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Sample records for human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

  1. Levels of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase RNA in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, A.M.; Luthman, H.; Hellgren, D.; Lambert, B. )

    1990-02-01

    The gene for the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is expressed at a low level in many cells. As is the case with several other housekeeping genes,' thorough studies of hprt gene regulation have been hampered by the low levels of its mRNA. The authors have used RNA/RNA hybridization in solution to determine the concentration of hprt-RNA in human cells. The sensitivity and specificity of the method have been validated, and it is shown that hprt-RNA can be accurately determined at a level of a few mRNA molecules per cell. As expected for a housekeeping gene, low and relatively constant hprt-RNA levels were found in primary cultures of normal amnion cells and fibroblasts, EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines, neuroblastoma, glioblastoma, and melanoma cell cultures. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of this method for determinations of low levels of RNA and clearly show induction of hprt-RNA after mitogenic stimulation of human lymphocytes.

  2. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  3. Molecular and clonal analysis of in vivo hprt (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) mutations in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R.J.; O'Neill, J.P.; Nicklas, J.A.; Allegretta, M. . Genetics Lab.); Recio, L.; Skopek, T.R. )

    1989-08-08

    There is no longer doubt that gene mutations occur in vivo in human somatic cells, and that methods can be developed to detect, quantify and study them. Four assays are now available for such purpose; two detecting mutations that arise in bone marrow erythroid stem cells and two defining mutations that occur in T-lymphocytes. The red cell assays measure changes in mature red blood cells that involve either the blood group glycophorin-A locus or the hemoglobin loci; the lymphocyte assays score for genetic events at either the X-chromosomal hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (hprt) locus. We describe here our attempts in studying in vivo gene mutations in human T-lymphocytes. 35 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-09-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no (3H)hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of (3H)hypoxanthine to (3H)IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol.

  5. Deletion and insertion in vivo somatic mutations in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of human T-lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart-Schultz, K.J.; Jones, I.M.

    1997-12-31

    Deletion and insertion mutations have been found to be a major component of the in vivo somatic mutation spectrum in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of T-lymphocytes. In a population of 172 healthy people (average age, 34; mutant frequency, 10.3 x 10{sup -6}), deletion/insertion mutations constituted 41% (89) of the 217 independent mutations, the remainder being base substitutions. Mutations were identified by multiplex PCR assay of genomic DNA for exon regions, by sequencing cDNA, or sequencing genomic DNA. The deletion and insertion mutations were divided among {+-} 1 to 2 basepair (bp) frameshifts (14%, 30), small deletions and insertions of 3-200 bps (13%, 28), large deletions of one or more exons (12%, 27), and complex events (2%, 4). Frameshift mutations were dominated by -1 bp deletions (21 of 30). Exon 3 contained five frameshift mutations in the run of 6 Gs, the only site in the coding region with multiple frameshift mutations, possibly caused by strand dislocation during replication. Both endpoints were sequenced for 23 of the 28 small deletions/insertions including two tandem duplication events in exon 6. More small deletions (8/28), possibly mediated by trinucleotide repeats, occurred in exon 2 than in the other exons. Large deletions included total gene deletions (6), exon 2 + 3 deletions (4), and loss of multiple (9) and single exons (8) in genomic DNA. The diverse mutation spectrum indicates that multiple mechanisms operated at many different sequences and provides a resource for examination of deletion mutation. 68 refs.

  6. High-resolution methylation analysis of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene 5{prime} region on the active and inactive X chromosomes: Correlation with binding sites for transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hornstra, I.K.; Yang, T.P.

    1994-02-01

    DNA methylation within GC-rich promoters of constitutively expressed X-linked genes is correlated with transcriptional silencing on the inactive X chromosome in female mammals. For most X-linked genes, X chromosome inactivation results in transcriptionally active and inactive alleles occupying each female nucleus. To examine mechanisms responsible for maintaining this unique system of differential gene expression, we have analyzed the methylation of individual cytosine residues in the 5{prime} CpG island of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the active and inactive X chromosomes. These studies demonstrate the 5{prime} CpG islands of active and 5-azacytidine-reactivated alleles are essentially unmethylated while the inactive allele is hypermethylated. The inactive allele is completely methylated at nearly all CpG dinucleotides except in a 68-bp region containing four adjacent GC boxes where most CpG dinucleotides are either unmethylated or partially methylated. Curiously, these GC boxes exhibit in vivo footprints only on the active X chromosome, not on the inactive X. The methylation pattern of the inactive HPRT gene is strikingly different from that reported for the inactive X-linked human phosphoglycerate kinase gene which exhibits methylation at all CpG sites in the 5{prime} CpG island. These results suggest that the position of methylated CpG dinucleotides, the density of methylated CpGs, the length of methylated regions, and/or chromatin structure associated with methylated DNA may have a role in repressing the activity of housekeeping promoters on the inactive X chromosome. The pattern of DNA methylation on the inactive human HPRT gene may also provide insight into the process of inactivating the gene early in female embryogenesis. 55 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase: radiochemical assay procedures for the forward and reverse reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; O'Sullivan, W.J.

    1985-02-15

    Simple and rapid radiochemical assay procedures for the forward (IMP synthesis) and reverse (IMP pyrophosphorolysis) reactions catalyzed by hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase have been developed. Enzyme activity in the forward direction was assessed by measuring the amount of (8-/sup 14/C)IMP formed from (8-/sup 14/C)hypoxanthine following their separation by polyethyleneimine-cellulose TLC in methanol:water (1:1, v/v). (8-/sup 14/C)IMP has been synthesized from (8-/sup 14/C)hypoxanthine, using hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase derived from human brain, with subsequent purification by elution from phenyl boronate-agarose. Enzyme activity in the reverse direction was assessed by measuring the amount of (8-/sup 14/C)uric acid formed from the labeled IMP following their separation by polyethyleneimine-cellulose TLC in 0.2 M LiCl saturated with boric acid (pH 4.5):95% ethanol (1:1, v/v), the transferase reaction being coupled with excess xanthine oxidase and catalase to overcome the unfavorable equilibrium.

  8. Mosaic mice with teratocarcinoma-derived mutant cells deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Dewey, M J; Martin, D W; Martin, G R; Mintz, B

    1977-12-01

    Mutagenized stem cells of a cultured mouse teratocarcinoma cell line were selected for resistance to the purine base analog 6-thioguanine. Cells of a resistant clone were completely deficient in activity of the enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT, IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), the same X-linked lesion as occurs in human Lesch-Nyhan disease. After microinjection into blastocysts of another genetic strain, the previously malignant cells successfully participated in normal embryogenesis and tumor-free, viable mosaic mice were obtained. Cells of tumor lineage were identified by strain markers in virtually all tissues of some individuals. Mature function of those cells was evident from their tissue-specific products (e.g., melanins, liver proteins). These mutagenized teratocarcinoma cells are therefore developmentally totipotent. Retention of the severe HPRT deficiency in the differentiated state was documented in extracts of mosaic tissues by depressed specific activity of the enzyme, and also by presence of unlabeled clones in autoradiographs of explanted cells incubated in [(3)H]hypoxanthine. Some mosaic individuals had mutant-strain cells in only one or a few tissues. Such animals may provide unique opportunities to identify the tissue sources of particular aspects of the complex disease syndrome. The tissue distribution of HPRT-deficient cells suggests that selection against them is particularly strong in blood of the mosaic mice, as is already known to be the case in human heterozygotes. This phenotypic parallelism supports the expectation that afflicted F(1) male mice that might be obtained from mutant germ cells can serve as a model of the human disease. PMID:271982

  9. Spectrum of point mutations in the coding region of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene in human T-lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Podlutsky, A; Osterholm, A M; Hou, S M; Hofmaier, A; Lambert, B

    1998-04-01

    The hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in 6-thioguanine (TG) resistant T-lymphocytes is a useful target for the study of somatic in vivo mutagenesis, since it provides information about a broad spectrum of mutation. Mutations in the hprt coding region were studied in 124 TG-resistant T-cell clones from 38 healthy, non-smoking male donors from a previously studied population of bus maintenance workers, fine-mechanics and laboratory personnel. Their mean age was 43 years (range 23-64) and their hprt mutant frequency was 9.3 +/- 5.2 x 10(-6) (mean +/- SD, range 1.4-22.6 x 10(-6)). Sequence analysis of hprt cDNA identified 115 unique mutations; 76% were simple base substitutions, 10% were +/-1 bp frameshifts, and 10% were small deletions within exons (3-52 bp). In addition, two tandem base substitutions and one complex mutation were observed. Simple base substitutions were observed at 55 (20%) of 281 sites known to be mutable in the hprt coding sequence. The distribution of these mutations was significantly different than would be expected based upon a Poisson distribution (P < 0.0001), suggesting the existence of 'hotspots'. All of the 87 simple base substitutions occurred at known mutable sites, but eight were substitutions of a kind that have not previously been reported at these sites. The most frequently mutated sites were cDNA positions 197 and 146, with six and five independent mutations respectively. Four mutations were observed at position 131, and three each at positions 143, 208, 508 and 617. Transitions (52%) were slightly more frequent than tranversions (48%), and mutations at GC base pairs (56%) more common than mutations at AT base pairs (44%). GC > AT was the most common type of base pair substitution (37%). The majority of the mutations at GC base pairs (78%) occurred at sites with G in the non-transcribed strand. All but one of eight mutations at CpG-sites were of the kind expected from deamination of methylated cytosine. Deletion of a single base pair (-1 frameshift) was three times more frequent than insertion of a single bp (+1 frameshift). Almost half (6/13) of the small (3-52 bp) deletions within the coding sequence clustered in the 5' end of exon 2. Short repeats and other sequence motifs that have been associated with replication error were found in the flanking regions of most of the frameshifts and small deletions. However, several differences in the local sequence context between +/-1 frameshift and deletion mutations were also noticed. The present results identify positions 197, 146 and possibly 131 as hotspots for base substitution mutations, and confirm previously reported hotspots at positions 197, 508 and 617. In addition, the earlier notion of a deletion hotspot in the 5'end of exon 2 was confirmed. The observations of these mutational cluster regions in different human populations suggest that they are due to endogeneous mechanisms of mutagenesis, or to ubiquitous environmental influences. The emerging background spectrum of somatic in vivo mutation in the human hprt gene provides a useful basis for comparisons with radiation or chemically induced mutational spectra, as well as with gene mutations in human tumors. PMID:9600338

  10. Clinical and biochemical observations on three cases of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, D N; Moss, I K; Nicholls, A; Scott, J T; Snaith, M L; Watson, M R

    1975-01-01

    Clinical and enzymatic studies on two brothers with severe deficiencies of erythrocyte hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase) are described, and are compared with similar studies of a classical case of the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome from another family. The two brothers have no neurological abnormalities, only traces of erythrocyte HGPRTase, erythrocyte adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activities approaching the high levels found in the Lesch-Nyhan patient, and similarly raised plasma and urinary concentrations of uric acid. Despite these strong biochemical similarities between the three patients, there were wide differences in the clinical case histories. In both families the enzyme deficiency appeared to be inherited as an X-linked character through asymptomatic carrier females. The relationship of HGPRTase deficiencies to the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is discussed. Some observations relating to techniques are reported. Cellulose acetate has been found to give much better separations of labelled reaction products in low-level phosphoribosyltransferase assays than filter paper, when used as a supporting medium for electrophoresis. The analysis of hair follicles gives indications of individuals heterozygous for the enzyme deficiency, but the proportion of enzyme-deficient follicles was very small, and the test needs support from studies of other cell types. Using haemolysates, there were signs of a slow indirect conversion of hypoxanthine to inosinic acid, via inosine. Inosine appears to be labelled by a ribosyl-transfer reaction. PMID:1155984

  11. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  12. Crystallization of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryo; Nakamura, Shota; Yoshida, Takuya; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2007-05-01

    Human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase has been crystallized using microseeding methods and X-ray diffraction data have been collected at 2.0 resolution. In the NAD biosynthetic pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase; EC 2.4.2.12) plays an important role in catalyzing the synthesis of nicotinamide mononucleotide from nicotinamide and 5?-phosphoribosyl-1?-pyrophosphate. Because the diffraction pattern of the initally obtained crystals was not suitable for structure analysis, the crystal quality was improved by successive use of the microseeding technique. The resultant crystals diffracted to 2.0 resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.56, b = 106.40, c = 82.78 . Here, the crystallization of human NMPRTase is reported in the free form; the crystals should be useful for inhibitor-soaking experiments on the enzyme.

  13. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT+/− cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT+/− rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  14. Slow ligand-induced conformational switch increases the catalytic rate in Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Karmakar, Tarak; Prahlada Rao, Vasudeva S; Nagappa, Lakshmeesha K; Balasubramanian, Sundaram; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2015-05-01

    P. falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) exhibits a unique mechanism of activation where the enzyme switches from a low activity (unactivated) to a high activity (activated) state upon pre-incubation with substrate/products. Xanthine phosphoribosylation by unactivated PfHGXPRT exhibits a lag phase, the duration of which reduces with an increase in concentration of the enzyme or substrate, PRPPMg(2+). Activated PfHGXPRT does not display the lag phase and exhibits a ten-fold drop in the Km value for PRPPMg(2+). These observations suggest the involvement of ligand-mediated oligomerization and conformational changes in the process of activation. The dipeptide Leu-Lys in the PPi binding site of human and T. gondii HG(X)PRT that facilitates PRPPMg(2+) binding by isomerization from trans to cis conformation is conserved in PfHGXPRT. Free energy calculations using the well-tempered metadynamics technique show the ligand-free enzyme to be more stable when this dipeptide is in the trans conformation than in the cis conformation. The high rotational energy barrier observed for the conformational change from experimental and computational studies permits delineation of the activation mechanism. PMID:25824378

  15. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P.; Ye, Shui Qing

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) was first reported as a pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor in 1994 with little notice, but it has received increasing attention in recent years due to accumulating evidence indicating that NAMPT is a pleiotropic protein such as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and a visfatin. Now, NAMPT has been accepted as an official name of this protein. Because of NAMPT’s multiple functions in a variety of physiological processes, their dysregulations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases or conditions such as acute lung injury, aging, atherosclerosis, cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and sepsis. This review will cover the current understanding of NAMPT’s structure and functions with an emphasis on recent progress of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase’s pathological roles in various human diseases and conditions. Future directions on exploring its Terra incognita will be offered in the end. PMID:22140607

  16. The Housekeeping Gene Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) Regulates Multiple Developmental and Metabolic Pathways of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Joel S.; Friedmann, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND) are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA) multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease. PMID:24130677

  17. The housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) regulates multiple developmental and metabolic pathways of murine embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hyuk; Park, Yongjin; Bader, Joel S; Friedmann, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND) are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA) multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease. PMID:24130677

  18. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step PreissHandler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  19. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  20. Phenotypic Variation Among Seven Members of One Family with Deficiency of Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Picot, Irne; Aug, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Brengre; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  1. Phenotypic variation among seven members of one family with deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Augé, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Bérengère; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H A

    2013-11-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  2. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  3. The restriction endonuclease Alu I induces chromosomal aberrations and mutations in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus, but not in the Na+/K+ ATPase locus in V79 hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Obe, G; Von der Hude, W; Scheutwinkel-Reich, M; Basler, A

    1986-05-01

    The restriction endonuclease Alu I induces chromosomal aberrations and mutations in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus as measured by 6-thioguanine resistance (TGr) in V79 hamster cells. Alu I does not induce mutations in the Na+/K+ ATPase locus as measured by ouabain resistance (OUAr). The data are interpreted to mean that most if not all Alu I-induced TGr mutations represent chromosomal aberrations. PMID:3010099

  4. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Prez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savn, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  5. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn?HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite. PMID:24923662

  6. Strand-specific mutation induction by 1,2-dibromomethane at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Ballering, L A; Vogel, E W; Vrieling, H; Nivard, M J

    1998-01-01

    The nature of mutations induced by 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) at the hprt (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) gene was analysed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-9) cells. Molecular characterization of 36 hprt mutants at the cDNA level yielded 19 GC-->AT transitions, two AT-->CG transversions, three frameshift mutations, two identical small deletions and 10 exon deletions. Further analysis of the deletion mutants by amplification of specific exons from genomic DNA showed two more GC-->AT transitions at splice sites and an approximately 70 bp deletion. Assuming that the S-[2-(N7-guanyl)ethyl]glutathione adduct is responsible for the GC-->AT transitions, 90% of the affected guanines were located in the non-transcribed strand of the hprt gene, suggesting a strand bias in repair of this adduct. Nearest neighbour analysis of induced GC-->AT transitions indicates a preference for a 5'-PyPuG DNA sequence, i.e. 15/21 mutated guanines were located in either a TGG or a CAG DNA sequence. These molecular data on DBE-induced mutations showed similar features as data from a study by Graves et al. (Mutagenesis, 11, 229-233, 1996) in which they analyzed 13 hprt mutants induced by DBE in CHO-K1 cells. Six of the seven GC-->AT mutations were on positions mutated more than once among the 36 hprt mutants in the present study. The combined findings suggest that some positions seem to be hot spots for DBE-induced mutations. Concerning the relevance of these in vitro studies for germ cell mutagenesis the conclusion may be that these data lend further support to the view that mutation spectra derived from in vitro systems have little predictive value for the nature of mutations induced in post-meiotic germ cells in vivo, as demonstrated for other alkylating agents in both Drosophila and mice. PMID:9491396

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum and Human 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Martin M; Hockov, Dana; Wang, Tzu-Hsuan; Dra?nsk, Martin; Potov-Slav?tnsk, Lenka; Prochzkov, Elika; Edstein, Michael D; Chavchich, Marina; Keough, Dianne T; Guddat, Luke W; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-10-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) are a promising class of antimalarial therapeutic drug leads that exhibit a wide variety of Ki values for Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and human hypoxanthine-guanine-(xanthine) phosphoribosyltransferases [HG(X)PRTs]. A novel series of ANPs, analogues of previously reported 2-(phosphonoethoxy)ethyl (PEE) and (R,S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl (HPMP) derivatives, were designed and synthesized to evaluate their ability to act as inhibitors of these enzymes and to extend our ongoing antimalarial structure-activity relationship studies. In this series, (S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propyl (HPEP), (S)-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propanoic acid (CPME), or (S)-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propanoic acid (CPEE) are the acyclic moieties. Of this group, (S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propylguanine (HPEPG) exhibits the highest potency for PfHGXPRT, with a Ki value of 0.1??M and a Ki value for human HGPRT of 0.6??M. The crystal structures of HPEPG and HPEPHx (where Hx=hypoxanthine) in complex with human HGPRT were obtained, showing specific interactions with active site residues. Prodrugs for the HPEP and CPEE analogues were synthesized and tested for in vitro antimalarial activity. The lowest IC50 value (22??M) in a chloroquine-resistant strain was observed for the bis-amidate prodrug of HPEPG. PMID:26368337

  8. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  9. Extensive regulation of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT) expression in human tissues and tumors.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Pereira, Sara; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Silva, Sarah S; Correia, Mariana Gonçalves; Neto, Célia; da Costa, Luís Teixeira; Amorim, António; Silva, Raquel M

    2016-01-12

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a cofactor in redox reactions and a substrate for NAD-consuming enzymes, such as PARPs and sirtuins. As cancer cells have increased NAD requirements, the main NAD salvage enzymes in humans, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), are involved in the development of novel anti-cancer therapies. Knowledge of the expression patterns of both genes in tissues and tumors is critical for the use of nicotinic acid (NA) as cytoprotective in therapies using NAMPT inhibitors. Herein, we provide a comprehensive study of NAPRT and NAMPT expression across human tissues and tumor cell lines. We show that both genes are widely expressed under normal conditions and describe the occurrence of novel NAPRT transcripts. Also, we explore some of the NAPRT gene expression mechanisms. Our findings underline that the efficiency of NA in treatments with NAMPT inhibitors is dependent on the knowledge of the expression profiles and regulation of both NAMPT and NAPRT. PMID:26675378

  10. Purine-phosphoribosyltransferase activities in rat and mouse tissues and in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, A W

    1966-09-01

    1. The activities of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase in extracts of rat and mouse liver, brain, spleen, heart and kidney, of rat bone marrow and of Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells have been measured. The specific activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in tumour cells (3mmu-moles of nucleotide formed/min./mg. of protein) was between 15 and 60 times the activity of any mouse tissue examined. Hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyltransferase activity was greater in extracts of tumour cells than in mouse tissues, but the difference was not great. 2. The specific activities of both adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase in ascites-tumour cells decreased respectively by 57% and 36% 2 days after the cells had been inoculated into mice. After 4 days of tumour growth the specific activities of both enzymes increased, reaching a maximum at 10 days. 3. The activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in rat-liver extracts increased steadily up to 4 days after partial hepatectomy, and was still above the control value after 14 days. Hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyltransferase activity in extracts of regenerating rat liver did not increase until the second day after operation and had begun to decrease by the fourth day. 4. From the results it was concluded that adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase may be physiologically important enzymes in rapidly growing tissues, and that inhibitors of the former enzyme have potential value in chemotherapy. PMID:16742414

  11. Aza-acyclic nucleoside phosphonates containing a second phosphonate group as inhibitors of the human, Plasmodium falciparum and vivax 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases and their prodrugs as antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Keough, Dianne T; Hockov, Dana; Janeba, Zlatko; Wang, Tzu-Hsuan; Naesens, Lieve; Edstein, Michael D; Chavchich, Marina; Guddat, Luke W

    2015-01-22

    Hypoxanthine-guanine-[xanthine] phosphoribosyltransferase (HG[X]PRT) is considered an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy as it is the only pathway for the synthesis of the purine nucleoside monophosphates required for DNA/RNA production. Thus, inhibition of this enzyme should result in cessation of replication. The aza-acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (aza-ANPs) are good inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum HGXPRT (PfHGXPRT), with Ki values as low as 0.08 and 0.01 ?M for Plasmodium vivax HGPRT (PvHGPRT). Prodrugs of these aza-ANPs exhibit antimalarial activity against Pf lines with IC50 values (0.8-6.0 ?M) and have low cytotoxicity against human cells. Crystal structures of six of these compounds in complex with human HGPRT have been determined. These suggest that the different affinities of these aza-ANPs could be due to the flexibility of the loops surrounding the active site as well as the flexibility of the inhibitors, allowing them to adapt to fit into three binding pockets of the enzyme(s). PMID:25494538

  12. Excision of hypoxanthine from DNA containing dIMP residues by the Escherichia coli, yeast, rat, and human alkylpurine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed Central

    Saparbaev, M; Laval, J

    1994-01-01

    The deamination of adenine residues in DNA generates hypoxanthine, which is mutagenic since it gives rise to an A.T to G.C transition. Hypoxanthine is removed by hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity present in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. Using polydeoxyribonucleotides or double-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides that contain dIMP residues, we show that this activity in E. coli is associated with the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II coded for by the alkA gene. This conclusion is based on the following facts: (i) the two enzymatic activities have the same chromatographic behavior on various supports and they have the same molecular weight, (ii) both are induced during the adaptive response, (iii) a multicopy plasmid bearing the alkA gene overproduces both activities, (iv) homogeneous preparation of AlkA has both enzymatic activities, (v) the E. coli alkA- mutant does not show any detectable hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity. Under the same experimental conditions, but using different substrates, the same amount of AlkA protein liberates 1 pmol of 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and 1.2 fmol of hypoxanthine from dIMP-containing DNA. The Km for the latter substrate is 420 x 10(-9) M as compared to 5 x 10(-9) M for alkylated DNA. Hypoxanthine is released as a free base during the reaction. Duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing hypoxanthine positioned opposite T, G, C, and A were cleaved efficiently. ANPG protein, APDG protein, and MAG protein--the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases of human, rat, and yeast origin, respectively--were also able to release hypoxanthine from various DNA substrates containing dIMP residues. The mammalian enzyme is by far the most efficient hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase of all the enzymes tested. Images PMID:8016081

  13. Metabolomics Analysis of Metabolic Effects of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Inhibition on Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotideconsuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometrybased metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level. PMID:25486521

  14. Visfatin Impairs Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Rat and Human Mesenteric Microvessels through Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Javier; Villalobos, Laura A.; Cercas, Elena; Leivas, Alejandra; Bermejo, Elena; Carraro, Raffaele; Snchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peir, Concepcin

    2011-01-01

    Visfatin, also known as extracellular preB-cell colonyenhancing factor (PBEF) and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), is an adipocytokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Circulating visfatin levels have been positively associated with vascular damage and endothelial dysfunction. Here, we investigated the ability of visfatin to directly impair vascular reactivity in mesenteric microvessels from both male Sprague-Dawley rats and patients undergoing non-urgent, non-septic abdominal surgery. The pre-incubation of rat microvessels with visfatin (50 and 100 ng/mL) did not modify the contractile response to noradrenaline (1 pmol/L to 30 mol/L), as determined using a small vessel myograph. However, visfatin (10 to 100 ng/mL) concentration-dependently impaired the relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh; 100 pmol/L to 3 mol/L), without interfering with the endothelium-independent relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (1 nmol/L to 3 mol/L). In both cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and rat microvascular preparations, visfatin (50 ng/mL) stimulated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminiscence. The relaxation to ACh impaired by visfatin was restored by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mol/L). Additionally, the Nampt inhibitor APO866 (10 mmol/L to 10 mol/L), but not an insulin receptor-blocking antibody, also prevented the stimulation of NADPH oxidase and the relaxation impairment elicited by visfatin. Accordingly, the product of Nampt activity nicotinamide mononucleotide (100 nmol/L to 1 mmol/L) stimulated endothelial NADPH oxidase activity and concentration-dependently impaired ACh-induced vasorelaxation. In human mesenteric microvessels pre-contracted with 35 mmol/L potassium chloride, the endothelium-dependent vasodilation to bradykinin (1 nmol/L to 3 mol/L) was equally impaired by visfatin and restored upon co-incubation with APO866. In conclusion, visfatin impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation through a mechanism involving NADPH oxidase stimulation and relying on Nampt enzymatic activity, and therefore arises as a potential new player in the development of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:22073309

  15. GENETIC ASSAY FOR ANEUPLOIDY: QUANTITATION OF CHROMOSOME LOSS USING A MOUSE/HUMAN MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL LINE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A genetic assay is described in which a mouse/human hybrid cell line R3-5 containing a single human chromosome (a monochromosomal hybrid) is used to detect chemically induced aneuploidy. The hybrid cells are deficient in hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and ...

  16. Application of HPLC to study the kinetics of a branched bi-enzyme system consisting of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and xanthine oxidase--an important biochemical system to evaluate the efficiency of the anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine in ALL cell line.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sukirti; Paul, Manash K; Balaram, Hemalatha; Mukhopadhyay, Anup Kumar

    2007-05-01

    The thiopurine antimetabolite 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) is an important chemotherapeutic drug in the conventional treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). 6MP is mainly catabolized by both hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) to form thioinosinic monophosphate (TIMP) (therapeutically active metabolite) and 6-thiouric acid (6TUA) (inactive metabolite), respectively. The activity of both the enzymes varies among ALL patients governing the active and the inactive metabolite profile within the immature lymphocytes. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the kinetic nature of the branched bi-enzyme system acting on 6MP and to quantitate TIMP and 6TUA formed when the two enzymes are present in equal and variable ratios. The quantification of the branched kinetics using spectrophotometric method presents problem due to the closely apposed lambda(max) of the substrates and products. Hence, employing an HPLC method, the quantification of the products was done with the progress of time. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of substrate was found to be 10nM and for products as 50 nM. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1 nM for the substrate and the products. The method exhibited linearity in the range of 0.01-100 microM for 6MP and 0.05-100 microM for both 6TUA and TIMP. The amount of TIMP formed was higher than that of 6TUA in the bi-enzyme system when both the enzymes were present in equivalent enzymatic ratio. It was further found that enzymatic ratios play an important role in determining the amounts of TIMP and 6TUA. This method was further validated using actively growing T-ALL cell line (Jurkat) to study the branched kinetics, wherein it was observed that treatment of 50 microM 6MP led to the generation of 12 microM TIMP and 0.8 microM 6TUA in 6 h at 37 degrees C. PMID:17081813

  17. Identification of benzothiophene amides as potent inhibitors of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Dong, Guoqiang; He, Shipeng; Xu, Tianying; Wang, Xia; Liu, Na; Zhang, Wannian; Miao, Chaoyu; Sheng, Chunquan

    2016-02-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is an attractive therapeutic target for cancer. A Nampt inhibitor with novel benzothiophene scaffold was discovered by high throughput screening. Herein the structure-activity relationship of the benzothiophene Nampt inhibitor was investigated. Several new inhibitors demonstrated potent activity in both biochemical and cell-based assays. In particular, compound 16b showed good Nampt inhibitory activity (IC50=0.17μM) and in vitro antitumor activity (IC50=3.9μM, HepG2 cancer cell line). Further investigation indicated that compound 16b could efficiently induce cancer cell apoptosis. Our findings provided a good starting point for the discovery of novel antitumor agents. PMID:26755394

  18. MULTIPLEX PCR ANALYSIS OF IN VIVO-ARISING DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was adapted for the rapid and efficient evaluation of the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene in human T-lymphocytes for deletions. he hprt clonal assay was used to isolate in-vivo-arising hprt-deficient...

  19. DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF T-LYMPHOCYTES AS A BIOMARKER FOR GENOMIC REARRANGEMENTS IMPORTANT IN HUMAN CANCERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA sequence of 11 in vivo-arising intragenic deletion breaksite junctions occurring in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene of human T-lymphocytes was determined and deletions ranged in size from 16 bp to 4057 bp. o extensive homology was found at the dele...

  20. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M; Heruth, Daniel P; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-05-10

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  1. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  2. Resolving differences in substrate specificities between human and parasite phosphoribosyltransferases via analysis of functional groups of substrates and receptors.

    PubMed

    Gasik, Zofia; Shugar, David; Antosiewicz, Jan M

    2013-01-01

    We herein review experimental and theoretical approaches widely applied to delineation of the differences in substrate specificities between human and parasite phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTases), the latter of which are key targets for treatment of diseases caused by parasites. Standard Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations have been applied to determine why the human PRTase prefers guanine over xanthine, whereas the Tritrichomonas foetus enzyme exhibits only a slight preference. We analyze this problem with the aid of standard MD simulations, as well as constant-pH MD simulations. Comparison of results of the two approaches reveals substantial differences, e.g. several Asp and Glu residues in the parasite enzyme, and one Glu residue in the human enzyme, are predicted to be permanently or frequently protonated during constant-pH simulations, whereas standard MD simulations assume that these residues are always ionized. Most interesting is the observation of a large conformational change, leading to tighter binding of the ligand, observed in constant-pH MD simulations of the parasite PRTase complexed with XMP, and lack of such a change in the human enzyme complexed with XMP. PMID:23170881

  3. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Gyun Kim, Tae; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Bu Kang, Gil; Youn Kang, Jung; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Yop An, Jun; Ryoung Park, Kyoung; Lee, Youngjin; Jun Im, Young; Hyuck Lee, Jun; Hyun Eom, Soo

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  4. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Tae Gyun; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kang, Jung Youn; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Im, Young Jun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  5. Fragment-based design of 3-aminopyridine-derived amides as potent inhibitors of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT).

    PubMed

    Dragovich, Peter S; Zhao, Guiling; Baumeister, Timm; Bravo, Brandon; Giannetti, Anthony M; Ho, Yen-Ching; Hua, Rongbao; Li, Guangkun; Liang, Xiaorong; Ma, Xiaolei; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Angela; Skelton, Nicholas J; Wang, Chengcheng; Wang, Weiru; Wang, Yunli; Xiao, Yang; Yuen, Po-wai; Zak, Mark; Zhao, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaozhang

    2014-02-01

    The fragment-based identification of two novel and potent biochemical inhibitors of the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) enzyme is described. These compounds (51 and 63) incorporate an amide moiety derived from 3-aminopyridine, and are thus structurally distinct from other known anti-NAMPT agents. Each exhibits potent inhibition of NAMPT biochemical activity (IC50=19 and 15 nM, respectively) as well as robust antiproliferative properties in A2780 cell culture experiments (IC50=121 and 99 nM, respectively). However, additional biological studies indicate that only inhibitor 51 exerts its A2780 cell culture effects via a NAMPT-mediated mechanism. The crystal structures of both 51 and 63 in complex with NAMPT are also independently described. PMID:24433859

  6. Do clinical features of Lesch-Nyhan disease correlate more closely with hypoxanthine or guanine recycling?

    PubMed

    Schretlen, David J; Callon, Wynne; Ward, Rebecca E; Fu, Rong; Ho, Tiffany; Gordon, Barry; Harris, James C; Jinnah, H A

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a rare, X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), an enzyme in the purine salvage pathway. HGprt has two functions; it recycles hypoxanthine and guanine. Which of these two functions is more relevant for pathogenesis is unclear because some evidence points to hypoxanthine recycling, but other evidence points to guanine recycling. In this study, we selectively assayed hypoxanthine (Hprt) and guanine (Gprt) recycling in skin fibroblasts from 17 persons with LND, 11 with an attenuated variant of the disease (LNV), and 19 age-, sex-, and race-matched healthy controls (HC). Activity levels of both enzymes differed across groups (p?hypoxanthine recycling. PMID:26067813

  7. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosophoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G

    2007-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity is an inborn error of purine metabolism associated with uric acid overproduction and a continuum spectrum of neurological manifestations depending on the degree of the enzymatic deficiency. The prevalence is estimated at 1/380,000 live births in Canada, and 1/235,000 live births in Spain. Uric acid overproduction is present inall HPRT-deficient patients and is associated with lithiasis and gout. Neurological manifestations include severe action dystonia, choreoathetosis, ballismus, cognitive and attention deficit, and self-injurious behaviour. The most severe forms are known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (patients are normal at birth and diagnosis can be accomplished when psychomotor delay becomes apparent). Partial HPRT-deficient patients present these symptoms with a different intensity, and in the least severe forms symptoms may be unapparent. Megaloblastic anaemia is also associated with the disease. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive, thus males are generally affected and heterozygous female are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. To date, more than 300 disease-associated mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been identified. The diagnosis is based on clinical and biochemical findings (hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria associated with psychomotor delay), and enzymatic (HPRT activity determination in haemolysate, intact erythrocytes or fibroblasts) and molecular tests. Molecular diagnosis allows faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis can be performed with amniotic cells obtained by amniocentesis at about 15–18 weeks' gestation, or chorionic villus cells obtained at about 10–12 weeks' gestation. Uric acid overproduction can be managed by allopurinol treatment. Doses must be carefully adjusted to avoid xanthine lithiasis. The lack of precise understanding of the neurological dysfunction has precluded development of useful therapies. Spasticity, when present, and dystonia can be managed with benzodiazepines and gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibitors such as baclofen. Physical rehabilitation, including management of dysarthria and dysphagia, special devices to enable hand control, appropriate walking aids, and a programme of posture management to prevent deformities are recommended. Self-injurious behaviour must be managed by a combination of physical restraints, behavioural and pharmaceutical treatments. PMID:18067674

  8. INDUCTION OF MUTATIONS BY CHEMICAL AGENTS AT THE HYPOXANTHINE-GUANINE PHOSPHORIBOSYL TRANSFERASE LOCUS IN HUMAN EPITHELIAL TERATOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance by chemical mutagens was examined in a line of cells derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma cell clone. The cells, designated as P3 cells, have a stable diploid karyotype with 46(XX) chromosomes, including a translocation betwee...

  9. Identification of amides derived from 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-5-carboxylic acid as potent inhibitors of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhang; Bair, Kenneth W; Bauer, Paul; Baumeister, Timm; Bowman, Krista K; Buckmelter, Alexandre J; Caligiuri, Maureen; Clodfelter, Karl H; Feng, Yezhen; Han, Bingsong; Ho, Yen-Ching; Kley, Nikolai; Li, Hong; Liang, Xiaorong; Liederer, Bianca M; Lin, Jian; Ly, Justin; O'Brien, Thomas; Oeh, Jason; Oh, Angela; Reynolds, Dominic J; Sampath, Deepak; Sharma, Geeta; Skelton, Nicholas; Smith, Chase C; Tremayne, Jarrod; Wang, Leslie; Wang, Weiru; Wang, Zhongguo; Wu, Hongxing; Wu, Jiansheng; Xiao, Yang; Yang, Guangxing; Yuen, Po-wai; Zak, Mark; Dragovich, Peter S

    2013-10-15

    Potent, 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-containing inhibitors of the human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) enzyme were identified using structure-based design techniques. Many of these compounds exhibited nanomolar antiproliferation activities against human tumor lines in in vitro cell culture experiments, and a representative example (compound 26) demonstrated encouraging in vivo efficacy in a mouse xenograft tumor model derived from the A2780 cell line. This molecule also exhibited reduced rat retinal exposures relative to a previously studied imidazo-pyridine-containing NAMPT inhibitor. Somewhat surprisingly, compound 26 was only weakly active in vitro against mouse and monkey tumor cell lines even though it was a potent inhibitor of NAMPT enzymes derived from these species. The compound also exhibited only minimal effects on in vivo NAD levels in mice, and these changes were considerably less profound than those produced by an imidazo-pyridine-containing NAMPT inhibitor. The crystal structures of compound 26 and the corresponding PRPP-derived ribose adduct in complex with NAMPT were also obtained. PMID:24021463

  10. A human-mouse somatic hybrid line selected for human deoxycytidine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chan, T S; Long, C; Green, H

    1975-01-01

    A new selective medium has been developed for cells containing the enzyme deoxycytidine deaminase. This medium contains hypoxanthine, aminopterin, and 5-methyldeoxycytidine (HAM medium). To survive in the presence of the aminopterin, the cells must utilize deoxycytidine deaminase to convert the 5-methyldeoxycytidine to thymidine. The cells must also have thymidine kinase and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. A mouse cell line deficient in deoxycytidine deaminase has been isolated from a deoxycytidine kinase-deficient line, using 5-bromodeoxycytidine as the selective agent. A hybrid line between this double mutant and a human diploid fibroblast was isolated in HAM medium. The hybrid line contains the chromosomes expected of a human-mouse hybrid. The deoxycytidine deaminase isozyme patterns on cellogel show that the human-mouse hybrid cell line produces an enzyme with an electrophoretic mobility intermediate between that of the human and that of the mouse. PMID:1235901

  11. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  12. Stable association of the human transgenome and host murine chromosomes demonstrated with trispecific microcell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, R E; Ruddle, F H

    1977-01-01

    Trispecific microcell hybrids were prepared by transferring limited numbers of chromosomes from a human/mouse gene-transfer cell line to a Chinese hamster recipient line. The donor cells employed were murine L-cells that stably expressed the human form of the enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. Karyotypic, zymographic, and back-selection tests of the resulting human/mouse/Chinese hamster microcell hybrids provided strong genetic evidence for a stable association of the human transgenome with host murine chromosomes in stable gene-transfer cell lines. This association, which may represent physical integration of the transgenome into the host cell genome, occurred at multiple chromosomal sites. Images PMID:269444

  13. Novel Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene Mutations in Saudi Arabian Hyperuricemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mohammed; Al-Arfaj, Abdulrahman Saud; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Fahad Al-Arfaj, Hussein; Reddy Parine, Narasimha; Purusottapatnam Shaik, Jilani; Khan, Zahid; Ali Khan Pathan, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, a steady increase in the incidence of HPRT-related hyperuricemia (HRH) has been observed in Saudi Arabia. We examined all the nine exons of HPRT gene for mutations in ten biochemically confirmed hyperuricemia patients, including one female and three normal controls. In all, we identified 13 novel mutations in Saudi Arabian HPRT-related hyperuricemia patients manifesting different levels of uric acid. The Lys103Met alteration was highly recurrent and was observed in 50% of the cases, while Ala160Thr and Lys158Asn substitutions were found in two patients. Moreover, in 70% of the patients ?2 mutations were detected concurrently in the HPRT gene. Interestingly, one of the patients that harbored Lys103Met substitution along with two frameshift mutations at codons 85 and 160 resulting in shortened protein demonstrated unusually high serum uric acid level of 738??mol/L. Two of the seven point mutations that resulted in amino acid change (Lys103Met and Val160Gly) were predicted to be damaging by SIFT and Polyphen and were further analyzed for their protein stability and function by molecular dynamics simulation. The identified novel mutations in the HPRT gene may prove useful in the prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:25136576

  14. First Crystal Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferase: Complexes with GMP and Pyrophosphate and with Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates Whose Prodrugs Have Antituberculosis Activity.

    PubMed

    Eng, Wai Soon; Hockov, Dana; pa?ek, Petr; Janeba, Zlatko; West, Nicholas P; Woods, Kyra; Naesens, Lieve M J; Keough, Dianne T; Guddat, Luke W

    2015-06-11

    Human tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease affecting millions of lives. Because of emerging resistance to current medications, new therapeutic drugs are needed. One potential new target is hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (MtHGPRT), a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. Here, newly synthesized acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) have been shown to be competitive inhibitors of MtHGPRT with Ki values as low as 0.69 ?M. Prodrugs of these compounds arrest the growth of a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis with MIC50 values as low as 4.5 ?M and possess low cytotoxicity in mammalian cells (CC50 values as high as >300 ?M). In addition, the first crystal structures of MtHGPRT (2.03-2.76 resolution) have been determined, three of these in complex with novel ANPs and one with GMP and pyrophosphate. These data provide a solid foundation for the further development of ANPs as selective inhibitors of MtHGPRT and as antituberculosis agents. PMID:25915781

  15. In vivo footprint analysis and genomic sequencing of the human hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) 5 prime region on the active and inactive X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Hornstra, I.K.; Yang, T.P. )

    1991-03-11

    In female placental mammals, one of the two X chromosome in each somatic cell is randomly inactivated during female embryogenesis as a mechanism for dosage compensation. Once a given X chromosome is inactivated, all mitotic progeny maintain the same X chromosome in the inactive state. DNA-protein interactions and DNA methylation are hypothesized to maintain this allele-specific system of differential gene expression. Ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR) in vivo footprinting and genomic sequencing were used to study DNA-protein interactions and DNA-methylation within the 5{prime} region of the X-linked human HPRT gene on the active and inactive X chromosomes. In vivo footprint analysis reveals at least one DNA-protein interaction specific to the active HPRT allele in human male fibroblast cells and hamster-human hybrid cells containing only the active human X chromosome. In the region examined, all CpG dinucleotides are methylated on the inactive HPRT allele and unmethylated on the active X allele in hamster-human hybrid cells carrying either the inactive or active human X chromosome, respectively. Thus, DNA-methylation may be mediating the differential binding of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins to the active or inactive HPRT alleles.

  16. Interactions at the Dimer Interface Influence the Relative Efficiencies for Purine Nucleotide Synthesis and Pyrophosphorolysis in a Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Canyuk, Bhutorn; Medrano, Francisco J.; Wenck, MaryAnne; Focia, Pamela J.; Eakin, Ann E.; Craig III, Sydney P.

    2010-03-05

    Enzymes that salvage 6-oxopurines, including hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs), are potential targets for drugs in the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. For this reason, a number of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the HPRTs from protozoa have been reported. Although these structures did not reveal why HPRTs need to form dimers for catalysis, they revealed the existence of potentially relevant interactions involving residues in a loop of amino acid residues adjacent to the dimer interface, but the contributions of these interactions to catalysis remained poorly understood. The loop, referred to as active-site loop I, contains an unusual non-proline cis-peptide and is composed of residues that are structurally analogous with Leu67, Lys68, and Gly69 in the human HPRT. Functional analyses of site-directed mutations (K68D, K68E, K68N, K68P, and K68R) in the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease, show that the side-chain at position 68 can differentially influence the K{sub m} values for all four substrates as well as the k{sub cat} values for both IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis. Also, the results for the K68P mutant are inconsistent with a cis-trans peptide isomerization-assisted catalytic mechanism. These data, together with the results of structural studies of the K68R mutant, reveal that the side-chain of residue 68 does not participate directly in reaction chemistry, but it strongly influences the relative efficiencies for IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis, and the prevalence of lysine at position 68 in the HPRT of the majority of eukaryotes is consistent with there being a biological role for nucleotide pyrophosphorolysis.

  17. Human Regulatory Gene for Inducible Tyrosine Aminotransferase in Rat-Human Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Carlo M.; Litwack, Gerald; Koprowski, Hilary

    1973-01-01

    The inducibility of tyrosine aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.5) by corticosteroid hormones in rat-human hybrid clones was studied. The presence of human X chromosome activity in the cells was always associated with the suppression of tyrosine aminotransferase inducibility in all the clones examined. Negative correlation between the human X chromosome and inducibility of the enzyme was clearly established. Corticosteroid receptor was present to the same extent in hybrid cell clones that either contained or lost the human X chromosome. The human repressor for inducible tyrosine aminotransferase has a linkage relationship with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) and, therefore, can be assigned to the X chromosome. Images PMID:4146214

  18. IR spectra of guanine and hypoxanthine isolated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheina, G. G.; Stepanian, S. G.; Radchenko, E. D.; Blagoi, Yu. P.

    1987-05-01

    High resolution spectra of guanine, hypoxanthine, isocytosine, 2-aminopyrimidine and their deutero- and methyl derivatives obtained in Ar matrices by the low temperature IR spectroscopy method are reported. Normal modes of enol tautomers of guanine, 9-CH 3-guanine, hypoxanthine and 2-aminopurine are calculated. Force fields are the same as for purine. Results calculated are used to interpret the experimental spectra. Ketoenol tautomerism is shown to exist in guanine and hypoxanthine, the proportions of enol tautomer being 50 and 5%, respectively. Possible biological applications of the results obtained are discussed.

  19. Trypanosoma brucei adenine-phosphoribosyltransferases mediate adenine salvage and aminopurinol susceptibility but not adenine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Alexandra; Lamprea-Burgunder, Estelle; Graf, Fabrice E; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    African trypanosomes, like all obligate parasitic protozoa, cannot synthesize purines de novo and import purines from their hosts to build nucleic acids. The purine salvage pathways of Trypanosoma brucei being redundant, none of the involved enzymes is likely to be essential. Nevertheless they can be of pharmacological interest due to their role in activation of purine nucleobase or nucleoside analogues, which only become toxic when converted to nucleotides. Aminopurine antimetabolites, in particular, are potent trypanocides and even adenine itself is toxic to trypanosomes at elevated concentrations. Here we report on the T. brucei adenine phosphoribosyltransferases TbAPRT1 and TbAPRT2, encoded by the two genes Tb927.7.1780 and Tb927.7.1790, located in tandem on chromosome seven. The duplication is syntenic in all available Trypanosoma genomes but not in Leishmania. While TbAPRT1 is cytosolic, TbAPRT2 possesses a glycosomal targeting signal and co-localizes with the glycosomal marker aldolase. Interestingly, the distribution of glycosomal targeting signals among trypanosomatid adenine phosphoribosyltransferases is not consistent with their phylogeny, indicating that the acquisition of adenine salvage to the glycosome happened after the radiation of Trypanosoma. Double null mutant T. brucei Δtbaprt1,2 exhibited no growth phenotype but no longer incorporated exogenous adenine into the nucleotide pool. This, however, did not reduce their sensitivity to adenine. The Δtbaprt1,2 trypanosomes were resistant to the adenine isomer aminopurinol, indicating that it is activated by phosphoribosyl transfer. Aminopurinol was about 1000-fold more toxic to bloodstream-form T. brucei than the corresponding hypoxanthine isomer allopurinol. Aminopurinol uptake was not dependent on the aminopurine permease P2 that has been implicated in drug resistance. PMID:24596669

  20. Genetics of cell surface receptors for bioactive polypeptides: Binding of epidermal growth factor is associated with the presence of human chromosome 7 in human-mouse cell hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Behzadian, M. Ali; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    1980-01-01

    Mouse A9 cells, L-cell-derived mutants deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8) were found to be incapable of binding 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) to the cell surface. The A9 cells were fused with human diploid fibroblasts (WI-38) possessing EGF-binding ability, and human-mouse cell hybrids (TA series) were isolated after hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine/ouabain selection. Analyses of isozyme markers and chromosomes of four representative clones of TA hybrids indicated that the expression of EGF-binding ability is correlated with the presence of human chromosome 7 or 19. Four subclones were isolated from an EGF-binding-positive line, TA-4, and segregation of EGF-binding was found to be concordant with the expression of human mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDHM; L-malate:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.37), a marker for chromosome 7, but not with glucosephosphate isomerase (GPI; D-glucose-6-phosphate ketol-isomerase, EC 5.3.1.9), a marker for chromosome 19. Furthermore, evidence from 27 clones of AUG hybrids that were produced between A9 and another human fibroblast line, GM1696, carrying an X/7 chromosome translocation indicated that EGF-binding ability segregates together with human MDHM and two X-linked markers, HPRT and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49), that are located on the translocation chromosome 7p+. These results permit assignment of the gene, designated EGFS, which is associated with the expression of EGF-binding ability, to human chromosome 7 and its localization to the p22-qter region. Because the EGF receptor is reported to be a glycoprotein the EGFS could be either a structural gene(s) for receptor protein or a gene(s) for modifying the receptor protein through glycosylation. Images PMID:6968072

  1. The synthetic substance hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide elicits alarm reactions in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Parra, Kevin V; Adrian, James C; Gerlai, Robert

    2009-12-28

    Zebrafish, one of the preferred study species of geneticists, is gaining increasing popularity in behavioral neuroscience. This small and prolific species may be an excellent tool with which the biological mechanisms of vertebrate brain function and behavior are investigated. Zebrafish has been proposed as a model organism in the analysis of fear responses and human anxiety disorders. Species-specific cues signaling the presence of predators have been successfully utilized in such research. Zebrafish has been shown to respond to its natural alarm substance with species-typical fear reactions. However, the extraction of this alarm substance and ascertaining its consistent dosing has been problematic. A synthetic substance with a known chemical identity and molecular weight would allow precise dosing and experimental control. Previously, the chemical component, hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide, common to several fish alarm substances has been identified and has been shown to elicit alarm reactions in fish species belonging to the Osteriophysan superorder. In the current study we investigate the effect of hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide by exposing zebrafish to three different concentrations of this synthetic substance. Our results show that the substance efficaciously induces species-typical fear reactions increasing the number of erratic movement episodes and jumps in zebrafish. We discuss the translational relevance of our findings and conclude that hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide will have utility to elicit fear responses in the laboratory in a precisely controlled manner in zebrafish. PMID:19583985

  2. Retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer into human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H E; Finley, K D; Hershberg, R M; Katzman, S S; Laikind, P K; Seegmiller, J E; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K; Jolly, D J

    1985-11-29

    The transfer of the human gene for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) into human bone marrow cells was accomplished by use of a retroviral vector. The cells were infected in vitro with a replication-incompetent murine retroviral vector that carried and expressed a mutant HPRT complementary DNA. The infected cells were superinfected with a helper virus and maintained in long-term culture. The production of progeny HPRT virus by the bone marrow cells was demonstrated with a colony formation assay on cultured HPRT-deficient, ouabain-resistant murine fibroblasts. Hematopoietic progenitor cells able to form colonies of granulocytes or macrophages (or both) in semisolid medium in the presence of colony stimulating factor were present in the nonadherent cell population. Colony forming units cloned in agar and subsequently cultured in liquid medium produced progeny HPRT virus, indicating infection of this class of hematopoietic progenitor cell. PMID:3864246

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uridine and inosine: high concentrations of the ATP metabolite, hypoxanthine, after hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, R A; Lund, R J

    1983-01-01

    CSF obtained for clinical purposes from newborn, children and adults has been analysed by high pressure liquid chromatography for hypoxanthine, xanthine, inosine, uridine and urate. Large rises in hypoxanthine and to a lesser extent xanthine occur for about 24 h after hypoxia. High concentrations were associated with later evidence of brain damage or subsequent death. Changes in CSF could be independent of those in plasma. Small or negligible rises were associated with localised and generalised infections including bacterial meningitis, fits, or both. Marked and rapid rises were found after death. These estimations may "predict" the extent of brain damage or brain death. PMID:6681617

  4. Over-expression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Rodney E; Bui, Marilyn M; Coppola, Domenico; Hakam, Ardeshir

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) synthesis and is required for cell growth, survival, DNA replication and repair, and angiogenesis. Nampt expression increases gene expression which promotes cell survival and increases SirT1 activity, promoting angiogenesis, and it is increased in several human malignancies. Recently, others have shown that ovarian serous adenocarcinomas (OSAs) express high levels of activated Stat3. Since Nampt expression is increased by Stat3, we hypothesized that Nampt protein might be highly expressed in OSAs. Using tissue microarray (TMA) and the avidin-biotin complex immunohistochemical technique we examined Nampt expression in 47 samples of benign ovarian tissue and 49 samples of ovarian serous adenoacarcinomas. Our data show that Nampt protein expression is significantly increased in OSAs as compared to benign ovarian tissue (0.49+/-0.12 benign vs. 4.78+/-0.46 malignant; +/-standard error of the mean). This is the first report demonstrating Nampt overexpression in OSA, which may shed light on the pathogenesis of OSA. Further studies of the role of Nampt overexpresion in OSA may shed light on the prognosis and clinical course of OSA. Last, since an effective pharmacologic Nampt inhibitor is currently in clinical use, further studies of Nampt overexpression in OSA may be used in selecting patients for Nampt inhibitor therapy. PMID:20606733

  5. V(D)J RECOMBINASE-MEDIATED DELETION OF THE HPRT GENE IN T-LYMPHOCYTES FROM ADULT HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hprt T-cell cloning assay allows the detection of mutations occurring in vivo in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of T-lymphocytes. e have shown previously that the illegitimate activity of V(D)J recombinase accounts for about 40% of the hprt mut...

  6. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosylotransferase deficiency--the spectrum of Polish mutations.

    PubMed

    Jurecka, A; Popowska, E; Tylki-Szymanska, A; Kubalska, J; Ciara, E; Krumina, Z; Sykut-Cegielska, J; Pronicka, E

    2008-12-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; EC 2.4.2.8) deficiency (OMIM 308000) is an inborn error of purine metabolism. The defect causes three overlapping clinical syndromes: Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND; OMIM 300322), HPRT-related hyperuricaemia with neurologic dysfunction (HRND) and hyperuricaemia alone (HRH; OMIM 300322). During the period 1977-2007, 18 patients belonging to 12 Polish families and one Latvian family with HPRT deficiency have been identified. The majority of patients had a typical LND phenotype, three patients were classified as HRH and one patient as an intermediate phenotype (HRND). Genetic analysis revealed 12 different HPRT1 mutations, five of them being unique. In two typical Lesch-Nyhan families a novel single-base substitution, c.220T>G (p.Phe74Val), and a deletion of seven nucleotides, c.395_401del7 (p.Ile132LysfsX3), were found. Another novel single-base substitution, c.295T>G (p.Phe99Val), was identified in a patient with severe partial deficiency of HPRT with neurological dysfunction. In patients belonging to the HRH group, two transitions were detected: c.481G>A (p.Ala161Thr) and c.526C>T (p.Pro176Ser). Other mutations identified in Polish patients, c.131A>G (p.Asp44Gly), c.222C>A (p.Phe74Leu), c.385-1G>A (p.Asn129_Glu134del), c.482C>A (p.Ala161Glu), c.508C>T (p.Arg170Ter) and c.569G>A (p.Gly190Glu), have been reported previously in unrelated patients and are located within one of the clusters of hot spots of the HPRT1 gene (exons 3, 7 and 8). Patients with partial phenotypes presented mutations predicted to permit some degree of residual enzyme function (single-base substitutions). All mutations, except c.508C>T (p.Arg170Ter), were found in single families only, indicating the lack of any common mutation causing HPRT deficiency in Poland. PMID:19016344

  7. Inhibitory action of hypoxanthine on meiotic resumption of denuded pig follicular oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyano, T; Ebihara, M; Goto, Y; Hirao, Y; Nagai, T; Kato, S

    1995-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the direct action of hypoxanthine, which has been reported to be present in pig follicular fluid, on spontaneous meiotic resumption of pig denuded oocytes in vitro. No oocytes, which were surrounded by a cumulus and some membrana granulosa cells directly adjacent to it from healthy antral follicles, underwent germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) when they were cultured in serum-supplemented 199 with or without 4 mM hypoxanthine. On the other hand, 81% of denuded oocytes prepared from such cumulus-oocyte-granulosa cell complexes showed GVBD after 24 h of culture. Hypoxanthine inhibited significantly this spontaneous resumption of meiosis in denuded oocytes. The inhibitory action of hypoxanthine was dose dependent at concentrations of 1-6 mM and was reversible following subsequent culture of the oocytes in hypoxanthine-free medium. However, premature chromosome condensation was observed in oocytes cultured in hypoxanthine-supplemented medium, and the oocytes released from the influence of hypoxanthine completed GVBD and reached the second metaphase slightly faster than those freshly isolated from the follicle. These results suggest that hypoxanthine inhibits spontaneous meiotic resumption of pig oocytes in vitro. However, the inhibitory action of hypoxanthine does not prevent all events involved in GVBD from occurring. PMID:7561726

  8. Structure of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Pei; Xu, Rui; Gao, Zeng-Qiang; Xu, Jian-Hua; Hou, Hai-Feng; Li, Li-Qin; She, Zhun; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) catalyzes the OMP-forming step in de novo pyrimidine-nucleotide biosynthesis. Here, the crystal structure of OPRTase from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans is reported at 2.4? resolution. S. mutans OPRTase forms a symmetric dimer and each monomer binds two sulfates at the active sites. The structural symmetry of the sulfate-binding sites and the missing loops in this structure are consistent with a symmetric catalysis mechanism. PMID:20445243

  9. Mechanism of Feedback Allosteric Inhibition of ATP Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the first and committed step in l-histidine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is therefore subjected to allosteric feedback regulation. Because of its essentiality, this enzyme is being studied as a potential target for novel anti-infectives. To understand the basis for its regulation, we characterized the allosteric inhibition using gel filtration, steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics, and the pH dependence of inhibition and binding. Gel filtration experiments indicate that MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase is a hexamer in solution, in the presence or absence of l-histidine. Steady-state kinetic studies demonstrate that l-histidine inhibition is uncompetitive versus ATP and noncompetitive versus PRPP. At pH values close to neutrality, a Kii value of 4 μM was obtained for l-histidine. Pre-steady-state kinetic experiments indicate that chemistry is not rate-limiting for the overall reaction and that l-histidine inhibition is caused by trapping the enzyme in an inactive conformation. The pH dependence of binding, obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance, indicates that l-histidine binds better as the neutral α-amino group. The pH dependence of inhibition (Kii), on the contrary, indicates that l-histidine better inhibits MtATP-phosphoribosytransferase with a neutral imidazole and an ionized α-amino group. These results are combined into a model that accounts for the allosteric inhibition of MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:22989207

  10. Retinal toxicity, in vivo and in vitro, associated with inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zabka, Tanja S; Singh, Jatinder; Dhawan, Preeti; Liederer, Bianca M; Oeh, Jason; Kauss, Mara A; Xiao, Yang; Zak, Mark; Lin, Tori; McCray, Bobbi; La, Nghi; Nguyen, Trung; Beyer, Joseph; Farman, Cynthia; Uppal, Hirdesh; Dragovich, Peter S; O'Brien, Thomas; Sampath, Deepak; Misner, Dinah L

    2015-03-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a pleiotropic protein with intra- and extra-cellular functions as an enzyme, cytokine, growth factor, and hormone. NAMPT is of interest for oncology, because it catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the salvage pathway to generate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which is considered a universal energy- and signal-carrying molecule involved in cellular energy metabolism and many homeostatic functions. This manuscript describes NAMPT inhibitor-induced retinal toxicity that was identified in rodent safety studies. This toxicity had a rapid onset and progression and initially targeted the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layers. Using in vivo safety and efficacy rodent studies, human and mouse cell line potency data, human and rat retinal pigmented epithelial cell in vitro systems, and rat mRNA expression data of NAMPT, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase, and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferease (NMNAT) in several tissues from rat including retina, we demonstrate that the retinal toxicity is on-target and likely human relevant. We demonstrate that this toxicity is not mitigated by coadministration of nicotinic acid (NA), which can enable NAD production through the NAMPT-independent pathway. Further, modifying the physiochemical properties of NAMPT inhibitors could not sufficiently reduce retinal exposure. Our work highlights opportunities to leverage appropriately designed efficacy studies to identify known and measurable safety findings to screen compounds more rapidly and reduce animal use. It also demonstrates that in vitro systems with the appropriate cell composition and relevant biology and toxicity endpoints can provide tools to investigate mechanism of toxicity and the human translation of nonclinical safety concerns. PMID:25505128

  11. Increased Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Rhabdomyosarcomas and Leiomyosarcomas Compared to Skeletal and Smooth Muscle Tissue.

    PubMed

    Vora, Moiz; Ansari, Junaid; Shanti, Rabie M; Veillon, Diana; Cotelingam, James; Coppola, Domenico; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2016-02-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in NAD synthesis and is up-regulated in several human malignancies, including breast, colon, prostate, thyroid, gastric, and several hematopoietic malignancies. In some malignancies, such as gastric, thyroid, and prostate carcinomas, higher NAMPT expression correlates with deeper tumor invasion, increased metastatic potential and chemotherapy resistance. We employed tissue microarray immunohistochemistry to examine NAMPT expression in benign skeletal and smooth muscle, leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas (graded low-, intermediate-, and high-grade), and spindle, embryonal, pleomorphic, and alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. We found low to intermediate NAMPT expression in benign tissue, leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas (low- and intermediate-grades), and spindle cell rhabdomyosarcomas. In contrast, high-grade leiomyosarcomas and embryonal, alveolar, and pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcomas showed high NAMPT expression. Herein we show for the first time that NAMPT is overexpressed in certain sarcoma types and the level of NAMPT expression correlates with tumor behavior. PMID:26851003

  12. Mechanism of feedback allosteric inhibition of ATP phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Pedreño, Sònia; Pisco, João Pedro; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Kelly, Geoff; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro Sório

    2012-10-01

    MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the first and committed step in l-histidine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is therefore subjected to allosteric feedback regulation. Because of its essentiality, this enzyme is being studied as a potential target for novel anti-infectives. To understand the basis for its regulation, we characterized the allosteric inhibition using gel filtration, steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics, and the pH dependence of inhibition and binding. Gel filtration experiments indicate that MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase is a hexamer in solution, in the presence or absence of l-histidine. Steady-state kinetic studies demonstrate that l-histidine inhibition is uncompetitive versus ATP and noncompetitive versus PRPP. At pH values close to neutrality, a K(ii) value of 4 μM was obtained for l-histidine. Pre-steady-state kinetic experiments indicate that chemistry is not rate-limiting for the overall reaction and that l-histidine inhibition is caused by trapping the enzyme in an inactive conformation. The pH dependence of binding, obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance, indicates that l-histidine binds better as the neutral α-amino group. The pH dependence of inhibition (K(ii)), on the contrary, indicates that l-histidine better inhibits MtATP-phosphoribosytransferase with a neutral imidazole and an ionized α-amino group. These results are combined into a model that accounts for the allosteric inhibition of MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:22989207

  13. The function of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chiao-Po; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Oka, Shinichi; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its roles as a coenzyme and an electron transfer molecule, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a substrate of sirtuins, a family of enzymes that control aging and metabolism. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), a rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD+ salvage pathway, plays an important role in controlling the level of NAD+ and the activity of Sirt1 in the heart and the cardiomyocytes therein. Nampt protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury by stimulating Sirt1. In this review, we summarize what is currently known regarding the function of Nampt in the heart. PMID:25277684

  14. The function of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiao-Po; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Oka, Shinichi; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-11-01

    In addition to its roles as a coenzyme and an electron transfer molecule, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a substrate of sirtuins, a family of enzymes that control aging and metabolism. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), a rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD+ salvage pathway, plays an important role in controlling the level of NAD+ and the activity of Sirt1 in the heart and the cardiomyocytes therein. Nampt protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury by stimulating Sirt1. In this review, we summarize what is currently known regarding the function of Nampt in the heart. PMID:25277684

  15. On the accessibility to conical intersections in purines: hypoxanthine and its singly protonated and deprotonated forms.

    PubMed

    Villabona-Monsalve, Juan P; Noria, Raquel; Matsika, Spiridoula; Pen, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    The dynamics following electronic excitation of hypoxanthine and its nucleoside inosine were studied by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion. Our objective was to explore variants of the purinic DNA bases in order to determine the molecular parameters that increase or reduce the accessibility to ground state conical intersections. From experiments in water and methanol solution we conclude that both dominant neutral tautomers of hypoxanthine exhibit ultrashort excited state lifetimes (? < 0.2 ps), which are significantly shorter than in the related nucleobase guanine. This points to a more accessible conical intersection for the fluorescent state upon removal of the amino group, present in guanine but absent in hypoxanthine. The excited state dynamics of singly protonated hypoxanthine were also studied, showing biexponential decays with a 1.1 ps component (5%) besides a sub-0.2 ps ultrafast component. On the other hand, the S(1) lifetimes of the singly deprotonated forms of hypoxanthine and inosine show drastic differences, where the latter remains ultrafast but the singly deprotonated hypoxanthine shows a much longer lifetime of 19 ps. This significant variation is related to the different deprotonation sites in hypoxanthine versus inosine, which gives rise to significantly different resonance structures. In our study we also include multireference perturbation theory (MRMP2) excited state calculations in order to determine the nature of the initial electronic excitation in our experiments and clarify the ordering of the states in the singlet manifold at the ground state geometry. In addition, we performed multireference configuration interaction calculations (MR-CIS) that identify the presence of low-lying conical intersections for both prominent neutral tautomers of hypoxanthine. In both cases, the surface crossings occur at geometries reached by out of plane opposite motions of C2 and N3. The study of this simpler purine gives several insights into how small structural modifications, including amino substitution and protonation site and state, determine the accessibility to conical intersections in this kind of heterocycles. PMID:22486543

  16. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  17. Isolation of the human chromosomal band Xq28 within somatic cell hybrids by fragile X site breakage

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.T.; Knight, S.J.L.; Peters, J.F.; Stayton, C.L.; Consalez, G.G.; Zhang, F. )

    1990-05-01

    The chromosomal fragile-site mapping to Xq27.3 is associated with a frequent form of mental retardation and is prone to breakage after induced deoxyribonucleotide pool perturbation. The human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes flank the fragile X chromosome site and can be used to monitor integrity of the site in human-hamster somatic cell hybrids deficient in the rodent forms of these activities. After induction of the fragile X site, negative selection for HPRT and positive enrichment for G6PD resulted in 31 independent colonies of HPRT{sup {minus}}, G6PD{sup +} phenotype. Southern blot analysis demonstrated the loss of all tested markers proximal to the fragile X site with retention of all tested human Xq28 loci in a majority of the hybrids. In situ hybridization with a human-specific probe demonstrated the translocation of a small amount of human DNA to rodent chromosomes in these hybrids, suggesting chromosome breakage at the fragile X site and the subsequent translocation of Xq28. Southern blot hybridization of hybrid-cell DNA, resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for human-specific repetitive sequences revealed abundant CpG-islands within Xq28, consistent with its known gene density. The electrophoretic banding patterns of human DNA among the hybrids were remarkably consistent, suggesting that fragile X site breakage is limited to a relatively small region in Xq27-28.

  18. Preparation and screening of an arrayed human genomic library generated with the P1 cloning system

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, N.S.; Perogner, B.D.; Coulby, J.N.; Ackerman, S.L.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Sauer, R.H.; Balkenhol, T.C.; Sternberg, N. |

    1994-03-29

    The authors describe here the construction and initial characterization of a 3-fold coverage genomic library of the human haploid genome that was prepared using the bacteriophase P1 cloning system. The cloned DNA inserts were produced by size fractionation of a Sau3AI partial digest of high molecular weight genomic DNA isolated from primary cells of human foreskin fibroblasts. The inserts were cloned into the pAd10sacBII vector and packaged in vitro into P1 phage. These were used to generate recombinant bacterial clones, each of which was picked robotically from an agar plate into a well of a 96-well microtiter dish, grown overnight, and stored at -70{degrees}C. The resulting library, designated DMPC-HFF No. 1 series A, consists of {approximately}130,000-140,000 recombinant clones that were stored in 1500 microtiter dishes. To screen the library, clones were combined in a pooling strategy and specific loci were identified by PCR analysis. On average, the library contains two or three different clones for each locus screened. To date the authors have identified a total of 17 clones containing the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, human serum albumin-human {alpha}-fetoprotein, p53, cyclooxygenase I, human apurinic endonuclease, {beta}-polymerase, and DNA ligase I genes. The cloned inserts average 80 kb in size and range from 70 to 95 kb, with one 49-kb insert and one 62-kb insert. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Properties of Pea Seedling Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase and Its Distribution in Other Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Ray A.; Murray, Michael G.; Gale, James M.; Ross, Cleon W.

    1978-01-01

    A uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UMP-pyrophosphorylase) was found in several angiosperms and was partially purified from epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings. Its pH optimum was about 8.5; its required approximately 0.3 mm MgCl2 for maximum activity but was inhibited by MnCl2; its molecular weight determined by chromatography on Sephadex G-150 columns was approximately 100,000; its Km values for uracil and 5-phosphorylribose 1-pyrophosphate were 0.7 ?m and 11 ?m; and it was partially resolved from a similar phosphoribosyltransferase converting orotic acid to orotodine 5?-phosphate. Enzyme fractions containing both uracil phosphoribosyl transferase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase converted 6-azauracil and 5-fluorouracil to products with chromatographic properties of 6-azauradine 5?-phosphate and 5-fluorouridine 5?-phosphate. Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase probably functions in salvage of uracil for synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:16660311

  20. Mutation induction in human lymphoid cells by energetic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-10-01

    One of the concerns for extended space flight outside the magnetosphere is exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. In the series of studies presented herein, the mutagenic effectiveness of high energy heavy ions is examined using human B-lymphoblastoid cells across an LET range from 32keV/?m to 190 keV/?m. Mutations were scored for an autosomal locus, thymidine kinase (tk), and for an X-linked locus, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt). For each of the radiations studied, the autosomal locus is more sensitive to mutation induction than is the X-linked locus. When mutational yields are expressed in terms of particle fluence, the two loci respond quite differently across the range of LET. The action cross section for mutation induction peaks at 61 keV/?m for the tk locus and then declines for particles of higher LET, including Fe ions. For the hprt locus, the action cross section for mutation is maximal at 95 keV/?m but is relatively constant across the range from 61 keV/?m to 190 keV/gmm. The yields of hprt-deficient mutants obtained after HZE exposure to TK6 lymphoblasts may be compared directly with published data on the induction of hprt-deficient mutants in human neonatal fibroblasts exposed to similar ions. The action cross section for induction of hprt-deficient mutants by energetic Fe ions is more than 10-fold lower for lymphoblastoid cells than for fibroblasts.

  1. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT/PBEF/visfatin) is a tumoural cytokine released from melanoma.

    PubMed

    Grolla, Ambra A; Torretta, Simone; Gnemmi, Ilaria; Amoruso, Angela; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Gatti, Marco; Caldarelli, Antonio; Lim, Dmitry; Penengo, Lorenza; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Genazzani, Armando A; Travelli, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    High plasma levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), traditionally considered an intracellular enzyme with a key role in NAD synthesis, have been reported in several oncological, inflammatory and metabolic diseases. We now show that eNAMPT can be actively released by melanoma cells in vitro. We analysed the mechanisms of its release, and we found both classical and non-classical pathway involvement. eNAMPT released by melanoma cells, in our hands, has paracrine and autocrine effects: it activates MAPK, AKT and NF-κB pathways and increases colony formation in anchorage-independent conditions. eNAMPT also induces M1 polarization in human monocytes. Last, we demonstrate, for the first time in any cancer type, that eNAMPT levels in plasma of tumour-bearing mice increase and that this increase can be reconducted to the tumour itself. This provides an important cue on previous observations that eNAMPT is increased in patients with cancer. Moreover, silencing NAMPT in melanoma cells leads to a reduction in the tumour growth rate. Our findings extend the basis to consider eNAMPT as a cytokine involved in tumour progression. PMID:26358657

  2. Prognostic value of serum nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in patients with bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kui; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhu; Chen, Peng; Pu, Yan; Song, Yaping; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Aim To analyze the serum nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) level and its prognostic value in bladder cancer (BC). Methods The study included 131 patients with transitional cell BC and 109 healthy controls from the West China Hospital of Sichuan University in the period between 2007 and 2013. Nampt concentration in serum was measured by commercial ELISA kits for human Nampt. Results The serum Nampt protein level in patients with BC (mean??standard deviation, 16.02??7.95 ng/mL) was significantly higher than in the control group (6.46??2.08 ng/mL) (P?14.74 ng/mL) indicating shorter recurrence-free survival rate (hazard ratio?=?2.85, 95% confidence interval, 1.01-8.06; P?=?0.048). Conclusion Our results suggest that serum Nampt level may serve as a biomarker of BC and an independent prognostic marker of non-muscle-invasive BC. PMID:25358883

  3. Crystal Structure of Sus scrofa Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase in Complex with Nicotinate Mononucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Tae Gyun; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Kang, Jung Youn; Song, Hye-Eun; Park, Inju; Cho, Chunghee; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of porcine quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase) in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN), which is the first crystal structure of a mammalian QAPRTase with its reaction product. The structure was determined from protein obtained from the porcine kidney. Because the full protein sequence of porcine QAPRTase was not available in either protein or nucleotide databases, cDNA was synthesized using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to determine the porcine QAPRTase amino acid sequence. The crystal structure revealed that porcine QAPRTases have a hexameric structure that is similar to other eukaryotic QAPRTases, such as the human and yeast enzymes. However, the interaction between NAMN and porcine QAPRTase was different from the interaction found in prokaryotic enzymes, such as those of Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The crystal structure of porcine QAPRTase in complex with NAMN provides a structural framework for understanding the unique properties of the mammalian QAPRTase active site and designing new antibiotics that are selective for the QAPRTases of pathogenic bacteria, such as H. pylori and M. tuberculosis. PMID:23626766

  4. Analysis of the structural integrity of YACs comprising human immunoglobulin genes in yeast and in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, M.J.; Abderrahim, H.; Noguchi, M.

    1995-03-20

    With the goal of creating a strain of mice capable of producing human antibodies, we are cloning and reconstructing the human immunoglobulin germline repertoire in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). We describe the identification of YACs containing variable and constant region sequences from the human heavy chain (IgH) and kappa light chain (IgK) loci and the characterization of their integrity in yeast and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The IgH locus-derived YAC contains five variable (V{sub H}) genes, the major diversity (D) gene cluster, the joining (J{sub H}) genes, the intronic enhancer (E{sub H}), and the constant region genes, mu (C{mu}) and delta (C{delta}). Two IgK locus-derived YACs each contain three variable (V{kappa}) genes, the joining (J{kappa}) region, the intronic enhancer (E{kappa}), the constant gene (C{kappa}), and the kappa deleting element (kde). The IgH YAC was unstable in yeast, generating a variety of deletion derivatives, whereas both IgK YACs were stable. YACs encoding heavy chain and kappa light chain, retrofitted with the mammalian selectable marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), were each introduced into HPRT-deficient mouse ES cells. Analysis of YAC integrity in ES cell lines revealed that the majority of DNA inserts were integrated in substantially intact form. 78 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Functional copies of a human gene can be directly isolated by transformation-associated recombination cloning with a small 3? end target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kouprina, Natalay; Annab, Lois; Graves, Joan; Afshari, Cynthia; Barrett, J. Carl; Resnick, Michael A.; Larionov, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    Unique, small sequences (sequence tag sites) have been identified at the 3? ends of most human genes that serve as landmarks in genome mapping. We investigated whether a single copy gene could be isolated directly from total human DNA by transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning in yeast using a short, 3? unique target. A TAR cloning vector was constructed that, when linearized, contained a small amount (381 bp) of 3? hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) sequence at one end and an 189-bp Alu repeat at the other end. Transformation with this vector along with human DNA led to selective isolations of the entire HPRT gene as yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that extended from the 3? end sequence to various Alu positions as much as 600 kb upstream. These YACs were retrofitted with a NeoR and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequence to transfer the YACs to bacteria and subsequently the BACs to mouse cells by using a Neo selection. Most of the HPRT isolates were functional, demonstrating that TAR cloning retains the functional integrity of the isolated material. Thus, this modified version of TAR cloning, which we refer to as radial TAR cloning, can be used to isolate large segments of the human genome accurately and directly with only a small amount of sequence information. PMID:9539761

  6. Effects of Hypoxanthine Substitution in Peptide Nucleic Acids Targeting KRAS2 Oncogenic mRNA Molecules: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Jeffrey M.; Wampole, Matthew E.; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D.; Thakur, Mathew L.; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multi-mutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick basepairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA-PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA-PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition. PMID:23972113

  7. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bolle, Guillaume; Dollinger, Ccile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jrme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  8. Clinical features and genotype of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency in iceland.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, V; Palsson, R; Olafsson, I; Hjaltadottir, G; Laxdal, T

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical, diagnostic, and prognostic features of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency in Icelandic patients, as well as determine their genotype. Medical records of all known patients in Iceland were reviewed. Urinalysis and polymerase chain reaction-based DNA mutation analysis were performed in all patients, siblings, and living parents of index cases. Twenty-three individuals homozygous for type I APRT deficiency were identified in 16 families from 1983 to 1998. There were 12 males and 11 females, and the median age at diagnosis was 37 years (range, 0.5 to 62 years). Seventeen patients were index cases and 6 patients were diagnosed during screening of first-degree relatives. Eighteen patients had symptomatic disease, 15 of whom experienced nephrolithiasis; 4 patients had mild to moderate renal insufficiency, 1 patient had advanced renal failure, and 1 patient died of uremic complications. Six patients experienced recurrent urinary tract infections and 3 infants had a history of reddish-brown diaper stains. Five patients were asymptomatic; 3 of these patients were diagnosed during routine urinalysis and 2 patients were identified during family screening. Urinary 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystals were detected in all cases, except for the patient who died of end-stage renal failure. All 23 patients were homozygous for the same mutation (D65V) in the APRT gene. Allopurinol therapy successfully prevented further stone formation and significantly improved renal function in most patients with renal insufficiency. Our results suggest that APRT deficiency may be more common than previously recognized and can lead to severe renal failure if left untreated. PMID:11532677

  9. Chromatin loop structure of the human X chromosome: relevance to X inactivation and CpG clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, A H; Migeon, B R

    1989-01-01

    Part of the higher-order structure of chromatin is achieved by constraining DNA in loops ranging in size from 30 to 100 kilobase pairs; these loops have been implicated in defining functional domains and replicons and possibly in facilitating transcription. Because the human active and inactive X chromosomes differ in transcriptional activity and replication, we looked for differences in their chromatin loop structures. Since the islands of CpG-rich DNA at the 5' ends of X-linked housekeeping genes are the regions where functional differences in DNA methylation and nuclease sensitivity are found, we looked for scaffold association of these sequences after extraction of histones with lithium diiodosalicylate. Specifically, we examined the 5' CpG islands within the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, P3, GdX, phosphoglycerate kinase type 1, and alpha-galactosidase loci in human lymphoblasts obtained from individuals with 1 to 4 X chromosomes. Although we detected no scaffold-associated regions near these genes, we found several such regions at the ornithine transcarbamylase and blood clotting factor IX loci. Our results suggest that the CpG islands are excluded from the nuclear scaffold and that even though transcriptionally active, housekeeping genes are less likely than X-linked tissue-specific genes to be scaffold associated. In all cases, the pattern of scaffold association was the same for loci on active and inactive X chromosomes. Images PMID:2761535

  10. HIV-1 TAT-mediated protein transduction of human HPRT into deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Paola; Dolcetta, Diego; Hladnik, Uros; Fortunati, Elisabetta

    2013-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe and incurable X-linked genetic syndrome caused by the deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), resulting in severe alterations of central nervous system, hyperuricemia and subsequent impaired renal functions. Therapeutic options consist in supportive care and treatments of complications, but the disease remains largely untreatable. Enzyme replacement of the malfunctioning cytosolic protein might represent a possible therapeutic approach for the LND treatment. Protein transduction domains, such as the TAT peptide derived from HIV TAT protein, have been used to transduce macromolecules into cells in vitro and in vivo. The present study was aimed to the generation of TAT peptide fused to human HPRT for cell transduction in enzyme deficient cells. Here we document the construction, expression and delivery of a functional HPRT enzyme into deficient cells by TAT transduction domain and by liposome mediated protein transfer. With this approach we demonstrate the correction of the enzymatic defect in HPRT deficient cells. Our data show for the first time the feasibility of the enzyme replacement therapy for the treatment of LND. PMID:24129187

  11. Stimulation of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in human cells by electroporation with site-specific endonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, M; Gimble, F S; Wilson, J H

    1996-01-01

    In somatic mammalian cells, homologous recombination is a rare event. To study the effects of chromosomal breaks on frequency of homologous recombination, site-specific endonucleases were introduced into human cells by electroporation. Cell lines with a partial duplication within the HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) gene were created through gene targeting. Homologous intrachromosomal recombination between the repeated regions of the gene can reconstruct a functioning, wild-type gene. Treatment of these cells with the restriction endonuclease Xba I, which has a recognition site within the repeated region of HPRT homology, increased the frequency or homologous recombination bv more than 10-fold. Recombination frequency was similarly increased by treatment with the rare-cutting yeast endonuclease PI-Sce I when a cleavage site was placed within the repeated region of HPRT. In contrast, four restriction enzymes that cut at positions either outside of the repeated regions or between them produced no change in recombination frequency. The results suggest that homologous recombination between intrachromosomal repeats can be specifically initiated by a double-strand break occurring within regions of homology, consistent with the predictions of a model. PMID:8622983

  12. Guanine, Adenine, and Hypoxanthine Production from UV-Irradiated Formamide: Relaxation of the Requirements for Prebiotic Purine Nucleobase Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, T. M.; Barks, H.; Buckley, R.; Grieves, G.; Dimauro, E.; Hud, N. V.

    2010-04-01

    We observe the production of adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanine in heated and UV irradiated formamide solutions. These "one pot" reactions occur due to the synergy of thermal and UV photon-induced processes.

  13. Urinary Hypoxanthine as a Measure of Increased ATP Utilization in Late Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Megan S.; Hopper, Andrew; Slater, Laurel; Asmerom, Yayesh; Esiaba, Ijeoma; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of neonatal morbidity on ATP breakdown in late preterm infants. Study Design Urinary hypoxanthine concentration, a marker of ATP breakdown, was measured from 82 late preterm infants on days of life (DOL) 3 to 6 using high-performance liquid chromatography. Infants were grouped according to the following diagnoses: poor nippling alone (n = 8), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (n = 21), poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (n = 26), and respiratory disease alone (n = 27). Results Neonates with respiratory disease alone had significantly higher urinary hypoxanthine over DOL 3 to 6 when compared with neonates with poor nippling (P = .020), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (P < .001), and poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (P = .017). Neonates with poor nippling who received respiratory support for 2 to 3 days had significantly higher hypoxanthine compared with infants who received respiratory support for 1 day (P = .017) or no days (P = .007). Conclusions These findings suggest that respiratory disorders significantly increase ATP degradation in late premature infants. PMID:26413195

  14. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of hypoxanthine metabolism in mouse oocyte-cumulus cell complexes: effects of purine metabolic perturbants.

    PubMed

    Downs, S M

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the metabolism of hypoxanthine by mouse oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. Complexes were isolated from immature mice 48 h after priming with 5 IU eCG and culture for 3 h in medium containing 14C-hypoxanthine in the absence or presence of one of three metabolic inhibitors: alanosine, mycophenolic acid, or 6-mercaptopurine. Tissue extracts from complexes were analyzed by HPLC using either a C18 reversed-phase column (for separation of purine bases and nucleosides) or an ion exchange column (for separation of nucleotides). Most of the hypoxanthine taken up by complexes was salvaged to inosine monophosphate (IMP) and then converted to nucleotides. Metabolism favored the synthesis of adenyl nucleotides over guanyl nucleotides. No evidence of metabolism to uric acid via xanthine oxidase was encountered, and metabolism to inosine via purine nucleoside phosphorylase was negligible. A similar pattern of hypoxanthine metabolism was observed in extracts of oocytes that had been denuded after the culture period. Addition of alanosine to the culture medium significantly reduced the synthesis of adenyl nucleotides in complexes and partially shunted metabolism in the direction of guanyl nucleotides. However, neither alanosine nor another inhibitor of adenylosuccinate synthetase, hadacidin, significantly influenced the meiotic arrest maintained by hypoxanthine. Mycophenolic acid eliminated conversion of IMP to guanyl nucleotides but did not appreciably affect metabolism to other nucleotides. 6-Mercaptopurine produced an increase in the hypoxanthine-containing peaks, which was consistent with suppression of purine salvage. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine is readily salvaged by the murine oocyte-cumulus cell complex and that the inhibitor-induced changes in metabolism are consistent with the presumed mechanism of action of each inhibitor. In addition, whereas metabolism favors conversion of IMP to adenyl nucleotides, synthesis of adenyl nucleotides by this route during the culture period is apparently not required for hypoxanthine-maintained meiotic arrest in vitro. PMID:8080928

  15. Ground-State Destabilization in Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferases by Binding Isotope Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Schramm, Vern L.

    2011-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTs) form and break the N-ribosidic bond to pyrimidines by way of ribocation-like transition states (TSs) and therefore exhibit large α-secondary [1′-3H] kcat/Km kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). Substrate binding isotope effects (BIEs) with OPRTs report on the degree of ground state destabilization for these complexes and permit resolution of binding and transition state effects from the kcat/Km KIEs. The BIEs for [1′-3H]orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) interactions with the catalytic sites of Plasmodium falciparum and human OPRTs are 1.104 and 1.108, respectively. These large BIEs establish altered sp3 bond hybridization of C1′ toward the sp2 geometry of the transition states upon OMP binding. Thus, the complexes of these OPRTs distort OMP part of the way toward the transition state. As the [1′-3H]OMP kcat/Km KIEs are approximately 1.20, half of the intrinsic kcat/Km KIEs originate from BIEs. Orotidine, a slow substrate for these enzymes, binds to the catalytic site with no significant [1′ 3H]orotidine BIEs. Thus, OPRTs are unable to initiate ground-state destabilization of orotidine by altered C1′ hybridization because of the missing 5′-phosphate. However the kcat/Km KIEs for [1′-3H]orotidine are also approximately 1.20. The C1′-distortion for OMP happens in two steps, half upon binding and half on going from the Michaelis complex to the TS. With orotidine as substrate, there is no ground-state destabilization in the Michaelis complexes, but the C1′-distortion at the TS is equal to that of OMP. The large single barrier for TS formation with orotidine slows the rate of barrier crossing. PMID:21526795

  16. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase can affect metastatic activity and cell adhesive functions by regulating integrins in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santidrian, Antonio F.; LeBoeuf, Sarah E.; Wold, Erik D.; Ritland, Melissa; Forsyth, Jane S.; Felding, Brunhilde H.

    2014-01-01

    NAD+ metabolism is an essential regulator of cellular redox reactions, energy pathways, and a substrate provider for NAD+ consuming enzymes. We recently demonstrated that enhancement of NAD+/NADH levels in breast cancer cells with impaired mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase activity, through augmentation of complex I or by supplementing tumor cell nutrients with NAD+ precursors, inhibits tumorigenicity and metastasis. To more fully understand how aberrantly low NAD+ levels promote tumor cell dissemination, we here asked whether inhibition of NAD+ salvage pathway activity by reduction in nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) expression can impact metastasis and tumor cell adhesive functions. We show that knockdown of NAMPT, the enzyme catalyzing the rate-limiting step of the NAD+ salvage pathway, enhances metastatic aggressiveness in human breast cancer cells and involves modulation of integrin expression and function. Reduction in NAMPT expression is associated with upregulation of select adhesion receptors, particularly ?v?3 and ?1 integrins, and results in increased breast cancer cell attachment to extracellular matrix proteins, a key function in tumor cell dissemination. Interestingly, NAMPT downregulation prompts expression of integrin ?v?3 in a high affinity conformation, known to promote tumor cell adhesive interactions during hematogenous metastasis. NAMPT has been selected as a therapeutic target for cancer therapy based on the essential functions of this enzyme in NAD+ metabolism, cellular redox, DNA repair and energy pathways. Notably, our results indicate that incomplete inhibition of NAMPT, which impedes NAD+ metabolism but does not kill a tumor cell can alter its phenotype to be more aggressive and metastatic. This phenomenon could promote cancer recurrence, even if NAMPT inhibition initially reduces tumor growth. PMID:25263164

  17. Guanine analog-induced differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells and changes in queuine modification of tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, K A; Katze, J R; Trewyn, R W

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT)-deficient human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells with 6-thioguanine results in growth inhibition and cell differentiation. 6-Thioguanine is a substrate for the tRNA modification enzyme tRNA-guanine ribosyltransferase, which normally catalyzes the exchange of queuine for guanine in position 1 of the anticodon of tRNAs for asparagine, aspartic acid, histidine, and tyrosine. During the early stages of HGPRT-deficient HL-60 cell differentiation induced by 6-thioguanine, there was a transient decrease in the queuine content of tRNA, and changes in the isoacceptor profiles of tRNA(His) indicate that 6-thioguanine was incorporated into the tRNA in place of queuine. Reversing this structural change in the tRNA anticodon by addition of excess exogenous queuine reversed the 6-thioguanine-induced growth inhibition and differentiation. Similar results were obtained when 8-azaguanine (another inhibitor of queuine modification of tRNA that can be incorporated into the anticodon) replaced 6-thioguanine as the inducing agent. The data suggest a primary role for the change in queuine modification of tRNA in mediating the differentiation of HGPRT-deficient HL-60 cells induced by guanine analogs. PMID:3479681

  18. Thirdhand smoke causes DNA damage in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to thirdhand smoke (THS) is a newly described health risk. Evidence supports its widespread presence in indoor environments. However, its genotoxic potential, a critical aspect in risk assessment, is virtually untested. An important characteristic of THS is its ability to undergo chemical transformations during aging periods, as demonstrated in a recent study showing that sorbed nicotine reacts with the indoor pollutant nitrous acid (HONO) to form tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) such as 4-(methylnitrosamino)-4-(3-pyridyl)butanal (NNA) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). The goal of this study was to assess the genotoxicity of THS in human cell lines using two in vitro assays. THS was generated in laboratory systems that simulated short (acute)- and long (chronic)-term exposures. Analysis by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry quantified TSNAs and common tobacco alkaloids in extracts of THS that had sorbed onto cellulose substrates. Exposure of human HepG2 cells to either acute or chronic THS for 24h resulted in significant increases in DNA strand breaks in the alkaline Comet assay. Cell cultures exposed to NNA alone showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage in the same assay. NNA is absent in freshly emitted secondhand smoke, but it is the main TSNA formed in THS when nicotine reacts with HONO long after smoking takes place. The long amplicon–quantitative PCR assay quantified significantly higher levels of oxidative DNA damage in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT) and polymerase β (POLB) genes of cultured human cells exposed to chronic THS for 24h compared with untreated cells, suggesting that THS exposure is related to increased oxidative stress and could be an important contributing factor in THS-mediated toxicity. The findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that exposure to THS is genotoxic in human cell lines. PMID:23462851

  19. Isolation of the human chromosomal band Xq28 within somatic cell hybrids by fragile X site breakage.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, S T; Knight, S J; Peters, J F; Stayton, C L; Consalez, G G; Zhang, F P

    1990-01-01

    The chromosomal fragile-site mapping to Xq27.3 is associated with a frequent form of mental retardation and is prone to breakage after induced deoxyribonucleotide pool perturbation. The human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes flank the fragile X chromosome site and can be used to monitor integrity of the site in human-hamster somatic cell hybrids deficient in the rodent forms of these activities. After induction of the fragile X site, negative selection for HPRT and positive enrichment for G6PD resulted in 31 independent colonies of HPRT-,G6PD+ phenotype. Southern blot analysis demonstrated the loss of all tested markers proximal to the fragile X site with retention of all tested human Xq28 loci in a majority of the hybrids. In situ hybridization with a human-specific probe demonstrated the translocation of a small amount of human DNA to rodent chromosomes in these hybrids, suggesting chromosome breakage at the fragile X site and the subsequent translocation of Xq28. Southern blot hybridization of hybrid-cell DNA, resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for human-specific repetitive sequences revealed abundant CpG-islands within Xq28, consistent with its known gene density. The electrophoretic banding patterns of human DNA among the hybrids were remarkably consistent, suggesting that fragile X site breakage is limited to a relatively small region in Xq27-28. These somatic cell hybrids, containing Xq27.3-qter as the sole human DNA, will aid the search for DNA associated with the fragile X site and will augment the high resolution genomic analysis of Xq28, including the identification of candidate genes for genetic-disease loci mapping to this region. Images PMID:2339126

  20. Carbon nanospheres enhanced electrochemiluminescence of CdS quantum dots for biosensing of hypoxanthine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Deng, Shengyuan; Lei, Jianping; Xu, Qiunan; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-09-30

    This work developed a novel method to greatly enhance the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdS quantum dots (QDs). The ECL amplification was achieved by the assembly of QDs on poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-functionalized carbon nanospheres (PFCNSs), and successfully employed for sensitive ECL biosensing of oxidase substrates. The carbon nanospheres were prepared by a "green" method, and the high loading of QDs on carbon nanospheres led to a 4-times increased ECL intensity with dissolved O(2) as the coreactant. Using xanthine oxidase (XOD) as a model, an ECL biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing the enzyme on the mixing membrane of PFCNSs and QDs. The ECL biosensor showed a fast response to hypoxanthine with a linear concentration range from 2.5 10(-8) to 1.4 10(-5)M. The limit of detection was 5 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The assay results of hypoxanthine in fish samples were in a good agreement with the reference values by amperometric technique. This facile approach to prepare the PFCNSs/QDs system for ECL biosensing could be of promising application in bioanalysis and electronic device. PMID:21872072

  1. Expression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase-influenced genes predicts recurrence-free survival in lung and breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G N

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis. NAMPT protein is a secreted plasma biomarker in inflammation and in cancer. The NAMPT enzymatic inhibitor, FK866, acts as an inducer of apoptosis and is a cancer therapeutic candidate, however, little is known regarding the influence of NAMPT on cancer biological mechanisms or on the prognosis of human cancers. We interrogated known microarray data sets to define NAMPT knockdown-influenced gene expression to demonstrate that reduced NAMPT expression strongly dysregulates cancer biology signaling pathways. Comparisons of gene expression datasets of four cancer types generated a N39 molecular signature exhibiting consistent dysregulated expression in multiple cancer tissues. The N39 signature provides a significant and independent prognostic tool of human recurrence-free survival in lung and breast cancers. Despite the absence of clear elucidation of molecular mechanisms, this study validates NAMPT as a novel "oncogene" with a central role in carcinogenesis. Furthermore, the N39 signature provides a potentially useful tool for prediction of recurrence-free survival in lung and breast cancer and validates NAMPT as a novel and effective therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:25146220

  2. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Promotes Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition as a Soluble Factor Independent of Its Enzymatic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Soncini, Debora; Caffa, Irene; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Cea, Michele; Cagnetta, Antonia; Passalacqua, Mario; Mastracci, Luca; Boero, Silvia; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Sociali, Giovanna; Lasigli, Denise; Damonte, Patrizia; Grozio, Alessia; Mannino, Elena; Poggi, Alessandro; D'Agostino, Vito G.; Monacelli, Fiammetta; Provenzani, Alessandro; Odetti, Patrizio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Bruzzone, Santina; Nencioni, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Boosting NAD+ biosynthesis with NAD+ intermediates has been proposed as a strategy for preventing and treating age-associated diseases, including cancer. However, concerns in this area were raised by observations that nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a key enzyme in mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis, is frequently up-regulated in human malignancies, including breast cancer, suggesting possible protumorigenic effects for this protein. We addressed this issue by studying NAMPT expression and function in human breast cancer in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that high NAMPT levels are associated with aggressive pathological and molecular features, such as estrogen receptor negativity as well as HER2-enriched and basal-like PAM50 phenotypes. Consistent with these findings, we found that NAMPT overexpression in mammary epithelial cells induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a morphological and functional switch that confers cancer cells an increased metastatic potential. However, importantly, NAMPT-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition was found to be independent of NAMPT enzymatic activity and of the NAMPT product nicotinamide mononucleotide. Instead, it was mediated by secreted NAMPT through its ability to activate the TGF? signaling pathway via increased TGF?1 production. These findings have implications for the design of therapeutic strategies exploiting NAD+ biosynthesis via NAMPT in aging and cancer and also suggest the potential of anticancer agents designed to specifically neutralize extracellular NAMPT. Notably, because high levels of circulating NAMPT are found in obese and diabetic patients, our data could also explain the increased predisposition to cancer of these subjects. PMID:25331943

  3. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Christoffersen, Stig; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Mlgaard, Anne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-04-14

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic, and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5-phosphoribosyl-?-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) or the inhibitor adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its evolutionary origin in this family of PRTases. Only the N-terminal two-thirds of the polypeptide chain folds as a traditional type I PRTase with a five-stranded ?-sheet surrounded by helices. The C-terminal third adopts an unusual three-helix bundle structure that together with the nucleobase-binding loop undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor ADP binds like the product AMP with both the ?- and ?-phosphates occupying the 5'-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide pH range, and the kinetic and ligand binding properties depend on both pH and the presence/absence of phosphate in the buffers. A slow hydrolysis of PRPP to ribose 5-phosphate and pyrophosphate, catalyzed by the enzyme, may be facilitated by elements in the C-terminal three-helix bundle part of the protein. PMID:25790177

  4. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, Leads to Altered Carbohydrate Metabolism in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bo; Dong, Sucai; Shepard, Robert L; Kays, Lisa; Roth, Kenneth D; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Zhao, Genshi

    2015-06-19

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has been extensively studied due to its essential role in NAD(+) biosynthesis in cancer cells and the prospect of developing novel therapeutics. To understand how NAMPT regulates cellular metabolism, we have shown that the treatment with FK866, a specific NAMPT inhibitor, leads to attenuation of glycolysis by blocking the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step (Tan, B., Young, D. A., Lu, Z. H., Wang, T., Meier, T. I., Shepard, R. L., Roth, K., Zhai, Y., Huss, K., Kuo, M. S., Gillig, J., Parthasarathy, S., Burkholder, T. P., Smith, M. C., Geeganage, S., and Zhao, G. (2013) Pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an enzyme essential for NAD(+) biosynthesis, in human cancer cells: metabolic basis and potential clinical implications. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 3500-3511). Due to technical limitations, we failed to separate isotopomers of phosphorylated sugars. In this study, we developed an enabling LC-MS methodology. Using this, we confirmed the previous findings and also showed that NAMPT inhibition led to accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate but not glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and sedoheptulose 7-phosphate as previously thought. To investigate the metabolic basis of the metabolite formation, we carried out biochemical and cellular studies and established the following. First, glucose-labeling studies indicated that fructose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde, and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and erythrose via an aldolase reaction. Second, biochemical studies showed that aldolase indeed catalyzed these reactions. Third, glyceraldehyde- and erythrose-labeling studies showed increased incorporation of corresponding labels into fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate in FK866-treated cells. Fourth, NAMPT inhibition led to increased glyceraldehyde and erythrose levels in the cell. Finally, glucose-labeling studies showed accumulated fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in FK866-treated cells mainly derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Taken together, this study shows that NAMPT inhibition leads to attenuation of glycolysis, resulting in further perturbation of carbohydrate metabolism in cancer cells. The potential clinical implications of these findings are also discussed. PMID:25944913

  5. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  6. Mutagenesis in human cells with accelerated H and Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy

    1994-01-01

    The overall goals of this research were to determine the risks of mutation induction and the spectra of mutations induced by energetic protons and iron ions at two loci in human lymphoid cells. During the three year grant period the research has focused in three major areas: (1) the acquisition of sufficient statistics for human TK6 cell mutation experiments using Fe ions (400 MeV/amu), Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and protons (250 MeV/amu); (2) collection of thymidine kinase- deficient (tk) mutants or hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient (hprt) mutants induced by either Fe 400 MeV/amu, Fe 600 MeV/amu, or H 250 MeV/amu for subsequent molecular analysis; and (3) molecular characterization of mutants isolated after exposure to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu). As a result of the shutdown of the BEVALAC heavy ion accelerator in December 1992, efforts were rearranged somewhat in time to complete our dose-response studies and to complete mutant collections in particular for the Fe ion beams prior to the shutdown. These goals have been achieved. A major effort was placed on collection, re-screening, and archiving of 3 different series of mutants for the various particle beam exposures: tk-ng mutants, tk-sg mutants, and hprt-deficient mutants. Where possible, groups of mutants were isolated for several particle fluences. Comparative analysis of mutation spectra has occured with characterization of the mutation spectrum for hprt-deficient mutants obtained after exposure of TK6 cells to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and a series of spontaneous mutants.

  7. Targeted disruption of the mouse adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene and the production of APRT-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, S.J.; Chen, J.; Tischfield, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT: EC 2.4.2.7), a ubiquitously expressed purine salvage enzyme, catalyzes the synthesis of AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate from existing adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans results in the accumulation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine leading to crystalluria and nephrolithiasis. In order to facilitate our study of this rare, autosomal recessive disorder, we applied the advances in gene targeting technology and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell culture to the production of APRT-deficient mice. A positive-negative targeting strategy was used. The tageting vector contain 5.6 kb of the mouse APRT gene, a neomycin resistance gene in exon 3 as a positive selection marker, and a HSV thymidine kinase gene at the 3{prime} end of the homology as a negative selection marker. The vector was introduced into D3 ES cells by electroporation and the cells were selected for G418 and ganciclovir (GANC) resistance. G418-GANC resistant clones were screened by Southern blot. One of several correctly targeted clones was expanded and used for blastocyst microinjection to produce chimeric mice. Chimeric animals were bred and agouti progeny heterozygous for the targeted allele were obtained. Heterozygous animals have been bred to produce APRT-deficient animals. Matings are currently underway to determine the phenotype of APRT/HPRT-deficient animals.

  8. Gold(I)-triphenylphosphine complexes with hypoxanthine-derived ligands: in vitro evaluations of anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    K?ikavov, Radka; Hoek, Jan; Van?o, Jn; Hutyra, Jakub; Dvo?k, Zden?k; Trvn?ek, Zden?k

    2014-01-01

    A series of gold(I) complexes involving triphenylphosphine (PPh3) and one N-donor ligand derived from deprotonated mono- or disubstituted hypoxanthine (HLn) of the general composition [Au(Ln)(PPh3)] (1-9) is reported. The complexes were thoroughly characterized, including multinuclear high resolution NMR spectroscopy as well as single crystal X-ray analysis (for complexes 1 and 3). The complexes were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines MCF7 (breast carcinoma), HOS (osteosarcoma) and THP-1 (monocytic leukaemia), which identified the complexes 4-6 as the most promising representatives, who antiproliferative activity was further tested against A549 (lung adenocarcinoma), G-361 (melanoma), HeLa (cervical cancer), A2780 (ovarian carcinoma), A2780R (ovarian carcinoma resistant to cisplatin), 22Rv1 (prostate cancer) cell lines. Complexes 4-6 showed a significantly higher in vitro anticancer effect against the employed cancer cells, except for G-361, as compared with the commercially used anticancer drug cisplatin, with IC50 ? 1-30 M. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in vitro by the assessment of the ability of the complexes to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?), in the lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage-like THP-1 cell model. The results of this study identified the complexes as auspicious anti-inflammatory agents with similar or better activity as compared with the clinically applied gold-based antiarthritic drug Auranofin. In an effort to explore the possible mechanisms responsible for the biological effect, the products of interactions of selected complexes with sulfur-containing biomolecules (L-cysteine and reduced glutathione) were studied by means of the mass-spectrometry study. PMID:25226034

  9. Inhibition of histidyl-tRNA-adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase complex formation by histidine and by guanosine tetraphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, J E; Parsons, S M

    1977-01-01

    Formation of the complex between the first enzyme of histidine biosynthesis from Salmonella typhimurium, ATP phosphoribosyltransferase [1-(5'-phosphoribosyl)-ATP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase; EC 2.4.2.17], and histidyl-tRNA is shown to be inhibited by L-histidine and by guanosine-5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate in the presence of histidine. Higher histodine levels make guanosine tetraphosphate a more effective inhibitor. Relatively high concentrations of guanosine-5'-triphosphate also inhibit complex formation, but this inhibition is not enhanced by histidine. The possible implications of these observations with respect to the gene regulatory activity of this enzyme are discussed. PMID:323857

  10. In silico analysis of the amido phosphoribosyltransferase inhibition by PY873, PY899 and a derivative of isophthalic acid.

    PubMed

    Batool, Sidra; Nawaz, Muhammad Sulaman; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2013-10-01

    Selectively decreasing the availability of precursors for the de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides is a valid approach towards seeking a cure for leukaemia. Nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are required by living cells for syntheses of RNA, DNA, and cofactors such as NADP(+), FAD(+), coenzyme A and ATP. Nucleotides contain purine and pyrimidine bases, which can be synthesized through salvage pathway as well. Amido phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), also known as glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase (GPAT), is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PPAT (phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase) gene. APRT catalyzes the first committed step of the de novo pathway using its substrate, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP). As APRT is inhibited by many folate analogues, therefore, in this study we focused on the inhibitory effects of three folate analogues on APRT activity. This is extension of our previous wet lab work to analyze and dissect molecular interaction and inhibition mechanism using molecular modeling and docking tools in the current study. Comparative molecular docking studies were carried out for three diamino folate derivatives employing a model of the human enzyme that was built using the 3D structure of Bacillus subtilis APRT (PDB ID; 1GPH) as the template. Binding orientation of interactome indicates that all compounds having nominal cluster RMSD in same active site's deep narrow polar fissure. On the basis of comparative conformational analysis, electrostatic interaction, binding free energy and binding orientation of interactome, we support the possibility that these molecules could behave as APRT inhibitors and therefore may block purine de novo biosynthesis. Consequently, we suggest that PY899 is the most active biological compound that would be a more potent inhibitor for APRT inhibition than PY873 and DIA, which also confirms previous wet lab report. PMID:23483322

  11. UV Radiation Induces Delayed Hyperrecombination Associated with Hypermutation in Human Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Stephen T.; Paffett, Kimberly S.; Shrivastav, Meena; Timmins, Graham S.; Morgan, William F.; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed genomic instability in human cells, including chromosomal abnormalities and hyperrecombination. Here, we investigate delayed genome instability of cells exposed to UV radiation. We examined homologous recombination-mediated reactivation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in p53-proficient human cells. We observed an ∼5-fold enhancement of delayed hyperrecombination (DHR) among cells surviving a low dose of UV-C (5 J/m2), revealed as mixed GFP+/− colonies. UV-B did not induce DHR at an equitoxic (75 J/m2) dose or a higher dose (150 J/m2). UV is known to induce delayed hypermutation associated with increased oxidative stress. We found that hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) mutation frequencies were ∼5-fold higher in strains derived from GFP+/− (DHR) colonies than in strains in which recombination was directly induced by UV (GFP+ colonies). To determine whether hypermutation was directly caused by hyperrecombination, we analyzed hprt mutation spectra. Large-scale alterations reflecting large deletions and insertions were observed in 25% of GFP+ strains, and most mutants had a single change in HPRT. In striking contrast, all mutations arising in the hypermutable GFP+/− strains were small (1- to 2-base) changes, including substitutions, deletions, and insertions (reminiscent of mutagenesis from oxidative damage), and the majority were compound, with an average of four hprt mutations per mutant. The absence of large hprt deletions in DHR strains indicates that DHR does not cause hypermutation. We propose that UV-induced DHR and hypermutation result from a common source, namely, increased oxidative stress. These two forms of delayed genome instability may collaborate in skin cancer initiation and progression. PMID:16880516

  12. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  13. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  14. High variation in hypoxanthine determination after analytical treatment of vitreous humor samples.

    PubMed

    Camba, Ana; Lendoiro, Elena; Cordeiro, Cristina; Martnez-Silva, Isabel; Rodrguez-Calvo, Mara S; Vieira, Duarte N; Muoz-Bars, Jos I

    2014-12-01

    In the field of legal medicine the correct determination of the time of death is of great importance because an error in calculating the post-mortem interval (PMI) could be crucial in a criminal investigation. The quantification of hypoxanthine (Hx) concentration in the vitreous humor (VH) as a means to estimate PMI is useful when dealing with a recent time interval of death and has several advantages over other biological matrices. However, due to its viscous nature, VH has to be liquefied prior to its analysis, and the different procedures to liquefy it may cause alterations in Hx concentration, and hence in estimation of PMI. The aim of this study was to determine differences in Hx concentration after applying several pre-analytical treatments to different aliquots of the same VH sample. Enzymatic digestion, sonication, centrifugation and heat were the liquefying methods applied to reduce the viscosity of 105 VH samples. Analysis was performed using solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry. Statistically significant differences in the measured Hx concentrations were found between enzymatic digestion and the other three methods analyzed (sonication, centrifugation, and heat). Additionally, high data dispersion was found under heat treatment but was not observed for centrifugation or sonication, where similar and more moderate results were found. We conclude that high variations in Hx determination are observed when enzymatic digestion or heat treatment is used and we therefore recommend sonication or centrifugation to quantify Hx concentration in the VH. PMID:25119241

  15. Formation and trapping of free radicals in irradiated purines: EPR and ENDOR of hypoxanthine derivatives studied as single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokdemir, Sibel

    Four different derivatives of hypoxanthine (hypoxanthine-HClH 2O, Na+Inosine-2.5H 2O, sodium inosine monophosphate, and calcium inosine monophosphate) were irradiated in the form of single crystals with the objective of identifying the radical products. To do so, magnetic resonance methods (EPR, ENDOR experiments and EPR spectrum simulations) were used to study radical products in crystals following x-irradiation at 10 K without warming, and under conditions of controlled warming. Also, computational chemistry methods were used in combination with the experimental methods to assist in identifying the radical products. Immediately following irradiation at 10 K, at least three different radicals were observed for hypoxanthineHClH2O. R5.1 was identified at the product of electron addition followed by protonation of the parent at N3. R5.2 was identified as the product of electron loss followed by deprotonation at N7, and R5.3 was tentatively identified as the product of electron gain followed by protonation at 06. On warming to room temperature, three new radicals were observed: R6.1 and R6.3 were the products of net H addition to C8 and C2 respectively, while R6.2 was the product of OH addition to C8. At least four different radical products of Na+Inosine - were detected immediately after irradiation at 10 K. R7.1 was identified as the electron-loss product of the parent hypoxanthine base, and R7.2 was identified as the product of net H-abstraction from C5 ' of the sugar. R7.3 and R7.4 were tentatively identified as the products of net H-addition to 06 (probably via electron addition followed by protonation), and the (doubly-negative) product of electron-gain, respectively. R7.5, the C8-H addition radical, was the only product detected on warming sodium inosine crystals to room temperature. Because the ENDOR spectra from sodium IMP irradiated at 10K were complex, it was possible to identify only two radicals. R8.1 was identified as the purine base electron-abstraction product, and R8.2 was identified as the 06 hydrogen-addition product. ENDOR spectra could be obtained from calcium IMP only at a few orientations. Thus, all radical identifications in this system are based on EPR spectrum simulations using likely radical structures based on results from other hypoxanthine-based systems.

  16. Radiation-quality dependent cellular response in mutation induction in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Liu, Cui Hua

    2009-09-01

    We studied cellular responses in normal human fibroblasts induced with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types, such as gamma rays, neutrons and high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions. The cells were pretreated with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations (approximately 1 mGy/7-8 h) of 137Cs gamma rays, 241Am-Be neutrons, helium, carbon and iron ions before irradiations with an X-ray challenging dose (1.5 Gy). Helium (LET = 2.3 keV/microm), carbon (LET = 13.3 keV/microm) and iron (LET = 200 keV/microm) ions were produced by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. No difference in cell-killing effect, measured by a colony forming assay, was observed among the pretreatment with different radiation types. In mutation induction, which was detected in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus to measure 6-thioguanine resistant clones, there was no difference in mutation frequency induced by the X-ray challenging dose between unpretreated and gamma-ray pretreated cells. In the case of the pretreatment of heavy ions, X-ray-induced mutation was around 1.8 times higher in helium-ion pretreated and 4.0 times higher in carbon-ion pretreated cells than in unpretreated cells (X-ray challenging dose alone). However, the mutation frequency in cells pretreated with iron ions was the same level as either unpretreated or gamma-ray pretreated cells. In contrast, it was reduced at 0.15 times in cells pretreated with neutrons when compared to unpretreated cells. The results show that cellular responses caused by the influence of hprt mutation induced in cells pretreated with low-dose-rate or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types were radiation-quality dependent manner. PMID:19680011

  17. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory proteinprotein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific proteinprotein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions. PMID:25945715

  18. Structure-based identification of ureas as novel nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhang; Bauer, Paul; Baumeister, Timm; Buckmelter, Alexandre J; Caligiuri, Maureen; Clodfelter, Karl H; Han, Bingsong; Ho, Yen-Ching; Kley, Nikolai; Lin, Jian; Reynolds, Dominic J; Sharma, Geeta; Smith, Chase C; Wang, Zhongguo; Dragovich, Peter S; Oh, Angela; Wang, Weiru; Zak, Mark; Gunzner-Toste, Janet; Zhao, Guiling; Yuen, Po-wai; Bair, Kenneth W

    2013-06-27

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is a promising anticancer target. Virtual screening identified a thiourea analogue, compound 5, as a novel highly potent Nampt inhibitor. Guided by the cocrystal structure of 5, SAR exploration revealed that the corresponding urea compound 7 exhibited similar potency with an improved solubility profile. These studies also indicated that a 3-pyridyl group was the preferred substituent at one inhibitor terminus and also identified a urea moiety as the optimal linker to the remainder of the inhibitor structure. Further SAR optimization of the other inhibitor terminus ultimately yielded compound 50 as a urea-containing Nampt inhibitor which exhibited excellent biochemical and cellular potency (enzyme IC50 = 0.007 ?M; A2780 IC50 = 0.032 ?M). Compound 50 also showed excellent in vivo antitumor efficacy when dosed orally in an A2780 ovarian tumor xenograft model (TGI of 97% was observed on day 17). PMID:23617784

  19. Discovery of potent and efficacious cyanoguanidine-containing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhang; Baumeister, Timm; Buckmelter, Alexandre J; Caligiuri, Maureen; Clodfelter, Karl H; Han, Bingsong; Ho, Yen-Ching; Kley, Nikolai; Lin, Jian; Reynolds, Dominic J; Sharma, Geeta; Smith, Chase C; Wang, Zhongguo; Dragovich, Peter S; Oh, Angela; Wang, Weiru; Zak, Mark; Wang, Yunli; Yuen, Po-Wai; Bair, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    A co-crystal structure of amide-containing compound (4) in complex with the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) protein and molecular modeling were utilized to design and discover a potent novel cyanoguanidine-containing inhibitor bearing a sulfone moiety (5, Nampt Biochemical IC50=2.5nM, A2780 cell proliferation IC50=9.7nM). Further SAR exploration identified several additional cyanoguanidine-containing compounds with high potency and good microsomal stability. Among these, compound 15 was selected for in vivo profiling and demonstrated good oral exposure in mice. It also exhibited excellent in vivo antitumor efficacy when dosed orally in an A2780 ovarian tumor xenograft model. The co-crystal structure of this compound in complex with the NAMPT protein was also determined. PMID:24279990

  20. Regional gene assignment of human porphobilinogen deaminase and esterase A4 to chromosome 11q23 leads to 11qter.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A L; Arredondo-Vega, F X; Giampietro, P F; Smith, M; Anderson, W F; Desnick, R J

    1981-01-01

    The regional gene assignments for human porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; EC 4.3.1.8) and esterase A4 (ESA4; EC3.1.1.1) chromosome 11 have been determined with somatic cell hybridization and immunologic, electrophoretic, and cytogenetic techniques. Dimethyl sulfoxide-induced erythroid differentiation of hybrid clones derived from the fusion of tetraploid Friend murine erythroleukemia (2S MEL) cells deficient in thymidine kinase and human Lesch--Nyhan fibroblasts (HLN) deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT-; EC 2.4.2.8) were examined for expression of human PBGD, ESA4, and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA; EC 1.1.1.27). Human PBGD was detected by rocket immunoelectrophoresis with rabbit anti-human PBGD IgG and by isoelectric focusing. The human chromosome complement of each clone was determined by cytogenetic and enzyme marker analyses. Of the five primary 2S MEL--HLN clones examined, three were positive for human PBGD. These were subcloned to yield a total of 10 secondary, tertiary, or quaternary clones. Analyses of these subclones permitted the regional assignment of human PBGD and ESA4 to the long arm of chromosome 11. Finer regional assignment of the loci for human PBGD and ESA4 was facilitated when two 2S MEL (HPRT-)--human fibroblast (HX/11) hybrids, each containing the X chromosome--autosome translocation (der11), t(X;11)(q25-26;q23) as the only human chromosome, were examined for expression of human PBGD, ESA4, and LDHA. One clone, HX/11-2, contained the intact X/11 translocated chromosome; in the other, HX/11-3, 11p was deleted, and the human X/11 derivative was translocated onto a mouse chromosome. HX/11-2 expressed human LDHA, but HX/11-3 did not, verifying that the latter human 11/X derivative did not include 11pter leads to 11p12; PBGD and ESA4 were not detected in either hybrid. These results confirm the location of the gene for human PBGD on chromosome 11 and establish the assignment of the loci for PBGD and ESA4 in the region 11q23 leads to 11qter. Images PMID:6946513

  1. A mycobacterial phosphoribosyltransferase promotes bacillary survival by inhibiting oxidative stress and autophagy pathways in macrophages and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Roy, Debasish; Alaridah, Nader; Saha, Pratip; Nongthomba, Upendra; Godaly, Gabriela; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sonawane, Avinash

    2015-05-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various strategies to modulate host immune responses to facilitate its persistence in macrophages. The M. tuberculosis cell wall contains numerous glycoproteins with unknown roles in pathogenesis. Here, by using Concanavalin A and LC-MS analysis, we identified a novel mannosylated glycoprotein phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by Rv3242c from M. tuberculosis cell walls. Homology modeling, bioinformatic analyses, and an assay of phosphoribosyltransferase activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing recombinant Rv3242c (MsmRv3242c) confirmed the mass spectrometry data. Using Mycobacterium marinum-zebrafish and the surrogate MsmRv3242c infection models, we proved that phosphoribosyltransferase is involved in mycobacterial virulence. Histological and infection assays showed that the M. marinum mimG mutant, an Rv3242c orthologue in a pathogenic M. marinum strain, was strongly attenuated in adult zebrafish and also survived less in macrophages. In contrast, infection with wild type and the complemented ΔmimG:Rv3242c M. marinum strains showed prominent pathological features, such as severe emaciation, skin lesions, hemorrhaging, and more zebrafish death. Similarly, recombinant MsmRv3242c bacteria showed increased invasion in non-phagocytic epithelial cells and longer intracellular survival in macrophages as compared with wild type and vector control M. smegmatis strains. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the Rv3242c- and mimG-mediated enhancement of intramacrophagic survival was due to inhibition of autophagy, reactive oxygen species, and reduced activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes. Infection with MsmRv3242c also activated the MAPK pathway, NF-κB, and inflammatory cytokines. In summary, we show that a novel mycobacterial mannosylated phosphoribosyltransferase acts as a virulence and immunomodulatory factor, suggesting that it may constitute a novel target for antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25825498

  2. Apoptotic induction with bifunctional E.coli cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyltransferase mediated suicide gene therapy is synergized by curcumin treatment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, P; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2008-05-01

    Development of novel suicide gene therapy vector with potential application in cancer treatment has a great impact on human health. Investigation to understand molecular mechanism of cell death is necessary to evaluate the therapeutic application of suicide vectors. For example, the bifunctional E.coli cytosine deaminase & uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fusion (CD-UPRT) gene expression is known to sensitize a wide range of cells toward nontoxic prodrug 5-flurocytosine (5-FC) by converting it to toxic compounds, but the exact pathway of cell death is yet to be defined. Herein, we investigated the mechanism of cell death by 5-FC/CD-UPRT suicide system in both cancer and non-cancer cells and found that the optimum 5-FC concentration led to programmed cell death in vitro. The CD-UPRT expression of transfected cells was measured by the RT-PCR analysis. Biochemical assays, such as mitochondrial activity (MTS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurements exhibited cell death. Microscopic experiments showed characteristic onset of apoptosis which was further supported by internucleosomal DNA cleavage of BrdU labeled cellular DNA, appearance of characteristic laddering of chromosomal DNA and involvement of caspase pathway. Furthermore, the 5-FC/CD-UPRT-mediated apoptosis was potentiated with addition of a known anticancer agent curcumin. Our in vitro studies confirmed synergistic induction of apoptotic pathway in the combination treatment. Therefore, combination of 5-FC/CD-UPRT with curcumin could be a potential chemosensitization strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:18092145

  3. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification studies of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRTase) from Baker's yeast catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate from phosphoribosyl {alpha}-1-pyrophosphate and nicotinate, concomitant with ATP hydrolysis. Using purified NaPRTase, initial velocity measurements were performed varying one substrate concentration at different fixed levels of the second substrate and maintaining the third substrate constant. Subsequently, an exchange of label was observed between ATP and ({sup 14}C)-ADP. This rate of exchange was inhibited by PRibPP and pyrophosphate. Incubations of NaPRTase with pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate followed by sodium borohydride reduction led to inactivation of the enzyme. Pyridoxal was a less effective inhibitor than pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate. The inactivation of the enzyme by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was reversible upon flow dialysis, whereas reduction of the enzyme-pyridoxal complex with sodium borohydride rendered the inhibition irreversible. The presence of ATP or PRibPP, with or with Mg{sup 2+}, provided protection against this inactivation, while a kinetic analysis revealed the inhibition to be competitive, and noncompetitive, respectively. One mole of ({sup 3}H)-pyridoxal phosphate was required to completely inactivate the enzyme, which was reduced in the presence of MgATP and MgPRibPP to 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. No incorporation of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was observed in the combination of both of the two substrates.

  4. The substrate capture mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase provides a mode for inhibition.

    PubMed

    Castell, Alina; Short, Francesca L; Evans, Genevieve L; Cookson, Tammie V M; Bulloch, Esther M M; Joseph, Dmitri D A; Lee, Clare E; Parker, Emily J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2013-03-12

    Anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (AnPRT, EC 2.4.2.18) is a homodimeric enzyme that catalyzes the reaction between 5'-phosphoribosyl 1'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and anthranilate, as part of the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway. Here we present the results of the first chemical screen for inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis AnPRT (Mtb-AnPRT), along with crystal structures of Mtb-AnPRT in complex with PRPP and several inhibitors. Previous work revealed that PRPP is bound at the base of a deep cleft in Mtb-AnPRT and predicted two anthranilate binding sites along the tunnel leading to the PRPP binding site. Unexpectedly, the inhibitors presented here almost exclusively bound at the entrance of the tunnel, in the presumed noncatalytic anthranilate binding site, previously hypothesized to have a role in substrate capture. The potencies of the inhibitors were measured, yielding Ki values of 1.5-119 ?M, with the strongest inhibition displayed by a bianthranilate compound that makes hydrogen bond and salt bridge contacts with Mtb-AnPRT via its carboxyl groups. Our results reveal how the substrate capture mechanism of AnPRT can be exploited to inhibit the enzyme's activity and provide a scaffold for the design of improved Mtb-AnPRT inhibitors that may ultimately form the basis of new antituberculosis drugs with a novel mode of action. PMID:23363292

  5. Hepatic FoxOs Regulate Lipid Metabolism via Modulation of Expression of the Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rongya; Wei, Dan; Gao, Hanlin; Liu, Yunlong; DePinho, Ronald A.; Dong, X. Charlie

    2011-01-01

    FoxO transcription factors have been implicated in lipid metabolism; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, in an effort to elucidate such mechanisms, we examined the phenotypic consequences of liver-specific deletion of three members of the FoxO family: FoxO1, FoxO3, and FoxO4. These liver-specific triply null mice, designated LTKO, exhibited elevated triglycerides in the liver on regular chow diet. More remarkably, LTKO mice developed severe hepatic steatosis following placement on a high fat diet. Further analyses revealed that hepatic NAD+ levels and Sirt1 activity were decreased in the liver of the LTKO mice relative to controls. At the mechanistic level, expression profile analyses showed that LTKO livers had significantly down-regulated expression of the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway of NAD+ biosynthesis. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that Nampt is a transcriptional target gene of FoxOs. Significantly, overexpression of Nampt gene reduced, whereas knockdown increased, hepatic triglyceride levels in vitro and in vivo. Thus, FoxOs control the Nampt gene expression and the NAD+ signaling in the regulation of hepatic triglyceride homeostasis. PMID:21388966

  6. Increasing NAD Synthesis in Muscle via Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Is Not Sufficient to Promote Oxidative Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, David W.; Davis, James G.; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  7. Structure-based discovery of novel amide-containing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (nampt) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhang; Bauer, Paul; Baumeister, Timm; Buckmelter, Alexandre J; Caligiuri, Maureen; Clodfelter, Karl H; Han, Bingsong; Ho, Yen-Ching; Kley, Nikolai; Lin, Jian; Reynolds, Dominic J; Sharma, Geeta; Smith, Chase C; Wang, Zhongguo; Dragovich, Peter S; Gunzner-Toste, Janet; Liederer, Bianca M; Ly, Justin; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Angela; Wang, Leslie; Wang, Weiru; Xiao, Yang; Zak, Mark; Zhao, Guiling; Yuen, Po-Wai; Bair, Kenneth W

    2013-08-22

    Crystal structures of several urea- and thiourea-derived compounds in complex with the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) protein were utilized to design a potent amide-containing inhibitor bearing an aza-indole moiety (7, Nampt BC IC50 = 9.0 nM, A2780 cell proliferation IC50 = 10 nM). The Nampt-7 cocrystal structure was subsequently obtained and enabled the design of additional amide-containing inhibitors which incorporated various other fused 6,5-heterocyclic moieties and biaryl sulfone or sulfonamide motifs. Additional modifications of these molecules afforded many potent biaryl sulfone-containing Nampt inhibitors which also exhibited favorable in vitro ADME properties (microsomal and hepatocyte stability, MDCK permeability, plasma protein binding). An optimized compound (58) was a potent inhibitor of multiple cancer cell lines (IC50 <10 nM vs U251, HT1080, PC3, MiaPaCa2, and HCT116 lines), displayed acceptable mouse PK properties (F = 41%, CL = 52.4 mL/min/kg), and exhibited robust efficacy in a U251 mouse xenograft model. PMID:23859118

  8. Cerebral Ischemia Is Exacerbated by Extracellular Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase via a Non-Enzymatic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue; Zhang, Xia-Yan; Xing, Qiong; Dong, Xu; Shi, Qiao-Juan; Huang, Peng; Lu, Yun-Bi; Wei, Er-Qing; Xia, Qiang; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Tang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (iNAMPT) in neuron has been known as a protective factor against cerebral ischemia through its enzymatic activity, but the role of central extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT) is not clear. Here we show that eNAMPT protein level was elevated in the ischemic rat brain after middle-cerebral-artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion, which can be traced to at least in part from blood circulation. Administration of recombinant NAMPT protein exacerbated MCAO-induced neuronal injury in rat brain, while exacerbated oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) induced neuronal injury only in neuron-glial mixed culture, but not in neuron culture. In the mixed culture, NAMPT protein promoted TNF-α release in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, while TNF-α neutralizing antibody protected OGD-induced, NAMPT-enhanced neuronal injury. Importantly, H247A mutant of NAMPT with essentially no enzymatic activity exerted similar effects on ischemic neuronal injury and TNF-α release as the wild type protein. Thus, eNAMPT is an injurious and inflammatory factor in cerebral ischemia and aggravates ischemic neuronal injury by triggering TNF-α release from glia cells, via a mechanism not related to NAMPT enzymatic activity. PMID:24392007

  9. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dvila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ?50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  10. Target enzyme mutations are the molecular basis for resistance towards pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) are promising cancer drugs currently in clinical trials in oncology, including APO866, CHS-828 and the CHS-828 prodrug EB1627/GMX1777, but cancer cell resistance to these drugs has not been studied in detail. Methods Here, we introduce an analogue of CHS-828 called TP201565 with increased potency in cellular assays. Further, we describe and characterize a panel of cell lines with acquired stable resistance towards several NAMPT inhibitors of 18 to 20,000 fold compared to their parental cell lines. Results We find that 4 out of 5 of the resistant sublines display mutations of NAMPT located in the vicinity of the active site or in the dimer interface of NAMPT. Furthermore, we show that these mutations are responsible for the resistance observed. All the resistant cell lines formed xenograft tumours in vivo. Also, we confirm CHS-828 and TP201565 as competitive inhibitors of NAMPT through docking studies and by NAMPT precipitation from cellular lysate by an analogue of TP201565 linked to sepharose. The NAMPT precipitation could be inhibited by addition of APO866. Conclusion We found that CHS-828 and TP201565 are competitive inhibitors of NAMPT and that acquired resistance towards NAMPT inhibitors can be expected primarily to be caused by mutations in NAMPT. PMID:21144000

  11. Prototropic tautomerism and basic molecular principles of hypoxanthine mutagenicity: an exhaustive quantum-chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structures, relative stability order, and dipole moments of a complete family of 21 planar hypoxanthine (Hyp) prototropic molecular-zwitterionic tautomers including ylidic forms were computationally investigated at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in vacuum and in three different surrounding environments: continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ = 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interface of protein-nucleic acid interactions, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and water. The keto-N1HN7H tautomer was established to be the global minimum in vacuum and in continuum with ϵ = 4, while Hyp molecule exists as a mixture of the keto-N1HN9H and keto-N1HN7H tautomers in approximately equal amounts in DMSO and in water at T = 298.15 K. We found out that neither intramolecular tautomerization by single proton transfer in the Hyp base, nor intermolecular tautomerization by double proton transfer in the most energetically favorable Hyp·Hyp homodimer (symmetry C(2h)), stabilized by two equivalent N1H…O6 H-bonds, induces the formation of the enol tautomer (marked with an asterisk) of Hyp with cis-oriented O6H hydroxyl group relative to neighboring N1C6 bond. We first discovered a new scenario of the keto-enol tautomerization of Hyp · Hyp homodimer (C(2h)) via zwitterionic near-orthogonal transition state (TS), stabilized by N1⁺H…N1⁻ and O6⁺H…N1⁻ H-bonds, to heterodimer Hyp∗ · Hyp (C(s)), stabilized by O6H…O6 and N1H…N1 H-bonds. We first showed that Hyp∗ · Thy mispair (C(s)), stabilized by O6H…O4, N3H…N1, and C2H…O2 H-bonds, mimicking Watson-Crick base pairing, converts to the wobble Hyp · Thy base pair (C(s)), stabilized by N3H…O6 and N1H…O2 H-bonds, via high- and low-energy TSs and intermediate Hyp · Thy∗, stabilized by O4H…O6, N1H…N3, and C2H…O2 H-bonds. The most energetically favorable TS is the zwitterionic pair Hyp⁺ · Thy⁻ (C(s)), stabilized by O6⁺H…O4⁻, O6⁺H…N3⁻, N1⁺H…N3⁻, and N1⁺H…O2⁻ H-bonds. The authors expressed and substantiated the hypothesis, that the keto tautomer of Hyp is a mutagenic compound, while enol tautomer Hyp∗ does not possess mutagenic properties. The lifetime of the nonmutagenic tautomer Hyp∗ exceeds by many orders the time needed to complete a round of DNA replication in the cell. For the first time purine-purine planar H-bonded mispairs containing Hyp in the anti-orientation with respect to the sugar moiety--Hyp · Ade(syn), Hyp · Gua∗(syn), and Hyp · Gua(syn), that closely resembles the geometry of the Watson-Crick base pairs, have been suggested as the source of transversions. An influence of the surrounding environment (ϵ = 4) on the stability of studied complexes and corresponding TSs was estimated by means of the conductor-like polarizable continuum model. Electron-topological, structural, vibrational, and energetic characterictics of all conventional and nonconventional H-bonds in the investigated structures are presented. Presented data are key to understanding elementary molecular mechanisms of mutagenic action of Hyp as a product of the adenine deamination in DNA. PMID:22962845

  12. [Influences of anti-allergic drugs on superoxide generation from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system or polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, T; Naito, Y; Takahashi, S; Tanigawa, T; Oyamada, H; Ueda, S; Takemura, T; Sugino, S; Kondo, M

    1989-06-01

    The influences of anti-allergic drugs on superoxide generation from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system or polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were studied by an electron spin resonance assay using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trapper. The intensity of DMPO-OOH signal generated from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system was not influenced by the presence of azelastine, ketotifen, disodium cromoglycate, mequitazine, or methylprednisolone, but it decreased in the presence of AA-673. A kinetic study showed that the second order rate constant for reaction between AA-673 and superoxide anion at pH 7.4 was 2.9 x 10(8)M-1S-1. The relative intensity of DMPO-OOH spin adduct generated from PMN stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan (OZ) significantly decreased in the presence of azelastine: from the PMN-PMA system, with 10.7 microM concentration of molar concentration causing 50% reduction of the signal intensity (IC50), while from the PMN-OZ system, with 10.5 microM concentration of IC50, and also decreased in the presence of mequitazine: from the PMN-PMA system, with 10.8 microM concentration of IC50, while from the PMN-OZ system, less than 2.0 microM concentration of IC50. These results suggest that some anti-allergic drugs may have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative actions due to scavenging superoxide radicals or due to inhibiting superoxide production. PMID:2574029

  13. Induction of adenine salvage in mouse cell lines deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Turker, M S; Martin, G M

    1985-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) (EC 2.4.2.7) pseudorevertant cell lines were isolated under selective conditions requiring adenine salvage for survival; yet they were found to be deficient in measurable APRT activity and resistant to the purine analog 2'6'-diaminopurine (DAP) (M.S. Turker, J. A. Tischfield, P. Rabinovitch, P.J. Stambrook, J.J. Trill, A.C. Smith, C.E. Ogburn, and G.M. Martin, manuscript in preparation). Adenine salvage was examined in two APRT pseudorevertant cell lines, their two APRT homozygous deficient parental cell lines, and a genotypic APRT revertant cell line (i.e., one with measurable APRT activity and DAP sensitivity). Adenine accumulation was observed in both revertant phenotypes and was demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography to be linked with adenine metabolism. The ability to salvage adenine declined substantially in the pseudorevertant cell lines when they were removed from selective media containing inhibitors of de novo 5'-AMP synthesis (alanosine and azaserine); for one pseudorevertant cell line this decline was accelerated by the addition of DAP to the medium. The readdition of alanosine or azaserine to the growth medium of the pseudorevertant lines induced adenine salvage to its previous levels. An APRT-like cross-reacting material was found in the pseudorevertant cell lines, although its relationship to adenine salvage is unknown. A low level of constitutive adenine salvage was found in the parental APRT-deficient lines, and it was also possible to induce adenine salvage in these cell lines. These findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for adenine salvage. PMID:3837181

  14. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor APO866 induces C6 glioblastoma cell death via autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Zhang, Lu; Shi, Qiao-Juan; Lu, Yun-Bi; Wu, Ming; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Ping

    2015-10-01

    APO866 is a potent inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and inhibits nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Our previous study showed that APO866 inhibits the proliferation of C6 glioblastoma cells, but failed to induce apoptosis. Since APO866 inhibits cellular metabolism and such metabolic stress is closely related with autophagy, thus we determined whether APO866 can induce autophagy in C6 glioblastoma cells and whether the autophagy induced by APO866 is pro-death or pro-survival. Using LC3 immunofluorescence imaging and transmission electron microscopy detection, we found that APO866 at 1-100 nM induced autophagy in C6 glioblastoma cells. APO866 at 1 nM mainly induced initial autophagic vacuoles. Whereas APO866 at 100 nM induced degrading autophagic vacuoles, as well as induced nuclei malformation and mitochondria swelling. In addition, APO866 concentration-dependently decreased the cell viability of C6 glioblastoma cells, and this effect was attenuated by autophagy inhibitors, including 3-methyladenine and LY294002. APO866 concentration-dependently decreased intracellular NAD level. Interestingly, APO866 at 1 nM slightly decreased intracellular NAD level, but dramatically increased autophagy-positive cells. The dramatical cell viability decreasing required the decreasing of intracellular NAD level to a very low threshold. Thus, our results indicated that APO866 induced pro-death autophagy in C6 glioblastoma cells by decreasing intracellular NAD, and low concentration of APO866 can be used as an autophagy inducer in autophagic-death sensitive glioblastoma. PMID:26601421

  15. Cloning and nucleic acid sequence of the Salmonella typhimurium pncB gene and structure of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Vinitsky, A; Teng, H; Grubmeyer, C T

    1991-01-01

    The pncB gene of Salmonella typhimurium, encoding nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase), was cloned on a 4.7-kb Sau3A fragment. The gene contains a 1,200-bp open reading frame coding for a 400-residue protein. Amino acid sequencing of the amino-terminal and two interior peptides of the purified protein confirmed the deduced sequence and revealed that the amino-terminal methionine residue was removed, giving a 399-residue mature protein of Mr 45,512. No signal sequence was observed in the predicted NAPRTase primary structure, suggesting that the enzyme is not periplasmic. The protein does not demonstrate clear sequence similarity to the other seven phosphoribosyltransferases of known primary structure and frustrates attempts to define a consensus 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate-binding region. The NAPRTase reaction is ATP stimulated, and the protein contains a carboxy-terminal sequence diagnostic of an ATP-binding site. An inverted repeat of the sequence TAAACAA observed in the proposed promoter region of pncB is also present in the promoter of nadA, which, like pncB, is also regulated by the NadR (NadI) repressor. The sequence may thus define an NadR repressor-binding site. PMID:1987148

  16. Perspectives on fast-neutron mutagenesis of human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, A

    1991-10-01

    The effects of low-fluence exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons (En = 4.2 MeV) have been studied in a sensitive human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, TK6. Mutations were scored for two genetic loci, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) and thymidine kinase (tk), as a function of dose and dose rate. For exposures limited to less than one cell cycle, the mutation frequency for the hgprt locus was 1.92 X 10(-7)/cGy. When exposures were protracted over multiple cell generations, mutation yields were increased to 6.07 X 10(-7)/cGy. Similar yields were obtained for the induction of tk-deficient mutants with a normal cell generation time (tk-ng) when exposures were carried out at very low dose rates over multiple cell generations. In the series of data presented here, the results obtained for short-duration neutron exposures are compared with data obtained for monoenergetic heavy charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) produced at the BEVALAC accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. TK6 cells have been exposed to beams ranging in atomic number from 20Ne to 40Ar over an energy range from 330 to 670 MeV/amu. Mutation induction was evaluated for both loci for a subset of these beams. The results obtained with 20Ne ions of 425 MeV/amu (LET = 32 keV/microns) and 28Si ions of 670 MeV/amu (LET = 50 keV/microns) closely resemble the mutation yields obtained for brief exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons. The nature of alterations in DNA structure induced within the tk locus of tk-ng mutants is reviewed for a series of neutron-induced mutants and a series of mutants induced by exposure to 40Ar ions (470 MeV/amu, LET = 95 keV/microns). The mutational spectra for these two types of mutants were similar and were dominated by allele loss mutations. Multilocus deletions inclusive of the c-erbA1 locus were common among tk-deficient mutants induced by these densely ionizing radiations. For the mutants induced by 40Ar ions, it is likely that the mutations were produced by the traversal of the chromosome by a single particle. PMID:1924755

  17. 3-Chloro-p-toluidine hydrochloride: in vitro mutagenicity studies for human health hazards determinations.

    PubMed

    Stankowski, L F; San Sebastian, J R; Sterner, R T

    1997-04-11

    3-Chloro-p-toluidine hydrochloride (CPT-HCl) is an aniline derivative used in the manufacture of the dye palatine fast yellow; it is also registered as a selective, low-volume-use (< 45 kg/yr) avicide. Three in vitro mutagenicity tests of CPT-HCl were performed according to methods recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): the Ames/Salmonella assay, the Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (CHO/HPRT) mammalian cell forward gene mutation assay, and the CHO chromosome aberration assay. CPT-HCl did not display mutagenic activity using the Ames/Salmonella or CHO/HPRT assays. However, CPT-HCl induced statistically significant, concentration-dependent, metabolically activated increases in the proportion of aberrant cells and aberrations/cell in cultured CHO cells. Results are suggestive of minimal mutagenicity effects associated with exposure to anilines and their derivatives. PMID:9140464

  18. Expression of Maternally and Embryonically Derived Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (Hprt) Activity in Mouse Eggs and Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Paul G.

    1983-01-01

    X-chromosome activity in early mouse development has been studied by a gene dosage method that involves measuring the activity level of the X-linked enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) in single eggs and embryos from XO females and from females heterozygous for In(X)1H, a paracentric inversion of the X chromosome. The HPRT activity in oocytes increased threefold over a 24-hr period beginning after ovulation. Afterward, the activity plateaued in unfertilized eggs but continued to increase for at least 66 hr in presumed OY embryos. Both before and after ovulation, the level of activity in unfertilized eggs from In(X)/X females was twice that from XO females, and the distributions of activity in eggs for both sets of females remained unimodal. Beginning with the two-cell stage, distributions of activity for embryos from In(X)/X females were trimodal, which is evidence for embryonic activity. It is proposed that activation of a maternal mRNA or proenzyme is responsible for the HPRT activity increase in oocytes and early embryos and is supplemented by dosage-dependent activity of the embryonic Hprt gene as early as the two-cell stage. PMID:6618165

  19. Radioprotector WR1065 reduces radiation-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hill, C.K.; Peraino, C. ); Biserka, N. ); Wells, R.L. . Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1985-06-01

    N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR1065) protects against radiation-induced cell killing and mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells. WR1065 (4 mm) was found to be effective in protecting against radiation-induced cell lethality only if present during irradiation. No protective effect was observed if the protector was added within 5 min after irradiation or 3 h later. The effect of WR1065 on radiation-induced mutation, expressed as resistance to the cytotoxic purine analogue 6-thioguanine (HGPRT), was also investigated. This agent was effective in reducing radiation-induced mutations regardless of when it was administered. Following 10 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, the mutation frequencies observed per 10/sup 6/ survivors were 77 +- 8, 27 +- 6, 42 +- 7, and 42 +- 7 for radiation only, and WR1065 present during, immediately after, or 3 h after irradiation. These data suggest that although a segment of radiation-induced damage leading to reproductive death cannot be modulated through the postirradiation action of WR1065, processes leading to the fixation of gross genetic damage and mutation induction in surviving cells can be effectively altered and interfered with leading to a marked reduction in mutation frequency.

  20. Identification of Stable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Analysis of Three-Dimensional Cultivated Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rauh, Juliane; Jacobi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The principles of tissue engineering (TE) are widely used for bone regeneration concepts. Three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of autologous human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on porous scaffolds is the basic prerequisite to generate newly formed bone tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a specific and sensitive analytical tool for the measurement of mRNA-levels in cells or tissues. For an accurate quantification of gene expression levels, stably expressed reference genes (RGs) are essential to obtain reliable results. Since the 3D environment can affect a cell's morphology, proliferation, and gene expression profile compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultivation, there is a need to identify robust RGs for the quantification of gene expression. So far, this issue has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the most stably expressed RGs for gene expression analysis of 3D-cultivated human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). For this, we analyzed the gene expression levels of n=31 RGs in 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs from six different donors compared with conventional 2D cultivation using qRT-PCR. MSCs isolated from bone marrow aspirates were cultivated on human cancellous bone cube scaffolds for 14 days. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expression of osteogenic marker genes. Expression levels of potential reference and target genes were quantified using commercially available TaqMan® assays. mRNA expression stability of RGs was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and using the algorithms of geNorm and NormFinder. Using both algorithms, we identified TATA box binding protein (TBP), transferrin receptor (p90, CD71) (TFRC), and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) as the most stably expressed RGs in 3D-cultivated BM-MSCs. Notably, genes that are routinely used as RGs, for example, beta actin (ACTB) and ribosomal protein L37a (RPL37A), were among the least stable genes. We recommend the combined use of TBP, TFRC, and HPRT1 for the accurate and robust normalization of qRT-PCR data of 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs. PMID:25000821

  1. Localization of the gene that codes for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase on the genetic map of chromosome 8 of mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, T.B.; Borodin, P.M.; Zakiyan, S.M.

    1988-11-01

    Polymorphism of electrophoretic mobility of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) was found in Mus musculus bactrianus, a population of domestic mouse. The presence of intraspecies polymorphism allows localization of the gene that codes for this enzyme on the genetic map of the 8th chromosome. Two markers were utilized to map the Aprt gene: the plasmin esterase-1, which is coded by the gene Es-1 located at a distance of 26 morganids from the centromere; and the Robertsonian translocation Rb(8.17)1 Iem, which marks the centromere. Results of the linkage analysis showed the gene Aprt to be located on the genetic map of the 8th chromosome at a distance of 51 morganids from the centromere and 25 morganids distil of the gene Es-1. Also discussed in this work was the influence of emotional stress on the recombination process in the 8th chromosome.

  2. Human hybrid hybridoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

  3. A human hybrid hybridoma.

    PubMed

    Tiebout, R F; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F; Stricker, E A; Zeijlemaker, W P

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. We have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. We fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1 kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxoid and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1 lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassays. Our results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. PMID:3119707

  4. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P.

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  5. Coupled optical assay for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and its extension for the spectrophotometric and radioenzymatic determination of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate in mixtures and in tissue extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Ipata, P.L.; Mura, U.; Camici, M.; Giovannitti, M.P.

    1987-08-01

    A reliable assay was developed to characterize crude cell homogenates with regard to their adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activities. The 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP)-dependent formation of AMP from adenine is followed spectrophotometrically at 265 nm by coupling it with the following two-stage enzymatic conversion: AMP + H/sub 2/O----adenosine + Pi (5'-nucleotidase); adenosine + H/sub 2/O----inosine + NH/sub 3/ (adenosine deaminase). The same principle was applied to develop a spectrophotometric and a radioenzymatic assay for PRPP. The basis of the spectrophotometric assay is the absorbance change at 265 nm associated with the enzymatic conversion of PRPP into inosine, catalyzed by the sequential action of partially purified adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, commercial 5'-nucleotidase, and commercial adenosine deaminase, in the presence of excess adenine. In the radiochemical assay PRPP is quantitatively converted into (/sup 14/C)inosine via the same combined reaction. Tissue extracts are incubated with excess (/sup 14/C)adenine. The radioactivity of inosine, separated by a thin-layer chromatographic system, is a measure of PRPP present in tissue extracts. The radioenzymatic assay is at least as sensitive as other methods based on the use of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. However, it overcomes the reversibility of the reaction and the need to use transferase preparations free of any phosphatase and adenosine deaminase activities.

  6. A highly sensitive and automated method for the determination of hypoxanthine based on lab-on-valve approach using Fe3O4/MWCNTs/β-CD modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Lu; Tian, Tian; Yao, Guojun; Hu, Xiaoya; Yang, Chun; Xu, Qin

    2012-09-15

    A Fe(3)O(4)/multiwall carbon nanotubes/β-cyclodextrin (Fe(3)O(4)/MWCNTs/β-CD) modified electrode, for highly sensitive and automated hypoxanthine measurements, was developed in a sequential injection lab-on-valve system. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of hypoxanthine was investigated in phosphate buffer solution by cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry. The Fe(3)O(4)/MWCNTs/β-CD modified electrode exhibits preferably analytical characteristics in electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of hypoxanthine. Under optimized conditions, the log oxidation peak current intensity was proportional to log hypoxanthine concentration covering the range from 5.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-5) mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9965. A detection limit of 0.3×10(-8) mol L(-1) was achieved along with a sampling frequency of 20 h(-1). This hyphenated system offers some advantages in terms of rapidness, sensitivity and ease of manipulation. Its further applications were utilized for the determination of hypoxanthine in meat samples. PMID:22967631

  7. Simultaneous assay of glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine levels in a rat striatum using enzyme electrodes based on neutral red-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fen-Fen; Wan, Qiao; Li, Chen-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Xian, Yue-Zhong; Jin, Li-Tong; Yamamoto, Katsunobu

    2004-10-01

    An electrochemical method suitable for the simultaneous measurement of cerebral glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine concentrations from in vivo microdialysis sampling has been successfully performed for the first time using a neutral red-doped silica (NRDS) nanoparticle-derived enzyme sensor system. These uniform NRDS nanoparticles (about 50 +/- 3 nm) were prepared by a water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion method, and characterized by a TEM technique. The neutral red-doped interior maintained its high electron-activity, while the exterior nano-silica surface prevented the mediator from leaching out into the aqueous solution, and showed high biocompability. These nanoparticles were then mixing with the glucose oxidase (GOD), lactate oxidase (LOD), L-glutamate oxidase (L-GLOD) or xanthine oxidase (XOD), and immobilized on four glassy carbon electrodes, respectively. A thin Nafion film was coated on the enzyme layer to prevent interference from molecules such as ascorbic acid and uric acid in the dialysate. The high sensitivity of the NRDS modified enzyme electrode system enables the simultaneous monitoring of trace levels of glucose, L-glutamate, lactate and hypoxanthine in diluted dialysate samples from a rat striatum. PMID:15517210

  8. Xanthine oxidase inhibits growth of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P A; Human, L; Freese, J A

    1991-01-01

    Malaria parasites, unable to synthesize purine de novo, use host-derived hypoxanthine preferentially as purine source. In a previous study (1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:6562-6568), we noted that xanthine oxidase rapidly and completely depleted hypoxanthine in human erythrocytes, not by crossing the erythrocyte membrane, but rather by creating a concentration gradient which facilitated hypoxanthine efflux. We therefore investigated the ability of xanthine oxidase to inhibit growth of FCR-3, a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro. Parasites were cultured in human group O+ erythrocytes in medium supplemented, as required, with xanthine oxidase or chloroquine. Parasite viability was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled glycine and adenosine triphosphate-derived purine into protein and nucleic acid, respectively, by nucleic acid accumulation, by L-lactate production, and by microscopic appearance. On average, a 90% inhibition of growth was observed after 72 h of incubation in 20 mU/ml xanthine oxidase. Inhibition was notably greater than that exerted by 10(-7) M chloroquine (less than 10%) over a comparable period. The IC50 for xanthine oxidase was estimated at 0.2 mU/ml, compared to 1.5 x 10(-7) M for chloroquine. Inhibition was completely reversed by excess hypoxanthine, but was unaffected by oxygen radical scavengers, including superoxide dismutase and catalase. The data confirms that a supply of host-derived hypoxanthine is critical for nucleic acid synthesis in P. falciparum, and that depletion of erythrocyte hypoxanthine pools of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. Images PMID:1752946

  9. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and genetic damage will be needed.

  10. The role of human cytochrome P4503A4 in biotransformation of tissue-specific derivatives of 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Mesarosova, Monika; Valovicova, Zuzana; Srancikova, Annamaria; Krajcovicova, Zdenka; Milcova, Alena; Sokolova, Romana; Schmuczerova, Jana; Topinka, Jan; Gabelova, Alena

    2011-09-15

    The environmental pollutant 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) and its derivative, 5,9-dimethylDBC (DiMeDBC), produced significant and dose-dependent levels of micronuclei followed by a substantial increase in the frequency of apoptotic cells in the V79MZh3A4 cell line stably expressing the human cytochrome P450 (hCYP) 3A4. In contrast, neither micronuclei nor apoptosis were found in cells exposed to the sarcomagenic carcinogen, N-methylDBC (N-MeDBC). A slight but significant level of gene mutations and DNA adducts detected in V79MZh3A4 cells treated with N-MeDBC, only at the highest concentration (30 {mu}M), revealed that this sarcomagenic carcinogen was also metabolized by hCYP3A4. Surprisingly, DBC increased the frequency of 6-thioguanine resistant (6-TG{sup r}) mutations only at the highest concentration (30 {mu}M), while DiMeDBC failed to increase the frequency of these mutations. The resistance to 6-thioguanine is caused by the mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) gene. The molecular analysis of the coding region of Hprt gene showed a deletion of the entire exon 8 in DiMeDBC-induced 6-TG{sup r} mutants, while no changes in the nucleotide sequences were identified in 6-TG{sup r} mutants produced by DBC and N-MeDBC. Based on our results, we suggest that hCYP3A4 is involved in the metabolism of DBC and its tissue-specific derivatives. While hCYP3A4 probably plays an important role in biotransformation of the liver carcinogens, DBC and DiMeDBC, it might only have a marginal function in N-MeDBC metabolism. - Highlights: > DBC activation via CYP3A4 resulted in micronuclei, DNA adduct formation and mutations in V79MZh3A4 cells. > The CYP3A4-mediated DiMeDBC activation caused micronuclei followed by apoptosis in V79MZh3A4 cells. > The genotoxic effects produced by N-MeDBC in V79MZh3A4 cells were negligible. > The hCYP3A4 may play an important role in DBC and DiMeDBC metabolism. > The CYP3A4 might only have a marginal function in N-MeDBC metabolism.

  11. The pyrimidine biosynthesis operon of the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus includes genes for uracil phosphoribosyltransferase and uracil permease.

    PubMed Central

    Ghim, S Y; Neuhard, J

    1994-01-01

    A 3-kb DNA segment of the Bacillus caldolyticus genome including the 5' end end of the pyr cluster has been cloned and sequenced. The sequence revealed the presence of two open reading frames, pyrR and pyrP, located immediately upstream of the previously sequenced pyrB gene encoding the pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase. The pyrR and pyrP genes encoded polypeptides with calculated molecular masses of 19.9 and 45.2 kDa, respectively. Expression of these ORFs was confirmed by analysis of plasmid-encoded polypeptides in minicells. Sequence alignment and complementation analyses identified the pyrR gene product as a uracil phosphoribosyltransferase and the pyrP gene product as a membrane-bound uracil permease. By using promoter expression vectors, a 650-bp EcoRI-HincII fragment, including the 5' end of pyrR and its upstream region, was found to contain the pyr operon promoter. The transcriptional start point was located by primer extension at a position 153 bp upstream of the pyrR translation initiation codon, 7 bp 3' of a sequence resembling a sigma A-dependent Bacillus subtilis promoter. This established the following organization of the ten cistrons within the pyr operon: promoter-pyrR-pyrP-pyrB-pyrC-pyrAa-pyrA b-orf2-pyrD-pyrF-pyrE. The nucleotide sequences of the region upstream of pyrR and of the pyrR-pyrP and pyrP-pyrB intercistronic regions indicated that the transcript may form two mutually exclusive secondary structures within each of these regions. One of these structures resembled a rho-independent transcriptional terminator. The possible implication of these structures for pyrimidine regulation of the operon is discussed. Images PMID:8206848

  12. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is required for the calorie restriction-mediated improvements in oxidative stress, mitochondrial biogenesis, and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Ke, Sen-Fang; Zhou, Can-Can; Zhang, Sai-Long; Guan, Yun-Feng; Xu, Tian-Ying; Sheng, Chun-Quan; Wang, Pei; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most reproducible treatments for weight loss and slowing aging. However, how CR induces these metabolic alterations is not fully understood. In this work, we studied whether nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis, plays a role in CR-induced beneficial metabolic effects using a specific inhibitor of NAMPT (FK866). CR upregulated NAMPT mRNA and protein levels in rat skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Inhibition of NAMPT activity by FK866 in rats did not affect the SIRT1 upregulation by CR but suppressed the CR-induced SIRT1 activity and deacetylation of Forkhead box protein O1/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α. Inhibition of NAMPT activity by FK866 also attenuated the CR-induced SIRT3 activity, evidenced by deacetylation of superoxide dismutase-2. Furthermore, FK866 not only weakened the CR-induced decrease of oxidative stress (dichlorofluorescin signal, superoxide , and malondialdehyde levels), but also greatly attenuated the CR-induced improvements of antioxidative activity (total superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio) and mitochondrial biogenesis (mRNA levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1, cytochrome c oxidase IV, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and transcription factor A, mitochondrial and citrate synthase activity). At last, FK866 blocked the CR-induced insulin sensitizing, Akt signaling activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence that the CR-induced beneficial effects in oxidative stress, mitochondrial biogenesis, and metabolic adaptation require NAMPT. PMID:23946338

  13. Studies on the energy metabolism of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) erythrocytes: V. Utilization of hypoxanthine for the synthesis of adenine and guanine nucleotides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlenfalvay, N.C.; White, J.C.; Chadwick, E.; Lima, J.E. )

    1990-06-01

    High pressure liquid radiochromatography was used to test the ability of opossum erythrocytes to incorporate tracer amounts of (G-{sup 3}H) hypoxanthine (Hy) into ({sup 3}H) labelled triphosphates of adenine and guanine. In the presence of supraphysiologic (30 mM) phosphate which is optimal for PRPP synthesis, both ATP and GTP are extensively labelled. When physiologic (1 mM) medium phosphate is used, red cells incubated under an atmosphere of nitrogen accumulate ({sup 3}H) ATP in a linear fashion suggesting ongoing PRPP synthesis in red cells whose hemoglobin is deoxygenated. In contrast, a lesser increase of labelled ATP is observed in cells incubated under oxygen, suggesting that conditions for purine nucleotide formation from ambient Hy are more favorable in the venous circulation.

  14. Theoretical study of valance photoelectron spectra of hypoxanthine, xanthine, and caffeine using direct symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration interaction methodology.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, Hossein; Fathi, Fariman

    2011-08-01

    UV photoelectron spectra of hypoxanthine, xanthine, and caffeine, up to 20 eV, were calculated and compared with the experimental spectra reported in literature. The calculations were performed using a novel version of the quantum mechanical symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method termed, direct SAC-CI. The Duning/Huzinaga valance double-zeta D95+(d,p) Gaussian basis set was also employed with this method. The ionization energies and intensities were calculated, and the corresponding spectral bands were assigned. Natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The calculated ionization energies and intensities reasonably produced the experimental photoelectron spectra. PMID:21598281

  15. Association of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Gene Polymorphisms and of Serum NAMPT Levels with Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Dou, Qingyu; Peng, Ying; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Kui; Lin, Jing; Dai, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lin; Rao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has crucial roles for myocardial development, cardiomyocyte energy metabolism and cell death/survival by regulating NAD⁺-dependent sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase. This study aimed to determine if the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NAMPT gene may affect the susceptibility and prognosis for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and to describe the association of serum NAMPT levels with clinical features of DCM. Three SNPs (rs61330082, rs2505568, and rs9034) were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in a case-control study of 394 DCM patients and 395 controls from China. Serum NAMPT levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The homozygote for the minor allele at rs2505568 and rs9034 could not be detected in this study. Rs9034 T allele and CT genotype were associated with increased DCM risk (OR: 1.63, 95% CI = 1.16-2.27, p = 0.005 and OR: 1.72, 95% CI = 1.20-2.50, p = 0.0027, respectively). Nominally significant decreased DCM risk was found to be associated with the A allele and AT genotype of rs2505568 (OR: 0.48, 95% CI = 0.35-0.67, p < 0.0001 and OR: 0.44, 95% CI = 0.31-0.62, p < 0.0001, respectively), but it should be interpreted with caution because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the control group. Of five haplotypes constructed, TAC (rs61330082-rs2505568-rs9034) was a protective haplotype to DCM (OR: 0.22, 95% CI = 0.13-0.39, p = 1.84 × 10(-8)). The Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that the rs9034 CT genotype (hazard ratio (HR): 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37-0.96, p = 0.03) was an independently multivariate predictor for longer overall survival in DCM patients. Serum NAMPT levels were significantly higher in the DCM group than controls (p < 0.0001) and gradually increased with the increase of New York Heart Association grade in DCM patients. However, there was a lack of association of the three SNPs with serum NAMPT levels. Spearman correlation test revealed that the NAMPT level was positively associated with brain natriuretic peptide (r = 0.56, p = 0.001), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (r = 0.293, p = 0.011) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (r = 0.294, p = 0.011). Our study suggested that NAMPT may play an important role in the development of DCM. PMID:26389889

  16. Non-invasive molecular and functional imaging of cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fused with red fluorescence protein

    PubMed Central

    XING, LIGANG; DENG, XUELONG; KOTEDIA, KHUSHALI; ACKERSTAFF, ELLEN; PONOMAREV, VLADIMIR; LING, C. CLIFTON; KOUTCHER, JASON A.; LI, GLORIA C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) may improve the antitumoral effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and thereby enhance the potential of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy. For the applicability of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy in a clinical setting, it is essential to be able to monitor the transgene expression and function in vivo. Thus, we developed a preclinical tumor model to investigate the feasibility of using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and optical imaging to measure non-invasively CD and UPRT expression and function. Materials and methods Expression vectors of CD or CD/UPRT fused to monomeric DsRed (mDsRed) were constructed and rat prostate carcinoma (R3327-AT) cell lines stably expressing either CD/mDsRed or CD/UPRT/mDsRed were generated. The expression of the fusion proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The function of the fusion protein was confirmed in vitro by assessing 5-FC and 5-FU cytotoxicity. In vivo fluorine-19 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F MRS) was used to monitor the conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in mice bearing the R3327-CD/mDsRed and R3327-CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumor xenografts. Results Sensitivity to 5-FC and 5-FU was higher in cells stably expressing the CD/UPRT/mDsRed fusion gene than in cells stably expressing CD/mDsRed alone or wild-type cells. Whole tumor 19F MRS measurements showed rapid conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU within 20 min after 5-FC was administered intravenously in both CD/mDsRed and CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumors with subsequent anabolism to cytotoxic fluoronucleotides (FNucs). CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumor was more efficient in these processes. Conclusion This study demonstrates the utility of these tumor models stably expressing CD or CD/UPRT to non-invasively evaluate the efficacy of the transgene expression/activity by monitoring drug metabolism in vivo using MRS, with potential applications in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:18661431

  17. Association of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Gene Polymorphisms and of Serum NAMPT Levels with Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Qingyu; Peng, Ying; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Kui; Lin, Jing; Dai, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lin; Rao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has crucial roles for myocardial development, cardiomyocyte energy metabolism and cell death/survival by regulating NAD+-dependent sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase. This study aimed to determine if the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NAMPT gene may affect the susceptibility and prognosis for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and to describe the association of serum NAMPT levels with clinical features of DCM. Three SNPs (rs61330082, rs2505568, and rs9034) were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in a case-control study of 394 DCM patients and 395 controls from China. Serum NAMPT levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The homozygote for the minor allele at rs2505568 and rs9034 could not be detected in this study. Rs9034 T allele and CT genotype were associated with increased DCM risk (OR: 1.63, 95% CI = 1.162.27, p = 0.005 and OR: 1.72, 95% CI = 1.202.50, p = 0.0027, respectively). Nominally significant decreased DCM risk was found to be associated with the A allele and AT genotype of rs2505568 (OR: 0.48, 95% CI = 0.350.67, p < 0.0001 and OR: 0.44, 95% CI = 0.310.62, p < 0.0001, respectively), but it should be interpreted with caution because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the control group. Of five haplotypes constructed, TAC (rs61330082-rs2505568-rs9034) was a protective haplotype to DCM (OR: 0.22, 95% CI = 0.130.39, p = 1.84 10?8). The Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that the rs9034 CT genotype (hazard ratio (HR): 0.59, 95% CI = 0.370.96, p = 0.03) was an independently multivariate predictor for longer overall survival in DCM patients. Serum NAMPT levels were significantly higher in the DCM group than controls (p < 0.0001) and gradually increased with the increase of New York Heart Association grade in DCM patients. However, there was a lack of association of the three SNPs with serum NAMPT levels. Spearman correlation test revealed that the NAMPT level was positively associated with brain natriuretic peptide (r = 0.56, p = 0.001), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (r = 0.293, p = 0.011) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (r = 0.294, p = 0.011). Our study suggested that NAMPT may play an important role in the development of DCM. PMID:26389889

  18. Matrix-isolation FT-IR study and theoretical calculations of the vibrational, tautomeric and H-bonding properties of hypoxanthine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaekers, R.; Maes, G.; Adamowicz, L.; Dkhissi, A.

    2001-01-01

    The neutral compound hypoxanthine is investigated using the technique of matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio methods. Two theoretical methods (RHF and DFT/B3-LYP) are compared for vibrational frequency prediction, and four methods (RHF//RHF, MP2//RHF, DFT//DFT and MP2//DFT) for prediction of the relative energies of the tautomers and the interaction energies of the complexes. All the possible tautomeric forms have been considered theoretically, and the results indicate that two oxo forms (O17 and O19) and one hydroxy form (H9-r1) are the three most stable forms. The experimental FT-IR spectra are consistent with this prediction, and nearly all the characteristic spectral features of these forms have been identified in the spectrum. A theoretical study of the H-bonded complexes of these three tautomers with water is also performed. Several structures have been found for each form and the results demonstrate that the closed complexes with two H-bonds are the most stable systems due to the H-bond cooperative effect.

  19. Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) Deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... film but are detected with ultrasound or computerized tomography (CT) scan, the stones will most likely be composed of uric acid. However, APRT deficiency and 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria is also a possible cause of the kidney stones. If you have radiolucent kidney stones you ...

  20. ANALYSIS OF X-RAY INDUCED HPRT MUTATIONS IN CHO CELLS: INSERTION AND DELETIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular alterations were examined in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of 41 independent X-ray-induced thioguanine-resistant (TGR) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clones. Rapid screening of the clones by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fo...

  1. An insight into prototropism and supramolecular motifs in solid-state structures of allopurinol, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid. A H-?N NQDR spectroscopy, hybrid DFT/QTAIM, and Hirshfeld surface-based study.

    PubMed

    Latosi?ska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosi?ska, Magdalena; Seliger, Janez; agar, Veselko; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt

    2014-09-18

    Allopurinol (1,5-dihydro-4H-pyrazolo [3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-one), the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drugs applied for the treatment of gout and tumor lysis syndrome, recently discovered to have multifaceted therapeutic potential, and hypoxanthine which is a naturally occurring purine have been studied experimentally in the solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR double resonance. Twelve (14)N resonance frequencies have been detected at 295 K and assigned to two pairs of two kinds of nitrogen sites (-N? and -NH) in each compound. The experimental results are supported by and interpreted with the help of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM)/density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The factors, such as the substituent effect, in particular the shift of nitrogen from position 7 (as in hypoxanthine) to position 8 (as in allopurinol), hybridization, possible prototropic tautomerism, and the pattern of intermolecular bonding, have been taken into account in (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR spectra interpretation. This study demonstrates the advantages of combining NQR, DFT/QTAIM, and Hirshfeld surface analysis to extract detailed information on electron density distribution and complex H-bonding networks in crystals of purinic type heterocycles, relevant in pharmacological processes. In the absence of X-ray data for xanthine, the NQR parameters supported by DFT/QTAIM calculations and Hirshfeld surface analysis were proved to be valuable tools for clarifying the details of crystalline packing and predicting an unsolved crystalline structure of xanthine. The influence of a decrease in purine ring conjugation level upon oxidation on the biological activity of allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme inhibitor, which blocks the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and subsequently xanthine to uric acid, is also discussed. PMID:25079386

  2. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  3. Molecular analyses of in vivo hprt mutations in human T-lymphocytes: IV. Studies in newborns

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, M.J.; Nicklas, J.A.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to characterize in vivo gene mutations that occur during fetal development, molecular analyses were undertaken of mutant 6-thioguanine resistant T-lymphocytes isolated from placental cord blood samples of 13 normal male newborns. These mutant T-cells were studied to define hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene structural alterations and to determine T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns. Structural hprt alterations, as shown by Southern blot analyses, occurred in 85% of these mutant clones. These alterations consisted mostly of deletion of exons 2 and 3. These findings contrast with the 10-20% of gross structural alterations occurring randomly across the entire gene previously reported for T-cell mutants isolated from normal young adults. Iterative analyses of hprt structural alterations and TCR gene rearrangement patterns show that approximately one-third of the newborn derived mutants may have originated as pre- or intrathymic hprt mutations. This too contrasts with previous findings in adults where the background in vivo hprt mutations appeared to originate in postthymic T-lymphocytes.

  4. A simple and sensitive method for estimating the concentration and synthesis of 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tax, W J; Veerkamp, J H

    1977-07-15

    A method is presented for the determination of 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), which is based on the release of 14CO2 from [carboxyl-14C]-orotic acid by the consecutive action of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase. The assay is simpler and less time-consuming than most methods currently employed and is equally sensitive. The method proved to be suitable for measuring low concentrations of PRPP such as found in human erythrocytes and fibroblasts. An increased PRPP concentration was observed in erythrocytes from patients with partial or complete deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phospho-ribosyltransferase. frp, sp,e (but not all) gouty patients and from a patient with deficiency of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. PRPP synthetase activity was measured with a method similar to the assay for PRPP. In erythrocytes with an increased PRPP concentration, PRPP synthetase activity was found to be normal at both optimal and suboptimal substrate concentrations. PMID:195752

  5. The human ?-amyloid precursor protein: biomolecular and epigenetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu

    2015-03-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a membrane-spanning protein with a large extracellular domain and a much smaller intracellular domain. APP plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis: APP processing generates ?-amyloid (A?) peptides, which are deposited as amyloid plaques in the brains of AD individuals; point mutations and duplications of APP are causal for a subset of early-onset familial AD (FAD) (onset age <65 years old). However, these mutations in FAD represent a very small percentage of cases (?1%). Approximately 99% of AD cases are nonfamilial and late-onset, i.e., sporadic AD (SAD) (onset age >65 years old), and the pathophysiology of this disorder is not yet fully understood. APP is an extremely complex molecule that may be functionally important in its full-length configuration, as well as the source of numerous fragments with varying effects on neural function, yet the normal function of APP remains largely unknown. This article provides an overview of our current understanding of APP, including its structure, expression patterns, proteolytic processing and putative functions. Importantly, and for the first time, my recent data concerning its epigenetic regulation, especially in alternative APP pre-mRNA splicing and in the control of genomic rearrangements of the APP gene, are also reported. These findings may provide new directions for investigating the role of APP in neuropathology associated with a deficiency in the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt) found in patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) and its attenuated variants (LNVs). Also, these findings may be of significance for research in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders in which the APP gene is involved in the pathogenesis of diseases such as autism, fragile X syndrome (FXS) and AD, with its diversity and complexity, SAD in particular. Accurate quantification of various APP-mRNA isoforms in brain tissues is needed, and antisense drugs are potential treatments. PMID:25719338

  6. Development of a new reporter gene system--dsRed/xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-xanthine for molecular imaging of processes behind the intact blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Doubrovin, Mikhail; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Serganova, Inna; Soghomonian, Suren; Myagawa, Tadashi; Beresten, Tatiana; Ageyeva, Lyudmila; Sadelain, Michel; Koutcher, Jason; Blasberg, Ronald G; Tjuvajev, Juri G Gelovani

    2003-04-01

    We report the development of a novel dual-modality fusion reporter gene system consisting of Escherichia coli xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT) for nuclear imaging with radiolabeled xanthine and Discosoma red fluorescent protein for optical fluorescent imaging applications. The dsRed/XPRT fusion gene was successfully created and stably transduced into RG2 glioma cells, and both reporters were shown to be functional. The level of dsRed fluorescence directly correlated with XPRT enzymatic activity as measured by ribophosphorylation of [14C]-xanthine was in vitro (Ki = 0.124 +/- 0.008 vs. 0.00031 +/- 0.00005 mL/min/g in parental cell line), and [*]-xanthine octanol/water partition coefficient was 0.20 at pH = 7.4 (logP = -0.69), meeting requirements for the blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetrating tracer. In the in vivo experiment, the concentration of [14C]-xanthine in the normal brain varied from 0.20 to 0.16 + 0.05% dose/g under 0.87 + 0.24% dose/g plasma radiotracer concentration. The accumulation in vivo in the transfected flank tumor was to 2.4 +/- 0.3% dose/g, compared to 0.78 +/- 0.02% dose/g and 0.64 +/- 0.05% dose/g in the control flank tumors and intact muscle, respectively. [14C]-Xanthine appeared to be capable of specific accumulation in the transfected infiltrative brain tumor (RG2-dsRed/XPRT), which corresponded to the 585 nm fluorescent signal obtained from the adjacent cryosections. The images of endogenous gene expression with the "sensory system" have to be normalized for the transfection efficiency based on the "beacon system" image data. Such an approach requires two different "reporter genes" and two different "reporter substrates." Therefore, the novel dsRed/XPRT fusion gene can be used as a multimodality reporter system in the biological applications requiring two independent reporter genes, including the cells located behind the BBB. PMID:12964307

  7. Selective removal of ATP degradation products from food matrices II: Rapid screening of hypoxanthine and inosine by molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion for evaluation of fish freshness.

    PubMed

    Cela-Prez, M C; Barbosa-Pereira, L; Vecino, X; Prez-Ameneiro, M; Lasagabaster Latorre, Aurora; Lpez-Vilario, J M; Gonzlez Rodrguez, M V; Moldes, A B; Cruz, J M

    2015-04-01

    A water compatible molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), synthesized using theophylline (TPH) as dummy-template and acrylamide (AM) as functional monomer, has been employed as supporting material in matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (MSPD-UPLC-PDA) for selective determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) derivatives in fish samples. ATP degradation products are used as freshness index for assessment of fish quality. The solid sample was directly blended with MIP in MSPD procedure resulting in sample disruption and subsequent adsorption of the compounds on the MIP. By using n-hexane and ammonium hydroxide aqueous solution at pH 9 as the washing and elution solvent, respectively, satisfactory recoveries and clean chromatograms have been obtained. Good linearity for hypoxanthine (HYP) and inosine (INO) has been observed with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.9987 and 0.9986, respectively. The recoveries of the two ATP derivatives at three different spiked levels ranged from 106.5% to 113.4% for HYP and from 103.1% to 111.2% for INO, with average relative standard deviations lower than 4.2% in both cases. This new method, which is rapid, simple and sensitive, can be used as an alternative tool to conventional tedious methods. PMID:25640126

  8. Analogues of 4-[(7-Bromo-2-methyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazolin-6-yl)methylprop-2-ynylamino]-N-(3-pyridylmethyl)benzamide (CB-30865) as potent inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt).

    PubMed

    Lockman, Jeffrey W; Murphy, Brett R; Zigar, Daniel F; Judd, Weston R; Slattum, Paul M; Gao, Zhong-Hua; Ostanin, Kirill; Green, Jeremy; McKinnon, Rena; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T; Fleischer, Tracey C; Boniface, J Jay; Shenderovich, Mark; Willardsen, J Adam

    2010-12-23

    We have shown previously that the target of the potent cytotoxic agent 4-[(7-bromo-2-methyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazolin-6-yl)methyl-prop-2-ynylamino]-N-(3-pyridylmethyl)benzamide (CB38065, 1) is nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). With its cellular target known we sought to optimize the biochemical and cellular Nampt activity of 1 as well as its cytotoxicity. It was found that a 3-pyridylmethylamide substituent in the A region was critical to cellular Nampt activity and cytotoxicity, although other aromatic substitution did yield compounds with submicromolar enzymatic inhibition. Small unsaturated groups worked best in the D-region of the molecule, with 3,3-dimethylallyl providing optimal potency. The E region required a quinazolin-4-one or 1,2,3-benzotriazin-4-one group for activity, and many substituents were tolerated at C² of the quinazolin-4-one. The best compounds showed subnanomolar inhibition of Nampt and low nanomolar cytotoxicity in cellular assays. PMID:21080724

  9. Comparative Study of 6-Mercaptopurine Metabolism in Human Leukemic Leukocytes and L1210 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Nakamura, Toru; Uchino, Haruto; Wakisaka, Gyoichi

    1977-01-01

    Leukocytes from patients with leukemia and L1210 cells from mice were examined for the rate of formation and cellular concentration of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, the rate of thioinosinic acid formation, and a number of selected enzymes involved in purine nucleotide synthesis. The amount of thioinosinic acid formed in L1210 cells was much higher than that in human leukemic leukocytes. In cell extracts, the synthesis of thioinosinic acid was similar in both cell types, and the amount of purine phosphoribosyltransferase was not rate limiting in either case. Much higher concentrations and rates of formation of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate were found in L1210 cells than in human leukemic leukocytes. The difference in response to 6-mercaptopurine between L1210 cells and human leukemic leukocytes might be attributed to their difference in supply of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate-amidotransferase was found to be high in L1210 cells, but was not detected in human leukemic leukocytes. PMID:921247

  10. MULTIPLE-ENDPOINT MUTAGENESIS WITH CHINESE HAMSTER OVARY (CHO) CELLS: EVALUATION WITH EIGHT CARCINOGENIC AND NON-CARCINOGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in culture, the authors have defined an assay, CHO/HGPRT, to quantify mutagen-induced cytotoxicity and mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) locus. This assay permits elucidation of the structure-activity r...

  11. Attenuated Variants of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinnah, H. A.; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Verdu, Alfonso; Larovere, Laura E.; Chen, Chung-Jen; Cossu, Antonello; Wu, Chien-Hui; Sampat, Radhika; Chang, Shun-Jen; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Nyhan, William; Harris, James C.; Reich, Stephen G.; Puig, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The classic form of the disease is described by a characteristic syndrome that includes overproduction of uric acid, severe generalized dystonia, cognitive disability and self-injurious behaviour. In addition to the

  12. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENICITY RESULTS FOR NINE COMPOUNDS EVALUATED AT THE HGPRT LOCUS IN THE STANDARD AND SUSPENSION CHO ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) assay which measures newly induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) locus has been widely used for mutagenesis testing. he insensitivity of the standard assay to some genotoxic agents has been speculated to be...

  13. Small Duplication of HPRT 1 Gene May Be Causative For Lesh-Nyhan Disease in Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    BOROUJERDI, Razieh; SHARIATI, Mohsen; NADDAFNIA, Hosein; REZAEI, Hojatolah

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a rare inborn error of purine metabolism and is characterized by uric acid overproduction along with a variety of neurological manifestations that depend on a degree of the enzymatic deficiency. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive; thus, males are generally more affected and heterozygous females are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. More than 300 mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been detected. Diagnosis can be based on clinical and biochemical findings as well as enzymatic and molecular testing. Molecular diagnosis is the best way as it allows for faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. In this report, a new small duplication in the HPRT1 gene was found by sequencing, which has yet to be reported. PMID:25767547

  14. Data in support of the mutagenic potential of the isoflavone irilone in cultured V79 cells

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Anne; Albrecht, Annette E.; Esch, Harald L.; Lehmann, Leane

    2015-01-01

    The isoflavone irilone is found in human plasma after ingestion of red clover-based dietary supplements, but information allowing safety assessment is rare. Here, data in support of the mutagenic potential of irilone in cultured V79 cells [1] are presented. These data include (i) a quantitative assessment of irilone in the culture medium during the cell culture experiments, (ii) changes in the mutation spectrum in cDNA of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of irilone-treated V79 cells, (iii) occurrence of karyorrhexis and apoptosis as well as (iv) number of micronucleated cells containing whole chromosomes or chromosomal fragments. Also exemplary micrographs, used for the fluorescence microscopic assessment of (iii) and (iv) are presented. PMID:26306322

  15. Characterization of a TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159-ala Human Lymphoblast Clone

    SciTech Connect

    Chyall, L.: Gauny, S.; Kronenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    TK6 cells are a well-characterized human B-lymphoblast cell line derived from WIL-2 cells. A derivative of the TK6 cell line that was stably transfected to express a mutated form of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL (TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159- ala clone #38) is compared with the parent cell line. Four parameters were evaluated for each cell line: growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency, and frequency of spontaneous mutation to 6‑thioguanine resistance (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase locus) or trifluorothymidine resistance (thymidine kinase locus). We conclude that the mutated Bcl-xL protein did not affect growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency or spontaneous mutation frequencies at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. Results at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus were inconclusive. A mutant fraction for TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells exposed to 150cGy of 160kVp x-rays was also calculated. Exposure to x-irradiation increased the mutant fraction of TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells.

  16. Inhibition of an NAD+ Salvage Pathway Provides Efficient and Selective Toxicity to Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Erin M.; Oleson, Bryndon J.; Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Diers, Anne R.; Hu, Qinghui; Sahoo, Daisy; Hogg, Neil; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Corbett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The tumorigenic potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is a major limitation to the widespread use of hPSC derivatives in the clinic. Here, we demonstrate that the small molecule STF-31 is effective at eliminating undifferentiated hPSCs across a broad range of cell culture conditions with important advantages over previously described methods that target metabolic processes. Although STF-31 was originally described as an inhibitor of glucose transporter 1, these data support the reclassification of STF-31 as a specific NAD+ salvage pathway inhibitor through the inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). These findings demonstrate the importance of an NAD+ salvage pathway in hPSC biology and describe how inhibition of NAMPT can effectively eliminate hPSCs from culture. These results will advance and accelerate the development of safe, clinically relevant hPSC-derived cell-based therapies. PMID:25834119

  17. Molecular Basis for the Inhibition of Human NMPRTase, a Novel Target for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Tao, X.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase) has a crucial role in the salvage pathway of NAD{sup +} biosynthesis, and a potent inhibitor of NMPRTase, FK866, can reduce cellular NAD+ levels and induce apoptosis in tumors. We have determined the crystal structures at up to 2.1-Angstroms resolution of human and murine NMPRTase, alone and in complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide or the inhibitor FK866. The structures suggest that Asp219 is a determinant of substrate specificity of NMPRTase, which is confirmed by our mutagenesis studies. FK866 is bound in a tunnel at the interface of the NMPRTase dimer, and mutations in this binding site can abolish the inhibition by FK866. Contrary to current knowledge, the structures show that FK866 should compete directly with the nicotinamide substrate. Our structural and biochemical studies provide a starting point for the development of new anticancer agents.

  18. Monochromosomal hybrids for the analysis of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Athwal, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    In this research project the authors proposed to develop rodent/human hybrid cell lines each containing a single different human chromosome. The human chromosomes will be marked with Ecogpt and stably maintained by selection in the hybrid cells. The experimental approach to produce the proposed cell lines involve the following: they will first transfer a cloned selectable marker, Ecogpt (an E. coli gene for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: XGPRT) to normal diploid human cells using a retroviral vector. The transferred gene will integrate at random into multiple sites in the recipient cell genome. Clonal cell lines from independent transgenotes will each carry the selectable marker integrated into a different site and perhaps a different chromosome. The chromosome carrying the selectable marker will then be transferred further to mouse cells by microcell fusion. In addition they also use directed integration of Ecogpt into the chromosome present in rodent cells, otherwise not marked with a selectable marker. This allows them to complete the bank of proposed cell line. The human chromosome, since it will be marked with a selectable marker, can be transferred to any other cell line of interest for complementation analysis. Clones of each cell line, containing varying size segments of the same chromosome produced by selection for the retention or loss of the selectable marker following x-irradiation or by metaphase chromosome transfer method will facilitate physical mapping and determination of gene order on a chromosome. 1 fig.

  19. Effects of antimycin and 2-deoxyglucose on adenine nucleotides in human platelets. Role of metabolic adenosine triphosphate in primary aggregation, secondary aggregation and shape change of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Holmsen, Holm; Setkowsky, Carol A.; Day, H. James

    1974-01-01

    1. Human platelet-rich plasma prelabelled with [3H]adenine was incubated at 37C with antimycin A and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Variations in the amounts of ATP, ADP and Pi, and in the radioactivity of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP, hypoxanthine+inosine and adenine were determined during incubation. Adrenaline- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation and the ADP-induced shape change of the platelets were determined concurrently. 2. 2-Deoxyglucose caused conversion of [3H]ATP to [3H]hypoxanthine+inosine. The rate of this conversion increased with increasing 2-deoxyglucose concentration and was markedly stimulated by addition of antimycin, which had no effect alone. At maximal ATPhypoxanthine conversion rates, the IMP radioactivity remained at values tenfold higher than control, whereas [3H]ADP and [3H]AMP radioactivity gave variations typical for product/substrates in consecutive reactions. The specific radioactivityof ethanol-soluble platelet ATP decreased during incubation to less than one-tenth of its original value. The amounts and radioactivity of ethanol-insoluble ADP did not vary during incubation with the metabolic inhibitors. 3. The rate of ADP- and adrenaline-induced primary aggregation decreased as the amount of radioactive ATP declined, and complete inhibition of aggregation was obtained at a certain ATP concentration (metabolic ATP threshold). This threshold decreased with increasing concentration of inducer ADP. 4. Secondary platelet aggregation (release reaction) had a metabolic ATP threshold markedly higher than that of primary aggregation. 5. Shape change was gradually inhibited as the ATP radioactivity decreased, and had a metabolic ATP threshold distinctly lower than that of primary aggregation, and which decreased with increasing concentration of ADP. 6. A small but distinct fraction of [3H]ATP disappeared rapidly during the combined shape changeaggregation process induced by ADP in platelets incubated with metabolic inhibitors, whereas no ATP disappearance occurred during aggregation in their absence. PMID:4462589

  20. Induction of Duplication Reversion in Human Fibroblasts, by Wild-Type and Mutated Sv40 T Antigen, Covaries with the Ability to Induce Host DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, M. A.; Xia, S. J.; Reis, RJS.

    1997-01-01

    Intrachromosomal homologous recombination, manifest as reversion of a 14-kbp duplication in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene, is elevated in human cells either stably transformed or transiently transfected by the SV40 (simian virus 40) large T antigen gene. Following introduction of wild-type SV40, or any of several T-antigen point mutations in a constant SV40 background, we observed a strong correlation between the stimulation of chromosomal recombination and induction of host-cell DNA synthesis. Moreover, inhibitors of DNA replication (aphidicolin and hydroxyurea) suppress SV40-induced homologous recombination to the extent that they suppress DNA synthesis. Stable integration of plasmids encoding T antigen also augments homologous recombination, which is suppressed by aphidicolin. We infer that the mechanism by which T antigen stimulates homologous recombination in human fibroblasts involves DNA replicative synthesis. PMID:9258684

  1. A human monoclonal IgG1 lambda anti-hepatitis B surface antibody. Production, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    Stricker, E A; Tiebout, R F; Lelie, P N; Zeijlemaker, W P

    1985-09-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a donor with a high titre of anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) antibodies were fused with a cell line that was positive for Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen and sensitive to hypoxanthine-aminopterine-thymidine. A cell line was established that produces a monoclonal IgG1 lambda anti-HBs antibody. Afterwards, it appeared that the anti-HBs antibody-producing cell line had arisen from Epstein-Barr virus transformation of the donor B cells. The cell line is capable of producing up to 60 micrograms/ml of the monoclonal antibody, which has a high avidity for HBs antigen (Ag) and recognizes both ad and ay subtypes. The antibody is useful as a reagent for the detection of HBsAg in human serum. Over 1000 patient sera have been tested with a conventional third-generation assay in parallel, and only a single discrepant serum was found. PMID:4048870

  2. The cobT gene of Salmonella typhimurium encodes the NaMN: 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of N1-(5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl)-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, an intermediate in the synthesis of the nucleotide loop of cobalamin.

    PubMed Central

    Trzebiatowski, J R; O'Toole, G A; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    1994-01-01

    We present in vitro evidence which demonstrates that CobT is the nicotinate nucleotide:5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.21) that catalyzes the synthesis of N1-(5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl)-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, a biosynthetic intermediate of the pathway that assembles the nucleotide loop of cobalamin in Salmonella typhimurium. Mutants previously isolated as DMB auxotrophs are shown by physical and genetic mapping studies and complementation studies to carry lesions in cobT. Explanations for this unexpected phenotype of cobT mutants are discussed. The expected nucleotide loop assembly phenotype of cobT mutants can be observed only in a specific genetic background, i.e., cobB deficient, an observation that is consistent with the existence of an alternative CobT function (G. A. O'Toole, M. R. Rondon, and J. C. Escalante-Semerena, J. Bacteriol. 175:3317-3326, 1993). Computer analysis of CobT homologs showed that at the amino acid level, enteric CobT proteins were 80% identical whereas Pseudomonas denitrificans and Rhizobium meliloti CobT proteins were 95% identical. Interestingly, the degree of identity between enteric and nonenteric CobT homologs was only 30%. The same pattern of homologies was reported for the S. typhimurium CobA, Escherichia coli BtuR, and P. denitrificans CobO proteins (S.-J. Suh and J.C. Escalante-Semerena, Gene 129:93-97, 1993), suggesting evolutionary divergence between the cob genes found in the enteric bacteria E. coli and S. typhimurium and those found in P. denitrificans and R. meliloti. Images PMID:8206834

  3. Purine oversecretion in cultured murine lymphoma cells deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase: genetic model for inherited hyperuricemia and gout.

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, B; Wormsted, M A; Cohen, M B; Martin, D W

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in several specific enzymes have been associated with increased rates of purine synthesis de novo in human and other mammalian cells. However, these recognized abnormalities in humans account for only a few percent of the clinical cases of hyperuricemia and gout. We have examined in detail the rates of purine production de novo and purine excretion by normal and by mutant (AU-100) murine lymphoma T cells (S49) 80% deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase [IMP:L-aspartate ligase (GDP-forming), EC 6.3.4.4]. The intracellular ATP concentration of the mutant cells is slightly diminished, but their GTP is increased 50% and their IMP, four-fold. Compared to wild-type cells, the AU-100 cells excrete into the culture medium 30- to 50-fold greater amounts of purine metabolites consisting mainly of inosine. Moreover, the AU-100 cell line overproduces total purines. In an AU-100-derived cell line, AU-TG50B, deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), purine nucleoside excretion is increased 50- to 100-fold, and de novo synthesis is even greater than that for AU-100 cells. The overexcretion of purine metabolites by the AU-100 cells seems to be due to the primary genetic deficiency of adenylosuccinate synthetase, a deficiency that requires the cell to increase intracellular IMP in an attempt to maintain ATP levels. As a consequence of elevated IMP pools, large amounts of inosine are secreted into the culture medium. We propose that a similar primary genetic defect may account for the excessive purine excretion in some patients with dominantly inherited hyperuricemia and gout. Images PMID:6957854

  4. End points for biomonitoring: assay sensitivity/selectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, C S; Zimmer, D M; Harbach, P R; Yu, R L

    1996-01-01

    Estimation of population exposure and biological impact of potential hazards are central reasons for performing biomonitoring. The sensitivity of the biomonitoring methods and the linkage of the measured phenomenon to human disease are also important, but often overlooked, considerations. We are conducting experiments to evaluate the sensitivity of hprt mutation measurement in the nonhuman primate, the cynomolgus monkey. Our findings demonstrate in the monkey that hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) mutations produced in vivo can be detected using technique originally worked out using human cells; cynomolgus monkeys were chosen to avoid many of the complications encountered in studying humans. Sequencing of mutants from the monkey using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction methods has led us to conclude that there is similarity of the spectra observed between the spontaneous mutations detected in the two species. However, more recent data suggest that due to low sensitivity, the method is probably not appropriate for routine biomonitoring of randomly selected populations. For example, the inability of the hprt mutation assay to detect some very potent mutagens in the monkey and the effects of the time-dependent pattern of mutant occurrence serve to urge caution in interpretation of elevation or lack of elevation in mutant frequency. Mechanisms for splitting and archiving samples of human tissues/blood from populations at risk may prove valuable as methods improve. PMID:8781375

  5. Human HPRT mutant database: software for data entry and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Cariello, N F; Craft, T R; Vrieling, H; van Zeeland, A A; Adams, T; Skopek, T R

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a computer database containing information on over 1,000 human hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants. Both published and unpublished data are present. The database itself is maintained in a dBASE format (.DBF) and we provide a set of programs to examine and extract information from the database. A program to input information into the database is also supplied. The database and programs are available directly from us or via remote FTP (file transfer protocol) using BITNET/INTERNET. All programs require an IBM-compatible computer, the MS-DOS operating system (version 3.3 or greater), and a hard disk with about 5 megabytes of free disk space. The purpose of the database is 1) to allow investigators to contribute their HPRT mutants directly to the database in a standardized fashion, and 2) to allow access to the entire database with a set of programs that allows manipulation and extraction of data. For example, using our programs it is possible to i) order the database by base pair position, ii) examine only information regarding mutagenesis by a particular agent, iii) search for a particular author, iv) create a report which contains selected portions of the database, the report can be printed or saved as a file. The database will be updated every several months and distributed. PMID:1505531

  6. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.

    1986-03-01

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with /sup 35/S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants.

  7. Adipose Tissuederived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Prodrug-converting Enzyme Inhibit Human Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cavarretta, Ilaria T; Altanerova, Veronika; Matuskova, Miroslava; Kucerova, Lucia; Culig, Zoran; Altaner, Cestmir

    2009-01-01

    The ability of human adipose tissuederived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs), engineered to express the suicide gene cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT), to convert the relatively nontoxic 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the highly toxic antitumor 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) together with their ability to track and engraft into tumors and micrometastases makes these cells an attractive tool to activate prodrugs directly within the tumor mass. In this study, we tested the feasibility and efficacy of these therapeutic cells to function as cellular vehicles of prodrug-activating enzymes in prostate cancer (PC) therapy. In in vitro migration experiments we have shown that therapeutic AT-MSCs migrated to all the prostate cell lines tested. In a pilot preclinical study, we observed that coinjections of human bone metastatic PC cells along with the transduced AT-MSCs into nude mice treated with 5-FC induced a complete tumor regression in a dose dependent manner or did not even allow the establishment of the tumor. More importantly, we also demonstrated that the therapeutic cells were effective in significantly inhibiting PC tumor growth after intravenous administration that is a key requisite for any clinical application of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies. PMID:19844197

  8. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. PMID:25853218

  9. In Vitro Evaluation of Genotoxic Effects under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. PMID:25853218

  10. Bacterial delivery of large intact genomic-DNA-containing BACs into mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Wing; Kotzamanis, George; Abdulrazzak, Hassan; Goussard, Sylvie; Kaname, Tadashi; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine; Huxley, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Efficient delivery of large intact vectors into mammalian cells remains problematical. Here we evaluate delivery by bacterial invasion of two large BACs of more than 150 kb in size into various cells. First, we determined the effect of several drugs on bacterial delivery of a small plasmid into different cell lines. Most drugs tested resulted in a marginal increase of the overall efficiency of delivery in only some cell lines, except the lysosomotropic drug chloroquine, which was found to increase the efficiency of delivery by 6-fold in B16F10 cells. Bacterial invasion was found to be significantly advantageous compared with lipofection in delivering large intact BACs into mouse cells, resulting in 100% of clones containing intact DNA. Furthermore, evaluation of expression of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene from its genomic locus, which was present in one of the BACs, showed that single copy integrations of the HPRT-containing BAC had occurred in mouse B16F10 cells and that expression of HPRT from each human copy was 0.33 times as much as from each endogenous mouse copy. These data provide new evidence that bacterial delivery is a convenient and efficient method to transfer large intact therapeutic genes into mammalian cells. PMID:22095052

  11. Molecular epidemiology studies on occupational and environmental exposure to mutagens and carcinogens, 1997-1999.

    PubMed Central

    Srm, R J; Binkov, B

    2000-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a new and evolving area of research, combining laboratory measurement of internal dose, biologically effective dose, biologic effects, and influence of individual susceptibility with epidemiologic methodologies. Biomarkers evaluated were selected according to basic scheme: biomarkers of exposure--metabolites in urine, DNA adducts, protein adducts, and Comet assay parameters; biomarkers of effect--chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene, and the activation of oncogenes coding for p53 or p21 proteins as measured on protein levels; biomarkers of susceptibility--genetic polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2. DNA adducts measured by 32P-postlabeling are the biomarker of choice for the evaluation of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Protein adducts are useful as a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke (4-aminobiphenyl) or to smaller molecules such as acrylonitrile or 1,3-butadiene. Of the biomarkers of effect, the most common are cytogenetic end points. Epidemiologic studies support the use of chromosomal breakage as a relevant biomarker of cancer risk. The use of the Comet assay and methods analyzing oxidative DNA damage needs reliable validation for human biomonitoring. Until now there have not been sufficient data to interpret the relationship between genotypes, biomarkers of exposure, and biomarkers of effect for assessing the risk of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:10698723

  12. The clastogenicity of 4NQO is cell-type dependent and linked to cytotoxicity, length of exposure and p53 proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Brsehafer, Katja; Manshian, Bella B.; Doherty, Ann T.; Zar, Zoulikha M.; Johnson, George E.; Doak, Shareen H.; Jenkins, Gareth J. S.

    2016-01-01

    4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) is used as a positive control in various genotoxicity assays because of its known mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The chemical is converted into 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide and gives rise to three main DNA adducts, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4AQO, 3-(desoxyguanosin-N 2-yl)-4AQO and 3-(deoxyadenosin-N 6-yl)-4AQO. This study was designed to assess the shape of the doseresponse curve at low concentrations of 4NQO in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines, MCL-5, AHH-1 and TK6 as well as the mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell line in vitro. Chromosomal damage was investigated using the in vitro micronucleus assay, while further gene mutation and DNA damage studies were carried out using the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase forward mutation and comet assays. 4NQO showed little to no significant increases in micronucleus induction in the human lymphoblastoid cell lines, even up to 555% toxicity. A doseresponse relationship could only be observed in the mouse lymphoma cell line L5178Y after 4NQO treatment, even at concentrations with no reduction in cell viability. Further significant increases in gene mutation and DNA damage induction were observed. Hence, 4NQO is a more effective point mutagen than clastogen, and its suitability as a positive control for genotoxicity testing has to be evaluated for every individual assay. PMID:26362870

  13. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5′ end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays. PMID:26217821

  14. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5' end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays. PMID:26217821

  15. The clastogenicity of 4NQO is cell-type dependent and linked to cytotoxicity, length of exposure and p53 proficiency.

    PubMed

    Brüsehafer, Katja; Manshian, Bella B; Doherty, Ann T; Zaïr, Zoulikha M; Johnson, George E; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2016-03-01

    4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) is used as a positive control in various genotoxicity assays because of its known mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The chemical is converted into 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide and gives rise to three main DNA adducts, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4AQO, 3-(desoxyguanosin-N (2)-yl)-4AQO and 3-(deoxyadenosin-N (6)-yl)-4AQO. This study was designed to assess the shape of the dose-response curve at low concentrations of 4NQO in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines, MCL-5, AHH-1 and TK6 as well as the mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell line in vitro. Chromosomal damage was investigated using the in vitro micronucleus assay, while further gene mutation and DNA damage studies were carried out using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase forward mutation and comet assays. 4NQO showed little to no significant increases in micronucleus induction in the human lymphoblastoid cell lines, even up to 55±5% toxicity. A dose-response relationship could only be observed in the mouse lymphoma cell line L5178Y after 4NQO treatment, even at concentrations with no reduction in cell viability. Further significant increases in gene mutation and DNA damage induction were observed. Hence, 4NQO is a more effective point mutagen than clastogen, and its suitability as a positive control for genotoxicity testing has to be evaluated for every individual assay. PMID:26362870

  16. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation. PMID:26330291

  17. Crucial involvement of xanthine oxidase in the intracellular signalling networks associated with human myeloid cell function.

    PubMed

    Abooali, Maryam; Lall, Gurprit S; Coughlan, Karen; Lall, Harjinder S; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is an enzyme which plays a central role in purine catabolism by converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and then further into uric acid. Here we report that XOD is activated in THP-1 human myeloid cells in response to pro-inflammatory and growth factor stimulation. This effect occurred following stimulation of THP-1 cells with ligands of plasma membrane associated TLRs 2 and 4, endosomal TLRs 7 and 8 as well as stem cell growth factor (SCF). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription complexes were found to be responsible for XOD upregulation. Importantly, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major myeloid cell translation regulator, was also found to be essential for XOD activation. Specific inhibition of XOD by allopurinol and sodium tungstate led to an increase in intracellular AMP levels triggering downregulation of mTOR activation by phosphorylation of its T2446 residue. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that XOD is not only activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli or SCF but also plays an important role in maintaining mTOR-dependent translational control during the biological responses of human myeloid cells. PMID:25200751

  18. Selection of suitable reference genes for expression analysis in human glioma using RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Grube, Susanne; Gttig, Tatjana; Freitag, Diana; Ewald, Christian; Kalff, Rolf; Walter, Jan

    2015-05-01

    In human glioma research, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR is a frequently used tool. Considering the broad variation in the expression of candidate reference genes among tumor stages and normal brain, studies using quantitative RT-PCR require strict definition of adequate endogenous controls. This study aimed at testing a panel of nine reference genes [beta-2-microglobulin, cytochrome c-1 (CYC1), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hydroxymethylbilane synthase, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase 1, ribosomal protein L13a (RPL13A), succinate dehydrogenase, TATA-box binding protein and 14-3-3 protein zeta] to identify and validate the most suitable reference genes for expression studies in human glioma of different grades (World Health Organization grades II-IV). After analysis of the stability values calculated using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper algorithms, GAPDH, RPL13A, and CYC1 can be indicated as reference genes applicable for accurate normalization of gene expression in glioma compared with normal brain and anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma alone within this experimental setting. Generally, there are no differences in expression levels and variability of candidate genes in glioma tissue compared to normal brain. But stability analyses revealed just a small number of genes suitable for normalization in each of the tumor subgroups and across these groups. Nevertheless, our data show the importance of validation of adequate reference genes prior to every study. PMID:25862007

  19. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Simon P.; Franco, Nunzio F.; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A.; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Brew, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes. PMID:26114426

  20. Escape from Het-6 Incompatibility in Neurospora Crassa Partial Diploids Involves Preferential Deletion within the Ectopic Segment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. L.; Yang, C. J.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Glass, N. L.

    1996-01-01

    Self-incompatible het-6(OR)/het-6(PA) partial diploids of Neurospora crassa were selected from a cross involving the translocation strain, T(IIL -> IIIR)AR18, and a normal sequence strain. About 25% of the partial diploids exhibited a marked increase in growth rate after 2 weeks, indicating that ``escape'' from het-6 incompatibility had occurred. Near isogenic tester strains with different alleles (het-6(OR) and het-6(PA)) were constructed and used to determine that 80 of 96 escape strains tested were het-6(PA), retaining the het-6 allele found in the normal-sequence LGII position; 16 were het-6(OR), retaining the allele in the translocated position. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 45 escape strains were examined with probes made from cosmids that spanned the translocated region. Along with electrophoretic analysis of chromosomes from three escape strains, RFLPs showed that escape is associated with deletion of part of one or the other of the duplicated DNA segments. Deletions ranged in size from ~70 kbp up to putatively the entire 270-kbp translocated region but always included a 35-kbp region wherein we hypothesize het-6 is located. The deletion spectrum at het-6 thus resembles other cases where mitotic deletions occur such as of tumor suppressor genes and of the hprt gene (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) in humans. PMID:8889517

  1. In vitro susceptibilities of Plasmodium falciparum to compounds which inhibit nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Queen, S A; Jagt, D L; Reyes, P

    1990-01-01

    A unique metabolic feature of malaria parasites is their restricted ability to synthesize nucleotides. These parasites are unable to synthesize the purine ring and must therefore obtain preformed purine bases and nucleosides from the host cell, the erythrocyte. On the other hand, pyrimidines must be synthesized de novo because of the inability of the parasites to salvage preformed pyrimidines. Thus, one would anticipate that the blockage of purine salvage or pyrimidine de novo synthesis should adversely affect parasite growth. This premise was tested in vitro with a total of 64 compounds, mostly purine and pyrimidine analogs, known to inhibit one or more steps of nucleotide synthesis. Of the 64 compounds, 22 produced a 50% inhibition of the growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at a concentration of 50 microM or less. Inhibition of the growth of chloroquine-resistant clones of P. falciparum did not differ significantly from that of the growth of chloroquine-susceptible clones. Two of the compounds which effectively inhibited parasite growth, 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine, were found to be potent competitive inhibitors of a key purine-salvaging enzyme (hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) of the parasite. PMID:2201255

  2. Fidelity of DNA polymerases in DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Keohavong, P.; Thilly, W.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by T4, modified T7, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, and Thermus aquaticus (Tag) DNA polymerases. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type by DGGE as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes and the heteroduplex fraction was used to calculate the average error rate (mutations per base duplication). The error rate induced in the 104-base-pair low-temperature melting domain of exon 3 of the human hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene was {approx} 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} for modified T7, 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Klenow fragment, and 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Taq polymerases after a 10{sup 6}-fold amplification. The error rate for T4 DNA polymerase was not more than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} error per base duplication. The predominant mutations were sequenced and found to be transitions of G{center dot}C to A{center dot}T for T4 and modified T7 DNA polymerases, and A{center dot}T to G{center dot}C for Taq polymerase. Klenow fragment induced both possible transitions and deletions of 2 and 4 base pairs.

  3. Sry-negative XX sex reversal in the American cocker spaniel dog.

    PubMed

    Meyers-Wallen, V N; Palmer, V L; Acland, G M; Hershfield, B

    1995-07-01

    The Sry gene product serves an important function in male sex determination through testis induction. However, testicular development has been reported in SRY-negative XX sex reversed humans. XX sex reversal of the American cocker spaniel, inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, may be a homolog of this disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Sry high mobility group (HMG) box is present in genomic DNA of affected dogs. Conserved Sry HMG box and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) sequences were used as primers in polymerase chain reactions. A 167 bp Y-specific canine Sry HMG box sequence was cloned from genomic DNA of normal male dogs. Internal primers generated a 104 bp Sry HMG box product from normal males, but not from females or XX sex reversed dogs. Parallel reactions generated an HPRT product from all dogs. Results indicate that the Sry HMG box is absent in genomic DNA of XX sex reversed dogs. We speculate that activation of the testis differentiation cascade in the absence of Sry in this model is due to a mutant autosomal gene. PMID:8588928

  4. Diminished Carcinogen Detoxification Is a Novel Mechanism for Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1-mediated Genetic Instability*

    PubMed Central

    Schults, Marten A.; Timmermans, Leen; Godschalk, Roger W.; Theys, Jan; Wouters, Bradly G.; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Chiu, Roland K.

    2010-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) pathway is induced in many tumors and associated with poorer outcome. The hypoxia-responsive transcription factor HIF-1? dimerizes with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), which is also an important binding partner for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR is an important mediator in the metabolic activation and detoxification of carcinogens, such as the environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). We hypothesized that HIF-1? activation attenuates BaP-induced AhR-mediated gene expression, which may lead to increased genetic instability and malignant progression. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were simultaneously stimulated with CoCl2, which leads to HIF-1? stabilization and varying concentrations of BaP. Both quantitative PCR and immunoblot analysis indicated that induction of the hypoxia response pathway significantly reduced the levels of AhR downstream targets CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and AhR protein binding to ARNT. We further demonstrate that the BaP-induced hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase mutation frequency and ?-H2AX foci were markedly amplified when the HIF-1 pathway was induced. BaP-DNA adducts were only marginally increased, and transient strand breaks were diminished by HIF-1 induction, indicating changes in DNA repair. These data indicate that concurrent exposure of tumor cells to hypoxia and exogenous genotoxins can enhance genetic instability. PMID:20228066

  5. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fladeby, Cathrine; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Laerdahl, Jon K; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjrs, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjrn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription. PMID:23139746

  6. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to

  7. Gonococci causing disseminated gonococcal infection are resistant to the bactericidal action of normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Schoolnik, G K; Buchanan, T M; Holmes, K K

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility of strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to the bactericidal action of normal human sera was determined for isolates from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection and uncomplicated gonorrhea. Serum susceptibility was correlated with penicillin susceptibility and auxotype. 38 of 39 strains (97%) of N. gonorrhoeae from Seattle patients with disseminated gonococcal infection were resistant to the complement-dependent bactericidal action of normal human sera. 36 of these were inhibited by less than or equal to mug/ml of penicillin G and required arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil for growth on chemically defined medium (Arg-Hyx-Ura- auxotype). 12 of 43 isolates from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea were also of the Arg-Hyx-Ura-auxotype, inhibited by less than or equal to 0.030 mug/ml of penicillin G, and serum resistant. Of the 31 remaining strains of other auxotypes isolated from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea, 18 (58.1%) were sensitive to normal human sera in titers ranging from 2 to 2,048. The bactericidal action of normal human sera may prevent the dissemination of serum-sensitive gonococci. However, since only a small proportion of individuals infected by serum-resistant strains develop disseminated gonococcal infection, serum resistance appears to be a necessary but not a sufficient virulence factor for dissemination. Host factors such as menstruation and pharyngeal gonococcal infection may favor the dissemination of serum-resistant strains. Since serum-resistant Arg-Hyx-Ura strains are far more frequently isolated from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection than serum-resistant strains of other auxotypes, Arg-Hyx-Ura-strains may possess other virulence factors in addition to serum resistance. PMID:825532

  8. Attenuated variants of Lesch-Nyhan disease

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Verdu, Alfonso; Larvere, Laura E.; Chen, Chung-Jen; Cossu, Antonello; Wu, Chien-Hui; Sampat, Radhika; Chang, Shun-Jen; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Nyhan, William; Harris, James C.; Reich, Stephen G.; Puig, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    LeschNyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The classic form of the disease is described by a characteristic syndrome that includes overproduction of uric acid, severe generalized dystonia, cognitive disability and self-injurious behaviour. In addition to the classic disease, variant forms of the disease occur wherein some clinical features are absent or unusually mild. The current studies provide the results of a prospective and multi-centre international study focusing on neurological manifestations of the largest cohort of LeschNyhan disease variants evaluated to date, with 46 patients from 3 to 65 years of age coming from 34 families. All had evidence for overproduction of uric acid. Motor abnormalities were evident in 42 (91%), ranging from subtle clumsiness to severely disabling generalized dystonia. Cognitive function was affected in 31 (67%) but it was never severe. Though none exhibited self-injurious behaviours, many exhibited behaviours that were maladaptive. Only three patients had no evidence of neurological dysfunction. Our results were compared with a comprehensive review of 78 prior reports describing a total of 127 LeschNyhan disease variants. Together these results define the spectrum of clinical features associated with hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency. At one end of the spectrum are patients with classic LeschNyhan disease and the full clinical phenotype. At the other end of the spectrum are patients with overproduction of uric acid but no apparent neurological or behavioural deficits. Inbetween are patients with varying degrees of motor, cognitive, or behavioural abnormalities. Recognition of this spectrum is valuable for understanding the pathogenesis and diagnosis of all forms of hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency. PMID:20176575

  9. Patterns of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate and ribose-5-phosphate concentration and generation in fibroblasts from patients with gout and purine overproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M A

    1976-01-01

    In the majority of patients with gout and excessive uric acid production, underlying enzyme abnormalities have not been identified. In the present study, measurement of both the rate of generation and concentration of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PP-ribose-P) and the concentration of ribose-5-phosphate in cultured cells were undertaken to establish a classification of purine overproducers to direct study of additional enzyme defects. Fibroblasts were cultured from 24 individuals assigned to 4 groups: group 1, 5 normal controls; group 2, 5 patients with gout and normal dialy urinary uric acid excretion (gouty controls); group 3, 7 patients with well-defined enzyme abnormalities and excessive urinary acid excretion (4 with hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and 3 with excessive PP-ribose-P synthetase activity); and group 4, 7 patients with gout and excessive uric acid excretion but without grossly abnormal activities of the above enzymes in erythrocyte lysates. In all 14 fibroblast strains from patients showing excessive production of uric acid (groups 3 and 4), rates of purine synthesis de novo and PP-ribose-P concentrations exceeded values for cells from control groups. Cells from group 3 patients with hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency showed normal PP-ribose-P generation, while those with excessive PP-ribose-P synthetase activity demonstrated increased generation of this regulatory substrate. All strains from group 3 patients had normal ribose-5-phosphate concentrations. Five cell strains from group 4 patients showed one of the two patterns of abnormalities in these measurements seen in strains from group 3 patients: two resembled hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient cells, and three resembled cells with excessive PP-ribose-P synthetase activity. Analyses of erythrocyte enzyme preparations from two of these patients in group 4 have led to identification of a kinetic variant of each enzyme as predicted from the foregoing patterns. Two additional group 4 cell lines that showed increased ribose-5-phosphate concentrations in addition to increased PP-ribose-P concentrations and generation were classified in a separate subgroup, since in the individuals excessive purine synthesis appeared to result from increases ribose-5-phosphate concentration, leading to increased availability of PP-ribose-P. No abnormality in either hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase or PP-ribose-P synthetase has been found in erythrocyte preparations from one patient so classified. PMID:176178

  10. Lesch-Nyhan disease: clinical experience with nineteen patients.

    PubMed

    Christie, R; Bay, C; Kaufman, I A; Bakay, B; Borden, M; Nyhan, W L

    1982-06-01

    The clinical phenotype in Lesch-Nyhan disease has been analyzed in 19 patients studied in hospital. In each case the diagnosis was made on the basis of inactivity of the enzyme hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in erythrocyte lysates. All had hyperuricemia, and the presence of 'orange sand' in the diaper was a prominent early complaint. All had self-mutilative behavior, of which the most characteristic form was biting the fingers or lips. All had the neurological syndrome of spasticity and choreoathetoid involuntary movements. All but one had less-than-normal intelligence. PMID:7095300

  11. Assay method for monitoring the inhibitory effects of antimetabolites on the activity of inosinate dehydrogenase in intact human CEM lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1992-01-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to monitor the inhibition of inosinate (IMP) dehydrogenase by antimetabolites in intact human CEM lymphocytes. This method is based on the determination of 3H release from [2,8-3H]hypoxanthine ([2,8-3H]Hx) or [2,8-3H]inosine ([2,8-3H]Ino). The validity of this procedure was assessed by evaluating IMP dehydrogenase inhibition in intact CEM cells by the well-known IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors ribavirin, mycophenolic acid and tiazofurin. As reference materials, several compounds that are targeted at other enzymes in de novo purine nucleotide anabolism (i.e. hadacidine, acivicin) or catabolism (i.e. 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) were evaluated. There was a strong correlation between the inhibitory effects of the IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors (ribavirin, mycophenolic acid, tiazofurin) on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx and [2,8-3H]Ino in intact CEM cells and their ability to decrease intracellular GTP pool levels. The other compounds (hadacidine, acivicin, 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) had no marked effect on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx. Using this method, we demonstrated that the novel ribavirin analogue, 5-ethynyl-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylimidazole-4-carboxamide, is a potent inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase in intact cells. PMID:1359876

  12. Molecular cloning of the human UMP synthase gene and characterization of point mutations in two hereditary orotic aciduria families.

    PubMed Central

    Suchi, M; Mizuno, H; Kawai, Y; Tsuboi, T; Sumi, S; Okajima, K; Hodgson, M E; Ogawa, H; Wada, Y

    1997-01-01

    Uridine monophosphate (UMP) synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the last two steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC). Loss of either enzymatic activity results in hereditary orotic aciduria, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retarded growth, anemia, and excessive urinary excretion of orotic acid. We have isolated the UMP synthase chromosomal gene from a lambdaEMBL-3 human genomic library and report a single-copy gene spanning approximately 15 kb. The UMP synthase genomic structure encodes six exons ranging in size from 115 bp to 672 bp, and all splicing junctions adhere to the canonical GT/AG rule. Cognate promoter elements implicated in glucocorticoid- and cAMP-mediated regulation as well as in liver-, myeloid-, and lymphocyte-specific expression are located within the 5' flanking sequence. Molecular investigation of UMP synthase deficiency in a Japanese orotic aciduria patient revealed mutations R96G (A-to-G transition; nt 286) and G429R (G-to-C transversion; nt 1285) in one allele and V109G (T-to-G transversion; nt 326) in the other allele. Expression of human UMP synthase cDNAs containing these mutations in pyrimidine auxotrophic Escherichia coli and in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf21 cells demonstrates impaired activity presumably associated with the urinary orotic acid substrate accumulations observed in vivo. We further establish the identity of two polymorphisms, G213A (v = .26) and 440Gpoly (v = .27) located in exons 3 and 6, respectively, which did not significantly compromise either OPRT or ODC function. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9042911

  13. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a wholly new

  14. Human bites

    MedlinePLUS

    Bites - human ... Human bites that break the skin, like all puncture wounds, have a high risk of infection. They ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than most animal ...

  15. Transfer of nonselectable genes into mouse teratocarcinoma cells and transcription of the transferred human. beta. -globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.F.; Mintz, B.

    1982-02-01

    Teratocarcinoma (TCC) stem cells can function as vehicles for the introduction of specific recombinant genes into mice. Because most genes do not code for a selectable marker, the authors investigated the transformation efficiency of vectors with a linked selectable gene. In one series, TCC cells first selected for thymidine kinase deficiency were treated with DNA from the plasmid vector PtkH..beta..1 containing the human genomic ..beta..-globin gene and the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus. A high transformation frequency was obtained after selection in hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium. Hybridization tests revealed that the majority of transformants had intact copies of the human gene among three to six total copies per cell. These were associated with cellular DNA sequences as judged from the presence of additional new restriction fragments and from stability of the sequences in tumors produced by injecting the cells subcutaneously. Total polyadenylate-containing RNA from cell cultures of two out of four transformants examined showed hybridization to the human gene probe: one RNA species resembled mature human ..beta..-globin mRNA transcripts; the others were of larger size. In differentiating tumors, various tissues, including hematopoietic cells of TCC provenance could be found. In a second model set of experiments, wild-type TCC cells were used to test a dominant-selection scheme with pSV-gpt vectors. Numerous transformants were isolated, and their transfected DNA was apparently stably integrated. Thus, any gene of choice can be transferred into TCC stem cells even without mutagenesis of the cells, and selected cell clones can be characterized. Cells of interest may then be introduced into early embryos to produce new mouse strains with predetermined genetic changes.

  16. Ex vivo Expansion of Human Adult Pancreatic Cells with Properties of Distributed Stem Cells by Suppression of Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Paré, JF; Sherley, JL

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for type I diabetes (T1D) might be improved if pancreatic stem cells were readily available for investigation. Unlike macroscopic islets, pancreatic tissue stem cells could more easily access the retroperitoneal pancreatic environment and thereby might achieve more effective pancreatic regeneration. Unfortunately, whether the adult pancreas actually contains renewing stem cells continues as a controversial issue in diabetes research. We evaluated a new method developed in our lab for expanding renewing distributed stem cells (DSCs) from adult tissues as a means to provide more evidence for adult pancreatic stem cells, and potentially advance their availability for future clinical investigation. The new method was designed to switch DSCs from asymmetric self-renewal to symmetric self-renewal, which promotes their exponential expansion in culture with reduced production of differentiated cells. Called suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK), the method uses natural purine metabolites to accomplish the self-renewal pattern shift. The SACK purine metabolites xanthine, xanthosine, and hypoxanthine were evaluated for promoting expansion of DSCs from the pancreas of adult human postmortem donors. Xanthine and xanthosine were effective for deriving both pooled and clonal populations of cells with properties indicative of human pancreatic DSCs. The expanded human cell strains had signature SACK agent-suppressible asymmetric cell kinetics, produced Ngn3+ bipotent precursors for α-cells and β-cells, and were non-tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. Our findings support the existence of pancreatic DSCs in the adult human pancreas and indicate a potential path to increasing their availability for future clinical evaluation. PMID:25197614

  17. Clinical Severity in Lesch-Nyhan Disease: the Role of Residual Enzyme and Compensatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong; Sutcliffe, Diane; Zhao, Hong; Huang, Xinyi; Schretlen, David J.; Benkovic, Steve; Jinnah, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the HPRT1 gene, which encodes the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), cause Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) and more mildly affected Lesch-Nyhan variants. Prior studies have suggested a strong correlation between residual hypoxanthine recycling activity and disease severity. However, the relevance of guanine recycling and compensatory changes in the de novo synthesis of purines have received little attention. In the current studies, fibroblast cultures were established for 21 healthy controls and 36 patients with a broad spectrum of disease severity related to HGprt deficiency. We assessed hypoxanthine recycling, guanine recycling, steady-state purine pools, and de novo purine synthesis. There was a strong correlation between disease severity and either hypoxanthine or guanine recycling. Intracellular purines were normal in the HGprt-deficient fibroblasts, but purine wasting was evident as increased purine metabolites excreted from the cells. The normal intracellular purines in the HGprt-deficient fibroblasts was likely due in part to a compensatory increase in purine synthesis, as demonstrated by a significant increase in purinosomes. However, the increase in purine synthesis did not appear to correlate with disease severity. These results refine our understanding of the potential sources of phenotypic heterogeneity in LND and its variants. PMID:25481104

  18. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  19. Long-term efficiency of mesenchymal stromal cell-mediated CD-MSC/5FC therapy in human melanoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, L; Skolekova, S; Demkova, L; Bohovic, R; Matuskova, M

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) can be exploited as cellular delivery vehicles for the enzymes converting non-toxic prodrugs to toxic substances. Because of their inherent chemoresistance, they exert potent bystander and antitumor effect. Here we show that the human adipose tissue-derived MSC expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD-MSC) in combination with 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) mediated a long-term tumor-free survival in the 83.3% of tumor-bearing animals. CD-MSC/5FC treatment induced cytotoxicity against model human melanoma cells EGFP-A375. Only 4% of the therapeutic CD-MSC cells eliminated >98.5% of the tumor cells in vitro. Long-term tumor-free survival was confirmed in 15 out of the 18 animals. However, repeatedly used CD-MSC/5FC therapeutic regimen generated more aggressive and metastatic variant of the melanoma cells EGFP-A375/Rel3. These cells derived from the refractory xenotransplants exhibited increased resistance to the CD-MSC/5FC treatment, altered cell adhesion, migration, tumorigenic and metastatic properties. However, long-term curative effect was achieved by the augmentation of the CD-MSC/5FC regimen along with the inhibition of c-Met/hepatocyte growth factor signaling axis in this aggressive melanoma derivative. In summary, the CD-MSC/5FC regimen can be regarded as a very effective antitumor approach to achieve long-term tumor-free survival as demonstrated on a mouse model of aggressive human melanoma xenografts. PMID:25056607

  20. 40 CFR 158.2050 - Biochemical pesticides human health assessment data requirements table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells, thymidine kinase (tk) gene locus, maximizing assay conditions for small...) cells, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hgprt) gene locus, accompanied by an appropriate... transferase (xprt) gene locus. 12. Required if there are effects on hematology, clinical chemistry,...

  1. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein-protein interactions with HPRT1.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S; Jackson, Brian C; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C

    2013-02-25

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. PMID:23348497

  2. Human Trafficking

    MedlinePLUS

    ... several important differences between them. Human Trafficking vs. Human Smuggling Victims are forced, defrauded, or coerced into trafficking. Even if victims initially offer consent, that consent is rendered meaningless by the actions of the traffickers to exploit them for labor, ...

  3. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  4. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  5. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  6. Normal uricemia in lesch-nyhan syndrome and the association with pulmonary embolism in a young child-a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Chen, Shan-Ming; Lin, Chien-Heng; Ku, Min-Sho; Tsao, Teng-Fu; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2014-08-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase activity is a rare inborn error of purine metabolism with subsequent uric acid overproduction and neurologic presentations. The diagnosis of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is frequently delayed until self-mutilation becomes evident. We report the case of a boy aged 1 year and 10 months who was diagnosed with profound global developmental delay, persistent chorea, and compulsive self-mutilation since the age of 1 year. Serial serum uric acid levels showed normal uric acid level, and the spot urine uric acid/creatinine ratio was >2. The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase cDNA showed the deletion of exon 6, and the boy was subsequently diagnosed to have LNS. He also had respiratory distress due to pulmonary embolism documented by chest computed tomography scan. This report highlights the need to determine the uric acid/creatinine ratio caused by increased renal clearance in LNS in young children. The presence of pulmonary embolism is unusual and may be the consequence of prolonged immobilization. PMID:23597535

  7. Different mechanisms of radiation-induced loss of heterozygosity in two human lymphoid cell lines from a single donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, C.; Gauny, S. S.; Liu, W. C.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C. L.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Allelic loss is an important mutational mechanism in human carcinogenesis. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at an autosomal locus is one outcome of the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and can occur by deletion or by mitotic recombination. We report that mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes occurred in human lymphoid cells exposed to densely ionizing radiation. We used cells derived from the same donor that express either normal TP53 (TK6 cells) or homozygous mutant TP53 (WTK1 cells) to assess the influence of TP53 on radiation-induced mutagenesis. Expression of mutant TP53 (Met 237 Ile) was associated with a small increase in mutation frequencies at the hemizygous HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus, but the mutation spectra were unaffected at this locus. In contrast, WTK1 cells (mutant TP53) were 30-fold more susceptible than TK6 cells (wild-type TP53) to radiation-induced mutagenesis at the TK1 (thymidine kinase) locus. Gene dosage analysis combined with microsatellite marker analysis showed that the increase in TK1 mutagenesis in WTK1 cells could be attributed, in part, to mitotic recombination. The microsatellite marker analysis over a 64-cM region on chromosome 17q indicated that the recombinational events could initiate at different positions between the TK1 locus and the centromere. Virtually all of the recombinational LOH events extended beyond the TK1 locus to the most telomeric marker. In general, longer LOH tracts were observed in mutants from WTK1 cells than in mutants from TK6 cells. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the incidence of radi-ation-induced mutations is dependent on the genetic background of the cell at risk, on the locus examined, and on the mechanisms for mutation available at the locus of interest.

  8. A Phosphoenzyme Mimic, Overlapping Catalytic Sites and Reaction Coordinate Motion for Human NAMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, E.; Ho, M; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3- as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site.

  9. Genetic variations in the HGPRT, ITPA, IMPDH1, IMPDH2, and GMPS genes in Japanese individuals.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Mutsumi; Saito, Yuka; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Akasaki, Hitomi; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Uehara, Moe; Fujikawa, Kiyomi; Ishikawa, Masaaki; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Hiratsuka, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Thiopurines (such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine) are widely used for the treatment of patients suffering from malignancies, rheumatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease and solid organ transplant rejection. These drugs are activated and eliminated by a number of enzymes in the human body. This analyzes all the exons and exon-intron junctions of 5 enzyme genes (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, HGPRT; inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase, ITPA; inosine monophosphate dehydrogenases 1 and 2, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2 and guanosine monophosphate synthetase, GMPS) involved in the metabolism of thiopurine drugs. Twelve novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (HGPRT: IVS6-12C>A (frequency:0.003); ITPA: 569T>C (Phe189Phe, 0.003); IMPDH1: IVS8-15C>A (0.003), IVS9+227A>G (0.003), IVS17+115C>T (0.003), and 930C>T (Thr310Thr, 0.005); IMPDH2: IVS1+50G>T (0.003), IVS2+15G>A (0.010), IVS3-20G>A (0.003), 609C>T (Arg203Arg, 0.003), and 1534C>T (Arg512Trp, 0.003); and GMPS: 1563T>C (Gly521Gly, 0.003)) and 7 known SNPs (ITPA: 94C>A (Pro32Thr, 0.005), 138G>A (Gln46Gln, 0.586), and 563G>A (Glu187Glu, 0.433); IMPDH1: 987G>C (Leu329Leu, 0.113) and 1575A>G (Ala525Ala, 0.620) and GMPS: IVS5-7T>C (0.153), 993A>G (Thr331Thr, 0.153)) were identified in 200 Japanese subjects. These data should provide useful information for thiopurine therapy in the Japanese and as well as other Asian populations. PMID:20045992

  10. DNA-Reactive Protein Monoepoxides Induce Cell Death and Mutagenesis in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Natalia Y.; Michaelson-Richie, Erin D.; Gherezghiher, Teshome B.; Kurtz, Jamie; Ming, Xun; Wickramaratne, Susith; Campion, Melissa; Kanugula, Sreenivas; Pegg, Anthony E.; Campbell, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Although cytotoxic alkylating agents possessing two electrophilic reactive groups are thought to act by cross-linking cellular biomolecules, their exact mechanisms of action have not been established. In cells, these compounds form a mixture of DNA lesions including nucleobase monoadducts, interstrand and intrastrand cross-links, and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links block replication and transcription by preventing DNA strand separation, contributing to toxicity and mutagenesis. In contrast, potential contributions of drug-induced DPCs are poorly understood. To gain insight into the biological consequences of DPC formation, we generated DNA-reactive protein reagents and examined their toxicity and mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Recombinant human O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) protein or its variants (C145A and K125L) were treated with 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane to yield proteins containing 2-hydroxy-3,4-epoxybutyl groups on cysteine residues. Gel shift and mass spectrometry experiments confirmed that epoxide-functionalized AGT proteins formed covalent DPC but no other types of nucleobase damage when incubated with duplex DNA. Introduction of purified AGT monoepoxides into mammalian cells via electroporation generated AGT-DNA cross-links and induced cell death and mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene. Lower numbers of DPC lesions and reduced levels of cell death were observed when using protein monoepoxides generated from an AGT variant that fails to accumulate in the cell nucleus (K125L), suggesting that nuclear DNA damage is required for toxicity. Taken together, these results indicate that AGT protein monoepoxides produce cytotoxic and mutagenic DPC lesions within chromosomal DNA. More generally, these data suggest that covalent DPC lesions contribute to the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of bis-electrophiles. PMID:23566219

  11. Alkyltransferase-mediated toxicity of bis-electrophiles in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalapila, Aley G.; Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    The primary function of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is to maintain genomic integrity in the face of damage by both endogenous and exogenous alkylating agents. However, paradoxically, bacterial and mammalian AGTs have been shown to increase cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dihaloalkanes and other bis-electrophiles when expressed in bacterial cells. We have extended these studies to mammalian cells using CHO cells that lack AGT expression and CHO cells stably transfected with a plasmid that expresses human AGT. The cytotoxicity of 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin was significantly increased by the presence of AGT but cytotoxicity of butadiene diepoxide was not affected. Mutations caused by these agents were assessed using hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) as a reporter gene. There was a small (c. 23-fold) but statistically significant AGT-mediated increase in mutations caused by 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin. Analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by 1,2-dibromoethane showed that the presence of AGT also altered the types of mutations with an increase in total base substitution mutants due to a rise in transversions at both G:C and A:T sites. AGT expression also led to mutations arising from the transcribed strand, which were not seen in cells lacking AGT. Although the frequency of deletion mutations was decreased by AGT expression, the formation of large deletions (?3 exons) was increased. This work demonstrates that interaction of AGT with some bis-electrophiles can cause mutagenicity and diminished cell survival in mammalian cells. It is consistent with the hypothesis that DNA-AGT cross-links, which have been characterized in experiments with purified AGT protein and such bis-electrophiles, can be formed in mammalian cells. PMID:19941875

  12. Alkyltransferase-mediated toxicity of bis-electrophiles in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kalapila, Aley G; Pegg, Anthony E

    2010-02-01

    The primary function of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is to maintain genomic integrity in the face of damage by both endogenous and exogenous alkylating agents. However, paradoxically, bacterial and mammalian AGTs have been shown to increase cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dihaloalkanes and other bis-electrophiles when expressed in bacterial cells. We have extended these studies to mammalian cells using CHO cells that lack AGT expression and CHO cells stably transfected with a plasmid that expresses human AGT. The cytotoxicity of 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin was significantly increased by the presence of AGT but cytotoxicity of butadiene diepoxide was not affected. Mutations caused by these agents were assessed using hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) as a reporter gene. There was a small (c. 2-3-fold) but statistically significant AGT-mediated increase in mutations caused by 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin. Analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by 1,2-dibromoethane showed that the presence of AGT also altered the types of mutations with an increase in total base substitution mutants due to a rise in transversions at both G:C and A:T sites. AGT expression also led to mutations arising from the transcribed strand, which were not seen in cells lacking AGT. Although the frequency of deletion mutations was decreased by AGT expression, the formation of large deletions (> or = 3 exons) was increased. This work demonstrates that interaction of AGT with some bis-electrophiles can cause mutagenicity and diminished cell survival in mammalian cells. It is consistent with the hypothesis that DNA-AGT cross-links, which have been characterized in experiments with purified AGT protein and such bis-electrophiles, can be formed in mammalian cells. PMID:19941875

  13. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S.

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Carboxylated short single-walled carbon nanotubes but not plain and multi-walled short carbon nanotubes show in vitro genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mrakovcic, Maria; Meindl, Claudia; Leitinger, Gerd; Roblegg, Eva; Frhlich, Eleonore

    2015-03-01

    Long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) resemble asbestos fibers due to their high length to diameter ratio and they thus have genotoxic effects. Another parameter that might explain their genotoxic effects is contamination with heavy metal ions. On the other hand, short (1-2 m) CNTs do not resemble asbestos fibers, and, once purified from contaminations, they might be suitable for medical applications. To identify the role of fiber thickness and surface properties on genotoxicity, well-characterized short pristine and carboxylated single-walled (SCNTs) and multi-walled (MCNTs) CNTs of different diameters were studied for cytotoxicity, the cell's response to oxidative stress (immunoreactivity against hemoxygenase 1 and glutathione levels), and in a hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) assay using V79 chinese hamster fibroblasts and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. DNA repair was demonstrated by measuring immunoreactivity against activated histone H2AX protein. The number of micronuclei as well as the number of multinucleated cells was determined. CNTs acted more cytotoxic in V79 than in A549 cells. Plain and carboxylated thin (<8 nm) SCNTs and MCNTs showed greater cytotoxic potential and carboxylated CNTs showed indication for generating oxidative stress. Multi-walled CNTs did not cause HPRT mutation, micronucleus formation, DNA damage, interference with cell division, and oxidative stress. Carboxylated, but not plain, SCNTs showed indication for in vitro DNA damage according to increase of H2AX-immunoreactive cells and HPRT mutation. Although short CNTs presented a low in vitro genotoxicity, functionalization of short SCNTs can render these particles genotoxic. PMID:25505129

  15. Severe pyridine nucleotide depletion in fibroblasts from Lesch-Nyhan patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, Lynette D; Jacomelli, Gabriella; Micheli, Vanna; Slade, Tina; Simmonds, H Anne

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between a complete deficiency of the purine enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and the neurobehavioural abnormalities in Lesch-Nyhan disease remains an enigma. In vitro studies using lymphoblasts or fibroblasts have evaluated purine and pyrimidine metabolism with conflicting results. This study focused on pyridine nucleotide metabolism in control and Lesch-Nyhan fibroblasts using radiolabelled salvage precursors to couple the extent of uptake with endocellular nucleotide concentrations. The novel finding, highlighted by specific culture conditions, was a marked NAD depletion in Lesch-Nyhan fibroblasts. ATP and GTP were also 50% of the control, as reported in lymphoblasts. A 6-fold greater incorporation of [(14)C]nicotinic acid into nicotinic acid- adenine dinucleotide by Lesch-Nyhan fibroblasts, with no unmetabolized substrate (20% in controls), supported disturbed pyridine metabolism, NAD depletion being related to utilization by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in DNA repair. Although pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were similar to controls, Lesch-Nyhan cells showed reduced [(14)C]cytidine/uridine salvage into UDP sugars. Incorporation of [(14)C]uridine into CTP by both was minimal, with more than 50% [(14)C]cytidine metabolized to UTP, indicating that fibroblasts, unlike lymphoblasts, lack active CTP synthetase, but possess cytidine deaminase. Restricted culture conditions may be neccesary to mimic the situation in human brain cells at an early developmental stage. Cell type may be equally important. NAD plus ATP depletion in developing brain could restrict DNA repair, leading to neuronal damage/loss by apoptosis, and, with GTP depletion, affect neurotransmitter synthesis and basal ganglia dopaminergic neuronal systems. Thus aberrant pyridine nucleotide metabolism could play a vital role in the pathophysiology of Lesch-Nyhan disease. PMID:11996669

  16. Characterization of the metabolic forms of 6-thioguanine responsible for cytotoxicity and induction of differentiation of HL-60 acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, K; Schwartz, E L; Sartorelli, A C

    1984-11-01

    HL-60 human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells that lack hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) activity have been developed by mutagenization and selection. These cells exhibited markedly decreased sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of 6-thioguanine (TG) and, in contrast to parental HL-60 cells, had the capacity to undergo terminal granulocytic differentiation after treatment with this purine antimetabolite. Analysis of extracellular and intracellular metabolites of TG revealed negligible metabolism of TG in these HGPRT- HL-60 cells. These findings are consistent with the concept that inhibition of cellular replication requires generation of analog nucleotide and suggest that TG itself is capable of initiation of differentiation. 6-Thioguanosine (TGuo) had limited activity, while beta-2'-deoxythioguanosine (dTGuo) was inactive, as an inducer of maturation of HGPRT- HL-60 cells. These cells converted relatively large amounts of the nucleosides to the free base TG; the simultaneous exposure of cells to 8-aminoguanosine (AGuo), an inhibitor of purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity, decreased the degradation of TGuo and dTGuo to TG and promoted the intracellular accumulation of TG nucleotides, presumably through the action of nucleoside kinase activities. In a double mutant deficient in both HGPRT and deoxycytidine kinase (DCK) activities, dTGuo was devoid of cytotoxicity and was an effective inducer of maturation. The potency of dTGuo as an inducer in this system was not significantly affected by the presence of AGuo. These results suggested that dTGuo itself was also an active initiator of maturation. Thus, induction of differentiation appeared to be due to the free base, TG, as well as its deoxynucleoside form, dTGuo, whereas the formation of TG nucleotides appeared to antagonize maturation and produce cytotoxicity. PMID:6593322

  17. Manipulation of Cell Physiology Enables Gene Silencing in Well-differentiated Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Sateesh; Behlke, Mark A; Ramachandran, Shyam; Salem, Aliasger K; McCray Jr, Paul B; Davidson, Beverly L

    2012-01-01

    The application of RNA interference-based gene silencing to the airway surface epithelium holds great promise to manipulate host and pathogen gene expression for therapeutic purposes. However, well-differentiated airway epithelia display significant barriers to double-stranded small-interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery despite testing varied classes of nonviral reagents. In well-differentiated primary pig airway epithelia (PAE) or human airway epithelia (HAE) grown at the airliquid interface (ALI), the delivery of a Dicer-substrate small-interfering RNA (DsiRNA) duplex against hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) with several nonviral reagents showed minimal uptake and no knockdown of the target. In contrast, poorly differentiated cells (25-day post-seeding) exhibited significant oligonucleotide internalization and target knockdown. This finding suggested that during differentiation, the barrier properties of the epithelium are modified to an extent that impedes oligonucleotide uptake. We used two methods to overcome this inefficiency. First, we tested the impact of epidermal growth factor (EGF), a known enhancer of macropinocytosis. Treatment of the cells with EGF improved oligonucleotide uptake resulting in significant but modest levels of target knockdown. Secondly, we used the connectivity map (Cmap) database to correlate gene expression changes during small molecule treatments on various cells types with genes that change upon mucociliary differentiation. Several different drug classes were identified from this correlative assessment. Well-differentiated epithelia treated with DsiRNAs and LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, significantly improved gene silencing and concomitantly reduced target protein levels. These novel findings reveal that well-differentiated airway epithelia, normally resistant to siRNA delivery, can be pretreated with small molecules to improve uptake of synthetic oligonucleotide and RNA interference (RNAi) responses. PMID:23344182

  18. Carboxylated Short Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes But Not Plain and Multi-walled Short Carbon Nanotubes Show in vitro Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mrakovcic, Maria; Meindl, Claudia; Leitinger, Gerd; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) resemble asbestos fibers due to their high length to diameter ratio and they thus have genotoxic effects. Another parameter that might explain their genotoxic effects is contamination with heavy metal ions. On the other hand, short (1–2 μm) CNTs do not resemble asbestos fibers, and, once purified from contaminations, they might be suitable for medical applications. To identify the role of fiber thickness and surface properties on genotoxicity, well-characterized short pristine and carboxylated single-walled (SCNTs) and multi-walled (MCNTs) CNTs of different diameters were studied for cytotoxicity, the cell’s response to oxidative stress (immunoreactivity against hemoxygenase 1 and glutathione levels), and in a hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) assay using V79 chinese hamster fibroblasts and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. DNA repair was demonstrated by measuring immunoreactivity against activated histone H2AX protein. The number of micronuclei as well as the number of multinucleated cells was determined. CNTs acted more cytotoxic in V79 than in A549 cells. Plain and carboxylated thin (<8 nm) SCNTs and MCNTs showed greater cytotoxic potential and carboxylated CNTs showed indication for generating oxidative stress. Multi-walled CNTs did not cause HPRT mutation, micronucleus formation, DNA damage, interference with cell division, and oxidative stress. Carboxylated, but not plain, SCNTs showed indication for in vitro DNA damage according to increase of H2AX-immunoreactive cells and HPRT mutation. Although short CNTs presented a low in vitro genotoxicity, functionalization of short SCNTs can render these particles genotoxic. PMID:25505129

  19. Genetic manipulation in Δku80 strains for functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein(1,2). The Δku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The Δku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale(1-4). Here, we report methods for using type I and type II Δku80Δhxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in Δku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human pathogens that cause malaria (Plasmodium sp.) and cryptosporidiosis (Cryptosporidium). PMID:23892917

  20. Identification of Selective Lead Compounds for Treatment of High-Ploidy Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Alka; Zachek, Brittany; Lera, Robert F; Zasadil, Lauren M; Lasek, Amber; Denu, Ryan A; Kim, Hyunjung; Kanugh, Craig; Laffin, Jennifer J; Harter, Josephine M; Wisinski, Kari B; Saha, Sandeep; Weaver, Beth A; Burkard, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Increased ploidy is common in tumors but treatments for tumors with excess chromosome sets are not available. Here, we characterize high-ploidy breast cancers and identify potential anticancer compounds selective for the high-ploidy state. Among 354 human breast cancers, 10% have mean chromosome copy number exceeding 3, and this is most common in triple-negative and HER2-positive types. Women with high-ploidy breast cancers have higher risk of recurrence and death in two patient cohorts, demonstrating that it represents an important group for improved treatment. Because high-ploidy cancers are aneuploid, rather than triploid or tetraploid, we devised a two-step screen to identify selective compounds. The screen was designed to assure both external validity on diverse karyotypic backgrounds and specificity for high-ploidy cell types. This screen identified novel therapies specific to high-ploidy cells. First, we discovered 8-azaguanine, an antimetabolite that is activated by hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1), suggesting an elevated gene-dosage of HPRT1 in high-ploidy tumors can control sensitivity to this drug. Second, we discovered a novel compound, 2,3-diphenylbenzo[g]quinoxaline-5,10-dione (DPBQ). DPBQ activates p53 and triggers apoptosis in a polyploid-specific manner, but does not inhibit topoisomerase or bind DNA. Mechanistic analysis demonstrates that DPBQ elicits a hypoxia gene signature and its effect is replicated, in part, by enhancing oxidative stress. Structure-function analysis defines the core benzo[g]quinoxaline-5,10 dione as being necessary for the polyploid-specific effects of DPBQ. We conclude that polyploid breast cancers represent a high-risk subgroup and that DPBQ provides a functional core to develop polyploid-selective therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(1); 48-59. 2015 AACR. PMID:26586723

  1. Methotrexate inhibits the first committed step of purine biosynthesis in mitogen-stimulated human T-lymphocytes: a metabolic basis for efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, L D; Rckemann, K; Qiu, Y; Hawrylowicz, C M; Richards, D F; Swaminathan, R; Kirschbaum, B; Simmonds, H A

    1999-01-01

    The immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose methotrexate (MTX) have been related directly to inhibition of folate-dependent enzymes by polyglutamated derivatives, or indirectly to adenosine release and/or apoptosis and clonal deletion of activated peripheral blood lymphocytes in S-phase. In this study of phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated primary human T-lymphocytes we show that MTX (20 nM to 20 microM) was cytostatic not cytotoxic, halting proliferation at G(1). This stasis of blastogenesis was associated with an inhibition of purine ribonucleotide synthesis but a stimulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis, the normal mitogen-induced expansion of ATP and GTP pools over 72 h being restricted to concentrations of unstimulated T-cells, whereas the increment in UTP pools exceeded that of controls. Decreased incorporation of H(14)CO(3) or [(14)C]glycine into purine ribonucleotides, with no radiolabel accumulation in any de novo synthetic intermediate but enhanced H(14)CO(3) incorporation into UTP, supported these MTX-related effects. Exaggerated [(14)C]hypoxanthine salvage (which normalized the purine and UTP pools) confirmed the increased availability of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PP-ribose-P) as the molecular mechanism underlying these disparate changes. These results provide the first substantive evidence that the immunosuppressive effects of low-dose MTX in primary blasting human T-lymphocytes relate not to the inhibition of the two folate-dependent enzymes of purine biosynthesis but to inhibition of the first enzyme, amidophosphoribosyltransferase, thereby elevating PP-ribose-P and stimulating UTP synthesis. Varying cell types or incubation conditions employed by other workers, especially malignant/activated cells with high basal metabolic rates, might mask the effects noted in primary human T-lymphocytes. The findings imply the involvement of low-dose MTX in the inhibition of T-lymphocyte proliferation and proliferation-dependent processes in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:10432311

  2. Detection of deletion mutations in pSV2gpt-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tindall, K R; Stankowski, L F; Machanoff, R; Hsie, A W

    1984-01-01

    We have developed a system to study mutations that affect xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (gpt) expression in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient CHO cells that have been transformed by the plasmid vector pSV2gpt. One isolated transformant, designated AS52, carries a single copy of the Escherichia coli gpt gene stably integrated into the high-molecular-weight DNA and expresses the bacterial gene for the enzyme xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. Mutants deficient in this enzyme can be induced in the AS52 cell line by a variety of mutagens, and spontaneous or induced mutants can be selected for resistance to 6-thioguanine (Tgr). Two Tgr clones derived from the AS52 line were analyzed by Southern blot hybridization and were found to contain deletions involving at least a portion of the gpt gene. Because of the small size and stability of the integrated pSV2gpt plasmid, and the well-defined selection protocol for mutant isolation, the AS52 line offers promise as a system suitable for the study of mutation at the molecular level in CHO cells. Images PMID:6095070

  3. Bis(benzyl)polyamine analogs inhibit the growth of chloroquine-resistant human malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum) in vitro and in combination with alpha-difluoromethylornithine cure murine malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Bitonti, A J; Dumont, J A; Bush, T L; Edwards, M L; Stemerick, D M; McCann, P P; Sjoerdsma, A

    1989-01-01

    A number of bis(benzyl)polyamine analogs were found to be potent inhibitors of both chloroquine-resistant and chloroquine-sensitive strains of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in vitro (IC50 values = 0.2-14 microM). Administration of one of the compounds, MDL 27695, which is N,N'-bis(3-[(phenylmethyl)amino]propyl)-1,7-diaminoheptane (C6H5CH2NH(CH2)3NH(CH2)7NH(CH2)3NHCH2C6H5), at 10-15 mg/kg i.p. three times per day for 3 days in combination with 2% alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO; eflornithine) in drinking water effected cures of 47/54 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. Cured mice were found to be immune upon rechallenge with the same P. berghei strain 4 months after the initial infection and drug-induced cure. MDL 27695 rapidly inhibited the incorporation of [3H]hypoxanthine into P. falciparum RNA and DNA, whereas the incorporation of [3H]isoleucine was not affected until much later. We conclude, therefore, that the major cytotoxic event may be direct binding of MDL 27695 to DNA with subsequent disruption of macromolecular biosynthesis and cell death. These compounds offer a lead in the search for new agents for chemotherapy of malaria. PMID:2463635

  4. Human rights

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J Enoch

    1977-01-01

    What are human rights? In this article Enoch Powell, MP (a former Conservative Minister of Health), approaches this question through a critical discussion of Article 25 (I) of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Professor R S Downie in his accompanying commentary analyses Mr Powell's statements and takes up in particular Mr Powell's argument that claiming rights for one person entails compulsion on another person. In Professor Downie's view there is nothing in Article 25 (I) that cannot embody acceptable moral rights, the commonly accepted interpretation of that Article of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights which many people think is wholly acceptable. PMID:604483

  5. Human Trafficking

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Victims of human trafficking are subjected to force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of commercial sex, ... the commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion. or in which the person induced ...

  6. Role of human CYP1A1 and NAT2 in 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-induced mutagenicity and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Bendaly, J; Metry, K J; Doll, M A; Jiang, G; States, J C; Smith, N B; Neale, J R; Holloman, J L; Pierce, W M; Hein, D W

    2009-05-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is carcinogenic in multiple organs and numerous species. Bioactivation of PhIP is initiated by PhIP N(2)-hydroxylation catalysed by cytochrome P450s. Following N-hydroxylation, O-acetylation catalysed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is considered a further possible activation pathway. Genetic polymorphisms in NAT2 may modify cancer risk following exposure. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles were used to test the effect of CYP1A1 and NAT2 polymorphism on PhIP genotoxicity. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had significantly higher levels of N-hydroxy-PhIP O-acetyltransferase (p = 0.0150) activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Following PhIP treatment, CHO cell lines transfected with CYP1A1, CYP1A1/NAT2*4 and CYP1A1/NAT2*5B each showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutagenesis not observed in untransfected CHO cells. dG-C8-PhIP was the primary DNA adduct formed and levels were dose dependent in transfected CHO cells in the order: CYP1A1 < CYP1A1 and NAT2*5B < CYP1A1 and NAT2*4, although levels did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) following one-way analysis of variance. These results strongly support activation of PhIP by CYP1A1 with little effect of human NAT2 genetic polymorphism on mutagenesis and DNA damage. PMID:19301197

  7. [Human monkeypox].

    PubMed

    Chastel, C

    2009-03-01

    Unlike other recent viral emergences, which were in majority caused by RNA viruses, the monkeypox results from infection by a DNA virus, an orthopoxvirus closely related to both vaccine and smallpox viruses and whose two genomic variants are known. Unexpectedly isolated from captive Asiatic monkeys and first considered as an laboratory curiosity, this virus was recognised in 1970 as an human pathogen in tropical Africa. Here it was responsible for sporadic cases following intrusions (for hunting) into tropical rain forests or rare outbreak with human-to-human transmission as observed in 1996 in Democratic Republic of Congo. As monkeypox in humans is not distinguishable from smallpox (a disease globally eradicated in 1977) it was only subjected to vigilant epidemiological surveillance and not considered as a potential threat outside Africa. This point of view radically changed in 2003 when monkeypox was introduced in the USA by African wild rodents and spread to 11 different states of this country. Responsible for 82 infections in American children and adults, this outbreak led to realize the sanitary hazards resulting from international trade of exotic animals and scientific investigations increasing extensively our knowledge of this zoonosis. PMID:18394820

  8. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among

  9. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  10. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3

  11. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  12. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing

  13. Human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Richart, R M; Wright, T C

    1992-10-01

    In the past year, new data have been published on the molecular biology of human papillomavirus infections and their relationship to cervical neoplasia. As molecular techniques have become more sophisticated and as the molecular knowledge of human papilloma-virus infections has been pursued in greater depth, it is increasingly apparent that this human tumor DNA virus is similar to a number of other oncogenic DNA viruses that have been described and well studied. These viruses appear to act through a common pathway of producing oncogenic proteins that interfere with key signalling elements that normally control the process of cell division. With a better mechanistic knowledge, it should be possible to design new therapeutic approaches to treating human papillomavirus-associated disease that are directed toward specific cellular events such as turning off the production of E6 and E7 proteins or restoring the activity of pRB or p53. Increased attention has also been turned to immunologic aspects of HPV infections, and a number of groups are eagerly pursuing the possibility of using simple office-based procedures to detect specific proteins encoded for by the human papillomavirus open reading frames in an attempt to determine who has been infected, is actively infected, and has proteins being produced that are indicative of neoplasia. From the clinical point of view, the use of outpatient excisional techniques such as the loop electrosurgical excision procedure is rapidly supplanting ablative techniques because of their superior ability to identify early invasive carcinomas and adenocarcinomas in situ that have not been detected by colposcopy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1327250

  14. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these

  15. Human Mind in Human Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furth, Hans G.

    1996-01-01

    Claims that mind and mental objects form a societal mental structure enabling children to assimilate the society and become co-constructing members. Cites evidence that competence to create mental objects, symbols, and meanings separated from action is the evolutionary evolved human capacity for society and culture. Vygotsky's "natural" line of…

  16. Human Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Inman, Verne T.

    1966-01-01

    The development of bipedal plantigrade progression is a purely human, and apparently learned, accomplishment. Experimental findings confirm the hypothesis that the human body will integrate the motion of various segments of the body and control the activity of muscles to minimize energy expenditure. Movements which are integrated for this purpose include vertical displacement of the body, horizontal rotation of the pelvis, mediolateral pelvic tilt, flexion of the knee, plantar flexion of the ankle and foot, lateral displacement of the torso and rotation of the shoulder girdle. Raising and lowering the body results in gains and losses of potential energy, and acceleration and deceleration result in gains and losses of kinetic energy. The motions are so co-ordinated that a transfer of energy back and forth from kinetic to potential occurs during walking, which tends to minimize total energy expenditure as well as muscle work. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5942660

  17. Human Protothecosis

    PubMed Central

    Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Mayr, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    Human protothecosis is a rare infection caused by members of the genus Prototheca. Prototheca species are generally considered to be achlorophyllic algae and are ubiquitous in nature. The occurrence of protothecosis can be local or disseminated and acute or chronic, with the latter being more common. Diseases have been classified as (i) cutaneous lesions, (ii) olecranon bursitis, or (iii) disseminated or systemic manifestations. Infections can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, although more severe and disseminated infections tend to occur in immunocompromised individuals. Prototheca wickerhamii and Prototheca zopfii have been associated with human disease. Usually, treatment involves medical and surgical approaches; treatment failure is not uncommon. Antifungals such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, and amphotericin B are the most commonly used drugs to date. Among them, amphotericin B displays the best activity against Prototheca spp. Diagnosis is largely made upon detection of characteristic structures observed on histopathologic examination of tissue. PMID:17428884

  18. Human protothecosis.

    PubMed

    Lass-Flrl, Cornelia; Mayr, Astrid

    2007-04-01

    Human protothecosis is a rare infection caused by members of the genus Prototheca. Prototheca species are generally considered to be achlorophyllic algae and are ubiquitous in nature. The occurrence of protothecosis can be local or disseminated and acute or chronic, with the latter being more common. Diseases have been classified as (i) cutaneous lesions, (ii) olecranon bursitis, or (iii) disseminated or systemic manifestations. Infections can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, although more severe and disseminated infections tend to occur in immunocompromised individuals. Prototheca wickerhamii and Prototheca zopfii have been associated with human disease. Usually, treatment involves medical and surgical approaches; treatment failure is not uncommon. Antifungals such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, and amphotericin B are the most commonly used drugs to date. Among them, amphotericin B displays the best activity against Prototheca spp. Diagnosis is largely made upon detection of characteristic structures observed on histopathologic examination of tissue. PMID:17428884

  19. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  20. Human defensins.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Josef Johann; Unholzer, Angela; Schaller, Martin; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Korting, Hans Christian

    2005-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small, cationic, amphiphilic peptides of 12-50 amino acids with microbicidal activity against both bacteria and fungi. The eukaryotic antimicrobial peptides may be divided into four distinct groups according to their structural features: cysteine-free alpha-helices, extended cysteine-free alpha-helices with a predominance of one or two amino acids, loop structures with one intramolecular disulfide bond, and beta-sheet structures which are stabilised by two or three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Mammalian defensins are part of the last-mentioned group. The mammalian defensins can be subdivided into three main classes according to their structural differences: the alpha-defensins, beta-defensins and the recently described theta-defensins. Mammalian alpha-defensins are predominantly found in neutrophils and in small intestinal Paneth cells, whereas mammalian beta-defensins have been isolated from both leukocytes and epithelial cells. Recently, two novel human beta-defensins, human beta-defensin-3 (HBD-3), and human beta-defensin-4 (HBD-4) have been discovered. Similar to HBD-1 and HBD-2, HBD-3 has microbicidal activity towards the Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli) and the yeasts Candida albicans and Malassezia furfur. In addition, HBD-3 kills Gram-positive bacteria such as Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus, including multi-resistant S. aureus strains, and even vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. In contrast to HBD-1 and HBD-2, significant expression of HBD-3 has been demonstrated in non-epithelial tissues, such as leukocytes, heart and skeletal muscle. HBD-4 is expressed in certain epithelia and in neutrophils. Its bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa is stronger than that of the other known beta-defensins. Here we present an overview of human antimicrobial peptides with some emphasis on their antifungal properties. PMID:15821901

  1. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa. PMID:8976151

  2. Human suffering.

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    10 measures of quality of life are used to rank 141 countries in the International Human Suffering Index (HSI). The Index differentiates between extreme, high, moderate, and minimal levels of human suffering. Social welfare is the sum of 10 measures: life expectancy, daily caloric intake, clean drinking water, infant immunization, secondary school enrollment, gross national product per capita, the rate of inflation, communication technology (i.e., telephones), political freedom, and civil rights. Each measure is ranked between 0 and 10. The highest score indicates the greatest country stress, with the worst possible score being 100. About 1 billion people live in desperate poverty. Living conditions are the worst in Mozambique (93), followed by Somalia, Afghanistan, Haiti, and Sudan. Most of these countries also have high population growth. The most comfortable countries are Denmark (1), the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, and Canada, which have low population growth. Total scores of 75 or greater (extreme human suffering) occur in 27 countries (20 in Africa, 16 in Asia, and Haiti) with 8% of the world's population (432 million people). High human suffering scores range between 50 and 74 and include 56 countries (24 in Africa, 16 in Asia, 15 in the Western Hemisphere, and 1 in Oceania) with 3.5 billion people. The number of countries in this grouping increased from 44 countries with 58% of world population in 1987. Moderate suffering scores range from 25-49. Countries with moderate suffering number 34 countries (9 in Europe, 13 in Asia, 8 in the Western Hemisphere, and 2 in Oceania and 2 in Africa) with 11.8% of world population (636 million). Over the preceding 5-year period the number of countries increased from 29 countries with 10% of world population. Minimal human suffering occurs in 24 countries (17 in Europe, Israel and Japan in Asia; Canada, the US, and Barbados in the Western Hemisphere; and Australia and New Zealand in Oceania) with 14.8% of world population (797 million). Five years ago 27 countries with 21% of world population were in the minimal suffering group. PMID:12179239

  3. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  4. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable

  5. Obesity-Related Metabolomic Analysis of Human Subjects in Black Soybean Peptide Intervention Study by Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography and Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jin Hee; Ahn, Chang-Won; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Kang Sung; Kwon, Dae Young

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify key metabolites related to weight reduction in humans by studying the metabolic profiles of sera obtained from 34 participants who underwent dietary intervention with black soybean peptides (BSP) for 12 weeks. This research is a sequel to our previous work in which the effects of BSP on BMI and blood composition of lipid were investigated. Sera of the study were subjected to ultra performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS), and the data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) score plots. Body mass index and percent body fat of the test group were reduced. Levels of betaine, benzoic acid, pyroglutamic acid, pipecolic acid, N-phenylacetamide, uric acid, l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine, and lysophosphatidyl cholines (lysoPCs) (C18:1, C18:2, C20:1, and C20:4) showed significant increases. Levels of l-proline, valine, l-leucine/isoleucine, hypoxanthine, glutamine, l-methionine, phenylpyruvic acid, several carnitine derivatives, and lysoPCs (C14:0, PC16:0, C15:0, C16:0, C17:1, C18:0, and C22:0) were significantly decreased. In particular, lysoPC 16:0 with a VIP value of 12.02 is esteemed to be the most important metabolite for evaluating the differences between the 2 serum samples. Our result confirmed weight-lowering effects of BSP, accompanied by favorable changes in metabolites in the subjects' blood. Therefore, this research enables us to better understand obesity and increases the predictability of the obesity-related risk by studying metabolites present in the blood. PMID:23862058

  6. Influence of smoking and donor age on the spectrum of in vivo mutation at the HPRT-locus in T lymphocytes of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Podlutsky, A; Hou, S M; Nyberg, F; Pershagen, G; Lambert, B

    1999-12-17

    Types and frequencies of in vivo mutation in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene was studied in 142 T cell mutants from 78 healthy nonsmoking and smoking adults with a mean of 65 years. The HPRT mutant frequency in the nonsmokers was 18.7 +/- 12.0 x 10(-6), and in the smokers 26.6 +/- 18.5 x 10(-6) (mean +/- S.D., P < 0.01). Among 107 single base pair substitutions (SBS) in the coding region of the HPRT gene, one new mutable site, one novel nonsense mutation and three not previously reported SBS were identified. Transitions accounted for 59% of the SBS and transversions for 41%. GC > AT transitions were the predominant type of mutation, with 50% of all SBS. The mutations showed a nonrandom distribution along the coding sequence, with three significant hotspots at positions 143, 197 and 617 (13, 14 and 7 mutations, respectively). There was no difference between smokers and nonsmokers with regard to the distribution of mutations at these hotspot positions. However, 85% of the mutations at GC base pairs and 88% of the mutations at AT base pairs in smokers occurred at sites with guanine or thymine, respectively, in the nontranscribed DNA strand. Moreover, smokers had a higher frequency of transversions and lower frequency of transitions than nonsmokers did. Particularly, GC > TA transversions were increased in smokers (11%) compared to nonsmokers (2%), which suggests that tobacco-smoke induced adducts at guanine bases in the nontranscribed DNA strand contributes to the increase of HPRT mutation in smokers. Overall, these results were very similar to the mutational spectra in two younger study populations reported previously [K.J. Burkhart-Schultz, C.L. Thompson, I.M. Jones, Spectrum of somatic mutation at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene of healthy people, Carcinogenesis 17 (1996) 1871-1883; A. Podlutsky, A.-M. Osterholm, S.-M. Hou, A. Hofmaier, B. Lambert, Spectrum of point mutations in the coding region of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, Carcinogenesis 19 (1998) 557-566]. With the possible exception of an increase of mutations at hotspot position 143, and a decrease of 5-methylcytosine deamination mediated transitions at CpG-sites in the older individuals, there were no differences between the mutational spectra of old and young adults. In conclusion, both smoking and ageing seem to have minor influences on the spectrum of HPRT mutation in T cells. PMID:10635998

  7. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  8. Human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  9. Human schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2014-06-28

    Human schistosomiasis--or bilharzia--is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  10. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  11. Biomarker triplet NAMPT/VEGF/HER2 as a de novo detection panel for the diagnosis and prognosis of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanyan; Guo, Meiyan; Zhang, Lingyun; Xu, Tao; Wang, Li; Xu, Guoxiong

    2016-01-01

    The early detection of breast cancer, the most common malignant tumor disease in women worldwide, relies on mammography and self breast examination. Here we evaluated the concentration of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor‑2 (HER2) in serum and their expression in breast tissues associated with the clinicopathological features of patients with benign and malignant breast tumors. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 proteins were overexpressed in breast tumors. The highest expression was observed in malignant tumors, low in benign tumors and negative in the adjacent normal tissue, indicating that the triplets may be progression markers and correlated with each other. The detection rate of NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 alone in tissue was 54.17, 64.58 and 60.42%, respectively, and was increased to about 79% in double combination and to 90% in triple combination. The basal levels of serum NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 in healthy controls were 94.90±4.24 pg/ml, 87.02±2.41 pg/ml and 1.12±0.04 ng/ml, respectively, measured by ELISA and found to be increased by 6.64‑, 1.76‑ and 2.52‑fold, respectively, in patients with malignant breast tumor. These elevated serum levels of NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 in patients were decreased after tumor removal, suggesting that these molecules are the indicators of treatment efficacy. The combined measurement of these triplets together may improve the sensitivity of breast cancer diagnosis and may potentially be used as a testing panel for the detection of malignant tumors, the assessment of treatment effectiveness and the monitoring of the disease progression in patients with breast cancer. Thus, we propose that the biomarker triplet NAMPT/VEGF/HER2 can be used as a de novo detection panel for the diagnosis and prognosis of human breast cancer. PMID:26531769

  12. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,

  13. Efficacy of laser capture microdissection plus RT-PCR technique in analyzing gene expression levels in human gastric cancer and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Hiroshi; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Danenberg, Kathleen; Danenberg, Peter V; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase gene expressions are reported to be valid predictive markers for 5-fluorouracil sensitivity to gastrointestinal cancer. For more reliable predictability, their expressions in cancer cells and stromal cells in the cancerous tissue (cancerous stroma) have been separately investigated using laser capture microdissection. Methods Thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase mRNA in cancer cells and cancerous stroma from samples of 47 gastric and 43 colon cancers were separately quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after laser capture microdissection. Results In both gastric and colon cancers, thymidylate synthase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase mRNA expressions were higher (p < 0.0001, p <0.0001 respectively in gastric cancer and P = 0.0002, p < 0.0001 respectively in colon cancer) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase mRNA expressions were lower in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma (P = 0.0136 in gastric cancer and p < 0.0001 in colon cancer). In contrast, thymidine phosphorylase mRNA was higher in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma in gastric cancer (p < 0.0001) and lower in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma in colon cancer (P = 0.0055). Conclusion By using this method, we could estimate gene expressions separately in cancer cells and stromal cells from colon and gastric cancers, in spite of the amount of stromal tissue. Our method is thought to be useful for accurately evaluating intratumoral gene expressions. PMID:18652704

  14. Human development?

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    This pamphlet gives a summary of the UN "Human Development Report, 1992" for developed countries in general and developing countries in general. Each country's ranking in the Human Development Index, 1992, is given. Scores range from 0.05 to 1.0, and are based on longevity, knowledge, and income. The Philippines' score of 0.6 ranks them 80th out of 160 countries. Global distribution of income is reported as 20% of the richest receiving 82.7% of the total world income while the poorest 20% receive only 1.4%. The second highest 20% receive 11.7% of the total world income; the middle 20% receive 2.3%; the second to the poorest 20% receive 1.9%. Developing countries have demonstrated progress in increased life expectancy, which in 26 developing countries is over 70 years. The average is 63 years. 66% have access to health services. Access to safe drinking water has improved considerably. Public expenditures on health as a proportion of gross national product have increased substantially. Adult literacy improved by over 33% since 1970. Almost 75% of children are enrolled in schools. Earnings, social security benefits, child mortality, immunization, and gaps between men and women in primary education have all improved in developing countries. The findings on deprivation still show 14 million child deaths annually, 1.5 billion people without access to health services, 1.3 billion without access to safe drinking water, and 2.3 billion people without access to sanitation. Almost 1 billion adults (600 million women) are illiterate. 1.2 billion people still live in absolute poverty where survival is threatened. In Sub-Saharan Africa, 1 in 40 adults and almost 1 million children are HIV infected. In developed countries 1 in 3 adults smokes, 5 in every 1000 are seriously injured in auto accidents, 33% of adults have not completed secondary education, the ratio of teachers to soldiers is 100:97, 30 million are unemployed in OECD countries, the gap between rich and poor is very wide, 1 in every 500 is in jail, homicide and divorce rates are high, and environmental pollution is a major concern. PMID:12179224

  15. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  16. Novel assay for simultaneous measurement of pyridine mononucleotides synthesizing activities allows dissection of the NAD(+) biosynthetic machinery in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zamporlini, Federica; Ruggieri, Silverio; Mazzola, Francesca; Amici, Adolfo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The redox coenzyme NAD(+) is also a rate-limiting co-substrate for several enzymes that consume the molecule, thus rendering its continuous re-synthesis indispensable. NAD(+) biosynthesis has emerged as a therapeutic target due to the relevance of NAD(+) -consuming reactions in complex intracellular signaling networks whose alteration leads to many neurologic and metabolic disorders. Distinct metabolic routes, starting from various precursors, are known to support NAD(+) biosynthesis with tissue/cell-specific efficiencies, probably reflecting differential expression of the corresponding rate-limiting enzymes, i.e. nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase, nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase. Understanding the contribution of these enzymes to NAD(+) levels depending on the tissue/cell type and metabolic status is necessary for the rational design of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating NAD(+) availability. Here we report a simple, fast and sensitive coupled fluorometric assay that enables simultaneous determination of the four activities in whole-cell extracts and biological fluids. Its application to extracts from various mouse tissues, human cell lines and plasma yielded for the first time an overall picture of the tissue/cell-specific distribution of the activities of the various enzymes. The screening enabled us to gather novel findings, including (a) the presence of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase in all examined tissues/cell lines, indicating that quinolinate and nicotinamide riboside are relevant NAD(+) precursors, and (b) the unexpected occurrence of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase in human plasma. PMID:25223558

  17. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  18. Investigation of coelectroporation as a method for introducing small mutations into embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, A C; Wims, M; Bradley, A

    1992-06-01

    We have investigated coelectroporation as a method for introducing minor genetic changes into specific genes in embryonic stem cells. A selectable marker (neo) and a targeting replacement vector designed to insert a 4-bp insertion into exon 3 of the mouse hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene were coelectroporated into embryonic stem cells and selected in G418 and 6-thioguanine (6-TG). HPRT-negative clones were obtained at a frequency of approximately 1 per 520 G418r clones. Southern analysis and the polymerase chain reaction were used to demonstrate that 3 of 36 of the 6-TG-resistant clones had the desired 4-bp insertion without any other disruption of the HPRT locus. Initial studies indicated that the other 33 6-TG-resistant clones probably resulted from the targeted integration of a concatemer containing both the targeting construct and the selectable neo gene. PMID:1588968

  19. Investigation of coelectroporation as a method for introducing small mutations into embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A C; Wims, M; Bradley, A

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated coelectroporation as a method for introducing minor genetic changes into specific genes in embryonic stem cells. A selectable marker (neo) and a targeting replacement vector designed to insert a 4-bp insertion into exon 3 of the mouse hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene were coelectroporated into embryonic stem cells and selected in G418 and 6-thioguanine (6-TG). HPRT-negative clones were obtained at a frequency of approximately 1 per 520 G418r clones. Southern analysis and the polymerase chain reaction were used to demonstrate that 3 of 36 of the 6-TG-resistant clones had the desired 4-bp insertion without any other disruption of the HPRT locus. Initial studies indicated that the other 33 6-TG-resistant clones probably resulted from the targeted integration of a concatemer containing both the targeting construct and the selectable neo gene. Images PMID:1588968

  20. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. PMID:24863549

  1. Lateralized effect of pallidal stimulation on self-mutilation in Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    PubMed

    Abel, Taylor J; Dalm, Brian D; Grossbach, Andrew J; Jackson, Adam W; Thomsen, Teri; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2014-12-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is an X-linked hereditary disorder caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. This syndrome is characterized by hyperuricemia, self-mutilation, cognitive impairment, and movement disorders such as spasticity and dystonia. The authors describe the case of a 15-year-old boy who underwent bilateral placement of globus pallidus internus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes for the treatment of generalized dystonia. His self-mutilating behavior gradually disappeared several weeks after the start of GPi stimulation. The dystonia and self-mutilating behavior returned on the left side only after a right lead fracture. This case is the first reported instance of LND treated with DBS in which the stimulation was interrupted and the self-mutilation returned in a lateralized fashion. The findings indicate that the neurobehavioral aspect of LND is lateralized and that contralateral GPi stimulation is responsible for lateralized improvement in self-injurious behavior. PMID:25303157

  2. Disorders of purines and pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Roger E; Andersson, Hans C

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of purine and pyrimidine metabolism can result in an array of clinical manifestations including neurologic manifestations. The most commonly cited disorder, in the neurologic realm, is Lesch-Nyhan syndrome which presumably reflects its distinctive feature of self-mutilation. Expansion of our knowledge with molecular genetic methodology has helped to better identify and characterize mutations such as those which occur with the enzyme hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), and this has enhanced our understanding of phenotypical expression of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Lesch-Nyhan variants. It is hoped that further elucidation of DNA coding regions and messenger RNA expression will lead to the potential for gene therapy to correct these inborn errors of purine and pyrimidine metabolism. PMID:24365355

  3. Humane Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Eileen S.; Westerlund, Stuart R.

    This booklet traces the historical development of human education as it has been instilled into the young people of America from colonial times to the present and provides a future prognosis of humaneness in the schools. Humane education promotes humane behavior and is an important part of the humane movement in the United States, although until

  4. Human herpesvirus 8 A novel human pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Daniel C

    2005-01-01

    In 1994, Chang and Moore reported on the latest of the gammaherpesviruses to infect humans, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) [1]. This novel herpesvirus has and continues to present challenges to define its scope of involvement in human disease. In this review, aspects of HHV-8 infection are discussed, such as, the human immune response, viral pathogenesis and transmission, viral disease entities, and the virus's epidemiology with an emphasis on HHV-8 diagnostics. PMID:16138925

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which cancers are caused by HPV? Who gets ... learn more about HPV infection? What are human papillomaviruses? Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of more ...

  6. Water: Human Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Human Health Water Quality Criteria Certain chemicals can harm human health ... Quality Criteria 2000 EPA Methodology for Deriving Ambient Water Quality Criteria for the Protection of Human Health ...

  7. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  8. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  9. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ingredients Regulations State Federal Tribal International Environment Air Water Soil Wildlife Plants Emergency Human Poisonings Pet Poisoning Spills and Contamination Wildlife Poisoning / Environmental Incident Pesticide Incidents Human Exposure ...

  10. Evaluation and validation of housekeeping genes in response to ionizing radiation and chemical exposure for normalizing RNA expression in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Banda, Malathi; Bommineni, Aryamani; Thomas, Robert A; Luckinbill, Leo S; Tucker, James D

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression changes are used with increasing frequency to assess the effects of exposure to environmental agents. Housekeeping (Hk) genes are essential in these analyses as internal controls for normalizing expression levels evaluated with Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR). Ideal Hk genes are constitutively expressed, do not respond to external stimuli and exhibit little or no sample-to-sample or run-to-run variation. Previous studies indicate that some commonly used Hk genes including glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and beta-actin have differential expression in various cell lines. Here we examine the expression of 11 Hk genes in four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines and one T-cell leukemia (Jurkat) cell line following exposure to graded doses of ionizing radiation or to varying ratio concentrations of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PHA and PMA are known to have synergistic effects on the expression of some genes and have very different effects from those of radiation. There has been no systematic study performed to ascertain the best control genes for radiation and/or PHA/PMA exposures in lymphoblastoid cells. Using a two-step reverse-transcriptase RT-PCR protocol we show that following radiation doses ranging from 0 to 400 cGy, 18S rRNA, acidic ribosomal protein, beta-actin, cyclophilin, GAPDH, phosphoglycerokinase, beta-2 microglobulin (B2M), beta-glucuronidase, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase and transferrin receptor showed no significant variation in expression in normal lymphoblastoid cells. In contrast, only 18S rRNA levels were unchanged in Jurkat cells. After PHA/PMA treatment of the same normal cell lines, B2M showed no significant variation and 18S rRNA, GAPDH and transcription binding protein (TBP) were minimally responsive, whereas in Jurkat cells all these genes were unresponsive. While our results suggest that the utility of a particular Hk gene should be determined for each experimental condition, 18S rRNA and B2M appear to be excellent candidates for use as internal controls in RT-PCR in human lymphoblastoid cells because they have the most constant levels of expression across cell lines following exposure to ionizing radiation as well as to PHA/PMA. PMID:17904413

  11. Queuine, a tRNA anticodon wobble base, maintains the proliferative and pluripotent potential of HL-60 cells in the presence of the differentiating agent 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed Central

    French, B T; Patrick, D E; Grever, M R; Trewyn, R W

    1991-01-01

    6-Thioguanine (6-TG)-induced differentiation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8)-deficient HL-60 cells is characterized by 2 days of growth, after which morphological differentiation proceeds. Addition of the tRNA wobble base queuine, in the presence of 6-TG, maintains the proliferative capability of the cells. The ability of 6-TG to induce differentiation correlates with c-myc mRNA down-regulation, but queuine has no effect on this parameter. Treatment with 6-TG for 2-3 days commits HL-60 cells to granulocytic differentiation, and, once committed, these cells do not respond to the monocytic inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Nonetheless, when cells are treated with queuine and 6-TG, they maintain the promyelocytic morphology and are capable of being induced down the monocytic pathway by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as indicated by stabilization of c-fms mRNA and cell adherence. In the absence of queuine, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate is incapable of inducing monocytic markers in the 6-TG-treated cells. The data presented indicate that 6-TG-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells is a tRNA-facilitated event and that the tRNA wobble base queuine is capable of maintaining both the proliferative and pluripotent potential of the cells. Images PMID:1988936

  12. Markerless Mutagenesis in Methanococcus maripaludis Demonstrates Roles for Alanine Dehydrogenase, Alanine Racemase, and Alanine Permease

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian C.; Leigh, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Among the archaea, Methanococcus maripaludis has the unusual ability to use l- or d-alanine as a nitrogen source. To understand how this occurs, we tested the roles of three adjacent genes encoding homologs of alanine dehydrogenase, alanine racemase, and alanine permease. To produce mutations in these genes, we devised a method for markerless mutagenesis that builds on previously established genetic tools for M. maripaludis. The technique uses a negative selection strategy that takes advantage of the ability of the M. maripaludis hpt gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase to confer sensitivity to the base analog 8-azahypoxanthine. In addition, we developed a negative selection method to stably incorporate constructs into the genome at the site of the upt gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations in the genes for alanine dehydrogenase and alanine permease lost the ability to grow on either isomer of alanine, while a mutant with an in-frame deletion mutation in the gene for alanine racemase lost only the ability to grow on d-alanine. The wild-type gene for alanine dehydrogenase, incorporated into the upt site, complemented the alanine dehydrogenase mutation. Hence, the permease is required for the transport of either isomer, the dehydrogenase is specific for the l isomer, and the racemase converts the d isomer to the l isomer. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all three genes had been acquired by lateral gene transfer from the low-moles-percent G+C gram-positive bacteria. PMID:15659675

  13. Adenine metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Sonali; Bopanna, Monnanda P; Bulusu, Vinay; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2010-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum lacks the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway and relies entirely on the salvage pathway to meet its purine nucleotide requirements. The entire flux for purine nucleotide biosynthesis in the parasite is believed to be through hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT), with the enzymes, adenosine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) being unannotated in the Plasmodium genome database. This manuscript reports on the studies carried out to explore bypass mechanisms, if any, for AMP synthesis in the intraerythrocyitc stages of the parasite life cycle. Uptake and subsequent incorporation of radiolabel adenine in the nucleotide pool of saponin released erythrocyte free parasites implicated the role of parasite encoded enzymes in adenine metabolism. To explore the route for AMP synthesis in the parasite, we have monitored adenine mediated supplementation of metabolic viability in saponin released hadacidin (N-formyl-N-hydroxyglycine) treated parasites. Our results implicate the role of an APRT like activity that enables parasite survival when the flux through the HGPRT pathway is blocked. PMID:20093117

  14. The Humanities: Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on a wide range of interdisciplinary themes and ideas for humanities instruction, the 17 articles in this journal issue discuss the following topics: (1) literature, humanities, and the adult learner; (2) the role of the humanities in educating for a democracy; (3) humanities in the marketplace; (4) literature versus "great books" in high

  15. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  16. Boundaries of Humanities: Writing Medical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Gillie

    2008-01-01

    Literature and medicine is a discipline within medical humanities, which challenges medicine to reconfigure its scientific model to become interdisciplinary, and be disciplined by arts and humanities as well as science. The psychological, emotional, spiritual and physical are inextricably linked in people, inevitably entailing provisionality,

  17. Thioguanine, mercaptopurine: their analogs and nucleosides as antimetabolites.

    PubMed

    Elgemeie, Galal H

    2003-01-01

    6-Mercaptopurine (6MP) and 6-thioguanine (6TG) are analogs of the natural purines: hypoxanthine and guanine. Both mercaptopurine and thioguanine are substrates for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and are converted into the ribonucleotides 6-thioguanosine monophosphate (6-thioGMP) and 6-thioinosine monophosphate (T-IMP) respectively. The accumulation of these monophosphates inhibits several vital metabolic reactions. Today, these thiopurine bases remain valuable agents for the induction and maintenance of remissions in patients with myelocytic and acute lymphocytic leukemia. Despite their proved clinical importance, 6MP and 6TG have certain therapeutic disadvantages, which have continued to stimulate the search for purine derivatives enhancing therapeutic efficacy. Considerable efforts have been made to prepare other novel mercaptopurine and thioguanine analogs and their nucleosides to improve the antitumor efficacy. The effectiveness of these thiopurines against certain tumor cell lines suggested that some of these mercaptopurine analogs and their nucleosides would be worthy of consideration in order to determine whether they exert a more selective effect against neoplastic cells than against normal cells or they might be useful in patients whose disease has become resistant to 6MP or 6TG. This review will focus on mercaptopurine analogs and their nucleosides as antimetabolite agents. PMID:14529546

  18. Mutagenic activity of high-energy 532 nm ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, J; Fatone, M; Hestdalen, C; Obringer, J W; Tillinghast, H S

    1997-04-01

    The mutagenic activity of green (532 nm) and infrared (1064 nm) ultra-short laser light pulses was tested in cultured Syrian hamster fibroblasts by a hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) mutagenesis assay. In 18 irradiation trials, cells were exposed to eight consecutive 100-ps pulses of either 532 nm or 1064 nm light from a Nd:YAG laser at average irradiances of 3.0 GW/cm2. The 532 nm irradiations produced Hprt mutations at an average observed frequency of 5.3-5.6 x 10(-6), 10-fold higher than control trials (P < 0.01), while 1064 nm irradiations produced only background (spontaneous mutation) frequencies. A HAT (hypoxanthine, aminopterin, thymidine) sensitivity test allowed us to infer that Hprt- clones, selected as 6-thioguanine-resistant clones, possessed mutations at the Hprt locus after 532 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The mutagenic effects of 532 nm high-energy laser pulses and not 1064 nm wavelengths are discussed in light of a two-photon absorption hypothesis. These preliminary findings suggest that 460-590 nm visible-light lasers may be mutagenic to mammalian cells either as a result of two-photon absorption or through some other photochemical process that damages DNA. PMID:9092930

  19. Genetic studies on the role of the nucleoside transport function in nucleoside efflux, the inosine cycle, and purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, B; Kaur, K; Watts, T

    1983-01-01

    A mutant clone (AU-100) which is 90% deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase activity was characterized from wild-type murine S49 T-lymphoma cells. This AU-100 cell line and its hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient derivative, AUTG-50B, overproduce purines severalfold and excrete massive amounts of inosine into the culture medium (Ullman et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79:5127-5131, 1982). We introduced a mutation into both of these cell lines which make them incapable of taking up nucleosides from the culture medium. The genetic deficiency in nucleoside transport prevents the adenylosuccinate synthetase-deficient AU-100 cells from excreting inosine. Because of an extremely efficient intracellular inosine salvage system, the nucleoside transport-deficient AU-100 cells also no longer overproduce purines. AUTG-50B cells which have been made genetically deficient in nucleoside transport still overproduce purines but excrete hypoxanthine rather than inosine. These studies demonstrate genetically that nucleoside transport and nucleoside efflux share a common component and that nucleoside transport has an important regulatory function which profoundly affects the rates of purine biosynthesis and purine salvage. Images PMID:6604218

  20. Quantitative expression proteomics and phosphoproteomics profile of brain from PINK1 knockout mice: insights into mechanisms of familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Judy C; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Sultana, Rukhsana; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Büeler, Hansruedi; Butterfield, David Allan

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, neurodegenerative motor disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and presence of α-synuclein-containing protein aggregates. Mutations in the mitochondrial Ser/Thr kinase PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are associated with an autosomal recessive familial form of early-onset PD. Recent studies have suggested that PINK1 plays important neuroprotective roles against mitochondrial dysfunction by phosphorylating and recruiting Parkin, a cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase, to facilitate elimination of damaged mitochondria via autophagy-lysosomal pathways. Loss of PINK1 in cells and animals leads to various mitochondrial impairments and oxidative stress, culminating in dopaminergic neuronal death in humans. Using a 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis proteomics approach, the differences in expressed brain proteome and phosphoproteome between 6-month-old PINK1-deficient mice and wild-type mice were identified. The observed changes in the brain proteome and phosphoproteome of mice lacking PINK1 suggest that defects in signaling networks, energy metabolism, cellular proteostasis, and neuronal structure and plasticity are involved in the pathogenesis of familial PD. Mutations in PINK1 are associated with an early-onset form of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examines changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of the PINK1 knockout mouse brain. Alterations were noted in several key proteins associated with: increased oxidative stress, aberrant cellular signaling, altered neuronal structure, decreased synaptic plasticity, reduced neurotransmission, diminished proteostasis networks, and altered metabolism. 14-3-3ε, 14-3-3 protein epsilon; 3-PGDH, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase; ALDOA, aldolase A; APT1, acyl-protein thioesterase 1; CaM, calmodulin; CBR3, carbonyl reductase [NADPH] 3; ENO2, gamma-enolase; HPRT, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase; HSP70, heat-shock-related 70 kDa protein 2; IDHc, cytoplasmic isocitrate dehydrogenase [NADP+]; MAPK1, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1; MEK1, MAP kinase kinase 1; MDHc, cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase; NFM, neurofilament medium polypeptide; NSF, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein; PHB, prohibitin; PINK1, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1; PPIaseA, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A; PSA2, proteasome subunit alpha type-2; TK, transketolase; VDAC-2, voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2. PMID:25626353

  1. Biological effectiveness of nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons interacting in tissues near the bone- soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, Mark Randall

    1999-12-01

    High-energy protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR)-or generated by nuclear interactions of GCR heavy-ions with material-are capable of penetrating great thicknesses of shielding to irradiate humans in spacecraft or in lunar or Martian habitats. As protons interact with the nuclei of the elemental constituents of soft tissue and bone, low energy nuclei-target fragments-are emitted into the cells responsible for bone development and maintenance and for hematopoiesis. Leukemogenesis is the principal endpoint of concern because it is the most likely deleterious effect, and it has a short latency period and comparatively low survival rate, although other myelo- proliferative disorders and osteosarcoma also may be induced. A one-dimensional proton-target fragment transport model was used to calculate the energy spectra of fragments produced in bone and soft tissue, and present in marrow cavities at distances from a bone interface. In terms of dose equivalent, the target fragments are as significant as the incident protons. An average radiation quality factor was found to be between 1.8 and 2.6. Biological response to the highly non- uniform energy deposition of the target fragments is such that an alternative approach to conventional predictive risk assessment is needed. Alternative procedures are presented. In vitro cell response and relative biological effectiveness were calculated from the radial dose distribution of each fragment produced by 1-GeV protons using parameters of a modified Ion-Gamma- Kill (IGK) model of radiation action. The modelled endpoints were survival of C3H10t 1/2 and V79 cells, neoplastic transformation of C3H10t1/2 cells, and mutation of the X-linked hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus in V79 cells. The dose equivalent and cell responses increased by 10% or less near the interface. Since RBE increases with decreasing dose in the IGK model, comparisons with quality factors were made at dose levels 0.01 <= D [Gy] <= 2. Applying average quality factors derived herein to GCR exposures results in a <= 5% increase of in average quality. Calculated RBEs indicate that accepted quality factors for high-energy protons may be too low due to the relatively high effectiveness of the low-charged target fragments. Derived RBEs for target fragments increase the calculated biological effectiveness of GCR by 20% to 180%.

  2. Virtual Human project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Richard C.; Kruse, Kara L.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Hively, Lee M.; Fischer, K. N.; Munro, Nancy B.; Easterly, Clay E.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  3. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the ... for this statement on human cloning. Ban Reproductive Cloning AAAS endorses a legally enforceable ban on efforts ...

  4. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Page Content Article Body According to ... Control and Prevention, there is an epidemic of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the United States. HPV is ...

  6. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... and Share (PDF 1105 KB ) En Español HPV (human papillomavirus) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is ...

  7. [The human microbiome].

    PubMed

    Solt, Ido; Kim, Matthew J; Offer, Cohavy

    2011-05-01

    The complex microbial populations that colonize the human body form the human microbiome. The human microbiota may contain 1014) cells, an order of magnitude greater than the number of the human cells, and can express 100 times more genes than the human genome. The metagenome is the collective genomes of the human and its microbial flora. Major international colLaborative efforts currently explore the diverse human microbiomes from five different body areas: the nasopharyngeal, gastrointestinal and female urogenital tracts, the oral cavity and the skin. Defining the complexity of the human microbiome in health and disease will enhance the understanding of multiple pathological mechanisms and facilitate the development of novel diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21678649

  8. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  9. Visible Human Project

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Navigation Home Projects Based on the Visible Human Data Set Applications for viewing images Sources of images and ... Banvard, Richard A., The Visible Human Project ® Image Data Set From Inception to Completion and Beyond, Proceedings CODATA ...

  10. Effect of rapid human N-acetyltransferase 2 haplotype on DNA damage and mutagenesis induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx).

    PubMed

    Metry, Kristin J; Neale, Jason R; Doll, Mark A; Howarth, Ashley L; States, J Christopher; McGregor, W Glenn; Pierce, William M; Hein, David W

    2010-02-01

    Heterocyclic amines such as 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are dietary carcinogens generated when meats are cooked well-done. Bioactivation includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with human CYP1A2 and either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles were treated with IQ or MeIQx to examine the effect of NAT2 genetic polymorphism on IQ- or MeIQx-induced DNA adducts and mutagenesis. MeIQx and IQ both induced decreases in cell survival and significantly (p<0.001) greater number of endogenous hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutants in the CYP1A2/NAT2*4 than the CYP1A2/NAT2*5B cell line. IQ- and MeIQx-induced hprt mutant cDNAs were sequenced and over 85% of the mutations were single-base substitutions with the remainder exon deletions likely caused by splice-site mutations. For the single-base substitutions, over 85% were at G:C base pairs. Deoxyguanosine (dG)-C8-IQ and dG-C8-MeIQx adducts were significantly (p<0.001) greater in the CYP1A2/NAT2*4 than the CYP1A2/NAT2*5B cell line. DNA adduct levels correlated very highly with hprt mutants for both IQ and MeIQx. These results suggest substantially increased risk for IQ- and MeIQx-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis in rapid NAT2 acetylators. PMID:20004212

  11. Human nature and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2009-03-01

    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes that altering or destroying human nature is in itself a bad thing. The second concern assumes that human nature provides a standard without which we cannot make coherent, defensible judgments about what is good. I will argue (1) that there is nothing wrong, per se, with altering or destroying human nature, because, on a plausible understanding of what human nature is, it contains bad as well as good characteristics and there is no reason to believe that eliminating some of the bad would so imperil the good as to make the elimination of the bad impermissible, and (2) that altering or destroying human nature need not result in the loss of our ability to make judgments about the good, because we possess a conception of the good by which we can and do evaluate human nature. I will argue that appeals to human nature tend to obscure rather than illuminate the debate over the ethics of enhancement and can be eliminated in favor of more cogent considerations. PMID:19161567

  12. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  13. Demystifying the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonham, George

    1980-01-01

    The new Rockefeller Foundation's Commission on the Humanities' report is discussed. Some of the commission's recommendations include: improved quality of elementary and secondary schools, strengthening of humanities research, reaffirmation within education of the values of the humanities, and closer collaboration of educational and cultural

  14. Portraits of Human Greatness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Anselm's Coll., Manchester, NH.

    Examined is the Humanities Program at St. Anselm College, a two-year program of readings and lectures ordered chronologically from ancient to contemporary times--from the age of Classical Greek thought and the Old Testament to the twentieth century. The first year of the Humanities Program is organized in eight units on general modes of "human

  15. Expanding Human Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyean, Beverly-Colleene

    1983-01-01

    The human brain is capable of mastering skills far beyond those it is now used for. Three questions about the further evolution of human intelligence are raised: What will be the next step in human intelligence? How is the next step manifesting itself? How can we prepare for those changes? (IS)

  16. HUMAN USE INDEX (FUTURE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...

  17. HUMAN USE INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...

  18. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences. PMID:23908778

  19. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human

  20. Literature in Humanities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marckwardt, Albert H., Ed.

    The 1966 National Council of Teachers of English Humanities Conference considered the place of the humanities in elementary and secondary education and the possible focus, content, and methods for presenting humanities programs. In this collection of papers given at the conference, leaders in various disciplines suggest the scope and magnitude of

  1. Human Relations Ideabook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, Jean A.

    Intended for local human relations committees and commissions, this ideabook may serve as a do-it-yourself kit, a springboard for human relations action, showing concrete action steps that can be taken. Ideas and suggestions given in the booklet may be used to provide a basis for organizing a human relations committee; awaken the educational

  2. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  3. 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine-induced DNA adducts and genotoxicity in chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing human CYP1A2 and rapid or slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Metry, Kristin J; Zhao, Shuang; Neale, Jason R; Doll, Mark A; States, J Christopher; McGregor, W Glenn; Pierce, William M; Hein, David W

    2007-07-01

    Heterocyclic amine carcinogens such as 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP) are present in diet and cigarette smoke. Bioactivation in humans includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P4501A2 possibly followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were stably transfected with human CYP1A2 and either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles. CYP1A2 and NAT2 catalytic activities were undetectable in untransfected CHO cell lines. CYP1A2 catalytic activity levels did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) among the CYP1A2-transfected cell lines. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had significantly higher levels of N-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0001) and N-hydroxy-PhIP O-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0170) catalytic activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. PhIP caused dose-dependent decreases in cell survival and significant (P < 0.001) increases in mutagenesis measured at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in all the CYP1A2-transfected cell lines. Transfection with NAT2*4 or NAT2*5B did not further increase hprt mutagenesis. PhIP-induced hprt mutant cDNAs were sequenced, and 80% of the mutations were single base substitutions at G:C base pairs. dG-C8-PhIP DNA adduct levels were dose-dependent in the order: untransfected < transfected with CYP1A2 < transfected with CYP1A2 and NAT2*5B < transfected with CYP1A2 and NAT2*4. Following incubation with 1.2 microM PhIP, DNA adduct levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in CHO cells transfected with CYP1A2/NAT2*4 versus CYP1A2/NAT2*5B. These results strongly support an activation role for CYP1A2 in PhIP-induced mutagenesis and DNA damage and suggest a modest effect of human NAT2 and its genetic polymorphism on PhIP DNA adduct levels. PMID:17295238

  4. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  5. Human-technology Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Katharine M.

    Human-technology integration is the replacement of human parts and extension of human capabilities with engineered devices and substrates. Its result is hybrid biological-artificial systems. We discuss here four categories of products furthering human-technology integration: wearable computers, pervasive computing environments, engineered tissues and organs, and prosthetics, and introduce examples of currently realized systems in each category. We then note that realization of a completely artificial sytem via the path of human-technology integration presents the prospect of empirical confirmation of an aware artificially embodied system.

  6. Humanism in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, S

    1993-09-01

    Emergency medicine has not yet appropriated "humanism" as a term of its own. Medical humanism needs to be interpreted in a way that is consistent with the practical goals of emergency medicine. In this essay, humanism in emergency medicine is defined by identifying the dehumanizing aspects of sudden illness and exploring of ways for sustaining the humanity of emergency department patients. Excerpts from Dr Oliver Sacks' autobiographical work A Leg to Stand On give voice to the human needs created by sudden illness and its treatment. PMID:8363690

  7. Biological races in humans.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  8. Mapping human genetic ancestry.

    PubMed

    Ebersberger, Ingo; Galgoczy, Petra; Taudien, Stefan; Taenzer, Simone; Platzer, Matthias; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2007-10-01

    The human genome is a mosaic with respect to its evolutionary history. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of 23,210 DNA sequence alignments from human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and rhesus, we present a map of human genetic ancestry. For about 23% of our genome, we share no immediate genetic ancestry with our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. This encompasses genes and exons to the same extent as intergenic regions. We conclude that about 1/3 of our genes started to evolve as human-specific lineages before the differentiation of human, chimps, and gorillas took place. This explains recurrent findings of very old human-specific morphological traits in the fossils record, which predate the recent emergence of the human species about 5-6 MYA. Furthermore, the sorting of such ancestral phenotypic polymorphisms in subsequent speciation events provides a parsimonious explanation why evolutionary derived characteristics are shared among species that are not each other's closest relatives. PMID:17660505

  9. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly. PMID:25051653

  10. Climate Impacts on Human Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Climate Change Impacts Human Health Impacts Human Health Climate Impacts on Human Health Climate Impacts on Alaska On This Page Impacts from ... in air pollution and the associated health effects Climate Change Affects Human Health and Welfare In 2008, ...

  11. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept. PMID:24979876

  12. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  13. Human genes and diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book consists of 16 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Towards a complete linkage map of he X-chromosome; The role of HPRT genes in human disease; Human plasminogen activators. Genes and proteins structure; Metallothionein gene regulation in Menke's Disease; Molecular genetics of human B cell neoplasia, The erb-B related growth factors receptors, and Aldolase gene and protein families: structure, expression and molecular pathophysiology.

  14. Computers and human intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Warnier, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    This text tackles a question central to the field of Artificial Intelligence: Is the computer capable of true, autonomous human behavior. After comparative analysis of human behavior and the science of computing, Warnier considers trends in the design of computer systems and concludes that the computer is not becoming a replacement for humans. Rather, developments in Artificial Intelligence are primarily directed to improving the computer's ability to perform complex tasks quickly and reliably.

  15. Human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, E.M.; Fragola, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a treatment of human reliability analysis incorporating an introduction to probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power generating stations. They treat the subject according to the framework established for general systems theory. Draws upon reliability analysis, psychology, human factors engineering, and statistics, integrating elements of these fields within a systems framework. Provides a history of human reliability analysis, and includes examples of the application of the systems approach.

  16. Human hemoglobin genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  17. Human imprinting syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Derek Hk; Maher, Eamonn R

    2009-12-01

    Human imprinting disorders can provide critical insights into the role of imprinted genes in human development and health, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate genomic imprinting. To illustrate these concepts we review the clinical and molecular features of several human imprinting syndromes including Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, pseudohypoparathyroidism, transient neonatal diabetes, familial complete hydatidiform moles and chromosome 14q32 imprinting domain disorders. PMID:22122706

  18. BNST neurocircuitry in humans

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Suzanne N.; Clauss, Jacqueline A.; Winder, Danny G.; Woodward, Neil; Heckers, Stephan; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and addiction disorders are two of the most common mental disorders in the United States, and are typically chronic, disabling, and comorbid. Emerging evidence suggests the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) mediates both anxiety and addiction through connections with other brain regions, including the amygdala and nucleus accumbens. Although BNST structural connections have been identified in rodents and a limited number of structural connections have been verified in non-human primates, BNST connections have yet to be described in humans. Neuroimaging is a powerful tool for identifying structural and functional circuits in vivo. In this study, we examined BNST structural and functional connectivity in a large sample of humans. The BNST has structural and functional connections with multiple subcortical regions, including limbic, thalamic, and basal ganglia structures, confirming structural findings in rodents. We describe two novel connections in the human brain that have not been previously reported in rodents or non-human primates, including structural connections with the temporal pole, and functional connections with the paracingulate gyrus. The findings of this study provide a map of the BNSTs structural and functional connectivity across brain in healthy humans. In large part, the BNST neurocircuitry in humans is similar to findings from rodents and non-human primates; however, several connections are unique to humans. Future explorations of BNST neurocircuitry in anxiety and addiction disorders have the potential to reveal novel mechanisms underlying these disabling psychiatric illnesses. PMID:24444996

  19. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  20. Perception of human motion.

    PubMed

    Blake, Randolph; Shiffrar, Maggie

    2007-01-01

    Humans, being highly social creatures, rely heavily on the ability to perceive what others are doing and to infer from gestures and expressions what others may be intending to do. These perceptual skills are easily mastered by most, but not all, people, in large part because human action readily communicates intentions and feelings. In recent years, remarkable advances have been made in our understanding of the visual, motoric, and affective influences on perception of human action, as well as in the elucidation of the neural concomitants of perception of human action. This article reviews those advances and, where possible, draws links among those findings. PMID:16903802

  1. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  2. The psychology of humanness.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures. PMID:23947277

  3. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  4. Human factors: Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, James P.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the Aeronautics Human Factors Research and Technology program are to provide the technology base and capability to design effective crew-cockpit systems and to advance solutions to human problems affecting air transport and rotorcraft effectiveness and safety. Advanced automation technologies, information display capabilities under computer control, and concern for the effects of human error in flight operations are elements which drive the directions of the program. Thus, the program has four thrusts: flight management, human engineering methods, rotorcraft, and subsonic transports.

  5. Human enhancement and perfection.

    PubMed

    Roduit, Johann A R; Baumann, Holger; Heilinger, Jan-Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Both, bioconservatives and bioliberals, should seek a discussion about ideas of human perfection, making explicit their underlying assumptions about what makes for a good human life. This is relevant, because these basic, and often implicit ideas, inform and influence judgements and choices about human enhancement interventions. Both neglect, and polemical but inconsistent use of the complex ideas of perfection are leading to confusion within the ethical debate about human enhancement interventions, that can be avoided by tackling the notion of perfection directly. In the recent debates, bioconservatives have prominently argued against the 'pursuit of perfection' by biotechnological means. In the first part of this paper, we show that--paradoxically--bioconservatives themselves explicitly embrace specific conceptions of human perfection and perfectionist assumptions about the good human life in order to argue against the use of enhancement technologies. Yet, we argue that the bioconservative position contains an untenable ambiguity between criticising and endorsing ideas of human perfection. Hence, they stand in need of clarifying their stance on human perfection. In the second part of the paper, we ask whether bioliberals in fact (implicitly) advocate a particular conception of perfection, or whether they are right in holding that they do not, and that discussing perfection is obsolete anyway. We show that bioliberals also rely on a specific idea of human perfection, based on the idea of autonomy. Hence, their denial of the relevance of perfection in the debate is unconvincing and has to be revised. PMID:23436909

  6. Health and Humanity: Humanities 401 Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Fraser; Taylor, Maxine

    A syllabus for the "Health and Humanities" interdisciplinary course at Northwestern State University, Louisiana, is presented. An introduction suggests that with the proliferation of technological advances in the field of health care, there is a need for reconsideration of many moral, ethical, legal, and humanistic questions. Information is…

  7. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  8. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  9. Human Sociobiology: Wilson's Fallacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrman, Nathaniel S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an introduction to and a critique of E.O. Wilson's new science of sociobiology, which focuses on explaining the social behavior of species as diverse as ants, apes, and humans. Suggests that Wilson has gone beyond his data in claiming that complex human behaviors such as altruism are caused to any extent by genetic, as opposed to

  10. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  11. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups

  13. Human Pythiosis, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Arajo, Joo Pessoa; Candeias, Joo Manuel Grisi; Fabiano de Franco, Marcello; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Mendoza, Leonel; Pires de Camargo, Rosangela; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2005-01-01

    Pythiosis, caused by Pythium insidiosum, occurs in humans and animals and is acquired from aquatic environments that harbor the emerging pathogen. Diagnosis is difficult because clinical and histopathologic features are not pathognomonic. We report the first human case of pythiosis from Brazil, diagnosed by using culture and rDNA sequencing. PMID:15890126

  14. Hooking Kids with Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anstead, Neil L.

    1993-01-01

    Humanitas is part of Collaboratives for Humanities and Arts Teaching (CHART), a nationwide network funded primarily by the Rockefeller Foundation. In 11 large school districts and numerous rural districts, high school teachers, academics, artists, and business and community leaders are cooperating to promote teaching of the arts and humanities.

  15. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  16. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  17. Human Dignity Through History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlie, Arthur L.

    A major educational need, as assessed by a committee of teachers, students, and community members, is to recognize acceptance of human dignity as the ultimate value in decision making. This concept provides a basis for the elementary and secondary social studies program. Although the concept of human dignity was promoted with the signing of the

  18. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  19. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  20. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  1. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  2. Human granulocytic Anaplasmosis, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Norio; Gaowa; Wuritu; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Wu, Dongxing; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Chiya, Seizou; Fukunaga, Kazutoshi; Funato, Toyohiko; Shiojiri, Masaaki; Nakajima, Hideki; Hamauzu, Yoshiji; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ando, Shuji; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    We retrospectively confirmed 2 cases of human Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection. Patient blood samples contained unique p44/msp2 for the pathogen, and antibodies bound to A. phagocytophilum antigens propagated in THP-1 rather than HL60 cells. Unless both cell lines are used for serodiagnosis of rickettsiosis-like infections, cases of human granulocytic anaplasmosis could go undetected. PMID:23460988

  3. Human ultralente insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Holman, R R; Steemson, J; Darling, P; Reeves, W G; Turner, R C

    1984-01-01

    The greater solubility of human insulin and its possible faster action have led to doubts about whether a sufficiently long acting formulation could be produced to provide a basal supply for diabetics. In a double blind crossover study in 18 diabetics human ultralente insulin was as effective as beef ultralente insulin in controlling basal plasma glucose concentrations (median 5.7 mmol/l (103 mg/100 ml) with human and 6.3 mmol/l (114 mg/100 ml) with beef ultralente insulin respectively). There was no significant difference between human and bovine insulin in the rise in plasma glucose concentration from 0400 to 0700 after an injection the previous morning and no difference between patients receiving an adequate or insufficient dose of human ultralente insulin. Bovine insulin antibody binding was reduced with human insulin (p less than 0.002), which suggests that human insulin is less antigenic than beef insulin. Once daily human ultralente insulin provides a suitable formulation for the basal insulin requirement of diabetics. Images p668-a PMID:6421424

  4. Humanizing the Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Norman K., Ed.; Saylor, J. Galen, Ed.

    These papers, presented during ASCD-sponsored conference, confront educators with issues in and alternatives for making secondary schools a more humanizing experience for students. The contributors and their articles are: Norman K. Hamilton, "Alternatives in Secondary Education"; Thornton B. Monez and Norman L. Bussiere, "The High School in Human

  5. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  6. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  7. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed included: (1)

  8. Vaccination against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Mello, Claudia Figueiredo

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is common and causes different manifestations. This infection is a public health concern because it has been associated with genital tract malignant diseases among men and women. Currently two vaccines are available to prevent the human papillomavirus infection and its associated diseases. PMID:24488402

  9. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  10. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can

  11. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  12. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied

  13. Human Nature and Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, Herbert William

    This paper is concerned with the development of a coherent unified theory for a science of curriculum--specifically, the development of logical consistency and compatibility with related fields in the formation of theory. Learning as a common human activity is subject to principles germane to human activity in general, as well as to universal

  14. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed included: (1)…

  15. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement

  16. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  17. Human hepatocyte carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    SHIRAHA, HIDENORI; YAMAMOTO, KAZUHIDE; NAMBA, MASAYOSHI

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide; and its incidence rate is increasing. Clinical and molecular medical analyses have revealed substantial information on hepatocarcinogenesis. Hepatocarcinogenesis is a stepwise process during which multiple genes are altered. Genetic changes and their biological consequences in human HCC can be divided into at least 4 groups: i) tumor suppressor genes (p53, retinoblastoma, phosphatase tensin homolog and runt-related transcription factor 3), ii) oncogenes (myc, K-ras, BRAF), iii) reactivation of developmental pathways (Wnt, hedgehog), and iv) growth factors and their receptors (transforming growth factor-?, insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor). An experimental model of human hepatocarcinogenesis such as in vitro neoplastic transformation of human hepatocytes has not been successfully achieved yet, but several immortalized human hepatocyte cell lines have been established. These immortalized human hepatocytes will become useful tools for the elucidation of hepatocarcinogenesis, especially for the initial step of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:23426905

  18. Investigation of vital pathogenic target orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTase) from Thermus thermophilus HB8: Phylogenetic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Prabhu, Damodharan; Richard, Mariadasse; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2016-06-01

    Biosynthesis pathways of pyrimidine and purine are shown to play an important role in regular cellular activities. The biosynthesis can occur either through de novo or salvage pathways based on the requirement of the cell. The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway has been linked to several disorders and various autoimmune diseases. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) is an important enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of orotate to orotate monophosphate in the fifth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of 228 OPRTase sequences shows the distribution of proteins across different living forms of life. High structural similarities between Thermusthermophilus and other organisms kindled us to concentrate on OPRTase as an anti-pathogenic target. In this study, a homology model of OPRTase was constructed using 2P1Z as a template. About 100ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the conformational stability and dynamic patterns of the protein. The amino acid residues (Met1, Asp2, Glu43, Ala44, Glu47, Lys51, Ala157 and Leu158) lining in the binding site were predicted using SiteMap. Further, structure based virtual screening was performed on the predicted binding site using ChemBridge, Asinex, Binding, NCI, TosLab and Zinc databases. Compounds retrieved from the screening collections were manually clustered. The resultant protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, which further validates the binding modes of the hits. The study may provide better insight for designing potent anti-pathogenic agent. PMID:26861612

  19. Human metapneumovirus and human bocavirus in children.

    PubMed

    Milder, Edmund; Arnold, John C

    2009-05-01

    Several new viruses have recently been described in children, including human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and human bocavirus (HBoV). hMPV has been established as a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children, often second only to respiratory syncytial virus as a cause of bronchiolitis in infants. Diagnostic tools have been developed for the clinician and effective treatment and prevention strategies are being investigated. HBoV was more recently identified. Although it was initially identified in the airway of children, high rates of codetection of other viral pathogens and detection of the virus in the stool have raised questions about the true role of HBoV as a cause of respiratory infections. A focus on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnostic techniques for hMPV and HBoV is presented. PMID:19190535

  20. Archaea on Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J.; Auerbach, Anna K.; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  1. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  2. Introduction to Human Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to “human factors engineering,” an applied science that seeks to optimize usability and safety of systems. Human factors engineering pursues this goal by aligning system design with the perceptual, cognitive, and physical capabilities of users. Human factors issues loom large in the diabetes management domain because patients and health care professionals interact with a complex variety of systems, including medical device hardware and software, which are themselves embedded within larger systems of institutions, people, and processes. Usability considerations must be addressed in these systems and devices to ensure safe and effective diabetes management. PMID:22538128

  3. Bromine in human tissue.

    PubMed

    Cross, J D; Smith, H

    1978-01-01

    The normal levels of bromine in human tissue are given and their use in the interpretation of levels found when over-exposure is a possibility is described. Bromine is "normally" distributed in human tissue as are essential trace elements. This allows a bromine (microgram) to chlorine (mg) ratio to be established (3.2) above which bromine exposure must be considered. The bromine concentrations in sections of hair can be used to establish the time of administration even when small amounts are ingested, but owing to the long half-life (about 15 days) found in human tissue interpretation after multiple doses may be difficult. PMID:658861

  4. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-06-01

    The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

  5. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  6. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  7. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting ?-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes. PMID:26395141

  8. The Concept of Being Human.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    This analysis of the relationship between humanism and humanitarianism outlines educational goals that should lead to a more humane world. Section 1, an outline of human life examines six substructures--human life, individuality, amenity, contact, actualization, and problems. A definition and examples of humanism in section 2 are elaborated into a

  9. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  10. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  11. Finland and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromm, Hans

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the status of the humanities in Finland, beginning with the post World War II era. Comments on state-supported programs and the successes achieved in such areas as linguistics, philology, literature, and historical research. (JDH)

  12. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  13. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  14. Human Balance System

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Top Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. The Human Balance System Good balance is often taken for granted. Most people don’ ... and difficulty with concentration and memory. What is balance? Balance is the ability to maintain the body’s ...

  15. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  16. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  17. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political

  18. Human Retrovirus Section

    Cancer.gov

    The Human Retrovirus Section, Vaccine Branch, studies the molecular biology and pathogenic mechanisms of HIV-1. We are interested in new vaccine approaches against AIDS and in identifying and validating new targets for antiviral therapies. Recent Activiti

  19. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  20. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  1. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  2. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative automation has shown the effectiveness of humans and machines directly interacting to perform tasks. To continue to advance this area of robotics, effective means need to be developed to allow natural ways for people to communicate and cooperate with robots just as they do with one another.

  3. Rationality in Human Movement.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Megan K; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2016-01-01

    It long has been appreciated that humans behave irrationally in economic decisions under risk: they fail to objectively consider uncertainty, costs, and rewards and instead exhibit risk-seeking or risk-averse behavior. We hypothesize that poor estimates of motor variability (influenced by motor task) and distorted probability weighting (influenced by relevant emotional processes) contribute to characteristic irrationality in human movement decisions. PMID:26509481

  4. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  5. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes. PMID:25704934

  6. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  7. The Human Relations School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert S.; Lippitt, Ronald

    As an expansion of ED 026 320, the model for a Human Relations School sketched in this document is an attempt to answer these questions: What would it be like if a school were to see itself as a laboratory for living and learning in which the test that is known about human interaction were utilized? How would it be organized? What would be its

  8. The great human expansion

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic and paleoanthropological evidence is in accord that todays human population is the result of a great demic (demographic and geographic) expansion that began approximately 45,000 to 60,000 y ago in Africa and rapidly resulted in human occupation of almost all of the Earths habitable regions. Genomic data from contemporary humans suggest that this expansion was accompanied by a continuous loss of genetic diversity, a result of what is called the serial founder effect. In addition to genomic data, the serial founder effect model is now supported by the genetics of human parasites, morphology, and linguistics. This particular population history gave rise to the two defining features of genetic variation in humans: genomes from the substructured populations of Africa retain an exceptional number of unique variants, and there is a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity within populations living outside of Africa. These two patterns are relevant for medical genetic studies mapping genotypes to phenotypes and for inferring the power of natural selection in human history. It should be appreciated that the initial expansion and subsequent serial founder effect were determined by demographic and sociocultural factors associated with hunter-gatherer populations. How do we reconcile this major demic expansion with the population stability that followed for thousands years until the inventions of agriculture? We review advances in understanding the genetic diversity within Africa and the great human expansion out of Africa and offer hypotheses that can help to establish a more synthetic view of modern human evolution. PMID:23077256

  9. [Demography and human ecology].

    PubMed

    Nazareth, J M

    1993-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century the German biologist Ernest Haekel was the first scientist to use the term ecology, which was defined as the study of relationships of organisms or groups of organisms with the environment and indicated the interdependence of the living world, including plants, animals, and humans. This concept also indicates a continuous process of adaptation of organisms to their external environment. The basic concepts of scientific ecology, which developed at the end of the 19th century, can be attributed to Darwin: the relationships between living beings and the notion of the process of adaptation to their environment. The term human ecology appeared in the early 1920s. Human ecology embodies fundamental ideas: biotype, habitat, community, biocenosis, ecosystem, biomass, interchange and equilibrium, and circulation of energy. The accumulated knowledge about human ecology is broken down using the criteria of topography (ecology of humid forests, deserts, lakes, etc.); followed by the appearance of species; and the variants of classical division: auto ecology (influence of external factors on living beings) and sinecology (the study of groups of associated organisms, i.e., natural, animal, and vegetation communities). The species are considered on the basis of equality or sinecology (all of them have the same interests), while in human ecology a species is determined by its relation to a reference group--autoecology or anthropocentric ecology. In 1911, J. Thompson bridged the gap between biological knowledge and social sciences; in 1921, H. Barrows identified human ecology as a component of geography; in 1925, L. Bernard presented the classification of ecosystems; and in 1936, Ezra Park published his work, Human Ecology, followed in 1945 by the emergence of the Chicago school. Demography and human ecology are intimately connected because population is the result of natural and migratory movements, therefore the two sciences require a methodology that integrates the dynamics of biocultural interactions. PMID:12179860

  10. Quality and human society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, W.

    1991-02-01

    Quality of products and services is seen as a necessity in our modern world. Quality also has important cross-links to safety in our society. It is however suggested, that human beings are living in their industrial environment under the stress of a fractured personality with anxieties and frustrations. Some cultural comparisons with other industrial nations are given. Quality control tailored to human nature is recommended.

  11. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  12. Pancreas development in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fong Cheng; Brissova, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review We highlight some of the major recent advances in characterizing human pancreas development and endocrine cell differentiation. Recent findings Extensive research efforts have helped to define crucial events in the mouse pancreas organogenesis. Information gained from these studies was used to develop human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation protocols with the goal of generating functional glucose-responsive, insulin-producing human ?-cells. In spite of remarkable progress in hESC differentiation, current protocols based on mouse developmental biology can produce human ?-cells only in vivo. New differentiation markers and recently generated reagents may provide an unprecedented opportunity to develop a high-density expression map of human fetal pancreas and pancreatic islets that could serve as a reference point for in vitro hESC differentiation. Summary Integrating an increased knowledge of human pancreas development into hESC differentiation protocols has the potential to greatly advance our ability to generate functional insulin-producing cells for ?-cell replacement therapy. PMID:24569548

  13. Potentiality and human embryos.

    PubMed

    Lizza, John P

    2007-09-01

    Consideration of the potentiality of human embryos to develop characteristics of personhood, such as intellect and will, has figured prominently in arguments against abortion and the use of human embryos for research. In particular, such consideration was the basis for the call of the US President's Council on Bioethics for a moratorium on stem cell research on human embryos. In this paper, I critique the concept of potentiality invoked by the Council and offer an alternative account. In contrast to the Council's view that an embryo's potentiality is determined by definition and is not affected by external conditions that may prevent certain possibilities from ever being realized, I propose an empirically grounded account of potentiality that involves an assessment of the physical and decisional conditions that may restrict an embryo's possibilities. In my view, some human embryos lack the potentiality to become a person that other human embryos have. Assuming for the sake of argument that the potential to become a person gives a being special moral status, it follows that some human embryos lack this status. This argument is then used to support Gene Outka's suggestion that it is morally permissible to experiment on 'spare' frozen embryos that are destined to be destroyed. PMID:17845464

  14. Cytokines in human milk.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past 30 years to investigate the protective functions of human milk strongly support the notion that breastfeeding prevents infantile infections, particularly those affecting the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, more recent clinical and experimental observations also suggest that human milk not only provides passive protection, but also can directly modulate the immunological development of the recipient infant. The study of this remarkable defense system in human milk has been difficult because of its biochemical complexity, the small concentration of certain bioactive components, the compartmentalization of some of these agents, the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes of milk during lactation, and the lack of specific reagents to quantify these agents. However, a host of bioactive substances, including hormones, growth factors, and immunological factors such as cytokines, have been identified in human milk. Cytokines are pluripotent polypeptides that act in autocrine/paracrine fashions by binding to specific cellular receptors. They operate in networks and orchestrate the development and functions of immune system. Several different cytokines and chemokines have been discovered in human milk in the past years, and the list is growing very rapidly. This article will review the current knowledge about the increasingly complex network of chemoattractants, activators, and anti-inflammatory cytokines present in human milk and their potential role in compensating for the developmental delay of the neonate immune system. PMID:20105664

  15. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  16. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OHRP Text Size: A A A Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) The Office for Human Research ... 6-7, 2016 REGISTER NOW for “Getting through Human Research Reviews with Skill” Workshop at the NIH ...

  17. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  18. Human Health Water Quality Criteria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Human Health Water Quality Criteria Certain chemicals can harm human health ... Quality Criteria 2000 EPA Methodology for Deriving Ambient Water Quality Criteria for the Protection of Human Health ...

  19. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  20. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRCs risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a framework, 3) how our use of modeling and simulation techniques could be used to develop and validate measures of human performance, and 4) what the possible outcomes are from this research as the modeling and simulation efforts generate results.

  1. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  2. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  3. Critical issues in chemotherapy with tiazofurin.

    PubMed

    Weber, G

    1989-01-01

    Some of the current critical issues in the tiazofurin treatment of end-stage leukemia were presented and discussed. 1. Tiazofurin infusions (daily X 10 to 15) provided remissions in 50% of end-stage leukemic patients. The remissions, of 1 to 10 months' duration, varied from antileukemic effect or hematologic improvement to complete response and complete remission. The total survival of the responding patients was from about 1 to 15 months. 2. Our administration of tiazofurin in a 60-min infusion by pump decreased the incidence and severity of toxicity. 3. It was shown that tiazofurin dose does not need to be escalated at each relapse. Depending on the biochemical and hematological response in this novel protocol, 2,200 to 4,400 mg/m2 tiazofurin appeared to be sufficient to provide remissions. 4. A new role was identified for allopurinol, originally given to decrease uric acid in the plasma. Allopurinol markedly increased plasma hypoxanthine concentrations which competitively inhibited the activity of the salvage enzyme, guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, in the blast cells. Thus, the elevated hypoxanthine plasma levels inhibited guanine salvage. To maintain high hypoxanthine levels allopurinol (100 mg) was given every 4 to 6 hr. This provided combination chemotherapy with tiazofurin which inhibited IMP dehydrogenase activity and blocked the de novo biosynthesis of guanylates in the blast cells. 5. Preliminary evidence was obtained in the patients that tiazofurin induced differentiation of the bone marrow. Recent studies also showed that tiazofurin down-regulated the expression of the c-Ki-ras oncogene in K562 erythroleukemic cells. Therefore, tiazofurin treatment provides an impact by chemotherapy, induced differentiation, and, if applicable, through down-regulation of the ras oncogene. 6. Novel aspects of tiazofurin treatment include rational targeting and a continuously monitored trial by measurement of the activity of IMP dehydrogenase and of GTP and TAD concentrations in blast cells and of tiazofurin and hypoxanthine in plasma. 7. Since tiazofurin has not yet achieved lasting remissions in patients nor terminal differentiation of leukemic cells it probably will be advantageous to combine tiazofurin with other drugs to provide synergism. In preclinical tissue culture studies in HL-60 cells synergy was observed with retinoic acid. This may be of interest because retinoic acid also caused differentiation and down-regulation of the myc oncogene. PMID:2699155

  4. Analysis of human metapneumovirus and human bocavirus viral load.

    PubMed

    Ricart, Silvia; Garcia-Garcia, Juan Jose; Anton, Andres; Pumarola, Tomas; Pons, Marti; Muoz-Almagro, Carmen; Marcos, Maria Angeles

    2013-09-01

    Viral load (VL) of human metapneumovirus and human bocavirus in infants <12 months admitted for bronchiolitis was analyzed. VL correlated with length of hospital stay in both viruses, human metapneumovirus VL with the duration oxygen therapy and human bocavirus VL inversely with days of respiratory effort before admission. Infants coinfected by other viruses were younger, but no differences were seen regarding VL. PMID:23538515

  5. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  6. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different

  7. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  8. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient. PMID:11684769

  9. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies. PMID:24239177

  10. The Human Aerodynamic Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary; Moyer, Zachary; Paterson, Eric; Edge, Brian

    2003-11-01

    The wake that trails behind a walking person in still air is, in effect, that of an irregular 3-D cylinder. At a brisk walking speed of 1.3 m/s (3 mph), the human wake is characterized by a Reynolds number of about 50,000. It is thus turbulent with underlying large-scale vortex motion. We show that buoyancy plays no role at this Reynolds number, even though it is dominant in the plume of a standing person. Computational Navier-Stokes solutions and laser-light-sheet experiments with a human subject reveal a large recirculation zone behind the torso and flow between the legs. The decay of a passive scalar introduced on the human body is found to be exponential with downstream distance. The volume flux in the human wake is roughly constant with downstream distance until the recirculation closes, whence it grows due to turbulent entrainment. Further experiments reveal the development of the wake from the human thermal plume as the Reynolds number (proportional to walking speed) is increased from zero to 50,000. These results pertain to the sensing of chemical traces in the wakes of walking persons for aviation security. Supported by FAA Grant 99-G-040.

  11. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  12. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  13. Is humanity suicidal?

    PubMed

    Wilson, E O

    1993-01-01

    The world's fauna and flora has entered a crisis unparalleled since the end of the Mesozoic Era, with the extinction rate of species now elevated to more than a thousand times that existing before the coming of humanity. Scientists and policy makers are ill-prepared to moderate this hemorrhaging, because so little is known of the biology of the Earth's millions of species and because so little effort has been directed toward conservation thus far. With the vanished species will go great potential wealth in scientific knowledge, new products, ecosystems services, and part of the natural world in which the human species originated. The need for new research and improved management is thus urgent. If it is not met, humanity will likely survive, but in a world biologically impoverished for all time. PMID:8155855

  14. Telocytes in human oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoke; Zheng, Yonghua; Manole, Catalin G; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs), a new type of interstitial cells, were identified in many different organs and tissues of mammalians and humans. In this study, we show the presence, in human oesophagus, of cells having the typical features of TCs in lamina propria of the mucosa, as well as in muscular layers. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and primary cell culture. Human oesophageal TCs present a small cell body with 23 very long Telopodes (Tps). Tps consist of an alternation of thin segments (podomers) and thick segments (podoms) and have a labyrinthine spatial arrangement. Tps establish close contacts (stromal synapses) with other neighbouring cells (e.g. lymphocytes, macrophages). The ELISA testing of the supernatant of primary culture of TCs indicated that the concentrations of VEGF and EGF increased progressively. In conclusion, our study shows the existence of typical TCs at the level of oesophagus (mucosa, submucosa and muscular layer) and suggests their possible role in tissue repair. PMID:24188731

  15. Human nutrition: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, N A

    2005-01-01

    In recent decades, much new evidence relating to the ape forerunners of modern humans has come to hand and diet appears to be an important factor. At some stage, there must have been a transition from a largely vegetarian ape diet to a modern human hunting economy providing significant amounts of meat. On an even longer evolutionary time scale the change was more complex. The mechanisms of evolutionary change are now better understood than they were in Darwin's time, thanks largely to great advances in genetics, both experimental and theoretical. It is virtually certain that diet, as a major component of the human environment, must have exerted evolutionary effects, but researchers still have little good evidence. PMID:17393680

  16. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  17. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium. PMID:23982047

  18. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  19. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  20. The human toxome project.

    PubMed

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Andersen, Melvin E; Baghdikian, Christina; Boekelheide, Kim; Crofton, Kevin M; Fornace, Albert J; Kleensang, Andre; Li, Henghong; Livi, Carolina; Maertens, Alexandra; McMullen, Patrick D; Rosenberg, Michael; Thomas, Russell; Vantangoli, Marguerite; Yager, James D; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Human Toxome Project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011-2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating and sharing molecular pathways of toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the responses of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are being phenotyped by transcriptomics and mass-spectroscopy-based metabolomics. The bioinformatics tools for PoT deduction represent a core deliverable. A number of challenges for quality and standardization of cell systems, omics technologies and bioinformatics are being addressed. In parallel, concepts for annotation, validation and sharing of PoT information, as well as their link to adverse outcomes, are being developed. A reasonably comprehensive public database of PoT, the Human Toxome Knowledge-base, could become a point of reference for toxicological research and regulatory test strategies. PMID:25742299

  1. Seaweed and human health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma S; Allsopp, Philip J; Magee, Pamela J; Gill, Chris I R; Nitecki, Sonja; Strain, Conall R; McSorley, Emeir M

    2014-03-01

    Seaweeds may have an important role in modulating chronic disease. Rich in unique bioactive compounds not present in terrestrial food sources, including different proteins (lectins, phycobiliproteins, peptides, and amino acids), polyphenols, and polysaccharides, seaweeds are a novel source of compounds with potential to be exploited in human health applications. Purported benefits include antiviral, anticancer, and anticoagulant properties as well as the ability to modulate gut health and risk factors for obesity and diabetes. Though the majority of studies have been performed in cell and animal models, there is evidence of the beneficial effect of seaweed and seaweed components on markers of human health and disease status. This review is the first to critically evaluate these human studies, aiming to draw attention to gaps in current knowledge, which will aid the planning and implementation of future studies. PMID:24697280

  2. The Human Toxome Project

    PubMed Central

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Andersen, Melvin E.; Baghdikian, Christina; Boekelheide, Kim; Crofton, Kevin M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Kleensang, Andre; Li, Henghong; Livi, Carolina; Maertens, Alexandra; McMullen, Patrick D.; Rosenberg, Michael; Thomas, Russell; Vantangoli, Marguerite; Yager, James D.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Human Toxome Project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011–2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating and sharing molecular pathways of toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the responses of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are being phenotyped by transcriptomics and mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics. The bioinformatics tools for PoT deduction represent a core deliverable. A number of challenges for quality and standardization of cell systems, omics technologies and bioinformatics are being addressed. In parallel, concepts for annotation, validation and sharing of PoT information, as well as their link to adverse outcomes, are being developed. A reasonably comprehensive public database of PoT, the Human Toxome Knowledge-base, could become a point of reference for toxicological research and regulatory test strategies. PMID:25742299

  3. Whither medical humanities?

    PubMed

    Singh, Navjeevan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the medical humanities (MH) and their role in medical education is in its infancy in India. Students are initiated into professional (medical) education too early in life, usually at the expense of a basic grounding in the humanities, resulting in warped intellectual growth. The author, arguing against the wholesale import of foreign systems, advocates free inquiry by medical educators to evolve a humanities programme for medical students derived from our own cultural context. This essay describes the early experiences of efforts to make a beginning at the University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. The author reviews the various strategies used and the challenges of introducing the subject to the current generation of medical students. PMID:22864074

  4. Slaughterhouses and humane treatment.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, M L

    1994-03-01

    Man has the moral obligation to respect all animals and also to safeguard animals which are destined for slaughter from unnecessary suffering. Each country should establish regulations to secure humane conditions of slaughter for the various animal species. Unloading, lairaging, moving, stunning and bleeding of animals are all important for animal welfare; training and sensitivity of personnel are also essential. Ethological principles should be applied to the handling of animals and the design of slaughterhouse facilities. Efforts should be made to improve existing slaughter methods and/or develop new systems which ensure animal welfare, meat quality and work safety, while reducing costs and human labour, if possible. Animal welfare will probably be maximised if economical, ethical and qualitative considerations coincide. The role of the veterinarian is fundamental in supervising personnel, slaughterhouse facilities and the slaughter process, and in ensuring prompt care and humane treatment for animals. PMID:8173095

  5. Discounting human lives

    SciTech Connect

    Cropper, M.L. ); Portney, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    The future costs of regulatory programs to protect human health are routinely discounted, but the lives they save in the future are not. To shed light on the public's attitude toward the discounting of human lives, researchers at Resources for the Future asked 2,600 individuals to choose between one hypothetical program that would save lives immediately and another that would save lives in 5, 10, 25, 50, or 100 years. From the responses, they inferred the number of lives that must be saved in the future to make people as content as saving one life today, compared this implicit discount rate to the respondents' discount rate for money, and identified several factors that affect discount rates for human lives.

  6. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  7. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  8. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  9. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  10. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  11. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  12. Microsporidia and human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Shadduck, J A; Greeley, E

    1989-01-01

    Protozoa of the phylum Microspora are obligate intracellular pathogens that are being detected with increasing frequency in humans, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Organisms from four genera have been reported to date, and serological data suggest the occurrence of latent infections. Sources of human infections are not known, but microsporidia are widespread in lower vertebrates and invertebrates. There is no known treatment. Study of the disease in mammals suggests that infection often will be clinically silent, that intact T-cell-mediated host defenses are required for resistance, and that serious clinical disease may occur under circumstances in which extensive parasite replication can occur. Images PMID:2650860

  13. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  14. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the ? -? -? globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  15. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  16. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nation's efforts to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system was given renewed emphasis in January of 1988 when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance, in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly compared to past space activities. Missions to Mars, the Moon, and Phobos, as well as an observatory based on the dark side of the Moon are discussed.

  17. Protothecosis in human medicine.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Daniela; Bergmann, Armin

    2002-02-01

    Prototheca spp. are ubiquitous achlorophyllous algae that produce disease in humans and animals. In the past years infections with Prototheca have obtained increasing importance in human medicine. The cases have been classified into three clinical forms: cutaneous and/or subcutaneous infection, synovitis of olecranon bursa or other fibrous tissue and systemic infection. Patients with a mild degree of immunosuppression may become colonized by Prototheca spp. with a subsequent worsening of their immune surveillance and spread of the disease. Among the numerous pharmacologic agents tried, amphotericin B is the most promising. Successful treatment of protothecosis involves radical excision of the involved structures. PMID:11885351

  18. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  19. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  20. [Human reservoirs of Pneumocystis].

    PubMed

    Wissmann, Gustavo; Morilla, Ruben; Friaza, Vicente; Calderón, Enrique; Varela, Jose M

    2010-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii, the fungal agent that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), is known to exclusively infect humans. Molecular studies have enabled detection of this fungus in individuals who have been colonized by P. jirovecii. Such colonization, found in several populations, seems to act as a human reservoir for the fungus. Various studies have reported mutations associated with sulfa resistance in P. jirovecii strains isolated from colonized patients, who can transmit the mutant genotype to PCP-susceptible individuals. The growing interest in P. jirovecii colonization may prompt the design of new prevention and management strategies for PCP. PMID:19403207

  1. Human push capability.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Ralph L; Liber, Theodore

    2006-02-22

    Use of unassisted human push capability arises from time to time in the areas of crowd and animal control, the security of locked doors, the integrity of railings, the removal of tree stumps and entrenched vehicles, the manoeuvering of furniture, and athletic pursuits such as US football or wrestling. Depending on the scenario, human push capability involves strength, weight, weight distribution, push angle, footwear/floor friction, and the friction between the upper body and the pushed object. Simple models are used to establish the relationships among these factors. PMID:16540441

  2. Mapping Human Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Chloe M.; Ren, Bing

    2013-01-01

    As the second dimension to the genome, the epigenome contains key information specific to every type of cells. Thousands of human epigenome maps have been produced in recent years thanks to rapid development of high throughput epigenome mapping technologies. In this review, we discuss the current epigenome mapping toolkit and utilities of epigenome maps. We focus particularly on mapping of DNA methylation, chromatin modification state and chromatin structures, and emphasize the use of epigenome maps to delineate human gene regulatory sequences and developmental programs. We also provide a perspective on the progress of the epigenomics field and challenges ahead. PMID:24074860

  3. Defining the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how the microbiome and its constituents are defined. This review highlights recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily time series datasets spanning months. Furthermore, emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes, and the possibility of enterotypes are discussed. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  4. The Case for the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cary, Michael S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the current impoverishment of the humanities and the gulf separating the humanities from the sciences. Discusses the need for adequate humanities instruction at the elementary-secondary level. Suggests that humanities teachers rediscover the Italian Renaissance spirit to improve their teaching. (SB)

  5. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  6. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered

  7. The Humanities at Triton College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacot, Robert E.; Prendergast, Nancy E.

    Designed to assist college personnel in assessing program needs, this report provides an overview of the humanities programs at Triton College. Part I focuses on curricular humanities programs, including discussions of the role and objectives of the School of Arts and Sciences; humanities courses offered in the school; special humanities

  8. Human Challenges in Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presents an overview using pictures some of the history of human exploration of the new frontiers of Earth and then examines some of the challenges to human exploration of space. Particular attention is given to the environmental factors and to the social and human factors that effect humans in space environments.

  9. Needed: Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    The author states that the trade deficit and the foreign debt reflect the inability of a large percentage of the U.S. work force to compete in an integrated world economy. He argues that investing in human capital is the only way to solve the competitiveness problem. A review of recent and current influences on the educational system is included.…

  10. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  11. Human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Haltia, M

    2000-10-01

    The term 'prion diseases' refers to a group of neurodegenerative disorders thought to be caused by prions, pathogenic agents with novel modes of replication and transmission. Prion diseases are characterized by long incubation periods ranging from months to years and are invariably fatal once clinical symptoms have appeared. They are also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), on account of the predominant neuropathological change observed in the central nervous system. The most important members of this group are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) of man displaying sporadic, inherited and infectious forms, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, 'mad cow disease') of cattle, and scrapie of sheep. Despite their rarity, human prion diseases have recently been covered extensively in the media because of the likely connection between a new variant of human CJD (vCJD) and BSE and the possibility of contamination of human blood and blood products by the vCJD agent. This short review discusses the basic biological properties of prions, followed by a presentation of the clinical and pathological features of the most important human prion diseases. PMID:11087170

  12. "HUMANITIES" AS A SUBJECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KUHNS, RICHARD

    SINCE MOST OF THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM IS DEVOTED TO SPECIALIZED DISCIPLINES, HUMANITIES COURSES PROVIDE THE OPPORTUNITY FOR CREATING IN STUDENTS AN AWARENESS OF THE UNITY WHICH EXISTS AMONG PHILOSOPHY, HISTORY, AND THE ARTS. INTENSIVE STUDY AND CLASS DISCUSSION OF INDIVIDUAL WORKS BECOMES IMPOSSIBLE, HOWEVER, WHEN TOO MANY BOOKS ARE CROWDED INTO A

  13. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  14. Futures of Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, L. S.

    There are several research areas basic to the long-range future of human communications. Telecommunication and transportation offer the possiblity of two worldwide communications networks whose interrelationships need to be explored in terms of the needs of the individual, the community, and the world at large. Expanding possibilities of…

  15. Fighting for the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Cary

    2012-01-01

    The question, "Who will bankroll poetry?", succinctly embodies what is now a widespread recognition that the humanities may have more to lose in the current budget wars than either the sciences or a number of technical fields. The only budget war that can unite individuals, rather than divide them, is one arguing that too much is being spent on…

  16. Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This set of 61 student learning modules deals with various topics pertaining to human development. The modules, which are designed for use in performance-based vocational education programs, each contain the following components: an introduction for the student, a performance objective, a variety of learning activities, content information, a…

  17. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key

  18. The Humanities, Unraveled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Graduate education in the humanities is in crisis. Every aspect, from the most specific details of the curriculum to the broadest questions about its purpose, is in crisis. It is a seamless garment of crisis: If one pulls on any one thread, the entire thing unravels. It is therefore exceptionally difficult to discuss any one aspect of graduate

  19. The Human Toxome Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Toxome project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011--? 2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating, and sharing molecular Pathways of Toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the respo...

  20. Deciphering the human antigenome.

    PubMed

    Sette, Alessandro; Schenkelberg, Theodore R; Koff, Wayne C

    2016-02-01

    Recent technological advances in genomics, mass spectrometry, and epitope identification algorithms offer significant potential to identify novel antigenic targets for vaccine and immunotherapeutic development. On 30 April 2015, leading immunologists and bioinformatics scientists met to consider how best to utilize these advances towards deciphering the human antigenome and exploiting this information for prevention and control of infectious and neoplastic diseases. PMID:26629807

  1. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  2. Neurobiology and the Humanities

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Can the arts and humanities contribute significantly to the study of the brain? Similar brain processes are involved in humanistic and scientific inference, and in this essay, I argue that conclusions reached by one are relevant to the other. PMID:25277451

  3. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity

  4. Learning to Be Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  5. Tackling Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, four high school students from the Tashkent International School in the capital city confronted the issue of their nation's human rights problems head on by researching the topic and publishing their findings on the Web. The site, "Uzbekistan: Opaque Reality," was created as an entry for the non-profit Global SchoolNet's Doors to

  6. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  7. Trends in Humanities Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, Bernard, Ed.; Whitney, Loralyn, Ed.

    Proceedings from this workshop sponsored by the Center for the Study of Rural Librarianship are intended to disseminate information to assist rural librarians engaged in planning and conducting public programs that explore issues related to the humanities. This report of the proceedings includes the texts of three presented papers, reactions from

  8. The Humanization of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, James H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an exercise which focuses on the ethical and human aspects of science. Outlines the approach and components of a writing assignment based on a literary and humanistic analysis of "The Double Helix" by James Watson. Provides sample questions and examples of integrative literary works. (ML)

  9. Fighting for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Bao

    2011-01-01

    Speak Truth To Power consists of 17 teacher-developed lessons based on the stories of rights advocates from all over the world. The lessons were created for sixth-through 12th-grade students, and have come to New York schools thanks to the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and the New York State United Teachers union. Speak…

  10. Fighting for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Bao

    2011-01-01

    Speak Truth To Power consists of 17 teacher-developed lessons based on the stories of rights advocates from all over the world. The lessons were created for sixth-through 12th-grade students, and have come to New York schools thanks to the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and the New York State United Teachers union. Speak

  11. Humanized Youth Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects on the history of the Circle of Courage model in creating resilient children in a world where virtually all young people can be considered to be at risk. The author stresses that those people in the Reclaiming Youth movement are in the business of humanizing youth work and childcare. They continue to call adults back to the

  12. Human Social Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural “social signal transduction” pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving. PMID:25166010

  13. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the

  14. Animal and Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Lynda

    Several misconceptions regarding the status of human communication systems relative to the systems of other animals are discussed in this paper. Arguments are offered supporting the expansion of the communication discipline to include the study of the communication systems of other species. The "communicative continuity" view which ranks man at…

  15. Human Ecology: Curriculum Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine commercially available programs which represent one aspect or a portion of the human ecology theme. Other information supplied for each program includes: program objectives; methods of instruction; specific subjects, grade, and ability levels; materials produced and purchasable; program implementation; teacher preparation; program…

  16. Who Hung the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper is partly based on a lecture given at the AGTA conference in Perth in January 2013. It argues for a progressive subject based curriculum in which geography plays an essential part. This is based on an analysis of why and how subjects like geography, as part of the humanities, have been undermined and diminished in recent times. In a way

  17. Human neurotrichinellosis, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasites of the genus Trichinella are globally-distributed, tissue-dwelling nematodes that predominantly infect mammals, though certain species are known to infect birds and reptiles as well. Human trichinellosis occurs by the ingestion of raw or improperly cooked meat harboring the infective muscl...

  18. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  19. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  20. Grass and human nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food products from animals that graze grasslands and consume diets high in forages are often better for human health than livestock fed diets with forages and concentrates. Meat from livestock that graze pastures in the United States frequently has less fat and higher concentrations of omega-3 fatty...