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Sample records for human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

  1. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  2. Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency: Activity in Normal, Mutant, and Heterozygote-Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.; Seegmiller, J. Edwin

    1970-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients deficient for the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRT) activity show very low but nevertheless significant levels of apparent PRT enzyme despite absence of detectable activity (<0.004% of normal) in erythrocytes of the same patients. In fibroblasts this mutant enzyme is more heat labile than the normal enzyme. These findings indicate that PRT deficiency in this disorder is not due to a deletion mutation of the PRT locus. Individual cultured skin fibroblasts from heterozygote females for PRT deficiency show normal, intermediate, or very low levels of PRT activity. The mosaicism demonstrated in the heterozygotes for this X-linked disorder accounts for the cells with normal and very low activities of PRT. Intermediate activity can best be explained by the phenomenon of metabolic cooperation presumably from the transfer of either PRT enzyme or messenger RNA, from normal to mutant cells. Images PMID:5267139

  3. Molecular and clonal analysis of in vivo hprt (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) mutations in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R.J.; O'Neill, J.P.; Nicklas, J.A.; Allegretta, M. . Genetics Lab.); Recio, L.; Skopek, T.R. )

    1989-08-08

    There is no longer doubt that gene mutations occur in vivo in human somatic cells, and that methods can be developed to detect, quantify and study them. Four assays are now available for such purpose; two detecting mutations that arise in bone marrow erythroid stem cells and two defining mutations that occur in T-lymphocytes. The red cell assays measure changes in mature red blood cells that involve either the blood group glycophorin-A locus or the hemoglobin loci; the lymphocyte assays score for genetic events at either the X-chromosomal hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (hprt) locus. We describe here our attempts in studying in vivo gene mutations in human T-lymphocytes. 35 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Differential Distortion of Purine Substrates by Human and Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Catalyse the Formation of Mononucleotides.

    PubMed

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Gogia, Spriha; Balaram, Hemalatha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-07-20

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a potential therapeutic target. Compared to structurally homologous human enzymes, it has expanded substrate specificity. In this study, 9-deazapurines are used as in situ probes of the active sites of human and Pf HGPRTs. Through the use of these probes it is found that non-covalent interactions stabilise the pre-transition state of the HGPRT-catalysed reaction. Vibrational spectra reveal that the bound substrates are extensively distorted, the carbonyl bond of nucleobase moiety is weakened and the substrate is destabilised along the reaction coordinate. Raman shifts of the human and Pf enzymes are used to quantify the differing degrees of hydrogen bonding in the homologues. A decreased Raman cross-section in enzyme-bound 9-deazaguanine (9DAG) shows that the phenylalanine residue (Phe186 in human and Phe197 in Pf) of HGPRT stacks with the nucleobase. Differential loss of the Raman cross-section suggests that the active site is more compact in human HGPRT as compared to the Pf enzyme, and is more so in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) complex 9DAG-PRPP-HGPRT than in 9-deazahypoxanthine (9DAH)-PRPP-HGPRT. PMID:25944719

  5. Ubiquitous and neuronal DNA-binding proteins interact with a negative regulatory element of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rincón-Limas, D E; Amaya-Manzanares, F; Niño-Rosales, M L; Yu, Y; Yang, T P; Patel, P I

    1995-01-01

    The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in all tissues but at higher levels in the brain; the significance and mechanism of this differential expression are unknown. We previously identified a 182-bp element (hHPRT-NE) within the 5'-flanking region of the human HPRT (hHPRT) gene, which is involved not only in conferring neuronal specificity but also in repressing gene expression in nonneuronal tissues. Here we report that this element interacts with different nuclear proteins, some of which are present specifically in neuronal cells (complex I) and others of which are present in cells showing constitutive expression of the gene (complex II). In addition, we found that complex I factors are expressed in human NT2/D1 cells following induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. This finding correlates with an increase of HPRT gene transcription following neuronal differentiation. We also mapped the binding sites for both complexes to a 60-bp region (Ff; positions -510 to -451) which, when analyzed in transfection assays, functioned as a repressor element analogous to the full-length hHPRT-NE sequence. Methylation interference footprintings revealed a minimal unique DNA motif, 5'-GGAAGCC-3', as the binding site for nuclear proteins from both neuronal and nonneuronal sources. However, site-directed mutagenesis of the footprinted region indicated that different nucleotides are essential for the associations of these two complexes. Moreover, UV cross-linking experiments showed that both complexes are formed by the association of several different proteins. Taken together, these data suggest that differential interaction of DNA-binding factors with this regulatory element plays a crucial role in the brain-preferential expression of the gene, and they should lead to the isolation of transcriptional regulators important in neuronal expression of the HPRT gene. PMID:8524221

  6. Fine structure mapping of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene region of the human X chromosome (Xq26).

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, J A; Hunter, T C; O'Neill, J P; Albertini, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Xq26-q27 region of the X chromosome is interesting, as an unusually large number of genes and anonymous RFLP probes have been mapped in this area. A number of studies have used classical linkage analysis in families to map this region. Here, we use mutant human T-lymphocyte clones known to be deleted for all or part of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene, to order anonymous probes known to map to Xq26. Fifty-seven T-cell clones were studied, including 44 derived from in vivo mutation and 13 from in vitro irradiated T-lymphocyte cultures. Twenty anonymous probes (DXS10, DXS11, DXS19, DXS37, DXS42, DXS51, DXS53, DXS59, DXS79, DXS86, DXS92, DXS99, DXS100d, DXS102, DXS107, DXS144, DXS172, DXS174, DXS177, and DNF1) were tested for codeletion with the hprt gene by Southern blotting methods. Five of these probes (DXS10, DXS53, DXS79, DXS86 and DXS177) showed codeletion with hprt in some mutants. The mutants established the following unambiguous ordering of the probes relative to the hprt gene: DXS53-DXS79-5'hprt3'-DXS86-DXS10-DXS177 . The centromere appears to map proximal to DXS53. These mappings order several closely linked but previously unordered probes. In addition, these studies indicate that rather large deletions of the functionally haploid X chromosome can occur while still retaining T-cell viability. Images Figure 1 PMID:1678246

  7. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-09-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no (3H)hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of (3H)hypoxanthine to (3H)IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol.

  8. Kinetic mechanism of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Nagappa, Lakshmeesha K; Prahladarao, Vasudeva S; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (PfHGXPRT) exhibits a kinetic mechanism that differs from that of the human homolog. Human HGPRT follows a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein PRPP binding precedes the binding of hypoxanthine/guanine and release of product IMP/GMP is the rate limiting step. In the current study, initial velocity kinetics with PfHGXPRT indicates a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein xanthine binding is conditional to the binding of PRPP. The value of the rate constant for IMP dissociation is greater by 183-fold than the kcat for hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation and this results in the absence of burst in progress curves from pre-steady-state kinetics. Further, IMP binding is 1000 times faster (4s(-1) at 0.5μM IMP) when compared to the kcat (3.9±0.2×10(-3)s(-1)) for the reverse IMP pyrophosphorolysis reaction. These results lend support to the fact that in both forward and reverse reactions, the process of chemical conversion (formation of IMP/hypoxanthine) is slow and the events of ligand association and dissociation are faster. PMID:26902413

  9. Human Adenovirus Type 2 but Not Adenovirus Type 12 Is Mutagenic at the Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase Locus of Cloned Rat Liver Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paraskeva, Christos; Roberts, Carl; Biggs, Paul; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    1983-01-01

    Using resistance to the base analog 8-azaguanine as a genetic marker, we showed that adenovirus type 2, but not adenovirus type 12, is mutagenic at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of cloned diploid rat liver epithelial cells. Adenovirus type 2 increased the frequency of 8-azaguanine-resistant colonies by up to ninefold over the spontaneous frequency, depending on expression time and virus dose. PMID:6572280

  10. Acyclic phosph(on)ate inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Evans, Gary B.; Hazleton, Keith Z.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoa responsible for malaria lack enzymes for the de novo synthesis of purines and rely on purine salvage from the host. In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) converts hypoxanthine to inosine monophosphate and is essential for purine salvage making the enzyme an anti-malarial drug target. We have synthesized a number of simple acyclic aza-C- nucleosides and shown that some are potent inhibitors of Pf HGXPRT while showing excellent selectivity for the Pf versus the human enzyme. PMID:23810424

  11. Mosaic mice with teratocarcinoma-derived mutant cells deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Dewey, M J; Martin, D W; Martin, G R; Mintz, B

    1977-12-01

    Mutagenized stem cells of a cultured mouse teratocarcinoma cell line were selected for resistance to the purine base analog 6-thioguanine. Cells of a resistant clone were completely deficient in activity of the enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT, IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), the same X-linked lesion as occurs in human Lesch-Nyhan disease. After microinjection into blastocysts of another genetic strain, the previously malignant cells successfully participated in normal embryogenesis and tumor-free, viable mosaic mice were obtained. Cells of tumor lineage were identified by strain markers in virtually all tissues of some individuals. Mature function of those cells was evident from their tissue-specific products (e.g., melanins, liver proteins). These mutagenized teratocarcinoma cells are therefore developmentally totipotent. Retention of the severe HPRT deficiency in the differentiated state was documented in extracts of mosaic tissues by depressed specific activity of the enzyme, and also by presence of unlabeled clones in autoradiographs of explanted cells incubated in [(3)H]hypoxanthine. Some mosaic individuals had mutant-strain cells in only one or a few tissues. Such animals may provide unique opportunities to identify the tissue sources of particular aspects of the complex disease syndrome. The tissue distribution of HPRT-deficient cells suggests that selection against them is particularly strong in blood of the mosaic mice, as is already known to be the case in human heterozygotes. This phenotypic parallelism supports the expectation that afflicted F(1) male mice that might be obtained from mutant germ cells can serve as a model of the human disease. PMID:271982

  12. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  13. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT. PMID:26968365

  14. Amplification of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Suppresses the Conditionally Lethal Growth and Virulence Phenotype of Leishmania donovani Mutants Lacking Both Hypoxanthine-guanine and Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Ullman, Buddy

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania donovani cannot synthesize purines de novo and obligatorily scavenge purines from the host. Previously, we described a conditional lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant of L. donovani (Boitz, J. M., and Ullman, B. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 16084–16089) that establishes that L. donovani salvages purines primarily through hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT). Unlike wild type L. donovani, the Δhgprt/Δxprt knock-out cannot grow on 6-oxypurines and displays an absolute requirement for adenine or adenosine and 2′-deoxycoformycin, an inhibitor of parasite adenine aminohydrolase activity. Here, we demonstrate that the ability of Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites to infect mice was profoundly compromised. Surprisingly, mutant parasites that survived the initial passage through mice partially regained their virulence properties, exhibiting a >10-fold increase in parasite burden in a subsequent mouse infection. To dissect the mechanism by which Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites persisted in vivo, suppressor strains that had regained their capacity to grow under restrictive conditions were cloned from cultured Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites. The ability of these suppressor clones to grow in and metabolize 6-oxypurines could be ascribed to a marked amplification and overexpression of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene. Moreover, transfection of Δhgprt/Δxprt cells with an APRT episome recapitulated the suppressor phenotype in vitro and enabled growth on 6-oxypurines. Biochemical studies further showed that hypoxanthine, unexpectedly, was an inefficient substrate for APRT, evidence that could account for the ability of the suppressors to metabolize hypoxanthine. Subsequent analysis implied that APRT amplification was also a potential contributory mechanism by which Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites displayed persistence and increased virulence in mice. PMID:20363738

  15. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P.; Ye, Shui Qing

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) was first reported as a pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor in 1994 with little notice, but it has received increasing attention in recent years due to accumulating evidence indicating that NAMPT is a pleiotropic protein such as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and a visfatin. Now, NAMPT has been accepted as an official name of this protein. Because of NAMPT’s multiple functions in a variety of physiological processes, their dysregulations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases or conditions such as acute lung injury, aging, atherosclerosis, cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and sepsis. This review will cover the current understanding of NAMPT’s structure and functions with an emphasis on recent progress of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase’s pathological roles in various human diseases and conditions. Future directions on exploring its Terra incognita will be offered in the end. PMID:22140607

  16. The Housekeeping Gene Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) Regulates Multiple Developmental and Metabolic Pathways of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Joel S.; Friedmann, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND) are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA) multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease. PMID:24130677

  17. Cotransfer of linked eukaryotic genes and efficient transfer of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase by DNA-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, J L; McBride, O W

    1980-01-01

    The efficiency of DNA-mediated transfer of the gene (hprt) for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; IMP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8) is dependent upon the recipient cell used. hprt has been transferred into mouse TG8 or Chinese hamster CHTG49 cells at a high frequency, similar to the frequency of the gene (tk) for thymidine kinase (TK; ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.21) transfer into mouse LMTK- cells (i.e., 10(-6)). In contrast, the frequency of transfer of hprt into mouse A9 cells was about two orders of magnitude less. The identification of efficient recipient cells for hprt transfer permits the use of DNA-mediated transfer as a bioassay for the gene. Cotransfer of the linked tk gene and the gene (galk) for galactokinase (ATP: D-galactose 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.6) to LMTK- cells has been detected once among 87 tk transferrents. This suggests that the distance between the tk and galk genes in the Chinese hamster genome may be smaller than was previously thought. Significant differences between chromosome-mediated and DNA-mediated gene transfer were observed with respect to both the size of the transferred functional genetic fragment and the recipient cell specificity. Images PMID:6929511

  18. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  19. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  20. Mouse model for somatic mutation at the HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase) gene: Molecular and cellular analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart-Schultz, K.; Strout, C.L.; Jones, I.M.

    1989-07-11

    Our goal is to use the mouse to model the organismal, cellular and molecular factors that affect somatic mutagenesis in vivo. A fundamental tenet of genetic toxicology is that the principles of mutagenesis identified in one system can be used to predict the principles of mutagenesis in another system. The validity of this tenet depends upon the comparability of the systems involved. To begin to achieve an understanding of somatic mutagenesis in vivo, we have been studying mutations that occur in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene of lymphocytes of mice. Our in vivo model for somatic mutation allows us to analyse factors that affect somatic mutation. Having chosen the mouse, we are working with cells in which the karyotype is normal, and metabolic and DNA repair capacity are defined by the mouse strain chosen. At the organismal level, we can vary sex, age, the exposure history, and the tissue source of cells analysed. (All studies reported here have, however, used male mice.) At the cellular level, T lymphocytes and their precursors are the targets and reporters of mutation. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  2. Analysis of HeLa cell hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase mutants and revertants by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: evidence for silent gene activation.

    PubMed Central

    Milman, G; Lee, E; Ghangas, G S; McLaughlin, J R; George, M

    1976-01-01

    The spot corresponding to hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8) has been identified in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels of HeLa cell extracts. This spot is absent in gels of 24 HPRT dificient mutants. A missense mutant displays a new HPRT spot at the same molecular weight but different isoelectric focusing position. Five independently isolated revertants of the missense mutant display spots corresponding to both the wild-type and mutant proteins indicating that they synthesize HPRT from two separate genes. If the missense protein is synthesized from a mutated form of the initially active HPRT gene, then wild-type HPRT protein in the revertants must be snythesized from a newly activated but prevously silent wild-type gene. The newly activated gene in the revertants of the missense mutation appears unstable producing a high frequency of spontaneous HPRT mutants. Images PMID:63948

  3. Product Release Pathways in Human and Plasmodium falciparum Phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Tarak; Roy, Sourav; Balaram, Hemalatha; Prakash, Meher K; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2016-08-22

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the metadynamics technique were carried out to delineate the product (PPi.2Mg and IMP) release mechanisms from the active site of both human (Hs) and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine-(xanthine) phosphoribosyltransferase (HG(X)PRT). An early movement of PPi.2Mg from its binding site has been observed. The swinging motion of the Asp side chain (D134/D145) in the binding pocket facilitates the detachment of IMP, which triggers the opening of flexible loop II, the gateway to the bulk solvent. In PfHGXPRT, PPi.2Mg and IMP are seen to be released via the same path in all of the biased MD simulations. In HsHGPRT too, the product molecules follow similar routes from the active site; however, an alternate but minor escape route for PPi.2Mg has been observed in the human enzyme. Tyr 104 and Phe 186 in HsHGPRT and Tyr 116 and Phe 197 in PfHGXPRT are the key residues that mediate the release of IMP, whereas the motion of PPi.2Mg away from the reaction center is guided by the negatively charged Asp and Glu and a few positively charged residues (Lys and Arg) that line the product release channels. Mutations of a few key residues present in loop II of Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) HGPRT have been shown to reduce the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Herein, in silico mutation of corresponding residues in loop II of HsHGPRT and PfHGXPRT resulted in partial opening of the flexible loop (loop II), thus exposing the active site to bulk water, which offers a rationale for the reduced catalytic activity of these two mutant enzymes. Investigations of the product release from these HsHGPRT and PfHGXPRT mutants delineate the role of these important residues in the enzymatic turnover. PMID:27404508

  4. Allopurinol enhances the activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in inflammatory bowel disease patients during low-dose thiopurine therapy: preliminary data of an ongoing series.

    PubMed

    Seinen, Margien L; de Boer, Nanne K H; Smid, Kees; van Asseldonk, Dirk P; Bouma, Gerd; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-12-01

    Thiopurines are crucial in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The phenotype of pivotal metabolic enzymes determines whether thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) are generated in clinically sufficiently high levels. The first step in activation of thiopurine prodrugs to 6-TGN is catalysis by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Often, patients exhibit a clinically unfavorable metabolism, leading to discontinuation of conventional thiopurine therapy. The combination of allopurinol and low-dose thiopurine therapy may optimize this variant metabolism, presumably by affecting enzyme activities. We performed a prospective pharmacodynamic study to determine the effect of combination therapy on the activity of HGPRT. The activity of HGPRT and 6-TGN concentrations was measured in red blood cells during thiopurine monotherapy and after 4 weeks of combination therapy. The activity of HGPRT was also measured after 12 weeks of combination therapy. From the results, we conclude that combination therapy increases the activity of HGPRT and subsequently 6-TGN concentrations. PMID:22132961

  5. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  6. Identification and characterization of human uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase).

    PubMed

    Li, Jixi; Huang, Shengdong; Chen, Jinzhong; Yang, Zhenxing; Fei, Xiangwei; Zheng, Mei; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2007-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, which catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-R-diphosphate to uridine monophosphate, is important in the pyrimidine salvage pathway and is an attractive target for rational drug design by incorporation of prodrugs that are lethal to many parasitic organisms specifically. So far, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase has been reported in Arabidopsis thaliana only, not in mammals. In this study, a novel uracil phosphoribosyltransferase family cDNA encoding a 309 amino acid protein with a putative uracil phosphoribosyltransferase domain was isolated from the human fetal brain library. It was named human UPRTase (uracil phosphoribosyltransferase). The ORF of human UPRTase gene was cloned into pQE30 and expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The protein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, but UPRTase activity could not be detected by spectrophotometry. RT-PCR analysis showed that human UPRTase was strongly expressed in blood leukocytes, liver, spleen, and thymus, with lower levels of expression in the prostate, heart, brain, lung, and skeletal muscle. Subcellular location of UPRTase-EGFP fusion protein revealed that human UPRTase was distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of AD293 cells. Evolutional tree analyses of UPRTases or UPRTase-domain-containing proteins showed that UPRTase was conserved in organisms. UPRTases of archaebacteria or eubacterium had UPRTase activity whereas those higher than Caenorhabditis elegans, which lacked two amino acids in the uracil-binding region, had no UPRTase activity. This means that human UPRTase may have enzymatic activity with another, unknown, factor or have other activity in pyrimidine metabolism. PMID:17384901

  7. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite. PMID:24923662

  8. Hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric determination of erythrocyte 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate in patients with hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Yoshihiko; Nozaki, Sayako; Nakamura, Makiko; Oh, Koei; Namiki, Osamu; Suzuki, Kiyotaka; Nakahara, Akihiko; Miyazawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Ken; Himeno, Takahiro; Yoshida, Sayaka; Ueda, Takanori; Yamada, Yasukazu; Ichida, Kimiyoshi

    2015-01-22

    Mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) and its variants (LNV). Due to the technical problems for measuring the HPRT activity in vitro, discordances between the residual HPRT activity and the clinical severity were found. 5-Phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is a substrate for HPRT. Since increased PRPP concentrations were observed in erythrocytes from patients with LND and LNV, we have turned our attention to erythrocyte PRPP as a biomarker for the phenotype classification. In the present work, a method for determination of PRPP concentration in erythrocyte was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Packed erythrocyte samples were deproteinized by heating and the supernatants were injected into the LC-MS/MS system. All measurement results showed good precision with RSD <6%. PRPP concentrations of nine normal male subjects, four male patents with LND and six male patients with LNV were compared. The PRPP concentrations in erythrocyte from patients with LND were markedly increased compared with those from normal subjects, and those from patients with LNV were also increased but the degree was smaller than those with LND. The increase pattern of PRPP concentration in erythrocyte from patients with HPRT deficiency was consistent with the respective phenotypes and was correlated with the disease severity. PRPP concentration was suggested to give us supportive information for the diagnosis and the phenotype classification of LND and LNV. PMID:25482009

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum and Human 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Martin M; Hocková, Dana; Wang, Tzu-Hsuan; Dračínský, Martin; Poštová-Slavětínská, Lenka; Procházková, Eliška; Edstein, Michael D; Chavchich, Marina; Keough, Dianne T; Guddat, Luke W; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-10-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) are a promising class of antimalarial therapeutic drug leads that exhibit a wide variety of Ki values for Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and human hypoxanthine-guanine-(xanthine) phosphoribosyltransferases [HG(X)PRTs]. A novel series of ANPs, analogues of previously reported 2-(phosphonoethoxy)ethyl (PEE) and (R,S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl (HPMP) derivatives, were designed and synthesized to evaluate their ability to act as inhibitors of these enzymes and to extend our ongoing antimalarial structure-activity relationship studies. In this series, (S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propyl (HPEP), (S)-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propanoic acid (CPME), or (S)-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propanoic acid (CPEE) are the acyclic moieties. Of this group, (S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propylguanine (HPEPG) exhibits the highest potency for PfHGXPRT, with a Ki value of 0.1 μM and a Ki value for human HGPRT of 0.6 μM. The crystal structures of HPEPG and HPEPHx (where Hx=hypoxanthine) in complex with human HGPRT were obtained, showing specific interactions with active site residues. Prodrugs for the HPEP and CPEE analogues were synthesized and tested for in vitro antimalarial activity. The lowest IC50 value (22 μM) in a chloroquine-resistant strain was observed for the bis-amidate prodrug of HPEPG. PMID:26368337

  10. Hypoxanthine enters human vascular endothelial cells (ECV 304) via the nitrobenzylthioinosine-insensitive equilibrative nucleoside transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Osses, N; Pearson, J D; Yudilevich, D L; Jarvis, S M

    1996-01-01

    The transport properties of the nucleobase hypoxanthine were examined in the human umbilical vein endothelial cell line ECV 304. Initial rates of hypoxanthine influx were independent of extracellular cations: replacement of Na+ with Li+, Rb+, N-methyl-D-glucamine or choline had no significant effect on hypoxanthine uptake by ECV 304 cells. Kinetic analysis demonstrated the presence of a single saturable system for the transport of hypoxanthine in ECV 304 cells with an apparent K(m) of 320 +/- 10 microM and a Vmax of 5.6 +/- 0.9 pmol/10(6) cells per s. Hypoxanthine uptake was inhibited by the nucleosides adenosine, uridine and thymidine (apparent Ki 41 +/- 6, 240 +/- 27 and 59 +/- 8 microM respectively) and the nucleoside transport inhibitors nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), dilazep and dipyridamole (apparent Ki 2.5 +/- 0.3, 11 +/- 3 and 0.16 +/- 0.006 microM respectively), whereas the nucleobases adenine, guanine and thymine had little effect (50% inhibition at > 1 mM). ECV 304 cells were also shown to transport adenosine via both the NBMPR-sensitive and -insensitive nucleoside carriers. Hypoxanthine specifically inhibited adenosine transport via the NBMPR-insensitive system in a competitive manner (apparent Ki 290 +/- 14 microM). These results indicate that hypoxanthine entry into ECV 304 endothelial cells is mediated by the NBMPR-insensitive nucleoside carrier present in these cells. PMID:8760371

  11. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  12. Extensive regulation of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT) expression in human tissues and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Pereira, Sara; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Silva, Sarah S.; Correia, Mariana Gonçalves; Neto, Célia; da Costa, Luís Teixeira; Amorim, António; Silva, Raquel M.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a cofactor in redox reactions and a substrate for NAD-consuming enzymes, such as PARPs and sirtuins. As cancer cells have increased NAD requirements, the main NAD salvage enzymes in humans, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), are involved in the development of novel anti-cancer therapies. Knowledge of the expression patterns of both genes in tissues and tumors is critical for the use of nicotinic acid (NA) as cytoprotective in therapies using NAMPT inhibitors. Herein, we provide a comprehensive study of NAPRT and NAMPT expression across human tissues and tumor cell lines. We show that both genes are widely expressed under normal conditions and describe the occurrence of novel NAPRT transcripts. Also, we explore some of the NAPRT gene expression mechanisms. Our findings underline that the efficiency of NA in treatments with NAMPT inhibitors is dependent on the knowledge of the expression profiles and regulation of both NAMPT and NAPRT. PMID:26675378

  13. Synergistic action of tiazofurin with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in human neuroectodermal tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, T; Schuchter, K; Chiba, P; Ressmann, G; Lhotka, C; Gharehbaghi, K; Szalay, S M; Pillwein, K

    1993-12-01

    The activity of IMP dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.14), the key enzyme of de novo guanylate biosynthesis, was shown to be increased in tumor cells. Tiazofurin (TR), a potent and specific inhibitor of this enzyme, proved to be effective in the treatment of refractory granulocytic leukemia in blast crisis. We examined the effects of tiazofurin as a single agent and in combination with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in six different neuroectodermal tumor cell lines, the STA-BT-3 and 146-18 human glioblastoma cell lines, the SK-N-SH, LA-N-1 and LA-N-5 human neuroblastoma cell lines, and the STA-ET-1 Ewing tumor cell line. Tiazofurin inhibited tumor cell growth with IC50 values between 2.2 microM (LA-N-1 cell line) and 550 microM (LA-N-5 cells) and caused a significant decrease of intracellular GTP pools (GTP concentrations decreased to 39-79% of control). Incorporation of [8-14C]guanine into GTP pools was determined as a measure of guanylate salvage activity; incubation with 100 microM hypoxanthine caused a 62-96% inhibition of the salvage pathway. Incubation with tiazofurin (100 microM) and hypoxanthine (100 microM) synergistically inhibited tumor cell growth, and the addition of allopurinol (100 microM) strengthened these effects. Therefore, this drug combination, inhibiting guanylate de novo and salvage pathways, may prove useful in the treatment of human neuroectodermal tumors. PMID:7903533

  14. Assignment of the Gene for Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Human Chromosome 16 by Mouse-Human Somatic Cell Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tischfield, Jay A.; Ruddle, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A series of mouse-human hybrids was prepared from mouse cells deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and normal human cells. The hybrids were made in medium containing adenine and alanosine, an antimetabolite known to inhibit de novo adenylic acid biosynthesis. The mouse cells, unable to utilize exogenous adenine, were killed in this medium, but the hybrids proliferated as a consequence of their retaining the human aprt gene. The hybrids were then exposed to the adenine analogs 2,6-diaminopurine and 2-fluoroadenine to select for cells that had lost this gene. Before exposure to the adenine analogs, the expression of human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase by the hybrids was strongly associated only with the presence of human chromosome 16, and afterwards this was the only human chromosome consistently lost. This observation suggests that the human aprt gene can be assigned to chromosome 16. Images PMID:4129802

  15. Hypoxanthine deregulates genes involved in early neuronal development. Implications in Lesch-Nyhan disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Torres, R J; Puig, J G

    2015-11-01

    Neurological manifestations in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) are attributed to the effect of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency on the nervous system development. HPRT deficiency causes the excretion of increased amounts of hypoxanthine into the extracellular medium and we hypothesized that HPRT deficiency related to hypoxanthine excess may then lead, directly or indirectly, to transcriptional aberrations in a variety of genes essential for the function and development of striatal progenitor cells. We have examined the effect of hypoxanthine excess on the differentiation of neurons in the well-established human NTERA-2 cl.D1 (NT2/D1) embryonic carcinoma neurogenesis model. NT2/D1 cells differentiate along neuroectodermal lineages after exposure to retinoic acid (RA). Hypoxanthine effects on RA-differentiation were examined by the changes on the expression of various transcription factor genes essential to neuronal differentiation and by the changes in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine, adenosine and serotonin receptors (DRD, ADORA, HTR). We report that hypoxanthine excess deregulate WNT4, from Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and engrailed homeobox 1 gene and increased TH and dopamine DRD1, adenosine ADORA2A and serotonin HTR7 receptors, whose over expression characterize early neuro-developmental processes. PMID:25940910

  16. Interaction of the recombinant human methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG protein) with oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing either hypoxanthine or abasic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Miao, F; Bouziane, M; O'Connor, T R

    1998-01-01

    Methylpurine-DNA glycosylases (MPG proteins, 3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylases) excise numerous damaged bases from DNA during the first step of base excision repair. The damaged bases removed by these proteins include those induced by both alkylating agents and/or oxidizing agents. The intrinsic kinetic parameters (k(cat) and K(m)) for the excision of hypoxanthine by the recombinant human MPG protein from a 39 bp oligodeoxyribonucleotide harboring a unique hypoxanthine were determined. Comparison with other reactions catalyzed by the human MPG protein suggests that the differences in specificity are primarily in product release and not binding. Analysis of MPG protein binding to the 39 bp oligodeoxyribonucleotide revealed that the apparent dissociation constant is of the same order of magnitude as the K(m) and that a 1:1 complex is formed. The MPG protein also forms a strong complex with the product of excision, an abasic site, as well as with a reduced abasic site. DNase I footprinting experiments with the MPG protein on an oligodeoxyribonucleotide with a unique hypoxanthine at a defined position indicate that the protein protects 11 bases on the strand with the hypoxanthine and 12 bases on the complementary strand. Competition experiments with different length, double-stranded, hypoxanthine-containing oligodeoxyribonucleotides show that the footprinted region is relatively small. Despite the small footprint, however, oligodeoxyribonucleotides comprising <15 bp with a hypoxanthine have a 10-fold reduced binding capacity compared with hypoxanthine-containing oligodeoxyribonucleotides >20 bp in length. These results provide a basis for other structural studies of the MPG protein with its targets. PMID:9705516

  17. Excision of hypoxanthine from DNA containing dIMP residues by the Escherichia coli, yeast, rat, and human alkylpurine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Saparbaev, M; Laval, J

    1994-06-21

    The deamination of adenine residues in DNA generates hypoxanthine, which is mutagenic since it gives rise to an A.T to G.C transition. Hypoxanthine is removed by hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity present in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. Using polydeoxyribonucleotides or double-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides that contain dIMP residues, we show that this activity in E. coli is associated with the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II coded for by the alkA gene. This conclusion is based on the following facts: (i) the two enzymatic activities have the same chromatographic behavior on various supports and they have the same molecular weight, (ii) both are induced during the adaptive response, (iii) a multicopy plasmid bearing the alkA gene overproduces both activities, (iv) homogeneous preparation of AlkA has both enzymatic activities, (v) the E. coli alkA- mutant does not show any detectable hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity. Under the same experimental conditions, but using different substrates, the same amount of AlkA protein liberates 1 pmol of 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and 1.2 fmol of hypoxanthine from dIMP-containing DNA. The Km for the latter substrate is 420 x 10(-9) M as compared to 5 x 10(-9) M for alkylated DNA. Hypoxanthine is released as a free base during the reaction. Duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing hypoxanthine positioned opposite T, G, C, and A were cleaved efficiently. ANPG protein, APDG protein, and MAG protein--the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases of human, rat, and yeast origin, respectively--were also able to release hypoxanthine from various DNA substrates containing dIMP residues. The mammalian enzyme is by far the most efficient hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase of all the enzymes tested. PMID:8016081

  18. Excision of hypoxanthine from DNA containing dIMP residues by the Escherichia coli, yeast, rat, and human alkylpurine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed Central

    Saparbaev, M; Laval, J

    1994-01-01

    The deamination of adenine residues in DNA generates hypoxanthine, which is mutagenic since it gives rise to an A.T to G.C transition. Hypoxanthine is removed by hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity present in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. Using polydeoxyribonucleotides or double-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides that contain dIMP residues, we show that this activity in E. coli is associated with the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II coded for by the alkA gene. This conclusion is based on the following facts: (i) the two enzymatic activities have the same chromatographic behavior on various supports and they have the same molecular weight, (ii) both are induced during the adaptive response, (iii) a multicopy plasmid bearing the alkA gene overproduces both activities, (iv) homogeneous preparation of AlkA has both enzymatic activities, (v) the E. coli alkA- mutant does not show any detectable hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity. Under the same experimental conditions, but using different substrates, the same amount of AlkA protein liberates 1 pmol of 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and 1.2 fmol of hypoxanthine from dIMP-containing DNA. The Km for the latter substrate is 420 x 10(-9) M as compared to 5 x 10(-9) M for alkylated DNA. Hypoxanthine is released as a free base during the reaction. Duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing hypoxanthine positioned opposite T, G, C, and A were cleaved efficiently. ANPG protein, APDG protein, and MAG protein--the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases of human, rat, and yeast origin, respectively--were also able to release hypoxanthine from various DNA substrates containing dIMP residues. The mammalian enzyme is by far the most efficient hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase of all the enzymes tested. Images PMID:8016081

  19. Interaction of Human DNA Polymerase α and DNA Polymerase I from Bacillus stearothermophilus with Hypoxanthine and 8-Oxoguanine Nucleotides †

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Jennifer N.; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how DNA polymerases interact with mutagenic bases, we examined how human DNA polymerase α (pol α), a B family enzyme, and DNA polymerase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BF), an A family enzyme, generate adenine:hypoxanthine and adenine:8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) base pairs. Pol α strongly discriminated against polymerizing dATP opposite 8-oxoG, and removing N1, N6, or N7 further inhibited incorporation, whereas removing N3 from dATP dramatically increased incorporation (32-fold). Eliminating N6 from 3-deaza-dATP now greatly reduced incorporation, suggesting that incorporation of dATP (analogues) opposite 8-oxoguanine proceeds via a Hoogsteen base-pair and that pol α uses N3 of a purine dNTP to block this incorporation. Pol α also polymerized 8-oxo-dGTP across from a templating A, and removing N6 from the template adenine inhibited incorporation of 8-oxoG. The effects of N1, N6, and N7 demonstrated a strong interdependence during formation of adenine:hypoxanthine base-pairs by pol α and N3 of dATP again helps prevent polymerization opposite a templating hypoxanthine. BF very efficiently polymerized 8-oxo-dGTP opposite adenine, and N1 and N7 of adenine appear to play important roles. BF incorporates dATP opposite 8-oxoG less efficiently, and modifying N1, N6, or N7 greatly inhibits incorporation. N6, and to a lesser extent N1, help drive hypoxanthine:adenine base pair formation by BF. The mechanistic implications of these results showing that different polymerases interact very differently with base lesions are discussed. PMID:19642651

  20. Metabolomics Analysis of Metabolic Effects of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Inhibition on Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry–based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level. PMID:25486521

  1. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition on human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level. PMID:25486521

  2. GENETIC ASSAY FOR ANEUPLOIDY: QUANTITATION OF CHROMOSOME LOSS USING A MOUSE/HUMAN MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL LINE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A genetic assay is described in which a mouse/human hybrid cell line R3-5 containing a single human chromosome (a monochromosomal hybrid) is used to detect chemically induced aneuploidy. The hybrid cells are deficient in hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and ...

  3. Determination of Activity of the Enzymes Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HPRT) and Adenine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (APRT) in Blood Spots on Filter Paper.

    PubMed

    Auler, Kasie; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) deficiency is the cause of Lesch-Nyhan disease. Adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) deficiency causes renal calculi. The activity of each enzyme is readily determined on spots of whole blood on filter paper. This unit describes a method for detecting deficiencies of HPRT and APRT. PMID:26132002

  4. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  5. MULTIPLEX PCR ANALYSIS OF IN VIVO-ARISING DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was adapted for the rapid and efficient evaluation of the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene in human T-lymphocytes for deletions. he hprt clonal assay was used to isolate in-vivo-arising hprt-deficient...

  6. DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF T-LYMPHOCYTES AS A BIOMARKER FOR GENOMIC REARRANGEMENTS IMPORTANT IN HUMAN CANCERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA sequence of 11 in vivo-arising intragenic deletion breaksite junctions occurring in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene of human T-lymphocytes was determined and deletions ranged in size from 16 bp to 4057 bp. o extensive homology was found at the dele...

  7. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Gyun Kim, Tae; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Bu Kang, Gil; Youn Kang, Jung; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Yop An, Jun; Ryoung Park, Kyoung; Lee, Youngjin; Jun Im, Young; Hyuck Lee, Jun; Hyun Eom, Soo

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  8. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Tae Gyun; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kang, Jung Youn; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Im, Young Jun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  9. Pharmacological Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bo; Young, Debra A.; Lu, Zhao-Hai; Wang, Tao; Meier, Timothy I.; Shepard, Robert L.; Roth, Kenneth; Zhai, Yan; Huss, Karen; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gillig, James; Parthasarathy, Saravanan; Burkholder, Timothy P.; Smith, Michele C.; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Zhao, Genshi

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in converting nicotinamide to NAD+, essential for cellular metabolism, energy production, and DNA repair. NAMPT has been extensively studied because of its critical role in these cellular processes and the prospect of developing therapeutics against the target, yet how it regulates cellular metabolism is not fully understood. In this study we utilized liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and serine biosynthesis in cancer cells and tumor xenografts. We show for the first time that NAMPT inhibition leads to the attenuation of glycolysis at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step due to the reduced availability of NAD+ for the enzyme. The attenuation of glycolysis results in the accumulation of glycolytic intermediates before and at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step, promoting carbon overflow into the pentose phosphate pathway as evidenced by the increased intermediate levels. The attenuation of glycolysis also causes decreased glycolytic intermediates after the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step, thereby reducing carbon flow into serine biosynthesis and the TCA cycle. Labeling studies establish that the carbon overflow into the pentose phosphate pathway is mainly through its non-oxidative branch. Together, these studies establish the blockade of glycolysis at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step as the central metabolic basis of NAMPT inhibition responsible for ATP depletion, metabolic perturbation, and subsequent tumor growth inhibition. These studies also suggest that altered metabolite levels in tumors can be used as robust pharmacodynamic markers for evaluating NAMPT inhibitors in the clinic. PMID:23239881

  10. Fragment-based design of 3-aminopyridine-derived amides as potent inhibitors of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT).

    PubMed

    Dragovich, Peter S; Zhao, Guiling; Baumeister, Timm; Bravo, Brandon; Giannetti, Anthony M; Ho, Yen-Ching; Hua, Rongbao; Li, Guangkun; Liang, Xiaorong; Ma, Xiaolei; O'Brien, Thomas; Oh, Angela; Skelton, Nicholas J; Wang, Chengcheng; Wang, Weiru; Wang, Yunli; Xiao, Yang; Yuen, Po-wai; Zak, Mark; Zhao, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaozhang

    2014-02-01

    The fragment-based identification of two novel and potent biochemical inhibitors of the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) enzyme is described. These compounds (51 and 63) incorporate an amide moiety derived from 3-aminopyridine, and are thus structurally distinct from other known anti-NAMPT agents. Each exhibits potent inhibition of NAMPT biochemical activity (IC50=19 and 15 nM, respectively) as well as robust antiproliferative properties in A2780 cell culture experiments (IC50=121 and 99 nM, respectively). However, additional biological studies indicate that only inhibitor 51 exerts its A2780 cell culture effects via a NAMPT-mediated mechanism. The crystal structures of both 51 and 63 in complex with NAMPT are also independently described. PMID:24433859

  11. Structural and biochemical analyses of the catalysis and potency impact of inhibitor phosphoribosylation by human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Oh, Angela; Ho, Yen-Ching; Zak, Mark; Liu, Yongbo; Chen, Xukun; Yuen, Po-Wai; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Liu, Yichin; Dragovich, Peter S; Wang, Weiru

    2014-05-26

    Prolonged inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a strategy for targeting cancer metabolism. Many NAMPT inhibitors undergo NAMPT-catalyzed phosphoribosylation (pRib), a property often correlated with their cellular potency. To understand this phenomenon and facilitate drug design, we analyzed a potent cellularly active NAMPT inhibitor (GNE-617). A crystal structure of pRib-GNE-617 in complex with NAMPT protein revealed a relaxed binding mode. Consistently, the adduct formation resulted in tight binding and strong product inhibition. In contrast, a biochemically equipotent isomer of GNE-617 (GNE-643) also formed pRib adducts but displayed significantly weaker cytotoxicity. Structural analysis revealed an altered ligand conformation of GNE-643, thus suggesting weak association of the adducts with NAMPT. Our data support a model for cellularly active NAMPT inhibitors that undergo NAMPT-catalyzed phosphoribosylation to produce pRib adducts that retain efficient binding to the enzyme. PMID:24797455

  12. A survey of splice variants of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase and DNA polymerase beta genes: products of alternative or aberrant splicing?

    PubMed Central

    Skandalis, Adonis; Uribe, Elke

    2004-01-01

    Errors during the pre-mRNA splicing of metazoan genes can degrade the transmission of genetic information, and have been associated with a variety of human diseases. In order to characterize the mutagenic and pathogenic potential of mis-splicing, we have surveyed and quantified the aberrant splice variants in the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) and DNA polymerase β (POLB) in the presence and the absence of the Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD) pathway, which removes transcripts with premature termination codons. POLB exhibits a high frequency of splice variants (40–60%), whereas the frequency of HPRT splice variants is considerably lower (∼1%). Treatment of cells with emetine to inactivate NMD alters both the spectrum and frequency of splice variants of POLB and HPRT. It is not certain at this point, whether POLB and HPRT splice variants are the result of regulated alternative splicing processes or the result of aberrant splicing, but it appears likely that at least some of the variants are the result of splicing errors. Several mechanisms that may contribute to aberrant splicing are discussed. PMID:15601998

  13. Selective potentiation of lometrexol growth inhibition by dipyridamole through cell-specific inhibition of hypoxanthine salvage.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, R. N.; Aherne, G. W.; Curtin, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    The novel antifolate lometrexol (5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate) inhibits de novo purine biosynthesis, and co-incubation with hypoxanthine abolishes its cytotoxicity. The prevention of hypoxanthine rescue from an antipurine antifolate by the nucleoside transport inhibitor dipyridamole was investigated for the first time in nine human and rodent cell lines from seven different tissues of origin. In A549, HeLa and CHO cells, dipyridamole prevented hypoxanthine rescue and so growth was inhibited by the combination of lometrexol, dipyridamole and hypoxanthine, but in HT29, HCT116, KK47, MDA231, CCRF CEM and L1210 cells dipyridamole had no effect and the combination did not inhibit growth. Dipyridamole inhibited hypoxanthine uptake in A549 but not in CCRF CEM cells. Dipyridamole prevented the hypoxanthine-induced repletion of dGTP pools, depleted by lometrexol, in A549 but not in CCRF CEM cells. Thus, the selective growth-inhibitory effect of the combination of lometrexol, dipyridamole and hypoxanthine is apparently due to the dipyridamole sensitivity (ds) or insensitivity (di) of hypoxanthine transport. Both the human and murine leukaemic cells are of the di phenotype. If this reflects the transport phenotype of normal bone marrow it would suggest that the combination of lometrexol, dipyridamole and hypoxanthine might be selectively toxic to certain tumour types and have reduced toxicity to the bone marrow. PMID:9374375

  14. Temporal order of replication of genes responsible for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase and Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase in chemically transformed human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, T.; Suzuki, N.; Elmore, E.; Maizumi, H.

    1986-06-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of a direct perturbation of DNA during various portions of the DNA synthetic period (S phase) of a chemically induced, transformed line (Hut-11A cells) derived from diploid human skin fibroblasts were examined. The cells were synchronized by a period of growth in low serum with a subsequent blockage of the cells at the G1/S boundary by hydroxyurea. This method resulted in over 90% synchrony, although approximately 20% of the cells were noncycling. Synchronized cells were treated for each of four 2-h periods during the S phase with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) followed by irradiation with near-ultraviolet (UV). The BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment was cytotoxic and mutagenic, while treatment with BrdU alone or irradiation alone was neither cytotoxic nor mutagenic. The cytotoxicity was dependent upon the periods of S phase during which treatment was administered. The highest lethality was observed for treatment in early to middle S phase, particularly in the first 2 h of S phase, whereas scare lethality was observed in late S phase. The BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment induced ouabain- and 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants, while BrdU alone or irradiation alone was not mutagenic. Ouabain-resistant mutants were induced during early S phase by the BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment. 6-Thioguanine-resistant mutants, however, were induced during middle to late S phase. These results suggest that a certain region or regions in the DNA of Hut-11A cells, as designated by their specific temporal relationship in the S phase, may be more sensitive to the DNA perturbation by BrdU treatment plus near-UV irradiation for cell survival and that gene(s) responsible for Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase is replicated during early S phase and gene(s) for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase is replicated during middle to late S phase.

  15. INDUCTION OF MUTATIONS BY CHEMICAL AGENTS AT THE HYPOXANTHINE-GUANINE PHOSPHORIBOSYL TRANSFERASE LOCUS IN HUMAN EPITHELIAL TERATOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance by chemical mutagens was examined in a line of cells derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma cell clone. The cells, designated as P3 cells, have a stable diploid karyotype with 46(XX) chromosomes, including a translocation betwee...

  16. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  17. New hypoxanthine nucleosides with RNA antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Nair, V; Ussery, M A

    1992-08-01

    A series of novel C-2 functionalized hypoxanthine and purine ribonucleosides have been synthesized and evaluated against exotic RNA viruses of the family or genus alpha, arena, flavi, and rhabdo. Both specific and broad-spectrum antiviral activities were discovered but only with hypoxanthine nucleosides. PMID:1444325

  18. Anti-oxidant effects of the extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata on human dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes against hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage.

    PubMed

    Thang, P T; Patrick, S; Teik, L S; Yung, C S

    2001-06-01

    In cutaneous tissue repair, oxidants and antioxidants play very important roles. In local acute and chronic wounds, oxidants are known to have the ability to cause as cell damage and may function as inhibitory factors to wound healing. The administration of anti-oxidants or free radical scavengers is reportedly helpful, notably in order to limit the delayed sequelae of thermal trauma and to enhance the healing process. Extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata have been shown to be beneficial for treatment of wounds. Studies in vitro of these extracts demonstrated enhanced proliferation of fibroblasts, endothelial cells and keratinocytes, stimulation of keratinocyte migration in an in vitro wound assay, up-regulation of production by keratinocytes of extracellular matrix proteins and basement membrane components, and inhibition of collagen lattice contraction by fibroblasts. In this study, the anti-oxidant effects of both total ethanol and polyphenolic extracts from the plant leaves on hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage to human fibroblasts and keratinocytes were investigated. Cell viability was monitored by a colorimetric assay. The results showed that for fibroblasts, toxicity of hydrogen peroxide or hypoxanthine xanthine oxidase on cells was dose-dependent. Total ethanol extract (TEE) at 400 and 800 microg/ml showed maximum and consistent protective cellular effect on oxidant toxicity at low or high doses of oxidants. The 50 microg/ml concentration of TEE also had significant and slightly protective effects on fibroblasts against hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage, respectively. For keratinocytes, a dose-dependent relationship of oxidant toxicity was only seen with hydrogen peroxide but the protective action of the extract correlated with oxidant dosage. TEE at 400 and 800 microg/ml showed dose-dependent effects with both low and high concentration of oxidants. TEE at 50 microg/ml had no

  19. Interactions at the Dimer Interface Influence the Relative Efficiencies for Purine Nucleotide Synthesis and Pyrophosphorolysis in a Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Canyuk, Bhutorn; Medrano, Francisco J.; Wenck, MaryAnne; Focia, Pamela J.; Eakin, Ann E.; Craig III, Sydney P.

    2010-03-05

    Enzymes that salvage 6-oxopurines, including hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs), are potential targets for drugs in the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. For this reason, a number of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the HPRTs from protozoa have been reported. Although these structures did not reveal why HPRTs need to form dimers for catalysis, they revealed the existence of potentially relevant interactions involving residues in a loop of amino acid residues adjacent to the dimer interface, but the contributions of these interactions to catalysis remained poorly understood. The loop, referred to as active-site loop I, contains an unusual non-proline cis-peptide and is composed of residues that are structurally analogous with Leu67, Lys68, and Gly69 in the human HPRT. Functional analyses of site-directed mutations (K68D, K68E, K68N, K68P, and K68R) in the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease, show that the side-chain at position 68 can differentially influence the K{sub m} values for all four substrates as well as the k{sub cat} values for both IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis. Also, the results for the K68P mutant are inconsistent with a cis-trans peptide isomerization-assisted catalytic mechanism. These data, together with the results of structural studies of the K68R mutant, reveal that the side-chain of residue 68 does not participate directly in reaction chemistry, but it strongly influences the relative efficiencies for IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis, and the prevalence of lysine at position 68 in the HPRT of the majority of eukaryotes is consistent with there being a biological role for nucleotide pyrophosphorolysis.

  20. In vivo footprint analysis and genomic sequencing of the human hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) 5 prime region on the active and inactive X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Hornstra, I.K.; Yang, T.P. )

    1991-03-11

    In female placental mammals, one of the two X chromosome in each somatic cell is randomly inactivated during female embryogenesis as a mechanism for dosage compensation. Once a given X chromosome is inactivated, all mitotic progeny maintain the same X chromosome in the inactive state. DNA-protein interactions and DNA methylation are hypothesized to maintain this allele-specific system of differential gene expression. Ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR) in vivo footprinting and genomic sequencing were used to study DNA-protein interactions and DNA-methylation within the 5{prime} region of the X-linked human HPRT gene on the active and inactive X chromosomes. In vivo footprint analysis reveals at least one DNA-protein interaction specific to the active HPRT allele in human male fibroblast cells and hamster-human hybrid cells containing only the active human X chromosome. In the region examined, all CpG dinucleotides are methylated on the inactive HPRT allele and unmethylated on the active X allele in hamster-human hybrid cells carrying either the inactive or active human X chromosome, respectively. Thus, DNA-methylation may be mediating the differential binding of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins to the active or inactive HPRT alleles.

  1. Cytotoxicity, differentiating activity and metabolism of tiazofurin in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pillwein, K; Schuchter, K; Ressmańn, G; Gharehbaghi, K; Knoflach, A; Cermak, B; Jayaram, H N; Szalay, S M; Szekeres, T; Chiba, P

    1993-08-19

    The IMP dehydrogenase inhibitor, tiazofurin (TR)-2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide, which exhibited oncolytic activity in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) in blast crisis was found to inhibit the growth of human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells with an IC50 of 4.2 microM. TR treatment of cells perturbed nucleic acid and catecholamine pathways. As biochemical markers of TR action decreased cellular GTP pools, increased inosine and hypoxanthine concentrations and depleted dopamine content were found. Incubation of tumour specimens obtained from paediatric patients with grade-IV neuroblastoma with TR resulted in the formation of the active metabolite, thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide, in concentrations sufficient to inhibit tumour growth. Cytotoxic and biochemical effects of TR were enhanced by combining it with allopurinol (an inhibitor of xanthine dehydrogenase), and hypoxanthine (an alternate substrate for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase). Induction of transdifferentiation of SK-N-SH cells from a neuroblast to an epitheloid, substrate-adherent phenotype was more pronounced with TR than with all-trans-retinoic acid. Transdifferentiating treatment with TR resulted in a 2-fold-enhanced sensitivity towards adriamycin. However, differentiation with all-trans-retinoic acid rendered the cells more resistant to adriamycin. Our results suggest that TR might be a promising agent for the treatment of children suffering from neuroblastoma. PMID:8344756

  2. IR spectra of guanine and hypoxanthine isolated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheina, G. G.; Stepanian, S. G.; Radchenko, E. D.; Blagoi, Yu. P.

    1987-05-01

    High resolution spectra of guanine, hypoxanthine, isocytosine, 2-aminopyrimidine and their deutero- and methyl derivatives obtained in Ar matrices by the low temperature IR spectroscopy method are reported. Normal modes of enol tautomers of guanine, 9-CH 3-guanine, hypoxanthine and 2-aminopurine are calculated. Force fields are the same as for purine. Results calculated are used to interpret the experimental spectra. Keto—enol tautomerism is shown to exist in guanine and hypoxanthine, the proportions of enol tautomer being 50 and 5%, respectively. Possible biological applications of the results obtained are discussed.

  3. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine.

    PubMed

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina; Genazzani, Armando A; Sethi, Jaswinder K

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro-environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro-environment. PMID:27128025

  4. Urinary hypoxanthine and xanthine levels in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Turgan, N; Boydak, B; Habif, S; Gülter, C; Senol, B; Mutaf, I; Ozmen, D; Bayindir, O

    1999-01-01

    Ischemia leads to impaired ATP metabolism, with increased production of purine degradation products, such as hypoxanthine and xanthine, which are useful markers of tissue hypoxia. These extracellular markers of ischemia have been studied extensively in many clinical conditions of oxidative stress, including perinatal asphyxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, cerebral ischemia, and preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of urinary hypoxanthine and xanthine as ischemia markers in acute coronary syndromes. Urinary excretion of hypoxanthine and xanthine was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography in 30 patients with acute coronary syndromes and in 30 age- and sex-matched controls. Serum and urine uric acid, creatinine, and urea concentrations were also determined. Hypoxanthine excretion was significantly elevated in patients compared with healthy controls (84.37+/-8.63 and 42.70+/-3.97 nmol/mg creatinine, mean+/-SEM, P<0.0001). Urinary xanthine levels were also increased in patients with acute coronary syndromes (100.13+/-12.14 and 34.74+/-4.07 nmol/mg creatinine patients and controls, respectively; P<0.0001). Hypoxanthine and xanthine excretion showed a strong positive correlation in both groups. Significant negative correlations between urinary hypoxanthine and uric acid and xanthine and uric acid were observed in the patients, but not in controls. In conclusion, increased levels of ATP degradation products hypoxanthine and xanthine are observed in various hypoxic clinical conditions. This study suggests that these parameters may be useful markers of ischemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes. PMID:10784378

  5. V(D)J RECOMBINASE-MEDIATED DELETION OF THE HPRT GENE IN T-LYMPHOCYTES FROM ADULT HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hprt T-cell cloning assay allows the detection of mutations occurring in vivo in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of T-lymphocytes. e have shown previously that the illegitimate activity of V(D)J recombinase accounts for about 40% of the hprt mut...

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uridine and inosine: high concentrations of the ATP metabolite, hypoxanthine, after hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, R A; Lund, R J

    1983-01-01

    CSF obtained for clinical purposes from newborn, children and adults has been analysed by high pressure liquid chromatography for hypoxanthine, xanthine, inosine, uridine and urate. Large rises in hypoxanthine and to a lesser extent xanthine occur for about 24 h after hypoxia. High concentrations were associated with later evidence of brain damage or subsequent death. Changes in CSF could be independent of those in plasma. Small or negligible rises were associated with localised and generalised infections including bacterial meningitis, fits, or both. Marked and rapid rises were found after death. These estimations may "predict" the extent of brain damage or brain death. PMID:6681617

  7. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  8. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  9. Antimalarial activity of prodrugs of N-branched acyclic nucleoside phosphonate inhibitors of 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Hocková, Dana; Janeba, Zlatko; Naesens, Lieve; Edstein, Michael D; Chavchich, Marina; Keough, Dianne T; Guddat, Luke W

    2015-09-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) that contain a 6-oxopurine base are good inhibitors of the human and Plasmodium falciparum 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTs), key enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Chemical modifications, based on the crystal structures of several inhibitors in complex with the human PRTase, led to the design of a new class of inhibitors--the aza-ANPs. Because of the negative charges of the phosphonic acid moiety, their ability to cross cell membranes is, however, limited. Thus, phosphoramidate prodrugs of the aza-ANPs were prepared to improve permeability. These prodrugs arrest parasitemia with IC50 values in the micromolar range against Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte cultures (both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant Pf strains). The prodrugs exhibit low cytotoxicity in several human cell lines. Thus, they fulfill two essential criteria to qualify them as promising antimalarial drug leads. PMID:26275679

  10. An amperometric hypoxanthine biosensor based on Au@FeNPs for determination of hypoxanthine in meat samples.

    PubMed

    Devi, Rooma; Yadav, Sujata; Nehra, Renuka; Pundir, C S

    2013-11-01

    A xanthine oxidase (XOD) from buttermilk was immobilized covalently onto boronic acid functionalized gold coated iron nanoparticles (Au@FeNPs) electrodeposited on pencil graphite (PG) electrode, via the boroester linkages, between free hydroxyl groups of boronic acid, α-COOH and -NH2 groups of enzyme. The surface functionalization of Fe/Au nanoparticles with boronic acid (Au@FeNPs) on pencil graphite (PG) electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) before and after immobilization of XOD. The biosensor exhibited optimum response within 3s at pH 7.2 and 30 °C and linearity in the range, 0.05 μM to 150 μM for hypoxanthine with a detection limit of 0.05 μM (S/N=3). Apparent Michaelis Menten constant (Km(app)) for hypoxanthine was 40 μM and Imax 0.125 mA. The biosensor was employed to determine hypoxanthine in fish, chicken, pork, beef meat and lost 50% of its initial activity after its 200 uses over 100 days, when stored at 4 °C. PMID:24140402

  11. Regulatory elements in the introns of the human HPRT gene are necessary for its expression in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, L H; Gregg, R G; Smithies, O; Koller, B H

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the expression of transfected human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase minigenes (HPRT) in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. cDNA constructs of this gene that have been successfully used in somatic cell lines failed to confer hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine (HAT) resistance in ES cells. In contrast, constructs containing introns 1 and 2 from the HPRT gene produced a high frequency of HAT-resistant colonies. This observation allowed us to identify two sequences in these introns that influence expression of the HPRT gene in ES cells. One element, located in intron 2, is required for effective HPRT expression in these cells; the other element, located in intron 1, acts as an enhancer of HPRT expression. Using this information, we have constructed an HPRT minigene that can be used for either positive or negative selection in ES cell experiments. This dual capability allows the design of "in-out" procedures to create subtle changes in target genes by homologous recombination with the aid of this selectable minigene. PMID:2349238

  12. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  13. Biochemical Characterization of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Villela, Anne Drumond; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Bloch, Carlos Junior; Prates, Maura Vianna; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Ramos, Carlos Henrique Inacio; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and pyrophosphate (PPi). UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT). Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PPi product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis. PMID:23424660

  14. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT/PBEF/visfatin) is a tumoural cytokine released from melanoma.

    PubMed

    Grolla, Ambra A; Torretta, Simone; Gnemmi, Ilaria; Amoruso, Angela; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Gatti, Marco; Caldarelli, Antonio; Lim, Dmitry; Penengo, Lorenza; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Genazzani, Armando A; Travelli, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    High plasma levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), traditionally considered an intracellular enzyme with a key role in NAD synthesis, have been reported in several oncological, inflammatory and metabolic diseases. We now show that eNAMPT can be actively released by melanoma cells in vitro. We analysed the mechanisms of its release, and we found both classical and non-classical pathway involvement. eNAMPT released by melanoma cells, in our hands, has paracrine and autocrine effects: it activates MAPK, AKT and NF-κB pathways and increases colony formation in anchorage-independent conditions. eNAMPT also induces M1 polarization in human monocytes. Last, we demonstrate, for the first time in any cancer type, that eNAMPT levels in plasma of tumour-bearing mice increase and that this increase can be reconducted to the tumour itself. This provides an important cue on previous observations that eNAMPT is increased in patients with cancer. Moreover, silencing NAMPT in melanoma cells leads to a reduction in the tumour growth rate. Our findings extend the basis to consider eNAMPT as a cytokine involved in tumour progression. PMID:26358657

  15. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease. PMID:24459232

  16. Plasmodium falciparum: assessment of in vitro growth by (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Chulay, J.D.; Haynes, J.D.; Diggs, C.L.

    1983-02-01

    To evaluate rapidly Plasmodium falciparum growth in Vitro, (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine was added to parasite microcultures and radioisotope incorporation was measured. When culture parameters were carefully controlled, (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation was proportional to the number of parasitized erythrocytes present. Factors affecting (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation included initial parasitemia, duration of culture, duration of radioisotope pulse, parasite stage, concentration of uninfected erythrocytes, the use of serum or plasma to supplement growth, and the concentration of a variety of purines in the culture medium. The method described can be used to measure inhibition of P. falciparum growth by immune serum and has previously been used to study antimalarial drug activity in vitro.

  17. The Role of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinzhi; Zhao, Shangfeng; Song, Yang; Shi, Yejie; Leak, Rehana K; Cao, Guodong

    2015-01-01

    As recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is the only drug approved for the clinical treatment of acute ischemic stroke, there is an urgent unmet need for novel stroke treatments. Endogenous defense mechanisms against stroke may hold the key to new therapies for stroke. A large number of studies suggest that nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase (NAMPT is an attractive candidate to improve post-stroke recovery. NAMPT is a multifunctional protein and plays important roles in immunity, metabolism, aging, inflammation, and stress responses. NAMPT exists in both the intracellular and extracellular space. As a rate-limiting enzyme, the intracellular form (iNAMPT catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD from nicotinamide. iNAMPT closely regulates energy metabolism, enhancing the proliferation of endothelial cells, inhibiting apoptosis, regulating vascular tone, and stimulating autophagy in disease conditions such as stroke. Extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT is also known as visfatin (visceral fat-derived adipokine and has pleotropic effects. It is widely believed that the diverse biological functions of eNAMPT are attributed to its NAMPT enzymatic activity. However, the effects of eNAMPT on ischemic injury are still controversial. Some authors have argued that eNAMPT exacerbates ischemic neuronal injury non-enzymatically by triggering the release of TNF-α from glial cells. In addition, NAMPT also participates in several pathophysiological processes such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and ischemic heart disease. Thus, it remains unclear under what conditions NAMPT is beneficial or destructive. Recent work using in vitro and in vivo genetic/ pharmacologic manipulations, including our own studies, has greatly improved our understanding of NAMPT. This review focuses on the multifaceted and complex roles of NAMPT under both normal and ischemic conditions. PMID:26059356

  18. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  19. Analysis of the structural integrity of YACs comprising human immunoglobulin genes in yeast and in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, M.J.; Abderrahim, H.; Noguchi, M.

    1995-03-20

    With the goal of creating a strain of mice capable of producing human antibodies, we are cloning and reconstructing the human immunoglobulin germline repertoire in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). We describe the identification of YACs containing variable and constant region sequences from the human heavy chain (IgH) and kappa light chain (IgK) loci and the characterization of their integrity in yeast and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The IgH locus-derived YAC contains five variable (V{sub H}) genes, the major diversity (D) gene cluster, the joining (J{sub H}) genes, the intronic enhancer (E{sub H}), and the constant region genes, mu (C{mu}) and delta (C{delta}). Two IgK locus-derived YACs each contain three variable (V{kappa}) genes, the joining (J{kappa}) region, the intronic enhancer (E{kappa}), the constant gene (C{kappa}), and the kappa deleting element (kde). The IgH YAC was unstable in yeast, generating a variety of deletion derivatives, whereas both IgK YACs were stable. YACs encoding heavy chain and kappa light chain, retrofitted with the mammalian selectable marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), were each introduced into HPRT-deficient mouse ES cells. Analysis of YAC integrity in ES cell lines revealed that the majority of DNA inserts were integrated in substantially intact form. 78 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Effects of Hypoxanthine Substitution in Peptide Nucleic Acids Targeting KRAS2 Oncogenic mRNA Molecules: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Jeffrey M.; Wampole, Matthew E.; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D.; Thakur, Mathew L.; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multi-mutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick basepairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA-PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA-PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition. PMID:23972113

  1. Human antiglioma monoclonal antibodies from patients with astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Dan, M D; Schlachta, C M; Guy, J; McKenzie, R G; Dorscheid, D R; Sandor, V A; Villemure, J G; Price, G B

    1992-04-01

    The current management of malignant gliomas is unsatisfactory compared to that of other solid tumors; the expected median survival period is less than 1 year with the patient undergoing conventional surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy treatment. Immunological reagents could be a useful adjunct. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from patients with astrocytic tumors might recognize subtle antigenic specificities that would differ from those recognized by xenogeneic (murine) systems. Five hybridomas, designated as BT27/1A2, BT27/2A3, BT32/A6, BT34/A5, and BT54/B8, were produced from the fusion of peripheral blood lymphocytes of four patients with astrocytic tumors to the human myeloma-like cell line TM-H2-SP2. This cell line has a 46, XX karyotype and is negative for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. All five human monoclonal antibodies produced 2.4 to 44 micrograms/ml of immunoglobulin M, had a similar but not identical pattern of reactivity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, and failed to react with normal human astrocytes. Labeling of four neuroectodermal tumor explant cultures by BT27/2A3 was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Karyotyping of three of the five hybridomas demonstrated that two were pseudodiploid (2-3n) and one hypodiploid (less than 2n). The monoclonality of the hybridomas was evaluated by Southern blot analysis of JH gene rearrangements, revealing two types of rearrangements for each hybridoma, both consistent with monoclonality. Preliminary antigen characterization indicated that at least four of the five human monoclonal antibodies were directed to cell-surface glycolipids. PMID:1545260

  2. The Small Molecule GMX1778 Is a Potent Inhibitor of NAD+ Biosynthesis: Strategy for Enhanced Therapy in Nicotinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase 1-Deficient Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Mark; Roulston, Anne; Bélec, Laurent; Billot, Xavier; Marcellus, Richard; Bédard, Dominique; Bernier, Cynthia; Branchaud, Stéphane; Chan, Helen; Dairi, Kenza; Gilbert, Karine; Goulet, Daniel; Gratton, Michel-Olivier; Isakau, Henady; Jang, Anne; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Koch, Elizabeth; Lavoie, Manon; Lawless, Michael; Nguyen, Mai; Paquette, Denis; Turcotte, Émilie; Berger, Alvin; Mitchell, Matthew; Shore, Gordon C.; Beauparlant, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    GMX1777 is a prodrug of the small molecule GMX1778, currently in phase I clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. We describe findings indicating that GMX1778 is a potent and specific inhibitor of the NAD+ biosynthesis enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). Cancer cells have a very high rate of NAD+ turnover, which makes NAD+ modulation an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Selective inhibition by GMX1778 of NAMPT blocks the production of NAD+ and results in tumor cell death. Furthermore, GMX1778 is phosphoribosylated by NAMPT, which increases its cellular retention. The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 can be bypassed with exogenous nicotinic acid (NA), which permits NAD+ repletion via NA phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (NAPRT1). The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 in cells with NAPRT1 deficiency, however, cannot be rescued by NA. Analyses of NAPRT1 mRNA and protein levels in cell lines and primary tumor tissue indicate that high frequencies of glioblastomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas are deficient in NAPRT1 and not susceptible to rescue with NA. As a result, the therapeutic index of GMX1777 can be widended in the treatment animals bearing NAPRT1-deficient tumors by coadministration with NA. This provides the rationale for a novel therapeutic approach for the use of GMX1777 in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:19703994

  3. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, Leads to Altered Carbohydrate Metabolism in Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bo; Dong, Sucai; Shepard, Robert L.; Kays, Lisa; Roth, Kenneth D.; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Zhao, Genshi

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has been extensively studied due to its essential role in NAD+ biosynthesis in cancer cells and the prospect of developing novel therapeutics. To understand how NAMPT regulates cellular metabolism, we have shown that the treatment with FK866, a specific NAMPT inhibitor, leads to attenuation of glycolysis by blocking the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step (Tan, B., Young, D. A., Lu, Z. H., Wang, T., Meier, T. I., Shepard, R. L., Roth, K., Zhai, Y., Huss, K., Kuo, M. S., Gillig, J., Parthasarathy, S., Burkholder, T. P., Smith, M. C., Geeganage, S., and Zhao, G. (2013) Pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an enzyme essential for NAD+ biosynthesis, in human cancer cells: metabolic basis and potential clinical implications. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 3500–3511). Due to technical limitations, we failed to separate isotopomers of phosphorylated sugars. In this study, we developed an enabling LC-MS methodology. Using this, we confirmed the previous findings and also showed that NAMPT inhibition led to accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate but not glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and sedoheptulose 7-phosphate as previously thought. To investigate the metabolic basis of the metabolite formation, we carried out biochemical and cellular studies and established the following. First, glucose-labeling studies indicated that fructose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde, and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and erythrose via an aldolase reaction. Second, biochemical studies showed that aldolase indeed catalyzed these reactions. Third, glyceraldehyde- and erythrose-labeling studies showed increased incorporation of corresponding labels into fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate in FK866-treated cells. Fourth, NAMPT inhibition led to increased glyceraldehyde and

  4. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, Leads to Altered Carbohydrate Metabolism in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bo; Dong, Sucai; Shepard, Robert L; Kays, Lisa; Roth, Kenneth D; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Zhao, Genshi

    2015-06-19

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has been extensively studied due to its essential role in NAD(+) biosynthesis in cancer cells and the prospect of developing novel therapeutics. To understand how NAMPT regulates cellular metabolism, we have shown that the treatment with FK866, a specific NAMPT inhibitor, leads to attenuation of glycolysis by blocking the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step (Tan, B., Young, D. A., Lu, Z. H., Wang, T., Meier, T. I., Shepard, R. L., Roth, K., Zhai, Y., Huss, K., Kuo, M. S., Gillig, J., Parthasarathy, S., Burkholder, T. P., Smith, M. C., Geeganage, S., and Zhao, G. (2013) Pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an enzyme essential for NAD(+) biosynthesis, in human cancer cells: metabolic basis and potential clinical implications. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 3500-3511). Due to technical limitations, we failed to separate isotopomers of phosphorylated sugars. In this study, we developed an enabling LC-MS methodology. Using this, we confirmed the previous findings and also showed that NAMPT inhibition led to accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate but not glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and sedoheptulose 7-phosphate as previously thought. To investigate the metabolic basis of the metabolite formation, we carried out biochemical and cellular studies and established the following. First, glucose-labeling studies indicated that fructose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde, and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and erythrose via an aldolase reaction. Second, biochemical studies showed that aldolase indeed catalyzed these reactions. Third, glyceraldehyde- and erythrose-labeling studies showed increased incorporation of corresponding labels into fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate in FK866-treated cells. Fourth, NAMPT inhibition led to increased glyceraldehyde and

  5. Isolation of the human chromosomal band Xq28 within somatic cell hybrids by fragile X site breakage.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, S T; Knight, S J; Peters, J F; Stayton, C L; Consalez, G G; Zhang, F P

    1990-01-01

    The chromosomal fragile-site mapping to Xq27.3 is associated with a frequent form of mental retardation and is prone to breakage after induced deoxyribonucleotide pool perturbation. The human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes flank the fragile X chromosome site and can be used to monitor integrity of the site in human-hamster somatic cell hybrids deficient in the rodent forms of these activities. After induction of the fragile X site, negative selection for HPRT and positive enrichment for G6PD resulted in 31 independent colonies of HPRT-,G6PD+ phenotype. Southern blot analysis demonstrated the loss of all tested markers proximal to the fragile X site with retention of all tested human Xq28 loci in a majority of the hybrids. In situ hybridization with a human-specific probe demonstrated the translocation of a small amount of human DNA to rodent chromosomes in these hybrids, suggesting chromosome breakage at the fragile X site and the subsequent translocation of Xq28. Southern blot hybridization of hybrid-cell DNA, resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for human-specific repetitive sequences revealed abundant CpG-islands within Xq28, consistent with its known gene density. The electrophoretic banding patterns of human DNA among the hybrids were remarkably consistent, suggesting that fragile X site breakage is limited to a relatively small region in Xq27-28. These somatic cell hybrids, containing Xq27.3-qter as the sole human DNA, will aid the search for DNA associated with the fragile X site and will augment the high resolution genomic analysis of Xq28, including the identification of candidate genes for genetic-disease loci mapping to this region. Images PMID:2339126

  6. Mutation in the Human HPRT1 Gene and the Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Nyhan, William L

    2016-08-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare X-linked inherited neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt) is defective. The authors report a novel mutation which led to HGprt-related neurological dysfunction (HND) in two brothers from the same family with a missense mutation in exon 6 of the coding region of the HPRT1 gene: c.437T>C, p.L146S. Molecular diagnosis discloses the genetic heterogeneity of the HPRT1 gene responsible for HGprt deficiency. It allows fast, accurate carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:27379977

  7. Archaeoglobus Fulgidus DNA Polymerase D: A Zinc-Binding Protein Inhibited by Hypoxanthine and Uracil.

    PubMed

    Abellón-Ruiz, Javier; Waldron, Kevin J; Connolly, Bernard A

    2016-07-17

    Archaeal family-D DNA polymerases (Pol-D) comprise a small (DP1) proofreading subunit and a large (DP2) polymerase subunit. Pol-D is one of the least studied polymerase families, and this publication investigates the enzyme from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Afu Pol-D). The C-terminal region of DP2 contains two conserved cysteine clusters, and their roles are investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. The cluster nearest the C terminus is essential for polymerase activity, and the cysteines are shown to serve as ligands for a single, critical Zn(2+) ion. The cysteines farthest from the C terminal were not required for activity, and a role for these amino acids has yet to be defined. Additionally, it is shown that Afu Pol-D activity is slowed by the template strand hypoxanthine, extending previous results that demonstrated inhibition by uracil. Hypoxanthine was a weaker inhibitor than uracil. Investigations with isolated DP2, which has a measurable polymerase activity, localised the deaminated base binding site to this subunit. Uracil and hypoxanthine slowed Afu Pol-D "in trans", that is, a copied DNA strand could be inhibited by a deaminated base in the alternate strand of a replication fork. The error rate of Afu Pol-D, measured in vitro, was 0.24×10(-5), typical for a polymerase that has been proposed to carry out genome replication in the Archaea. Deleting the 3'-5' proofreading exonuclease activity reduced fidelity twofold. The results presented in this publication considerably increase our knowledge of Pol-D. PMID:27320386

  8. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Christoffersen, Stig; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Mølgaard, Anne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-04-14

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic, and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) or the inhibitor adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its evolutionary origin in this family of PRTases. Only the N-terminal two-thirds of the polypeptide chain folds as a traditional type I PRTase with a five-stranded β-sheet surrounded by helices. The C-terminal third adopts an unusual three-helix bundle structure that together with the nucleobase-binding loop undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor ADP binds like the product AMP with both the α- and β-phosphates occupying the 5'-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide pH range, and the kinetic and ligand binding properties depend on both pH and the presence/absence of phosphate in the buffers. A slow hydrolysis of PRPP to ribose 5-phosphate and pyrophosphate, catalyzed by the enzyme, may be facilitated by elements in the C-terminal three-helix bundle part of the protein. PMID:25790177

  9. Mutagenesis in human cells with accelerated H and Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy

    1994-01-01

    The overall goals of this research were to determine the risks of mutation induction and the spectra of mutations induced by energetic protons and iron ions at two loci in human lymphoid cells. During the three year grant period the research has focused in three major areas: (1) the acquisition of sufficient statistics for human TK6 cell mutation experiments using Fe ions (400 MeV/amu), Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and protons (250 MeV/amu); (2) collection of thymidine kinase- deficient (tk) mutants or hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient (hprt) mutants induced by either Fe 400 MeV/amu, Fe 600 MeV/amu, or H 250 MeV/amu for subsequent molecular analysis; and (3) molecular characterization of mutants isolated after exposure to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu). As a result of the shutdown of the BEVALAC heavy ion accelerator in December 1992, efforts were rearranged somewhat in time to complete our dose-response studies and to complete mutant collections in particular for the Fe ion beams prior to the shutdown. These goals have been achieved. A major effort was placed on collection, re-screening, and archiving of 3 different series of mutants for the various particle beam exposures: tk-ng mutants, tk-sg mutants, and hprt-deficient mutants. Where possible, groups of mutants were isolated for several particle fluences. Comparative analysis of mutation spectra has occured with characterization of the mutation spectrum for hprt-deficient mutants obtained after exposure of TK6 cells to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and a series of spontaneous mutants.

  10. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus shuttle vector for stable episomal replication of cDNA expression libraries in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Margolskee, R F; Kavathas, P; Berg, P

    1988-01-01

    Efficient transfection and expression of cDNA libraries in human cells has been achieved with an Epstein-Barr virus-based subcloning vector (EBO-pcD). The plasmid vector contains a resistance marker for hygromycin B to permit selection for transformed cells. The Epstein-Barr virus origin for plasmid replication (oriP) and the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen gene have also been incorporated into the vector to ensure that the plasmids are maintained stably and extrachromosomally. Human lymphoblastoid cells can be stably transformed at high efficiency (10 to 15%) by such plasmids, thereby permitting the ready isolation of 10(6) to 10(7) independent transformants. Consequently, entire high-complexity EBO-pcD expression libraries can be introduced into these cells. Furthermore, since EBO-pcD plasmids are maintained as episomes at two to eight copies per cell, intact cDNA clones can be readily isolated from transformants and recovered by propagation in Escherichia coli. By using such vectors, human cells have been stably transformed with EBO-pcD-hprt to express hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and with EBO-pcD-Leu-2 to express the human T-cell surface marker Leu-2 (CD8). Reconstruction experiments with mixtures of EBO-pcD plasmids demonstrated that one clone of EBO-pcD-hprt per 10(6) total clones or one clone of EBO-pcD-Leu-2 per 2 x 10(4) total clones can be recovered intact from the transformed cells. The ability to directly select for expression of very rare EBO-pcD clones and to then recover these episomes should make it possible to clone certain genes where hybridization and immunological screening methods are not applicable but where a phenotype can be scored or selected in human cell lines. Images PMID:2841588

  12. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  13. Dynamic architecture of the purinosome involved in human de novo purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kyoung, Minjoung; Russell, Sarah J; Kohnhorst, Casey L; Esemoto, Nopondo N; An, Songon

    2015-01-27

    Enzymes in human de novo purine biosynthesis have been demonstrated to form a reversible, transient multienzyme complex, the purinosome, upon purine starvation. However, characterization of purinosomes has been limited to HeLa cells and has heavily relied on qualitative examination of their subcellular localization and reversibility under wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative approaches, which are particularly compatible with human disease-relevant cell lines, are necessary to explicitly understand the purinosome in live cells. In this work, human breast carcinoma Hs578T cells have been utilized to demonstrate the preferential utilization of the purinosome under purine-depleted conditions. In addition, we have employed a confocal microscopy-based biophysical technique, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, to characterize kinetic properties of the purinosome in live Hs578T cells. Quantitative characterization of the diffusion coefficients of all de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes reveals the significant reduction of their mobile kinetics upon purinosome formation, the dynamic partitioning of each enzyme into the purinosome, and the existence of three intermediate species in purinosome assembly under purine starvation. We also demonstrate that the diffusion coefficient of the purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1, is not sensitive to purine starvation, indicating exclusion of the salvage pathway from the purinosome. Furthermore, our biophysical characterization of nonmetabolic enzymes clarifies that purinosomes are spatiotemporally different cellular bodies from stress granules and cytoplasmic protein aggregates in both Hs578T and HeLa cells. Collectively, quantitative analyses of the purinosome in Hs578T cells led us to provide novel insights for the dynamic architecture of the purinosome assembly. PMID:25540829

  14. Gold(I)-triphenylphosphine complexes with hypoxanthine-derived ligands: in vitro evaluations of anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Křikavová, Radka; Hošek, Jan; Vančo, Ján; Hutyra, Jakub; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    A series of gold(I) complexes involving triphenylphosphine (PPh3) and one N-donor ligand derived from deprotonated mono- or disubstituted hypoxanthine (HLn) of the general composition [Au(Ln)(PPh3)] (1-9) is reported. The complexes were thoroughly characterized, including multinuclear high resolution NMR spectroscopy as well as single crystal X-ray analysis (for complexes 1 and 3). The complexes were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines MCF7 (breast carcinoma), HOS (osteosarcoma) and THP-1 (monocytic leukaemia), which identified the complexes 4-6 as the most promising representatives, who antiproliferative activity was further tested against A549 (lung adenocarcinoma), G-361 (melanoma), HeLa (cervical cancer), A2780 (ovarian carcinoma), A2780R (ovarian carcinoma resistant to cisplatin), 22Rv1 (prostate cancer) cell lines. Complexes 4-6 showed a significantly higher in vitro anticancer effect against the employed cancer cells, except for G-361, as compared with the commercially used anticancer drug cisplatin, with IC50 ≈ 1-30 µM. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in vitro by the assessment of the ability of the complexes to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), in the lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage-like THP-1 cell model. The results of this study identified the complexes as auspicious anti-inflammatory agents with similar or better activity as compared with the clinically applied gold-based antiarthritic drug Auranofin. In an effort to explore the possible mechanisms responsible for the biological effect, the products of interactions of selected complexes with sulfur-containing biomolecules (L-cysteine and reduced glutathione) were studied by means of the mass-spectrometry study. PMID:25226034

  15. Gold(I)-Triphenylphosphine Complexes with Hypoxanthine-Derived Ligands: In Vitro Evaluations of Anticancer and Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Křikavová, Radka; Hošek, Jan; Vančo, Ján; Hutyra, Jakub; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    A series of gold(I) complexes involving triphenylphosphine (PPh3) and one N-donor ligand derived from deprotonated mono- or disubstituted hypoxanthine (HLn) of the general composition [Au(Ln)(PPh3)] (1–9) is reported. The complexes were thoroughly characterized, including multinuclear high resolution NMR spectroscopy as well as single crystal X-ray analysis (for complexes 1 and 3). The complexes were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines MCF7 (breast carcinoma), HOS (osteosarcoma) and THP-1 (monocytic leukaemia), which identified the complexes 4–6 as the most promising representatives, who antiproliferative activity was further tested against A549 (lung adenocarcinoma), G-361 (melanoma), HeLa (cervical cancer), A2780 (ovarian carcinoma), A2780R (ovarian carcinoma resistant to cisplatin), 22Rv1 (prostate cancer) cell lines. Complexes 4–6 showed a significantly higher in vitro anticancer effect against the employed cancer cells, except for G-361, as compared with the commercially used anticancer drug cisplatin, with IC50 ≈ 1–30 µM. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in vitro by the assessment of the ability of the complexes to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), in the lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage-like THP-1 cell model. The results of this study identified the complexes as auspicious anti-inflammatory agents with similar or better activity as compared with the clinically applied gold-based antiarthritic drug Auranofin. In an effort to explore the possible mechanisms responsible for the biological effect, the products of interactions of selected complexes with sulfur-containing biomolecules (L-cysteine and reduced glutathione) were studied by means of the mass-spectrometry study. PMID:25226034

  16. UV Radiation Induces Delayed Hyperrecombination Associated with Hypermutation in Human Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Stephen T.; Paffett, Kimberly S.; Shrivastav, Meena; Timmins, Graham S.; Morgan, William F.; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed genomic instability in human cells, including chromosomal abnormalities and hyperrecombination. Here, we investigate delayed genome instability of cells exposed to UV radiation. We examined homologous recombination-mediated reactivation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in p53-proficient human cells. We observed an ∼5-fold enhancement of delayed hyperrecombination (DHR) among cells surviving a low dose of UV-C (5 J/m2), revealed as mixed GFP+/− colonies. UV-B did not induce DHR at an equitoxic (75 J/m2) dose or a higher dose (150 J/m2). UV is known to induce delayed hypermutation associated with increased oxidative stress. We found that hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) mutation frequencies were ∼5-fold higher in strains derived from GFP+/− (DHR) colonies than in strains in which recombination was directly induced by UV (GFP+ colonies). To determine whether hypermutation was directly caused by hyperrecombination, we analyzed hprt mutation spectra. Large-scale alterations reflecting large deletions and insertions were observed in 25% of GFP+ strains, and most mutants had a single change in HPRT. In striking contrast, all mutations arising in the hypermutable GFP+/− strains were small (1- to 2-base) changes, including substitutions, deletions, and insertions (reminiscent of mutagenesis from oxidative damage), and the majority were compound, with an average of four hprt mutations per mutant. The absence of large hprt deletions in DHR strains indicates that DHR does not cause hypermutation. We propose that UV-induced DHR and hypermutation result from a common source, namely, increased oxidative stress. These two forms of delayed genome instability may collaborate in skin cancer initiation and progression. PMID:16880516

  17. In vitro mutational spectrum of cyclopenta[cd]pyrene in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, P; Melacrinos, A; Shukla, R

    1995-04-01

    Cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) is a widely distributed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with potent mutagenic and carcinogenic activity. In order to acquire an understanding of the mutagenic pathways of CPP, we studied mutations induced by this chemical in human cells. Four independent cultures of a human cell line expressing cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 (cell line MCL-5) were treated with CPP, and mutants at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus were selected en masse by 6-thioguanine (6TG) resistance. The kinds and positions of the mutations were analyzed using the combination of high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (hifi-PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The third exon of the HPRT gene was amplified from the 6TG-resistant cells using the hifi-PCR and the amplified fragment was subsequently analyzed by DGGE to separate mutant sequences from the wild-type sequence. Mutant bands were excised from the gel, amplified using PCR and sequenced. Sixteen different mutations were identified and consisted mostly of the G to T and A to T transversions. Other mutations identified included G to A and A to G transitions, a G to C transversion, and a single G deletion. Of these mutations, six occurred within a run of six guanines. The predominance of transversions involving a guanine or an adenine observed with CPP is similar to the data previously reported for the racemic mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), suggesting that the mechanisms of mutation induced by CPP may be similar to those induced by B[a]P. PMID:7728967

  18. A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin in serum.

    PubMed

    Kock, R; Delvoux, B; Greiling, H

    1993-05-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous determination of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin based on isocratic reversed-phase chromatography. This HPLC-method additionally allows the direct determination with UV-detection of inosine-5'-phosphate, uridine, thymine, orotic acid, allopurinol and oxipurinol, besides hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid in the same chromatographic run. Allantoin elutes in this system near the void volume and a fraction is collected covering the retention time range for this substance. After hydrolysis allantoin is converted to glyoxylate-2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone, rechromatographed and detected at 360 nm. The coefficient of variation for this method does not exceed 5.0% for a serum concentration of 0.3 mumol/l hypoxanthine and is not greater than 5.3% for a xanthine concentration of 0.3 mumol/l serum. Recoveries were 90-110% for both hypoxanthine and xanthine. The determination of uric acid had an imprecision and inaccuracy not exceeding 1.45% in the concentration range of 103-568 mumol/l. Due to the more complex procedure required for the determination of allantoin, the coefficient of variation between days was 13.6% for a sample containing 0.8 mumol/l allantoin and the recoveries for this analyte were in the range of 86-93%. Reference ranges (mean +/- SD) determined on 171 serum samples from healthy adults were 12.7 +/- 6.6 mumol/l for hypoxanthine, 3.3 +/- 1.4 mumol/l for xanthine, and 15.7 +/- 7.9 mumol/l for allantoin. No significant age or sex dependence was observed. Uric acid concentrations were 320 +/- 55 mumol/l serum for men and 206 +/- 55 mumol/l for women. PMID:8357939

  19. Discovery of potent and efficacious cyanoguanidine-containing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhang; Baumeister, Timm; Buckmelter, Alexandre J; Caligiuri, Maureen; Clodfelter, Karl H; Han, Bingsong; Ho, Yen-Ching; Kley, Nikolai; Lin, Jian; Reynolds, Dominic J; Sharma, Geeta; Smith, Chase C; Wang, Zhongguo; Dragovich, Peter S; Oh, Angela; Wang, Weiru; Zak, Mark; Wang, Yunli; Yuen, Po-Wai; Bair, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    A co-crystal structure of amide-containing compound (4) in complex with the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) protein and molecular modeling were utilized to design and discover a potent novel cyanoguanidine-containing inhibitor bearing a sulfone moiety (5, Nampt Biochemical IC50=2.5nM, A2780 cell proliferation IC50=9.7nM). Further SAR exploration identified several additional cyanoguanidine-containing compounds with high potency and good microsomal stability. Among these, compound 15 was selected for in vivo profiling and demonstrated good oral exposure in mice. It also exhibited excellent in vivo antitumor efficacy when dosed orally in an A2780 ovarian tumor xenograft model. The co-crystal structure of this compound in complex with the NAMPT protein was also determined. PMID:24279990

  20. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions. PMID:25945715

  1. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Attenuates Methotrexate Response in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Funk, R S; Singh, R; Pramann, L; Gigliotti, N; Islam, S; Heruth, D P; Ye, S Q; Chan, M A; Leeder, J S; Becker, M L

    2016-06-01

    Variability in response to methotrexate (MTX) in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) remains unpredictable and poorly understood. Based on previous studies implicating an interaction between nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) expression and MTX therapy in inflammatory arthritis, we hypothesized that increased NAMPT expression would be associated with reduced therapeutic response to MTX in patients with JIA. A significant association was found between increased plasma concentrations of NAMPT and reduced therapeutic response in patients with JIA treated with MTX. Inhibition of NAMPT in cell culture by either siRNA-based gene silencing or pharmacological inhibition with FK-866 was found to result in a fourfold increase in the pharmacological activity of MTX. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that NAMPT inhibits the pharmacological activity of MTX and may represent a predictive biomarker of response, as well as a therapeutic target, in the treatment of JIA with MTX. PMID:27166432

  2. Radiation-quality dependent cellular response in mutation induction in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Liu, Cui Hua

    2009-09-01

    We studied cellular responses in normal human fibroblasts induced with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types, such as gamma rays, neutrons and high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions. The cells were pretreated with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations (approximately 1 mGy/7-8 h) of 137Cs gamma rays, 241Am-Be neutrons, helium, carbon and iron ions before irradiations with an X-ray challenging dose (1.5 Gy). Helium (LET = 2.3 keV/microm), carbon (LET = 13.3 keV/microm) and iron (LET = 200 keV/microm) ions were produced by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. No difference in cell-killing effect, measured by a colony forming assay, was observed among the pretreatment with different radiation types. In mutation induction, which was detected in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus to measure 6-thioguanine resistant clones, there was no difference in mutation frequency induced by the X-ray challenging dose between unpretreated and gamma-ray pretreated cells. In the case of the pretreatment of heavy ions, X-ray-induced mutation was around 1.8 times higher in helium-ion pretreated and 4.0 times higher in carbon-ion pretreated cells than in unpretreated cells (X-ray challenging dose alone). However, the mutation frequency in cells pretreated with iron ions was the same level as either unpretreated or gamma-ray pretreated cells. In contrast, it was reduced at 0.15 times in cells pretreated with neutrons when compared to unpretreated cells. The results show that cellular responses caused by the influence of hprt mutation induced in cells pretreated with low-dose-rate or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types were radiation-quality dependent manner. PMID:19680011

  3. A mycobacterial phosphoribosyltransferase promotes bacillary survival by inhibiting oxidative stress and autophagy pathways in macrophages and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Roy, Debasish; Alaridah, Nader; Saha, Pratip; Nongthomba, Upendra; Godaly, Gabriela; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sonawane, Avinash

    2015-05-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various strategies to modulate host immune responses to facilitate its persistence in macrophages. The M. tuberculosis cell wall contains numerous glycoproteins with unknown roles in pathogenesis. Here, by using Concanavalin A and LC-MS analysis, we identified a novel mannosylated glycoprotein phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by Rv3242c from M. tuberculosis cell walls. Homology modeling, bioinformatic analyses, and an assay of phosphoribosyltransferase activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing recombinant Rv3242c (MsmRv3242c) confirmed the mass spectrometry data. Using Mycobacterium marinum-zebrafish and the surrogate MsmRv3242c infection models, we proved that phosphoribosyltransferase is involved in mycobacterial virulence. Histological and infection assays showed that the M. marinum mimG mutant, an Rv3242c orthologue in a pathogenic M. marinum strain, was strongly attenuated in adult zebrafish and also survived less in macrophages. In contrast, infection with wild type and the complemented ΔmimG:Rv3242c M. marinum strains showed prominent pathological features, such as severe emaciation, skin lesions, hemorrhaging, and more zebrafish death. Similarly, recombinant MsmRv3242c bacteria showed increased invasion in non-phagocytic epithelial cells and longer intracellular survival in macrophages as compared with wild type and vector control M. smegmatis strains. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the Rv3242c- and mimG-mediated enhancement of intramacrophagic survival was due to inhibition of autophagy, reactive oxygen species, and reduced activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes. Infection with MsmRv3242c also activated the MAPK pathway, NF-κB, and inflammatory cytokines. In summary, we show that a novel mycobacterial mannosylated phosphoribosyltransferase acts as a virulence and immunomodulatory factor, suggesting that it may constitute a novel target for antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25825498

  4. A Mycobacterial Phosphoribosyltransferase Promotes Bacillary Survival by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Autophagy Pathways in Macrophages and Zebrafish*

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Roy, Debasish; Alaridah, Nader; Saha, Pratip; Nongthomba, Upendra; Godaly, Gabriela; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sonawane, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various strategies to modulate host immune responses to facilitate its persistence in macrophages. The M. tuberculosis cell wall contains numerous glycoproteins with unknown roles in pathogenesis. Here, by using Concanavalin A and LC-MS analysis, we identified a novel mannosylated glycoprotein phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by Rv3242c from M. tuberculosis cell walls. Homology modeling, bioinformatic analyses, and an assay of phosphoribosyltransferase activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing recombinant Rv3242c (MsmRv3242c) confirmed the mass spectrometry data. Using Mycobacterium marinum-zebrafish and the surrogate MsmRv3242c infection models, we proved that phosphoribosyltransferase is involved in mycobacterial virulence. Histological and infection assays showed that the M. marinum mimG mutant, an Rv3242c orthologue in a pathogenic M. marinum strain, was strongly attenuated in adult zebrafish and also survived less in macrophages. In contrast, infection with wild type and the complemented ΔmimG:Rv3242c M. marinum strains showed prominent pathological features, such as severe emaciation, skin lesions, hemorrhaging, and more zebrafish death. Similarly, recombinant MsmRv3242c bacteria showed increased invasion in non-phagocytic epithelial cells and longer intracellular survival in macrophages as compared with wild type and vector control M. smegmatis strains. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the Rv3242c- and mimG-mediated enhancement of intramacrophagic survival was due to inhibition of autophagy, reactive oxygen species, and reduced activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes. Infection with MsmRv3242c also activated the MAPK pathway, NF-κB, and inflammatory cytokines. In summary, we show that a novel mycobacterial mannosylated phosphoribosyltransferase acts as a virulence and immunomodulatory factor, suggesting that it may constitute a novel target for antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25825498

  5. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  6. Estimation of time since death by vitreous humor hypoxanthine, potassium, and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rognum, T O; Holmen, S; Musse, M A; Dahlberg, P S; Stray-Pedersen, A; Saugstad, O D; Opdal, S H

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of vitreous humor potassium (K(+)) has since the 1960s been recognized as an adjunct for estimation of time since death. In 1991 we introduced hypoxanthine (Hx) as a new marker. Furthermore we demonstrated that time since death estimation was more accurate when ambient temperature was included in the calculations, both for K(+) and for Hx. In this paper we present a refined method. The subjects consist of 132 cases with known time of death and ambient temperature. One sample from each subject was used in the calculations. Vitreous humor Hx levels were available in all subjects, while K(+) was measured in 106 of the subjects, due to insufficient volume of vitreous humor. Linear regression analysis was applied to model the correlation between vitreous humor Hx and K(+), taking the interactions with temperature into consideration. The diagrams published in 1991, which also included ambient temperature, estimated median time since death with range between the 10th and 90th percentile, whereas the linear regression analysis presented in this paper estimates mean time since death with a corresponding 95% interval of confidence. We conclude that time since death may be estimated with relatively high precision applying vitreous humor Hx and K(+) concentrations combined with ambient temperature. PMID:26994446

  7. Increasing NAD Synthesis in Muscle via Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Is Not Sufficient to Promote Oxidative Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, David W.; Davis, James G.; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  8. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  9. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification studies of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRTase) from Baker's yeast catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate from phosphoribosyl {alpha}-1-pyrophosphate and nicotinate, concomitant with ATP hydrolysis. Using purified NaPRTase, initial velocity measurements were performed varying one substrate concentration at different fixed levels of the second substrate and maintaining the third substrate constant. Subsequently, an exchange of label was observed between ATP and ({sup 14}C)-ADP. This rate of exchange was inhibited by PRibPP and pyrophosphate. Incubations of NaPRTase with pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate followed by sodium borohydride reduction led to inactivation of the enzyme. Pyridoxal was a less effective inhibitor than pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate. The inactivation of the enzyme by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was reversible upon flow dialysis, whereas reduction of the enzyme-pyridoxal complex with sodium borohydride rendered the inhibition irreversible. The presence of ATP or PRibPP, with or with Mg{sup 2+}, provided protection against this inactivation, while a kinetic analysis revealed the inhibition to be competitive, and noncompetitive, respectively. One mole of ({sup 3}H)-pyridoxal phosphate was required to completely inactivate the enzyme, which was reduced in the presence of MgATP and MgPRibPP to 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. No incorporation of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was observed in the combination of both of the two substrates.

  10. Hepatic FoxOs Regulate Lipid Metabolism via Modulation of Expression of the Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rongya; Wei, Dan; Gao, Hanlin; Liu, Yunlong; DePinho, Ronald A.; Dong, X. Charlie

    2011-01-01

    FoxO transcription factors have been implicated in lipid metabolism; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, in an effort to elucidate such mechanisms, we examined the phenotypic consequences of liver-specific deletion of three members of the FoxO family: FoxO1, FoxO3, and FoxO4. These liver-specific triply null mice, designated LTKO, exhibited elevated triglycerides in the liver on regular chow diet. More remarkably, LTKO mice developed severe hepatic steatosis following placement on a high fat diet. Further analyses revealed that hepatic NAD+ levels and Sirt1 activity were decreased in the liver of the LTKO mice relative to controls. At the mechanistic level, expression profile analyses showed that LTKO livers had significantly down-regulated expression of the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) gene encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway of NAD+ biosynthesis. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that Nampt is a transcriptional target gene of FoxOs. Significantly, overexpression of Nampt gene reduced, whereas knockdown increased, hepatic triglyceride levels in vitro and in vivo. Thus, FoxOs control the Nampt gene expression and the NAD+ signaling in the regulation of hepatic triglyceride homeostasis. PMID:21388966

  11. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. PMID:27018006

  12. An ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of xanthine, hypoxanthine and uric acid based on Co doped CeO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lavanya, N; Sekar, C; Murugan, R; Ravi, G

    2016-08-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor has been fabricated using Co doped CeO2 nanoparticles for selective and simultaneous determination of xanthine (XA), hypoxanthine (HXA) and uric acid (UA) in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH5.0) for the first time. The Co-CeO2 NPs have been prepared by microwave irradiation method and characterized by Powder XRD, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM and VSM measurements. The electrochemical behaviours of XA, HXA and UA at the Co-CeO2 NPs modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry methods. The modified electrode exhibited remarkably well-separated anodic peaks corresponding to the oxidation of XA, HXA and UA over the concentration range of 0.1-1000, 1-600 and 1-2200μM with detection limits of 0.096, 0.36, and 0.12μM (S/N=3), respectively. For simultaneous detection by synchronous change of the concentrations of XA, HXA and UA, the linear responses were in the range of 1-400μM each with the detection limits of 0.47, 0.26, and 0.43μM (S/N=3), respectively. The fabricated sensor was further applied to the detection of XA, HXA and UA in human urine samples with good selectivity and high reproducibility. PMID:27157753

  13. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase is overexpressed in malignant pleural mesothelioma: Dramatically responds one case in high OPRT expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Yoichiro; Takeoka, Shinjiro; Mouri, Atsuto; Fukusumi, Munehisa; Wakuda, Kazushige; Ibe, Tatsuya; Honma, Chie; Arimoto, Yoshihito; Yamada, Kazuaki; Wagatsuma, Miyuki; Tashiro, Akito; Kamoshida, Shingo; Kamimura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive, treatment-resistant cancer. Pemetrexed, an inhibitor of thymidylate synthase (TS), is used worldwide for MPM as a first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, there is little consensus for a second-line chemotherapy. S-1, a highly effective dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD)-inhibitory fluoropyrimidine, mainly acts via a TS inhibitory mechanism similar to pemetrexed. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) is a key enzyme related to the first step activation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for inhibiting RNA synthesis. We investigated 5-FU related-metabolism proteins, especially focusing on OPRT expression, in MPM Methods and Patients: Fifteen MPM patients who were diagnosed between July 2004 and December 2013 were enrolled. We examined the protein levels of 5-FU metabolism-related enzymes (TS, DPD, OPRT, and thymidine phosphorylase [TP]) in 14 cases Results: High TS, DPD, OPRT, and TP expressions were seen in 28.6%, 71.4%, 85.7%, and 35.7% of patients, respectively. We found that OPRT expression was extremely high in MPM tissue. We experienced one remarkable case of highly effective S-1 combined therapy for pemetrexed refractory MPM. This case also showed high OPRT protein expression Conclusion: The present study suggests that OPRT expression is high in MPM tumors. Although pemetrexed is mainly used for MPM chemotherapy as a TS inhibitor, S-1 has potential as an anticancer drug not only as a TS inhibitor but also inhibiting RNA synthesis through the OPRT pathway. This is the first report investigating OPRT protein expressions in MPM. PMID:27274438

  14. Perspectives on fast-neutron mutagenesis of human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, A

    1991-10-01

    The effects of low-fluence exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons (En = 4.2 MeV) have been studied in a sensitive human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, TK6. Mutations were scored for two genetic loci, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) and thymidine kinase (tk), as a function of dose and dose rate. For exposures limited to less than one cell cycle, the mutation frequency for the hgprt locus was 1.92 X 10(-7)/cGy. When exposures were protracted over multiple cell generations, mutation yields were increased to 6.07 X 10(-7)/cGy. Similar yields were obtained for the induction of tk-deficient mutants with a normal cell generation time (tk-ng) when exposures were carried out at very low dose rates over multiple cell generations. In the series of data presented here, the results obtained for short-duration neutron exposures are compared with data obtained for monoenergetic heavy charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) produced at the BEVALAC accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. TK6 cells have been exposed to beams ranging in atomic number from 20Ne to 40Ar over an energy range from 330 to 670 MeV/amu. Mutation induction was evaluated for both loci for a subset of these beams. The results obtained with 20Ne ions of 425 MeV/amu (LET = 32 keV/microns) and 28Si ions of 670 MeV/amu (LET = 50 keV/microns) closely resemble the mutation yields obtained for brief exposures to (Pu, Be) neutrons. The nature of alterations in DNA structure induced within the tk locus of tk-ng mutants is reviewed for a series of neutron-induced mutants and a series of mutants induced by exposure to 40Ar ions (470 MeV/amu, LET = 95 keV/microns). The mutational spectra for these two types of mutants were similar and were dominated by allele loss mutations. Multilocus deletions inclusive of the c-erbA1 locus were common among tk-deficient mutants induced by these densely ionizing radiations. For the mutants induced by 40Ar ions, it is likely that the mutations were produced by

  15. Coupled optical assay for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and its extension for the spectrophotometric and radioenzymatic determination of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate in mixtures and in tissue extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Ipata, P.L.; Mura, U.; Camici, M.; Giovannitti, M.P.

    1987-08-01

    A reliable assay was developed to characterize crude cell homogenates with regard to their adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activities. The 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP)-dependent formation of AMP from adenine is followed spectrophotometrically at 265 nm by coupling it with the following two-stage enzymatic conversion: AMP + H/sub 2/O----adenosine + Pi (5'-nucleotidase); adenosine + H/sub 2/O----inosine + NH/sub 3/ (adenosine deaminase). The same principle was applied to develop a spectrophotometric and a radioenzymatic assay for PRPP. The basis of the spectrophotometric assay is the absorbance change at 265 nm associated with the enzymatic conversion of PRPP into inosine, catalyzed by the sequential action of partially purified adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, commercial 5'-nucleotidase, and commercial adenosine deaminase, in the presence of excess adenine. In the radiochemical assay PRPP is quantitatively converted into (/sup 14/C)inosine via the same combined reaction. Tissue extracts are incubated with excess (/sup 14/C)adenine. The radioactivity of inosine, separated by a thin-layer chromatographic system, is a measure of PRPP present in tissue extracts. The radioenzymatic assay is at least as sensitive as other methods based on the use of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. However, it overcomes the reversibility of the reaction and the need to use transferase preparations free of any phosphatase and adenosine deaminase activities.

  16. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  17. Radioprotector WR1065 reduces radiation-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hill, C.K.; Peraino, C. ); Biserka, N. ); Wells, R.L. . Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1985-06-01

    N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR1065) protects against radiation-induced cell killing and mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells. WR1065 (4 mm) was found to be effective in protecting against radiation-induced cell lethality only if present during irradiation. No protective effect was observed if the protector was added within 5 min after irradiation or 3 h later. The effect of WR1065 on radiation-induced mutation, expressed as resistance to the cytotoxic purine analogue 6-thioguanine (HGPRT), was also investigated. This agent was effective in reducing radiation-induced mutations regardless of when it was administered. Following 10 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, the mutation frequencies observed per 10/sup 6/ survivors were 77 +- 8, 27 +- 6, 42 +- 7, and 42 +- 7 for radiation only, and WR1065 present during, immediately after, or 3 h after irradiation. These data suggest that although a segment of radiation-induced damage leading to reproductive death cannot be modulated through the postirradiation action of WR1065, processes leading to the fixation of gross genetic damage and mutation induction in surviving cells can be effectively altered and interfered with leading to a marked reduction in mutation frequency.

  18. Down-Regulation of a Nicotinate Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene, OsNaPRT1, Leads to Withered Leaf Tips1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Deyong; Li, Gengmi; Jiang, Liang; Hu, Xingming; Ye, Weijun; Zhu, Li; Hu, Jiang; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Guo, Longbiao

    2016-01-01

    Premature leaf senescence affects plant growth and yield in rice. NAD plays critical roles in cellular redox reactions and remains at a sufficient level in the cell to prevent cell death. Although numerous factors affecting leaf senescence have been identified, few involving NAD biosynthetic pathways have been described for plants. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of Leaf Tip Senescence 1 (LTS1) in rice (Oryza sativa), a recessive mutation in the gene encoding O. sativa nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (OsNaPRT1) in the NAD salvage pathway. A point mutation in OsNaPRT1 leads to dwarfism and the withered leaf tip phenotype, and the lts1 mutant displays early leaf senescence compared to the wild type. Leaf nicotinate and nicotinamide contents are elevated in lts1, while NAD levels are reduced. Leaf tissue of lts1 exhibited significant DNA fragmentation and H2O2 accumulation, along with up-regulation of genes associated with senescence. The lts1 mutant also showed reduced expression of SIR2-like genes (OsSRT1 and OsSRT2) and increased acetylation of histone H3K9. Down-regulation of OsSRTs induced histone H3K9 acetylation of senescence-related genes. These results suggest that deficiency in the NAD salvage pathway can trigger premature leaf senescence due to transcriptional activation of senescence-related genes. PMID:27208230

  19. Structure-Based Design of Potent Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Inhibitors with Promising in Vitro and in Vivo Antitumor Activities.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jinhong; Liao, Chenzhong; Liu, Yanghan; Qin, Xiaochu; Chen, Jiaxuan; Qiu, Yatao; Qin, Dongguang; Li, Zheng; Tu, Zheng-Chao; Jiang, Sheng

    2016-06-23

    Inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has the potential to directly limit NAD production in cancer cells and is an effective strategy for cancer treatment. Using a structure-based strategy, we have designed a new class of potent small-molecule inhibitors of NAMPT. Several designed compounds showed promising antiproliferative activities in vitro. (E)-N-(5-((4-(((2-(1H-Indol-3-yl)ethyl)(isopropyl)amino)methyl)phenyl)amino)pentyl)-3-(pyridin-3-yl)acrylamide, 30, bearing an indole moiety, has an IC50 of 25.3 nM for binding to the NAMPT protein and demonstrated promising inhibitory activities in the nanomolar range against several cancer cell lines (MCF-7 GI50 = 0.13 nM; MDA-MB-231 GI50 = 0.15 nM). Triple-negative breast cancer is the most malignant subtype of breast cancer with no effective targeted treatments currently available. Significant antitumor efficacy of compound 30 was achieved (TGI was 73.8%) in an orthotopic MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer xenograft tumor model. This paper reports promising lead molecules for the inhibition of NAMPT which could serve as a basis for further investigation. PMID:27224875

  20. Down-Regulation of a Nicotinate Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene, OsNaPRT1, Leads to Withered Leaf Tips.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liwen; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Shikai; Li, Gengmi; Dong, Guojun; Jiang, Liang; Hu, Xingming; Ye, Weijun; Cui, Yongtao; Zhu, Li; Hu, Jiang; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Zeng, Dali; Qian, Qian; Guo, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    Premature leaf senescence affects plant growth and yield in rice. NAD plays critical roles in cellular redox reactions and remains at a sufficient level in the cell to prevent cell death. Although numerous factors affecting leaf senescence have been identified, few involving NAD biosynthetic pathways have been described for plants. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of Leaf Tip Senescence 1 (LTS1) in rice (Oryza sativa), a recessive mutation in the gene encoding O. sativa nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (OsNaPRT1) in the NAD salvage pathway. A point mutation in OsNaPRT1 leads to dwarfism and the withered leaf tip phenotype, and the lts1 mutant displays early leaf senescence compared to the wild type. Leaf nicotinate and nicotinamide contents are elevated in lts1, while NAD levels are reduced. Leaf tissue of lts1 exhibited significant DNA fragmentation and H2O2 accumulation, along with up-regulation of genes associated with senescence. The lts1 mutant also showed reduced expression of SIR2-like genes (OsSRT1 and OsSRT2) and increased acetylation of histone H3K9. Down-regulation of OsSRTs induced histone H3K9 acetylation of senescence-related genes. These results suggest that deficiency in the NAD salvage pathway can trigger premature leaf senescence due to transcriptional activation of senescence-related genes. PMID:27208230

  1. Campylobacter jejuni adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase is an active hexamer that is allosterically controlled by the twisting of a regulatory tail.

    PubMed

    Mittelstädt, Gerd; Moggré, Gert-Jan; Panjikar, Santosh; Nazmi, Ali Reza; Parker, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT) catalyzes the first committed step of the histidine biosynthesis in plants and microorganisms. Here, we present the functional and structural characterization of the ATP-PRT from the pathogenic ε-proteobacteria Campylobacter jejuni (CjeATP-PRT). This enzyme is a member of the long form (HisGL ) ATP-PRT and is allosterically inhibited by histidine, which binds to a remote regulatory domain, and competitively inhibited by AMP. In the crystalline form, CjeATP-PRT was found to adopt two distinctly different hexameric conformations, with an open homohexameric structure observed in the presence of substrate ATP, and a more compact closed form present when inhibitor histidine is bound. CjeATP-PRT was observed to adopt only a hexameric quaternary structure in solution, contradicting previous hypotheses favoring an allosteric mechanism driven by an oligomer equilibrium. Instead, this study supports the conclusion that the ATP-PRT long form hexamer is the active species; the tightening of this structure in response to remote histidine binding results in an inhibited enzyme. PMID:27191057

  2. Enhancement of succinate production by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli with co-expression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase and pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiangfeng; Gou, Dongmei; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Chen, Xu; Zhang, Changqing; Zhang, Jiuhua; Chen, Kequan; Jiang, Min

    2013-08-01

    Escherichia coli BA002, in which the ldhA and pflB genes are deleted, cannot utilize glucose anaerobically due to the inability to regenerate NAD(+). To restore glucose utilization, overexpression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase) encoded by the pncB gene, a rate-limiting enzyme of NAD(H) synthesis pathway, resulted in a significant increase in cell mass and succinate production under anaerobic conditions. However, a high concentration of pyruvate accumulated. Thus, co-expression of NAPRTase and the heterologous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000 in recombinant E. coli BA016 was investigated. The total concentration of NAD(H) was 9.8-fold higher in BA016 than in BA002, and the NADH/NAD(+) ratio decreased from 0.60 to 0.04. Under anaerobic conditions, BA016 consumed 17.50 g l(-1) glucose and produced 14.08 g l(-1) succinate with a small quantity of pyruvate. Furthermore, when the reducing agent dithiothreitol or reduced carbon source sorbitol was added, the cell growth and carbon source consumption rate of BA016 was reasonably enhanced and succinate productivity increased. PMID:23740313

  3. Alternative substrates reveal catalytic cycle and key binding events in the reaction catalysed by anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Tammie V M; Castell, Alina; Bulloch, Esther M M; Evans, Genevieve L; Short, Francesca L; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Parker, Emily J

    2014-07-01

    AnPRT (anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase), required for the biosynthesis of tryptophan, is essential for the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). AnPRT catalyses the Mg2+-dependent transfer of a phosphoribosyl group from PRPP (5'-phosphoribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate) to anthranilate to form PRA (5'-phosphoribosyl anthranilate). Mtb-AnPRT was shown to catalyse a sequential reaction and significant substrate inhibition by anthranilate was observed. Antimycobacterial fluoroanthranilates and methyl-substituted analogues were shown to act as alternative substrates for Mtb-AnPRT, producing the corresponding substituted PRA products. Structures of the enzyme complexed with anthranilate analogues reveal two distinct binding sites for anthranilate. One site is located over 8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) from PRPP at the entrance to a tunnel leading to the active site, whereas in the second, inner, site anthranilate is adjacent to PRPP, in a catalytically relevant position. Soaking the analogues for variable periods of time provides evidence for anthranilate located at transient positions during transfer from the outer site to the inner catalytic site. PRPP and Mg2+ binding have been shown to be associated with the rearrangement of two flexible loops, which is required to complete the inner anthranilate-binding site. It is proposed that anthranilate first binds to the outer site, providing an unusual mechanism for substrate capture and efficient transfer to the catalytic site following the binding of PRPP. PMID:24712732

  4. A QM/QTAIM microstructural analysis of the tautomerisationviathe DPT of the hypoxanthine·adenine nucleobase pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Zhurakivsky, Roman O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-08-01

    We provide a pathway for the tautomerisation of the biologically important hypoxanthine.adenine (Hyp.Ade) nucleobase pair (Cs) formed by the keto tautomer of the Hyp and the amino tautomer of the Ade into the Hyp*.Ade* base pair (Cs) formed by the enol tautomer of the Hyp and the imino tautomer of the Ade by applying quantum-mechanical calculations and Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis. It was found out that the dipole active Hyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* tautomerisation occurs via the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT) through the TSHyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* (Cs). Based on the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds along the intrinsic reaction coordinate, it was established that the N6H...O6 H-bond (5.40) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (6.99) in the Hyp.Ade base pair, as well as the O6H...N6 H-bond (11.50) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (7.28 kcal.mol-1) in the Hyp*.Ade* base pair, mutually strengthening each other. The Hyp*.Ade* base pair possesses an extremely short lifetime 2.68.10-14 s, which is predetermined by the negative value of the Gibbs free energy of the reverse barrier of its tautomerisation, and all of the six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations cannot develop during this period of time. Consequently, the Hyp.Ade→Hyp*.Ade* DPT tautomerisation cannot serve as a source of the rare tautomers of the bases.

  5. Increased plasma nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is associated with a hyperproliferative phenotype and restrains disease progression in MPN-associated myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rosti, Vittorio; Campanelli, Rita; Massa, Margherita; Viarengo, Gianluca; Villani, Laura; Poletto, Valentina; Bonetti, Elisa; Catarsi, Paolo; Magrini, Umberto; Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina; Genazzani, Armando A; Barosi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN)-associated myelofibrosis is a clonal, neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic stem cells, in which inflammation and immune dysregulation play an important role. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (eNAMPT), also known as visfatin, is a cytokine implicated in a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Here plasma levels of eNAMPT in patients with MPN-associated myelofibrosis and their effects on disease phenotype and outcomes were examined. The concordance of eNAMPT levels with the marker of general inflammation high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was also studied. A total of 333 MPN-associated myelofibrosis patients (187 males and 146 females) and 31 age- and gender-matched normal-weight healthy subjects were enrolled in the study main body. Levels of eNAMPT and hs-CRP were simultaneously assayed in 209 MPN-associated myelofibrosis patients. Twenty-four polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia patients were used as controls. eNAMPT was over expressed in MPN-associated myelofibrosis, and eNAMPT expression was correlated with higher white blood cell count, higher hemoglobin, and higher platelet count, suggesting that eNAMPT is an indispensable permissive agent for myeloproliferation of MPN-associated myelofibrosis. The lack of correlation between eNAMPT and hs-CRP revealed that eNAMPT in MPN-associated myelofibrosis does not behave as a canonical inflammatory cytokine. In addition, higher levels of eNAMPT predicted longer time to blast transformation, and protected against progression toward thrombocytopenia and large splenomegaly. In conclusion, in MPN-associated myelofibrosis high levels of eNAMPT mark the myeloproliferative potential and, at variance with a high number of cancers, are protective against disease progression. Am. J. Hematol. 91:709-713, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074203

  6. Co-expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase for succinate production in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Chen, Xu; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Wan, Qing; Wu, Mingke; Zhang, Hanwen; Ma, Jiangfeng; Chen, Kequan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-03-01

    Succinate is not the dominant fermentation product from xylose in wild-type Escherichia coli K12. E. coli BA 203 is a lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA), pyruvate formate lyase (pflB), and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-carboxylase (ppc) deletion strain. To increase succinate accumulation and reduce byproduct formation, engineered E. coli BA204, in which ATP-forming PEP-carboxykinase (PEPCK) is overexpressed in BA203, was constructed and produced 2.17-fold higher succinate yield. To further improve the biomass and the consumption rate of xylose, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase), a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NAD(H), was also overexpressed. Thus, co-expression of PEPCK and NAPRTase in recombinant E. coli BA209 was investigated. In BA209, the pck gene and the pncB gene each have a trc promoter, hence, both genes are well expressed. During a 72-h anaerobic fermentation in sealed bottles, the total concentration of NAD(H) in BA209 was 1.25-fold higher than that in BA204, and the NADH/NAD+ ratio decreased from 0.28 to 0.11. During the exclusively anaerobic fermentation in a 3-L bioreactor, BA209 consumed 17.1 g L⁻¹ xylose and produced 15.5 g L⁻¹ succinate. Furthermore, anaerobic fermentation of corn stalk hydrolysate contained 30.1 g L⁻¹ xylose, 2.1 g L⁻¹ glucose and 1.5 g L⁻¹ arabinose, it produced a final succinate concentration of 17.2 g L⁻¹ with a yield of 0.94 g g⁻¹ total sugars. PMID:24564896

  7. Biochemical characterization of quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and inhibition of its activity by pyrazinamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Shibayama, Keigo; Rimbara, Emiko; Mori, Shigetarou

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis and a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. QAPRTase catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) through a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. The crystal structure of QAPRTase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtQAPRTase) has been determined; however, a detailed functional analysis of MtQAPRTase has not been published. Here, we analyzed the enzymatic activities of MtQAPRTase and determined the effect on catalysis of the anti-tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA). The optimum temperature and pH for MtQAPRTase activity were 60°C and pH 9.2. MtQAPRTase required bivalent metal ions and its activity was highest in the presence of Mg2+. Kinetic analyses revealed that the Km values for QA and PRPP were 0.08 and 0.39 mM, respectively, and the kcat values for QA and PRPP were 0.12 and 0.14 [s-1], respectively. When the amino acid residues of MtQAPRTase, which may interact with QA, were substituted with alanine residues, catalytic activity was undetectable. Further, PZA, which is an anti-tuberculosis drug and a structural analog of QA, markedly inhibited the catalytic activity of MtQAPRTase. The structure of PZA may provide the basis for the design of new inhibitors of MtQAPRTase. These findings provide new insights into the catalytic properties of MtQAPRTase. PMID:24949952

  8. Quantifaction of mutagens at the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) gene loci in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell/hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) mutagen assay developed by Hsie et al., was simplified by culturing the cells as unattached cultures, and also modified to include mutation at the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase (ouabain resistance) gene locus. The cost and time involved were decreased by culturing the CHO cells unattached on nontissue culture plates during the expression period. The inclusion of a second gene locus ensures that mutagenicities observed were not due to the peculiar properties of a specific gene locus. These procedures are now used in our laboratory for routine testing of environmental chemicals and complex mixtures.

  9. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and genetic

  10. The role of human cytochrome P4503A4 in biotransformation of tissue-specific derivatives of 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Mesarosova, Monika; Valovicova, Zuzana; Srancikova, Annamaria; Krajcovicova, Zdenka; Milcova, Alena; Sokolova, Romana; Schmuczerova, Jana; Topinka, Jan; Gabelova, Alena

    2011-09-15

    The environmental pollutant 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) and its derivative, 5,9-dimethylDBC (DiMeDBC), produced significant and dose-dependent levels of micronuclei followed by a substantial increase in the frequency of apoptotic cells in the V79MZh3A4 cell line stably expressing the human cytochrome P450 (hCYP) 3A4. In contrast, neither micronuclei nor apoptosis were found in cells exposed to the sarcomagenic carcinogen, N-methylDBC (N-MeDBC). A slight but significant level of gene mutations and DNA adducts detected in V79MZh3A4 cells treated with N-MeDBC, only at the highest concentration (30 {mu}M), revealed that this sarcomagenic carcinogen was also metabolized by hCYP3A4. Surprisingly, DBC increased the frequency of 6-thioguanine resistant (6-TG{sup r}) mutations only at the highest concentration (30 {mu}M), while DiMeDBC failed to increase the frequency of these mutations. The resistance to 6-thioguanine is caused by the mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) gene. The molecular analysis of the coding region of Hprt gene showed a deletion of the entire exon 8 in DiMeDBC-induced 6-TG{sup r} mutants, while no changes in the nucleotide sequences were identified in 6-TG{sup r} mutants produced by DBC and N-MeDBC. Based on our results, we suggest that hCYP3A4 is involved in the metabolism of DBC and its tissue-specific derivatives. While hCYP3A4 probably plays an important role in biotransformation of the liver carcinogens, DBC and DiMeDBC, it might only have a marginal function in N-MeDBC metabolism. - Highlights: > DBC activation via CYP3A4 resulted in micronuclei, DNA adduct formation and mutations in V79MZh3A4 cells. > The CYP3A4-mediated DiMeDBC activation caused micronuclei followed by apoptosis in V79MZh3A4 cells. > The genotoxic effects produced by N-MeDBC in V79MZh3A4 cells were negligible. > The hCYP3A4 may play an important role in DBC and DiMeDBC metabolism. > The CYP3A4 might only have a marginal function in N

  11. Simultaneous assay of glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine levels in a rat striatum using enzyme electrodes based on neutral red-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fen-Fen; Wan, Qiao; Li, Chen-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Xian, Yue-Zhong; Jin, Li-Tong; Yamamoto, Katsunobu

    2004-10-01

    An electrochemical method suitable for the simultaneous measurement of cerebral glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine concentrations from in vivo microdialysis sampling has been successfully performed for the first time using a neutral red-doped silica (NRDS) nanoparticle-derived enzyme sensor system. These uniform NRDS nanoparticles (about 50 +/- 3 nm) were prepared by a water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion method, and characterized by a TEM technique. The neutral red-doped interior maintained its high electron-activity, while the exterior nano-silica surface prevented the mediator from leaching out into the aqueous solution, and showed high biocompability. These nanoparticles were then mixing with the glucose oxidase (GOD), lactate oxidase (LOD), L-glutamate oxidase (L-GLOD) or xanthine oxidase (XOD), and immobilized on four glassy carbon electrodes, respectively. A thin Nafion film was coated on the enzyme layer to prevent interference from molecules such as ascorbic acid and uric acid in the dialysate. The high sensitivity of the NRDS modified enzyme electrode system enables the simultaneous monitoring of trace levels of glucose, L-glutamate, lactate and hypoxanthine in diluted dialysate samples from a rat striatum. PMID:15517210

  12. A comparative study of the concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin in the peripheral blood of normals and patients with acute myocardial infarction and other ischaemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kock, R; Delvoux, B; Sigmund, M; Greiling, H

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was the elucidation of the role of the xanthine oxidoreductase in the purine metabolism in ischaemic diseases of man. The serum concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin were determined in peripheral blood samples from patients with angina pectoris, cerebral insult and myocardial infarction with thrombolytic therapy and were compared with the concentrations obtained for healthy males and females. No significant differences were observed for the serum hypoxanthine concentrations, xanthine concentrations, the sum (hypoxanthine+xanthine) and the ratio (xanthine/hypoxanthine) between the healthy males, healthy females, the patients suffering from angina pectoris and the patients suffering from cerebral insult. An increase of the serum xanthine concentration in patients with myocardial infarction indicates a significant metabolic involvement of xanthine oxidoreductase in this disease and therefore a possible role in the development of tissue damage in the postischaemic phase due to oxygen radicals generated by the oxidase activity of this enzyme. The serum concentrations of uric acid and allantoin showed no differences between any of the studied groups. Study of the non-enzymatic oxidation of uric acid to allantoin by oxygen radicals, a relevant radical-scavenging mechanism in other diseases, provided no indication of an increased concentration of oxygen radicals due to the xanthine oxidoreductase reaction or other radical-producing mechanisms. PMID:7888480

  13. Studies on the energy metabolism of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) erythrocytes: V. Utilization of hypoxanthine for the synthesis of adenine and guanine nucleotides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlenfalvay, N.C.; White, J.C.; Chadwick, E.; Lima, J.E. )

    1990-06-01

    High pressure liquid radiochromatography was used to test the ability of opossum erythrocytes to incorporate tracer amounts of (G-{sup 3}H) hypoxanthine (Hy) into ({sup 3}H) labelled triphosphates of adenine and guanine. In the presence of supraphysiologic (30 mM) phosphate which is optimal for PRPP synthesis, both ATP and GTP are extensively labelled. When physiologic (1 mM) medium phosphate is used, red cells incubated under an atmosphere of nitrogen accumulate ({sup 3}H) ATP in a linear fashion suggesting ongoing PRPP synthesis in red cells whose hemoglobin is deoxygenated. In contrast, a lesser increase of labelled ATP is observed in cells incubated under oxygen, suggesting that conditions for purine nucleotide formation from ambient Hy are more favorable in the venous circulation.

  14. Hypoxanthine uptake by skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cells from equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1)-null mice: effect of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bone, D B J; Antic, M; Quinonez, D; Hammond, J R

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous regulator of vascular tone. This activity of adenosine is terminated by its uptake and metabolism by microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC). The predominant transporter involved is ENT1 (equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype 1). MVEC also express the nucleobase transporter (ENBT1) which is involved in the cellular flux of adenosine metabolites such as hypoxanthine. Changes in either of these transport systems would impact the bioactivity of adenosine and its metabolism, including the formation of oxygen free radicals. MVEC isolated from skeletal muscle of ENT1(+/+) and ENT1(-/-) mice were subjected to oxidative stress induced by simulated ischemia/reperfusion or menadione. The functional activities of ENT1 and ENBT1 were assessed based on zero-trans influx kinetics of radiolabeled substrates. There was a reduction in the rate of ENBT1-mediated hypoxanthine uptake by ENT1(+/+) MVEC treated with menadione or after exposure to conditions that simulate ischemia/reperfusion. In both cases, the superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTMPyP attenuated the loss of ENBT1 activity, implicating superoxide radicals in the response. In contrast, MVEC isolated from ENT1(-/-) mice showed no reduction in ENBT1 activity upon treatment with menadione or simulated ischemia/reperfusion, but they did have a significantly higher level of catalase activity relative to ENT1(+/+) MVEC. These data suggest that ENBT1 activity is decreased in MVEC in response to the increased superoxide radical that is associated with ischemia/reperfusion injury. MVEC isolated from ENT1(-/-) mice do not show this reduction in ENBT1, possibly due to increased catalase activity. PMID:25448155

  15. Photosensitized Oxidation of Hypoxanthine and Xanthine by Aluminum Phthalocyanine Tetrasulfonate. Role of the Alkylating Quinone 2,5-Dichloro-diaziridinyl-1,4-benzoquinone

    PubMed Central

    Alegria, Antonio E.; Inostroza, Yaritza; Kumar, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Photoirradiation of nitrogen-saturated aqueous solutions containing aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS4) at 675 nm in the presence of 2,5-dichloro-diaziridinyl-1,4-benzoquinone (AZDClQ) and hypoxanthine (HX) produces the oxidized HX derivatives, xanthine (X) and uric acid (UA). Concentrations of the AZDClQ semiquinone, X and UA increase at the expense of HX with an increase in irradiation time. Almost negligible decomposition of HX, as well as very low amounts of X, are detected if photolysis occurs under identical conditions but in the absence of AZDClQ. Addition of calf-thymus DNA produces quinone-DNA covalent adducts after photolysis of anaerobic samples containing quinone, DNA and AlPcS4, in the presence or absence of HX and at pH 5.5. However, larger amounts of quinone-DNA adducts are detected if HX is present. The results presented here could have applications in the photodynamic treatment of hypoxic tissues such as solid tumors, under conditions of high HX concentration, where Type-I pathways could be more important than singlet oxygen generation. PMID:18627517

  16. The role of the C-terminal region on the oligomeric state and enzymatic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Wanda M; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Defelipe, Lucas A; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier; Delfino, José M

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcHPRT) is a critical enzyme for the survival of the parasite. This work demonstrates that the full-length form in solution adopts a stable and enzymatically active tetrameric form, exhibiting large inter-subunit surfaces. Although this protein irreversibly aggregates during unfolding, oligomerization is reversible and can be modulated by low concentrations of urea. When the C-terminal region, which is predicted as a disordered stretch, is excised by proteolysis, TcHPRT adopts a dimeric state, suggesting that the C-terminal region acts as a main guide for the quaternary arrangement. These results are in agreement with X-ray crystallographic data presented in this work. On the other hand, the C-terminal region exhibits a modulatory role on the enzyme, as attested by the enhanced activity observed for the dimeric form. Bisphosphonates act as substrate-mimetics, uncovering long-range communications among the active sites. All in all, this work contributes to establish new ways applicable to the design of novel inhibitors that could eventually result in new drugs against parasitic diseases. PMID:26969784

  17. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase localizes to the Golgi complex and its expression levels affect the sensitivity to anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Yasukazu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Hirooki; Nasu, Takashi; Koike, Shuji; Kakehata, Seiji; Ito, Tsukasa; Goto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) is engaged in de novo pyrimidine synthesis. It catalyzes oronitine to uridine monophosphate (UMP), which is used for RNA synthesis. De novo pyrimidine synthesis has long been known to play an important role in providing DNA/RNA precursors for rapid proliferative activity of cancer cells. Furthermore, chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is taken up into cancer cells and is converted to 5-fluoro-UMP (FUMP) by OPRT or to 5-fluoro-dUMP (FdUMP) through intermediary molecules by thymidine phosphorylase. These 5-FU metabolites are misincorporated into DNA/RNA, thereby producing dysfunction of these information processing. However, it remains unclear how the subcellular localization of OPRT and how its variable expression levels affect the response to 5-FU at the cellular level. In this study, immunocytochemical analysis reveals that OPRT localizes to the Golgi complex. Results also show that not only overexpression but also downregulation of OPRT render cells susceptible to 5-FU exposure, but it has no effect on DNA damaging agent doxorubicin. This study provides clues to elucidate the cellular response to 5-FU chemotherapy in relation to the OPRT expression level. PMID:26700594

  18. Unravelling the potential of a new uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) from Arabidopsis thaliana in sensitizing HeLa cells towards 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sharmila; Sanpui, Pallab; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-10-01

    In silico studies with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtUPRT) revealed its lower binding energies for uracil and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as compared to those of bacterial UPRT indicating the prospective of AtUPRT in gene therapy implications. Hence, AtUPRT was cloned and stably expressed in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) to investigate the effect of prodrug 5-FU on these transfected cancer cells. The treatment of AtUPRT-expressing HeLa (HeLa-UPP) cells with 5-FU for 72h resulted in significant decrease in cell viability. Moreover, 5-FU was observed to induce apoptosis and perturb mitochondrial membrane potential in HeLa-UPP cells. While cell cycle analysis revealed significant S-phase arrest as a result of 5-FU treatment in HeLa-UPP cells, quantitative gene expression analysis demonstrated simultaneous upregulation of important cell cycle related genes, cyclin D1 and p21. The survival fractions of non-transfected, vector-transfected and AtUPRT-transfected HeLa cells, following 5-FU treatment, were calculated to be 0.425, 0.366 and 0.227, respectively. PMID:27180296

  19. Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Anthranilate Phosphoribosyltransferase Variants Reveal the Conformational Changes That Facilitate Delivery of the Substrate to the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Tammie V M; Evans, Genevieve L; Castell, Alina; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Parker, Emily J

    2015-10-01

    Anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (AnPRT) is essential for the biosynthesis of tryptophan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This enzyme catalyzes the second committed step in tryptophan biosynthesis, the Mg²⁺-dependent reaction between 5'-phosphoribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and anthranilate. The roles of residues predicted to be involved in anthranilate binding have been tested by the analysis of six Mtb-AnPRT variant proteins. Kinetic analysis showed that five of six variants were active and identified the conserved residue R193 as being crucial for both anthranilate binding and catalytic function. Crystal structures of these Mtb-AnPRT variants reveal the ability of anthranilate to bind in three sites along an extended anthranilate tunnel and expose the role of the mobile β2-α6 loop in facilitating the enzyme's sequential reaction mechanism. The β2-α6 loop moves sequentially between a "folded" conformation, partially occluding the anthranilate tunnel, via an "open" position to a "closed" conformation, which supports PRPP binding and allows anthranilate access via the tunnel to the active site. The return of the β2-α6 loop to the "folded" conformation completes the catalytic cycle, concordantly allowing the active site to eject the product PRA and rebind anthranilate at the opening of the anthranilate tunnel for subsequent reactions. Multiple anthranilate molecules blocking the anthranilate tunnel prevent the β2-α6 loop from undergoing the conformational changes required for catalysis, thus accounting for the unusual substrate inhibition of this enzyme. PMID:26356348

  20. Biomarker analysis in patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy: orotate phosphoribosyltransferase expression is associated with treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Sil; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Haeryoung; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Jong Seok

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed to analyze the impact of protein expression related to fluoropyrimidine and cisplatin metabolism (thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase [OPRT], excision repair cross-complementation 1, Fanconi anemia complementation group D2, glutathione S-transferase P1, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1) on treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic or relapsed gastric cancer (MRGC) receiving S-1/cisplatin chemotherapy. Protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Of the 43 patients who had received S-1 (80 mg/m2/day; days 1-14) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2; day 1) every 3 weeks and had available tissue blocks, IHC was successfully performed in 41 patients. Patients with high OPRT levels in tumor tissues (IHC score≥6) had superior progression-free survival (PFS) (23.3 vs. 14.1 weeks [median]) and overall survival (OS) (72.4 vs. 55.4 weeks [median]) to those with low OPRT levels (IHC score≤5; P-values<.05). Expression levels of other proteins were not predictive of treatment outcomes. In multivariate analysis, both a good performance status and a high OPRT level were independently associated with prolonged PFS and OS. The OPRT expression level may be a good predictive marker in S-1/cisplatin-treated patients with MRGC. PMID:20533001

  1. Molecular analyses of in vivo hprt mutations in human T-lymphocytes: IV. Studies in newborns

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, M.J.; Nicklas, J.A.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to characterize in vivo gene mutations that occur during fetal development, molecular analyses were undertaken of mutant 6-thioguanine resistant T-lymphocytes isolated from placental cord blood samples of 13 normal male newborns. These mutant T-cells were studied to define hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene structural alterations and to determine T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns. Structural hprt alterations, as shown by Southern blot analyses, occurred in 85% of these mutant clones. These alterations consisted mostly of deletion of exons 2 and 3. These findings contrast with the 10-20% of gross structural alterations occurring randomly across the entire gene previously reported for T-cell mutants isolated from normal young adults. Iterative analyses of hprt structural alterations and TCR gene rearrangement patterns show that approximately one-third of the newborn derived mutants may have originated as pre- or intrathymic hprt mutations. This too contrasts with previous findings in adults where the background in vivo hprt mutations appeared to originate in postthymic T-lymphocytes.

  2. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  3. Molecular analysis of mutations affecting hprt mRNA splicing in human T-lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A.M. Pisa Univ. ); Tates, A.D.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Vrieling, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) cDNA from 6-thioguanine-resistant T-lymphocytes cloned from smoking and non-smoking adult donors showed that 35% of these mutants were defective in splicing of hprt mRNA. Among a set of 42 hprt splice mutants, the authors observed (1) complete loss of one or more exons, (2) partial loss of one exon, or (3) inclusion of part of an intron sequence between adjacent exons. Loss of exon 4 was significantly more frequent than of the other exons, suggesting that the sequences that regulate splicing of this exon are either larger than those of the other exons or especially prone to mutation. In order to identify the molecular nature of DNA alterations causing aberrant splicing of hprt mRNA, 17 splice mutants were analyzed in more detail by sequencing the genomic regions flanking the mis-spliced exon. Base pair substitutions or small deletions causing defective splicing were either detected in exon sequences or in splice site consensus sequences of introns.

  4. The effect of phorbols on metabolic cooperation between human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mosser, D.D.; Bols, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    Autoradiography has been used to study the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), 4-O-methyl TPA, and phorbol on metabolic cooperation between human diploid fibroblasts. When the donors, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase+ (HGPRT+) cells, and recipients, HGPRT- cells, were plated together in the presence of (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine and either 4-O-methyl TPA or phorbol, nearly all interactions that developed in 4 h were positive for metabolic cooperation whereas when high concentrations of TPA were used, the number of positive interactions was significantly less than the control. If the phorbol analogs were added after the donors and recipients had made contact, the number of positive interactions was the same as the control in all cases. However, although primary recipients in the cultures that had been treated with phorbol had the same number of grains as those in the control, primary recipients in cultures that had been treated with TPA or high concentrations of 4-O-methyl TPA had significantly fewer grains than those in the control. TPA treatment for 4 h had no effect on total (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation or incorporation into acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions. Thus, the effect of TPA on metabolic cooperation is interpreted as a reduction in the transfer of (/sup 3/H)nucleotides and is an indication of an interference with intercellular communication.

  5. Quantitative assay for mutation in diploid human lymphoblasts using microtiter plates

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, E.A.; Thilly, W.G.; Penman, B.W.; Liber, H.L.; Rand, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    A microtiter plating technique which eliminates the need for soft agar and fibroblast feeder layers to determine the colony-forming ability of diploid human lymphoblast lines was described. The calculation of cloning efficiency is based on the Poisson distribution, and a statistical method for calculating confidence intervals is presented. This technique has been applied to the comcomitant examination of induced mutation at the putative loci for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, thymidine, kinase, and Na/sup +//K/sup +/ adenosine triphosphatase.

  6. Nature of 6-methylpurine inhibition and characterization of two 6-methylpurine-resistant mutants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, L; Smyth, J; Wellman, A M

    1979-01-01

    6-Methylpurine, an analog of adenine, inhibits the growth of Neurospora crassa. From kinetic studies it was found that 6-methylpurine is converted to its nucleotide form by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7), and inhibits the de novo purine biosynthesis. Adenine relieves the growth inhibition caused by 6-methylpurine, whereas hypoxanthine is not very effective. Studies dealing with hypoxanthine utilization in the presence of 6-methylpurine indicated a severely reduced uptake of hypoxanthine and a general slowdown in its further metabolism. Two mutants (Mepr-3 and Mepr-10) which are resistant to 6-methylpurine were characterized. Studies of purine base uptake and the in vivo and in vitro conversion to nucleotides indicated that Mepr-10 may be an adenine phosphoribosyltransferase-defective mutant, whereas Mepr-3 may be a mutant with altered feedback response to 6-methylpurine. Both mutants showed a severely lowered hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase activity, but because 6-methylpurine did not have any effect on the conversion of hypoxanthine to IMP in the wild type, it was concluded that 6-methylpurine resistance in these mutants cannot be due to lowered hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase activity, but rather that the lowering of enzyme activity may be a secondary effect. PMID:153898

  7. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay for N2-[5-(hypoxanthin-9-yl)pentyloxycarbonyl]-L-arginine (ST 789) in plasma by cyclization with benzoin and fluorimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Bruno, G; Curti, S; Longo, A; Marzo, A; Arrigoni Martelli, E

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a new highly sensitive assay for N2-[5-(hypoxanthin-9-yl)pentyloxycarbonyl]-L-arginine, an immunomodulatory agent, required for clinical pharmacokinetic investigation. A pre-column derivatization by cyclization with benzoin in aqueous medium produces the fluorescent 2-substituted amino-4,5-diphenylimidazole fluorescing at 450 nm (excitation wavelength 310 nm). L-Arginine-acetyl-L-carnitinamide chloride (ST 857, II), another arginine derivative, was used as an internal standard. A C18 DB column (5 microns, 250 mm x 4.6 mm I.D.) and a 45:55 (v/v) mixture of 0.05 M ammonium phosphate at pH 7.2 and methanol as mobile phase were used. Linearity was ascertained in the range 5-100 ng. Extraction recovery from plasma proved to be higher than 90% in the range 5-50 ng/ml. Intra-day precision, expressed as coefficient of variation, was in the range 4.7-6.0%. The limit of quantification proved to be 5 ng/ml and the limit of detection 2 ng/ml at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5. The method is specific. PMID:8245158

  8. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase from baker's yeast: I. Kinetic analysis, chemical modification, and proton NMR spectroscopy of the enzyme substrate complex. II. Amino acid analysis and NMR spectroscopy of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of the effect of pH on the reversible reaction catalyzed by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) from Baker's yeast revealed that different amino acid residues may enable the enzyme-catalyzed reactions to proceed in the forward and reverse directions, respectively. For the forward reaction, there appear to be at least two critical amino acid residues (pK's 4.6 and 7.1) which must be in a deprotonated state to reach a maximum activity near pH 8 which is maintained through pH 9.5. For the reverse reaction, maximum activity is reached near pH 7 (pK's at 5.4) and then the activity decreases at higher pH (pK's at 7.9 and possibly above 9). A theoretical proton NMR spectrum was generated for OPRTase, based on its amino acid composition. The spectrum thus produced has a similar number of major peaks to that of the actual spectrum taken at 300 MHz. Spectra collected at various pH values between 8 and 5, were consistent with the maintenance of the gross conformational structure of the enzyme over that pH range.

  9. Slow base excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase limits the rate of formation of AP sites and AP endonuclease 1 does not stimulate base excision.

    PubMed

    Maher, Robyn L; Vallur, Aarthy C; Feller, Joyce A; Bloom, Linda B

    2007-01-01

    The base excision repair pathway removes damaged DNA bases and resynthesizes DNA to replace the damage. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) is one of several damage-specific DNA glycosylases that recognizes and excises damaged DNA bases. AAG removes primarily damaged adenine residues. Human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes AP sites produced by DNA glycosylases and incises the phophodiester bond 5' to the damaged site. The repair process is completed by a DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. If not tightly coordinated, base excision repair could generate intermediates that are more deleterious to the cell than the initial DNA damage. The kinetics of AAG-catalyzed excision of two damaged bases, hypoxanthine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine, were measured in the presence and absence of APE1 to investigate the mechanism by which the base excision activity of AAG is coordinated with the AP incision activity of APE1. 1,N6-ethenoadenine is excised significantly slower than hypoxanthine and the rate of excision is not affected by APE1. The excision of hypoxanthine is inhibited to a small degree by accumulated product, and APE1 stimulates multiple turnovers by alleviating product inhibition. These results show that APE1 does not significantly affect the kinetics of base excision by AAG. It is likely that slow excision by AAG limits the rate of AP site formation in vivo such that AP sites are not created faster than can be processed by APE1. PMID:17018265

  10. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats. PMID:27268719

  11. Assay of SF/sub 6/ and spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ for mutagenic activity in the CHO/HGPRT (Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mammalian cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Kurka, K.; Griffin, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The potential mutagenic (and cytotoxic) activity of SF/sub 6/ and spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ was investigated in an in vitro mammalian cell culture system using Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The CHO cells were exposed to the gases in vacutainer tubes which were constantly rotated. After a 4 h exposure the mutagenic and cytotoxic activity was assayed with the CHO/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) system. Results indicated that SF/sub 6/ was neither cytotoxic nor mutagenic to CHO cells. Spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ was found to be strongly cytotoxic (-80% cell death following 4 h exposure to 2 kJ spark discharge in 60 cm/sup 3/ at 1000 torr of SF/sub 6/) but not mutagenic. Increasing spark energy increased cytotoxicity but the spark samples remained nonmutagenic. The CHO/HGPRT system was coupled with a metabolic activation (S9 fraction) system used for detecting promutagens. When exposures were carried out in the presence of S9 fraction, SF/sub 6/ was still neither cytotoxic nor mutagenic; spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ was again strongly cytotoxic but not mutagenic. It appears that SF/sub 6/ and sparked SF/sub 6/ are neither promutagens nor direct acting mutagens in the CHO/HGPRT system. Studies have begun using a more mutagenically sensitive subclone of the CHO cells known as CHO-AS/sub 52/. The results of initial experiments using the CHO-AS/sub 52/ cells remain unchanged. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of expression of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase on the in vivo anti-tumor activity of prodrugs activated by E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Parker, W B; Allan, P W; Waud, W R; Hong, J S; Sorscher, E J

    2011-06-01

    The use of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) to activate prodrugs has demonstrated excellent activity in the treatment of various human tumor xenografts in mice. E. coli PNP cleaves purine nucleoside analogs to generate toxic adenine analogs, which are activated by adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) to metabolites that inhibit RNA and protein synthesis. We created tumor cell lines that encode both E. coli PNP and excess levels of human APRT, and have used these new cell models to test the hypothesis that treatment of otherwise refractory human tumors could be enhanced by overexpression of APRT. In vivo studies with 6-methylpurine-2'-deoxyriboside (MeP-dR), 2-F-2'-deoxyadenosine (F-dAdo) or 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-2-fluoroadenine 5'-monophosphate (F-araAMP) indicated that increased APRT in human tumor cells coexpressing E. coli PNP did not enhance either the activation or the anti-tumor activity of any of the three prodrugs. Interestingly, expression of excess APRT in bystander cells improved the activity of MeP-dR, but diminished the activity of F-araAMP. In vitro studies indicated that increasing the expression of APRT in the cells did not significantly increase the activation of MeP. These results provide insight into the mechanism of bystander killing of the E. coli PNP strategy, and suggest ways to enhance the approach that are independent of APRT. PMID:21394111

  13. PRTFDC1 Is a Genetic Modifier of HPRT-Deficiency in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Freeman, Kimberly G.; Edwards, Gaylen L.; Weinshenker, David; Thomas, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe X-linked neurological disorder caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). In contrast, HPRT-deficiency in the mouse does not result in the profound phenotypes such as self-injurious behavior observed in humans, and the genetic basis for this phenotypic disparity between HPRT-deficient humans and mice is unknown. To test the hypothesis that HPRT deficiency is modified by the presence/absence of phosphoribosyltransferase domain containing 1 (PRTFDC1), a paralog of HPRT that is a functional gene in humans but an inactivated pseudogene in mice, we created transgenic mice that express human PRTFDC1 in wild-type and HPRT-deficient backgrounds. Male mice expressing PRTFDC1 on either genetic background were viable and fertile. However, the presence of PRTFDC1 in the HPRT-deficient, but not wild-type mice, increased aggression as well as sensitivity to a specific amphetamine-induced stereotypy, both of which are reminiscent of the increased aggressive and self-injurious behavior exhibited by patients with LND. These results demonstrate that PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse and could therefore have important implications for unraveling the molecular etiology of LND. PMID:21818316

  14. MULTIPLE-ENDPOINT MUTAGENESIS WITH CHINESE HAMSTER OVARY (CHO) CELLS: EVALUATION WITH EIGHT CARCINOGENIC AND NON-CARCINOGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in culture, the authors have defined an assay, CHO/HGPRT, to quantify mutagen-induced cytotoxicity and mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) locus. This assay permits elucidation of the structure-activity r...

  15. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENICITY RESULTS FOR NINE COMPOUNDS EVALUATED AT THE HGPRT LOCUS IN THE STANDARD AND SUSPENSION CHO ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) assay which measures newly induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) locus has been widely used for mutagenesis testing. he insensitivity of the standard assay to some genotoxic agents has been speculated to be...

  16. Attenuated Variants of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinnah, H. A.; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Verdu, Alfonso; Larovere, Laura E.; Chen, Chung-Jen; Cossu, Antonello; Wu, Chien-Hui; Sampat, Radhika; Chang, Shun-Jen; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Nyhan, William; Harris, James C.; Reich, Stephen G.; Puig, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The classic form of the disease is described by a characteristic syndrome that includes overproduction of uric acid, severe generalized dystonia, cognitive disability and self-injurious behaviour. In addition to the…

  17. Rapid and High-Throughput Detection and Quantitation of Radiation Biomarkers in Human and Nonhuman Primates by Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhidan; Coy, Stephen L.; Pannkuk, Evan L.; Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Hall, Adam B.; Fornace, Albert J.; Vouros, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Radiation exposure is an important public health issue due to a range of accidental and intentional threats. Prompt and effective large-scale screening and appropriate use of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate radiation injury requires rapid methods for determining the radiation dose. In a number of studies, metabolomics has identified small-molecule biomarkers responding to the radiation dose. Differential mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) has been used for similar compounds for high-throughput small-molecule detection and quantitation. In this study, we show that DMS-MS can detect and quantify two radiation biomarkers, trimethyl-L-lysine (TML) and hypoxanthine. Hypoxanthine is a human and nonhuman primate (NHP) radiation biomarker and metabolic intermediate, whereas TML is a radiation biomarker in humans but not in NHP, which is involved in carnitine synthesis. They have been analyzed by DMS-MS from urine samples after a simple strong cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE). The dramatic suppression of background and chemical noise provided by DMS-MS results in an approximately 10-fold reduction in time, including sample pretreatment time, compared with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). DMS-MS quantitation accuracy has been verified by validation testing for each biomarker. Human samples are not yet available, but for hypoxanthine, selected NHP urine samples (pre- and 7-d-post 10 Gy exposure) were analyzed, resulting in a mean change in concentration essentially identical to that obtained by LC-MS (fold-change 2.76 versus 2.59). These results confirm the potential of DMS-MS for field or clinical first-level rapid screening for radiation exposure.

  18. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase leukocyte overexpression in Graves' opthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Budny, Bartłomiej; Zybek-Kocik, Ariadna; Sowiński, Jerzy; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the role of NAMPT/visfatin in euthyroid patients with Graves' disease without (GD) and with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), we analyzed NAMPT leukocyte expression and its serum concentration. This was a single-center, cross-sectional study with consecutive enrollment. In total, 149 patients diagnosed with Graves' disease were enrolled in the study. We excluded subjects with hyper- or hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, other autoimmune disorders, active neoplastic disease, and infection. The control group was recruited among healthy volunteers adjusted for age, sex, and BMI with normal thyroid function and negative thyroid antibodies. Serum levels of visfatin, TSH, FT4, FT3, antibodies against TSH receptor (TRAb), antithyroperoxidase antibodies, antithyroglobulin antibodies, fasting glucose, and insulin were measured. NAMPT mRNA leukocyte expression was assessed using RT-qPCR. NAMPT/visfatin serum concentration was higher in GD (n = 44) and GO (n = 49) patients than in the control group (n = 40) (p = 0.0275). NAMPT leukocyte expression was higher in patients with GO (n = 30) than in GD patients (n = 27) and the control group (n = 29) (p < 0.0001). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that NAMPT/visfatin serum concentration was significantly associated with GD (β = 1.5723; p = 0.021). When NAMPT leukocyte expression was used as a dependent variable, simple regression analysis found association with TRAb, fasting insulin level, HOMA-IR, GD, and GO. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis, we confirmed the association between higher serum NAMPT/visfatin level and GD (coefficient = 1.5723; p = 0.0212), and between NAMPT leukocyte expression and GO (coefficient = 2.4619; p = 0.0001) and TRAb (coefficient = 0.08742; p = 0.006). Increased NAMPT leukocyte expression in patients with GO might suggest a presently undefined role in the pathogenesis of GO. PMID:26767650

  19. Multiple dispersed spontaneous mutations: A novel pathway of mutation in a malignant human cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, J.; Tachibana, Akira; Meuth, M. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors analyzed the nature of spontaneous mutations at the autosomal locus coding for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in the human colorectal carcinoma cell line SW620 to establish whether distinctive mutational pathways exist that might underlie the more complex genome rearrangements arising in tumor cells. Point mutations occur at a low rate in part hemizygotes derived from SW620, largely as a result of base substitutions at G {center dot} C base pairs to yield transversions and transitions. However, a novel pathway is evident in the form of multiple dispersed mutations in which two errors, separated by as much as 1,800 bp, fall in the same mutant gene. Such mutations could be the result of error-prone DNA synthesis occurring during normal replication or during long-patch excision-repair of spontaneously arising DNA lesions. This process could also contribute to the chromosomal instability evident in these tumor cells.

  20. Inhibition of an NAD+ Salvage Pathway Provides Efficient and Selective Toxicity to Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Erin M.; Oleson, Bryndon J.; Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Diers, Anne R.; Hu, Qinghui; Sahoo, Daisy; Hogg, Neil; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Corbett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The tumorigenic potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is a major limitation to the widespread use of hPSC derivatives in the clinic. Here, we demonstrate that the small molecule STF-31 is effective at eliminating undifferentiated hPSCs across a broad range of cell culture conditions with important advantages over previously described methods that target metabolic processes. Although STF-31 was originally described as an inhibitor of glucose transporter 1, these data support the reclassification of STF-31 as a specific NAD+ salvage pathway inhibitor through the inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). These findings demonstrate the importance of an NAD+ salvage pathway in hPSC biology and describe how inhibition of NAMPT can effectively eliminate hPSCs from culture. These results will advance and accelerate the development of safe, clinically relevant hPSC-derived cell-based therapies. PMID:25834119

  1. Characterization of a TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159-ala Human Lymphoblast Clone

    SciTech Connect

    Chyall, L.: Gauny, S.; Kronenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    TK6 cells are a well-characterized human B-lymphoblast cell line derived from WIL-2 cells. A derivative of the TK6 cell line that was stably transfected to express a mutated form of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL (TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159- ala clone #38) is compared with the parent cell line. Four parameters were evaluated for each cell line: growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency, and frequency of spontaneous mutation to 6‑thioguanine resistance (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase locus) or trifluorothymidine resistance (thymidine kinase locus). We conclude that the mutated Bcl-xL protein did not affect growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency or spontaneous mutation frequencies at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. Results at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus were inconclusive. A mutant fraction for TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells exposed to 150cGy of 160kVp x-rays was also calculated. Exposure to x-irradiation increased the mutant fraction of TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells.

  2. Production of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against human alphafetoprotein, a hepatocellular tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Hwang, Jing-Min; Chen, Chien-Yuan

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study is to produce and purify monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against human alphafetoprotein (AFP). Hyperimmune ICR mice produced PAbs after injection with 0.5 mL pristane, and were injected with NS-1 myeloma cells 2 weeks later. Hyperimmune Balb/c mice were used for the production of MAbs. Mice were immunized four times, given a final boost, and their spleen cells were collected and fused with NS-1 myeloma cells under the presence of PEG 1500. The fused cells were then selected in the hypoxanthine, aminopterine, and thymidine (HAT)-RPMIX medium. Anti-AFP antibody-secreting hybridoma cell lines with high titer were cloned by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then subcloned by limiting dilution in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS), hypoxanthine, thymidine (HT)-RPMIX medium. Twelve murine hybridoma producing anti-AFP MAbs were obtained and designated as A73F3, A73E8, B73C5, A73G3, A73F8, 67B3, B73C2, B73E1, A73G2, B73G7, B73D7, and B73F4. Isotypes of these MAbs were identified as IgG(1) heavy chain and kappa light chain. The MAbs with high purity were obtained by affinity chromatography. The purity analysis of AFP and the MAbs was performed by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:12193284

  3. Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Strniste, G.F.; Tokita, N.

    1984-11-01

    Cell inactivation and induced mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus have been measured in cultured human fibroblasts (GM10) exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/ Pu and 250 kVp X rays. The survival curves resulting from exposure to ..cap alpha.. particles are exponential. The mean lethal dose, D/sub 0/, is approximately 1.3 Gy for X rays and 0.25 Gy for ..cap alpha.. particles. As a function of radiation dose, mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was linear for ..cap alpha.. particles whereas the X-ray-induced mutation data were better fitted by a quadratic function. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in cells exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles than to X rays.

  4. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P; Phillips, Margaret A

    2015-09-01

    The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5'-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  5. Monochromosomal hybrids for the analysis of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Athwal, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    In this research project the authors proposed to develop rodent/human hybrid cell lines each containing a single different human chromosome. The human chromosomes will be marked with Ecogpt and stably maintained by selection in the hybrid cells. The experimental approach to produce the proposed cell lines involve the following: they will first transfer a cloned selectable marker, Ecogpt (an E. coli gene for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: XGPRT) to normal diploid human cells using a retroviral vector. The transferred gene will integrate at random into multiple sites in the recipient cell genome. Clonal cell lines from independent transgenotes will each carry the selectable marker integrated into a different site and perhaps a different chromosome. The chromosome carrying the selectable marker will then be transferred further to mouse cells by microcell fusion. In addition they also use directed integration of Ecogpt into the chromosome present in rodent cells, otherwise not marked with a selectable marker. This allows them to complete the bank of proposed cell line. The human chromosome, since it will be marked with a selectable marker, can be transferred to any other cell line of interest for complementation analysis. Clones of each cell line, containing varying size segments of the same chromosome produced by selection for the retention or loss of the selectable marker following x-irradiation or by metaphase chromosome transfer method will facilitate physical mapping and determination of gene order on a chromosome. 1 fig.

  6. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5′-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5′-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of HAT. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  7. Genetic and physiological characterization of Bacillus subtilis mutants resistant to purine analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Saxild, H H; Nygaard, P

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis mutants defective in purine metabolism have been isolated by selecting for resistance to purine analogs. Mutants resistant to 2-fluoroadenine were found to be defective in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (apt) activity and slightly impaired in adenine uptake. By making use of apt mutants and mutants defective in adenosine phosphorylase activity, it was shown that adenine deamination is an essential step in the conversion of both adenine and adenosine to guanine nucleotides. Mutants resistant to 8-azaguanine, pbuG mutants, appeared to be defective in hypoxanthine and guanine transport and normal in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. Purine auxotrophic pbuG mutants grew in a concentration-dependent way on hypoxanthine, while normal growth was observed on inosine as the purine source. Inosine was taken up by a different transport system and utilized after conversion to hypoxanthine. Two mutants resistant to 8-azaxanthine were isolated: one was defective in xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (xpt) activity and xanthine transport, and another had reduced GMP synthetase activity. The results obtained with the various mutants provide evidence for the existence of specific purine base transport systems. The genetic lesions causing the mutant phenotypes, apt, pbuG, and xpt, have been located on the B. subtilis linkage map at 243, 55, and 198 degrees, respectively. PMID:3110131

  8. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-07-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  9. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  10. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27262062

  11. Analysis of purine metabolic enzymes in human CD4 Leu 8- and CD4 Leu 8+ lymphocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mejia, C; Polmar, S H; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1993-02-01

    1. Specific activities of adenosine deaminase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, adenosine kinase, 5'-nucleotidase, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, AMP deaminase, adenine phosphoribosyl transferase, and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase were analyzed in human CD4 T-lymphocyte subsets. 2. CD4 Leu 8- (helper/inducer) and CD4 Leu 8+ (suppressor/inducer) subpopulations were obtained by panning or fluorescence activated cell sorting techniques using specific monoclonal antibodies. 3. A 45% decrease of 5'-NT AMP activity in the CD4 Leu 8- cells (suppressor/inducer) compared with CD4 total cell population. 4. No statistical significant differences in enzyme activity were found between the subsets analyzed in other purine enzymes. 5. These results suggest that the distribution of purine metabolic enzymes is homogeneous in CD4 Leu 8- and CD4 Leu 8+ T-lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:8444317

  12. Use of PCR amplification of cDNA to study mechanisms of human cell mutagenesis and malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, V.M.; Yang, Jialing; Chen, Rueyhwa; McGregor, W.G.; Lukash, L.; Scheid, J.M.; Reinhold, D.S.; McCormick, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    PCR is widely employed to amplify short segments of genomic DNA to determine if a specific change has occurred. But some investigators need to sequence the entire coding region of mammalian genes to determine what specific changes have occurred. In 1989, the authors described a method to copy mRNA of the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene directly from the lysate of a clone of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutant diploid human fibroblasts without the need for RNA extraction or DNA template purification. The consensus sequence of the cDNA is determined by direct nucleotide sequencing. Using this method, they have investigated the kinds of mutations induced by carcinogens in the coding region of the HPRT gene and their location in the gene and examined the role of DNA repair were exposed to mutagens in exponential growth or synchronized and exposed at the beginning of S phase or in G{sub 1} phase several hr prior to DNA replication.

  13. Alzheimer's disease shares gene expression aberrations with purinergic dysregulation of HPRT deficiency (Lesch-Nyhan disease).

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hyuk; Friedmann, Theodore

    2015-03-17

    Transcriptomic studies of murine D3 embryonic stem (ES) cells deficient in the purinergic biosynthetic function hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and undergoing dopaminergic neuronal differentiation has demonstrated a marked shift from neuronal to glial gene expression and aberrant expression of multiple genes also known to be aberrantly expressed in Alzheimer's and other CNS disorders. Such genetic dysregulations may indicate some shared pathogenic metabolic mechanisms in diverse CNS diseases. PMID:25636690

  14. Purine oversecretion in cultured murine lymphoma cells deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase: genetic model for inherited hyperuricemia and gout.

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, B; Wormsted, M A; Cohen, M B; Martin, D W

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in several specific enzymes have been associated with increased rates of purine synthesis de novo in human and other mammalian cells. However, these recognized abnormalities in humans account for only a few percent of the clinical cases of hyperuricemia and gout. We have examined in detail the rates of purine production de novo and purine excretion by normal and by mutant (AU-100) murine lymphoma T cells (S49) 80% deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase [IMP:L-aspartate ligase (GDP-forming), EC 6.3.4.4]. The intracellular ATP concentration of the mutant cells is slightly diminished, but their GTP is increased 50% and their IMP, four-fold. Compared to wild-type cells, the AU-100 cells excrete into the culture medium 30- to 50-fold greater amounts of purine metabolites consisting mainly of inosine. Moreover, the AU-100 cell line overproduces total purines. In an AU-100-derived cell line, AU-TG50B, deficient in adenylosuccinate synthetase and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), purine nucleoside excretion is increased 50- to 100-fold, and de novo synthesis is even greater than that for AU-100 cells. The overexcretion of purine metabolites by the AU-100 cells seems to be due to the primary genetic deficiency of adenylosuccinate synthetase, a deficiency that requires the cell to increase intracellular IMP in an attempt to maintain ATP levels. As a consequence of elevated IMP pools, large amounts of inosine are secreted into the culture medium. We propose that a similar primary genetic defect may account for the excessive purine excretion in some patients with dominantly inherited hyperuricemia and gout. Images PMID:6957854

  15. Visfatin expression analysis in association with recruitment and activation of human and rodent brown and brite adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Didier F; Dumortier, Olivier; Beranger, Guillaume E; Casamento, Virginie; Ghandour, Rayane A; Giroud, Maude; Gautier, Nadine; Balaguer, Thierry; Chambard, Jean-Claude; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo; Niemi, Tarja; Taittonen, Markku; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Hinault, Charlotte; Amri, Ez-Zoubir

    2016-01-01

    Human brown adipocytes are able to burn fat and glucose and are now considered as a potential strategy to treat obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic disorders. Besides their thermogenic function, brown adipocytes are able to secrete adipokines. One of these is visfatin, a nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase involved in nicotinamide dinucleotide synthesis, which is known to participate in the synthesis of insulin by pancreatic β cells. In a therapeutic context, it is of interest to establish whether a potential correlation exists between brown adipocyte activation and/or brite adipocyte recruitment, and adipokine expression. We analyzed visfatin expression, as a pre-requisite to its secretion, in rodent and human biopsies and cell models of brown/brite adipocytes. We found that visfatin was preferentially expressed in mature adipocytes and that this expression was higher in brown adipose tissue of rodents compared to other fat depots. However, using various rodent models we were unable to find any correlation between visfatin expression and brown or brite adipocyte activation or recruitment. Interestingly, the situation is different in humans where visfatin expression was found to be equivalent between white and brown or brite adipocytes in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, visfatin can be considered only as a rodent brown adipocyte biomarker, independently of tissue activation. PMID:27386154

  16. Adipose Tissue–derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Prodrug-converting Enzyme Inhibit Human Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cavarretta, Ilaria T; Altanerova, Veronika; Matuskova, Miroslava; Kucerova, Lucia; Culig, Zoran; Altaner, Cestmir

    2009-01-01

    The ability of human adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs), engineered to express the suicide gene cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT), to convert the relatively nontoxic 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the highly toxic antitumor 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) together with their ability to track and engraft into tumors and micrometastases makes these cells an attractive tool to activate prodrugs directly within the tumor mass. In this study, we tested the feasibility and efficacy of these therapeutic cells to function as cellular vehicles of prodrug-activating enzymes in prostate cancer (PC) therapy. In in vitro migration experiments we have shown that therapeutic AT-MSCs migrated to all the prostate cell lines tested. In a pilot preclinical study, we observed that coinjections of human bone metastatic PC cells along with the transduced AT-MSCs into nude mice treated with 5-FC induced a complete tumor regression in a dose dependent manner or did not even allow the establishment of the tumor. More importantly, we also demonstrated that the therapeutic cells were effective in significantly inhibiting PC tumor growth after intravenous administration that is a key requisite for any clinical application of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies. PMID:19844197

  17. Mutagenic effects of alpha particles in normal human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Carpenter, S.; Hanks, T.

    1992-12-31

    Alpha-irradiation to the bronchial airways from inhaled radon progeny increases the risk of developing lung cancer. The molecular mechanism of radon-induced lung cancer is not clear, but one of the most important genetic effects of ionizing radiation is the induction of gene mutation. Mutations, especially those associated with visible chromosome abnormalities in humans, have been associated with cancer. Therefore, our objective is to use a well-defined model system to determine the mutagenic potential of alpha particles in normal human skin cells and to define this action at the molecular level. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with alpha particles (3.59 MeV, LET 115 keV {mu}m{sup {minus}1}) emitted from the decay of {sup 238}Pu. Mutagenicity was determined at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. Results from this study indicate that beta particles were more efficient in mutation induction than gamma rays. Based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, the RBE for mutation is about 8 for alpha particles. HPRT-deficient mutants which are resistant to 6-thioguanine have been isolated and analyzed by the Southern blot technique. To date, we have characterized 69 gamma-ray-induced and 195 alpha-particle-induced HPRT-deficient mutants. Our data indicate that more than 50% of all gamma-ray-induced mutants have band patterns identical to that observed for the normal structural HPRT gene, whereas the remaining mutants (45%) contain either a rearrangement, partial deletion, or total deletion of the HPRT gene. In contrast, only 30% of alpha-particle-induced human HPRT mutants contain a normal Southern blot pattern, and about 50% indicate total deletion of the HPRT gene. Our results support the notion that high-LET radiation produces more unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage than do gamma rays.

  18. The clastogenicity of 4NQO is cell-type dependent and linked to cytotoxicity, length of exposure and p53 proficiency.

    PubMed

    Brüsehafer, Katja; Manshian, Bella B; Doherty, Ann T; Zaïr, Zoulikha M; Johnson, George E; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2016-03-01

    4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) is used as a positive control in various genotoxicity assays because of its known mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The chemical is converted into 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide and gives rise to three main DNA adducts, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4AQO, 3-(desoxyguanosin-N (2)-yl)-4AQO and 3-(deoxyadenosin-N (6)-yl)-4AQO. This study was designed to assess the shape of the dose-response curve at low concentrations of 4NQO in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines, MCL-5, AHH-1 and TK6 as well as the mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell line in vitro. Chromosomal damage was investigated using the in vitro micronucleus assay, while further gene mutation and DNA damage studies were carried out using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase forward mutation and comet assays. 4NQO showed little to no significant increases in micronucleus induction in the human lymphoblastoid cell lines, even up to 55±5% toxicity. A dose-response relationship could only be observed in the mouse lymphoma cell line L5178Y after 4NQO treatment, even at concentrations with no reduction in cell viability. Further significant increases in gene mutation and DNA damage induction were observed. Hence, 4NQO is a more effective point mutagen than clastogen, and its suitability as a positive control for genotoxicity testing has to be evaluated for every individual assay. PMID:26362870

  19. Molecular epidemiology studies on occupational and environmental exposure to mutagens and carcinogens, 1997-1999.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J; Binková, B

    2000-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a new and evolving area of research, combining laboratory measurement of internal dose, biologically effective dose, biologic effects, and influence of individual susceptibility with epidemiologic methodologies. Biomarkers evaluated were selected according to basic scheme: biomarkers of exposure--metabolites in urine, DNA adducts, protein adducts, and Comet assay parameters; biomarkers of effect--chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene, and the activation of oncogenes coding for p53 or p21 proteins as measured on protein levels; biomarkers of susceptibility--genetic polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2. DNA adducts measured by 32P-postlabeling are the biomarker of choice for the evaluation of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Protein adducts are useful as a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke (4-aminobiphenyl) or to smaller molecules such as acrylonitrile or 1,3-butadiene. Of the biomarkers of effect, the most common are cytogenetic end points. Epidemiologic studies support the use of chromosomal breakage as a relevant biomarker of cancer risk. The use of the Comet assay and methods analyzing oxidative DNA damage needs reliable validation for human biomonitoring. Until now there have not been sufficient data to interpret the relationship between genotypes, biomarkers of exposure, and biomarkers of effect for assessing the risk of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:10698723

  20. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. PMID:25853218

  1. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5′ end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays. PMID:26217821

  2. Purine Salvage Pathways among Borrelia Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Jonas; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Guyard, Cyril; Lawrence, Kevin; Gherardini, Frank C.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2007-01-01

    Genome sequencing projects on two relapsing fever spirochetes, Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia turicatae, revealed differences in genes involved in purine metabolism and salvage compared to those in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The relapsing fever spirochetes contained six open reading frames that are absent from the B. burgdorferi genome. These genes included those for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hpt), adenylosuccinate synthase (purA), adenylosuccinate lyase (purB), auxiliary protein (nrdI), the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase alpha subunit (nrdE), and the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase beta subunit (nrdF). Southern blot assays with multiple Borrelia species and isolates confirmed the presence of these genes in the relapsing fever group of spirochetes but not in B. burgdorferi and related species. TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the chromosomal genes (hpt, purA, and purB) were transcribed in vitro and in mice. Phosphoribosyltransferase assays revealed that, in general, B. hermsii exhibited significantly higher activity than did the B. burgdorferi cell lysate, and enzymatic activity was observed with adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanine as substrates. B. burgdorferi showed low but detectable phosphoribosyltransferase activity with hypoxanthine even though the genome lacks a discernible ortholog to the hpt gene in the relapsing fever spirochetes. B. hermsii incorporated radiolabeled hypoxanthine into RNA and DNA to a much greater extent than did B. burgdorferi. This complete pathway for purine salvage in the relapsing fever spirochetes may contribute, in part, to these spirochetes achieving high cell densities in blood. PMID:17502392

  3. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation. PMID:26330291

  4. Differential effects of immunosuppressants and antibiotics on human monoclonal antibody production in SCID mouse ascites by five heterohybridomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, K; Arai, K

    1998-02-01

    SCID mice were inoculated with five human-mouse heterohybridomas derived by fusion of human lymph node lymphocytes from lung cancer patients with murine myeloma cells or human-mouse heteromyeloma cells, and the production of their human monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the mouse ascites was investigated. In a comparison of the effects of pretreatment by i.p. (intraperitoneal) injection of pristane and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the antibody production of three of the hybridomas, pristane pretreatment resulted in substantial antibody production by all three, and pretreatment with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in similar or slightly lower levels of antibody production by two of the hybridomas but none by the third. In a second series of experiments using four of the hybridomas with pristane pretreatment, the co-injection of either penicillin G and streptomycin or kanamycin together with the hybridoma at the time of i.p. inoculation resulted in enhanced MAb production by the two heterohybridomas that had been propagated in medium containing hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine (HAT) but not by the two that had been propagated in HAT-free medium. PMID:9523236

  5. Crucial involvement of xanthine oxidase in the intracellular signalling networks associated with human myeloid cell function

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Lall, Gurprit S.; Coughlan, Karen; Lall, Harjinder S.; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is an enzyme which plays a central role in purine catabolism by converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and then further into uric acid. Here we report that XOD is activated in THP-1 human myeloid cells in response to pro-inflammatory and growth factor stimulation. This effect occurred following stimulation of THP-1 cells with ligands of plasma membrane associated TLRs 2 and 4, endosomal TLRs 7 and 8 as well as stem cell growth factor (SCF). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription complexes were found to be responsible for XOD upregulation. Importantly, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major myeloid cell translation regulator, was also found to be essential for XOD activation. Specific inhibition of XOD by allopurinol and sodium tungstate led to an increase in intracellular AMP levels triggering downregulation of mTOR activation by phosphorylation of its T2446 residue. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that XOD is not only activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli or SCF but also plays an important role in maintaining mTOR-dependent translational control during the biological responses of human myeloid cells. PMID:25200751

  6. Selection of suitable reference genes for expression analysis in human glioma using RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Grube, Susanne; Göttig, Tatjana; Freitag, Diana; Ewald, Christian; Kalff, Rolf; Walter, Jan

    2015-05-01

    In human glioma research, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR is a frequently used tool. Considering the broad variation in the expression of candidate reference genes among tumor stages and normal brain, studies using quantitative RT-PCR require strict definition of adequate endogenous controls. This study aimed at testing a panel of nine reference genes [beta-2-microglobulin, cytochrome c-1 (CYC1), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hydroxymethylbilane synthase, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase 1, ribosomal protein L13a (RPL13A), succinate dehydrogenase, TATA-box binding protein and 14-3-3 protein zeta] to identify and validate the most suitable reference genes for expression studies in human glioma of different grades (World Health Organization grades II-IV). After analysis of the stability values calculated using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper algorithms, GAPDH, RPL13A, and CYC1 can be indicated as reference genes applicable for accurate normalization of gene expression in glioma compared with normal brain and anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma alone within this experimental setting. Generally, there are no differences in expression levels and variability of candidate genes in glioma tissue compared to normal brain. But stability analyses revealed just a small number of genes suitable for normalization in each of the tumor subgroups and across these groups. Nevertheless, our data show the importance of validation of adequate reference genes prior to every study. PMID:25862007

  7. The human T-cell cloning assay: identifying genotypes susceptible to drug toxicity and somatic mutation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sai-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit marked genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism that contribute to high incidence of adverse effects in susceptible individuals due to altered balance between metabolic activation and detoxification. The T-cell cloning assay, which detects mutations in the gene for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), is the most well-developed reporter system for studying specific locus mutation in human somatic cells. The assay is based on a mitogen- and growth factor-dependent clonal expansion of peripheral T-lymphocytes in which the 6-thioguanine-resistant HPRT mutants can be selected, enumerated, and collected for molecular analysis of the mutational nature. The assay provides a unique tool for studying in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis, for investigating the functional impact of common polymorphism in metabolism and repair genes, and for identifying risk genotypes for drug-induced toxicity and mutagenicity. This chapter presents a simple and reliable method for the enumeration of HPRT mutant frequency induced in vitro without using any source of recombinant interleukin-2. The other main feature is that only truly induced and unique mutants are collected for further analysis. PMID:24623236

  8. Mutations Associated with Functional Disorder of Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Hereditary Xanthinuria in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid with concomitant reduction of either NAD+ or O2. The enzyme is a target of drugs to treat hyperuricemia, gout and reactive oxygen-related diseases. Human diseases associated with genetically determined dysfunction of XOR are termed xanthinuria, because of the excretion of xanthine in urine. Xanthinuria is classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Type I xanthinuria involves XOR deficiency due to genetic defect of XOR, whereas type II xanthinuria involves dual deficiency of XOR and aldehyde oxidase (AO, a molybdoflavo enzyme similar to XOR) due to genetic defect in the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is associated with triple deficiency of XOR, AO and sulfite oxidase, due to defective synthesis of molybdopterin, which is a precursor of molybdenum cofactor for all three enzymes. The present review focuses on mutation or chemical modification studies of mammalian XOR, as well as on XOR mutations identified in humans, aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism of XOR and the relevance of mutated XORs as models to estimate the possible side effects of clinical application of XOR inhibitors. PMID:23203137

  9. Crucial involvement of xanthine oxidase in the intracellular signalling networks associated with human myeloid cell function.

    PubMed

    Abooali, Maryam; Lall, Gurprit S; Coughlan, Karen; Lall, Harjinder S; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is an enzyme which plays a central role in purine catabolism by converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and then further into uric acid. Here we report that XOD is activated in THP-1 human myeloid cells in response to pro-inflammatory and growth factor stimulation. This effect occurred following stimulation of THP-1 cells with ligands of plasma membrane associated TLRs 2 and 4, endosomal TLRs 7 and 8 as well as stem cell growth factor (SCF). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription complexes were found to be responsible for XOD upregulation. Importantly, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major myeloid cell translation regulator, was also found to be essential for XOD activation. Specific inhibition of XOD by allopurinol and sodium tungstate led to an increase in intracellular AMP levels triggering downregulation of mTOR activation by phosphorylation of its T2446 residue. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that XOD is not only activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli or SCF but also plays an important role in maintaining mTOR-dependent translational control during the biological responses of human myeloid cells. PMID:25200751

  10. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    PubMed

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G F; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K; Gill, Andrew C; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  11. Mutator activity induced by microRNA-155 (miR-155) links inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Tili, Esmerina; Michaille, Jean-Jacques; Wernicke, Dorothee; Alder, Hansjuerg; Costinean, Stefan; Volinia, Stefano; Croce, Carlo M

    2011-03-22

    Infection-driven inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ~15-20% of human tumors. Expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155) is elevated during innate immune response and autoimmune disorders as well as in various malignancies. However, the molecular mechanisms providing miR-155 with its oncogenic properties remain unclear. We examined the effects of miR-155 overexpression and proinflammatory environment on the frequency of spontaneous hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) mutations that can be detected based on the resistance to 6-thioguanine. Both miR-155 overexpression and inflammatory environment increased the frequency of HPRT mutations and down-regulated WEE1 (WEE1 homolog-S. pombe), a kinase that blocks cell-cycle progression. The increased frequency of HPRT mutation was only modestly attributable to defects in mismatch repair machinery. This result suggests that miR-155 enhances the mutation rate by simultaneously targeting different genes that suppress mutations and decreasing the efficiency of DNA safeguard mechanisms by targeting of cell-cycle regulators such as WEE1. By simultaneously targeting tumor suppressor genes and inducing a mutator phenotype, miR-155 may allow the selection of gene alterations required for tumor development and progression. Hence, we anticipate that the development of drugs reducing endogenous miR-155 levels might be key in the treatment of inflammation-related cancers. PMID:21383199

  12. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J.; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G. F.; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L.; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K.; Gill, Andrew C.; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  13. Escape from Het-6 Incompatibility in Neurospora Crassa Partial Diploids Involves Preferential Deletion within the Ectopic Segment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. L.; Yang, C. J.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Glass, N. L.

    1996-01-01

    Self-incompatible het-6(OR)/het-6(PA) partial diploids of Neurospora crassa were selected from a cross involving the translocation strain, T(IIL -> IIIR)AR18, and a normal sequence strain. About 25% of the partial diploids exhibited a marked increase in growth rate after 2 weeks, indicating that ``escape'' from het-6 incompatibility had occurred. Near isogenic tester strains with different alleles (het-6(OR) and het-6(PA)) were constructed and used to determine that 80 of 96 escape strains tested were het-6(PA), retaining the het-6 allele found in the normal-sequence LGII position; 16 were het-6(OR), retaining the allele in the translocated position. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 45 escape strains were examined with probes made from cosmids that spanned the translocated region. Along with electrophoretic analysis of chromosomes from three escape strains, RFLPs showed that escape is associated with deletion of part of one or the other of the duplicated DNA segments. Deletions ranged in size from ~70 kbp up to putatively the entire 270-kbp translocated region but always included a 35-kbp region wherein we hypothesize het-6 is located. The deletion spectrum at het-6 thus resembles other cases where mitotic deletions occur such as of tumor suppressor genes and of the hprt gene (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) in humans. PMID:8889517

  14. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon P; Franco, Nunzio F; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes. PMID:26114426

  15. Effects of 8-aminoguanosine and 2'-deoxyguanosine on the human mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). I. Description of the inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.E.; Gilbertsen, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    Patients deficient in purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) generally have a pronounced deficiency in T cell function with no deleterious effect on B cell function. It has been demonstrated that high concentrations of 8-amino-guanosine (8-AG), an inhibitor of PNP, in combination with the PNP substrate 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) can inhibit mitogen and antigen responsiveness of human lymphocytes in culture. The studies described here evaluated the effects of 8-AG and dGuo on the human MLR. Normal human lymphocytes were isolated from venous blood using Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Stimulator cells, pretreated with mitomycin C (50 ..mu..g/ml), were added with an equal number of responder cells (2 x 10/sup 5/) to the wells of flat-bottomed microtiter plates. Cell proliferation was quantitated by the uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine (TdR) during the final 4 hrs of six-day cultures. dGuo at 10-50 ..mu..M had no effect or stimulated proliferation, while dGuo at > 75 ..mu..M was markedly inhibitory. 8-AG alone at 100 ..mu..M had essentially no effect on TdR uptake. 8-AG (10-100 ..mu..M) plus dGuo (50 ..mu..M) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the MLR resulting in 8-AG IC/sub 50/s generally < 60 ..mu..M. Coaddition of 50 ..mu..M 2'-deoxycytidine, hypoxanthine or adenine partially prevented inhibition of the MLR.

  16. Development and application of human cell lines engineered to metabolically activate structurally diverse environmental mutagens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, C. I.; Langenbach, Robert; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gelboin, Harry V.; Penman, B. W.

    1993-03-01

    Cytochromes P450 are responsible for the mutagenic/carcinogenic activation of many environmental promutagens/procarcinogens. These enzymes are present at highest concentrations in liver in vivo but are markedly absent in tester organisms for most in vitro mutagenicity test systems. Two approaches have been used to supply needed metabolic activation, incorporation of an extracellular activating system, usually derived from a rodent liver and introduction of activating enzymes into the target cell. The latter approach appears to result in a more sensitive testing system because of the close proximity of the activating enzymes and the target DNA. Human cell lines have been developed which stably express human cytochromes P450 and other cDNAs which have been introduced individually or in combination. The resulting cell lines are exquisitely sensitive to exposure to promutagens and procarcinogens. Mutagenicity is measured at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and thymidine kinase (tk) gene loci. The most versatile cell line, designated MCL-5, stably express five cDNAs encoding all of the human hepatic P450s known to be principally responsible for known human procarcinogen activation. The induction of mutation is observed in MCL-5 cells upon exposure to ng/ml levels of model compounds such as nitrosamines, aflatoxin B1 and benzo(a)pyrene. A lower volume mutagenicity assay has been developed for use with samples available in limited amounts. Human lymphoblast mutation assays have been used to screen for mutagenic activity sediment samples from a polluted watershed. Two sediment samples were found to have mutagenic activity to human lymphoblasts.

  17. Membrane permeation characteristics of abacavir in human erythrocytes and human T-lymphoblastoid CD4+ CEM cells: comparison with (-)-carbovir.

    PubMed

    Mahony, William B; Domin, Barbara A; Daluge, Susan M; Zimmerman, Thomas P

    2004-11-01

    Abacavir, (-)-(1S,4R)-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2-cyclopentene-1-methanol, is a novel purine carbocyclic nucleoside analogue that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of HIV (as Ziagen trade mark [abacavir sulfate]). Chemically, abacavir and (-)-carbovir (CBV) differ only at the 6-position of the purine ring; abacavir contains a cyclopropylamino moiety in place of the 6-lactam functionality of CBV. Intracellularly both are ultimately metabolized to CBV triphosphate. We compared the membrane permeation characteristics of these two compounds at 20 degrees C in human erythrocytes and in human T-lymphoblastoid CD4+ CEM cells, using a "papaverine-stop" assay. In erythrocytes, abacavir influx was rapid, nonsaturable (rate constant=200 pmol/s/mM/microl cell water), and unaffected by inhibitors of nucleoside or nucleobase transport. CBV influx was slow, saturable, strongly inhibited by adenine or hypoxanthine, and occurred via both the nucleobase carrier (Vmax=0.67 pmol/s/microl cell water; Km=50 microM) and the nucleoside carrier (Vmax=0.47 pmol/s/microl cell water; Km=440 microM). Similar qualitative results were obtained with CD4+ CEM cells, although CBV influx rates were somewhat higher and abacavir influx rates lower, compared to the corresponding rates in erythrocytes. Equilibrium studies further revealed that both compounds are concentrated intracellularly, but nonmetabolically, in both cell types, apparently due to cytosolic protein binding (absent in erythrocyte ghosts). We conclude that, in both cell types, while CBV influx is slow and carrier-dependent, abacavir influx occurs rapidly by nonfacilitated diffusion. The membrane permeation characteristics of abacavir are consistent with its superior oral bioavailability and its impressive ability to penetrate the central nervous system. PMID:15450945

  18. Clock Gene Bmal1 Modulates Human Cartilage Gene Expression by Crosstalk With Sirt1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Kang, Xiaomin; Liu, Jiali; Li, Huixia; Ma, Zhengmin; Jin, Xinxin; Qian, Zhuang; Xie, Tianping; Qin, Na; Feng, Dongxu; Pan, Wenjie; Chen, Qian; Sun, Hongzhi; Wu, Shufang

    2016-08-01

    The critical regulation of the peripheral circadian gene implicated in osteoarthritis (OA) has been recently recognized; however, the causative role and clinical potential of the peripheral circadian rhythm attributable to such effects remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of a circadian gene Bmal1 in human cartilage and pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. In our present study, the mRNA and protein levels of circadian rhythm genes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (NAD(+)) and sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), in human knee articular cartilage were determined. In OA cartilage, the levels of both Bmal1 and NAD(+) decreased significantly, which resulted in the inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase activity and Sirt1 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of Bmal1 was sufficient to decrease the level of NAD(+) and aggravate OA-like gene expression changes under the stimulation of IL-1β. The overexpression of Bmal1 relieved the alteration induced by IL-1β, which was consistent with the effect of the inhibition of Rev-Erbα (known as NR1D1, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D). On the other hand, the transfection of Sirt1 small interfering RNA not only resulted in a reduction of the protein expression of Bmal1 and a moderate increase of period 2 (per2) and Rev-Erbα but also further exacerbated the survival of cells and the expression of cartilage matrix-degrading enzymes induced by IL-1β. Overexpression of Sirt1 restored the metabolic imbalance of chondrocytes caused by IL-1β. These observations suggest that Bmal1 is a key clock gene to involve in cartilage homeostasis mediated through sirt1 and that manipulating circadian rhythm gene expression implicates an innovative strategy to develop novel therapeutic agents against cartilage diseases. PMID:27253997

  19. A system for assaying homologous recombination at the endogenous human thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.B.; Little, J.B. ); Potter, H. ); Yandell, D.W. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-08-01

    A system for assaying human interchromosomal recombination in vitro was developed, using a cell line containing two different mutant thymidine kinase genes (TK) on chromosomes 17. Heteroalleles were generated in the TK{sup +/+} parent B-lymphoblast cell line WIL-2 by repeated exposure to the alkylating nitrogen mustard ICR-191, which preferentially causes +1 or {minus}1 frameshifts. Resulting TK{sup {minus}/{minus}} mutants were selected in medium containing the toxic thymidine analog trifluorothymidine. In two lines, heterozygous frameshifts were located in exons 4 and 7 of the TK gene separated by {approx}8 kilobases. These lines undergo spontaneous reversion to TK{sup +} at a frequency of < 10{sup {minus}7}, and revertants can be selected in cytidine/hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium. The nature and location of these heteroallelic mutations make large deletions, rearrangements, nondisjunction, and reduplication unlikely mechanisms for reversion to TK{sup +}. The mode of reversion to TK{sup +} was specifically assessed by DNA sequencing, use of single-strand conformation polymorphisms, and analysis of various restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the TK gene on chromosome 17. The data suggest that a proportion of revertants has undergone recombination and gene conversion at the TK locus, with concomitant loss of frameshifts and allele loss at linked RFLPs. Models are presented for the origin of two recombinants.

  20. Capillary bioreactors based on human purine nucleoside phosphorylase: a new approach for ligands identification and characterization.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Donato, Augusto José; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2012-04-01

    The enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the discovery of new lead compounds employed on the treatment severe T-cell mediated disorders. Within this context, the development of new, direct, and reliable methods for ligands screening is an important task. This paper describes the preparation of fused silica capillaries human PNP (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). The activity of the obtained IMER is monitored on line in a multidimensional liquid chromatography system, by the quantification of the product formed throughout the enzymatic reaction. The K(M) value for the immobilized enzyme was about twofold higher than that measured for the enzyme in solution (255 ± 29.2 μM and 133 ± 14.9 μM, respectively). A new fourth-generation immucillin derivative (DI4G; IC(50)=40.6 ± 0.36 nM), previously identified and characterized in HsPNP free enzyme assays, was used to validate the IMER as a screening method for HsPNP ligands. The validated method was also used for mechanistic studies with this inhibitor. This new approach is a valuable tool to PNP ligand screening, since it directly measures the hypoxanthine released by inosine phosphorolysis, thus furnishing more reliable results than those one used in a coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assay. PMID:22099222

  1. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by direct and indirect chemical agents in a human teratoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1989-01-01

    In the present work, we have extended the characterization of the P3 cell line, derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma, by studying the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by direct and indirect carcinogens. Several direct-acting carcinogens produce a dose-dependent increase in SCEs. Most notably, N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and 7{beta}, 8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9 {alpha},10{alpha}-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene produce increases in SCEs at dosages comparable to those used to induce mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. The indirect carcinogens elicit SCEs only when the P3 cells are cocultured with cells capable of metabolizing the indirect carcinogens to the active form. Human breast carcinoma (BJ-015) and rat hepatoma (RL12) cells are equally efficient in activating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the active form. This cell-mediated induction of SCEs is obtained when P3 cells are incubated with live, x-irradiated, or UV-irradiated BJ or RL cells. This P3 cell line is thus equally suitable to study the induction of mutations or the induction of SCEs with direct and indirect carcinogens. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Human Placenta-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured on Normal Tissue Culture Surface and Hyaluronan-Coated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Chen, Ying-Hui; Liu, Szu-Heng; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Yu, Chen-Hsiang; Chang, Chiung-Hsin; Huang, Lynn L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous results showed that hyaluronan (HA) preserved human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PDMSC) in a slow cell cycling mode similar to quiescence, the pristine state of stem cells in vivo, and HA was found to prevent murine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from senescence. Here, stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC) proteomic profiling was used to evaluate the effects of HA on aging phenomenon in stem cells, comparing (1) old and young passage PDMSC cultured on normal tissue culture surface (TCS); (2) old passage on HA-coated surface (CHA) compared to TCS; (3) old and young passage on CHA. The results indicated that senescence-associated protein transgelin (TAGLN) was upregulated in old TCS. Protein CYR61, reportedly senescence-related, was downregulated in old CHA compared to old TCS. The SIRT1-interacting Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) increased by 2.23-fold in old CHA compared to old TCS, and is 0.48-fold lower in old TCS compared to young TCS. Results also indicated that components of endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) pathway were upregulated in old CHA compared to old TCS cells, potentially for overcoming stress to maintain cell function and suppress senescence. Our data points to pathways that may be targeted by HA to maintain stem cells youth. PMID:27057169

  3. Gonococci causing disseminated gonococcal infection are resistant to the bactericidal action of normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Schoolnik, G K; Buchanan, T M; Holmes, K K

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility of strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to the bactericidal action of normal human sera was determined for isolates from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection and uncomplicated gonorrhea. Serum susceptibility was correlated with penicillin susceptibility and auxotype. 38 of 39 strains (97%) of N. gonorrhoeae from Seattle patients with disseminated gonococcal infection were resistant to the complement-dependent bactericidal action of normal human sera. 36 of these were inhibited by less than or equal to mug/ml of penicillin G and required arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil for growth on chemically defined medium (Arg-Hyx-Ura- auxotype). 12 of 43 isolates from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea were also of the Arg-Hyx-Ura-auxotype, inhibited by less than or equal to 0.030 mug/ml of penicillin G, and serum resistant. Of the 31 remaining strains of other auxotypes isolated from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea, 18 (58.1%) were sensitive to normal human sera in titers ranging from 2 to 2,048. The bactericidal action of normal human sera may prevent the dissemination of serum-sensitive gonococci. However, since only a small proportion of individuals infected by serum-resistant strains develop disseminated gonococcal infection, serum resistance appears to be a necessary but not a sufficient virulence factor for dissemination. Host factors such as menstruation and pharyngeal gonococcal infection may favor the dissemination of serum-resistant strains. Since serum-resistant Arg-Hyx-Ura strains are far more frequently isolated from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection than serum-resistant strains of other auxotypes, Arg-Hyx-Ura-strains may possess other virulence factors in addition to serum resistance. PMID:825532

  4. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  5. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome in a Family with a Deletion Followed by an Insertion within the HPRT1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare X-linked inherited neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase(HGprt) is defective. The authors report a novel mutation which led to LNS in a family with a deletion followed by an insertion (INDELS) via the serial replication slippage mechanism: c.428_432delTGCAGinsAGCAAA, p.Met143Lysfs*12 in exon 6 of HPRT1 gene. Molecular diagnosis discloses the genetic heterogeneity of HPRT1 gene responsible for HGprt deficiency. It allows fast, accurate carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:25965333

  6. Use of HeLa cell guanine nucleotides by Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, M M; Hatch, T P

    1979-01-01

    Exogenous guanine was found to be incorporated into the nucleic acids of Chlamydia psittaci when the parasite was grown in HeLa cells containing hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity but not when the parasite was grown in transferase-deficient HeLa cells. No evidence for a chlamydia-specific transferase activity was found in either transferase-containing or transferase-deficient infected HeLa cells. It is concluded that C. psittaci is incapable of metabolizing guanine, but that the parasite can use host-generated guanine nucleotides as precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. Images PMID:478649

  7. Assay method for monitoring the inhibitory effects of antimetabolites on the activity of inosinate dehydrogenase in intact human CEM lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1992-01-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to monitor the inhibition of inosinate (IMP) dehydrogenase by antimetabolites in intact human CEM lymphocytes. This method is based on the determination of 3H release from [2,8-3H]hypoxanthine ([2,8-3H]Hx) or [2,8-3H]inosine ([2,8-3H]Ino). The validity of this procedure was assessed by evaluating IMP dehydrogenase inhibition in intact CEM cells by the well-known IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors ribavirin, mycophenolic acid and tiazofurin. As reference materials, several compounds that are targeted at other enzymes in de novo purine nucleotide anabolism (i.e. hadacidine, acivicin) or catabolism (i.e. 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) were evaluated. There was a strong correlation between the inhibitory effects of the IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors (ribavirin, mycophenolic acid, tiazofurin) on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx and [2,8-3H]Ino in intact CEM cells and their ability to decrease intracellular GTP pool levels. The other compounds (hadacidine, acivicin, 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) had no marked effect on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx. Using this method, we demonstrated that the novel ribavirin analogue, 5-ethynyl-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylimidazole-4-carboxamide, is a potent inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase in intact cells. PMID:1359876

  8. Development of a high-throughput screening system for identification of novel reagents regulating DNA damage in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seunghee; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major inducer of skin aging and accumulated exposure to UV radiation increases DNA damage in skin cells, including dermal fibroblasts. In the present study, we developed a novel DNA repair regulating material discovery (DREAM) system for the high-throughput screening and identification of putative materials regulating DNA repair in skin cells. First, we established a modified lentivirus expressing the luciferase and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) genes. Then, human dermal fibroblast WS-1 cells were infected with the modified lentivirus and selected with puromycin to establish cells that stably expressed luciferase and HPRT (DREAM-F cells). The first step in the DREAM protocol was a 96-well-based screening procedure, involving the analysis of cell viability and luciferase activity after pretreatment of DREAM-F cells with reagents of interest and post-treatment with UVB radiation, and vice versa. In the second step, we validated certain effective reagents identified in the first step by analyzing the cell cycle, evaluating cell death, and performing HPRT-DNA sequencing in DREAM-F cells treated with these reagents and UVB. This DREAM system is scalable and forms a time-saving high-throughput screening system for identifying novel anti-photoaging reagents regulating DNA damage in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:26431110

  9. Toxoplasma gondii: mechanism of the parasitostatic action of 6-thioxanthine.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, E R; Bzik, D J; Honsinger, C P

    2001-12-01

    In contrast to the cytocidal effect of 6-thiopurines on mammalian cells, the action of 6-thioxanthine on Toxoplasma gondii was only parasitostatic. 6-Thioxanthine was a substrate of the parasite's hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. That enzyme converted 6-thioxanthine to 6-thioxanthosine 5'-phosphate which accumulated to near millimolar concentrations within parasites incubated intracellularly in medium containing the drug. 6-Thioxanthosine 5'-phosphate was the only detectable metabolite of 6-thioxanthine. The absence of 6-thioguanine nucleotides explains the lack of a parasitocidal effect because the incorporation of 6-thiodeoxyguanosine triphosphate into DNA is the mechanism of the lethal effect of 6-thiopurines on mammalian cells. Extracellular parasites that had accumulated a high concentration of 6-thioxanthosine 5'-phosphate incorporated more labeled hypoxanthine or xanthine into their nucleotide pools than did control parasites. The basis for this increased nucleobase salvage remains unexplained. It was not due to up-regulation of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and could not be explained by reduced use of labeled nucleotides for nucleic acid synthesis. Extracellular parasites that had accumulated a high concentration of 6-thioxanthosine 5'-phosphate used labeled hypoxanthine almost entirely to make adenine nucleotides while control parasites made both adenine and guanine nucleotides. Both extracellular parasites that had accumulated a high concentration of 6-thioxanthosine 5'-phosphate and control parasites efficiently used labeled xanthine to make guanine nucleotides. These observations suggested that inosine 5'-phosphate-dehydrogenase was inhibited while guanosine 5'-phosphate synthase was not. Assay of inosine 5'-phosphate dehydrogenase in soluble extracts of T. gondii confirmed that 6-thioxanthosine 5'-phosphate was an inhibitor. We conclude that 6-thioxanthine blocks the growth of T. gondii by a depletion a guanine

  10. Synthesis and antiviral properties of (+/-)-5'-noraristeromycin and related purine carbocyclic nucleosides. A new lead for anti-human cytomegalovirus agent design.

    PubMed

    Patil, S D; Schneller, S W; Hosoya, M; Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1992-09-01

    (+/-)-5'-Noraristeromycin (3) has been prepared in three steps beginning with the 2,3-O-isopropylidene derivative of (+/-)-(1 alpha, 2 beta, 3 beta, 4 alpha)-4-amino-1,2,3-cyclopentanetriol (7). Also prepared from the same starting material were the related hypoxanthine (4), guanine (5), and 2,6-diaminopurine (6) analogues. Compounds 3-6 were evaluated for antiviral activity against a large number of viruses with marked activity being observed for 3 towards vaccinia virus, human cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, parainfluenza (type 3) virus, measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, reovirus (type 1), and the arenaviruses Junin and Tacaribe. None of the compounds showed cytotoxicity to the host cell monolayers used in the antiviral studies. Both 3 and 6 have been found to be inhibitors of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy hydrolase), which likely accounts for their antiviral activity. Inhibition of AdoHcy hydrolase represents a new approach to human cytomegalovirus drug design that should be pursued. Also, the activity of 3 should be further scrutinized for the treatment of pox-, rhabdo-, paramyxo-, reo-, and arenavirus infections. PMID:1326633

  11. Genotoxicity of 2,6- and 3,5-Dimethylaniline in Cultured Mammalian Cells: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ming-Wei; Kim, Min Young; Wogan, Gerald N.

    2012-01-01

    Several alkylanilines with structures more complex than toluidines have been associated epidemiologically with human cancer. Their mechanism of action remains largely undetermined, and there is no reported evidence that it replicates that of multicyclic aromatic amines even though the principal metabolic pathways of P450-mediated hydroxylation and phase II conjugation are very similar. As a means to elucidate their mechanisms of action, lethality and mutagenicity in the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt +/−) gene induced in several Chinese hamster ovary cell types by 2,6- and 3,5-dimethylaniline (2,6-DMA, 3,5-DMA) and their N- and ring-hydroxyl derivatives (N-OH-2,6-DMA, N-OH-3,5-DMA, 2,6-DMAP, 3,5-DMAP) were assessed. Dose-response relationships were determined in the parental AA8 cell line, its repair-deficient UV5 subclone and other repair-deficient 5P3NAT2 or -proficient 5P3NAT2R9 subclones engineered to express mouse cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) and human N-acetyltransferase (NAT2), and also in AS52 cells harboring the bacterial guanine-hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (gpt) gene. Mutations in the gpt gene of AS52 cells were characterized and found to be dominated by G:C to A:T and A:T to G:C transitions. Separately, treatment of AS52 cells with N-OH-2,6-DMA, N-OH-3,5-DMA, 2,6-DMAP, 3,5-DMAP, and 3,5-DMAP led to intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for at least 24h after removal of the mutagens in every case. Using the comet assay, DNA strand breaks were observed in a dose-dependent manner in AS52 cells when treated with each of the four N-OH-2,6-DMA, N-OH-3,5-DMA, 2,6-DMAP, and 3,5-DMAP derivatives. Comparative evaluation of the results indicates that the principal mechanism of mutagenic action is likely to be through redox cycling of intracellularly bound aminophenol/quinone imine structures to generate ROS rather than through formation of covalent DNA adducts. PMID:22831970

  12. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a wholly new…

  13. Ex vivo Expansion of Human Adult Pancreatic Cells with Properties of Distributed Stem Cells by Suppression of Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Paré, JF; Sherley, JL

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for type I diabetes (T1D) might be improved if pancreatic stem cells were readily available for investigation. Unlike macroscopic islets, pancreatic tissue stem cells could more easily access the retroperitoneal pancreatic environment and thereby might achieve more effective pancreatic regeneration. Unfortunately, whether the adult pancreas actually contains renewing stem cells continues as a controversial issue in diabetes research. We evaluated a new method developed in our lab for expanding renewing distributed stem cells (DSCs) from adult tissues as a means to provide more evidence for adult pancreatic stem cells, and potentially advance their availability for future clinical investigation. The new method was designed to switch DSCs from asymmetric self-renewal to symmetric self-renewal, which promotes their exponential expansion in culture with reduced production of differentiated cells. Called suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK), the method uses natural purine metabolites to accomplish the self-renewal pattern shift. The SACK purine metabolites xanthine, xanthosine, and hypoxanthine were evaluated for promoting expansion of DSCs from the pancreas of adult human postmortem donors. Xanthine and xanthosine were effective for deriving both pooled and clonal populations of cells with properties indicative of human pancreatic DSCs. The expanded human cell strains had signature SACK agent-suppressible asymmetric cell kinetics, produced Ngn3+ bipotent precursors for α-cells and β-cells, and were non-tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. Our findings support the existence of pancreatic DSCs in the adult human pancreas and indicate a potential path to increasing their availability for future clinical evaluation. PMID:25197614

  14. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  15. Cleavage of Human Transferrin by Porphyromonas gingivalis Gingipains Promotes Growth and Formation of Hydroxyl Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Véronique; Britigan, Bradley; Nakayama, Koji; Grenier, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium associated with active lesions of chronic periodontitis, produces several proteinases which are presumably involved in host colonization, perturbation of the immune system, and tissue destruction. The aims of this study were to investigate the degradation of human transferrin by gingipain cysteine proteinases of P. gingivalis and to demonstrate the production of toxic hydroxyl radicals (HO·) catalyzed by the iron-containing transferrin fragments generated or by release of iron itself. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting showed that preparations of Arg- and Lys-gingipains of P. gingivalis cleave transferrin (iron-free and iron-saturated forms) into fragments of various sizes. Interestingly, gingival crevicular fluid samples from diseased periodontal sites but not samples from healthy periodontal sites contained fragments of transferrin. By using 55Fe-transferrin, it was found that degradation by P. gingivalis gingipains resulted in the production of free iron, as well as iron bound to lower-molecular-mass fragments. Subsequent to the degradation of transferrin, bacterial cells assimilated intracellularly the radiolabeled iron. Growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, but not growth of an Arg-gingipain- and Lys-gingipain-deficient mutant, was possible in a chemically defined medium containing 30% iron-saturated transferrin as the only source of iron and peptides, suggesting that gingipains play a critical role in the acquisition of essential growth nutrients. Finally, the transferrin degradation products generated by Arg-gingipains A and B were capable of catalyzing the formation of HO·, as determined by a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system and spin trapping-electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry. Our study indicates that P. gingivalis gingipains degrade human transferrin, providing sources of iron and peptides. The iron-containing transferrin fragments or the

  16. Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of climate change Video not supported Human Health Climate change threatens human health and well-being ... Copy link to clipboard Key Message: Wide-ranging Health Impacts Climate change threatens human health and well- ...

  17. Pseudogenes as Weaknesses of ACTB (Actb) and GAPDH (Gapdh) Used as Reference Genes in Reverse Transcription and Polymerase Chain Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Yan; Luo, Dianzhong; Liao, D. Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The genes encoding β-actin (ACTB in human or Actb in mouse) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH in human or Gapdh in mouse) are the two most commonly used references for sample normalization in determination of the mRNA level of interested genes by reverse transcription (RT) and ensuing polymerase chain reactions (PCR). In this study, bioinformatic analyses revealed that the ACTB, Actb, GAPDH and Gapdh had 64, 69, 67 and 197 pseudogenes (PGs), respectively, in the corresponding genome. Most of these PGs are intronless and similar in size to the authentic mRNA. Alignment of several PGs of these genes with the corresponding mRNA reveals that they are highly homologous. In contrast, the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-1 gene (HPRT1 in human or Hprt in mouse) only had 3 or 1 PG, respectively, and the mRNA has unique regions for primer design. PCR with cDNA or genomic DNA (gDNA) as templates revealed that our HPRT1, Hprt and GAPDH primers were specific, whereas our ACTB and Actb primers were not specific enough both vertically (within the cDNA) and horizontally (compared cDNA with gDNA). No primers could be designed for the Gapdh that would not mis-prime PGs. Since most of the genome is transcribed, we suggest to peers to forgo ACTB (Actb) and GAPDH (Dapdh) as references in RT-PCR and, if there is no surrogate, to use our primers with extra caution. We also propose a standard operation procedure in which design of primers for RT-PCR starts from avoiding mis-priming PGs and all primers need be tested for specificity with both cDNA and gDNA. PMID:22927912

  18. Biomarker triplet NAMPT/VEGF/HER2 as a de novo detection panel for the diagnosis and prognosis of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanyan; Guo, Meiyan; Zhang, Lingyun; Xu, Tao; Wang, Li; Xu, Guoxiong

    2016-01-01

    The early detection of breast cancer, the most common malignant tumor disease in women worldwide, relies on mammography and self breast examination. Here we evaluated the concentration of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) in serum and their expression in breast tissues associated with the clinicopathological features of patients with benign and malignant breast tumors. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 proteins were overexpressed in breast tumors. The highest expression was observed in malignant tumors, low in benign tumors and negative in the adjacent normal tissue, indicating that the triplets may be progression markers and correlated with each other. The detection rate of NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 alone in tissue was 54.17, 64.58 and 60.42%, respectively, and was increased to about 79% in double combination and to 90% in triple combination. The basal levels of serum NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 in healthy controls were 94.90±4.24 pg/ml, 87.02±2.41 pg/ml and 1.12±0.04 ng/ml, respectively, measured by ELISA and found to be increased by 6.64-, 1.76- and 2.52-fold, respectively, in patients with malignant breast tumor. These elevated serum levels of NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 in patients were decreased after tumor removal, suggesting that these molecules are the indicators of treatment efficacy. The combined measurement of these triplets together may improve the sensitivity of breast cancer diagnosis and may potentially be used as a testing panel for the detection of malignant tumors, the assessment of treatment effectiveness and the monitoring of the disease progression in patients with breast cancer. Thus, we propose that the biomarker triplet NAMPT/VEGF/HER2 can be used as a de novo detection panel for the diagnosis and prognosis of human breast cancer. PMID:26531769

  19. Steroid sulfatase gene in XX males.

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, T K; Stern, H J; Meeker, C A; Passage, M B; Müller, U; Page, D C; Yen, P H; Shapiro, L J

    1990-01-01

    The human X and Y chromosomes pair and recombine at their distal short arms during male meiosis. Recent studies indicate that the majority of XX males arise as a result of an aberrant exchange between X and Y chromosomes such that the testis-determining factor gene (TDF) is transferred from a Y chromatid to an X chromatid. It has been shown that X-specific loci such as that coding for the red cell surface antigen, Xg, are sometimes lost from the X chromosome in this aberrant exchange. The steroid sulfatase functional gene (STS) maps to the distal short arm of the X chromosome proximal to XG. We have asked whether STS is affected in the aberrant X-Y interchange leading to XX males. DNA extracted from fibroblasts of seven XX males known to contain Y-specific sequences in their genomic DNA was tested for dosage of the STS gene by using a specific genomic probe. Densitometry of the autoradiograms showed that these XX males have two copies of the STS gene, suggesting that the breakpoint on the X chromosome in the aberrant X-Y interchange is distal to STS. To obtain more definitive evidence, cell hybrids were derived from the fusion of mouse cells, deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and fibroblasts of the seven XX males. The X chromosomes in these patients could be distinguished from each other when one of three X-linked restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms was used. Hybrid clones retaining a human X chromosome containing Y-specific sequences in the absence of the normal X chromosome could be identified in six of the seven cases of XX males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2301402

  20. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein–protein interactions with HPRT1

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S.; Jackson, Brian C.; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Johnson, Richard J.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. PMID:23348497

  1. Effects of cell cycle position on ionizing radiation mutagenesis. I. Quantitative assays of two genetic loci in a human lymphoblastoid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Yao-Yu; Liber, H.L.

    1996-11-01

    Relatively little work has been done on the influence of the position of the cell in the cell cycle on ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis. We synchronized WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells with 200 {mu}M lovastatin for 48 h; under these conditions more than 80% of the cells were arrested in G{sub 1} phase. Upon release, there was a 12-15-h lag followed by movement of a large fraction into S phase. We irradiated cells with either 1.5 Gy X rays at 1, 15, 18, 21 or 24 h or 1.5 Gy {gamma} rays at 1, 5, 10, 15 or 24 h after release from lovastatin. We showed that WTK1 cells were most sensitive to ionizing radiation-induced toxicity in G{sub 1} and into S phase, and more resistant in mid to late S and G{sub 2}/M phase. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that the two different gene loci had different sensitivities to radiation-induced mutation through the cell cycle. Cells in late G{sub 1} through mid-S phase were most sensitive to radiation-induced mutations at the autosomal thymidine kinase (TK) locus, whereas G{sub 1} phase was the most sensitive phase at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Release of nucleosides from canine and human hearts as an index of prior ischemia.

    PubMed

    Fox, A C; Reed, G E; Meilman, H; Silk, B B

    1979-01-01

    During ischemia, myocardial adenosine triphosphate is degraded to adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine. These nucleosides are released into coronary venous blood and may provide an index of ischemia; adenosine may also participate in the autoregulation of coronary flow. In dogs, the temporal relations between reactive hyperemic flow and nucleoside concentrations in regional venous blood were correlated after brief occlusions of a segmental coronary artery. Reactive hyperemia and adenosine release peaked together in 10 seconds, persisted for 10 to 30 seconds and then decreased in a pattern consistent with the hypothesis that they are related. During initial reflow after 45 seconds of ischemia, mean concentrations of adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine increased, respectively, to 52, 67 and 114 nmol/100 ml plasma; after 5 minutes of ischemia, the respective levels increased to 58, 1,570 and 1,134 nmol and fell quickly. In nine patients there was a similar release of nucleosides into coronary sinus blood during reperfusion after 59 to 80 minutes of ischemic arrest during cardiac surgery. With initial reflow, adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine levels reached 65, 655 and 917 nmol/100 ml of blood, respectively. Inosine and hypoxanthine concentrations remained high for 5 to 10 minutes after cardiac beating resumed, often when production of lactate had decreased. The results indicate that postischemic release of nucleosides reaches significant levels in man as well as animals, is parallel with the duration of ischemia, is temporary and may be a useful supplement to measurement of lactate as an index of prior myocardial ischemia. PMID:758770

  3. Mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of five antitumor ellipticines in mammalian cells and their structure-activity relationships in Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarini, D.M.; Cros, S.; Paoletti, C.; Lecointe, P.; Hsie, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of five antitumor compounds (ellipticines) were investigated in the Chinese hamster ovary cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase assay and in six strains of Salmonella. All five compounds (ellipticine, 9-methoxyellipticine, 9-hydroxyellipticine, 9-aminoellipticine, and 2-methyl-9-hydroxyellipticinium) were cytotoxic and mutagenic in the Chinese hamster ovary cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase assay in the presence or absence of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver S9, and all except the last compound were mutagenic in Salmonella. Based on the reversion pattern obtained in various frame-shift and DNA repair-proficient (uvrB/sup +/) or -deficient (uvrB) strains of Salmonella in the presence or absence of S9, the first three compounds appear to cause frameshift mutations by both intercalation and covalent bonding with DNA; thus, these are classified as reactive intercalators. However, 9-aminoellipticine intercalates only weakly and may instead exert its mutagenic activity primarily (or exclusively) by forming a covalent adduct with DNA. Compared to the published antitumor data obtained in mice, the results in Salmonella and Chinese hamster ovary cells suggest that the ability of ellipticine, 9-methoxyellipticine, and 9-hydroxyellipticine to intercalate with DNA, induce frame-shift mutations, and cause cell killing is associated with and may be the basis for their antitumor activity. The observation that the ellipticines are mutagenic in mammalian cells suggests that these antitumor agents may be carcinogenic.

  4. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  5. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  6. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  7. Effect of zinc supplementation on resistance of cultured human skin fibroblasts toward oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Richard, M J; Guiraud, P; Leccia, M T; Beani, J C; Favier, A

    1993-01-01

    In purified system zinc has been shown to have an antioxidant role. Its effects on the resistance of cultured cells towards oxidative stress in vitro were examined. Diploid human skin fibroblasts were grown for 21 d in culture media (RPMI 1640 containing 15% fetal calf serum) added with different zinc (Zn) concentrations (100, 125, and 150 microM as Zinc chlorur ZnCl2). In comparison, cell controls were grown in standard culture media (6.5 microM Zn). The intracellular zinc levels of treated fibroblasts increased from 3- to 7-fold (2330 +/- 120 ng/mg protein in 150-microM Zn-treated cells versus 331 +/- 21 ng/mg protein in control cells). The intracellular copper increased 3- fold whereas the iron content slightly but not significantly decreased. The index of basal lipid peroxidation measured as thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBARs) of zinc-supplemented cells was lower than that of non zinc supplemented controls (0.89 mumol/g protein in 150 microM Zn-treated cells versus 1.59 mumol/g protein in controls). At these high doses of zinc, fibroblasts expressed lower antioxidant metalloenzymes activities. Diminished TBARs in Zn treated cells tends to support that Zn acts protectively against free radical mediated damage. However when the cells were challenged with extracellular oxidant stresses mediated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an increased toxicity in Zn-supplemented cells was observed. When we applied an intracellular oxidative stress as UV-B or UV-A radiation, Zn-treated fibroblasts were more resistant than cells grown in normal medium. If Zn has shown antioxidant effect in some in vitro or in vivo systems our observations clearly demonstrate that this role is not mediated by antioxidant metalloenzymes. PMID:7688532

  8. Human Trafficking

    MedlinePlus

    ... to debt bondage or peonage in which traffickers demand labor as a means repayment for a real ... human smuggling are two separate crimes under federal law. There are several important differences between them. Human ...

  9. Human Trafficking

    MedlinePlus

    ... TRAFFICKING (English) Listen < Back to Search FACT SHEET: HUMAN TRAFFICKING (English) Published: August 2, 2012 Topics: Public Awareness , ... organizations that protect and serve trafficking victims. National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1.888.373.7888 Last ...

  10. A Phosphoenzyme Mimic, Overlapping Catalytic Sites and Reaction Coordinate Motion for Human NAMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, E.; Ho, M; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3- as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site.

  11. Different mechanisms of radiation-induced loss of heterozygosity in two human lymphoid cell lines from a single donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, C.; Gauny, S. S.; Liu, W. C.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C. L.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Allelic loss is an important mutational mechanism in human carcinogenesis. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at an autosomal locus is one outcome of the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and can occur by deletion or by mitotic recombination. We report that mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes occurred in human lymphoid cells exposed to densely ionizing radiation. We used cells derived from the same donor that express either normal TP53 (TK6 cells) or homozygous mutant TP53 (WTK1 cells) to assess the influence of TP53 on radiation-induced mutagenesis. Expression of mutant TP53 (Met 237 Ile) was associated with a small increase in mutation frequencies at the hemizygous HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus, but the mutation spectra were unaffected at this locus. In contrast, WTK1 cells (mutant TP53) were 30-fold more susceptible than TK6 cells (wild-type TP53) to radiation-induced mutagenesis at the TK1 (thymidine kinase) locus. Gene dosage analysis combined with microsatellite marker analysis showed that the increase in TK1 mutagenesis in WTK1 cells could be attributed, in part, to mitotic recombination. The microsatellite marker analysis over a 64-cM region on chromosome 17q indicated that the recombinational events could initiate at different positions between the TK1 locus and the centromere. Virtually all of the recombinational LOH events extended beyond the TK1 locus to the most telomeric marker. In general, longer LOH tracts were observed in mutants from WTK1 cells than in mutants from TK6 cells. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the incidence of radi-ation-induced mutations is dependent on the genetic background of the cell at risk, on the locus examined, and on the mechanisms for mutation available at the locus of interest.

  12. Clonal Expansions of 6-Thioguanine Resistant T Lymphocytes in the Blood and Tumor of Melanoma Patients1

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Mark R.; Macklin, Michael D.; Zuleger, Cindy L.; Newton, Michael A.; Judice, Stephen A.; Albertini, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of specific lymphocyte populations that mediate tumor immune responses is required for elucidating the mechanisms underlying these responses and facilitating therapeutic interventions in humans with cancer. To this end, mutant hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficient (HPRT-) T-cells were employed as probes to detect T-cell clonal amplifications and trafficking in vivo in patients with advanced melanoma. Mutant T-cells from peripheral blood were obtained as clonal isolates or in mass cultures in the presence of 6-thioguanine (TG) selection, and from tumor-bearing lymph nodes or metastatic melanoma tissues by TG-selected mass cultures. Non-mutant (wild-type) cells were obtained from all sites by analogous means, but without TG selection. cDNA sequences of the T-cell receptor (TCR) beta chains (TCR-β), determined directly (clonal isolates) or following insertion into plasmids (mass cultures), were used as unambiguous biomarkers of in vivo clonality of mature T-cell clones. Clonal amplifications, identified as repetitive TCR-β V-region, complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3), and J-region gene sequences, were demonstrated at all sites studied, i.e., peripheral blood, lymph nodes, and metastatic tumors. Amplifications were significantly enriched among the mutant compared with the wild-type T-cell fractions. Importantly, T-cell trafficking was manifest by identical TCR-β cDNA sequences, including the hyper-variable CDR3 motifs, being found in both blood and tissues in individual patients. The findings described herein indicate that the mutant T-cell fractions from melanoma patients are enriched for proliferating T-cells that infiltrate the tumor, making them candidates for investigations of potentially protective immunological responses. PMID:18712786

  13. Carboxylated Short Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes But Not Plain and Multi-walled Short Carbon Nanotubes Show in vitro Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mrakovcic, Maria; Meindl, Claudia; Leitinger, Gerd; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) resemble asbestos fibers due to their high length to diameter ratio and they thus have genotoxic effects. Another parameter that might explain their genotoxic effects is contamination with heavy metal ions. On the other hand, short (1–2 μm) CNTs do not resemble asbestos fibers, and, once purified from contaminations, they might be suitable for medical applications. To identify the role of fiber thickness and surface properties on genotoxicity, well-characterized short pristine and carboxylated single-walled (SCNTs) and multi-walled (MCNTs) CNTs of different diameters were studied for cytotoxicity, the cell’s response to oxidative stress (immunoreactivity against hemoxygenase 1 and glutathione levels), and in a hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) assay using V79 chinese hamster fibroblasts and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. DNA repair was demonstrated by measuring immunoreactivity against activated histone H2AX protein. The number of micronuclei as well as the number of multinucleated cells was determined. CNTs acted more cytotoxic in V79 than in A549 cells. Plain and carboxylated thin (<8 nm) SCNTs and MCNTs showed greater cytotoxic potential and carboxylated CNTs showed indication for generating oxidative stress. Multi-walled CNTs did not cause HPRT mutation, micronucleus formation, DNA damage, interference with cell division, and oxidative stress. Carboxylated, but not plain, SCNTs showed indication for in vitro DNA damage according to increase of H2AX-immunoreactive cells and HPRT mutation. Although short CNTs presented a low in vitro genotoxicity, functionalization of short SCNTs can render these particles genotoxic. PMID:25505129

  14. Genetic Manipulation in Δku80 Strains for Functional Genomic Analysis of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Rommereim, Leah M.; Hortua Triana, Miryam A.; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L.; Guevara, Rebekah B.; Bzik, David J.; Fox, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein1,2. The Δku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The Δku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale1-4. Here, we report methods for using type I and type II Δku80Δhxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in Δku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human

  15. Genetic manipulation in Δku80 strains for functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein(1,2). The Δku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The Δku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale(1-4). Here, we report methods for using type I and type II Δku80Δhxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in Δku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human

  16. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S.

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Relative photomutagenicity of furocoumarins and limettin in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase assay in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Raquet, Nicole; Schrenk, Dieter

    2009-09-01

    Furocoumarins are phototoxic and photomutagenic natural plant constituents found in many medicinal plants and food items. Because plants contain mixtures of several furocoumarins, there is a need for a comparative risk assessment of a large number of furocoumarins. Little is known about the photomutagenicity of the structurally related family of coumarins, which are also abundant in many plant species. In this study, we analyzed the photomutagenic potency of the linear furocoumarins 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), the angular furocoumarin angelicin, and the coumarin limettin. Above certain concentrations, all test compounds were more or less phototoxic in the presence of UVA doses between 50 and 200 mJ/cm(2), 5-MOP being the most phototoxic compound. At nonphototoxic concentrations, linear correlations were found between concentration and mutagenicity at a UVA dose of 125 mJ/cm(2) for all test compounds including limettin. For 5-MOP, strictly linear correlations were also found for the relationships of mutagenicity vs concentration at various UVA doses or vs UVA dose at given concentrations, respectively. These data indicate that the photomutagenicity of 5-MOP is proportional to the UVA dose x concentration product for noncytotoxic combinations of both factors. They also suggest that the slope of the concentration-photomutagenicity correlation at a given UVA dose may provide a basis for comparison between individual compounds. Applying this concept, in vitro photomutagenicity equivalency factors at 125 mJ/cm(2) were as follows: 1.0 (5-MOP, reference compound), 0.25 (8-MOP), and 0.02 (angelicin and limettin, respectively). These findings provide a new concept for the description of the relative photomutagenic potency of coumarins and furocoumarins and indicate that, in V79 cells, 8-MOP is less photomutagenic and limettin and angelicin are much less photomutagenic than 5-MOP. PMID:19725558

  18. Human Issues in Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the report of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee in Human Rights which seeks to ease the plight of individual scientists, engineers, and medical personnel suffering severe repression. Case studies of instances of negligence of human rights are provided. (CP)

  19. Biochemistry and metabolism of Giardia.

    PubMed

    Jarroll, E L; Manning, P; Berrada, A; Hare, D; Lindmark, D G

    1989-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, an aerotolerant anaerobe, respires in the presence of oxygen by a flavin, iron-sulfur protein-mediated electron transport system. Glucose appears to be the only sugar catabolized by the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas and hexose monophosphate pathways, and energy is produced by substrate level phosphorylation. Substrates are incompletely oxidized to CO2, ethanol and acetate by nonsedimentable enzymes. The lack of incorporation of inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, formate or glycine into nucleotides indicates an absence of de novo purine synthesis. Only adenine, adenosine, guanine and guanosine are salvaged, and no interconversion of these purines was detected. Salvage of these purines and their nucleosides is accomplished by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, adenosine hydrolase, guanosine phosphoribosyltransferase and guanine hydrolase. The absence of de novo pyrimidine synthesis was confirmed by the lack of incorporation of bicarbonate, orotate and aspartate into nucleotides, and by the lack of detectable levels of the enzymes of de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Salvage appears to be accomplished by the action of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, uridine hydrolase, uridine phosphotransferase, cytidine deaminase, cytidine hydrolase, cytosine phosphoribosyltransferase and thymidine phosphotransferase. Nucleotides of uracil may be converted to nucleotides of cytosine by cytidine triphosphate synthetase, but thymidylate synthetase and dihydrofolate reductase activities were not detected. Uptake of pyrmidine nucleosides, and perhaps pyrimidines, appears to be accomplished by carrier-mediated transport, and the common site for uptake of uridine and cytidine is distinct from the site for thymidine. Thymine does not appear to be incorporated into nucleotide pools. Giardia trophozoites appear to rely on preformed lipids rather than synthesizing them de novo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2657035

  20. Action, human.

    PubMed

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term "human action" designates the intentional and deliberate movement that is proper and exclusive to mankind. Human action is a unified structure: knowledge, intention or volition, deliberation, decision or choice of means and execution. The integration between these dimensions appears as a task that demands strength of will to achieve the synthesis of self-possession and self-control that enables full personal realisation. Recently, the debate about the dynamism of human action has been enriched by the contribution of neurosciences. Thanks to techniques of neuroimaging, neurosciences have expanded the field of investigation to the nature of volition, to the role of the brain in decision-making processes and to the notion of freedom and responsibility. PMID:20393686

  1. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  2. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  3. Classical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donn; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot course in humanities team-taught by three teachers, two from a senior high-school and one from a junior high-school, in Brookfield, Wisconsin. The specific subject matter is Greek and Roman culture. The curriculum is outlined and the basic reading list is included. (CLK)

  4. [Human monkeypox].

    PubMed

    Chastel, C

    2009-03-01

    Unlike other recent viral emergences, which were in majority caused by RNA viruses, the monkeypox results from infection by a DNA virus, an orthopoxvirus closely related to both vaccine and smallpox viruses and whose two genomic variants are known. Unexpectedly isolated from captive Asiatic monkeys and first considered as an laboratory curiosity, this virus was recognised in 1970 as an human pathogen in tropical Africa. Here it was responsible for sporadic cases following intrusions (for hunting) into tropical rain forests or rare outbreak with human-to-human transmission as observed in 1996 in Democratic Republic of Congo. As monkeypox in humans is not distinguishable from smallpox (a disease globally eradicated in 1977) it was only subjected to vigilant epidemiological surveillance and not considered as a potential threat outside Africa. This point of view radically changed in 2003 when monkeypox was introduced in the USA by African wild rodents and spread to 11 different states of this country. Responsible for 82 infections in American children and adults, this outbreak led to realize the sanitary hazards resulting from international trade of exotic animals and scientific investigations increasing extensively our knowledge of this zoonosis. PMID:18394820

  5. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  6. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  7. Human Protothecosis

    PubMed Central

    Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Mayr, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    Human protothecosis is a rare infection caused by members of the genus Prototheca. Prototheca species are generally considered to be achlorophyllic algae and are ubiquitous in nature. The occurrence of protothecosis can be local or disseminated and acute or chronic, with the latter being more common. Diseases have been classified as (i) cutaneous lesions, (ii) olecranon bursitis, or (iii) disseminated or systemic manifestations. Infections can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, although more severe and disseminated infections tend to occur in immunocompromised individuals. Prototheca wickerhamii and Prototheca zopfii have been associated with human disease. Usually, treatment involves medical and surgical approaches; treatment failure is not uncommon. Antifungals such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, and amphotericin B are the most commonly used drugs to date. Among them, amphotericin B displays the best activity against Prototheca spp. Diagnosis is largely made upon detection of characteristic structures observed on histopathologic examination of tissue. PMID:17428884

  8. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  9. Transient induction of a nuclear antigen unrelated to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen in cells of two human B-lymphoma lines converted by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fresen, K O; zur Hausen, H

    1977-01-01

    Infection of cells of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human B-lymphoma lines BJAB and Ramos with EBV preparations from P3HR-1 or B 95-8 cells converted these cells to EBV genome carriers expressing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) in almost 100% of these cells. Induction of these cells as well as of clones from P3HR-1 EBV-converted BJAB cells with iododeoxyuridine, aminopterin, and hypoxanthine resulted in the appearance of a nuclear antigen in about 1-6% of the cells 1-4 days after induction. The antigen is different from known EBV-induced antigens like EBNA, viral capsid antigen (VCA) or the D- and R-subspecificities of the early antigen (EA) complex. It is demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence and inactivated after acetone fixation. The antigen was not detectable after induction of uninfected BJAB and Ramos cells nor has it been found in noninduced or induced P3HR-1 and Raji cells. Thus, it appears that EBV-infection mediates the expression of this antigen, for which the name TINA (transiently induced nuclear antigen) is suggested. Sera reacting against TINA generally contained high antibody titers against EBV-induced EA. Only a limited number of highly EA-reactive sera, however, were also positive for TINA. Among 200 sera tested thus far, TINA reactivity was most frequently observed in sera of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (7 out of 28), in sera of the only two patients with immunoblastoma tested and occasionally in sera from patients with Hodgkin's disease and chronic lymphatic leukemia. Among 70 sera from nontumor patients, TINA reactivity was observed three times: two patients suffered from "chronic" infectious mononucleosis, the other revealed persistent splenomegaly. PMID:189313

  10. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa. PMID:8976151

  11. Xanthine metabolism in Bacillus subtilis: characterization of the xpt-pbuX operon and evidence for purine- and nitrogen-controlled expression of genes involved in xanthine salvage and catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, L C; Schou, S; Nygaard, P; Saxild, H H

    1997-01-01

    The xpt and pbuX genes from Bacillus subtilis were cloned, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. The xpt gene encodes a specific xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the pbuX gene encodes a xanthine-specific purine permease. The genes have overlapping coding regions, and Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicated an operon organization. The translation of the second gene, pbuX, was strongly dependent on the translation of the first gene, xpt. Expression of the operon was repressed by purines, and the effector molecules appear to be hypoxanthine and guanine. When hypoxanthine and guanine were added together, a 160-fold repression was observed. The regulation of expression was at the level of transcription, and we propose that a transcription termination-antitermination control mechanism similar to the one suggested for the regulation of the purine biosynthesis operon exists. The expression of the xpt-pbuX operon was reduced when hypoxanthine served as the sole nitrogen source. Under these conditions, the level of the hypoxanthine- and xanthine-degrading enzyme, xanthine dehydrogenase, was induced more than 80-fold. The xanthine dehydrogenase level was completely derepressed in a glnA (glutamine synthetase) genetic background. Although the regulation of the expression of the xpt-pbuX operon was found to be affected by the nitrogen source, it was normal in a glnA mutant strain. This result suggests the existence of different signalling pathways for repression of the transcription of the xpt-pbuX operon and the induction of xanthine dehydrogenase. PMID:9098051

  12. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  13. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  14. Human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  15. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  16. Novel assay for simultaneous measurement of pyridine mononucleotides synthesizing activities allows dissection of the NAD(+) biosynthetic machinery in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zamporlini, Federica; Ruggieri, Silverio; Mazzola, Francesca; Amici, Adolfo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The redox coenzyme NAD(+) is also a rate-limiting co-substrate for several enzymes that consume the molecule, thus rendering its continuous re-synthesis indispensable. NAD(+) biosynthesis has emerged as a therapeutic target due to the relevance of NAD(+) -consuming reactions in complex intracellular signaling networks whose alteration leads to many neurologic and metabolic disorders. Distinct metabolic routes, starting from various precursors, are known to support NAD(+) biosynthesis with tissue/cell-specific efficiencies, probably reflecting differential expression of the corresponding rate-limiting enzymes, i.e. nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase, nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase. Understanding the contribution of these enzymes to NAD(+) levels depending on the tissue/cell type and metabolic status is necessary for the rational design of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating NAD(+) availability. Here we report a simple, fast and sensitive coupled fluorometric assay that enables simultaneous determination of the four activities in whole-cell extracts and biological fluids. Its application to extracts from various mouse tissues, human cell lines and plasma yielded for the first time an overall picture of the tissue/cell-specific distribution of the activities of the various enzymes. The screening enabled us to gather novel findings, including (a) the presence of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase in all examined tissues/cell lines, indicating that quinolinate and nicotinamide riboside are relevant NAD(+) precursors, and (b) the unexpected occurrence of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase in human plasma. PMID:25223558

  17. Human abilities.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, R J; Kaufman, J C

    1998-01-01

    This chapter reviews recent literature, primarily from the 1990s, on human abilities. The review opens with a consideration of the question of what intelligence is, and then considers some of the major definitions of intelligence, as well as implicit theories of intelligence around the world. Next, the chapter considers cognitive approaches to intelligence, and then biological approaches. It proceeds to psychometric or traditional approaches to intelligence, and then to broad, recent approaches. The different approaches raise somewhat different questions, and hence produce somewhat different answers. They have in common, however, the attempt to understand what kinds of mechanisms lead some people to adapt to, select, and shape environments in ways that match particularly well the demands of those environments. PMID:9496630

  18. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  19. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  20. Repeated doses of gamma rays induce resistance to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osmak, M.

    1988-09-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were preirradiated repeatedly with gamma rays and then exposed to ultraviolet (uv) light or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). The cell killing and induction of mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus were examined following these treatments. Cells preirradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays exhibit the same sensitivity to uv light as the control cells with respect to cell survival and mutation induction. Following treatment with MNNG, resistance to cell killing was observed along with a decreased frequency of mutations induced. These results indicate that the progeny of cells irradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays could display subsequent changes in sensitivity to lethal and mutagenic effects of additional treatment with DNA-damaging agents.

  1. Pharmacogenetics of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Derijks, Luc J J; Wong, Dennis R

    2010-01-01

    Thiopurines are widely used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, in clinical practice azathioprine (AZA) or 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) are not effective in one-third of patients and up to one-fifth of patients discontinue thiopurine therapy due to adverse reactions. The observed interindividual differences in therapeutic response and toxicity to thiopurines are explained to a large extent by the variable formation of active metabolites, which is at least partly caused by genetic polymorphisms of the genes encoding crucial enzymes in thiopurine metabolism. In this in-depth review we discuss the genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding for glutathione S-tranferases, xanthine oxidase, thiopurine S-methyltransferase, inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and multidrug resistance proteins. Pharmacogenetic knowledge in this field has increased dramatically and is still rapidly increasing, but the translation into practical guidelines with tailored advices will cost much effort in the near future. PMID:20205660

  2. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. PMID:24863549

  3. NAD metabolism in HPRT-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacomelli, Gabriella; Di Marcello, Federica; Notarantonio, Laura; Sestini, Silvia; Cerboni, Barbara; Bertelli, Matteo; Pompucci, Giuseppe; Jinnah, Hyder A.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is virtually absent in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by uric acid accumulation and neurodevelopmental dysfunction. The biochemical basis for the neurological and behavioral abnormalities have not yet been completely explained. Prior studies of cells from affected patients have shown abnormalities of NAD metabolism. In the current studies, NAD metabolism was evaluated in HPRT gene knock-out mice. NAD content and the activities of the enzymes required for synthesis and breakdown of this coenzyme were investigated in blood, brain and liver of HPRT− and control mice. NAD concentration and enzyme activities were found to be significantly increased in liver, but not in brain or blood of the HPRT− mice. These results demonstrate that changes in NAD metabolism occur in response to HPRT deficiency depending on both species and tissue type. PMID:19319672

  4. Genetic background of uric acid metabolism in a patient with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Petru, Lenka; Pavelcova, Katerina; Sebesta, Ivan; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2016-09-01

    Hyperuricemia depends on the balance of endogenous production and renal excretion of uric acid. Transporters for urate are located in the proximal tubule where uric acid is secreted and extensively reabsorbed: secretion is principally ensured by the highly variable ABCG2 gene. Enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) plays a central role in purine metabolism and its deficiency is an X-linked inherited metabolic disorder associated with clinical manifestations of purine overproduction. Here we report the case of a middle-aged man with severe chronic tophaceous gout with a poor response to allopurinol and requiring repeated surgical intervention. We identified the causal mutations in the HPRT1 gene, variant c.481G>T (p.A161S), and in the crucial urate transporter ABCG2, a heterozygous variant c.421C>A (p.Q141K). This case shows the value of an analysis of the genetic background of serum uric acid. PMID:27288985

  5. Homologies between T cell receptor junctional sequences unique to multiple sclerosis and T cells mediating experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Allegretta, M; Albertini, R J; Howell, M D; Smith, L R; Martin, R; McFarland, H F; Sriram, S; Brostoff, S; Steinman, L

    1994-01-01

    The selection of T cell clones with mutations in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene has been used to isolate T cells reactive to myelin basic protein (MBP) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). These T cell clones are activated in vivo, and are not found in healthy individuals. The third complementarity determining regions (CDR3) of the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains are the putative contact sites for peptide fragments of MBP bound in the groove of the HLA molecule. The TCR V gene usage and CDR3s of these MBP-reactive hprt-T cell clones are homologous to TCRs from other T cells relevant to MS, including T cells causing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and T cells found in brain lesions and in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients. In vivo activated MBP-reactive T cells in MS patients may be critical in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:8040252

  6. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A T; van Zeeland, A A; Zwanenburg, T S

    1983-01-01

    frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations in A-T and FA cells. 3AB does not influence the frequencies of SCEs induced by UV or mitomycin C (MMC) in CHO cells. However, it increases the frequencies of SCEs induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Under the conditions in which 3AB increases the frequencies of spontaneously occurring as well as induced SCEs, it does not increase the frequencies of point mutations in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) locus. 3AB does not influence the amount of repair replication following dimethylsulphate (DMS) treatment of human fibroblasts, or UV irradiated human lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6317638

  7. Human oestrus

    PubMed Central

    Gangestad, Steven W; Thornhill, Randy

    2008-01-01

    For several decades, scholars of human sexuality have almost uniformly assumed that women evolutionarily lost oestrus—a phase of female sexuality occurring near ovulation and distinct from other phases of the ovarian cycle in terms of female sexual motivations and attractivity. In fact, we argue, this long-standing assumption is wrong. We review evidence that women's fertile-phase sexuality differs in a variety of ways from their sexuality during infertile phases of their cycles. In particular, when fertile in their cycles, women are particularly sexually attracted to a variety of features that likely are (or, ancestrally, were) indicators of genetic quality. As women's fertile-phase sexuality shares with other vertebrate females' fertile-phase sexuality a variety of functional and physiological features, we propose that the term oestrus appropriately applies to this phase in women. We discuss the function of women's non-fertile or extended sexuality and, based on empirical findings, suggest ways that fertile-phase sexuality in women has been shaped to partly function in the context of extra-pair mating. Men are particularly attracted to some features of fertile-phase women, but probably based on by-products of physiological changes males have been selected to detect, not because women signal their cycle-based fertility status. PMID:18252670

  8. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  9. [Human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes. PMID:14610898

  10. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  11. Human Research Roadmap

    NASA Video Gallery

    Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) investigates and mitigates the highest risks to human health and per...

  12. Differences between human slow N-acetyltransferase 2 alleles in levels of 4-aminobiphenyl-induced DNA adducts and mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bendaly, Jean; Doll, Mark A.; Millner, Lori M.; Metry, Kristin J.; Smith, Ned B.; Pierce, William M.; Hein, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Aromatic amines such as 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP) require biotransformation to exert their carcinogenic effects. Genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes such as N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) may modify cancer risk following exposure. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator), NAT2*5B (common Caucasian slow acetylator), or NAT2*7B (common Asian slow acetylator) alleles (haplotypes) were treated with ABP to test the effect of NAT2 polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis. ABP N-acetyltransferase catalytic activities were detectable only in cell lines transfected with NAT2 and were highest in cells transfected with NAT2*4, lower in cells transfected with NAT2*7B, and lowest in cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Following ABP treatment, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP) was the primary adduct formed. Cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed the highest concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutants, and dG-C8-ABP adducts. Cells transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*7B showed lower levels of cytotoxicity, hprt mutagenesis, and dG-C8-ABP adducts. Cells transfected with CYP1A1 only or cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*5B did not induce cytotoxicity, hprt mutagenesis or dG-C8-ABP adducts. ABP DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r > 0.96) with ABP-induced hprt mutant levels following each treatment. The results of the present study suggest that investigations of NAT2 genotype or phenotype associations with disease or toxicity could be more precise and reproducible if heterogeneity within the “slow” NAT2 acetylator phenotype is considered and incorporated into the study design. PMID:19682468

  13. Queuine, a tRNA anticodon wobble base, maintains the proliferative and pluripotent potential of HL-60 cells in the presence of the differentiating agent 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed Central

    French, B T; Patrick, D E; Grever, M R; Trewyn, R W

    1991-01-01

    6-Thioguanine (6-TG)-induced differentiation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8)-deficient HL-60 cells is characterized by 2 days of growth, after which morphological differentiation proceeds. Addition of the tRNA wobble base queuine, in the presence of 6-TG, maintains the proliferative capability of the cells. The ability of 6-TG to induce differentiation correlates with c-myc mRNA down-regulation, but queuine has no effect on this parameter. Treatment with 6-TG for 2-3 days commits HL-60 cells to granulocytic differentiation, and, once committed, these cells do not respond to the monocytic inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Nonetheless, when cells are treated with queuine and 6-TG, they maintain the promyelocytic morphology and are capable of being induced down the monocytic pathway by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as indicated by stabilization of c-fms mRNA and cell adherence. In the absence of queuine, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate is incapable of inducing monocytic markers in the 6-TG-treated cells. The data presented indicate that 6-TG-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells is a tRNA-facilitated event and that the tRNA wobble base queuine is capable of maintaining both the proliferative and pluripotent potential of the cells. Images PMID:1988936

  14. DNA crosslinking, sister-chromatid exchange and specific-locus mutations.

    PubMed

    Carrano, A V; Thompson, L H; Stetka, D G; Minkler, J L; Mazrimas, J A; Fong, S

    1979-11-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with the DNA-crosslinking chemicals, mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (POR), and their monofunctional derivative decarbamoyl mitomycin C (DCMMC). After exposure, the cells were studied for the induction of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and mutations at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase loci. The frequency of SCEs varied significantly in successive sampling intervals, requiring the weighting of each interval by the percentage of second-division mitosis in that interval to obtain the mean SCE frequency for each dose. All 3 compounds were potent inducers of SCEs but weakly mutagenic. All 3 chemicals by concentration were approximately equally effective in inducing SCEs or mutations. When the induced SCEs and mutations were compared at equal levels of survival, DCMMC was slightly more effective than MMC or POR in inducing SCEs and somewhat less mutagenic. These results indicate that the DNA interstrand crosslink is not the major lesion responsible for the induction of SCE or mutation by these compounds. PMID:522865

  15. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  16. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  17. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis in DNA repair deficient CHO cells expressing human CYP1A1 and rapid or slow acetylator NAT2

    PubMed Central

    Bendaly, Jean; Zhao, Shuang; Neale, Jason R.; Metry, Kristin J.; Doll, Mark A.; States, J. Christopher; Pierce, William M.; Hein, David W.

    2007-01-01

    2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is one of the most potent and abundant mutagens in the western diet. Bioactivation includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P450s followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). Nucleotide excision repair-deficient chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were constructed by stable transfection of human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles. CYP1A1 and NAT2 catalytic activities were undetectable in untransfected CHO cell lines. CYP1A1 activity did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) among the CYP1A1-transfected cell lines. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had significantly higher levels of sulfamethazine N-acetyltransferase (p = 0.0001) and N-hydroxy-MeIQx O-acetyltransferase (p = 0.0093) catalytic activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Only cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutagenesis following MeIQx treatment. dG-C8-MeIQx was the primary DNA adduct formed and levels were dose-dependent in each cell line and in the order: untransfected < transfected with CYP1A1 < transfected with CYP1A1 & NAT2*5B < transfected with CYP1A1 & NAT2*4. MeIQx DNA adduct levels were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in CYP1A1/NAT2*4 than CYP1A1/NAT2*5B cells at all concentrations of MeIQx tested. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r2 = 0.88) with MeIQx-induced mutants. These results strongly support extrahepatic activation of MeIQx by CYP1A1 and a robust effect of human NAT2 genetic polymorphism on MeIQx –induced DNA adducts and mutagenesis. The results provide laboratory-based support for epidemiological studies reporting higher frequency of heterocyclic amine-related cancers in rapid NAT2 acetylators. PMID:17627018

  18. Cooperation in human teaching.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Ann Cale

    2015-01-01

    Kline's evolutionary analysis of teaching provides welcome reframing for cross-species comparisons. However, theory based on competition cannot explain the transmission of human cultural elements that were collectively created. Humans evolved in a cultural niche and teaching-learning coevolved to transmit culture. To study human cultural variation in teaching, we need a more articulated theory of this distinctively human engagement. PMID:26786392

  19. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  20. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  1. Humanism: A Christian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaasa, Harris; And Others

    As part of a four-college project to integrate the religious tradition with humanities teaching, humanism is discussed from a Christian perspective. Definitions of the terms humanism, religion, Christianity, and Christian humanism are provided. The latter is viewed as the issues surrounding the Christian approach to the dichotomy of good and evil…

  2. The Humanities: Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on a wide range of interdisciplinary themes and ideas for humanities instruction, the 17 articles in this journal issue discuss the following topics: (1) literature, humanities, and the adult learner; (2) the role of the humanities in educating for a democracy; (3) humanities in the marketplace; (4) literature versus "great books" in high…

  3. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  4. Molecular analysis of mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, Phouthone; Xi, Liqiang; Grant, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The HPRT assay uses incorporation of toxic nucleotide analogues to select for cells lacking the purine scavenger enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. A major advantage of this assay is the ability to isolate mutant cells and determine the molecular basis for their functional deficiency. Many types of analyses have been performed at this locus: the current protocol involves generation of a cDNA and multiplex PCR of each exon, including the intron/exon junctions, followed by direct sequencing of the products. This analysis detects point mutations, small deletions and insertions within the gene, mutations affecting RNA splicing, and products of illegitimate V(D)J recombination within the gene. Establishment of and comparisons with mutational spectra hold the promise of identifying exposures to mutation-inducing genotoxicants from their distinctive pattern of gene-specific DNA damage at this easily analyzed reporter gene. PMID:24623237

  5. Boundaries of Humanities: Writing Medical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Gillie

    2008-01-01

    Literature and medicine is a discipline within medical humanities, which challenges medicine to reconfigure its scientific model to become interdisciplinary, and be disciplined by arts and humanities as well as science. The psychological, emotional, spiritual and physical are inextricably linked in people, inevitably entailing provisionality,…

  6. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  7. Virtual Human Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, RD

    2001-06-12

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  8. Virtual Human project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Richard C.; Kruse, Kara L.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Hively, Lee M.; Fischer, K. N.; Munro, Nancy B.; Easterly, Clay E.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  9. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  10. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  11. Human Resource Accounting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  12. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  13. Human Rights Resource Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrano, Elias, Comp.

    This document provides information about 25 programs/brochures which focus on human rights topics. Specific topics include: (1) counselor preparation; (2) multicultural awareness; (3) abuse and neglect; (4) Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; (5) self-awareness; (6) human rights awareness and human rights of students; (7) cultural diversity; (8)…

  14. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  15. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  16. HUMAN USE INDEX (FUTURE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...

  17. HUMAN USE INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...

  18. Visible Human Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mobile Gallery Site Navigation Home The Visible Human Project ® Overview The Visible Human Project ® is an outgrowth of the NLM's 1986 Long- ... The long-term goal of the Visible Human Project ® is to produce a system of knowledge structures ...

  19. Human Rights Educational Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Gives a variety of educational resources on human rights that include videos, resource notebooks, books, publications, and websites along with short descriptions of the materials. Provides the contact information for a list of human-rights organizations, such as the Center for Human Rights Education and the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt…

  20. Expanding Human Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyean, Beverly-Colleene

    1983-01-01

    The human brain is capable of mastering skills far beyond those it is now used for. Three questions about the further evolution of human intelligence are raised: What will be the next step in human intelligence? How is the next step manifesting itself? How can we prepare for those changes? (IS)

  1. Financing Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juffras, Jason; Sawhill, Isabel V.

    This paper examines the government's role in financing human capital investments. It first examines why private investments in education, training, and other forms of human capital are likely to fall short of socially desirable levels. It then reviews past trends in public support for human resource investments. Finally, it discusses current…

  2. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  3. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences. PMID:23908778

  4. Some Criteria for Humanizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Charlotte S.

    Patterns for humanizing the information sciences include recognizing essential "humanness," taking a holistic approach to the subject field, and being aware of the epistemological nature of how people communicate and relate to others and themselves. The complete inclusion of the human factor in information theory researches can only amplify the…

  5. Esprit: A Humanities Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Donald G.; Capella, Barry John

    In March 1984, the first issue of "Esprit," a semi-annual humanities magazine for the 56 two-year colleges in New York State, was published. The magazine seeks to confront the apparent decline of student interest in the humanities, community doubts about the relevance of the humanities, and the seeming indifference to the special truths inherent…

  6. Humanism in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, S

    1993-09-01

    Emergency medicine has not yet appropriated "humanism" as a term of its own. Medical humanism needs to be interpreted in a way that is consistent with the practical goals of emergency medicine. In this essay, humanism in emergency medicine is defined by identifying the dehumanizing aspects of sudden illness and exploring of ways for sustaining the humanity of emergency department patients. Excerpts from Dr Oliver Sacks' autobiographical work A Leg to Stand On give voice to the human needs created by sudden illness and its treatment. PMID:8363690

  7. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  8. Human-technology Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Katharine M.

    Human-technology integration is the replacement of human parts and extension of human capabilities with engineered devices and substrates. Its result is hybrid biological-artificial systems. We discuss here four categories of products furthering human-technology integration: wearable computers, pervasive computing environments, engineered tissues and organs, and prosthetics, and introduce examples of currently realized systems in each category. We then note that realization of a completely artificial sytem via the path of human-technology integration presents the prospect of empirical confirmation of an aware artificially embodied system.

  9. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  10. Biological races in humans.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  11. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office for Human Research Protections The Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) provides leadership in the protection of the rights, welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in ...

  12. Investigation of vital pathogenic target orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTase) from Thermus thermophilus HB8: Phylogenetic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Prabhu, Damodharan; Richard, Mariadasse; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2016-06-01

    Biosynthesis pathways of pyrimidine and purine are shown to play an important role in regular cellular activities. The biosynthesis can occur either through de novo or salvage pathways based on the requirement of the cell. The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway has been linked to several disorders and various autoimmune diseases. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) is an important enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of orotate to orotate monophosphate in the fifth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of 228 OPRTase sequences shows the distribution of proteins across different living forms of life. High structural similarities between Thermusthermophilus and other organisms kindled us to concentrate on OPRTase as an anti-pathogenic target. In this study, a homology model of OPRTase was constructed using 2P1Z as a template. About 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the conformational stability and dynamic patterns of the protein. The amino acid residues (Met1, Asp2, Glu43, Ala44, Glu47, Lys51, Ala157 and Leu158) lining in the binding site were predicted using SiteMap. Further, structure based virtual screening was performed on the predicted binding site using ChemBridge, Asinex, Binding, NCI, TosLab and Zinc databases. Compounds retrieved from the screening collections were manually clustered. The resultant protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, which further validates the binding modes of the hits. The study may provide better insight for designing potent anti-pathogenic agent. PMID:26861612

  13. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly. PMID:25051653

  14. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  15. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept. PMID:24979876

  16. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  17. Human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, E.M.; Fragola, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a treatment of human reliability analysis incorporating an introduction to probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power generating stations. They treat the subject according to the framework established for general systems theory. Draws upon reliability analysis, psychology, human factors engineering, and statistics, integrating elements of these fields within a systems framework. Provides a history of human reliability analysis, and includes examples of the application of the systems approach.

  18. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  19. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  20. The psychology of humanness.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures. PMID:23947277

  1. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  2. 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline-induced DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis in DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human cytochrome P4501A1 and rapid or slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Bendaly, Jean; Zhao, Shuang; Neale, Jason R; Metry, Kristin J; Doll, Mark A; States, J Christopher; Pierce, William M; Hein, David W

    2007-07-01

    2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is one of the most potent and abundant mutagens in the western diet. Bioactivation includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P450s followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). In humans, NAT2*4 allele is associated with rapid acetylator phenotype, whereas NAT2*5B allele is associated with slow acetylator phenotype. We hypothesized that rapid acetylator phenotype predisposes humans to DNA damage and mutagenesis from MeIQx. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells were constructed by stable transfection of human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles. CYP1A1 and NAT2 catalytic activities were undetectable in untransfected Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. CYP1A1 activity did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) among the CYP1A1-transfected cell lines. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had 20-fold significantly higher levels of sulfamethazine N-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0001) and 6-fold higher levels of N-hydroxy-MeIQx O-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0093) catalytic activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Only cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase mutagenesis following MeIQx treatment. Deoxyguanosine-C8-MeIQx was the primary DNA adduct formed and levels were dose dependent in each cell line and in the following order: untransfected < transfected with CYP1A1 < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*5B < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*4. MeIQx DNA adduct levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in CYP1A1/NAT2*4 than CYP1A1/NAT2*5B cells at all concentrations of MeIQx tested. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r2 = 0.88) with MeIQx-induced mutants. These results strongly support extrahepatic activation of MeIQx by CYP1A1 and a robust effect of human NAT2 genetic polymorphism

  3. Health and Humanity: Humanities 401 Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Fraser; Taylor, Maxine

    A syllabus for the "Health and Humanities" interdisciplinary course at Northwestern State University, Louisiana, is presented. An introduction suggests that with the proliferation of technological advances in the field of health care, there is a need for reconsideration of many moral, ethical, legal, and humanistic questions. Information is…

  4. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  5. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  6. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  7. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  8. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  9. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed included: (1)…

  10. Teaching Human Rights Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Howard R.

    1985-01-01

    The international community has developed a system of human rights law relevant to many areas of legal encounter, which American law schools have been slow to incorporate into curricula. Teaching human rights law provides an opportunity for law schools to enrich the learning process and contribute creatively to the respect for rights in society.…

  11. Human Pythiosis, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Araújo, João Pessoa; Candeias, João Manuel Grisi; Fabiano de Franco, Marcello; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Mendoza, Leonel; Pires de Camargo, Rosangela; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2005-01-01

    Pythiosis, caused by Pythium insidiosum, occurs in humans and animals and is acquired from aquatic environments that harbor the emerging pathogen. Diagnosis is difficult because clinical and histopathologic features are not pathognomonic. We report the first human case of pythiosis from Brazil, diagnosed by using culture and rDNA sequencing. PMID:15890126

  12. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  13. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  14. Human Sociobiology: Wilson's Fallacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrman, Nathaniel S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an introduction to and a critique of E.O. Wilson's new science of sociobiology, which focuses on explaining the social behavior of species as diverse as ants, apes, and humans. Suggests that Wilson has gone beyond his data in claiming that complex human behaviors such as altruism are caused to any extent by genetic, as opposed to…

  15. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  16. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  17. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  18. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  19. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  20. HSI in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggerman, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document examines the scope of Human Systems Integration (HSI) at NASA, and the implementation of HSI in the human space flight programs. Two areas of interest are the Responsibilities and the lessons learned from the International Space Station and the strategy and approach for the Crew Exploration Vehicle.

  1. Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Gaowa; Wuritu; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Wu, Dongxing; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Chiya, Seizou; Fukunaga, Kazutoshi; Funato, Toyohiko; Shiojiri, Masaaki; Nakajima, Hideki; Hamauzu, Yoshiji; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ando, Shuji; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively confirmed 2 cases of human Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection. Patient blood samples contained unique p44/msp2 for the pathogen, and antibodies bound to A. phagocytophilum antigens propagated in THP-1 rather than HL60 cells. Unless both cell lines are used for serodiagnosis of rickettsiosis-like infections, cases of human granulocytic anaplasmosis could go undetected. PMID:23460988

  2. Neurobehavioral testing in humans.

    PubMed

    Anger, W K; Rohlman, D S; Storzbach, D

    2001-05-01

    The evaluation of the effects of chemical exposures on humans is a worldwide concern, and most chemicals have not been evaluated for neurotoxic effect. Human neurobehavioral research or clinical evaluations of populations exposed to chemicals must be carefully planned and structured. This unit describes the steps required to create such a study, select the appropriate measures, and evaluate the results. PMID:20957644

  3. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  4. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  5. Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances

    2004-01-01

    The first human space flight, in the early 1960s, was aimed primarily at determining whether humans could indeed survive and function in micro-gravity. Would eating and sleeping be possible? What mental and physical tasks could be performed? Subsequent programs increased the complexity of the tasks the crew performed. Table 1 summarizes the history of U.S. space flight, showing the projects, their dates, crew sizes, and mission durations. With over forty years of experience with human space flight, the emphasis now is on how to design space vehicles, habitats, and missions to produce the greatest returns to human knowledge. What are the roles of the humans in space flight in low earth orbit, on the moon, and in exploring Mars?

  6. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  7. Humanization of immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Rybak, S M; Hoogenboom, H R; Meade, H M; Raus, J C; Schwartz, D; Youle, R J

    1992-04-15

    The construction and expression of a chimeric gene encoding a mouse/human antibody to the human transferrin receptor fused to the gene for angiogenin, a human homolog of pancreatic RNase, are described. F(ab')2-like antibody-enzyme fusions were prepared by linking the gene for human angiogenin to a chimeric anti-transferrin receptor heavy chain gene. The antibody-enzyme fusion gene was introduced into a transfectoma that secretes the chimeric light chain of the same antibody, and cell lines were cloned that synthesize and secrete the antibody-enzyme fusion protein of the expected size at a concentration of 1-5 ng/ml. Culture supernatants from clones secreting the fusion protein caused inhibition of growth and protein synthesis of K562 cells that express the human transferrin receptor but not toward a non-human-derived cell line that lacks this receptor. Whereas excess antibody to the same receptor did not itself inhibit protein synthesis, it was able to completely prevent the protein synthesis inhibition caused by the fusion protein. These results indicate that the cytotoxicity is due to a transferrin receptor-mediated mechanism involving the angiogenin portion of the fusion protein and demonstrate the feasibility of constructing recombinant antibody-RNase molecules capable of killing tumor cells bearing the transferrin receptor. The significance of the acquired cytotoxicity of a mouse/human chimeric antibody linked to a human protein may bear importantly in human therapeutic strategies that use mouse antibodies linked to toxins from plants or bacteria to target tumor cells. It is expected that the humanization of immunotoxins will lead to less toxicity and immunogenicity than currently available reagents. PMID:1565609

  8. Novel human astroviruses: Novel human diseases?

    PubMed

    Vu, Diem-Lan; Cordey, Samuel; Brito, Francisco; Kaiser, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Astroviruses are small, non-enveloped, single-stranded positive RNA viruses that belong to the Astroviridae family. While classical human astroviruses (HAstV) are a well-recognized cause of acute non-bacterial diarrhea among young children worldwide, novel astroviruses, named HAstV-MLB and HAstV-VA/HMO, have been identified recently in humans by molecular assays. They are phylogenetically more related to animal astroviruses than to classical human astroviruses, thus suggesting cross-species transmission. Serological studies demonstrated a surprisingly high seroprevalence in certain populations and highlighted a high infection rate in the early years of life. Although their pathogenic role has not yet been clearly determined, novel astrovirus RNA sequences have been identified in different biological specimens of symptomatic patients, including the feces, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain biopsies. Thus, there is evidence that they could contribute not only to digestive tract infection, but also to unexpected clinical syndromes, notably encephalitis and meningitis. Severe infections affect mainly immunocompromised patients. These findings indicate that novel astroviruses should be considered in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with meningitis or encephalitis of unknown origin. PMID:27434149

  9. Archaea on human skin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Auerbach, Anna K; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  10. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  11. Managing human bites

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pradnya D; Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Galwankar, Sagar C

    2009-01-01

    Human bites are frequently overlooked in making a diagnosis in the emergency room. They are particularly notorious due to the polymicrobial nature of human saliva inoculated in the wound and the risk they pose for transmission of infectious diseases. Early treatment, appropriate prophylaxis and surgical evaluation are the key to achieving desired treatment outcomes. Through this article, we have tried to summarize the diagnostic features, complications as well as the recommended treatment alternatives for human bites based on the current available evidence. PMID:20009309

  12. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  13. Human Photoreactivating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, J. C.; Sutherland, B. M.

    1975-01-01

    The action spectrum for photoreactivation by enzymes from human leukocytes and fibroblasts extends from 300 to approximately 600 nm with a maximum near 400 nm. The ability of the human enzymes to utilize light of wavelengths greater than 500 nm suggested that yellow or gold lights conventionally used as safelights for photoreactivation might serve as sources of photoreactivating light for these enzymes. Experiments using lights with a range of spectral outputs confirm that the standard yellow “safe” lights do produce photoreactivation by the human but not the Escherichia coli enzyme. PMID:19211015

  14. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  15. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes. PMID:26395141

  16. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-06-01

    The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

  17. The Concept of Being Human.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    This analysis of the relationship between humanism and humanitarianism outlines educational goals that should lead to a more humane world. Section 1, an outline of human life examines six substructures--human life, individuality, amenity, contact, actualization, and problems. A definition and examples of humanism in section 2 are elaborated into a…

  18. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  19. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Rodenticides Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose ...

  20. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  1. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  2. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You Human Papillomavirus Vaccine HPV Information in Other Languages Women ...

  3. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  4. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  5. Sociobiology and Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoult, Thomas Ford

    1979-01-01

    Describes the fundamental conflict between the implications of sociobiology and the aspirations of humanists. Sociobiology tends to rationalize and defend special privileges for the powerful few, while humanism stresses equality of opportunity. Journal availability: see SO 507 272. (Author)

  6. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  7. Human Biomass Consumption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Humans are using an increasing amount of Earth’s annual production of plants. Research shows that, from 1995 to 2005, consumption rose from 20 to 25 percent of the planet's annual production. Wha...

  8. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  9. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  10. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  11. Human Computers 1947

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Langley's human computers at work in 1947. The female presence at Langley, who performed mathematical computations for male staff. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 48), by James Schultz.

  12. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  13. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  14. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  15. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  16. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  17. Humans in space.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Averner, M

    2001-02-22

    Many successful space missions over the past 40 years have highlighted the advantages and necessity of humans in the exploration of space. But as space travel becomes ever more feasible in the twenty-first century, the health and safety of future space explorers will be paramount. In particular, understanding the risks posed by exposure to radiation and extended weightlessness will be crucial if humans are to travel far from Earth. PMID:11234026

  18. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  19. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  20. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes. PMID:25704934

  1. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory. PMID:24151100

  2. Human immunoglobulin allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty recombinant monoclonal antibodies are approved as therapeutics. Almost all of these are based on the whole IgG isotype format, but vary in the origin of the variable regions between mouse (chimeric), humanized mouse and fully human sequences; all of those with whole IgG format employ human constant region sequences. Currently, the opposing merits of the four IgG subclasses are considered with respect to the in vivo biological activities considered to be appropriate to the disease indication being treated. Human heavy chain genes also exhibit extensive structural polymorphism(s) and, being closely linked, are inherited as a haplotype. Polymorphisms (allotypes) within the IgG isotype were originally discovered and described using serological reagents derived from humans; demonstrating that allotypic variants can be immunogenic and provoke antibody responses as a result of allo-immunization. The serologically defined allotypes differ widely within and between population groups; therefore, a mAb of a given allotype will, inevitably, be delivered to a cohort of patients homozygous for the alternative allotype. This publication reviews the serologically defined human IgG allotypes and considers the potential for allotype differences to contribute to or potentiate immunogenicity. PMID:20073133

  3. The human telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Moyzis, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    An ultimate goal of human genetics is the generation of a complete physical and ''functional'' map of the human genome. Twenty-five percent of human DNA, however, consists of repetitive DNA sequences. These repetitive DNA sequences are thought to arise by many mechanisms, from direct sequence amplification by the unequal recombination of homologous DNA regions to the reverse flow of genetic information. A general outline of the chromosomal organization of these repetitive sequences will be discussed. Our working hypothesis is that certain classes of human repetitive DNA sequences ''encode'' the information necessary for defining long-range genomic structure. Evidence will be presented that the first goal of this research, the identification and cloning of the human telomere, has been achieved. A human repetitive DNA library was constructed from randomly sheared, reassociated, and oligo(G/center dot/C)-tailed DNA, a method that minimizes the potential loss of sequences devoid of a given restriction enzyme site. Sequences too large to clone efficiently in cosmid or /lambda/ vectors, such as centromeric repeats, or telomeric sequences with an end incompatible for cloning, should be present in this library. In order to isolate highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences, this library was screened with radiolabeled hamster Cot50 repetitive DNA. Two clones, containing tandem arrays of the sequence (TTAGGG), were isolated by this method. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  5. Human bites - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in two ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  6. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  7. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a

  8. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  9. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  10. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population. PMID:26111568

  11. Why Geo-Humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  12. Archaic human genomics.

    PubMed

    Disotell, Todd R

    2012-01-01

    For much of the 20th century, the predominant view of human evolutionary history was derived from the fossil record. Homo erectus was seen arising in Africa from an earlier member of the genus and then spreading throughout the Old World and into the Oceania. A regional continuity model of anagenetic change from H. erectus via various intermediate archaic species into the modern humans in each of the regions inhabited by H. erectus was labeled the multiregional model of human evolution (MRE). A contrasting model positing a single origin, in Africa, of anatomically modern H. sapiens with some populations later migrating out of Africa and replacing the local archaic populations throughout the world with complete replacement became known as the recent African origin (RAO) model. Proponents of both models used different interpretations of the fossil record to bolster their views for decades. In the 1980s, molecular genetic techniques began providing evidence from modern human variation that allowed not only the different models of modern human origins to be tested but also the exploration demographic history and the types of selection that different regions of the genome and even specific traits had undergone. The majority of researchers interpreted these data as strongly supporting the RAO model, especially analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Extrapolating backward from modern patterns of variation and using various calibration points and substitution rates, a consensus arose that saw modern humans evolving from an African population around 200,000 years ago. Much later, around 50,000 years ago, a subset of this population migrated out of Africa replacing Neanderthals in Europe and western Asia as well as archaics in eastern Asia and Oceania. mtDNA sequences from more than two-dozen Neanderthals and early modern humans re-enforced this consensus. In 2010, however, the complete draft genomes of Neanderthals and of heretofore unknown hominins from Siberia, called

  13. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  14. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  15. Human Spinal Motor Control.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-07-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. Humans have direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. PMID:27023730

  16. Human and murine erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiuli; Schulz, Vincent P.; Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Research into the fundamental mechanisms of erythropoiesis has provided critical insights into inherited and acquired disorders of the erythrocyte. Studies of human erythropoiesis have primarily utilized in-vitro systems, whereas murine models have provided insights from in-vivo studies. This report reviews recent insights into human and murine erythropoiesis gained from transcriptome-based analyses. Recent findings The availability of high-throughput genomic methodologies has allowed attainment of detailed gene expression data from cells at varying developmental and differentiation stages of erythropoiesis. Transcriptome analyses of human and murine reveal both stage and species-specific similarities and differences across terminal erythroid differentiation. Erythroid-specific long noncoding RNAs exhibit poor sequence conservation between human and mouse. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing reveal that complex, dynamic, stage-specific programs of alternative splicing program are utilized during terminal erythroid differentiation. Transcriptome data provide a significant resource for understanding mechanisms of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. Understanding these processes will provide innovative strategies to detect, diagnose, prevent, and treat hematologic disease. Summary Understanding the shared and different mechanisms controlling human and murine erythropoiesis will allow investigators to leverage the best model system to provide insights in normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. PMID:25719574

  17. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  18. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  19. [Human genetics and ethics].

    PubMed

    Zergollern, L

    1990-01-01

    Many new problems and dilemmas have occurred in the practice of medical geneticists with the development of human genetics and its subdisciplines--molecular genetics, ethic genetics and juridical genetics. Devoid of the possibility to get adequate education, genetic informer or better to say, counsellor, although a scientist and a professional who has already formed his ethic attitudes, often finds himself in a dilemma when he has to decide whether a procedure made possible by progress of science is ethical or not. Thus, due to different attitudes, same decision is ethical for some, while for the others it is not. Ethic committees are groups of moral and good people trying to find an objective approach to certain genetic and ethic problems. There are more and more ethically unanswered questions in modern human genetics, and particularly in medical genetics. Medical geneticist-ethicist still encounters numerous problems in his work. These are, for example, experiments with human gametes and embryos, possibilities of hybridization of human gametes with animal gametes, in vitro fertilization, detection of heterozygotes and homozygotes for monogene diseases. early detection of chromosomopathies, substitute mothers, homo and hetero insemination, transplantation of fetal and cadeveric organs, uncontrolled consumption of alcohol and drugs, environmental pollution, etc. It is almost impossible to create a single attitude which shall be shared by all those engaged in human health protection. Therefore, it is best to have a neutral eugenetic attitude which allows free ethical choice of each individual, in any case, for the well-being of man. PMID:2366624

  20. Healthy human gut phageome.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M; Young, Mark J

    2016-09-13

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20-50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  1. Discounting human lives

    SciTech Connect

    Cropper, M.L. ); Portney, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    The future costs of regulatory programs to protect human health are routinely discounted, but the lives they save in the future are not. To shed light on the public's attitude toward the discounting of human lives, researchers at Resources for the Future asked 2,600 individuals to choose between one hypothetical program that would save lives immediately and another that would save lives in 5, 10, 25, 50, or 100 years. From the responses, they inferred the number of lives that must be saved in the future to make people as content as saving one life today, compared this implicit discount rate to the respondents' discount rate for money, and identified several factors that affect discount rates for human lives.

  2. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  3. Human nutrition: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, N A

    2005-01-01

    In recent decades, much new evidence relating to the ape forerunners of modern humans has come to hand and diet appears to be an important factor. At some stage, there must have been a transition from a largely vegetarian ape diet to a modern human hunting economy providing significant amounts of meat. On an even longer evolutionary time scale the change was more complex. The mechanisms of evolutionary change are now better understood than they were in Darwin's time, thanks largely to great advances in genetics, both experimental and theoretical. It is virtually certain that diet, as a major component of the human environment, must have exerted evolutionary effects, but researchers still have little good evidence. PMID:17393680

  4. The Human Toxome Project

    PubMed Central

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Andersen, Melvin E.; Baghdikian, Christina; Boekelheide, Kim; Crofton, Kevin M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Kleensang, Andre; Li, Henghong; Livi, Carolina; Maertens, Alexandra; McMullen, Patrick D.; Rosenberg, Michael; Thomas, Russell; Vantangoli, Marguerite; Yager, James D.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Human Toxome Project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011–2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating and sharing molecular pathways of toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the responses of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are being phenotyped by transcriptomics and mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics. The bioinformatics tools for PoT deduction represent a core deliverable. A number of challenges for quality and standardization of cell systems, omics technologies and bioinformatics are being addressed. In parallel, concepts for annotation, validation and sharing of PoT information, as well as their link to adverse outcomes, are being developed. A reasonably comprehensive public database of PoT, the Human Toxome Knowledge-base, could become a point of reference for toxicological research and regulatory test strategies. PMID:25742299

  5. Is humanity suicidal?

    PubMed

    Wilson, E O

    1993-01-01

    The world's fauna and flora has entered a crisis unparalleled since the end of the Mesozoic Era, with the extinction rate of species now elevated to more than a thousand times that existing before the coming of humanity. Scientists and policy makers are ill-prepared to moderate this hemorrhaging, because so little is known of the biology of the Earth's millions of species and because so little effort has been directed toward conservation thus far. With the vanished species will go great potential wealth in scientific knowledge, new products, ecosystems services, and part of the natural world in which the human species originated. The need for new research and improved management is thus urgent. If it is not met, humanity will likely survive, but in a world biologically impoverished for all time. PMID:8155855

  6. Classifying human manipulation behavior.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Ian M; Dollar, Aaron M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a taxonomy for detailed classification of human and anthropomorphic manipulation behavior. This hand-centric, motion-centric taxonomy differentiates tasks based on criteria such as object contact, prehension, and the nature of object motion relative to a hand frame. A sub-classification of the most dexterous categories, within-hand manipulation, is also presented, based on the principal axis of object rotation or translation in the hand frame. Principles for categorizing complex, multi-faceted tasks are also presented, along with illustrative examples. We hope that the proposed taxonomy will both establish a standard language around human and anthropomorphic manipulation as well as enable improved understanding of the differences in hand use for a wide variety of behavior. Although designed for human and anthropomorphic hands, the taxonomy might easily be extended to a wide range of robot manipulators and end-effectors. PMID:22275611

  7. Autophagy and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peidu; Mizushima, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a major intracellular degradative process that delivers cytoplasmic materials to the lysosome for degradation. Since the discovery of autophagy-related (Atg) genes in the 1990s, there has been a proliferation of studies on the physiological and pathological roles of autophagy in a variety of autophagy knockout models. However, direct evidence of the connections between ATG gene dysfunction and human diseases has emerged only recently. There are an increasing number of reports showing that mutations in the ATG genes were identified in various human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases, infectious diseases, and cancers. Here, we review the major advances in identification of mutations or polymorphisms of the ATG genes in human diseases. Current autophagy-modulating compounds in clinical trials are also summarized. PMID:24323045

  8. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  9. The human toxome project.

    PubMed

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Andersen, Melvin E; Baghdikian, Christina; Boekelheide, Kim; Crofton, Kevin M; Fornace, Albert J; Kleensang, Andre; Li, Henghong; Livi, Carolina; Maertens, Alexandra; McMullen, Patrick D; Rosenberg, Michael; Thomas, Russell; Vantangoli, Marguerite; Yager, James D; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Human Toxome Project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011-2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating and sharing molecular pathways of toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the responses of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are being phenotyped by transcriptomics and mass-spectroscopy-based metabolomics. The bioinformatics tools for PoT deduction represent a core deliverable. A number of challenges for quality and standardization of cell systems, omics technologies and bioinformatics are being addressed. In parallel, concepts for annotation, validation and sharing of PoT information, as well as their link to adverse outcomes, are being developed. A reasonably comprehensive public database of PoT, the Human Toxome Knowledge-base, could become a point of reference for toxicological research and regulatory test strategies. PMID:25742299

  10. Whither medical humanities?

    PubMed

    Singh, Navjeevan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the medical humanities (MH) and their role in medical education is in its infancy in India. Students are initiated into professional (medical) education too early in life, usually at the expense of a basic grounding in the humanities, resulting in warped intellectual growth. The author, arguing against the wholesale import of foreign systems, advocates free inquiry by medical educators to evolve a humanities programme for medical students derived from our own cultural context. This essay describes the early experiences of efforts to make a beginning at the University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. The author reviews the various strategies used and the challenges of introducing the subject to the current generation of medical students. PMID:22864074

  11. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  12. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  13. Preparing for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.; Joosten, B. Kent

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise is defining architectures and requirements for human exploration that radically reduce the costs of such missions through the use of advanced technologies, commercial partnerships and innovative systems strategies. In addition, the HEDS Enterprise is collaborating with the Space Science Enterprise to acquire needed early knowledge about Mars and to demonstrate critical technologies via robotic missions. This paper provides an overview of the technological challenges facing NASA as it prepares for human exploration. Emphasis is placed on identifying the key technologies including those which will provide the most return in terms of reducing total mission cost and/or reducing potential risk to the mission crew. Top-level requirements are provided for those critical enabling technology options currently under consideration.

  14. Abortion and human rights.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus. PMID:20303830

  15. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  16. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  17. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  18. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  19. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  20. Human variation databases

    PubMed Central

    Küntzer, Jan; Eggle, Daniela; Klostermann, Stefan; Burtscher, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    More than 100 000 human genetic variations have been described in various genes that are associated with a wide variety of diseases. Such data provides invaluable information for both clinical medicine and basic science. A number of locus-specific databases have been developed to exploit this huge amount of data. However, the scope, format and content of these databases differ strongly and as no standard for variation databases has yet been adopted, the way data is presented varies enormously. This review aims to give an overview of current resources for human variation data in public and commercial resources. PMID:20639550

  1. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  2. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  3. [Human reservoirs of Pneumocystis].

    PubMed

    Wissmann, Gustavo; Morilla, Ruben; Friaza, Vicente; Calderón, Enrique; Varela, Jose M

    2010-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii, the fungal agent that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), is known to exclusively infect humans. Molecular studies have enabled detection of this fungus in individuals who have been colonized by P. jirovecii. Such colonization, found in several populations, seems to act as a human reservoir for the fungus. Various studies have reported mutations associated with sulfa resistance in P. jirovecii strains isolated from colonized patients, who can transmit the mutant genotype to PCP-susceptible individuals. The growing interest in P. jirovecii colonization may prompt the design of new prevention and management strategies for PCP. PMID:19403207

  4. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  5. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  6. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  7. Memristance in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, S.; Lütken, C. A.; Johnsen, G. K.

    2010-04-01

    The memristor is basically a resistor with memory, so that the resistance is dependent on the net amount of charge having passed through the device. It is the regarded the fourth fundamental component, in addition to the resistor, capacitor and inductor, that can be deduced from the four basic circuit variables; current, voltage, charge and magnetic flux. We show that memristors can be used for modelling electrical properties of human skin. In particular is electro-osmosis in human sweat ducts of memristive nature.

  8. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  9. Human Challenges in Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presents an overview using pictures some of the history of human exploration of the new frontiers of Earth and then examines some of the challenges to human exploration of space. Particular attention is given to the environmental factors and to the social and human factors that effect humans in space environments.

  10. Designers of Human Settlements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Ursula

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed herein are the ideas of nine men who have addressed themselves to the problems of human settlements in this century. The ideas reviewed include those of Arnold Toynbee, Lewis Mumford, Hassan Fathy, Buckminster Fuller, Constantinos Doxiadis, Charles Correa, Paul Mwaluko, Robert McNamara and John F. C. Turner. (BT)

  11. The Human Toxome Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Toxome project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011--‐ 2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating, and sharing molecular Pathways of Toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the respo...

  12. Human neurotrichinellosis, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasites of the genus Trichinella are globally-distributed, tissue-dwelling nematodes that predominantly infect mammals, though certain species are known to infect birds and reptiles as well. Human trichinellosis occurs by the ingestion of raw or improperly cooked meat harboring the infective muscl...

  13. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  14. Learning to Be Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  15. Human Babesiosis, Bolivia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Macchioni, Fabio; Zuñiga, Freddy; Rojas, Patricia; Lara, Yuni; Roselli, Mimmo; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    To investigate human babesiosis in the Bolivian Chaco, in 2013 we tested blood samples from 271 healthy persons living in 2 rural communities in this region. Microscopy and PCR indicated that 3.3% of persons were positive for Babesia microti parasites (US lineage); seroprevalence was 45.7%. Appropriate screening should mitigate the risk for transfusion-associated babesiosis. PMID:27434696

  16. Occupying the Digital Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This essay questions the digital humanities' dependence on interpretation and critique as strategies for reading and responding to texts. Instead, the essay proposes suggestion as a digital rhetorical practice, one that does not replace hermeneutics, but instead offers alternative ways to respond to texts. The essay uses the Occupy movement as an…

  17. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccine for T1D promising in the clinic HPV vaccines halved infections in US teenage girls Modified DC immunotherapy against melanoma New study looks at clinical severity of human H7N9 infections Prevnar vaccines are valuable for healthcare systems GAPVAC: New consortium in the fight of brain cancer Cytomegalovirus vaccine to enter phase 3 Malaria vaccination using chemically attenuated parasites

  18. Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This set of 61 student learning modules deals with various topics pertaining to human development. The modules, which are designed for use in performance-based vocational education programs, each contain the following components: an introduction for the student, a performance objective, a variety of learning activities, content information, a…

  19. The Human Potential Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    The advent of the human potential movement has generated the expectation that educators unleash the intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual talents of students. This movement is characterized by its focus on (1) the person as a total being, (2) the needs and concerns of students, (3) phenomenology, (4) personal values and goals, and (5)…

  20. Toward a Technical Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malassis, Louis

    1977-01-01

    Examines the relationship between education and development in developing nations. Advocates the fostering of a technical humanism--the development of knowledge in all its forms as a basis for action. In this system, technical education is as highly valued as general education. The system, and its applications to rural education is discussed. (CP)

  1. Television and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George; And Others

    To compile a comprehensive review of English language scientific literature regarding the effects of television on human behavior, the authors of this book evaluated more than 2,500 books, articles, reports, and other documents. Rather than taking a traditional approach, the authors followed a new model for the retrieval and synthesis of…

  2. Trends in Humanities Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, Bernard, Ed.; Whitney, Loralyn, Ed.

    Proceedings from this workshop sponsored by the Center for the Study of Rural Librarianship are intended to disseminate information to assist rural librarians engaged in planning and conducting public programs that explore issues related to the humanities. This report of the proceedings includes the texts of three presented papers, reactions from…

  3. Humanizing the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Roy P., Ed.

    A series of essays discussing ideas about humanizing work are presented in the document. Three major sections divide the essays, and each includes a preface with comments suggesting the central focus and questions with which the authors are concerned. The first section deals with the history, philosophy, and issues related to work and contains…

  4. Television's New Humane Collectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Robert L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes "Taxi,""Barney Miller,""Lou Grant," and "M*A*S*H" in terms of three fantasy themes: the realization of significant others, the alliance in action, and membership into personhood. From these themes emerges a rhetorical vision of the new humane collectivity. (PD)

  5. Strategic Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garavan, Thomas N.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews literature on strategic human resource development (HRD) focusing on the characteristics of such activities, conditions necessary for the promotion of HRD, and the benefits to an organization pursuing such activities. Empirical evidence is presented on HRD policy formation and planning processes in Irish high technology companies. (JOW)

  6. Grass and human nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food products from animals that graze grasslands and consume diets high in forages are often better for human health than livestock fed diets with forages and concentrates. Meat from livestock that graze pastures in the United States frequently has less fat and higher concentrations of omega-3 fatty...

  7. Humanism in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This is the text of Michael Armstrong's address to the Brian Simon Centenary conference, held at the Institute of Education on 26 March 2015. Michael Armstrong celebrates the humanism that underlay Brian's belief in a common system of education, democratic and non-selective, and finds its counterpart in the creative practice of school children.

  8. Futures of Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, L. S.

    There are several research areas basic to the long-range future of human communications. Telecommunication and transportation offer the possiblity of two worldwide communications networks whose interrelationships need to be explored in terms of the needs of the individual, the community, and the world at large. Expanding possibilities of…

  9. Human Papilloma Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V. Cecil

    1989-01-01

    Genital warts are believed to be caused by human papilloma viruses and to be sexually transmitted. The viruses are classified by DNA types, which appear to cause different types of disease. The choice of treatment, and usually its success rate, vary according to the type of disease and its location. PMID:21248973

  10. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  11. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  12. Human performance measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J.; Scow, J.

    1970-01-01

    Complex coordinator, consisting of operator control console, recorder, subject display panel, and limb controls, measures human performance by testing perceptual and motor skills. Device measures psychophysiological functions in drug and environmental studies, and is applicable to early detection of psychophysiological body changes.

  13. Independent Human Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Suzanne; Wilson, Gordon

    1978-01-01

    The Independent Human Studies program at Schoolcraft College offers an alternative method of earning academic credits. Students delineate an area of study, pose research questions, gather resources, synthesize the information, state the thesis, choose the method of presentation, set schedules, and take responsibility for meeting deadlines. (MB)

  14. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  15. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  16. The healthy human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Abu-Ali, Galeb; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Humans are virtually identical in their genetic makeup, yet the small differences in our DNA give rise to tremendous phenotypic diversity across the human population. By contrast, the metagenome of the human microbiome-the total DNA content of microbes inhabiting our bodies-is quite a bit more variable, with only a third of its constituent genes found in a majority of healthy individuals. Understanding this variability in the "healthy microbiome" has thus been a major challenge in microbiome research, dating back at least to the 1960s, continuing through the Human Microbiome Project and beyond. Cataloguing the necessary and sufficient sets of microbiome features that support health, and the normal ranges of these features in healthy populations, is an essential first step to identifying and correcting microbial configurations that are implicated in disease. Toward this goal, several population-scale studies have documented the ranges and diversity of both taxonomic compositions and functional potentials normally observed in the microbiomes of healthy populations, along with possible driving factors such as geography, diet, and lifestyle. Here, we review several definitions of a 'healthy microbiome' that have emerged, the current understanding of the ranges of healthy microbial diversity, and gaps such as the characterization of molecular function and the development of ecological therapies to be addressed in the future. PMID:27122046

  17. Neurobiology and the Humanities

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Can the arts and humanities contribute significantly to the study of the brain? Similar brain processes are involved in humanistic and scientific inference, and in this essay, I argue that conclusions reached by one are relevant to the other. PMID:25277451

  18. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. PMID:27486731

  19. Who Hung the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper is partly based on a lecture given at the AGTA conference in Perth in January 2013. It argues for a progressive subject based curriculum in which geography plays an essential part. This is based on an analysis of why and how subjects like geography, as part of the humanities, have been undermined and diminished in recent times. In a way…

  20. Humanizing the Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Norman K., Ed.; Saylor, J. Galen, Ed.

    These papers, presented during ASCD-sponsored conference, confront educators with issues in and alternatives for making secondary schools a more humanizing experience for students. The contributors and their articles are: Norman K. Hamilton, "Alternatives in Secondary Education"; Thornton B. Monez and Norman L. Bussiere, "The High School in Human…

  1. Human Babesiosis, Bolivia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Macchioni, Fabio; Zuñiga, Freddy; Rojas, Patricia; Lara, Yuni; Roselli, Mimmo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    To investigate human babesiosis in the Bolivian Chaco, in 2013 we tested blood samples from 271 healthy persons living in 2 rural communities in this region. Microscopy and PCR indicated that 3.3% of persons were positive for Babesia microti parasites (US lineage); seroprevalence was 45.7%. Appropriate screening should mitigate the risk for transfusion-associated babesiosis. PMID:27434696

  2. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  3. Fighting for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Bao

    2011-01-01

    Speak Truth To Power consists of 17 teacher-developed lessons based on the stories of rights advocates from all over the world. The lessons were created for sixth-through 12th-grade students, and have come to New York schools thanks to the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and the New York State United Teachers union. Speak…

  4. Developing Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, Leonard

    This book attempts to capture the essence of a rapidly emerging field, that of Human Resource Development (HRD). HRD includes improving performance on the present job (training), preparing individuals for future but identifiable jobs within the organization (education), and helping individuals grow to meet future organizational growth…

  5. Fighting for the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Cary

    2012-01-01

    The question, "Who will bankroll poetry?", succinctly embodies what is now a widespread recognition that the humanities may have more to lose in the current budget wars than either the sciences or a number of technical fields. The only budget war that can unite individuals, rather than divide them, is one arguing that too much is being spent on…

  6. Communicating with Virtual Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalmann, Nadia Magnenat

    The face is a small part of a human, but it plays an essential role in communication. An open hybrid system for facial animation is presented. It encapsulates a considerable amount of information regarding facial models, movements, expressions, emotions, and speech. The complex description of facial animation can be handled better by assigning…

  7. Animal and Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Lynda

    Several misconceptions regarding the status of human communication systems relative to the systems of other animals are discussed in this paper. Arguments are offered supporting the expansion of the communication discipline to include the study of the communication systems of other species. The "communicative continuity" view which ranks man at…

  8. The Humanities, Unraveled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Graduate education in the humanities is in crisis. Every aspect, from the most specific details of the curriculum to the broadest questions about its purpose, is in crisis. It is a seamless garment of crisis: If one pulls on any one thread, the entire thing unravels. It is therefore exceptionally difficult to discuss any one aspect of graduate…

  9. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  10. Ubiquitous human computing.

    PubMed

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2008-10-28

    Ubiquitous computing means network connectivity everywhere, linking devices and systems as small as a drawing pin and as large as a worldwide product distribution chain. What could happen when people are so readily networked? This paper explores issues arising from two possible emerging models of ubiquitous human computing: fungible networked brainpower and collective personal vital sign monitoring. PMID:18672463

  11. Humans as Lie Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaulo, Bella; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses several studies of whether and how well humans can detect lies. Examines the accuracy of such persons as well as the process of how they actually detect lies, how they think they detect lies, and whether the actual and perceived processes of lie detection correspond to one another. (JMF)

  12. Reconsidering Human Performance Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Hwan Young

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses three perceived challenges in the field of human performance technology: a missing link from training to performance, limitations in gap analysis and cause analysis, and a lack of attention to business and organization performance. It then provides possible alternatives for each issue, such as instructional system…

  13. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  15. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  16. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  17. Tackling Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, four high school students from the Tashkent International School in the capital city confronted the issue of their nation's human rights problems head on by researching the topic and publishing their findings on the Web. The site, "Uzbekistan: Opaque Reality," was created as an entry for the non-profit Global SchoolNet's Doors to…

  18. The human genome project.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M V

    1993-01-01

    The Human Genome Project in the United States is now well underway. Its programmatic direction was largely set by a National Research Council report issued in 1988. The broad framework supplied by this report has survived almost unchanged despite an upheaval in the technology of genome analysis. This upheaval has primarily affected physical and genetic mapping, the two dominant activities in the present phase of the project. Advances in mapping techniques have allowed good progress toward the specific goals of the project and are also providing strong corollary benefits throughout biomedical research. Actual DNA sequencing of the genomes of the human and model organisms is still at an early stage. There has been little progress in the intrinsic efficiency of DNA-sequence determination. However, refinements in experimental protocols, instrumentation, and project management have made it practical to acquire sequence data on an enlarged scale. It is also increasingly apparent that DNA-sequence data provide a potent means of relating knowledge gained from the study of model organisms to human biology. There is as yet little indication that the infusion of technology from outside biology into the Human Genome Project has been effectively stimulated. Opportunities in this area remain large, posing substantial technical and policy challenges. PMID:8506271

  19. Human thimet oligopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Dando, P M; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have purified human thimet oligopeptidase to homogeneity from erythrocytes, and compared it with the enzyme from rat testis and chicken liver. An antiserum raised against rat thimet oligopeptidase also recognized the human and chicken enzymes, suggesting that the structure of the enzyme has been strongly conserved in evolution. Consistent with this, the properties of the human enzyme were very similar to those for the other species. Thus human thimet oligopeptidase also is a thiol-dependent metallo-oligopeptidase with M(r) about 75,000. Specificity for cleavage of a number of peptides was indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme, but Ki values for the four potent reversible inhibitors tested were lower. In discussing the results, we consider the determinants of the complex substrate specificity of thimet oligopeptidase. We question whether substrates containing more than 17 amino acid residues are cleaved, as has been suggested. We also point out that the favourable location of a proline residue and a free C-terminus in the substrate may be as important as the hydrophobic residues in the P2, P1 and P3' positions that have been emphasized in the past. Images Figure 1 PMID:8373360

  20. Humanizing the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubos, Rene J.

    1973-01-01

    By using scientific knowledge and ecological wisdom, new ecosystems can be created which will be more stable, profitable, and favorable to the continued growth of civilization. Nature by itself has not taken care of many problems of ecological interest in past and human intervention is necessary. (PS)

  1. Human Biology: Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    Education is a process of adapting to change, and the rate of change is especially rapid in science today. This curriculum in human biology is an alternative to the New York State courses in general and Regents biology, and it has been designed to focus on change from the standpoint of the urban student. It is designed to provide students with…

  2. Food Affects Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A conference on whether food and nutrients affect human behavior was held on November 9, 1982 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Various research studies on this topic are reviewed, including the effects of food on brain biochemistry (particularly sleep) and effects of tryptophane as a pain reducer. (JN)

  3. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  4. Making Human Beings Human: Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    To a greater extent than any other species, human beings create the environments that, in turn, shape their own development. This book endeavors to demonstrate that human beings can also develop those environments to optimize their most constructive genetic potentials. What makes human beings human, therefore, is both the potential to shape their…

  5. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  6. The science of unitary human beings and interpretive human science.

    PubMed

    Reeder, F

    1993-01-01

    Natural science and human science are identified as the bases of most nursing theories and research programs. Natural science has been disclaimed by Martha Rogers as the philosophy of science that undergirds her work. The question remains, is the science of unitary human beings an interpretive human science? The author explores the works of Rogers through a dialectic with two human scientists' works. Wilhelm Dilthey's works represent the founding or traditional view, and Jurgen Habermas' works represent a contemporary, reconstructionist view. The ways Rogerian thought contributes to human studies but is distinct from traditional and reconstructionist human sciences are illuminated. PMID:8455869

  7. Zygomycetes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribes, Julie A.; Vanover-Sams, Carolyn L.; Baker, Doris J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants or, less commonly, a clinical disease called zygomycosis. There are two orders of Zygomycetes containing organisms that cause human disease, the Mucorales and the Entomophthorales. The majority of human illness is caused by the Mucorales. While disease is most commonly linked to Rhizopus spp., other organisms are also associated with human infection, including Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces, and Syncephalastrum spp. Although Mortierella spp. do cause disease in animals, there is no longer sufficient evidence to suggest that they are true human pathogens. The spores from these molds are transmitted by inhalation, via a variety of percutaneous routes, or by ingestion of spores. Human zygomycosis caused by the Mucorales generally occurs in immunocompromised hosts as opportunistic infections. Host risk factors include diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, sustained immunosuppressive therapy, chronic prednisone use, iron chelation therapy, broad-spectrum antibiotic use, severe malnutrition, and primary breakdown in the integrity of the cutaneous barrier such as trauma, surgical wounds, needle sticks, or burns. Zygomycosis occurs only rarely in immunocompetent hosts. The disease manifestations reflect the mode of transmission, with rhinocerebral and pulmonary diseases being the most common manifestations. Cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and allergic diseases are also seen. The Mucorales are associated with angioinvasive disease, often leading to thrombosis, infarction of involved tissues, and tissue destruction mediated by a number of fungal proteases, lipases, and mycotoxins. If the diagnosis is not made early, dissemination often occurs. Therapy, if it is to be effective, must be started early and requires combinations of antifungal drugs, surgical intervention, and reversal of the underlying risk

  8. A focus on human flourishing.

    PubMed

    Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2010-10-01

    In this column the author focuses on the concepts of human vulnerability and human flourishing. A parable is presented highlighting the importance of now, the present, in human flourishing. A bioethical, anthropological perspective and a nursing humanbecoming perspective on human flourishing are offered. Nursing education is challenged to emphasize the nursing theories of the discipline to teach the concept of human flourishing. Parse's concept of true presence, the four postulates of humanbecoming, and the humanbecoming community change concepts illuminate a nursing theoretical understanding of human flourishing. PMID:20870999

  9. Human eosinophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Bazan-Socha, Stanislawa; Zuk, Joanna; Jakiela, Bogdan; Musial, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we describe an optimized eosinophil transmigration assay. Transmigration of purified human peripheral blood eosinophils can be studied using special insert with membrane coated with extracellular matrix components or membrane covered with cells growing as a confluent monolayer, such as vascular endothelial cells of any origin or airway epithelial cells. In our opinion, eosinophil transmigration assay performed through monolayer of human microvascular endothelial cells of lung origin is a suitable tool to estimate the full migratory potential of eosinophils in studies on the pathology of asthma or other respiratory diseases, where eosinophils play important effector functions. This experimental system is easy to perform, simple for optimization, and comparable to in vivo processes occurring during eosinophil migration to the inflammatory sites in lungs. PMID:24986615

  10. [Human dignity revisited].

    PubMed

    Pereira-Menaut, Antonio Carlos; Pereira Sáez, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Since World War II, human dignity has made its way into many constitutions, bills of rights and international treaties. As its roots can be traced easily back to the Judeo-Christian tradition, and, later on, to the influential Kantian vision, dignity cannot be deemed an entirely new concept. For the same token, it cannot be said that dignity has been entirely alien to the legal realm till 1945. On the other hand, the latest philosophical and anthropological trends, as well as the politicisation of the human being, along with some recent advances in biotechnologies, help to explain its growing presence in the legal world. However, these authors suggest that writing down dignity in legal texts does not fully settle its meaning, not even if such texts are constitutions, and the fact remains that its presence in the judicial reasoning does not always imply being the ratio decidendi, as the study of some relevant judicial decisions shows. PMID:25329413

  11. Autophagosomes and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Beau, Isabelle; Mehrpour, Maryam; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-04-01

    The autophagosome is a double-membrane bound compartment that initiates macroautophagy, a degradative pathway for cytoplasmic material terminating in the lysosomal compartment. The discovery of ATG genes involved in the formation of autophagosomes has greatly increased our understanding of the molecular basis of macroautophagy, and its role in cell function. Macroautophagy plays a pivotal role in cell fitness by removing obsolete organelles and protein aggregates. Its stimulation is an adaptive response to stressful situations, such as nutrient deprivation, intended to maintain a level of ATP compatible with cell survival. Macroautophagy is central for organ homeostasis, embryonic development, and longevity. Malfunctioning autophagy is observed in many human diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac and muscular diseases, infectious and inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and obesity. Discovering potential drug therapies that can be used to modulate macroautophagy is a major challenge, and likely to enhance the therapeutic arsenal against many human diseases. PMID:21256243

  12. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  13. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  14. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Claudia; Späte, Kira; Krampe, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still unsatisfactory and essentially non-existing for the progressive course of the disease. Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) may be a promising neuroprotective/neuroregenerative treatment of MS. In the nervous system, EPO acts anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic and plasticity-modulating. Beneficial effects have been shown in animal models of various neurological and psychiatric diseases, including different models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. EPO is also effective in human brain disease, as shown in double-blind placebo-controlled clinical studies on ischemic stroke and chronic schizophrenia. An exploratory study on chronic progressive MS yielded lasting improvement in motor and cognitive performance upon high-dose long-term EPO treatment. PMID:21180577

  15. Posthumanism: beyond humanism?

    PubMed

    Valera, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The focal point of posthumanism consists not as such in an a-critical acceptance of the technological promises - like there is for transhumanism - but in a total contamination and hybridization of human beings with other living beings and machines (these are the two main forms of contamination). The change of perspective untaken by posthumanism would be, thus, a paradigmatic shift in anthropology. As with ecologism, posthumanism, in order to obtain total contamination and man's openness to otherness, proposes the elimination and the fluidification of boundaries, thus even denying man's identity, and, with it, the very possibility of openness. However, by denying the identity, one denies the condition of possibility of thought, just as it has been manifested in history until now: hence we understand how, primarily, posthumanism is not configured as an adequate philosophical reflection, but as a narrative that takes origin from certain requirements, which are eminently human, and that discloses its deeply anthropogenic roots. PMID:25684386

  16. Ancient human microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    Very recently, we discovered a vast new microbial self: the human microbiome. Our native microbiota interface with our biology and culture to influence our health, behavior, and quality of life, and yet we know very little about their origin, evolution, or ecology. With the advent of industrialization, globalization, and modern sanitation, it is intuitive that we have changed our relationship with microbes, but we have little information about the ancestral state of our microbiome, and therefore, we lack a foundation for characterizing this change. High-throughput sequencing has opened up new opportunities in the field of paleomicrobiology, allowing us to investigate the evolution of the complex microbial ecologies that inhabit our bodies. By focusing on recent coprolite and dental calculus research, we explore how emerging research on ancient human microbiomes is changing the way we think about ancient disease and how archaeological studies can contribute to a medical understanding of health and nutrition today. PMID:25559298

  17. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  18. Studying the Human Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alan W

    2016-01-01

    There are a range of methodologies available to study the human microbiota, ranging from traditional approaches such as culturing through to state-of-the-art developments in next generation DNA sequencing technologies. The advent of molecular techniques in particular has opened up tremendous new avenues for research, and has galvanised interest in the study of our microbial inhabitants. Given the dazzling array of available options, however, it is important to understand the inherent advantages and limitations of each technique so that the best approach can be employed to address the particular research objective. In this chapter we cover some of the most widely used current techniques in human microbiota research and highlight the particular strengths and caveats associated with each approach. PMID:27161348

  19. [PALEOPATHOLOGY OF HUMAN REMAINS].

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Simona; Fornaciari, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases induce alterations in the human skeleton, leaving traces of their presence in ancient remains. Paleopathological examination of human remains not only allows the study of the history and evolution of the disease, but also the reconstruction of health conditions in the past populations. This paper describes the most interesting diseases observed in skeletal samples from the Roman Imperial Age necropoles found in urban and suburban areas of Rome during archaeological excavations in the last decades. The diseases observed were grouped into the following categories: articular diseases, traumas, infections, metabolic or nutritional diseases, congenital diseases and tumours, and some examples are reported for each group. Although extensive epidemiological investigation in ancient skeletal records is impossible, the palaeopathological study allowed to highlight the spread of numerous illnesses, many of which can be related to the life and health conditions of the Roman population. PMID:27348992

  20. Secure Distributed Human Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Craig; Ramzan, Zulfikar; Stubblebine, Stuart

    In Peha’s Financial Cryptography 2004 invited talk, he described the Cyphermint PayCash system (see www.cyphermint.com), which allows people without bank accounts or credit cards (a sizeable segment of the U.S. population) to automatically and instantly cash checks, pay bills, or make Internet transactions through publicly-accessible kiosks. Since PayCash offers automated financial transactions and since the system uses (unprotected) kiosks, security is critical. The kiosk must decide whether a person cashing a check is really the person to whom the check was made out, so it takes a digital picture of the person cashing the check and transmits this picture electronically to a central office, where a human worker compares the kiosk’s picture to one that was taken when the person registered with Cyphermint. If both pictures are of the same person, then the human worker authorizes the transaction.