growth Anomalies on the Coral Genera Acropora and Porites Are Strongly Associated with Host Density and Human Population Size across the Indo-Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Erik C.; Haapkyla, Jessica; Harvell, C. Drew; Neale, Stephen; Page, Cathie A.; Raymundo, Laurie; Vargas-Ángel, Bernardo; Willis, Bette L.; Work, Thierry M.; Davy, Simon K.

    2011-01-01

    Growth anomalies (GAs) are common, tumor-like diseases that can cause significant morbidity and decreased fecundity in the major Indo-Pacific reef-building coral genera, Acropora and Porites. GAs are unusually tractable for testing hypotheses about drivers of coral disease because of their pan-Pacific distributions, relatively high occurrence, and unambiguous ease of identification. We modeled multiple disease-environment associations that may underlie the prevalence of Acropora growth anomalies (AGA) (n = 304 surveys) and Porites growth anomalies (PGA) (n = 602 surveys) from across the Indo-Pacific. Nine predictor variables were modeled, including coral host abundance, human population size, and sea surface temperature and ultra-violet radiation anomalies. Prevalence of both AGAs and PGAs were strongly host density-dependent. PGAs additionally showed strong positive associations with human population size. Although this association has been widely posited, this is one of the first broad-scale studies unambiguously linking a coral disease with human population size. These results emphasize that individual coral diseases can show relatively distinct patterns of association with environmental predictors, even in similar diseases (growth anomalies) found on different host genera (Acropora vs. Porites). As human densities and environmental degradation increase globally, the prevalence of coral diseases like PGAs could increase accordingly, halted only perhaps by declines in host density below thresholds required for disease establishment. PMID:21365011

  17. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  18. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, Ruth

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  19. The evolution of acceptance and tolerance in hosts of avian brood parasites.

    PubMed

    Medina, Iliana; Langmore, Naomi E

    2016-08-01

    Avian brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of their hosts, which rear the parasite's progeny. The costs of parasitism have selected for the evolution of defence strategies in many host species. Most research has focused on resistance strategies, where hosts minimize the number of successful parasitism events using defences such as mobbing of adult brood parasites or rejection of parasite eggs. However, many hosts do not exhibit resistance. Here we explore why some hosts accept parasite eggs in their nests and how this is related to the virulence of the parasite. We also explore the extent to which acceptance of parasites can be explained by the evolution of tolerance; a strategy in which the host accepts the parasite but adjusts its life history or other traits to minimize the costs of parasitism. We review examples of tolerance in hosts of brood parasites (such as modifications to clutch size and multi-broodedness), and utilize the literature on host-pathogen interactions and plant herbivory to analyse the prevalence of each type of defence (tolerance or resistance) and their evolution. We conclude that (i) the interactions between brood parasites and their hosts provide a highly tractable system for studying the evolution of tolerance, (ii) studies of host defences against brood parasites should investigate both resistance and tolerance, and (iii) tolerance and resistance can lead to contrasting evolutionary scenarios. PMID:25765722

  20. Novel insights into human respiratory syncytial virus-host factor interactions through integrated proteomics and transcriptomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dapat, Clyde; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lack of vaccine and limited antiviral options against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) highlights the need for novel therapeutic strategies. One alternative is to develop drugs that target host factors required for viral replication. Several microarray and proteomics studies had been published to identify possible host factors that are affected during RSV replication. In order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of RSV-host interaction, we integrated available proteome and transcriptome datasets and used it to construct a virus-host interaction network. Then, we interrogated the network to identify host factors that are targeted by the virus and we searched for drugs from the DrugBank database that interact with these host factors, which may have potential applications in repositioning for future treatment options of RSV infection. PMID:26760927

  1. Dietary Epicatechin Is Available to Breastfed Infants through Human Breast Milk in the Form of Host and Microbial Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khymenets, Olha; Rabassa, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Palmero, María; Rivero-Urgell, Montserrat; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Tulipani, Sara; Brandi, Pilar; Campoy, Cristina; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols play an important role in human health. To address their accessibility to a breastfed infant, we planned to evaluate whether breast milk (BM) (colostrum, transitional, and mature) epicatechin metabolites could be related to the dietary habits of mothers. The polyphenol consumption of breastfeeding mothers was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire and 24 h recalls. Solid-phase extraction-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-UPLC-MS/MS) was applied for direct epicatechin metabolite analysis. Their bioavailability in BM as a result of dietary ingestion was confirmed in a preliminary experiment with a single dose of dark chocolate. Several host and microbial phase II metabolites of epicatechin were detected in BM among free-living lactating mothers. Interestingly, a modest correlation between dihydroxyvalerolactone sulfate and the intake of cocoa products was observed. Although a very low percentage of dietary polyphenols is excreted in BM, they are definitely in the diet of breastfed infants. Therefore, evaluation of their role in infant health could be further promoted. PMID:27285570

  2. Human cytomegalovirus carries serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and a host-cell derived PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, S; Turowski, P; Picard, L; Goris, J; Landini, M P; Topilko, A; Hemmings, B; Bessia, C; Garcia, A; Virelizier, J L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. When studying hyper-immediate-early events after contact between CMV virions and the cell membrane, we observed a hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins within 10 min. This can be explained in part by our finding that purified CMV contains serine/threonine protein phosphatase activities. Biochemical analyses indicate that this protein phosphatase activity has all characteristics of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A). Specifically, PP1 accounts for approximately 30% and PP2A accounts for the remaining 70% of the phosphorylase phosphatase activity found. CMV produced in astrocytoma cells stably expressing an amino-terminally tagged PP2A catalytic subunit contained tagged enzyme, thus demonstrating the cellular origin of CMV-associated PP2A. PP2A is specifically found inside the virus, associated with the nucleocapsid fraction. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of purified virus revealed the presence of the catalytic subunits of PP2A and PP1. Furthermore, the catalytic subunit of PP2A appears to be complexed to the regulatory subunits PR65 and PR55, which is also the most abundant configuration of this enzyme found in the host cells. Incubation of virus with okadaic acid before contact of CMV with cells prevented hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins, thus demonstrating the role of CMV-associated phosphatases in this phenomenon. CMV can thus transport an active enzyme from one cell to another. PMID:8627658

  3. The influence of space and time on the evolution of altruistic defence: the case of ant slave rebellion.

    PubMed

    Metzler, D; Jordan, F; Pamminger, T; Foitzik, S

    2016-05-01

    How can antiparasite defence traits evolve even if they do not directly benefit their carriers? An example of such an indirect defence is rebellion of enslaved Temnothorax longispinosus ant workers against their social parasite Temnothorax americanus, a slavemaking ant. Ant slaves have been observed to kill their oppressors' offspring, a behaviour from which the sterile slaves cannot profit directly. Parasite brood killing could, however, reduce raiding pressure on related host colonies nearby. We analyse with extensive computer simulations for the Temnothorax slavemaker system under what conditions a hypothetical rebel allele could invade a host population, and in particular, how host-parasite dynamics and population structure influence the rebel allele's success. Exploring a wide range of model parameters, we only found a small number of parameter combinations for which kin selection or multilevel selection could allow a slave rebellion allele to spread in the host population. Furthermore, we did not detect any cases in which the reduction of raiding pressure in the close vicinity of the slavemaker nest would substantially contribute to the inclusive fitness of rebels. This suggests that slave rebellion is not costly and perhaps a side-effect of some other beneficial trait. In some of our simulations, however, even a costly rebellion allele could spread in the population. This was possible when host-parasite interactions led to a metapopulation dynamic with frequent local extinctions and recolonizations of demes by the offspring of few immigrants. PMID:26873305

  4. Two modalities of manic defences: their function in adolescent breakdown.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Catalina

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore two different modalities of manic defences and their specific underlying anxieties. I will describe the relation between these defences and the role of the superego and their specific function in adolescent breakdown. While one type of manic defence operates by the ego's identification with a sadistic superego the other one operates via evacuation of a guilt-inducing superego. I will illustrate the proposed ideas with clinical examples from the analysis of two adolescents. This paper stresses the specific differences between these two modalities and the clinical importance of both identifying and addressing the enactment in the transference of the unconscious phantasies and anxieties (paranoid and depressive) that give rise to these two types of defences. PMID:20590929

  5. Between-Population Outbreeding Affects Plant Defence

    PubMed Central

    Leimu, Roosa; Fischer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Between-population crosses may replenish genetic variation of populations, but may also result in outbreeding depression. Apart from direct effects on plant fitness, these outbreeding effects can also alter plant-herbivore interactions by influencing plant tolerance and resistance to herbivory. We investigated effects of experimental within- and between-population outbreeding on herbivore resistance, tolerance and plant fitness using plants from 13 to 19 Lychnis flos-cuculi populations. We found no evidence for outbreeding depression in resistance reflected by the amount of leaf area consumed. However, herbivore performance was greater when fed on plants from between-population compared to within-population crosses. This can reflect outbreeding depression in resistance and/or outbreeding effects on plant quality for the herbivores. The effects of type of cross on the relationship between herbivore damage and plant fitness varied among populations. This demonstrates how between-population outbreeding effects on tolerance range from outbreeding depression to outbreeding benefits among plant populations. Finally, herbivore damage strengthened the observed outbreeding effects on plant fitness in several populations. These results raise novel considerations on the impact of outbreeding on the joint evolution of resistance and tolerance, and on the evolution of multiple defence strategies. PMID:20838662

  6. Salinity change impairs pipefish immune defence.

    PubMed

    Birrer, Simone C; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Roth, Olivia

    2012-12-01

    Global change is associated with fast and severe alterations of environmental conditions. Superimposed onto existing salinity variations in a semi-enclosed brackish water body such as the Baltic Sea, a decrease in salinity is predicted due to increased precipitation and freshwater inflow. Moreover, we predict that heavy precipitation events will accentuate salinity fluctuations near shore. Here, we investigated how the immune function of the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle), an ecologically important teleost with sex-role reversal, is influenced by experimentally altered salinities (control: 18 PSU, lowered: 6 PSU, increased: 30 PSU) upon infection with bacteria of the genus Vibrio. Salinity changes resulted in increased activity and proliferation of immune cells. However, upon Vibrio infection, individuals at low salinity were unable to mount specific immune response components, both in terms of monocyte and lymphocyte cell proliferation and immune gene expression compared to pipefish kept at ambient salinities. We interpret this as resource allocation trade-off, implying that resources needed for osmoregulation under salinity stress are lacking for subsequent activation of the immune defence upon infection. Our data suggest that composition of small coastal fish communities may change due to elevated environmental stress levels and the incorporated consequences thereof. PMID:22982326

  7. Middle Devonian liverwort herbivory and antiherbivore defence.

    PubMed

    Labandeira, Conrad C; Tremblay, Susan L; Bartowski, Kenneth E; VanAller Hernick, Linda

    2014-04-01

    To test the extent of herbivory in early terrestrial ecosystems, we examined compression-impression specimens of the late Middle Devonian liverwort Metzgeriothallus sharonae, from the Catskill Delta deposit of eastern New York state. Shale fragments of field-collected specimens were processed by applying liquid nitrocellulose on exposed surfaces. After drying, the film coatings were lifted off and mounted on microscope slides for photography. Unprocessed fragments were photographed under cedarwood oil for enhanced contrast. An extensive repertoire of arthropodan-mediated herbivory was documented, representing three functional feeding groups and nine subordinate plant-arthropod damage types (DTs). The herbivory is the earliest occurrence of external foliage-feeding and galling in the terrestrial fossil record. Our evidence indicates that thallus oil body cells, similar to the terpenoid-containing oil bodies of modern liverworts, were probably involved in the chemical defence of M. sharonae against arthropod herbivores. Based on damage patterns of terrestrial plants and an accompanying but sparse body-fossil record, Devonian arthropodan herbivores were significantly smaller compared to those of the later Palaeozoic. These data collectively suggest that a broad spectrum herbivory may have had a more important role in early terrestrial ecosystems than previously thought. PMID:24372344

  8. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora: a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence.

    PubMed

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2016-08-01

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for visualizing interactions with the pathogen over time using high-resolution microscopy. We tested four Phytophthora species for their ability to infect P. patens and showed that P. sojae and P. palmivora were only rarely capable to infect P. patens. In contrast, P. infestans and P. capsici frequently and successfully penetrated moss protonemal cells, showed intracellular hyphal growth and formed sporangia. Next to these successful invasions, many penetration attempts failed. Here the pathogen was blocked by a barrier of cell wall material deposited in papilla-like structures, a defence response that is common in higher plants. Another common response is the upregulation of defence-related genes upon infection and also in moss we observed this upregulation in tissues infected with Phytophthora. For more advanced analyses of the novel pathosystem we developed a special set-up that allowed live-cell imaging of subcellular defence processes by high-resolution microscopy. With this set-up, we revealed that Phytophthora infection of moss induces repositioning of the nucleus, accumulation of cytoplasm and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but not of microtubules. PMID:27027911

  9. Host life history and host-parasite syntopy predict behavioural resistance and tolerance of parasites.

    PubMed

    Sears, Brittany F; Snyder, Paul W; Rohr, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    There is growing interest in the role that life-history traits of hosts, such as their 'pace-of-life', play in the evolution of resistance and tolerance to parasites. Theory suggests that, relative to host species that have high syntopy (local spatial and temporal overlap) with parasites, host species with low syntopy should have lower selection pressures for more constitutive (always present) and costly defences, such as tolerance, and greater reliance on more inducible and cheaper defences, such as behaviour. Consequently, we postulated that the degree of host-parasite syntopy, which is negatively correlated with host pace-of-life (an axis reflecting the developmental rate of tadpoles and the inverse of their size at metamorphosis) in our tadpole-parasitic cercarial (trematode) system, would be a negative and positive predictor of behavioural resistance and tolerance, respectively. To test these hypotheses, we exposed seven tadpole species to a range of parasite (cercarial) doses crossed with anaesthesia treatments that controlled for anti-parasite behaviour. We quantified host behaviour, successful and unsuccessful infections, and each species' reaction norm for behavioural resistance and tolerance, defined as the slope between cercarial exposure (or attempted infections) and anti-cercarial behaviours and mass change, respectively. Hence, tolerance is capturing any cost of parasite exposure. As hypothesized, tadpole pace-of-life was a significant positive predictor of behavioural resistance and negative predictor of tolerance, a result that is consistent with a trade-off between behavioural resistance and tolerance across species that warrants further investigation. Moreover, these results were robust to considerations of phylogeny, all possible re-orderings of the three fastest or slowest paced species, and various measurements of tolerance. These results suggest that host pace-of-life and host-parasite syntopy are powerful drivers of both the strength and type

  10. Infectious diseases of marine molluscs and host responses as revealed by genomic tools.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ximing; Ford, Susan E

    2016-03-01

    More and more infectious diseases affect marine molluscs. Some diseases have impacted commercial species including MSX and Dermo of the eastern oyster, QPX of hard clams, withering syndrome of abalone and ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections of many molluscs. Although the exact transmission mechanisms are not well understood, human activities and associated environmental changes often correlate with increased disease prevalence. For instance, hatcheries and large-scale aquaculture create high host densities, which, along with increasing ocean temperature, might have contributed to OsHV-1 epizootics in scallops and oysters. A key to understanding linkages between the environment and disease is to understand how the environment affects the host immune system. Although we might be tempted to downplay the role of immunity in invertebrates, recent advances in genomics have provided insights into host and parasite genomes and revealed surprisingly sophisticated innate immune systems in molluscs. All major innate immune pathways are found in molluscs with many immune receptors, regulators and effectors expanded. The expanded gene families provide great diversity and complexity in innate immune response, which may be key to mollusc's defence against diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Further advances in host and parasite genomics should improve our understanding of genetic variation in parasite virulence and host disease resistance. PMID:26880838

  11. The Glycoproteins of All Filovirus Species Use the Same Host Factors for Entry into Bat and Human Cells but Entry Efficiency Is Species Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Markus; González Hernández, Mariana; Berger, Elisabeth; Marzi, Andrea; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Ebola and marburgviruses, members of the family Filoviridae, can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. The ongoing Ebola virus (EBOV) disease epidemic in Western Africa claimed more than 11,300 lives and was associated with secondary cases outside Africa, demonstrating that filoviruses pose a global health threat. Bats constitute an important natural reservoir of filoviruses, including viruses of the recently identified Cuevavirus genus within the Filoviridae family. However, the interactions of filoviruses with bat cells are incompletely understood. Here, we investigated whether filoviruses employ different strategies to enter human and bat cells. For this, we examined host cell entry driven by glycoproteins (GP) from all filovirus species into cell lines of human and fruit bat origin. We show that all GPs were able to mediate entry into human and most fruit bat cell lines with roughly comparable efficiency. In contrast, the efficiency of entry into the cell line EidNi/41 derived from a straw-colored fruit bat varied markedly between the GPs of different filovirus species. Furthermore, inhibition studies demonstrated that filoviruses employ the same host cell factors for entry into human, non-human primate and fruit bat cell lines, including cysteine proteases, two pore channels and NPC1 (Niemann-Pick C1 molecule). Finally, processing of GP by furin and the presence of the mucin-like domain in GP were dispensable for entry into both human and bat cell lines. Collectively, these results show that filoviruses rely on the same host cell factors for entry into human and fruit bat cells, although the efficiency of the usage of these factors might differ between filovirus species. PMID:26901159

  12. The Glycoproteins of All Filovirus Species Use the Same Host Factors for Entry into Bat and Human Cells but Entry Efficiency Is Species Dependent.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Markus; González Hernández, Mariana; Berger, Elisabeth; Marzi, Andrea; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Ebola and marburgviruses, members of the family Filoviridae, can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. The ongoing Ebola virus (EBOV) disease epidemic in Western Africa claimed more than 11,300 lives and was associated with secondary cases outside Africa, demonstrating that filoviruses pose a global health threat. Bats constitute an important natural reservoir of filoviruses, including viruses of the recently identified Cuevavirus genus within the Filoviridae family. However, the interactions of filoviruses with bat cells are incompletely understood. Here, we investigated whether filoviruses employ different strategies to enter human and bat cells. For this, we examined host cell entry driven by glycoproteins (GP) from all filovirus species into cell lines of human and fruit bat origin. We show that all GPs were able to mediate entry into human and most fruit bat cell lines with roughly comparable efficiency. In contrast, the efficiency of entry into the cell line EidNi/41 derived from a straw-colored fruit bat varied markedly between the GPs of different filovirus species. Furthermore, inhibition studies demonstrated that filoviruses employ the same host cell factors for entry into human, non-human primate and fruit bat cell lines, including cysteine proteases, two pore channels and NPC1 (Niemann-Pick C1 molecule). Finally, processing of GP by furin and the presence of the mucin-like domain in GP were dispensable for entry into both human and bat cell lines. Collectively, these results show that filoviruses rely on the same host cell factors for entry into human and fruit bat cells, although the efficiency of the usage of these factors might differ between filovirus species. PMID:26901159

  13. Expression profiles of defence related cDNAs in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) inoculated with mycorrhizae and Trichoderma harzianum Rifai T32.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yung-Chie; Wong, Mui-Yun; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-11-01

    Basal stem rot is one of the major diseases of oil palm (Elaies guineensis Jacq.) caused by pathogenic Ganoderma species. Trichoderma and mycorrhizae were proposed to be able to reduce the disease severity. However, their roles in improving oil palm defence system by possibly inducing defence-related genes in the host are not well characterized. To better understand that, transcript profiles of eleven putative defence-related cDNAs in the roots of oil palm inoculated with Trichoderma harzianum T32 and mycorrhizae at different time points were studied. Transcripts encoding putative Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (EgBBI2) and defensin (EgDFS) increased more than 2 fold in mycorrhizae-treated roots at 6 weeks post inoculation (wpi) compared to those in controls. Transcripts encoding putative dehydrin (EgDHN), glycine-rich RNA binding protein (EgGRRBP), isoflavone reductase (EgIFR), type 2 ribosome inactivating protein (EgT2RIP), and EgDFS increased in the oil palm roots treated with T. harzianum at 6 and/or 12 wpi compared to those in the controls. Some of these genes were also expressed in oil palm roots treated with Ganoderma boninense. This study provides an insight of some defence-related genes induced by Trichoderma and mycorrhizae, and their roles as potential agents to boost the plant defence system. PMID:26322853

  14. EST sequencing and gene expression profiling of defence-related genes from Persea americana infected with Phytophthora cinnamomi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Avocado (Persea americana) belongs to the Lauraceae family and is an important commercial fruit crop in over 50 countries. The most serious pathogen affecting avocado production is Phytophthora cinnamomi which causes Phytophthora root rot (PRR). Root pathogens such as P. cinnamomi and their interactions with hosts are poorly understood and despite the importance of both the avocado crop and the effect Phytophthora has on its cultivation, there is a lack of molecular knowledge underpinning our understanding of defence strategies against the pathogen. In order to initiate a better understanding of host-specific defence we have generated EST data using 454 pyrosequencing and profiled nine defence-related genes from Pc-infected avocado roots. Results 2.0 Mb of data was generated consisting of ~10,000 reads on a single lane of the GS FLX platform. Using the Newbler assembler 371 contigs were assembled, of which 367 are novel for Persea americana. Genes were classified according to Gene Ontology terms. In addition to identifying root-specific ESTs we were also able to identify and quantify the expression of nine defence-related genes that were differentially regulated in response to P. cinnamomi. Genes such as metallothionein, thaumatin and the pathogenesis related PsemI, mlo and profilin were found to be differentially regulated. Conclusions This is the first study in elucidating the avocado root transcriptome as well as identifying defence responses of avocado roots to the root pathogen P. cinnamomi. Our data is currently the only EST data that has been generated for avocado rootstocks, and the ESTs identified in this study have already been useful in identifying defence-related genes as well as providing gene information for other studies looking at processes such as ROS regulation as well as hypoxia in avocado roots. Our EST data will aid in the elucidation of the avocado transcriptome and identification of markers for improved rootstock breeding and

  15. CD103+ Conventional Dendritic Cells Are Critical for TLR7/9-Dependent Host Defense against Histoplasma capsulatum, an Endemic Fungal Pathogen of Humans

    PubMed Central

    Van Prooyen, Nancy; Henderson, C. Allen; Hocking Murray, Davina; Sil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune cells shape the host response to microbial pathogens. Here we elucidate critical differences in the molecular response of macrophages vs. dendritic cells (DCs) to Histoplasma capsulatum, an intracellular fungal pathogen of humans. It has long been known that macrophages are permissive for Histoplasma growth and succumb to infection, whereas DCs restrict fungal growth and survive infection. We used murine macrophages and DCs to identify host pathways that influence fungal proliferation and host-cell viability. Transcriptional profiling experiments revealed that DCs produced a strong Type I interferon (IFN-I) response to infection with Histoplasma yeasts. Toll-like receptors 7 and 9 (TLR7/9), which recognize nucleic acids, were required for IFN-I production and restriction of fungal growth in DCs, but mutation of TLR7/9 had no effect on the outcome of macrophage infection. Moreover, TLR7/9 were essential for the ability of infected DCs to elicit production of the critical cytokine IFNγ from primed CD4+ T cells in vitro, indicating the role of this pathway in T cell activation. In a mouse model of infection, TLR7/9 were required for optimal production of IFN-I and IFNγ, host survival, and restriction of cerebral fungal burden. These data demonstrate the critical role of this pathway in eliciting an appropriate adaptive immune response in the host. Finally, although other fungal pathogens have been shown to elicit IFN-I in mouse models, the specific host cell responsible for producing IFN-I has not been elucidated. We found that CD103+ conventional DCs were the major producer of IFN-I in the lungs of wild-type mice infected with Histoplasma. Mice deficient in this DC subtype displayed reduced IFN-I production in vivo. These data reveal a previously unknown role for CD103+ conventional DCs and uncover the pivotal function of these cells in modulating the host immune response to endemic fungi. PMID:27459510

  16. Infection of human urethral epithelium with Neisseria gonorrhoeae elicits an upregulation of host anti-apoptotic factors and protects cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, Matthew J; Williams, Richard D; Apicella, Michael A

    2003-08-01

    In order to better understand the host response to an infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, microarray technology was used to analyse the gene expression profile between uninfected and infected human urethral epithelium. The anti-apoptotic genes bfl-1, cox-2 and c-IAP-2 were identified to be upregulated approximately eight-, four- or twofold, respectively, following infection. Subsequent assays including RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and RNase protection confirmed the increased expression of these apoptotic regulators, and identified that a fourth anti-apoptotic factor, mcl-1, is also upregulated. RT-PCR and RNase protection also showed that key pro-apoptotic factors including bax, bad and bak do not change in expression. Furthermore, our studies demonstrated that infection with the gonococcus partially protects urethral epithelium from apoptosis induced by the protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine (STS). This work shows that following infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, several host anti-apoptotic factors are upregulated. In addition, a gonococcal infection protects host cells from subsequent STS-induced death. The regulation of host cell death by the gonococcus may represent a mechanism employed by this pathogen to survive and proliferate in host epithelium. PMID:12864814

  17. Isolation of the human PC6 gene encoding the putative host protease for HIV-1 gp160 processing in CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, L; Wolf, J; Pichuantes, S; Duke, R; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Production of infectious HIV-1 virions is dependent on the processing of envelope glycoprotein gp160 by a host cell protease. The protease in human CD4+ T lymphocytes has not been unequivocally identified, yet members of the family of mammalian subtilisin-like protein convertases (SPCs), which are soluble or membrane-bound proteases of the secretory pathway, best fulfill the criteria. These proteases are required for proprotein maturation and cleave at paired basic amino acid motifs in numerous cellular and viral glycoprotein precursors, both in vivo and in vitro. To identify the gp160 processing protease, we have used reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analyses to ascertain the spectrum of SPC proteases in human CD4+ T cells. We have cloned novel members of the SPC family, known as the human PC6 genes. Two isoforms of the hPC6 protease are expressed in human T cells, hPC6A and the larger hPC6B. The patterns of SPC gene expression in human T cells has been compared with the furin-defective LoVo cell line, both of which are competent in the production of infectious HIV virions. This comparison led to the conclusion that the hPC6 gene products are the most likely candidates for the host cell protease responsible for HIV-1 gp160 processing in human CD4+ T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8755538

  18. Systems-Level Comparison of Host-Responses Elicited by Avian H5N1 and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses in Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suki M. Y.; Gardy, Jennifer L.; Cheung, C. Y.; Cheung, Timothy K. W.; Hui, Kenrie P. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.; Guan, Y.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Peiris, J. S. Malik

    2009-01-01

    Human disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 can lead to a rapidly progressive viral pneumonia leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is increasing evidence from clinical, animal models and in vitro data, which suggests a role for virus-induced cytokine dysregulation in contributing to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. The key target cells for the virus in the lung are the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages, and we have shown that, compared to seasonal human influenza viruses, equivalent infecting doses of H5N1 viruses markedly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in both primary cell types in vitro. Whether this H5N1-induced dysregulation of host responses is driven by qualitative (i.e activation of unique host pathways in response to H5N1) or quantitative differences between seasonal influenza viruses is unclear. Here we used microarrays to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles in primary human macrophages at 1, 3, and 6 h after infection with H5N1 virus or low-pathogenic seasonal influenza A (H1N1) virus. We found that host responses to both viruses are qualitatively similar with the activation of nearly identical biological processes and pathways. However, in comparison to seasonal H1N1 virus, H5N1 infection elicits a quantitatively stronger host inflammatory response including type I interferon (IFN) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genes. A network-based analysis suggests that the synergy between IFN-β and TNF-α results in an enhanced and sustained IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine response at the early stage of viral infection that may contribute to the viral pathogenesis and this is of relevance to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for H5N1 induced respiratory disease. PMID:20011590

  19. Defence and Security Research Coexistence, Coherence, and Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breant, Christian; Karock, Ulrich

    Defence and security research have coexisted at the European Union level since the inception of the European Defence Agency (EDA). The agency was established under a Joint Action of the Council of Ministers on 12 July 2004, "to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European defence capabilities in the field of crisis management and to sustain the European Security and Defence Policy as it stands now and develops in the future".1 The political decision to create the EDA was taken at the Thessaloniki European Council on 19 and 20 June 2003. Heads of State or Government tasked the Council bodies to undertake the requisite actions, in the course of 2004, to create an intergovernmental agency in the field of defence capabilities development, research, acquisition and armaments. The EDA has been located in Brussels right from the start. It is an intergovernmental EU agency under the Council's authority within the single institutional framework of the Union. It performs its mission in close cooperation with its participating Member States (pMS) and the European institutional actors.

  20. Independently recruited oxidases from the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enabled chemical defences in leaf beetle larvae (subtribe Chrysomelina) to evolve

    PubMed Central

    Rahfeld, Peter; Kirsch, Roy; Kugel, Susann; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors (e.g. salicylaldehyde). The autonomous production of iridoids, as in Phaedon cochleariae, is the ancestral chrysomeline chemical defence and predates the evolution of salicylaldehyde-based defence. Both biosynthesis strategies include an oxidative step of an alcohol intermediate. In salicylaldehyde-producing species, this step is catalysed by salicyl alcohol oxidases (SAOs) of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, but the enzyme oxidizing the iridoid precursor is unknown. Here, we show by in vitro as well as in vivo experiments that P. cochleariae also uses an oxidase from the GMC superfamily for defensive purposes. However, our phylogenetic analysis of chrysomeline GMC oxidoreductases revealed that the oxidase of the iridoid pathway originated from a GMC clade different from that of the SAOs. Thus, the evolution of a host-independent chemical defence followed by a shift to a host-dependent chemical defence in chrysomeline beetles coincided with the utilization of genes from different GMC subfamilies. These findings illustrate the importance of the GMC multi-gene family for adaptive processes in plant–insect interactions. PMID:24943369

  1. Cooperation and conflict in host-microbe relations.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, Elling

    2009-05-01

    Hosts and microbes associate in a variety of relations along a continuum ranging from symbiotic to pathogenic. Defence mechanisms have been evolutionarily selected in both hosts and microbes to protect the organism's integrity. Such defences have to be utilized with caution. They must be adapted to the tasks at hand; otherwise any symbiotic relation would be impossible. To explain this cautionary use of defences we need to understand how life on Earth evolved into cooperative and competing entities at various levels of organization. The purpose of this article is to review theory and selected mechanisms relating to the evolution and development of host-microbe interactions, with special emphasis on host responses. The rationale is that without theory, extrapolations from misleading observations can dominate and distort, for a significant time, the course of a scientific field. The argument is set forth that social evolution theory provides a conceptual framework for addressing questions relating to interaction between hosts and microbes. The article is a partial summary of arguments presented in my book Defending life - the nature of host-parasite relations. PMID:19400859

  2. Gene coevolution and regulation lock cyclic plant defence peptides to their targets.

    PubMed

    Gilding, Edward K; Jackson, Mark A; Poth, Aaron G; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Prentis, Peter J; Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Craik, David J

    2016-04-01

    Plants have evolved many strategies to protect themselves from attack, including peptide toxins that are ribosomally synthesized and thus adaptable directly by genetic polymorphisms. Certain toxins in Clitoria ternatea (butterfly pea) are cyclic cystine-knot peptides of c. 30 residues, called cyclotides, which have co-opted the plant's albumin-1 gene family for their production. How butterfly pea albumin-1 genes were commandeered and how these cyclotides are utilized in defence remain unclear. The role of cyclotides in host plant ecology and biotechnological applications requires exploration. We characterized the sequence diversity and expression dynamics of precursor and processing proteins implicated in butterfly pea cyclotide biosynthesis by expression profiling through RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). Peptide-enriched extracts from various organs were tested for activity against insect-like membranes and the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that the evolution and deployment of cyclotides involved their diversification to exhibit different chemical properties and expression between organs facing different defensive challenges. Cyclotide-enriched fractions from soil-contacting organs were effective at killing nematodes, whereas similar enriched fractions from aerial organs contained cyclotides that exhibited stronger interactions with insect-like membrane lipids. Cyclotides are employed as versatile and combinatorial mediators of defence in C. ternatea and have specialized to affect different classes of attacking organisms. PMID:26668107

  3. Role of extracytoplasmic leucine rich repeat proteins in plant defence mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, V

    2005-01-01

    Plant-pathogen interactions involve highly complex series of reactions in disease development. Plants are endowed with both, resistance and defence genes. The activation of defence genes after contact with avirulence gene products of pathogens depends on signals transduced by leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) contained in resistance genes. Additionally, LRRs play roles for various actions following ligand recognition. Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs), the only plant LRR protein with known ligands, are pectinase inhibitors, bound by ionic interactions to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of plant cells. They have a high affinity for fungal endopolygalacturonases (endoPGs). PGIP genes are organised in families encoding proteins with similar physical characteristics but different specificities. They are induced by infection and stress related signals. The molecular basis of PG-PGIP interaction serves as a model to understand the evolution of plant LRR proteins in recognising non-self-molecules. Extensins form a different class of structural proteins with repetitive sequences. They are also regulated by wounding and pathogen infection. Linkage of extensins with LRR motifs is highly significant in defending host tissues against pathogen invasion. Overexpression of PGIPs or expression of several PGIPs in a plant tissue, and perhaps manipulation of extensin expression could be possible strategies for disease management. PMID:15782942

  4. The commensal Streptococcus salivarius K12 downregulates the innate immune responses of human epithelial cells and promotes host-microbe homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cosseau, Celine; Devine, Deirdre A; Dullaghan, Edie; Gardy, Jennifer L; Chikatamarla, Avinash; Gellatly, Shaan; Yu, Lorraine L; Pistolic, Jelena; Falsafi, Reza; Tagg, John; Hancock, Robert E W

    2008-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an early colonizer of human oral and nasopharyngeal epithelia, and strain K12 has reported probiotic effects. An emerging paradigm indicates that commensal bacteria downregulate immune responses through the action on NF-kappaB signaling pathways, but additional mechanisms underlying probiotic actions are not well understood. Our objective here was to identify host genes specifically targeted by K12 by comparing their responses with responses elicited by pathogens and to determine if S. salivarius modulates epithelial cell immune responses. RNA was extracted from human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14O- cells) cocultured with K12 or bacterial pathogens. cDNA was hybridized to a human 21K oligonucleotide-based array. Data were analyzed using ArrayPipe, InnateDB, PANTHER, and oPOSSUM. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) and growth-regulated oncogene alpha (Groalpha) secretion were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was demonstrated that S. salivarius K12 specifically altered the expression of 565 host genes, particularly those involved in multiple innate defense pathways, general epithelial cell function and homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, cell development and migration, and signaling pathways. It inhibited baseline IL-8 secretion and IL-8 responses to LL-37, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and flagellin in epithelial cells and attenuated Groalpha secretion in response to flagellin. Immunosuppression was coincident with the inhibition of activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. Thus, the commensal and probiotic behaviors of S. salivarius K12 are proposed to be due to the organism (i) eliciting no proinflammatory response, (ii) stimulating an anti-inflammatory response, and (iii) modulating genes associated with adhesion to the epithelial layer and homeostasis. S. salivarius K12 might thereby ensure that it is tolerated by the host and maintained on the epithelial surface while actively protecting the host from inflammation and apoptosis

  5. The Commensal Streptococcus salivarius K12 Downregulates the Innate Immune Responses of Human Epithelial Cells and Promotes Host-Microbe Homeostasis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cosseau, Celine; Devine, Deirdre A.; Dullaghan, Edie; Gardy, Jennifer L.; Chikatamarla, Avinash; Gellatly, Shaan; Yu, Lorraine L.; Pistolic, Jelena; Falsafi, Reza; Tagg, John; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an early colonizer of human oral and nasopharyngeal epithelia, and strain K12 has reported probiotic effects. An emerging paradigm indicates that commensal bacteria downregulate immune responses through the action on NF-κB signaling pathways, but additional mechanisms underlying probiotic actions are not well understood. Our objective here was to identify host genes specifically targeted by K12 by comparing their responses with responses elicited by pathogens and to determine if S. salivarius modulates epithelial cell immune responses. RNA was extracted from human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14O- cells) cocultured with K12 or bacterial pathogens. cDNA was hybridized to a human 21K oligonucleotide-based array. Data were analyzed using ArrayPipe, InnateDB, PANTHER, and oPOSSUM. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) and growth-regulated oncogene alpha (Groα) secretion were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was demonstrated that S. salivarius K12 specifically altered the expression of 565 host genes, particularly those involved in multiple innate defense pathways, general epithelial cell function and homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, cell development and migration, and signaling pathways. It inhibited baseline IL-8 secretion and IL-8 responses to LL-37, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and flagellin in epithelial cells and attenuated Groα secretion in response to flagellin. Immunosuppression was coincident with the inhibition of activation of the NF-κB pathway. Thus, the commensal and probiotic behaviors of S. salivarius K12 are proposed to be due to the organism (i) eliciting no proinflammatory response, (ii) stimulating an anti-inflammatory response, and (iii) modulating genes associated with adhesion to the epithelial layer and homeostasis. S. salivarius K12 might thereby ensure that it is tolerated by the host and maintained on the epithelial surface while actively protecting the host from inflammation and apoptosis induced by

  6. Herpes B Virus, Macacine Herpesvirus 1, Breaks Simplex Virus Tradition via Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression in Cells from Human and Macaque Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddi, Mugdha

    2012-01-01

    B virus of the family Herpesviridae is endemic to rhesus macaques but results in 80% fatality in untreated humans who are zoonotically infected. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in order to evade CD8+ T-cell activation is characteristic of most herpesviruses. Here we examined the cell surface presence and total protein expression of MHC class I molecules in B virus-infected human foreskin fibroblast cells and macaque kidney epithelial cells in culture, which are representative of foreign and natural host initial target cells of B virus. Our results show <20% downregulation of surface MHC class I molecules in either type of host cells infected with B virus, which is statistically insignificantly different from that observed in uninfected cells. We also examined the surface expression of MHC class Ib molecules, HLA-E and HLA-G, involved in NK cell inhibition. Our results showed significant upregulation of HLA-E and HLA-G in host cells infected with B virus relative to the amounts observed in other herpesvirus-infected cells. These results suggest that B virus-infected cell surfaces maintain normal levels of MHC class Ia molecules, a finding unique among simplex viruses. This is a unique divergence in immune evasion for B virus, which, unlike human simplex viruses, does not inhibit the transport of peptides for loading onto MHC class Ia molecules because B virus ICP47 lacks a transporter-associated protein binding domain. The fact that MHC class Ib molecules were significantly upregulated has additional implications for host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22973043

  7. Indicators for elevated risk of human exposure to host-seeking adults of the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni) in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Ibarra-Juarez, Luis A; Eisen, Rebecca J; Piesman, Joseph

    2008-06-01

    The human-biting adult stage of the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni) can cause tick paralysis in humans and domestic animals and is the primary tick vector in the intermountain west of the pathogens causing Colorado tick fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and tularemia. We conducted drag sampling studies in Poudre Canyon and Rocky Mountain National Park of Larimer County, CO, to determine microhabitat use patterns by host-seeking D. andersoni adults and find environmental factors signaling elevated risk of tick exposure. Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) was found to serve as a general indicator of areas with elevated risk of exposure to host-seeking D. andersoni adults; this likely results from a shared climate tolerance of big sagebrush and D. andersoni. Grass was the favored substrate for host-seeking ticks. Drag sampling of open grass or grass bordering rock or shrub produced abundances of D. andersoni adults significantly higher than sampling of brush. Sampling sites in Rocky Mountain National Park, relative to Poudre Canyon, were characterized by more intense usage by elk (Cervus elaphus) but decreased brush coverage, smaller brush size, and lower abundances of host-seeking D. andersoni adults. There has been a tremendous increase in the population of elk in Rocky Mountain National Park over the last decades and we speculate that this has resulted in an ecological cascade where overgrazing of vegetation by elk is followed by suppression of rodent populations, decreased tick abundance, and, ultimately, reduced risk of human exposure to D. andersoni and its associated pathogens. PMID:18697314

  8. Chloroform-induced insanity defence confounds lawyer Lincoln.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D; Suskind, P B

    1997-12-01

    During an 1857 trial, the defence claimed that the accused should be absolved of wilful murder because an overdose of chloroform during surgery induced insanity. In a rare appearance as a prosecutor, Abraham Lincoln tried the case for the State of Illinois. Expert medical witnesses testified about the side effects of chloroform and chloroform-induced insanity. Significantly, Lincoln was not knowledgeable about medical jurisprudence and overlooked potential sources of evidence and expert witnesses. Defence lawyers presented an impressive array of physicians to testify about insanity, about chloroform and about the results of an overdosage during anaesthesia. Considering the state of scientific knowledge at the time, the trial was notable. PMID:11619819

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Bhongir, Ravi K. V.; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa ‘hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa 'hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  11. The mechanics of malaria parasite invasion of the human erythrocyte - towards a reassessment of the host cell contribution.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marion; Baum, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of research, we still know little about the mechanics of Plasmodium host cell invasion. Fundamentally, while the essential or non-essential nature of different parasite proteins is becoming clearer, their actual function and how each comes together to govern invasion are poorly understood. Furthermore, in recent years an emerging world view is shifting focus away from the parasite actin-myosin motor being the sole force responsible for entry to an appreciation of host cell dynamics and forces and their contribution to the process. In this review, we discuss merozoite invasion of the erythrocyte, focusing on the complex set of pre-invasion events and how these might prime the red cell to facilitate invasion. While traditionally parasite interactions at this stage have been viewed simplistically as mediating adhesion only, recent work makes it apparent that by interacting with a number of host receptors and signalling pathways, combined with secretion of parasite-derived lipid material, that the merozoite may initiate cytoskeletal re-arrangements and biophysical changes in the erythrocyte that greatly reduce energy barriers for entry. Seen in this light Plasmodium invasion may well turn out to be a balance between host and parasite forces, much like that of other pathogen infection mechanisms. PMID:26663815

  12. The mechanics of malaria parasite invasion of the human erythrocyte – towards a reassessment of the host cell contribution

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Summary Despite decades of research, we still know little about the mechanics of Plasmodium host cell invasion. Fundamentally, while the essential or non‐essential nature of different parasite proteins is becoming clearer, their actual function and how each comes together to govern invasion are poorly understood. Furthermore, in recent years an emerging world view is shifting focus away from the parasite actin–myosin motor being the sole force responsible for entry to an appreciation of host cell dynamics and forces and their contribution to the process. In this review, we discuss merozoite invasion of the erythrocyte, focusing on the complex set of pre‐invasion events and how these might prime the red cell to facilitate invasion. While traditionally parasite interactions at this stage have been viewed simplistically as mediating adhesion only, recent work makes it apparent that by interacting with a number of host receptors and signalling pathways, combined with secretion of parasite‐derived lipid material, that the merozoite may initiate cytoskeletal re‐arrangements and biophysical changes in the erythrocyte that greatly reduce energy barriers for entry. Seen in this light Plasmodium invasion may well turn out to be a balance between host and parasite forces, much like that of other pathogen infection mechanisms. PMID:26663815

  13. Prevalence of Human-Active and Variant 1 Strains of the Tick-Borne Pathogen Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Hosts and Forests of Eastern North America

    PubMed Central

    Keesing, Felicia; McHenry, Diana J.; Hersh, Michelle; Tibbetts, Michael; Brunner, Jesse L.; Killilea, Mary; LoGiudice, Kathleen; Schmidt, Kenneth A.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplasmosis is an emerging infectious disease caused by infection with the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. In the eastern United States, A. phagocytophilum is transmitted to hosts through the bite of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis. We determined the realized reservoir competence of 14 species of common vertebrate hosts for ticks by establishing the probability that each species transmits two important strains of A. phagocytophilum (A. phagocytophilum human-active, which causes human cases, and A. phagocytophilum variant 1, which does not) to feeding larval ticks. We also sampled questing nymphal ticks from ∼150 sites in a single county over 2 years and sampled over 6 years at one location. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) and Eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) were the most competent reservoirs for infection with the A. phagocytophilum human-active strain. Across the county, prevalence in ticks for both strains together was 8.3%; ticks were more than two times as likely to be infected with A. phagocytophilum human-active as A. phagocytophilum variant 1. PMID:24865688

  14. In defence of the vegan project.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Jan

    2013-06-01

    The vegan project is defined as the project that strives for radical legal reform to pass laws that would reserve the consumption of animal products to a very narrow range of situations, resulting in vegan diets being the default diets for the majority of human beings. Two objections that have been raised against such a project are described. The first is that such a project would jeopardise the nutritional adequacy of human diets. The second is that it would alienate human beings from nature. It is argued that neither undermines the vegan project. PMID:23515957

  15. Chemical defence in a sawfly: genetic components of variation in relevant life-history traits.

    PubMed

    Müller, C; Zwaan, B J; de Vos, H; Brakefield, P M

    2003-06-01

    Larvae of several tenthredinid sawfly species readily release droplets of haemolymph through their integument when attacked by predators. This defence mechanism via 'bleeding' is characterised by a low integument resistance and a high haemolymph deterrence. Both traits are variable, and negatively correlated among species. We sought to determine if such differences in the propensity to bleed also occur intraspecifically by studying the heritability of traits potentially associated with the bleeding phenomenon in the turnip sawfly Athalia rosae ruficornis Jakovlev (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae, Allantinae). For three European populations, heritabilities were estimated in the laboratory in a parent-offspring and a full-sib design for haemolymph deterrence (measured as concentration of sequestered glucosinolate), integument resistance, body mass of eonymph and adult, and developmental time. Within A. rosae, no significant negative phenotypic correlation was found between the two traits directly related to the defence mechanism: integument resistance and haemolymph deterrence. However, the significant heritabilities found for these traits in the full-sib analysis (0.39 and 0.35, respectively, for males in the Swiss population) show that the variation has a genetic component. While full-sib analysis revealed highly significant heritabilities for most traits in all the three populations, parent-offspring regression revealed little or no evidence of heritable variation. Effects of common environment for siblings and variation in the host-plant quality between insect generations are likely to be the main factors explaining these differences. A consequence of such host-plant variation in the wild might be that genetic variation of such chemical defensive traits is largely invisible to natural selection. PMID:12764422

  16. Different Host Exploitation Strategies in Two Zebra Mussel-Trematode Systems: Adjustments of Host Life History Traits

    PubMed Central

    Minguez, Laëtitia; Buronfosse, Thierry; Giambérini, Laure

    2012-01-01

    The zebra mussel is the intermediate host for two digenean trematodes, Phyllodistomum folium and Bucephalus polymorphus, infecting gills and the gonad respectively. Many gray areas exist relating to the host physiological disturbances associated with these infections, and the strategies used by these parasites to exploit their host without killing it. The aim of this study was to examine the host exploitation strategies of these trematodes and the associated host physiological disturbances. We hypothesized that these two parasite species, by infecting two different organs (gills or gonads), do not induce the same physiological changes. Four cellular responses (lysosomal and peroxisomal defence systems, lipidic peroxidation and lipidic reserves) in the host digestive gland were studied by histochemistry and stereology, as well as the energetic reserves available in gonads. Moreover, two indices were calculated related to the reproductive status and the physiological condition of the organisms. Both parasites induced adjustments of zebra mussel life history traits. The host-exploitation strategy adopted by P. folium would occur during a short-term period due to gill deformation, and could be defined as “virulent.” Moreover, this parasite had significant host gender-dependent effects: infected males displayed a slowed-down metabolism and energetic reserves more allocated to growth, whereas females displayed better defences and would allocate more energy to reproduction and maintenance. In contrast, B. polymorphus would be a more “prudent” parasite, exploiting its host during a long-term period through the consumption of reserves allocated to reproduction. PMID:22448287

  17. Different host exploitation strategies in two zebra mussel-trematode systems: adjustments of host life history traits.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Laëtitia; Buronfosse, Thierry; Giambérini, Laure

    2012-01-01

    The zebra mussel is the intermediate host for two digenean trematodes, Phyllodistomum folium and Bucephalus polymorphus, infecting gills and the gonad respectively. Many gray areas exist relating to the host physiological disturbances associated with these infections, and the strategies used by these parasites to exploit their host without killing it. The aim of this study was to examine the host exploitation strategies of these trematodes and the associated host physiological disturbances. We hypothesized that these two parasite species, by infecting two different organs (gills or gonads), do not induce the same physiological changes. Four cellular responses (lysosomal and peroxisomal defence systems, lipidic peroxidation and lipidic reserves) in the host digestive gland were studied by histochemistry and stereology, as well as the energetic reserves available in gonads. Moreover, two indices were calculated related to the reproductive status and the physiological condition of the organisms. Both parasites induced adjustments of zebra mussel life history traits. The host-exploitation strategy adopted by P. folium would occur during a short-term period due to gill deformation, and could be defined as "virulent." Moreover, this parasite had significant host gender-dependent effects: infected males displayed a slowed-down metabolism and energetic reserves more allocated to growth, whereas females displayed better defences and would allocate more energy to reproduction and maintenance. In contrast, B. polymorphus would be a more "prudent" parasite, exploiting its host during a long-term period through the consumption of reserves allocated to reproduction. PMID:22448287

  18. Long-term familiarity promotes joining in neighbour nest defence.

    PubMed

    Grabowska-Zhang, A M; Sheldon, B C; Hinde, C A

    2012-08-23

    Familiarity plays an important role in the evolution of sociality and cooperation. Familiar individuals may gain a reputation for participating in, or defecting from, cooperative tasks. Previous research suggests that long-term familiarity with territorial neighbours benefits breeders. We tested the hypothesis that great tits (Parus major) are more likely to join in neighbours' nest defence if those neighbours are familiar from the previous year. We show that neighbours that shared a territory boundary the previous year are more likely to join their neighbours' nest defence than neighbours that did not share a boundary before. Closer neighbours did not differ from distant neighbours in their latency to join. For familiar neighbours that joined, there was no difference in call rate in relation to whether one or both members of the focal pair were familiar. First-time breeders (by definition unfamiliar) did not join each other's nest defence. This is the first evidence of a relationship between familiarity and joining in nest defence. Such direct benefits of familiarity may have important implications in the evolution of sociality. PMID:22535641

  19. A Strong Remedy to a Weak Ethical Defence of Homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David

    2015-12-01

    In this article, I indicate and illustrate several flaws in a recent "ethical defence" of homeopathy. It transpires that the authors' arguments have several features in common with homeopathic remedies, including strong claims, a lack of logic or evidence, and no actual effect. PMID:26659862

  20. Communal range defence in primates as a public goods dilemma.

    PubMed

    Willems, Erik P; Arseneau, T Jean M; Schleuning, Xenia; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-12-01

    Classic socio-ecological theory holds that the occurrence of aggressive range defence is primarily driven by ecological incentives, most notably by the economic defendability of an area or the resources it contains. While this ecological cost-benefit framework has great explanatory power in solitary or pair-living species, comparative work on group-living primates has always found economic defendability to be a necessary, but not sufficient condition to account for the distribution of effective range defence across the taxon. This mismatch between theory and observation has recently been ascribed to a collective action problem among group members in, what is more informatively viewed as, a public goods dilemma: mounting effective defence of a communal range against intrusions by outgroup conspecifics. We here further develop this framework, and report on analyses at three levels of biological organization: across species, across populations within a single lineage and across groups and individuals within a single population. We find that communal range defence in primates very rarely involves collective action sensu stricto and that it is best interpreted as the outcome of opportunistic and strategic individual-level decisions. Whether the public good of a defended communal range is produced by solitary, joint or collective action is thus the outcome of the interplay between the unique characteristics of each individual, local and current socio-ecological conditions, and fundamental life-history traits of the species. PMID:26503678

  1. Quantitative differences in host cell reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged virus in human skin fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes cultured from the same foreskin biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Pidoux, M.

    1986-06-01

    Repair efficiency of cultured cells may be estimated by measuring the ability of a particular cell type to support virus damaged by an appropriate agent. In this study we have compared the inactivation of ultraviolet (254 nm)-damaged herpes simplex virus in human fibroblast and epidermal keratinocyte cell lines derived from the same foreskin biopsy and found the epithelial cells to be a factor of 3 times less efficient in supporting the damaged virus. The two different cell types show comparable ultraviolet inactivation of clone-forming ability, indicating that the difference is specific to viral host cell reactivation. This study required the development of a quantitative infectious centers assay for the measurement of viral titer in human epithelial cells, a system which may be of more general application in studies of potential human carcinogens.

  2. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis promotes the systemic induction of regulatory defence-related genes in rice leaves and confers resistance to pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soriano, Lidia; García-Martínez, José; San Segundo, Blanca

    2012-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses are mutualistic associations between soil fungi and most vascular plants. Their association benefits the host plant by improving nutrition, mainly phosphorus nutrition, and by providing increased capability to cope with adverse conditions. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional changes triggered in rice leaves as a result of AM symbiosis, focusing on the relevance of the plant defence response. We showed that root colonization by the AM fungus Glomus intraradices is accompanied by the systemic induction of genes that play a regulatory role in the host defence response, such as OsNPR1, OsAP2, OsEREBP and OsJAmyb. Genes involved in signal transduction processes (OsDUF26 and OsMPK6) and genes that function in calcium-mediated signalling processes (OsCBP, OsCaM and OsCML4) are also up-regulated in leaves of mycorrhizal rice plants in the absence of pathogen infection. In addition, the mycorrhizal rice plants exhibit a stronger induction of defence marker genes [i.e. pathogenesis-related (PR) genes] in their leaves in response to infection by the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Evidence indicates that mycorrhizal rice plants show enhanced resistance to the rice blast fungus. Overall, these results suggest that the protective effect of the AM symbiosis in rice plants relies on both the systemic activation of defence regulatory genes in the absence of pathogen challenge and the priming for stronger expression of defence effector genes during pathogen infection. The possible mechanisms involved in the mycorrhiza-induced resistance to M. oryzae infection are discussed. PMID:22212404

  3. Landscape settings as part of earth wall systems for defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Remnants of earth wall systems from different periods are preserved in many European countries. They were built for different functions, such as defence, demarcating ownership or keeping wild animals or cattle in or out a terrain, and often changed function over time. Earth walls date from a past in which man had limited access to man- and horsepower. In the case of defence systems, our ancestors made use of the landscape settings to improve the strength. The poster gives an overview of landscape settings used for this purpose, from prehistoric up to medieval age, for building round and linear earth wall defence systems. Round earth walls systems are found on: • High viewpoints along a river, often in combination with marshland at its feet, • Almost completely cut-off meanders of antecedent rivers. This natural setting offered an ideal defence. It allowed an almost 360 degree view and exposed the enemy for a long time when passing the river, while the steep slopes and narrow entrance made the hill fort difficult to access, • Islands in lakes, • Bordering a lake at one side, • Confluences of rivers, • Hills near the sea and a natural harbour with possibilities for defence, • High flat hill tops of medium size with steep sides. Of each situation examples are presented. Linear earth wall defence systems For linear defence earth walls no overview of landscape settings can be given, for lack of sufficient data. The Celtic, 10 m steep Beech Bottom Dyke earth wall system from around 20 A.D. connects two steeply incised river valleys. For building the Hadrian Wall (UK) the Romans made use of earth walls paralleling the steepest cuesta of the Cheviot hills. The Viking Danewerk (Ger), was built on push moraines and used the coastal marsh lands at their feet for defence. And the defence of the earth wall around the Velder (NL, probably 13th century) made use of the many small streams crossing this marshy coversand landscape, by diverting them into a canal

  4. Canine and Human Atopic Dermatitis: Two Faces of the Same Host-Microbe Interaction.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Rodrigues Hoffmann, Aline

    2016-06-01

    Host-microbe interaction has been suggested to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The dog has been shown to be the best model to study both pathogenesis and microbiome modifications in atopic dermatitis. Bradley et al. show a significant correlation between microbiome diversity, clinical signs, and skin barrier function in atopic dogs before, during, and after antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27212648

  5. A Robust and Adaptable High Throughput Screening Method to Study Host-Microbiota Interactions in the Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    de Wouters, Tomas; Ledue, Florence; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Doré, Joël; Blottière, Hervé M.; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has many beneficial roles for its host. However, the precise mechanisms developed by the microbiota to influence the host intestinal cell responses are only partially known. The complexity of the ecosystem and our inability to culture most of these micro-organisms have led to the development of molecular approaches such as functional metagenomics, i.e. the heterologous expression of a metagenome in order to identify functions. This elegant strategy coupled to high throughput screening allowed to identify novel enzymes from different ecosystems where culture methods have not yet been adapted to isolate the candidate microorganisms. We have proposed to use this functional metagenomic approach in order to model the microbiota’s interaction with the host by combining this heterologous expression with intestinal reporter cell lines. The addition of the cellular component to this functional metagenomic approach introduced a second important source of variability resulting in a novel challenge for high throughput screening. First attempts of high throughput screening with various reporter cell-lines showed a high distribution of the response and consequent difficulties to reproduce the response, impairing an easy and clear identification of confirmed hits. In this study, we developed a robust and reproducible methodology to combine these two biological systems for high throughput application. We optimized experimental setups and completed them by appropriate statistical analysis tools allowing the use this innovative approach in a high throughput manner and on a broad range of reporter assays. We herewith present a methodology allowing a high throughput screening combining two biological systems. Therefore ideal conditions for homogeneity, sensitivity and reproducibility of both metagenomic clones as well as reporter cell lines have been identified and validated. We believe that this innovative method will allow the identification of new

  6. Esch. coli infections in childhood. Significance of bacterial virulence and immune defence.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, L A

    1976-01-01

    The Esch. coli harboured in the gut constitute a reservoir of potential pathogens in the infant and child. The conditions required for these intestinal inhabitants to cause infection are not well understood. The presence of virulence factors such as capsular antigens, especially K1, may be of significance for the ability of Esch. coli to cause neonatal meningitis. The capacity of certain Esch. coli to attach to epithelial cells of mucous membranes may be important for their infective powers in the urinary as well as the intestinal tract. Furthermore, the ability of certain Esch. coli to produce enterotoxins similar to that of V. cholerae is of importance for their capacity to provoke diarrhoea. The importance of the immune defence mechanisms for prevention of these Esch. coli infections is suggested, especially in the form of local immunity provided by secretory IgA antibodies. Such antibodies directed against Esch. coli O and K antigens as well as enterotoxins are present in large amounts in human milk and may be of considerable importance for protection against Esch. coli in the breast-fed baby. Breast feeding may be of special significance until the baby has built up its own local immune defence preventing the micro-organisms from attaching to and invading the intestinal mucous membranes. SIgA antibodies in urine may have a similar protective effect against urinary tract infections. The variable pictures of Esch. coli infections in childhood are striking, ranging from severe sepsis/meningitis or diarrhoea to "asymptomatic" bacteriuria. This variability is obviously closely connected with the presence of various virulence factors and the function of different components of the immune defence. PMID:795381

  7. Network and pathway analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; ZHAO, SHISHUN; XU, ZHIWEN

    2016-01-01

    To date, there has been rapid development with regard to gene and microRNA (miR/miRNA) research in gliomas. However, the regulatory mechanisms of the associated genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, the genes, miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs) were considered as elements in the regulatory network, and focus was placed on the associations between TFs and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and miRNAs and host genes. In order to show the regulatory correlation clearly, all the elements were investigated and three regulatory networks, namely the differentially-expressed, related and global networks, were constructed. Certain important pathways were highlighted, with analysis of the similarities and differences among the networks. Next, the upstream and downstream elements of differentially-expressed genes, miRNAs and predicted TFs were listed. The most notable aspect of the present study was the three levels of network, particularly the differentially-expressed network, since the differentially-expressed associations that these networks provide appear at the initial stages of cancers such as glioma. If the states of the differentially-expressed associations can be adjusted to the normal state via alterations in regulatory associations, which were also recorded in the study networks and tables, it is likely that cancer can be regulated or even avoided. In the present study, the differentially-expressed network illuminated the pathogenesis of glioma; for example, a TF can regulate one or more miRNAs, and a target gene can be targeted by one or more miRNAs. Therefore, the host genes and target genes, the host genes and TFs, and the target genes and TFs indirectly affect each other through miRNAs. The association also exists between TFs and TFs, target genes and target genes, and host genes and host genes. The present study also demonstrated self-adaption associations and circle-regulations. The related network further described the regulatory mechanism

  8. Early and sustained expression of latent and host modulating genes in coordinated transcriptional program of KSHV productive primary infection of human primary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Min; Zhou, Fu-Chun; Ye, Feng-Chun; Pan, Hong-Yi; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated expression of viral genes in primary infection is essential for successful infection of host cells. We examined the expression profiles of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) transcripts in productive primary infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells by whole-genome reverse-transcription real-time quantitative PCR. The latent transcripts were expressed early and sustained at high levels throughout the infection while the lytic transcripts were expressed in the order of immediate early, early, and lytic transcripts, all of which culminated before the production of infectious virions. Significantly, transcripts encoding genes with host modulating functions, including mitogenic and cell cycle-regulatory, immune-modulating, and anti-apoptotic genes, were expressed before those encoding viral structure and replication genes, and sustained at high levels throughout the infection, suggesting KSHV manipulation of host environment to facilitate infection. The KSHV transcriptional program in a primary infection defined in this study should provide a basis for further investigation of virus–cell interactions. PMID:16154170

  9. Cyclo(Phe-Pro) Produced by the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Inhibits Host Innate Immune Responses through the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiwan; Kim, Na-Jeong; Kim, So Young; Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Kun-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclo(Phe-Pro) (cFP) is a secondary metabolite produced by certain bacteria and fungi. Although recent studies highlight the role of cFP in cell-to-cell communication by bacteria, its role in the context of the host immune response is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of cFP produced by the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus in the modulation of innate immune responses toward the pathogen. cFP suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocyte/macrophage cell line and in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Specifically, cFP inhibited inhibitory κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) translocation to the cell nucleus, indicating that cFP affects the NF-κB pathway. We searched for genes that are responsible for cFP production in V. vulnificus and identified VVMO6_03017 as a causative gene. A deletion of VVMO6_03017 diminished cFP production and decreased virulence in subcutaneously inoculated mice. In summary, cFP produced by V. vulnificus actively suppresses the innate immune responses of the host, thereby facilitating its survival and propagation in the host environment. PMID:25561711

  10. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors Develop Into Neurons and Integrate Into the Host Brain

    PubMed Central

    Guillaume, Daniel J.; Johnson, M. Austin; Li, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Whether and how in-vitro-produced human neural precursors mature and integrate into the brain are crucial to the utility of human embryonic stem (hES) cells in treating neurological disorders. After transplantation into the ventricles of neonatal immune-deficient mice, hES-cell-derived neural precursors stopped expressing the cell division marker Ki67, except in neurogenic areas, and differentiated into neurons and then glia in a temporal course intrinsic to that of human cells regardless of location. The human cells located in the gray matter became neurons in the olfactory bulb and striatum, whereas those in the white matter produced exclusively glia. Importantly, the grafted human cells formed synapses. Thus, the in-vitro-produced human neural precursors follow their intrinsic temporal program to produce neurons and glia and, in response to environmental signals, generate cells appropriate to their target regions and integrate into the brain. PMID:16941479

  11. Pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase CaALDH1 interacts with Xanthomonas effector AvrBsT and promotes effector-triggered cell death and defence responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-06-01

    Xanthomonas type III effector AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death and defence responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum) and Nicotiana benthamiana. Little is known about the host factors that interact with AvrBsT. Here, we identified pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (CaALDH1) as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction between CaALDH1 and AvrBsT in planta. CaALDH1:smGFP fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. CaALDH1 expression in pepper was rapidly and strongly induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transient co-expression of CaALDH1 with avrBsT significantly enhanced avrBsT-triggered cell death in N. benthamiana leaves. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was higher in leaves transiently expressing CaALDH1, suggesting that CaALDH1 acts as a cell death enhancer, independently of AvrBsT. CaALDH1 silencing disrupted phenolic compound accumulation, H2O2 production, defence response gene expression, and cell death during avirulent Xcv Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing CaALDH1 exhibited enhanced defence response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. These results indicate that cytoplasmic CaALDH1 interacts with AvrBsT and promotes plant cell death and defence responses. PMID:25873668

  12. Human subtilase SKI-1/S1P is a master regulator of the HCV Lifecycle and a potential host cell target for developing indirect-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Andrea D; Knecht, Wolfgang; Lazarov, Ina; Dixit, Surjit B; Jean, François

    2012-01-01

    HCV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer and liver transplantation worldwide. Overstimulation of host lipid metabolism in the liver by HCV-encoded proteins during viral infection creates a favorable environment for virus propagation and pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesize that targeting cellular enzymes acting as master regulators of lipid homeostasis could represent a powerful approach to developing a novel class of broad-spectrum antivirals against infection associated with human Flaviviridae viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), whose assembly and pathogenesis depend on interaction with lipid droplets (LDs). One such master regulator of cholesterol metabolic pathways is the host subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1)--or site-1 protease (S1P). SKI-1/S1P plays a critical role in the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), which control expression of the key enzymes of cholesterol and fatty-acid biosynthesis. Here we report the development of a SKI-1/S1P-specific protein-based inhibitor and its application to blocking the SREBP signaling cascade. We demonstrate that SKI-1/S1P inhibition effectively blocks HCV from establishing infection in hepatoma cells. The inhibitory mechanism is associated with a dramatic reduction in the abundance of neutral lipids, LDs, and the LD marker: adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP)/perilipin 2. Reduction of LD formation inhibits virus assembly from infected cells. Importantly, we confirm that SKI-1/S1P is a key host factor for HCV infection by using a specific active, site-directed, small-molecule inhibitor of SKI-1/S1P: PF-429242. Our studies identify SKI-1/S1P as both a novel regulator of the HCV lifecycle and as a potential host-directed therapeutic target against HCV infection and liver steatosis. With identification of an increasing number of human viruses that use host LDs for infection, our results suggest that SKI-1/S1P inhibitors may allow development of

  13. Host Specificity of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, Andreas; Fang, Ferric C.

    2013-01-01

    Most pathogens are able to infect multiple hosts but some are highly adapted to a single-host species. A detailed understanding of the basis of host specificity can provide important insights into molecular pathogenesis, the evolution of pathogenic microbes, and the potential for pathogens to cross the species barrier to infect new hosts. Comparative genomics and the development of humanized mouse models have provided important new tools with which to explore the basis of generalism and specialism. This review will examine host specificity of bacterial pathogens with a focus on generalist and specialist serovars of Salmonella enterica. PMID:24296346

  14. Does vegetation complexity affect host plant chemistry, and thus multitrophic interactions, in a human-altered landscape?

    PubMed

    Wäschke, Nicole; Hancock, Christine; Hilker, Monika; Obermaier, Elisabeth; Meiners, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic land use may shape vegetation composition and affect trophic interactions by altering concentrations of host plant metabolites. Here, we investigated the hypotheses that: (1) plant N and defensive secondary metabolite contents of the herb Plantago lanceolata are affected by land use intensity (LUI) and the surrounding vegetation composition (=plant species richness and P. lanceolata density), and that (2) changes in plant chemistry affect abundances of the herbivorous weevils Mecinus pascuorum and Mecinus labilis, as well as their larval parasitoid Mesopolobus incultus, in the field. We determined plant species richness, P. lanceolata density, and abundances of the herbivores and the parasitoid in 77 grassland plots differing in LUI index in three regions across Germany. We also measured the N and secondary metabolite [the iridoid glycosides (IGs) aucubin and catalpol] contents of P. lanceolata leaves. Mixed-model analysis revealed that: (1) concentrations of leaf IGs were positively correlated with plant species richness; leaf N content was positively correlated with the LUI index. Furthermore: (2) herbivore abundance was not related to IG concentrations, but correlated negatively with leaf N content. Parasitoid abundance correlated positively only with host abundance over the three regions. Structural equation models revealed a positive impact of IG concentrations on parasitoid abundance in one region. We conclude that changes in plant chemistry due to land use and/or vegetation composition may affect higher trophic levels and that the manifestation of these effects may depend on local biotic or abiotic features of the landscape. PMID:25986560

  15. Evaluation of the Human Host Range of Bovine and Porcine Viruses that may Contaminate Bovine Serum and Porcine Trypsin Used in the Manufacture of Biological Products

    PubMed Central

    Marcus-Sekura, Carol; Richardson, James C.; Harston, Rebecca K.; Sane, Nandini; Sheets, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Current U.S. requirements for testing cell substrates used in production of human biological products for contamination with bovine and porcine viruses are U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 9CFR tests for bovine serum or porcine trypsin. 9CFR requires testing of bovine serum for seven specific viruses in six families (immunofluorescence) and at least 2 additional families non-specifically (cytopathicity and hemadsorption). 9CFR testing of porcine trypsin is for porcine parvovirus. Recent contaminations suggest these tests may not be sufficient. Assay sensitivity was not the issue for these contaminations that were caused by viruses/virus families not represented in the 9CFR screen. A detailed literature search was undertaken to determine which viruses that infect cattle or swine or bovine or porcine cells in culture also have human host range [ability to infect humans or human cells in culture] and to predict their detection by the currently used 9CFR procedures. There are more viruses of potential risk to biological products manufactured using bovine or porcine raw materials than are likely to be detected by 9CFR testing procedures; even within families, not all members would necessarily be detected. Testing gaps and alternative methodologies should be evaluated to continue to ensure safe, high quality human biologicals. PMID:22000165

  16. Genetically modified human CD4(+) T cells can be evaluated in vivo without lethal graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Riyasat; Babad, Jeffrey; Follenzi, Antonia; Gebe, John A; Brehm, Michael A; Nepom, Gerald T; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy for human diseases, including the use of T cells modified to express an anti-tumour T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor, is showing promise as an effective treatment modality. Further advances would be accelerated by the availability of a mouse model that would permit human T-cell engineering protocols and proposed genetic modifications to be evaluated in vivo. NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG) mice accept the engraftment of mature human T cells; however, long-term evaluation of transferred cells has been hampered by the xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) that occurs soon after cell transfer. We modified human primary CD4(+) T cells by lentiviral transduction to express a human TCR that recognizes a pancreatic beta cell-derived peptide in the context of HLA-DR4. The TCR-transduced cells were transferred to NSG mice engineered to express HLA-DR4 and to be deficient for murine class II MHC molecules. CD4(+) T-cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells were also transferred to facilitate engraftment. The transduced cells exhibited long-term survival (up to 3 months post-transfer) and lethal GVHD was not observed. This favourable outcome was dependent upon the pre-transfer T-cell transduction and culture conditions, which influenced both the kinetics of engraftment and the development of GVHD. This approach should now permit human T-cell transduction protocols and genetic modifications to be evaluated in vivo, and it should also facilitate the development of human disease models that incorporate human T cells. PMID:27124592

  17. Dietary antioxidants: immunity and host defense.

    PubMed

    Puertollano, María A; Puertollano, Elena; de Cienfuegos, Gerardo Álvarez; de Pablo, Manuel A

    2011-01-01

    Natural antioxidants may be defined as molecules that prevent cell damage against free radicals and are critical for maintaining optimum health in both animals and humans. In all living systems, cells require adequate levels of antioxidant defenses in order to avoid the harmful effect of an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to prevent damage to the immune cells. During the inflammatory processes, the activation of phagocytes and/or the action of bacterial products with specific receptors are capable of promoting the assembly of the multicomponent flavoprotein NADPH oxidase, which catalyzes the production of high amounts of the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)). Under these particular circumstances, neutrophils and macrophages are recognized to produce superoxide free radicals and H(2)O(2), which are essential for defence against phagocytized or invading microbes. In this state, antioxidants are absolutely necessary to regulate the reactions that release free radicals. Antioxidant nutrients commonly included in the diet such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene, selenium, copper, iron and zinc improve different immune function exhibiting an important protective role in infections caused by bacteria, viruses or parasites. As a result, dietary antioxidants have been related to modulate the host susceptibility or resistance to infectious pathogens. Overall, numerous studies have suggested that the development of tolerance, and control of inflammation are strongly correlated with specific immune mechanisms that may be altered by an inadequate supply of either macronutrients or micronutrients. Therefore, the present paper will review the effects of dietary antioxidants on immune cell function and the impact on protection against infectious microorganisms. PMID:21506934

  18. Host response during Yersinia pestis infection of human bronchial epithelial cells involves negative regulation of autophagy and suggests a modulation of survival-related and cellular growth pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alem, Farhang; Yao, Kuan; Lane, Douglas; Calvert, Valerie; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Kramer, Liana; Hale, Martha L.; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G.; Hakami, Ramin M.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis (Yp) causes the re-emerging disease plague, and is classified by the CDC and NIAID as a highest priority (Category A) pathogen. Currently, there is no approved human vaccine available and advances in early diagnostics and effective therapeutics are urgently needed. A deep understanding of the mechanisms of host response to Yp infection can significantly advance these three areas. We employed the Reverse Phase Protein Microarray (RPMA) technology to reveal the dynamic states of either protein level changes or phosphorylation changes associated with kinase-driven signaling pathways during host cell response to Yp infection. RPMA allowed quantitative profiling of changes in the intracellular communication network of human lung epithelial cells at different times post infection and in response to different treatment conditions, which included infection with the virulent Yp strain CO92, infection with a derivative avirulent strain CO92 (Pgm-, Pst-), treatment with heat inactivated CO92, and treatment with LPS. Responses to a total of 111 validated antibodies were profiled, leading to discovery of 12 novel protein hits. The RPMA analysis also identified several protein hits previously reported in the context of Yp infection. Furthermore, the results validated several proteins previously reported in the context of infection with other Yersinia species or implicated for potential relevance through recombinant protein and cell transfection studies. The RPMA results point to strong modulation of survival/apoptosis and cell growth pathways during early host response and also suggest a model of negative regulation of the autophagy pathway. We find significant cytoplasmic localization of p53 and reduced LC3-I to LC3-II conversion in response to Yp infection, consistent with negative regulation of autophagy. These studies allow for a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis mechanisms and the discovery of innovative approaches for prevention, early diagnosis, and

  19. Evidence that the structural conformation of envelope gp120 affects human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infectivity, host range, and syncytium-forming ability.

    PubMed Central

    Stamatatos, L; Cheng-Mayer, C

    1993-01-01

    We investigated how amino acid changes within and outside the V3 loop of the envelope glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 influence the infectivity, host range, and syncytium-forming ability of the virus. Our studies show that on the genomic backgrounds of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains SF2 and SF13, a reciprocal exchange of full-loop sequences does not alter the syncytium-forming ability of the viruses, indicating that a determinant(s) for this biological property maps outside the loop. However, specific amino acid substitutions, both within and outside the V3 loop, resulted in loss of infectivity, host range, and syncytium-forming potential of the virus. Furthermore, it appears that a functional interaction of the V3 loop with regions in the C2 domain of envelope gp120 plays a role in determining these biological properties. Structural studies of mutant glycoproteins show that the mutations introduced affect the proper association of gp120 with the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Our results suggest that mutations that alter the structure of the V3 loop can affect the overall conformation of gp120 and that, reciprocally, the structure of the V3 loop is influenced by the conformation of other regions of gp120. Since the changes in the replicative potential, host range, and fusogenic ability of the mutant viruses correlate well with the changes in gp120 conformation, as monitored by the association of gp120 with gp41, our results support a close relationship between envelope gp120 structural conformation and the biological phenotype of the virus. Images PMID:8350416

  20. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sunde, Marianne; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Böckerman, Inger; Norström, Madelaine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331) isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241) produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9) than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3), (p<0.01, Chi-square test). Identical cassette arrays including dfrA1-aadA1, aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, oxa-30-aadA1 (class 1 integrons) and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (class 2 integrons) were detected from both humans and meat. However, the most prevalent cassette array in human isolates, dfrA17-aadA5, did not occur in isolates from meat, suggesting a possible linkage between this class 1 integron and a subpopulation of E. coli adapted to a human host. The drfA1-aadA1 and aadA1 class 1 integrons were found frequently in both human and meat isolates. These isolates were subjected to further studies to investigate similarities with regard to transferability, plasmid and host strain characteristics. We detected incF plasmids with pMLST profile F24:A-:B1 carrying drfA1-aadA1 integrons in isolates from pork and in a more distantly related E. coli strain from a human with septicaemia. Furthermore, we showed that most of the class 1 integrons with aadA1 were located on incF plasmids with pMLST profile F51:A-:B10 in human isolates. The plasmid was present in unrelated as well as closely related host strains, demonstrating that dissemination of this

  1. Downregulation of host tryptophan–aspartate containing coat (TACO) gene restricts the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in human macrophage model

    PubMed Central

    Gogulamudi, Venkateswara Reddy; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Kaul, Deepak; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of mammalian hosts. Promastigotes of Leishmania are internalized by macrophages and transformed into amastigotes in phagosomes, and replicate in phagolysosomes. Phagosomal maturation arrest is known to play a crucial role in the survival of pathogenic Leishmania within activated macrophages. Recently, tryptophan–aspartate containing coat (TACO) gene has been recognized as playing a central role in the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages by arresting the phagosome maturation process. We postulated that a similar association of TACO gene with phagosomes would prevent the vacuole from maturation in the case of Leishmania. In this study we attempted to define the effect of TACO gene downregulation on the entry/survival of Leishmania donovani intracellularly, by treatment with Vitamin D3 (Vit.D3)/Retinoic acid (RA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA)/RA combinations in human THP-1 macrophages (in vitro). Treatment with these molecules downregulated the TACO gene in macrophages, resulting in reduced parasite load and marked reduction of disease progression in L. donovani infected macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that TACO gene downregulation may play a role in subverting macrophage machinery in establishing the L. donovani replicative niche inside the host. Our study is the first to highlight the important role of the TACO gene in Leishmania entry, survival and to identify TACO gene downregulation as potential drug target against leishmaniasis. PMID:26528242

  2. Downregulation of host tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO) gene restricts the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in human macrophage model.

    PubMed

    Gogulamudi, Venkateswara Reddy; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Kaul, Deepak; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of mammalian hosts. Promastigotes of Leishmania are internalized by macrophages and transformed into amastigotes in phagosomes, and replicate in phagolysosomes. Phagosomal maturation arrest is known to play a crucial role in the survival of pathogenic Leishmania within activated macrophages. Recently, tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO) gene has been recognized as playing a central role in the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages by arresting the phagosome maturation process. We postulated that a similar association of TACO gene with phagosomes would prevent the vacuole from maturation in the case of Leishmania. In this study we attempted to define the effect of TACO gene downregulation on the entry/survival of Leishmania donovani intracellularly, by treatment with Vitamin D3 (Vit.D3)/Retinoic acid (RA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA)/RA combinations in human THP-1 macrophages (in vitro). Treatment with these molecules downregulated the TACO gene in macrophages, resulting in reduced parasite load and marked reduction of disease progression in L. donovani infected macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that TACO gene downregulation may play a role in subverting macrophage machinery in establishing the L. donovani replicative niche inside the host. Our study is the first to highlight the important role of the TACO gene in Leishmania entry, survival and to identify TACO gene downregulation as potential drug target against leishmaniasis. PMID:26528242

  3. Transcriptional responses to exposure to the brassicaceous defence metabolites camalexin and allyl-isothiocyanate in the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Sellam, Adnane; Dongo, Anita; Guillemette, Thomas; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Simoneau, Philippe

    2007-03-01

    SUMMARY Alternaria brassicicola is the causative agent of black spot disease of Brassicaceae belonging to the genera Brassica and Raphanus. During host infection, A. brassicicola is exposed to high levels of antimicrobial defence compounds such as indolic phytoalexins and glucosinolate breakdown products. To investigate the transcriptomic response of A. brassicicola when challenged with brassicaceous defence metabolites, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was performed to generate two cDNA libraries from germinated conidia treated either with allyl isothiocyanate (Al-ITC) or with camalexin. Following exposure to Al-ITC, A. brassicicola displayed a response similar to that experienced during oxidative stress. Indeed, a substantial subset of differentially expressed genes was related to cell protection against oxidative damage. Treatment of A. brassicicola conidia with the phytoalexin camalexin appeared to activate a compensatory mechanism to preserve cell membrane integrity and, among the camalexin-elicited genes, several were involved in sterol and sphingolipid biosynthesis. The transcriptomic analysis suggested that protection against the two tested compounds also involved mechanisms aimed at limiting their intracellular accumulation, such as melanin biosynthesis (in the case of camalexin exposure only) and drug efflux. From the Al-ITC and the camalexin differentially expressed genes identified here, 25 were selected to perform time-course studies during interactions with brassicaceous hosts. In planta, up-regulation of all the selected genes was observed during infection of Raphanus sativus whereas only a subset were over-expressed during the incompatible interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia. PMID:20507491

  4. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Adam; Ongena, Marc; Duby, Francéline; Dommes, Jacques; Thonart, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR) in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR. PMID:19000301

  5. Human enteroids as an ex-vivo model of host-pathogen interactions in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Ettayebi, Khalil; Blutt, Sarah E; Hyser, Joseph M; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Crawford, Sue E; Broughman, James R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Currently, 9 out of 10 experimental drugs fail in clinical studies. This has caused a 40% plunge in the number of drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 2005. It has been suggested that the mechanistic differences between human diseases modeled in animals (mostly rodents) and the pathophysiology of human diseases might be one of the critical factors that contribute to drug failure in clinical trials. Rapid progress in the field of human stem cell technology has allowed the in-vitro recreation of human tissue that should complement and expand upon the limitations of cell and animal models currently used to study human diseases and drug toxicity. Recent success in the identification and isolation of human intestinal epithelial stem cells (Lgr5(+)) from the small intestine and colon has led to culture of functional intestinal epithelial units termed organoids or enteroids. Intestinal enteroids are comprised of all four types of normal epithelial cells and develop a crypt-villus differentiation axis. They demonstrate major intestinal physiologic functions, including Na(+) absorption and Cl(-) secretion. This review discusses the recent progress in establishing human enteroids as a model of infectious diarrheal diseases such as cholera, rotavirus, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, and use of the enteroids to determine ways to correct the diarrhea-induced ion transport abnormalities via drug therapy. PMID:24719375

  6. The tuberculous granuloma: an unsuccessful host defence mechanism providing a safety shelter for the bacteria?

    PubMed

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Breiman, Adrien; Allain, Sophie; Deknuydt, Florence; Altare, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    One of the main features of the immune response to M. Tuberculosis is the formation of an organized structure called granuloma. It consists mainly in the recruitment at the infectious stage of macrophages, highly differentiated cells such as multinucleated giant cells, epithelioid cells and Foamy cells, all these cells being surrounded by a rim of lymphocytes. Although in the first instance the granuloma acts to constrain the infection, some bacilli can actually survive inside these structures for a long time in a dormant state. For some reasons, which are still unclear, the bacilli will reactivate in 10% of the latently infected individuals, escape the granuloma and spread throughout the body, thus giving rise to clinical disease, and are finally disseminated throughout the environment. In this review we examine the process leading to the formation of the granulomatous structures and the different cell types that have been shown to be part of this inflammatory reaction. We also discuss the different in vivo and in vitro models available to study this fascinating immune structure. PMID:22811737

  7. Calcineurin/NFAT signaling and innate host defence: a role for NOD1-mediated phagocytic functions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATs) signaling pathway plays a central role in T cell mediated adaptive immune responses, but a number of recent studies demonstrated that calcineurin/NFAT signaling also plays a key role in the control of the innate immune response by myeloid cells. Calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506), are commonly used in organ transplantation to prevent graft rejection and in a variety of immune diseases. These immunosuppressive drugs have adverse effects and significantly increase host’s susceptibility towards bacterial or fungal infections. Recent studies highlighted the role of NFAT signaling in fungal infection and in the control of the pattern recognition receptor nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1), which predominantly senses invasive Gram-negative bacteria and mediates neutrophil phagocytic functions. This review summarises some of the current knowledge concerning the role of NFAT signaling in the innate immune response and the recent advances on NFAT-dependent inhibition of NOD1-mediated innate immune response caused by CsA, which may contribute to sensitizing transplant recipients to bacterial infection. PMID:24479879

  8. Estimating true human and animal host source contribution in quantitative microbial source tracking using the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Silkie, Sarah S; Nelson, Kara L; Wuertz, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    Cultivation- and library-independent, quantitative PCR-based methods have become the method of choice in microbial source tracking. However, these qPCR assays are not 100% specific and sensitive for the target sequence in their respective hosts' genome. The factors that can lead to false positive and false negative information in qPCR results are well defined. It is highly desirable to have a way of removing such false information to estimate the true concentration of host-specific genetic markers and help guide the interpretation of environmental monitoring studies. Here we propose a statistical model based on the Law of Total Probability to predict the true concentration of these markers. The distributions of the probabilities of obtaining false information are estimated from representative fecal samples of known origin. Measurement error is derived from the sample precision error of replicated qPCR reactions. Then, the Monte Carlo method is applied to sample from these distributions of probabilities and measurement error. The set of equations given by the Law of Total Probability allows one to calculate the distribution of true concentrations, from which their expected value, confidence interval and other statistical characteristics can be easily evaluated. The output distributions of predicted true concentrations can then be used as input to watershed-wide total maximum daily load determinations, quantitative microbial risk assessment and other environmental models. This model was validated by both statistical simulations and real world samples. It was able to correct the intrinsic false information associated with qPCR assays and output the distribution of true concentrations of Bacteroidales for each animal host group. Model performance was strongly affected by the precision error. It could perform reliably and precisely when the standard deviation of the precision error was small (≤ 0.1). Further improvement on the precision of sample processing and q

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Sonic Defences in Bombycoidea Caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Bura, Veronica L; Kawahara, Akito Y; Yack, Jayne E

    2016-01-01

    Caterpillars have long been used as models for studying animal defence. Their impressive armour, including flamboyant warning colours, poisonous spines, irritating sprays, and mimicry of plant parts, snakes and bird droppings, has been extensively documented. But research has mainly focused on visual and chemical displays. Here we show that some caterpillars also exhibit sonic displays. During simulated attacks, 45% of 38 genera and 33% of 61 species of silk and hawkmoth caterpillars (Bombycoidea) produced sounds. Sonic caterpillars are found in many distantly-related groups of Bombycoidea, and have evolved four distinct sound types- clicks, chirps, whistles and vocalizations. We propose that different sounds convey different messages, with some designed to warn of a chemical defence and others, to startle predators. This research underscores the importance of exploring acoustic communication in juvenile insects, and provides a model system to explore how different signals have evolved to frighten, warn or even trick predators. PMID:27510510

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Sonic Defences in Bombycoidea Caterpillars

    PubMed Central

    Bura, Veronica L.; Kawahara, Akito Y.; Yack, Jayne E.

    2016-01-01

    Caterpillars have long been used as models for studying animal defence. Their impressive armour, including flamboyant warning colours, poisonous spines, irritating sprays, and mimicry of plant parts, snakes and bird droppings, has been extensively documented. But research has mainly focused on visual and chemical displays. Here we show that some caterpillars also exhibit sonic displays. During simulated attacks, 45% of 38 genera and 33% of 61 species of silk and hawkmoth caterpillars (Bombycoidea) produced sounds. Sonic caterpillars are found in many distantly-related groups of Bombycoidea, and have evolved four distinct sound types- clicks, chirps, whistles and vocalizations. We propose that different sounds convey different messages, with some designed to warn of a chemical defence and others, to startle predators. This research underscores the importance of exploring acoustic communication in juvenile insects, and provides a model system to explore how different signals have evolved to frighten, warn or even trick predators. PMID:27510510

  11. The Morality and Economics of Safety in Defence Procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Tim

    Ministry of Defence policy is to conform as closely as possible to UK health and safety legislation in all its operations. We consider the implications of the law and the guidance provided by the Health and Safety Executive for the arguments we need to make for the safety of defence procurements, and extract four general principles to help in answering the questions that arise when considering the safety of systems with complex behaviour. One of these principles is analysed further to identify how case law and the guidance interpret the requirement for risks to be reduced so far as is reasonably practicable. We then apply the principles to answer some questions that have arisen in our work as Independent Safety Auditors, including the limits to the tolerability of risk to armed forces personnel and civilians in wartime, and the acceptability of the transfer of risk from one group to another when controls on risk are introduced.

  12. Fungal sensing of host environment.

    PubMed

    Braunsdorf, C; Mailänder-Sánchez, D; Schaller, M

    2016-09-01

    To survive inside a host, fungi have to adapt to a changing and often hostile environment and therefore need the ability to recognize what is going on around them. To adapt to different host niches, they need to sense external conditions such as temperature, pH and to recognize specific host factors. The ability to respond to physiological changes inside the host, independent of being in a commensal, pathogenic or even symbiotic context, implicates mechanisms for sensing of specific host factors. Because the cell wall is constantly in contact with the surrounding, fungi express receptors on the surface of their cell wall, such as pheromone receptors, which have important roles, besides mediating chemotropism for mating. We are not restricting the discussion to the human host because the receptors and mechanisms used by different fungal species to sense their environment are often similar even for plant pathogens. Furthermore, the natural habitat of opportunistic pathogenic fungi with the potential to cause infection in a human host is in soil and on plants. While the hosts' mechanisms of sensing fungal pathogens have been addressed in the literature, the focus of this review is to fill the gap, giving an overview on fungal sensing of a host-(ile) environment. Expanding our knowledge on host-fungal interactions is extremely important to prevent and treat diseases of pathogenic fungi, which are important issues in human health and agriculture but also to understand the delicate balance of fungal symbionts in our ecosystem. PMID:27155351

  13. Induced tRNA Import into Human Mitochondria: Implication of a Host Aminoacyl-tRNA-Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Gowher, Ali; Smirnov, Alexandre; Tarassov, Ivan; Entelis, Nina

    2013-01-01

    In human cell, a subset of small non-coding RNAs is imported into mitochondria from the cytosol. Analysis of the tRNA import pathway allowing targeting of the yeast tRNALysCUU into human mitochondria demonstrates a similarity between the RNA import mechanisms in yeast and human cells. We show that the cytosolic precursor of human mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetase (preKARS2) interacts with the yeast tRNALysCUU and small artificial RNAs which contain the structural elements determining the tRNA mitochondrial import, and facilitates their internalization by isolated human mitochondria. The tRNA import efficiency increased upon addition of the glycolytic enzyme enolase, previously found to be an actor of the yeast RNA import machinery. Finally, the role of preKARS2 in the RNA mitochondrial import has been directly demonstrated in vivo, in cultured human cells transfected with the yeast tRNA and artificial importable RNA molecules, in combination with preKARS2 overexpression or downregulation by RNA interference. These findings suggest that the requirement of protein factors for the RNA mitochondrial targeting might be a conserved feature of the RNA import pathway in different organisms. PMID:23799079

  14. Hosts and parasites as aliens.

    PubMed

    Taraschewski, H

    2006-06-01

    introduced areas, F. hepatica co-occurs with native or exotic populations of the congeneric F. gigantica, with thus far unknown implications. Over the fluke's extended range, in addition to domestic stock animals, wild native or naturalized mammals can also serve as final hosts. Indigenous and displaced populations of F. hepatica, however, have not yet been studied comparatively from an evolutionary perspective. A. crassus, from the Far East, has invaded three continents, without the previous naturalization of its natural host Anguilla japonica, by switching to the respective indigenous eel species. Local entomostrac crustaceans serve as susceptible intermediate hosts. The novel final hosts turned out to be naive in respect to the introduced nematode with far reaching consequences for the parasite's morphology (size), abundance and pathogenicity. Comparative infection experiments with Japanese and European eels yielded many differences in the hosts' immune defence, mirroring coevolution versus an abrupt host switch associated with the introduction of the helminth. In other associations of native hosts and invasive parasites, the elevated pathogenicity of the parasite seems to result from other deficiencies such as a lack of anti-parasitic behaviour of the naïve host compared to the donor host which displays distinct behavioural patterns, keeping the abundance of the parasite low. From the small amount of available literature, it can be concluded that the adaptation of certain populations of the novel host to the alien parasite takes several decades to a century or more. Summarizing all we know about hosts and parasites as aliens, tentative patterns and principles can be figured out, but individual case studies teach us that generalizations should be avoided. PMID:16768855

  15. Signalling Network Construction for Modelling Plant Defence Response

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovic, Dragana; Stare, Tjaša; Mozetič, Igor; Podpečan, Vid; Petek, Marko; Witek, Kamil; Dermastia, Marina; Lavrač, Nada; Gruden, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Plant defence signalling response against various pathogens, including viruses, is a complex phenomenon. In resistant interaction a plant cell perceives the pathogen signal, transduces it within the cell and performs a reprogramming of the cell metabolism leading to the pathogen replication arrest. This work focuses on signalling pathways crucial for the plant defence response, i.e., the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene signal transduction pathways, in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. The initial signalling network topology was constructed manually by defining the representation formalism, encoding the information from public databases and literature, and composing a pathway diagram. The manually constructed network structure consists of 175 components and 387 reactions. In order to complement the network topology with possibly missing relations, a new approach to automated information extraction from biological literature was developed. This approach, named Bio3graph, allows for automated extraction of biological relations from the literature, resulting in a set of (component1, reaction, component2) triplets and composing a graph structure which can be visualised, compared to the manually constructed topology and examined by the experts. Using a plant defence response vocabulary of components and reaction types, Bio3graph was applied to a set of 9,586 relevant full text articles, resulting in 137 newly detected reactions between the components. Finally, the manually constructed topology and the new reactions were merged to form a network structure consisting of 175 components and 524 reactions. The resulting pathway diagram of plant defence signalling represents a valuable source for further computational modelling and interpretation of omics data. The developed Bio3graph approach, implemented as an executable language processing and graph visualisation workflow, is publically available at http://ropot.ijs.si/bio3graph/and can be utilised for

  16. Mycoplasma CG- and GATC-specific DNA methyltransferases selectively and efficiently methylate the host genome and alter the epigenetic landscape in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Andrei V; Reyes, Leticia; Xu, Zhenkang; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Golovko, Georgiy; Peterson, Scott; Perucho, Manuel; Fofanov, Yuriy; Strongin, Alex Y

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is frequently observed in disease, including many cancer types, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Because germline and somatic mutations in the genes that are responsible for DNA methylation are infrequent in malignancies, additional mechanisms must be considered. Mycoplasmas spp., including Mycoplasma hyorhinis, efficiently colonize human cells and may serve as a vehicle for delivery of enzymatically active microbial proteins into the intracellular milieu. Here, we performed, for the first time, genome-wide and individual gene mapping of methylation marks generated by the M. hyorhinis CG- and GATC-specific DNA cytosine methyltransferases (MTases) in human cells. Our results demonstrated that, upon expression in human cells, MTases readily translocated to the cell nucleus. In the nucleus, MTases selectively and efficiently methylated the host genome at the DNA sequence sites free from pre-existing endogenous methylation, including those in a variety of cancer-associated genes. We also established that mycoplasma is widespread in colorectal cancers, suggesting that either the infection contributed to malignancy onset or, alternatively, that tumors provide a favorable environment for mycoplasma growth. In the human genome, ∼11% of GATC sites overlap with CGs (e.g., CGATmCG); therefore, the methylated status of these sites can be perpetuated by human DNMT1. Based on these results, we now suggest that the GATC-specific methylation represents a novel type of infection-specific epigenetic mark that originates in human cells with a previous exposure to infection. Overall, our findings unveil an entirely new panorama of interactions between the human microbiome and epigenome with a potential impact in disease etiology. PMID:25695131

  17. Identification of Host-Immune Response Protein Candidates in the Sera of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yeng; Azman, Siti Nuraishah; Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Chen, Yu Nieng; Wong, Yin-Ling; Gopinath, Subash C. B.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common cancers worldwide is oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), which is associated with a significant death rate and has been linked to several risk factors. Notably, failure to detect these neoplasms at an early stage represents a fundamental barrier to improving the survival and quality of life of OSCC patients. In the present study, serum samples from OSCC patients (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 25) were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and silver staining in order to identify biomarkers that might allow early diagnosis. In this regard, 2-DE spots corresponding to various up- and down-regulated proteins were sequenced via high-resolution MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and analyzed using the MASCOT database. We identified the following differentially expressed host-specific proteins within sera from OSCC patients: leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG), alpha-1-B-glycoprotein (ABG), clusterin (CLU), PRO2044, haptoglobin (HAP), complement C3c (C3), proapolipoprotein A1 (proapo-A1), and retinol-binding protein 4 precursor (RBP4). Moreover, five non-host factors were detected, including bacterial antigens from Acinetobacter lwoffii, Burkholderia multivorans, Myxococcus xanthus, Laribacter hongkongensis, and Streptococcus salivarius. Subsequently, we analyzed the immunogenicity of these proteins using pooled sera from OSCC patients. In this regard, five of these candidate biomarkers were found to be immunoreactive: CLU, HAP, C3, proapo-A1 and RBP4. Taken together, our immunoproteomics approach has identified various serum biomarkers that could facilitate the development of early diagnostic tools for OSCC. PMID:25272005

  18. Susceptibility and Immune Defence Mechanisms of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) against Entomopathogenic Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Abid; Rizwan-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Al-Ayedh, Hassan; AlJabr, Ahmed Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Insects infected with entomopathogenic fungi, experience physiological changes that influence their growth and immune defence. The potential of nine isolates of entomopathogenic fungi was evaluated after determining percent germination and relative conidial hydrophobicity. However, nutritional indices were evaluated after immersing eighth-instar Rhynchophorus ferrugineus larvae into each isolate suspension (1 × 10⁷ conidia/mL). The results showed that isolates B6884 and M9374 had 44.51% and 39.02% higher conidial hydrophobicity compared with isolate I03011 (least virulent). The results of nutritional index assays revealed a significant reduction in growth indices after infection with different isolates. Compared with control, B6884 and M9374 greatly decreased larval growth by reducing the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (36%-47%) and Efficacy of conversion of digested food (50%-63%). Furthermore, only isolate B6884 induced 100% mortality within 12 days. Compared with control, isolate I03011, possessing the lowest conidial hydrophobicity, only reduced 0.29% of the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (ECI) and 0.48% of the efficacy of conversion of digested food (ECD). Similarly, transcriptomic analysis of genes related to the Red palm weevil (RPW) immune response, including pathogen recognition receptors (C-type lectin and endo-beta-1,4-glucanse), signal modulator (Serine protease-like protein), signal transductors (Calmodulin-like protein and EF-hand domain containing protein) and effectors (C-type lysozyme, Cathepsin L., Defensin-like protein, Serine carboxypeptidase, and Thaumatin-like protein), was significantly increased in larval samples infected with B6884 and M9374. These results suggest that for an isolate to be virulent, conidial hydrophobicity and germination should also be considered during pathogen selection, as these factors could significantly impact host growth and immune defence mechanisms. PMID:27618036

  19. Focal accumulation of defences at sites of fungal pathogen attack

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, William; Somerville, Shauna C.

    2008-01-01

    Plants resist attack by haustorium-forming biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic fungi through fortification of the cell wall to prevent penetration through the wall and the subsequent establishment of haustorial feeding structures by the fungus. While the existence of cell wall-based defences has been known for many years, only recently have the molecular components contributing to such defences been identified. Forward genetic screens identified Arabidopsis mutants impaired in penetration resistance to powdery mildew fungi that were normally halted at the cell wall. Several loci contributing to penetration resistance have been identified and a common feature is the striking focal accumulation of proteins associated with penetration resistance at sites of interaction with fungal appressoria and penetration pegs. The focal accumulation of defence-related proteins and the deposition of cell wall reinforcements at sites of attempted fungal penetration represent an example of cell polarization and raise many questions of relevance, not only to plant pathology but also to general cell biology. PMID:18703493

  20. The protein quality control system manages plant defence compound synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; González-Guzmán, Miguel; De Geyter, Nathan; Lippens, Saskia; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Marhavý, Peter; Kremer, Anna; Morreel, Kris; Guérin, Christopher J; Tava, Aldo; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Thevelein, Johan M; Campos, Narciso; Goormachtig, Sofie; Goossens, Alain

    2013-12-01

    Jasmonates are ubiquitous oxylipin-derived phytohormones that are essential in the regulation of many development, growth and defence processes. Across the plant kingdom, jasmonates act as elicitors of the production of bioactive secondary metabolites that serve in defence against attackers. Knowledge of the conserved jasmonate perception and early signalling machineries is increasing, but the downstream mechanisms that regulate defence metabolism remain largely unknown. Here we show that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, jasmonate recruits the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) quality control system to manage the production of triterpene saponins, widespread bioactive compounds that share a biogenic origin with sterols. An ERAD-type RING membrane-anchor E3 ubiquitin ligase is co-expressed with saponin synthesis enzymes to control the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the supply of the ubiquitous terpene precursor isopentenyl diphosphate. Thus, unrestrained bioactive saponin accumulation is prevented and plant development and integrity secured. This control apparatus is equivalent to the ERAD system that regulates sterol synthesis in yeasts and mammals but that uses distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, of the HMGR degradation 1 (HRD1) type, to direct destruction of HMGR. Hence, the general principles for the management of sterol and triterpene saponin biosynthesis are conserved across eukaryotes but can be controlled by divergent regulatory cues. PMID:24213631