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Sample records for human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

  1. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  2. Determination of the subunit molecular weight of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from human erythrocytes by recovery of enzyme activity from sodium dodecyl sulphate gels.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M

    1975-12-18

    The molecular weights of the subunits of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) from human erythrocytes were determined with a simple novel method, including electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate gels, gel slicing, elution of protein from the gel slices and enzyme reactivation in the presence of the substrate 5-phosphorylribose-1-pyrophosphate. As molecular weight standards glutaraldehyde-polymerized polypeptides of human haemoglobin were used. The experiments clearly showed the existence of molecular weight differences in human erythrocyte hypoxanthine-quanine phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:1203254

  3. Characterization of in vivo somatic mutations at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene of a human control population.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart-Schultz, K; Thomas, C B; Thompson, C L; Strout, C L; Brinson, E; Jones, I M

    1993-01-01

    The ability to recognize a change in mutation spectrum after an exposure to a toxic substance and then relate that exposure to health risk depends on the knowledge of mutations that occur in the absence of exposure. Toward this end, we have been studying both the frequency and molecular nature of mutations of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene in peripheral blood lymphocytes as surrogate reporters of genetic damage. We have analyzed mutants, one per donor to ensure independence, from a control population in which the quantitative effects of smoking and age on mutant frequency have been well defined. Analyses of cDNA and genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing have identified the mutations in 63 mutants, 45 from males and 18 from females, of which 34 were smokers and 29 were nonsmokers. Slightly less than half of the mutations were base substitutions; they were predominantly at GC base pairs. Different mutations at the same site indicated that there are features of the hprt polypeptide that affect the mutation spectrum. Two pairs of identical mutations indicated that there may also be hot spots. Mutations not previously reported have been detected, indicating that the mutation spectrum is only partly defined. The remainder of the mutations were deletions or insertions/duplications; deletions ranged from one base pair to complete loss of the locus. Despite a small average increase in mutant frequency for smokers, an increased proportion of base substitutions at AT base pairs in smokers (p = 0.2) hinted at a smoking-associated shift in the mutation spectrum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8513767

  4. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-09-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no (3H)hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of (3H)hypoxanthine to (3H)IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol.

  5. Mutations which alter splicing in the human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrimsdottir, H; Rowley, G; Dorado, G; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R

    1992-01-01

    A large proportion of mutations at the human hprt locus result in aberrant splicing of the hprt mRNA. We have been able to relate the mutation to the splicing abnormality in 30 of these mutants. Mutations at the splice acceptor sites of introns 4, 6 and 7 result in splicing out of the whole of the downstream exons, whereas in introns 1, 7 or 8 a cryptic site in the downstream exon can be used. Mutations in the donor site of introns 1 and 5 result in the utilisation of cryptic sites further downstream, whereas in the other introns, the upstream exons are spliced out. Our most unexpected findings were mutations in the middle of exons 3 and 8 which resulted in splicing out of these exons in part of the mRNA populations. Our results have enabled us to assess current models of mRNA splicing. They emphasize the importance of the polypyrimidine tract in splice acceptor sites, they support the role of the exon as the unit of assembly for splicing, and they are consistent with a model proposing a stem-loop structure for exon 8 in the hprt mRNA. Images PMID:1373235

  6. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: characteristics of the mutant enzyme in erythrocytes from patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W J; Meade, J C; Kelley, W N

    1972-07-01

    The Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is characterized clinically by choreoathetosis, spasticity, selfmutilation, and mental and growth retardation. Biochemically, there is a striking reduction of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) activity in affected individuals. We have examined erythrocytes from 14 patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome for the presence of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity and enzyme protein. In contrast to the usual finding of no detectable hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity, we have found low levels (0.002-0.79 nmoles/mg protein per hr) of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates from five of these patients. In three of the five patients, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity appeared to be substantially more labile in vivo than normal using erythrocytes which had been separated according to their density (age). Immunochemical studies using a monospecific antiserum prepared from a homogeneous preparation of normal human erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase revealed immunoreactive protein (CRM) in hemolysate from all 14 patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. The immunoreactive protein from each patient gave a reaction of complete identity with normal erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and was present in quantities equal to those observed in normal erythrocytes. In addition, a constant amount of CRM was found in erythrocytes of increasing density (age) from patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome despite the decreasing hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. These studies confirm previous data which indicate that the mutations leading to the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome are usually, if not always on the structural gene coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. In addition, although the mutant proteins appear to be present in normal amounts, they are often very labile in vivo with respect to enzymatic activity. These observations suggest that therapy directed at stabilization or activation of enzyme activity in vivo may be of potential benefit. PMID:4624352

  7. Genetic modification of substrate specificity of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, C E; Gots, J S

    1975-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium strain GP660 (proAB-gpt deletion, purE) lacks guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and hence cannot utilize guanine as a purine source and is resistant to inhibition by 8-azaguanine. Strain GP660 was mutagenized and a derivative strain (GP36) was isolated for utilization of guanine and hypoxanthine, but not xanthine, as purine sources. This alteration was designated sug. The strain was then sensitive to inhibition by 8-azaguanine. Column chromatographic analysis revealed the altered phosphoribosyltransferase peaks for both hypoxanthine and guanine to be located together, in the same position as hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hpt gene product) of the wild-type strain. Genetic analysis showed the sug mutation to be allelic with hpt. Therefore sug represented a modification of the substrate specificity of the hpt gene product. PMID:1090579

  8. Mosaic mice with teratocarcinoma-derived mutant cells deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Dewey, M J; Martin, D W; Martin, G R; Mintz, B

    1977-12-01

    Mutagenized stem cells of a cultured mouse teratocarcinoma cell line were selected for resistance to the purine base analog 6-thioguanine. Cells of a resistant clone were completely deficient in activity of the enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT, IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8), the same X-linked lesion as occurs in human Lesch-Nyhan disease. After microinjection into blastocysts of another genetic strain, the previously malignant cells successfully participated in normal embryogenesis and tumor-free, viable mosaic mice were obtained. Cells of tumor lineage were identified by strain markers in virtually all tissues of some individuals. Mature function of those cells was evident from their tissue-specific products (e.g., melanins, liver proteins). These mutagenized teratocarcinoma cells are therefore developmentally totipotent. Retention of the severe HPRT deficiency in the differentiated state was documented in extracts of mosaic tissues by depressed specific activity of the enzyme, and also by presence of unlabeled clones in autoradiographs of explanted cells incubated in [(3)H]hypoxanthine. Some mosaic individuals had mutant-strain cells in only one or a few tissues. Such animals may provide unique opportunities to identify the tissue sources of particular aspects of the complex disease syndrome. The tissue distribution of HPRT-deficient cells suggests that selection against them is particularly strong in blood of the mosaic mice, as is already known to be the case in human heterozygotes. This phenotypic parallelism supports the expectation that afflicted F(1) male mice that might be obtained from mutant germ cells can serve as a model of the human disease. PMID:271982

  9. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  10. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  11. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT. PMID:26968365

  12. Structures of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (TTHA0220) from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Baba, Seiki; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Hirotsu, Ken; Mega, Ryosuke; Kim, Kwang; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Sampei, Gen-ichi; Kawai, Gota

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase), which is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the synthesis of IMP or GMP from α-d-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate and hypoxanthine or guanine, respectively. Structures of HGPRTase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 in the unliganded form, in complex with IMP and in complex with GMP have been determined at 2.1, 1.9 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. The overall fold of the IMP complex was similar to that of the unliganded form, but the main-chain and side-chain atoms of the active site moved to accommodate IMP. The overall folds of the IMP and GMP complexes were almost identical to each other. Structural comparison of the T. thermo­philus HB8 enzyme with 6-­oxopurine PRTases for which structures have been determined showed that these enzymes can be tentatively divided into groups I and II and that the T. thermophilus HB8 enzyme belongs to group I. The group II enzymes are characterized by an N-­terminal extension with additional secondary elements and a long loop connecting the second α-helix and β-strand compared with the group I enzymes. PMID:20693661

  13. Crystallization of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryo; Nakamura, Shota; Yoshida, Takuya; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2007-05-01

    Human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase has been crystallized using microseeding methods and X-ray diffraction data have been collected at 2.0 Å resolution. In the NAD biosynthetic pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase; EC 2.4.2.12) plays an important role in catalyzing the synthesis of nicotinamide mononucleotide from nicotinamide and 5′-phosphoribosyl-1′-pyrophosphate. Because the diffraction pattern of the initally obtained crystals was not suitable for structure analysis, the crystal quality was improved by successive use of the microseeding technique. The resultant crystals diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.56, b = 106.40, c = 82.78 Å. Here, the crystallization of human NMPRTase is reported in the free form; the crystals should be useful for inhibitor-soaking experiments on the enzyme.

  14. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT+/− cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT+/− rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  15. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P.; Ye, Shui Qing

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) was first reported as a pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor in 1994 with little notice, but it has received increasing attention in recent years due to accumulating evidence indicating that NAMPT is a pleiotropic protein such as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and a visfatin. Now, NAMPT has been accepted as an official name of this protein. Because of NAMPT’s multiple functions in a variety of physiological processes, their dysregulations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases or conditions such as acute lung injury, aging, atherosclerosis, cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and sepsis. This review will cover the current understanding of NAMPT’s structure and functions with an emphasis on recent progress of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase’s pathological roles in various human diseases and conditions. Future directions on exploring its Terra incognita will be offered in the end. PMID:22140607

  16. The Housekeeping Gene Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) Regulates Multiple Developmental and Metabolic Pathways of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Joel S.; Friedmann, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND) are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA) multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease. PMID:24130677

  17. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  18. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  19. Phenotypic Variation Among Seven Members of One Family with Deficiency of Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Augé, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Bérengère; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  20. Phenotypic variation among seven members of one family with deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Augé, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Bérengère; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H A

    2013-11-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  1. In vivo footprinting and high-resolution methylation analysis of the mouse hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene 5' region on the active and inactive X chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Litt, M D; Hornstra, I K; Yang, T P

    1996-01-01

    To investigate potential mechanisms regulating the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene by X-chromosome inactivation, we performed in vivo footprinting and high-resolution DNA methylation analysis on the 5' region of the active and inactive mouse HPRT alleles and compared these results with those from the human HPRT gene. We found multiple footprinted sites on the active mouse HPRT allele and no footprints on the inactive allele. Comparison of the footprint patterns of the mouse and human HPRT genes demonstrated that the in vivo binding of regulatory proteins between these species is generally conserved but not identical. Detailed nucleotide sequence comparison of footprinted regions in the mouse and human genes revealed a novel 9-bp sequence associated with transcription factor binding near the transcription sites of both genes, suggesting the identification of a new conserved initiator element. Ligation-mediated PCR genomic sequencing showed that all CpG dinucleotides examined on the active allele are unmethylated, while the majority of CpGs on the inactive allele are methylated and interspersed with a few hypomethylated sites. This pattern of methylation on the inactive mouse allele is notably different from the unusual methylation pattern of the inactive human gene, which exhibited strong hypomethylation specifically at GC boxes. These studies, in conjunction with other genomic sequencing studies of X-linked genes, demonstrate that (i) the active alleles are essentially unmethylated, (ii) the inactive alleles are hypermethylated, and (iii) the high-resolution methylation patterns of the hypermethylated inactive alleles are not strictly conserved. There is no obvious correlation between the pattern of methylated sites on the inactive alleles and the pattern of binding sites for transcription factors on the active alleles. These results are discussed in relationship to potential mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:8887649

  2. The spectrum of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency. Clinical experience based on 22 patients from 18 Spanish families.

    PubMed

    Puig, J G; Torres, R J; Mateos, F A; Ramos, T H; Arcas, J M; Buño, A S; O'Neill, P

    2001-03-01

    The enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) catalyzes the reutilization of hypoxanthine and guanine to the purine nucleotides IMP and GMP, respectively. HPRT deficiency is an X-linked disorder characterized by uric acid overproduction and variable neurologic impairment. The complete deficiency of HPRT is diagnostic of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome manifested by choreoathetosis, spasticity, mental retardation, and self-injurious behavior. In some HPRT-deficient patients the enzyme defect appeared to be "partial" and the neurologic symptoms mild to severe (Kelley-Seegmiller syndrome). This has prompted the classification of HPRT deficiency in 2 distinct groups: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Kelley-Seegmiller syndrome, which has created much confusion. A spectrum of clinical consequences of HPRT deficiency has been recognized in small series of patients, but the complete spectrum of the neurologic disorder has not been described in a single series of patients examined by the same observers. We analyzed our experience with 22 patients belonging to 18 different families with HPRT deficiency diagnosed at "La Paz" University Hospital in Madrid over the past 16 years. The clinical spectrum of these HPRT-deficient Spanish patients was similar to the different phenotypes occasionally reported in the literature, in some cases diagnosed as Lesch-Nyhan "variants." The clinical, biochemical, enzymatic, and molecular genetic studies on these 22 patients allowed us to delineate a new classification of HPRT deficiency. Based on the neurologic symptoms, dependency for personal care, HPRT activity in hemolysate and in intact erythrocytes, and predicted protein size, patients were classified into 4 groups: Group 1 (2 patients), normal development with no neurologic symptoms, HPRT activity was detectable in hemolysates and in intact erythrocytes, and the mutation did not affect the predicted protein size. Group 2 (3 patients) mild neurologic symptoms that did not prevent independent lives, HPRT activity was detectable in intact erythrocytes, and the protein size was normal. Group 3 (2 patients), severe neurologic impairment that precluded an independent life, no residual HPRT activity, and normal protein size. Group 4 (15 patients), clinical characteristics of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (some may not show self-injurious behavior), no residual HPRT activity, and in most (7 of 8 patients in whom the mutation could be detected) the mutation affected the predicted protein size. This classification of HPRT deficiency into 4 groups may be more useful in terms of accuracy, reproducibility, assessment for treatment trials and prognosis. The study of this Spanish series allows us to conclude that HPRT deficiency may be manifested by a wide spectrum of neurologic symptoms; the overall severity of the disease is associated with mutations permitting some degree of residual enzyme activity; and mutation analysis provides a valuable tool for prognosis, carrier identification, and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:11307586

  3. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  4. Elevated frequencies of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase lymphocyte mutants are detected in Russian liquidators 6 to 10 years after exposure to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C B; Nelson, D O; Pleshanov, P; Vorobstova, I; Tureva, L; Jensen, R; Jones, I M

    1999-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficient lymphocyte mutants would detect an effect of radiation exposure in a population of Russians who were exposed to low levels of radiation while working in 1986 and 1987 as liquidators cleaning up after the Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accident. The HPRT lymphocyte cloning assay was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes collected between 1992 and 1996 from 142 liquidators and 66 Russian controls, and between 1989 and 1993 from 231 American controls. Russian and American controls were not significantly different for either cloning efficiency or mutant frequency (MF); inclusion of both sets of controls in the analysis increased the ability to detect a Chernobyl exposure effect in the liquidators. After adjusting for age and smoking, the results revealed no significant difference in cloning efficiency of Chernobyl liquidators relative to Russian controls but a significant, 24% increase in liquidator HPRT mutant frequency over Russian controls (90% confidence interval was 7% to 45% increase). The analytical method also accounted for differences in precision of the individual estimates of log CE and log MF and accommodated for outliers. The increase in HPRT mutant frequency of liquidators is an attribute of the exposed population as a whole rather than of individuals. These results demonstrate that, under appropriate circumstances, the HPRT specific locus mutation assay of peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used to detect a semi-acute, low dose radiation exposure of a population, even 6 to 10 years after the exposure. PMID:10029687

  5. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum and Human 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Martin M; Hockov, Dana; Wang, Tzu-Hsuan; Dra?nsk, Martin; Potov-Slav?tnsk, Lenka; Prochzkov, Elika; Edstein, Michael D; Chavchich, Marina; Keough, Dianne T; Guddat, Luke W; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-10-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) are a promising class of antimalarial therapeutic drug leads that exhibit a wide variety of Ki values for Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and human hypoxanthine-guanine-(xanthine) phosphoribosyltransferases [HG(X)PRTs]. A novel series of ANPs, analogues of previously reported 2-(phosphonoethoxy)ethyl (PEE) and (R,S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl (HPMP) derivatives, were designed and synthesized to evaluate their ability to act as inhibitors of these enzymes and to extend our ongoing antimalarial structure-activity relationship studies. In this series, (S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propyl (HPEP), (S)-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propanoic acid (CPME), or (S)-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propanoic acid (CPEE) are the acyclic moieties. Of this group, (S)-3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonoethoxy)propylguanine (HPEPG) exhibits the highest potency for PfHGXPRT, with a Ki value of 0.1??M and a Ki value for human HGPRT of 0.6??M. The crystal structures of HPEPG and HPEPHx (where Hx=hypoxanthine) in complex with human HGPRT were obtained, showing specific interactions with active site residues. Prodrugs for the HPEP and CPEE analogues were synthesized and tested for in vitro antimalarial activity. The lowest IC50 value (22??M) in a chloroquine-resistant strain was observed for the bis-amidate prodrug of HPEPG. PMID:26368337

  6. Hypoxanthine enters human vascular endothelial cells (ECV 304) via the nitrobenzylthioinosine-insensitive equilibrative nucleoside transporter.

    PubMed

    Osses, N; Pearson, J D; Yudilevich, D L; Jarvis, S M

    1996-08-01

    The transport properties of the nucleobase hypoxanthine were examined in the human umbilical vein endothelial cell line ECV 304. Initial rates of hypoxanthine influx were independent of extracellular cations: replacement of Na+ with Li+, Rb+, N-methyl-D-glucamine or choline had no significant effect on hypoxanthine uptake by ECV 304 cells. Kinetic analysis demonstrated the presence of a single saturable system for the transport of hypoxanthine in ECV 304 cells with an apparent K(m) of 320 +/- 10 microM and a Vmax of 5.6 +/- 0.9 pmol/10(6) cells per s. Hypoxanthine uptake was inhibited by the nucleosides adenosine, uridine and thymidine (apparent Ki 41 +/- 6, 240 +/- 27 and 59 +/- 8 microM respectively) and the nucleoside transport inhibitors nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), dilazep and dipyridamole (apparent Ki 2.5 +/- 0.3, 11 +/- 3 and 0.16 +/- 0.006 microM respectively), whereas the nucleobases adenine, guanine and thymine had little effect (50% inhibition at > 1 mM). ECV 304 cells were also shown to transport adenosine via both the NBMPR-sensitive and -insensitive nucleoside carriers. Hypoxanthine specifically inhibited adenosine transport via the NBMPR-insensitive system in a competitive manner (apparent Ki 290 +/- 14 microM). These results indicate that hypoxanthine entry into ECV 304 endothelial cells is mediated by the NBMPR-insensitive nucleoside carrier present in these cells. PMID:8760371

  7. Hypoxanthine enters human vascular endothelial cells (ECV 304) via the nitrobenzylthioinosine-insensitive equilibrative nucleoside transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Osses, N; Pearson, J D; Yudilevich, D L; Jarvis, S M

    1996-01-01

    The transport properties of the nucleobase hypoxanthine were examined in the human umbilical vein endothelial cell line ECV 304. Initial rates of hypoxanthine influx were independent of extracellular cations: replacement of Na+ with Li+, Rb+, N-methyl-D-glucamine or choline had no significant effect on hypoxanthine uptake by ECV 304 cells. Kinetic analysis demonstrated the presence of a single saturable system for the transport of hypoxanthine in ECV 304 cells with an apparent K(m) of 320 +/- 10 microM and a Vmax of 5.6 +/- 0.9 pmol/10(6) cells per s. Hypoxanthine uptake was inhibited by the nucleosides adenosine, uridine and thymidine (apparent Ki 41 +/- 6, 240 +/- 27 and 59 +/- 8 microM respectively) and the nucleoside transport inhibitors nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), dilazep and dipyridamole (apparent Ki 2.5 +/- 0.3, 11 +/- 3 and 0.16 +/- 0.006 microM respectively), whereas the nucleobases adenine, guanine and thymine had little effect (50% inhibition at > 1 mM). ECV 304 cells were also shown to transport adenosine via both the NBMPR-sensitive and -insensitive nucleoside carriers. Hypoxanthine specifically inhibited adenosine transport via the NBMPR-insensitive system in a competitive manner (apparent Ki 290 +/- 14 microM). These results indicate that hypoxanthine entry into ECV 304 endothelial cells is mediated by the NBMPR-insensitive nucleoside carrier present in these cells. PMID:8760371

  8. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  9. Extensive regulation of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT) expression in human tissues and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Pereira, Sara; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Silva, Sarah S.; Correia, Mariana Gonçalves; Neto, Célia; da Costa, Luís Teixeira; Amorim, António; Silva, Raquel M.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a cofactor in redox reactions and a substrate for NAD-consuming enzymes, such as PARPs and sirtuins. As cancer cells have increased NAD requirements, the main NAD salvage enzymes in humans, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), are involved in the development of novel anti-cancer therapies. Knowledge of the expression patterns of both genes in tissues and tumors is critical for the use of nicotinic acid (NA) as cytoprotective in therapies using NAMPT inhibitors. Herein, we provide a comprehensive study of NAPRT and NAMPT expression across human tissues and tumor cell lines. We show that both genes are widely expressed under normal conditions and describe the occurrence of novel NAPRT transcripts. Also, we explore some of the NAPRT gene expression mechanisms. Our findings underline that the efficiency of NA in treatments with NAMPT inhibitors is dependent on the knowledge of the expression profiles and regulation of both NAMPT and NAPRT. PMID:26675378

  10. Extensive regulation of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT) expression in human tissues and tumors.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Pereira, Sara; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Silva, Sarah S; Correia, Mariana Gonçalves; Neto, Célia; da Costa, Luís Teixeira; Amorim, António; Silva, Raquel M

    2016-01-12

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a cofactor in redox reactions and a substrate for NAD-consuming enzymes, such as PARPs and sirtuins. As cancer cells have increased NAD requirements, the main NAD salvage enzymes in humans, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), are involved in the development of novel anti-cancer therapies. Knowledge of the expression patterns of both genes in tissues and tumors is critical for the use of nicotinic acid (NA) as cytoprotective in therapies using NAMPT inhibitors. Herein, we provide a comprehensive study of NAPRT and NAMPT expression across human tissues and tumor cell lines. We show that both genes are widely expressed under normal conditions and describe the occurrence of novel NAPRT transcripts. Also, we explore some of the NAPRT gene expression mechanisms. Our findings underline that the efficiency of NA in treatments with NAMPT inhibitors is dependent on the knowledge of the expression profiles and regulation of both NAMPT and NAPRT. PMID:26675378

  11. Aza-acyclic nucleoside phosphonates containing a second phosphonate group as inhibitors of the human, Plasmodium falciparum and vivax 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases and their prodrugs as antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Keough, Dianne T; Hockov, Dana; Janeba, Zlatko; Wang, Tzu-Hsuan; Naesens, Lieve; Edstein, Michael D; Chavchich, Marina; Guddat, Luke W

    2015-01-22

    Hypoxanthine-guanine-[xanthine] phosphoribosyltransferase (HG[X]PRT) is considered an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy as it is the only pathway for the synthesis of the purine nucleoside monophosphates required for DNA/RNA production. Thus, inhibition of this enzyme should result in cessation of replication. The aza-acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (aza-ANPs) are good inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum HGXPRT (PfHGXPRT), with Ki values as low as 0.08 and 0.01 ?M for Plasmodium vivax HGPRT (PvHGPRT). Prodrugs of these aza-ANPs exhibit antimalarial activity against Pf lines with IC50 values (0.8-6.0 ?M) and have low cytotoxicity against human cells. Crystal structures of six of these compounds in complex with human HGPRT have been determined. These suggest that the different affinities of these aza-ANPs could be due to the flexibility of the loops surrounding the active site as well as the flexibility of the inhibitors, allowing them to adapt to fit into three binding pockets of the enzyme(s). PMID:25494538

  12. Excision of hypoxanthine from DNA containing dIMP residues by the Escherichia coli, yeast, rat, and human alkylpurine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed Central

    Saparbaev, M; Laval, J

    1994-01-01

    The deamination of adenine residues in DNA generates hypoxanthine, which is mutagenic since it gives rise to an A.T to G.C transition. Hypoxanthine is removed by hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity present in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. Using polydeoxyribonucleotides or double-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides that contain dIMP residues, we show that this activity in E. coli is associated with the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II coded for by the alkA gene. This conclusion is based on the following facts: (i) the two enzymatic activities have the same chromatographic behavior on various supports and they have the same molecular weight, (ii) both are induced during the adaptive response, (iii) a multicopy plasmid bearing the alkA gene overproduces both activities, (iv) homogeneous preparation of AlkA has both enzymatic activities, (v) the E. coli alkA- mutant does not show any detectable hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity. Under the same experimental conditions, but using different substrates, the same amount of AlkA protein liberates 1 pmol of 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and 1.2 fmol of hypoxanthine from dIMP-containing DNA. The Km for the latter substrate is 420 x 10(-9) M as compared to 5 x 10(-9) M for alkylated DNA. Hypoxanthine is released as a free base during the reaction. Duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing hypoxanthine positioned opposite T, G, C, and A were cleaved efficiently. ANPG protein, APDG protein, and MAG protein--the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases of human, rat, and yeast origin, respectively--were also able to release hypoxanthine from various DNA substrates containing dIMP residues. The mammalian enzyme is by far the most efficient hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase of all the enzymes tested. Images PMID:8016081

  13. Interaction of Human DNA Polymerase α and DNA Polymerase I from Bacillus stearothermophilus with Hypoxanthine and 8-Oxoguanine Nucleotides †

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Jennifer N.; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how DNA polymerases interact with mutagenic bases, we examined how human DNA polymerase α (pol α), a B family enzyme, and DNA polymerase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BF), an A family enzyme, generate adenine:hypoxanthine and adenine:8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) base pairs. Pol α strongly discriminated against polymerizing dATP opposite 8-oxoG, and removing N1, N6, or N7 further inhibited incorporation, whereas removing N3 from dATP dramatically increased incorporation (32-fold). Eliminating N6 from 3-deaza-dATP now greatly reduced incorporation, suggesting that incorporation of dATP (analogues) opposite 8-oxoguanine proceeds via a Hoogsteen base-pair and that pol α uses N3 of a purine dNTP to block this incorporation. Pol α also polymerized 8-oxo-dGTP across from a templating A, and removing N6 from the template adenine inhibited incorporation of 8-oxoG. The effects of N1, N6, and N7 demonstrated a strong interdependence during formation of adenine:hypoxanthine base-pairs by pol α and N3 of dATP again helps prevent polymerization opposite a templating hypoxanthine. BF very efficiently polymerized 8-oxo-dGTP opposite adenine, and N1 and N7 of adenine appear to play important roles. BF incorporates dATP opposite 8-oxoG less efficiently, and modifying N1, N6, or N7 greatly inhibits incorporation. N6, and to a lesser extent N1, help drive hypoxanthine:adenine base pair formation by BF. The mechanistic implications of these results showing that different polymerases interact very differently with base lesions are discussed. PMID:19642651

  14. Characterization of quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human blood and observations in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Foster, A C; Schwarcz, R

    1985-07-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an excitotoxic compound present in the mammalian CNS and periphery, has been hypothetically linked to human neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease and epilepsy. Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT), the catabolic enzyme of QUIN, is found in the CNS and peripheral organs where it may be a major influence on the tissue levels of QUIN. We have measured QPRT activity in human blood as a means of assessing one aspect of QUIN metabolism in humans. The enzyme was present in blood cells, platelets having a sixfold greater activity than erythrocytes, but was essentially absent from the plasma. In a blood cell fraction, enzyme activity was potently inhibited by phthalic acid (IC50 = 6.1 microM). Kinetic analyses conducted over a range of QUIN concentrations yielded Km values of 1.89-3.75 microM and Vmax values of 33.4-72.5 fmol nicotinic acid mononucleotide/h/mg protein. Enzyme activity varied 2.2-fold between normal individuals, was reasonably constant over a series of sampling intervals, and showed some diminution when blood was stored for 1 month at -20 degrees C. No differences of enzyme activity in erythrocytes or platelets were apparent between three Huntington's disease patients and their unaffected spouses. These data indicate that measurements of QPRT activities in blood are a convenient means to monitor QUIN metabolism in human subjects and that a deficiency of the enzyme is not apparent in Huntington's disease. PMID:2582090

  15. Recycling nicotinamide. The transition-state structure of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Emmanuel S.; Vetticatt, Mathew J.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    Human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) replenishes the NAD pool and controls the activities of sirtuins (SIRT), mono- and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) and NAD nucleosidase (CD38). The nature of the enzymatic transition-state (TS) is central to understanding the function of NAMPT. We determined the TS structure for pyrophosphorolysis of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) by kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). With the natural substrates, NMN and pyrophosphate (PPi), the intrinsic KIEs of [1′-14C], [1-15N], [1′-3H] and [2′-3H] are 1.047, 1.029, 1.154 and 1.093, respectively. A unique quantum computational approach was used for TS analysis that included structural elements of the catalytic site. Without constraints (e.g. imposed torsion angles), the theoretical and experimental data are in good agreement. The quantum-mechanical calculations incorporated a crucial catalytic site residue (D313), two magnesium atoms and coordinated water molecules. The transition state model predicts primary 14C, α-secondary 3H, β-secondary 3H and primary 15N KIE close to the experimental values. The analysis reveals significant ribocation character at the TS. The attacking PPi nucleophile is weakly interacting (rC-O = 2.60 Å) and the N-ribosidic C1′-N bond is highly elongated at the TS (rC-N = 2.35 Å), consistent with an ANDN mechanism. Together with the crystal structure of the NMN•PPi•Mg2•enzyme complex, the reaction coordinate is defined. The enzyme holds the nucleophile and leaving group in relatively fixed positions to create a reaction coordinate with C1′-anomeric migration from nicotinamide to the PPi. The transition state is reached by a 0.85 Å migration of C1′. PMID:23373462

  16. Metabolomics Analysis of Metabolic Effects of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Inhibition on Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tolstikov, Vladimir; Nikolayev, Alexander; Dong, Sucai; Zhao, Genshi; Kuo, Ming-Shang

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry–based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer) and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer) cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA), and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC)-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level. PMID:25486521

  17. Studies on the coordinate activity and lability of orotidylate phosphoribosyltransferase and decarboxylase in human erythrocytes, and the effects of allopurinol administration

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Richard M.; Wood, Margaret H.; O'Sullivan, William J.

    1971-01-01

    A coordinate relationship between the activities of two sequential enzymes in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway has been demonstrated in human red cells. The two enzymes, orotidylate phosphoribosyltransferase and decarboxylase are responsible for the conversion of orotic acid to uridine-5′-monophosphate. Fractionation of red cells, on the basis of increase of specific gravity with cell age, has revealed that these two enzymes have a marked but equal degree of lability in the ageing red cell. It is postulated that orotidylate phosphoribosyltransferase and decarboxylase form an enzyme-enzyme complex, and that the sequential deficiency of these two enzymes in hereditary orotic aciduria may reflect a structural abnormality in this complex. In patients receiving allopurinol, the activities of both enzymes are coordinately increased, and this increase appears to be due, at least in part, to stabilization of both orotidylate phosphoribosyltransferase and decarboxylase in the ageing red cell. Allopurinol ribonucleotide is an in vitro inhibitor of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase and requires the enzyme hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase for its synthesis. However, the administration of allopurinol to patients lacking this enzyme results in orotidinuria and these patients have elevated orotidylate phosphoribosyltransferase and decarboxylase activities in their erythrocytes. Evidence is presented that the chief metabolite of allopurinol, oxipurinol, with a 2,4-diketo pyrimidine ring is capable of acting as an analogue of orotic acid. It is postulated that the in vivo formation of oxipurinol ribonucleotide, catalyzed by orotidylate phosphoribosyltransferase, after allopurinol administration, leads to inhibition of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase. This inhibition results in the urinary excretion of excessive amounts of orotidine and orotic acid, and “pseudo-substrate” stabilization of orotidylate phosphoribosyltransferase and decarboxylase. PMID:5552406

  18. GENETIC ASSAY FOR ANEUPLOIDY: QUANTITATION OF CHROMOSOME LOSS USING A MOUSE/HUMAN MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL LINE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A genetic assay is described in which a mouse/human hybrid cell line R3-5 containing a single human chromosome (a monochromosomal hybrid) is used to detect chemically induced aneuploidy. The hybrid cells are deficient in hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and ...

  19. Visfatin Impairs Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Rat and Human Mesenteric Microvessels through Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Javier; Villalobos, Laura A.; Cercas, Elena; Leivas, Alejandra; Bermejo, Elena; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peiró, Concepción

    2011-01-01

    Visfatin, also known as extracellular pre–B-cell colony–enhancing factor (PBEF) and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), is an adipocytokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Circulating visfatin levels have been positively associated with vascular damage and endothelial dysfunction. Here, we investigated the ability of visfatin to directly impair vascular reactivity in mesenteric microvessels from both male Sprague-Dawley rats and patients undergoing non-urgent, non-septic abdominal surgery. The pre-incubation of rat microvessels with visfatin (50 and 100 ng/mL) did not modify the contractile response to noradrenaline (1 pmol/L to 30 µmol/L), as determined using a small vessel myograph. However, visfatin (10 to 100 ng/mL) concentration-dependently impaired the relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh; 100 pmol/L to 3 µmol/L), without interfering with the endothelium-independent relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (1 nmol/L to 3 µmol/L). In both cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and rat microvascular preparations, visfatin (50 ng/mL) stimulated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminiscence. The relaxation to ACh impaired by visfatin was restored by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 µmol/L). Additionally, the Nampt inhibitor APO866 (10 mmol/L to 10 µmol/L), but not an insulin receptor-blocking antibody, also prevented the stimulation of NADPH oxidase and the relaxation impairment elicited by visfatin. Accordingly, the product of Nampt activity nicotinamide mononucleotide (100 nmol/L to 1 mmol/L) stimulated endothelial NADPH oxidase activity and concentration-dependently impaired ACh-induced vasorelaxation. In human mesenteric microvessels pre-contracted with 35 mmol/L potassium chloride, the endothelium-dependent vasodilation to bradykinin (1 nmol/L to 3 µmol/L) was equally impaired by visfatin and restored upon co-incubation with APO866. In conclusion, visfatin impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation through a mechanism involving NADPH oxidase stimulation and relying on Nampt enzymatic activity, and therefore arises as a potential new player in the development of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:22073309

  20. Human T cell recognition of the blood stage antigen Plasmodium hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGXPRT) in acute malaria

    PubMed Central

    Woodberry, Tonia; Pinzon-Charry, Alberto; Piera, Kim A; Panpisutchai, Yawalak; Engwerda, Christian R; Doolan, Denise L; Salwati, Ervi; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Ric N; Good, Michael F; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2009-01-01

    Background The Plasmodium purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGXPRT) can protect mice against Plasmodium yoelii pRBC challenge in a T cell-dependent manner and has, therefore, been proposed as a novel vaccine candidate. It is not known whether natural exposure to Plasmodium falciparum stimulates HGXPRT T cell reactivity in humans. Methods PBMC and plasma collected from malaria-exposed Indonesians during infection and 7–28 days after anti-malarial therapy, were assessed for HGXPRT recognition using CFSE proliferation, IFNγ ELISPOT assay and ELISA. Results HGXPRT-specific T cell proliferation was found in 44% of patients during acute infection; in 80% of responders both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets proliferated. Antigen-specific T cell proliferation was largely lost within 28 days of parasite clearance. HGXPRT-specific IFN-γ production was more frequent 28 days after treatment than during acute infection. HGXPRT-specific plasma IgG was undetectable even in individuals exposed to malaria for at least two years. Conclusion The prevalence of acute proliferative and convalescent IFNγ responses to HGXPRT demonstrates cellular immunogenicity in humans. Further studies to determine minimal HGXPRT epitopes, the specificity of responses for Plasmodia and associations with protection are required. Frequent and robust T cell proliferation, high sequence conservation among Plasmodium species and absent IgG responses distinguish HGXPRT from other malaria antigens. PMID:19500406

  1. DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF T-LYMPHOCYTES AS A BIOMARKER FOR GENOMIC REARRANGEMENTS IMPORTANT IN HUMAN CANCERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA sequence of 11 in vivo-arising intragenic deletion breaksite junctions occurring in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene of human T-lymphocytes was determined and deletions ranged in size from 16 bp to 4057 bp. o extensive homology was found at the dele...

  2. MULTIPLEX PCR ANALYSIS OF IN VIVO-ARISING DELETION MUTATIONS IN THE HPRT GENE OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was adapted for the rapid and efficient evaluation of the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene in human T-lymphocytes for deletions. he hprt clonal assay was used to isolate in-vivo-arising hprt-deficient...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Youn, Hyung-Seop; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Sung Hang; Kim, Yongseong; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase) is a key NAD-biosynthetic enzyme which catalyzes the transfer of quinolinic acid to 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, yielding nicotinic acid mononucleotide. Homo sapiens QPRTase (Hs-QPRTase) appeared as a hexamer during purification and the protein was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Native Hs-QPRTase crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.2, b = 137.1, c = 92.7 Å, β = 103.8°. Assuming the presence of six molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated Matthews coefficient is 2.46 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of 49.9%. PMID:21206019

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Youn, Hyung-Seop; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Sung Hang; Kim, Yongseong; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase) is a key NAD-biosynthetic enzyme which catalyzes the transfer of quinolinic acid to 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, yielding nicotinic acid mononucleotide. Homo sapiens QPRTase (Hs-QPRTase) appeared as a hexamer during purification and the protein was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Native Hs-QPRTase crystals belonged to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a=76.2, b=137.1, c=92.7 Å, β=103.8°. Assuming the presence of six molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated Matthews coefficient is 2.46 Å3 Da(-1), which corresponds to a solvent content of 49.9%. PMID:21206019

  5. Identification of benzothiophene amides as potent inhibitors of human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Dong, Guoqiang; He, Shipeng; Xu, Tianying; Wang, Xia; Liu, Na; Zhang, Wannian; Miao, Chaoyu; Sheng, Chunquan

    2016-02-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is an attractive therapeutic target for cancer. A Nampt inhibitor with novel benzothiophene scaffold was discovered by high throughput screening. Herein the structure-activity relationship of the benzothiophene Nampt inhibitor was investigated. Several new inhibitors demonstrated potent activity in both biochemical and cell-based assays. In particular, compound 16b showed good Nampt inhibitory activity (IC50=0.17μM) and in vitro antitumor activity (IC50=3.9μM, HepG2 cancer cell line). Further investigation indicated that compound 16b could efficiently induce cancer cell apoptosis. Our findings provided a good starting point for the discovery of novel antitumor agents. PMID:26755394

  6. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M; Heruth, Daniel P; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-05-10

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  7. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  8. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Mayhall, Kim; Maxwell, Nicole M.; Kandil, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Both intracellular and extracellular Nampt (iNampt and eNampt) levels are increased in several human malignancies and some studies demonstrate increased iNampt in more aggressive/invasive tumors and in tumor metastases. Several different molecular targets have been identified that promote carcinogenesis following iNampt overexpression, including SirT1, CtBP, and PARP-1. Additionally, eNampt is elevated in several human cancers and is often associated with a higher tumor stage and worse prognoses. Here we review the roles of Nampt in malignancy, some of the known mechanisms by which it promotes carcinogenesis, and discuss the possibility of employing Nampt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:24386506

  9. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Gyun Kim, Tae; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Bu Kang, Gil; Youn Kang, Jung; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Yop An, Jun; Ryoung Park, Kyoung; Lee, Youngjin; Jun Im, Young; Hyuck Lee, Jun; Hyun Eom, Soo

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  10. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Tae Gyun; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kang, Jung Youn; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Im, Young Jun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  11. Pharmacological Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bo; Young, Debra A.; Lu, Zhao-Hai; Wang, Tao; Meier, Timothy I.; Shepard, Robert L.; Roth, Kenneth; Zhai, Yan; Huss, Karen; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gillig, James; Parthasarathy, Saravanan; Burkholder, Timothy P.; Smith, Michele C.; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Zhao, Genshi

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in converting nicotinamide to NAD+, essential for cellular metabolism, energy production, and DNA repair. NAMPT has been extensively studied because of its critical role in these cellular processes and the prospect of developing therapeutics against the target, yet how it regulates cellular metabolism is not fully understood. In this study we utilized liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and serine biosynthesis in cancer cells and tumor xenografts. We show for the first time that NAMPT inhibition leads to the attenuation of glycolysis at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step due to the reduced availability of NAD+ for the enzyme. The attenuation of glycolysis results in the accumulation of glycolytic intermediates before and at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step, promoting carbon overflow into the pentose phosphate pathway as evidenced by the increased intermediate levels. The attenuation of glycolysis also causes decreased glycolytic intermediates after the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step, thereby reducing carbon flow into serine biosynthesis and the TCA cycle. Labeling studies establish that the carbon overflow into the pentose phosphate pathway is mainly through its non-oxidative branch. Together, these studies establish the blockade of glycolysis at the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step as the central metabolic basis of NAMPT inhibition responsible for ATP depletion, metabolic perturbation, and subsequent tumor growth inhibition. These studies also suggest that altered metabolite levels in tumors can be used as robust pharmacodynamic markers for evaluating NAMPT inhibitors in the clinic. PMID:23239881

  12. A survey of splice variants of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase and DNA polymerase beta genes: products of alternative or aberrant splicing?

    PubMed Central

    Skandalis, Adonis; Uribe, Elke

    2004-01-01

    Errors during the pre-mRNA splicing of metazoan genes can degrade the transmission of genetic information, and have been associated with a variety of human diseases. In order to characterize the mutagenic and pathogenic potential of mis-splicing, we have surveyed and quantified the aberrant splice variants in the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) and DNA polymerase β (POLB) in the presence and the absence of the Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD) pathway, which removes transcripts with premature termination codons. POLB exhibits a high frequency of splice variants (40–60%), whereas the frequency of HPRT splice variants is considerably lower (∼1%). Treatment of cells with emetine to inactivate NMD alters both the spectrum and frequency of splice variants of POLB and HPRT. It is not certain at this point, whether POLB and HPRT splice variants are the result of regulated alternative splicing processes or the result of aberrant splicing, but it appears likely that at least some of the variants are the result of splicing errors. Several mechanisms that may contribute to aberrant splicing are discussed. PMID:15601998

  13. Do clinical features of Lesch-Nyhan disease correlate more closely with hypoxanthine or guanine recycling?

    PubMed

    Schretlen, David J; Callon, Wynne; Ward, Rebecca E; Fu, Rong; Ho, Tiffany; Gordon, Barry; Harris, James C; Jinnah, H A

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a rare, X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), an enzyme in the purine salvage pathway. HGprt has two functions; it recycles hypoxanthine and guanine. Which of these two functions is more relevant for pathogenesis is unclear because some evidence points to hypoxanthine recycling, but other evidence points to guanine recycling. In this study, we selectively assayed hypoxanthine (Hprt) and guanine (Gprt) recycling in skin fibroblasts from 17 persons with LND, 11 with an attenuated variant of the disease (LNV), and 19 age-, sex-, and race-matched healthy controls (HC). Activity levels of both enzymes differed across groups (p < 0.0001), but only Gprt distinguished patients with LND from those with LNV (p < 0.05). Gprt also showed slightly stronger correlations than Hprt with 13 of 14 measures of the clinical phenotype, including the severity of dystonia, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. These findings suggest that loss of guanine recycling might be more closely linked to the LND/LNV phenotype than loss of hypoxanthine recycling. PMID:26067813

  14. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosophoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G

    2007-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity is an inborn error of purine metabolism associated with uric acid overproduction and a continuum spectrum of neurological manifestations depending on the degree of the enzymatic deficiency. The prevalence is estimated at 1/380,000 live births in Canada, and 1/235,000 live births in Spain. Uric acid overproduction is present inall HPRT-deficient patients and is associated with lithiasis and gout. Neurological manifestations include severe action dystonia, choreoathetosis, ballismus, cognitive and attention deficit, and self-injurious behaviour. The most severe forms are known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (patients are normal at birth and diagnosis can be accomplished when psychomotor delay becomes apparent). Partial HPRT-deficient patients present these symptoms with a different intensity, and in the least severe forms symptoms may be unapparent. Megaloblastic anaemia is also associated with the disease. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive, thus males are generally affected and heterozygous female are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. To date, more than 300 disease-associated mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been identified. The diagnosis is based on clinical and biochemical findings (hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria associated with psychomotor delay), and enzymatic (HPRT activity determination in haemolysate, intact erythrocytes or fibroblasts) and molecular tests. Molecular diagnosis allows faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis can be performed with amniotic cells obtained by amniocentesis at about 15–18 weeks' gestation, or chorionic villus cells obtained at about 10–12 weeks' gestation. Uric acid overproduction can be managed by allopurinol treatment. Doses must be carefully adjusted to avoid xanthine lithiasis. The lack of precise understanding of the neurological dysfunction has precluded development of useful therapies. Spasticity, when present, and dystonia can be managed with benzodiazepines and gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibitors such as baclofen. Physical rehabilitation, including management of dysarthria and dysphagia, special devices to enable hand control, appropriate walking aids, and a programme of posture management to prevent deformities are recommended. Self-injurious behaviour must be managed by a combination of physical restraints, behavioural and pharmaceutical treatments. PMID:18067674

  15. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosophoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G

    2007-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity is an inborn error of purine metabolism associated with uric acid overproduction and a continuum spectrum of neurological manifestations depending on the degree of the enzymatic deficiency. The prevalence is estimated at 1/380,000 live births in Canada, and 1/235,000 live births in Spain. Uric acid overproduction is present inall HPRT-deficient patients and is associated with lithiasis and gout. Neurological manifestations include severe action dystonia, choreoathetosis, ballismus, cognitive and attention deficit, and self-injurious behaviour. The most severe forms are known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (patients are normal at birth and diagnosis can be accomplished when psychomotor delay becomes apparent). Partial HPRT-deficient patients present these symptoms with a different intensity, and in the least severe forms symptoms may be unapparent. Megaloblastic anaemia is also associated with the disease. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive, thus males are generally affected and heterozygous female are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. To date, more than 300 disease-associated mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been identified. The diagnosis is based on clinical and biochemical findings (hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria associated with psychomotor delay), and enzymatic (HPRT activity determination in haemolysate, intact erythrocytes or fibroblasts) and molecular tests. Molecular diagnosis allows faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis can be performed with amniotic cells obtained by amniocentesis at about 15-18 weeks' gestation, or chorionic villus cells obtained at about 10-12 weeks' gestation. Uric acid overproduction can be managed by allopurinol treatment. Doses must be carefully adjusted to avoid xanthine lithiasis. The lack of precise understanding of the neurological dysfunction has precluded development of useful therapies. Spasticity, when present, and dystonia can be managed with benzodiazepines and gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibitors such as baclofen. Physical rehabilitation, including management of dysarthria and dysphagia, special devices to enable hand control, appropriate walking aids, and a programme of posture management to prevent deformities are recommended. Self-injurious behaviour must be managed by a combination of physical restraints, behavioural and pharmaceutical treatments. PMID:18067674

  16. Temporal order of replication of genes responsible for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase and Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase in chemically transformed human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, T.; Suzuki, N.; Elmore, E.; Maizumi, H.

    1986-06-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of a direct perturbation of DNA during various portions of the DNA synthetic period (S phase) of a chemically induced, transformed line (Hut-11A cells) derived from diploid human skin fibroblasts were examined. The cells were synchronized by a period of growth in low serum with a subsequent blockage of the cells at the G1/S boundary by hydroxyurea. This method resulted in over 90% synchrony, although approximately 20% of the cells were noncycling. Synchronized cells were treated for each of four 2-h periods during the S phase with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) followed by irradiation with near-ultraviolet (UV). The BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment was cytotoxic and mutagenic, while treatment with BrdU alone or irradiation alone was neither cytotoxic nor mutagenic. The cytotoxicity was dependent upon the periods of S phase during which treatment was administered. The highest lethality was observed for treatment in early to middle S phase, particularly in the first 2 h of S phase, whereas scare lethality was observed in late S phase. The BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment induced ouabain- and 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants, while BrdU alone or irradiation alone was not mutagenic. Ouabain-resistant mutants were induced during early S phase by the BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment. 6-Thioguanine-resistant mutants, however, were induced during middle to late S phase. These results suggest that a certain region or regions in the DNA of Hut-11A cells, as designated by their specific temporal relationship in the S phase, may be more sensitive to the DNA perturbation by BrdU treatment plus near-UV irradiation for cell survival and that gene(s) responsible for Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase is replicated during early S phase and gene(s) for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase is replicated during middle to late S phase.

  17. INDUCTION OF MUTATIONS BY CHEMICAL AGENTS AT THE HYPOXANTHINE-GUANINE PHOSPHORIBOSYL TRANSFERASE LOCUS IN HUMAN EPITHELIAL TERATOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance by chemical mutagens was examined in a line of cells derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma cell clone. The cells, designated as P3 cells, have a stable diploid karyotype with 46(XX) chromosomes, including a translocation betwee...

  18. Up-regulation of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and increase of NAD+ levels by glucose restriction extend replicative lifespan of human fibroblast Hs68 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nae-Cherng; Song, Tuzz-Ying; Chang, Yan-Zin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in a remarkable range of organisms. However, the mechanisms of CR related to the longevity effects are not fully elucidated to date. Using human fibroblast Hs68 (Hs68) cells cultured at a lower level of medium glucose (i.e., glucose restriction; GR) to mimic CR, we investigated the crucial role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), and nicotinamide (NAM) in GR-extended replicative lifespan of Hs68 cells. We found that GR extended the lifespan of Hs68 cells, in parallel to significantly increased expression of Nampt, intracellular NAD(+) levels, and SIRT1 activities, and to significantly decreased NAM levels. The lifespan-extending effects of GR were profoundly diminished by FK866 (a noncompetitive inhibitor of Nampt) and blocked by sirtinol (a noncompetitive inhibitor of sirtuins). However, the steady-state intracellular NAM level (averaged 2.5 μM) was much lower than the IC50 of NAM on human SIRT1 (about 50 μM). All these results suggest that up-regulation of Nampt play an important role in GR-extended lifespan of Hs68 cells by increasing the intracellular NAD(+) levels followed by activating SIRT1 activity in Hs68 cells. In contrast, the role of NAM depletion is limited. PMID:25146190

  19. Enzymatic assay procedures that employ high-performance liquid chromatography: competition between phosphoribosyltransferases for a common substrate.

    PubMed

    Sloan, D L; Ali, L Z; Aybar-Batista, D; Yan, C; Hess, S L

    1984-12-21

    A survey of the phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) activities in yeast has been accomplished using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic assay procedures. The following bases were observed to be utilized during phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRibPP)-dependent nucleotide syntheses: adenine, xanthine, hypoxanthine, guanine, uracil, orotate, nicotinamide, nicotinate and quinolinate. Gradient elution procedures have also been perfected that allow the separation of the two following sets of PRTase assay components: (1) adenosine monophosphate, nicotinate mononucleotide, orotate, adenosine triphosphate, nicotinate, adenosine diphosphate, inosine monophosphate and hypoxanthine, and (2) nicotinate mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, adenosine triphosphate, nicotinate, adenosine diphosphate and nicotinamide. Separation 1 has been employed to examine the PRibPP allocation among the hypoxanthine PRTase, orotate PRTase and nicotinate PRTase catalyzed reactions, whereas separation 2 has been employed to define the role that ATP plays in the nicotinamide PRTase-catalyzed reaction along with the allocation of nicotinamide between the reactions catalyzed by nicotinamide PRTase and nicotinamide deamidase. PMID:6241619

  20. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  1. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Pittelli, Maria; Formentini, Laura; Faraco, Giuseppe; Lapucci, Andrea; Rapizzi, Elena; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Moneti, Gloriano; Moroni, Flavio; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The NAD rescue pathway consists of two enzymatic steps operated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferases. Recently, the potent Nampt inhibitor FK866 has been identified and evaluated in clinical trials against cancer. Yet, how Nampt inhibition affects NAD contents and bioenergetics is in part obscure. It is also unknown whether NAD rescue takes place in mitochondria, and FK866 alters NAD homeostasis within the organelle. Here, we show that FK866-dependent reduction of the NAD contents is paralleled by a concomitant increase of ATP in various cell types, in keeping with ATP utilization for NAD resynthesis. We also show that poly- and mono(ADP-ribose) transferases rather than Sirt-1 are responsible for NAD depletion in HeLa cells exposed to FK866. Mass spectrometry reveals that the drug distributes in the cytosolic and mitochondrial compartment. However, the cytoplasmic but not the mitochondrial NAD pool is reduced upon acute or chronic exposure to the drug. Accordingly, Nampt does not localize within the organelles and their bioenergetics is not affected by the drug. In the mouse, FK866-dependent reduction of NAD contents in various organs is prevented by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases or the NAD precursor kynurenine. For the first time, our data indicate that mitochondria lack the canonical NAD rescue pathway, broadening current understanding of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:20724478

  2. Linkage of the gene for an X-linked mental retardation disorder to a hypervariable (AGAT)n repeat motif within the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus (Xq26).

    PubMed Central

    Huang, T H; Hejtmancik, J F; Edwards, A; Pettigrew, A L; Herrera, C A; Hammond, H A; Caskey, C T; Zoghbi, H Y; Ledbetter, D H

    1991-01-01

    We recently reported a new X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) disorder in a four-generation family of Dutch descent. Features included Dandy-Walker malformation, basal ganglia disease, and seizures. Twenty-six family members, including two living affected males and two obligate carriers, were available for study. No evidence of linkage was observed between the disease locus and RFLPs from several X-chromosome regions, including Xp21-p22 (13 markers), proximal Xq (four markers), and Xq28 (three markers). However, a new hypervariable short tandem repeat (STR) within the HPRT gene at Xq26 showed positive linkage to the disease locus, with a maximum lod score of 2.19 at a recombination fraction of 0. A second hypervariable marker in Xq26, the dinucleotide repeat XL90A3 (DXS425), showed a lod score of .84 at a recombination fraction of .11. Both the HPRT and DXS425 markers were typed in 40 CEPH families, and subsequent multipoint linkage analysis showed the following order: Xcen-DXS425-(HPRT,XLMR)-F9-qter. HPRT and these flanking markers are therefore useful for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in this family. This study illustrates that hypervariable STRs will be powerful tools for linkage analysis and genetic diagnosis, particularly when relatively small families are involved. Images Figure 1 PMID:1746558

  3. Novel Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene Mutations in Saudi Arabian Hyperuricemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mohammed; Al-Arfaj, Abdulrahman Saud; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Fahad Al-Arfaj, Hussein; Reddy Parine, Narasimha; Purusottapatnam Shaik, Jilani; Khan, Zahid; Ali Khan Pathan, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, a steady increase in the incidence of HPRT-related hyperuricemia (HRH) has been observed in Saudi Arabia. We examined all the nine exons of HPRT gene for mutations in ten biochemically confirmed hyperuricemia patients, including one female and three normal controls. In all, we identified 13 novel mutations in Saudi Arabian HPRT-related hyperuricemia patients manifesting different levels of uric acid. The Lys103Met alteration was highly recurrent and was observed in 50% of the cases, while Ala160Thr and Lys158Asn substitutions were found in two patients. Moreover, in 70% of the patients ≥2 mutations were detected concurrently in the HPRT gene. Interestingly, one of the patients that harbored Lys103Met substitution along with two frameshift mutations at codons 85 and 160 resulting in shortened protein demonstrated unusually high serum uric acid level of 738 μmol/L. Two of the seven point mutations that resulted in amino acid change (Lys103Met and Val160Gly) were predicted to be damaging by SIFT and Polyphen and were further analyzed for their protein stability and function by molecular dynamics simulation. The identified novel mutations in the HPRT gene may prove useful in the prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:25136576

  4. Effects of allopurinol and oxipurinol on purine synthesis in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, William N.; Wyngaarden, James B.

    1970-01-01

    In the present study we have examined the effects of allopurinol and oxipurinol on the de novo synthesis of purines in cultured human fibroblasts. Allopurinol inhibits de novo purine synthesis in the absence of xanthine oxidase. Inhibition at lower concentrations of the drug requires the presence of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase as it does in vivo. Although this suggests that the inhibitory effect of allopurinol at least at the lower concentrations tested is a consequence of its conversion to the ribonucleotide form in human cells, the nucleotide derivative could not be demonstrated. Several possible indirect consequences of such a conversion were also sought. There was no evidence that allopurinol was further utilized in the synthesis of nucleic acids in these cultured human cells and no effect of either allopurinol or oxipurinol on the long-term survival of human cells in vitro could be demonstrated. At higher concentrations, both allopurinol and oxipurinol inhibit the early steps of de novo purine synthesis in the absence of either xanthine oxidase or hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. This indicates that at higher drug concentrations, inhibition is occurring by some mechanism other than those previously postulated. PMID:5415686

  5. First Crystal Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 6-Oxopurine Phosphoribosyltransferase: Complexes with GMP and Pyrophosphate and with Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates Whose Prodrugs Have Antituberculosis Activity.

    PubMed

    Eng, Wai Soon; Hockov, Dana; pa?ek, Petr; Janeba, Zlatko; West, Nicholas P; Woods, Kyra; Naesens, Lieve M J; Keough, Dianne T; Guddat, Luke W

    2015-06-11

    Human tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease affecting millions of lives. Because of emerging resistance to current medications, new therapeutic drugs are needed. One potential new target is hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (MtHGPRT), a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. Here, newly synthesized acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) have been shown to be competitive inhibitors of MtHGPRT with Ki values as low as 0.69 ?M. Prodrugs of these compounds arrest the growth of a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis with MIC50 values as low as 4.5 ?M and possess low cytotoxicity in mammalian cells (CC50 values as high as >300 ?M). In addition, the first crystal structures of MtHGPRT (2.03-2.76 resolution) have been determined, three of these in complex with novel ANPs and one with GMP and pyrophosphate. These data provide a solid foundation for the further development of ANPs as selective inhibitors of MtHGPRT and as antituberculosis agents. PMID:25915781

  6. Interactions at the Dimer Interface Influence the Relative Efficiencies for Purine Nucleotide Synthesis and Pyrophosphorolysis in a Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Canyuk, Bhutorn; Medrano, Francisco J.; Wenck, MaryAnne; Focia, Pamela J.; Eakin, Ann E.; Craig III, Sydney P.

    2010-03-05

    Enzymes that salvage 6-oxopurines, including hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs), are potential targets for drugs in the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. For this reason, a number of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the HPRTs from protozoa have been reported. Although these structures did not reveal why HPRTs need to form dimers for catalysis, they revealed the existence of potentially relevant interactions involving residues in a loop of amino acid residues adjacent to the dimer interface, but the contributions of these interactions to catalysis remained poorly understood. The loop, referred to as active-site loop I, contains an unusual non-proline cis-peptide and is composed of residues that are structurally analogous with Leu67, Lys68, and Gly69 in the human HPRT. Functional analyses of site-directed mutations (K68D, K68E, K68N, K68P, and K68R) in the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease, show that the side-chain at position 68 can differentially influence the K{sub m} values for all four substrates as well as the k{sub cat} values for both IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis. Also, the results for the K68P mutant are inconsistent with a cis-trans peptide isomerization-assisted catalytic mechanism. These data, together with the results of structural studies of the K68R mutant, reveal that the side-chain of residue 68 does not participate directly in reaction chemistry, but it strongly influences the relative efficiencies for IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis, and the prevalence of lysine at position 68 in the HPRT of the majority of eukaryotes is consistent with there being a biological role for nucleotide pyrophosphorolysis.

  7. A kinetic study of hypoxanthine oxidation by milk xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, J; Garcia-Canovas, F; Garcia-Carmona, F

    1988-01-01

    The course of the reaction sequence hypoxanthine----xanthine----uric acid catalysed by xanthine:oxygen oxidoreductase from milk was investigated on the basis of u.v. spectra taken during the course of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidations. It was found that xanthine accumulated in the reaction mixture when hypoxanthine was used as a substrate. The time course of the concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine intermediate and uric acid product was simulated numerically. The mathematical model takes into account the competition of substrate, intermediate and product and the accumulation of the intermediate at the enzyme. This type of analysis permits the kinetic parameters of the enzyme for hypoxanthine and xanthine to be obtained. PMID:3196295

  8. Trypanosoma brucei adenine-phosphoribosyltransferases mediate adenine salvage and aminopurinol susceptibility but not adenine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Alexandra; Lamprea-Burgunder, Estelle; Graf, Fabrice E; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    African trypanosomes, like all obligate parasitic protozoa, cannot synthesize purines de novo and import purines from their hosts to build nucleic acids. The purine salvage pathways of Trypanosoma brucei being redundant, none of the involved enzymes is likely to be essential. Nevertheless they can be of pharmacological interest due to their role in activation of purine nucleobase or nucleoside analogues, which only become toxic when converted to nucleotides. Aminopurine antimetabolites, in particular, are potent trypanocides and even adenine itself is toxic to trypanosomes at elevated concentrations. Here we report on the T. brucei adenine phosphoribosyltransferases TbAPRT1 and TbAPRT2, encoded by the two genes Tb927.7.1780 and Tb927.7.1790, located in tandem on chromosome seven. The duplication is syntenic in all available Trypanosoma genomes but not in Leishmania. While TbAPRT1 is cytosolic, TbAPRT2 possesses a glycosomal targeting signal and co-localizes with the glycosomal marker aldolase. Interestingly, the distribution of glycosomal targeting signals among trypanosomatid adenine phosphoribosyltransferases is not consistent with their phylogeny, indicating that the acquisition of adenine salvage to the glycosome happened after the radiation of Trypanosoma. Double null mutant T. brucei Δtbaprt1,2 exhibited no growth phenotype but no longer incorporated exogenous adenine into the nucleotide pool. This, however, did not reduce their sensitivity to adenine. The Δtbaprt1,2 trypanosomes were resistant to the adenine isomer aminopurinol, indicating that it is activated by phosphoribosyl transfer. Aminopurinol was about 1000-fold more toxic to bloodstream-form T. brucei than the corresponding hypoxanthine isomer allopurinol. Aminopurinol uptake was not dependent on the aminopurine permease P2 that has been implicated in drug resistance. PMID:24596669

  9. Retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer into human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H E; Finley, K D; Hershberg, R M; Katzman, S S; Laikind, P K; Seegmiller, J E; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K; Jolly, D J

    1985-11-29

    The transfer of the human gene for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) into human bone marrow cells was accomplished by use of a retroviral vector. The cells were infected in vitro with a replication-incompetent murine retroviral vector that carried and expressed a mutant HPRT complementary DNA. The infected cells were superinfected with a helper virus and maintained in long-term culture. The production of progeny HPRT virus by the bone marrow cells was demonstrated with a colony formation assay on cultured HPRT-deficient, ouabain-resistant murine fibroblasts. Hematopoietic progenitor cells able to form colonies of granulocytes or macrophages (or both) in semisolid medium in the presence of colony stimulating factor were present in the nonadherent cell population. Colony forming units cloned in agar and subsequently cultured in liquid medium produced progeny HPRT virus, indicating infection of this class of hematopoietic progenitor cell. PMID:3864246

  10. Asynchronous replication of homologous loci on human active and inactive X chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, M.; Migeon, B.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The two X chromosomes in mammalian females replicate asynchronously, the inactive later than the active one. Using BrdUrd-sensitive restriction and UV irradiation to identify newly synthesized DNA directly on Southern blots, and restriction fragment length differences to discriminate alleles on active and inactive human X chromosomes, the authors examined the replication of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and clotting factor IX (F9) loci in clonal populations of mouse-human hybrids. They find that HPRT replicates at different times during the period of DNA synthesis (S phase), depending on its activity: It replicates in early S phase, when expressed (on the active X chromosome), and in late S phase when silent (on the inactive X chromosome). Furthermore, when reactivated, the derepressed locus is earlier replicating, supporting a relationship between replication and transcription. Neither F9 allele is expressed in these cells, and both replicate in the second half of S phase, (slightly earlier on active than on inactive X chromosome).

  11. The synthetic substance hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide elicits alarm reactions in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Parra, Kevin V; Adrian, James C; Gerlai, Robert

    2009-12-28

    Zebrafish, one of the preferred study species of geneticists, is gaining increasing popularity in behavioral neuroscience. This small and prolific species may be an excellent tool with which the biological mechanisms of vertebrate brain function and behavior are investigated. Zebrafish has been proposed as a model organism in the analysis of fear responses and human anxiety disorders. Species-specific cues signaling the presence of predators have been successfully utilized in such research. Zebrafish has been shown to respond to its natural alarm substance with species-typical fear reactions. However, the extraction of this alarm substance and ascertaining its consistent dosing has been problematic. A synthetic substance with a known chemical identity and molecular weight would allow precise dosing and experimental control. Previously, the chemical component, hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide, common to several fish alarm substances has been identified and has been shown to elicit alarm reactions in fish species belonging to the Osteriophysan superorder. In the current study we investigate the effect of hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide by exposing zebrafish to three different concentrations of this synthetic substance. Our results show that the substance efficaciously induces species-typical fear reactions increasing the number of erratic movement episodes and jumps in zebrafish. We discuss the translational relevance of our findings and conclude that hypoxanthine 3-N-oxide will have utility to elicit fear responses in the laboratory in a precisely controlled manner in zebrafish. PMID:19583985

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uridine and inosine: high concentrations of the ATP metabolite, hypoxanthine, after hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, R A; Lund, R J

    1983-01-01

    CSF obtained for clinical purposes from newborn, children and adults has been analysed by high pressure liquid chromatography for hypoxanthine, xanthine, inosine, uridine and urate. Large rises in hypoxanthine and to a lesser extent xanthine occur for about 24 h after hypoxia. High concentrations were associated with later evidence of brain damage or subsequent death. Changes in CSF could be independent of those in plasma. Small or negligible rises were associated with localised and generalised infections including bacterial meningitis, fits, or both. Marked and rapid rises were found after death. These estimations may "predict" the extent of brain damage or brain death. PMID:6681617

  13. V(D)J RECOMBINASE-MEDIATED DELETION OF THE HPRT GENE IN T-LYMPHOCYTES FROM ADULT HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hprt T-cell cloning assay allows the detection of mutations occurring in vivo in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of T-lymphocytes. e have shown previously that the illegitimate activity of V(D)J recombinase accounts for about 40% of the hprt mut...

  14. Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Foster, A C; Zinkand, W C; Schwarcz, R

    1985-02-01

    Because of the possible participation of quinolinic acid in brain function and/or dysfunction, the characteristics of its catabolic enzyme, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase; EC 2.4.2.19), were examined in rat brain tissue. For this purpose, a sensitive radiochemical assay method, based on the conversion of quinolinic acid to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN), was developed. For brain QPRTase, the Mg2+ dependency, substrate specificity, and optimal assay conditions were virtually identical to those of the liver enzyme. Kinetic analyses of brain QPRTase revealed a Km of 3.17 +/- 0.30 microM for quinolinic acid and Km = 65.13 +/- 13.74 microM for the cosubstrate phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. The respective Vmax values were: 0.91 +/- 0.08 pmol NAMN/h/mg tissue for quinolinic acid and 11.65 +/- 1.55 fmol NAMN/h/mg tissue for phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. All kinetic parameters measured for the brain enzyme were significantly different from those determined for liver QPRTase, indicating structural differences or distinct regulatory processes for the brain and liver enzymes. Phthalic acid was a potent competitive inhibitor of brain QPRTase. Examination of the regional distribution of QPRTase in the rat CNS and retina indicated a greater than 20-fold difference between the area displaying the highest activity (olfactory bulb) and those of only moderate activity (frontal cortex, striatum, retina, hippo-campus). Enzyme activity was present at the earliest age tested, 2 days, and tended to increase in older animals. Brain QPRTase activity was preferentially located in the nerve-ending (synaptosomal) fraction. Enzyme activity was stable over extensive periods of storage at -80 degrees C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2578178

  15. Structural and kinetic characterization of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (hQPRTase) from homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanting; Woznica, Kerry; Catton, Gemma; Crawford, Amanda; Botting, Nigel; Naismith, James H

    2007-10-26

    Human quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.19) (hQPRTase) is a member of the type II phosphoribosyltransferase family involved in the catabolism of quinolinic acid (QA). It catalyses the formation of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid, which involves a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. hQPRTase has been implicated in a number of neurological conditions and in order to study it further, we have carried out structural and kinetic studies on recombinant hQPRTase. The structure of the fully active enzyme overexpressed in Escherichia coli was solved using multiwavelength methods to a resolution of 2.0 A. hQPRTase has a alpha/beta barrel fold sharing a similar overall structure with the bacterial QPRTases. The active site of hQPRTase is located at an alpha/beta open sandwich structure that serves as a cup for the alpha/beta barrel of the adjacent subunit with a QA binding site consisting of three arginine residues (R102, R138 and R161) and two lysine residues (K139 and K171). Mutation of these residues affected substrate binding or abolished the enzymatic activity. The kinetics of the human enzyme are different to the bacterial enzymes studied, hQPRTase is inhibited competitively and non-competitively by one of its substrates, 5-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The human enzyme adopts a hexameric arrangement, which places the active sites in close proximity to each other. PMID:17868694

  16. Structure of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Pei; Xu, Rui; Gao, Zeng-Qiang; Xu, Jian-Hua; Hou, Hai-Feng; Li, Li-Qin; She, Zhun; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) catalyzes the OMP-forming step in de novo pyrimidine-nucleotide biosynthesis. Here, the crystal structure of OPRTase from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans is reported at 2.4? resolution. S. mutans OPRTase forms a symmetric dimer and each monomer binds two sulfates at the active sites. The structural symmetry of the sulfate-binding sites and the missing loops in this structure are consistent with a symmetric catalysis mechanism. PMID:20445243

  17. Mechanism of Feedback Allosteric Inhibition of ATP Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the first and committed step in l-histidine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is therefore subjected to allosteric feedback regulation. Because of its essentiality, this enzyme is being studied as a potential target for novel anti-infectives. To understand the basis for its regulation, we characterized the allosteric inhibition using gel filtration, steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics, and the pH dependence of inhibition and binding. Gel filtration experiments indicate that MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase is a hexamer in solution, in the presence or absence of l-histidine. Steady-state kinetic studies demonstrate that l-histidine inhibition is uncompetitive versus ATP and noncompetitive versus PRPP. At pH values close to neutrality, a Kii value of 4 μM was obtained for l-histidine. Pre-steady-state kinetic experiments indicate that chemistry is not rate-limiting for the overall reaction and that l-histidine inhibition is caused by trapping the enzyme in an inactive conformation. The pH dependence of binding, obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance, indicates that l-histidine binds better as the neutral α-amino group. The pH dependence of inhibition (Kii), on the contrary, indicates that l-histidine better inhibits MtATP-phosphoribosytransferase with a neutral imidazole and an ionized α-amino group. These results are combined into a model that accounts for the allosteric inhibition of MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:22989207

  18. Increased Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Rhabdomyosarcomas and Leiomyosarcomas Compared to Skeletal and Smooth Muscle Tissue.

    PubMed

    Vora, Moiz; Ansari, Junaid; Shanti, Rabie M; Veillon, Diana; Cotelingam, James; Coppola, Domenico; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2016-02-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in NAD synthesis and is up-regulated in several human malignancies, including breast, colon, prostate, thyroid, gastric, and several hematopoietic malignancies. In some malignancies, such as gastric, thyroid, and prostate carcinomas, higher NAMPT expression correlates with deeper tumor invasion, increased metastatic potential and chemotherapy resistance. We employed tissue microarray immunohistochemistry to examine NAMPT expression in benign skeletal and smooth muscle, leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas (graded low-, intermediate-, and high-grade), and spindle, embryonal, pleomorphic, and alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. We found low to intermediate NAMPT expression in benign tissue, leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas (low- and intermediate-grades), and spindle cell rhabdomyosarcomas. In contrast, high-grade leiomyosarcomas and embryonal, alveolar, and pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcomas showed high NAMPT expression. Herein we show for the first time that NAMPT is overexpressed in certain sarcoma types and the level of NAMPT expression correlates with tumor behavior. PMID:26851003

  19. Mechanism of feedback allosteric inhibition of ATP phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Pedreño, Sònia; Pisco, João Pedro; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Kelly, Geoff; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro Sório

    2012-10-01

    MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the first and committed step in l-histidine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is therefore subjected to allosteric feedback regulation. Because of its essentiality, this enzyme is being studied as a potential target for novel anti-infectives. To understand the basis for its regulation, we characterized the allosteric inhibition using gel filtration, steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics, and the pH dependence of inhibition and binding. Gel filtration experiments indicate that MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase is a hexamer in solution, in the presence or absence of l-histidine. Steady-state kinetic studies demonstrate that l-histidine inhibition is uncompetitive versus ATP and noncompetitive versus PRPP. At pH values close to neutrality, a K(ii) value of 4 μM was obtained for l-histidine. Pre-steady-state kinetic experiments indicate that chemistry is not rate-limiting for the overall reaction and that l-histidine inhibition is caused by trapping the enzyme in an inactive conformation. The pH dependence of binding, obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance, indicates that l-histidine binds better as the neutral α-amino group. The pH dependence of inhibition (K(ii)), on the contrary, indicates that l-histidine better inhibits MtATP-phosphoribosytransferase with a neutral imidazole and an ionized α-amino group. These results are combined into a model that accounts for the allosteric inhibition of MtATP-phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:22989207

  20. The function of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiao-Po; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Oka, Shinichi; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-11-01

    In addition to its roles as a coenzyme and an electron transfer molecule, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a substrate of sirtuins, a family of enzymes that control aging and metabolism. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), a rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD+ salvage pathway, plays an important role in controlling the level of NAD+ and the activity of Sirt1 in the heart and the cardiomyocytes therein. Nampt protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury by stimulating Sirt1. In this review, we summarize what is currently known regarding the function of Nampt in the heart. PMID:25277684

  1. Isolation and properties of crystalline quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase from hog kidney.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Iwai, K

    1980-02-14

    Crystalline quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinatenucleotide: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (carboxylating), EC 2.4.2.19) was isolated from hog kidney and compared with the same enzyme prepared from hog liver. The enzyme preparation was homogeneous as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation analysis. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 220 000 and the subunit 35 000. The physicochemical properties of the enzyme were: sedimentation coefficient (S200,W), 7.75 . 10(-13) s; difussion coefficient (D200,W), 5.04 . 10(-7) cm2/s; Stokes radius, 62.05 A, frictional ratio (f/f0), 1.62 and isoelectric point (pI), 4.5. The enzyme was stable at 37 degrees C for 30 min between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Enzyme activity was inhibited by various carboxylic acids; however, this inhibition was reversed by raising the Mg2+ concentration. Optimum pH was 5.5, and no detectable amounts of Mg2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Ca2+ were found by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The enzyme was found to contain sugar. Mg2+ was completely replaceable by Mn2+. The reaction mechanism of this enzyme was suggested to be of the 'ping-pong' type. Km values of quinolinic acid and 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate were 4 . 10(-5) and 1.4 . 10(-4) M, respectively. PMID:7357010

  2. Preparation and screening of an arrayed human genomic library generated with the P1 cloning system

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, N.S.; Perogner, B.D.; Coulby, J.N.; Ackerman, S.L.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Sauer, R.H.; Balkenhol, T.C.; Sternberg, N. |

    1994-03-29

    The authors describe here the construction and initial characterization of a 3-fold coverage genomic library of the human haploid genome that was prepared using the bacteriophase P1 cloning system. The cloned DNA inserts were produced by size fractionation of a Sau3AI partial digest of high molecular weight genomic DNA isolated from primary cells of human foreskin fibroblasts. The inserts were cloned into the pAd10sacBII vector and packaged in vitro into P1 phage. These were used to generate recombinant bacterial clones, each of which was picked robotically from an agar plate into a well of a 96-well microtiter dish, grown overnight, and stored at -70{degrees}C. The resulting library, designated DMPC-HFF No. 1 series A, consists of {approximately}130,000-140,000 recombinant clones that were stored in 1500 microtiter dishes. To screen the library, clones were combined in a pooling strategy and specific loci were identified by PCR analysis. On average, the library contains two or three different clones for each locus screened. To date the authors have identified a total of 17 clones containing the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, human serum albumin-human {alpha}-fetoprotein, p53, cyclooxygenase I, human apurinic endonuclease, {beta}-polymerase, and DNA ligase I genes. The cloned inserts average 80 kb in size and range from 70 to 95 kb, with one 49-kb insert and one 62-kb insert. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  4. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Carmichael, Ian; Denifl, Stephan; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C5H4N4O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp - H) anion (C5H3N4O-) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp - NH)-, C4H3N4-/C4HN3O-, C4H2N3-, C3NO-/HC(HCN)CN-, OCN-, CN-, and O-. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  5. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine.

    PubMed

    Dawley, M Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Carmichael, Ian; Denifl, Stephan; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C5H4N4O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp - H) anion (C5H3N4O(-)) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp - NH)(-), C4H3N4 (-)/C4HN3O(-), C4H2N3 (-), C3NO(-)/HC(HCN)CN(-), OCN(-), CN(-), and O(-). Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules. PMID:26049525

  6. Kinetic analysis of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast using high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L S; Hess, S L; Sloan, D L

    1983-08-25

    A new procedure has been designed for the purification of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase from the same baker's yeast extract. Using purified nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase, the enzyme-catalyzed formation of nicotinate mononucleotide was analyzed using a new high pressure liquid chromatographic assay (Hanna, L., and Sloan, D. L. (1980) Anal. Biochem. 103, 230-234). Initial velocity measurements and product inhibition studies, with pyrophosphate, were performed. In addition, this assay procedure was used to demonstrate that purified nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase possesses an ATPase activity in the presence of either product (pyrophosphate or nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN] but in the absence of 5-phosphoribosyl alpha-1-pyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP). Moreover, exchanges of radioactivity between specific substrate/product pairs [( 14C]nicotinate/NaMN and [32P]PPi/P-Rib-PP) in the absence of other substrates were not observed when these pairs were incubated with nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase, and binding of [14C] nicotinate to nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase was not detected in the presence of ATP. In contrast, an exchange of label between ATP and [14C]ADP was characterized in the absence of other substrates and in the presence of either P-Rib-PP or PPi. These results indicate that nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase proceeds through the use of an ordered Uni Uni Bi Ter Ping Pong kinetic mechanism during which ATP reacts with nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase to form ADP and a previously described phosphorylated enzyme (Kosaka, A., Spivey, H. O., and Gholson, R. K. (1977) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 179, 334-341). Thereafter, P-Rib-PP and nicotinate bind in order to the active site, to produce PPi and NaMN which are released in a random order followed by Pi. The Km values for ATP, P-Rib-PP, and nicotinate were calculated to be 70 +/- 10, 24 +/- 3, and 23 +/- 4 microM, respectively, whereas a value for Ki(PRPP) of 5 +/- 1 microM was determined. PMID:6224784

  7. Plasmodium falciparum: assessment of in vitro growth by (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Chulay, J.D.; Haynes, J.D.; Diggs, C.L.

    1983-02-01

    To evaluate rapidly Plasmodium falciparum growth in Vitro, (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine was added to parasite microcultures and radioisotope incorporation was measured. When culture parameters were carefully controlled, (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation was proportional to the number of parasitized erythrocytes present. Factors affecting (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation included initial parasitemia, duration of culture, duration of radioisotope pulse, parasite stage, concentration of uninfected erythrocytes, the use of serum or plasma to supplement growth, and the concentration of a variety of purines in the culture medium. The method described can be used to measure inhibition of P. falciparum growth by immune serum and has previously been used to study antimalarial drug activity in vitro.

  8. Discovery and characterization of novel small-molecule inhibitors targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tian-Ying; Zhang, Sai-Long; Dong, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Xin-Zhu; Wang, Xia; Lv, Xiao-Qun; Qian, Qi-Jun; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Sheng, Chun-Quan; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a promising anticancer target. Using high throughput screening system targeting NAMPT, we obtained a potent NAMPT inhibitor MS0 (China Patent ZL201110447488.9) with excellent in vitro activity (IC50 = 9.87 ± 1.15nM) and anti-proliferative activity against multiple human cancer cell lines including stem-like cancer cells. Structure-activity relationship studies yielded several highly effective analogues. These inhibitors specifically bound NAMPT, rather than downstream NMNAT. We provided the first chemical case using cellular thermal shift assay to explain the difference between in vitro and cellular activity; MS7 showed best in vitro activity (IC50 = 0.93 ± 0.29 nM) but worst cellular activity due to poor target engagement in living cells. Site-directed mutagenesis studies identified important residues for NAMPT catalytic activity and inhibitor binding. The present findings contribute to deep understanding the action mode of NAMPT inhibitors and future development of NAMPT inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:26040985

  9. Crystal Structure of Sus scrofa Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase in Complex with Nicotinate Mononucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Tae Gyun; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Kang, Jung Youn; Song, Hye-Eun; Park, Inju; Cho, Chunghee; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of porcine quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase) in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN), which is the first crystal structure of a mammalian QAPRTase with its reaction product. The structure was determined from protein obtained from the porcine kidney. Because the full protein sequence of porcine QAPRTase was not available in either protein or nucleotide databases, cDNA was synthesized using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to determine the porcine QAPRTase amino acid sequence. The crystal structure revealed that porcine QAPRTases have a hexameric structure that is similar to other eukaryotic QAPRTases, such as the human and yeast enzymes. However, the interaction between NAMN and porcine QAPRTase was different from the interaction found in prokaryotic enzymes, such as those of Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The crystal structure of porcine QAPRTase in complex with NAMN provides a structural framework for understanding the unique properties of the mammalian QAPRTase active site and designing new antibiotics that are selective for the QAPRTases of pathogenic bacteria, such as H. pylori and M. tuberculosis. PMID:23626766

  10. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT/PBEF/visfatin) is a tumoural cytokine released from melanoma.

    PubMed

    Grolla, Ambra A; Torretta, Simone; Gnemmi, Ilaria; Amoruso, Angela; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Gatti, Marco; Caldarelli, Antonio; Lim, Dmitry; Penengo, Lorenza; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Genazzani, Armando A; Travelli, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    High plasma levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), traditionally considered an intracellular enzyme with a key role in NAD synthesis, have been reported in several oncological, inflammatory and metabolic diseases. We now show that eNAMPT can be actively released by melanoma cells in vitro. We analysed the mechanisms of its release, and we found both classical and non-classical pathway involvement. eNAMPT released by melanoma cells, in our hands, has paracrine and autocrine effects: it activates MAPK, AKT and NF-κB pathways and increases colony formation in anchorage-independent conditions. eNAMPT also induces M1 polarization in human monocytes. Last, we demonstrate, for the first time in any cancer type, that eNAMPT levels in plasma of tumour-bearing mice increase and that this increase can be reconducted to the tumour itself. This provides an important cue on previous observations that eNAMPT is increased in patients with cancer. Moreover, silencing NAMPT in melanoma cells leads to a reduction in the tumour growth rate. Our findings extend the basis to consider eNAMPT as a cytokine involved in tumour progression. PMID:26358657

  11. Periplasmic localization of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baecker, P A; Yung, S G; Rodriguez, M; Austin, E; Andreoli, A J

    1978-03-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase) in Escherichia coli mediates the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide, a direct precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), from nicotinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Specifically, NAPRTase contributes to NAD synthesis by utilizing intracellular nicotinate formed from NAD degradation products, which are recycled by NAD cycle enzymes and exogenous nicotinate when it is available. In previous studies, it has been tacitly assumed that almost all NAD cycle enzymes are localized in the cytoplasm of E. coli. The results of this investigation provide evidence that NAPRTase is a periplasmic (extracytoplasmic) enzyme. The osmotic shock of exponential-phase cells of E. coli K-12 and ML 308-225 resulted in the release of 63 to 72% and 42 to 48%, respectively, of the NAPRTase into the shock medium. In addition, when exponential cells of strains K-12 and ML 308-225 were converted into spheroplasts, 75 to 84% and 54 to 68%, respectively, of the enzyme was released into the spheroplast medium. Since previous estimates of the effective levels of NAPRTase present in putative repressed and derepressed E. coli cells appeared to be very low, a more convenient and accurate alternative method for the evaluation of NAPRTase in whole cells was developed. The results show that NAPRTase is subject only to a modest degree of enzyme repression. In addition, no evidence was found for the presence of a protein or low-molecular-weight inhibitor of the enzyme in repressed cells. PMID:346557

  12. Effects of Hypoxanthine Substitution in Peptide Nucleic Acids Targeting KRAS2 Oncogenic mRNA Molecules: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Jeffrey M.; Wampole, Matthew E.; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D.; Thakur, Mathew L.; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multi-mutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick basepairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA-PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA-PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition. PMID:23972113

  13. Clinical features and genotype of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency in iceland.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, V; Palsson, R; Olafsson, I; Hjaltadottir, G; Laxdal, T

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical, diagnostic, and prognostic features of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency in Icelandic patients, as well as determine their genotype. Medical records of all known patients in Iceland were reviewed. Urinalysis and polymerase chain reaction-based DNA mutation analysis were performed in all patients, siblings, and living parents of index cases. Twenty-three individuals homozygous for type I APRT deficiency were identified in 16 families from 1983 to 1998. There were 12 males and 11 females, and the median age at diagnosis was 37 years (range, 0.5 to 62 years). Seventeen patients were index cases and 6 patients were diagnosed during screening of first-degree relatives. Eighteen patients had symptomatic disease, 15 of whom experienced nephrolithiasis; 4 patients had mild to moderate renal insufficiency, 1 patient had advanced renal failure, and 1 patient died of uremic complications. Six patients experienced recurrent urinary tract infections and 3 infants had a history of reddish-brown diaper stains. Five patients were asymptomatic; 3 of these patients were diagnosed during routine urinalysis and 2 patients were identified during family screening. Urinary 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystals were detected in all cases, except for the patient who died of end-stage renal failure. All 23 patients were homozygous for the same mutation (D65V) in the APRT gene. Allopurinol therapy successfully prevented further stone formation and significantly improved renal function in most patients with renal insufficiency. Our results suggest that APRT deficiency may be more common than previously recognized and can lead to severe renal failure if left untreated. PMID:11532677

  14. Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase: kinetic mechanism for a type II PRTase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hong; Pietrak, Beth L; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2002-03-12

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide, carbon dioxide, and pyrophosphate from 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and quinolinic acid (QA, pyridine 2,3-dicarboxylic acid). The enzyme is the only type II PRTase whose X-ray structure is known. Here we determined the kinetic mechanism of the enzyme from Salmonella typhimurium. Equilibrium binding studies show that PRPP and QA each form binary complexes with the enzyme, with K(D) values (53 and 21 microM, respectively) similar to their K(M) values (30 and 25 microM, respectively). Although neither PP(i) nor NAMN products bound well to the enzyme, 130-fold tighter binding of PP(i) (K(D) = 75 microM) and NAMN (K(D) = 6 microM) in a ternary complex was observed. Phthalic acid (K(D) = 21 microM) and PRPP each caused a 2.5-fold tightening of the other's binding. Isotope trapping experiments indicated that the E.QA complex is catalytically competent, whereas the E.PRPP complex could not be trapped. Pre-steady-state kinetics gave a linear rate of NAMN formation, indicating that on-enzyme phosphoribosyl transfer chemistry is rate-determining. Isotope trapping from the steady state revealed that nearly all QA and about one-third of PRPP in ternary enzyme.QA.PRPP complexes could be trapped as the product. Substrate inhibition by PRPP was observed. These data demonstrate a predominantly ordered kinetic mechanism in which productive binding of quinolinic acid precedes that of PRPP. An E.PRPP complex exists as a nonproductive side branch. PMID:11876660

  15. Guanine, Adenine, and Hypoxanthine Production from UV-Irradiated Formamide: Relaxation of the Requirements for Prebiotic Purine Nucleobase Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, T. M.; Barks, H.; Buckley, R.; Grieves, G.; Dimauro, E.; Hud, N. V.

    2010-04-01

    We observe the production of adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanine in heated and UV irradiated formamide solutions. These "one pot" reactions occur due to the synergy of thermal and UV photon-induced processes.

  16. Ultrafast nonradiative decay by hypoxanthine and several methylxanthines in aqueous and acetonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Kohler, Bern

    2012-08-14

    Excited state lifetimes of hypoxanthine and four methylxanthine compounds (paraxanthine, theophylline, theobromine, and caffeine) were studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in aqueous and acetonitrile solution. Transient absorption signals recorded at visible and UV probe wavelengths reveal that internal conversion from the photoexcited state to the electronic ground state takes place in water on the hundreds of femtoseconds time scale. Excited-state relaxation occurs approximately threefold more slowly in acetonitrile solution than in water. Structural considerations suggest that the deactivating conical intersection for the methylxanthines differs from that responsible for nonradiative decay by hypoxanthine, adenine, and guanine. All compounds studied have ultrashort excited state lifetimes similar to those of adenine and guanine, suggesting that these xanthine derivatives could have been photostable building blocks in prebiotic environments exposed to intense UV radiation. PMID:22751681

  17. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Reduces Neutrophil-Mediated Injury in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Inga; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Bruzzone, Santina; Akhmedov, Alexander; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Speer, Timo; Poggi, Alessandro; Mannino, Elena; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Bertolotto, Maria; Lenglet, Sébastien; Garuti, Anna; Montessuit, Christophe; Lerch, René; Pellieux, Corinne; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Dallegri, Franco; Mage, Jacqueline; Sebastian, Carlos; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Patrone, Franco; Mach, François; Nencioni, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is a key enzyme for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis, and recent evidence indicates its role in inflammatory processes. Here, we investigated the potential effects of pharmacological Nampt inhibition with FK866 in a mouse myocardial ischemia/reperfusion model. In vivo and ex vivo mouse myocardial ischemia/reperfusion procedures were performed. Results: Treatment with FK866 reduced myocardial infarct size, neutrophil infiltration, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation within infarcted hearts in vivo in a mouse model of ischemia and reperfusion. The benefit of FK866 was not shown in the Langendorff model (ex vivo model of working heart without circulating leukocytes), suggesting a direct involvement of these cells in cardiac injury. Sera from FK866-treated mice showed reduced circulating levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL2 and impaired capacity to prime migration of these cells in vitro. The release of CXCL8 (human homolog of murine chemokine CXCL2) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and Jurkat cells was also reduced by FK866, as well as by sirtuin (SIRT) inhibitors and SIRT6 silencing, implying a pivotal role for this NAD+-dependent deacetylase in the production of this chemokine. Innovation: The pharmacological inhibition of Nampt might represent an effective approach to reduce neutrophilic inflammation- and oxidative stress-mediated tissue damage in early phases of reperfusion after a myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Nampt inhibition appears as a new strategy to dampen CXCL2-induced neutrophil recruitment and thereby reduce neutrophil-mediated tissue injury in mice. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 630–641. PMID:22452634

  18. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of hypoxanthine metabolism in mouse oocyte-cumulus cell complexes: effects of purine metabolic perturbants.

    PubMed

    Downs, S M

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the metabolism of hypoxanthine by mouse oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. Complexes were isolated from immature mice 48 h after priming with 5 IU eCG and culture for 3 h in medium containing 14C-hypoxanthine in the absence or presence of one of three metabolic inhibitors: alanosine, mycophenolic acid, or 6-mercaptopurine. Tissue extracts from complexes were analyzed by HPLC using either a C18 reversed-phase column (for separation of purine bases and nucleosides) or an ion exchange column (for separation of nucleotides). Most of the hypoxanthine taken up by complexes was salvaged to inosine monophosphate (IMP) and then converted to nucleotides. Metabolism favored the synthesis of adenyl nucleotides over guanyl nucleotides. No evidence of metabolism to uric acid via xanthine oxidase was encountered, and metabolism to inosine via purine nucleoside phosphorylase was negligible. A similar pattern of hypoxanthine metabolism was observed in extracts of oocytes that had been denuded after the culture period. Addition of alanosine to the culture medium significantly reduced the synthesis of adenyl nucleotides in complexes and partially shunted metabolism in the direction of guanyl nucleotides. However, neither alanosine nor another inhibitor of adenylosuccinate synthetase, hadacidin, significantly influenced the meiotic arrest maintained by hypoxanthine. Mycophenolic acid eliminated conversion of IMP to guanyl nucleotides but did not appreciably affect metabolism to other nucleotides. 6-Mercaptopurine produced an increase in the hypoxanthine-containing peaks, which was consistent with suppression of purine salvage. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine is readily salvaged by the murine oocyte-cumulus cell complex and that the inhibitor-induced changes in metabolism are consistent with the presumed mechanism of action of each inhibitor. In addition, whereas metabolism favors conversion of IMP to adenyl nucleotides, synthesis of adenyl nucleotides by this route during the culture period is apparently not required for hypoxanthine-maintained meiotic arrest in vitro. PMID:8080928

  19. Urinary Hypoxanthine as a Measure of Increased ATP Utilization in Late Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Megan S.; Hopper, Andrew; Slater, Laurel; Asmerom, Yayesh; Esiaba, Ijeoma; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of neonatal morbidity on ATP breakdown in late preterm infants. Study Design Urinary hypoxanthine concentration, a marker of ATP breakdown, was measured from 82 late preterm infants on days of life (DOL) 3 to 6 using high-performance liquid chromatography. Infants were grouped according to the following diagnoses: poor nippling alone (n = 8), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (n = 21), poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (n = 26), and respiratory disease alone (n = 27). Results Neonates with respiratory disease alone had significantly higher urinary hypoxanthine over DOL 3 to 6 when compared with neonates with poor nippling (P = .020), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (P < .001), and poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (P = .017). Neonates with poor nippling who received respiratory support for 2 to 3 days had significantly higher hypoxanthine compared with infants who received respiratory support for 1 day (P = .017) or no days (P = .007). Conclusions These findings suggest that respiratory disorders significantly increase ATP degradation in late premature infants. PMID:26413195

  20. Kinetic mechanism of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase: implications for energy coupling.

    PubMed

    Gross, J W; Rajavel, M; Grubmeyer, C

    1998-03-24

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase; EC 2.4.2.11) is a facultative ATPase that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive the synthesis of nicotinate mononucleotide and pyrophosphate from nicotinic acid (NA) and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP). To learn how NAPRTase uses this hydrolytic energy, we have further delineated the kinetic mechanism using steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding, and isotope trapping. NAPRTase undergoes covalent phosphorylation by bound ATP at a rate of 30 s-1. The phosphoenzyme (E-P) binds PRPP with a KD of 0.6 microM, a value 2000-fold lower than that measured for the nonphosphorylated enzyme. The minimal rate constant for PRPP binding to E-P is 0.72 x 10(5) M-1 s-1. Isotope trapping shows that greater than 90% of bound PRPP partitions toward product upon addition of NA. Binding of NA to E-P.PRPP is rapid, kon >/= 7.0 x 10(6) M-1 s-1, and is followed by rapid formation of NAMN and PPi, k >/= 500 s-1. After product formation, E-P undergoes hydrolytic cleavage, k = 6.3 s-1, and products NAMN, PPi, and Pi are released. Quenching from the steady state under Vmax conditions indicates that slightly less than half the enzyme is in phosphorylated forms. To account for this finding, we propose that one step in the release of products is as slow as 5.2 s-1 and, together with the E-P cleavage step, codetermines the overall kcat of 2.3 s-1 at 22 degrees C. Energy coupling by NAPRTase involves two strategies frequently proposed for ATPases of macromolecular recognition and processing. First, E-P has a 10(3)-fold higher affinity for substrates than does nonphosphorylated enzyme, allowing the E-P to bind substrate from low concentration and nonphosphorylated enzyme to expel products against a high concentration. Second, the kinetic pathway follows "rules" [Jencks, W. P. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 18855-18858] that minimize unproductive alternative reaction pathways. However, an analysis of reaction schemes based on these strategies suggests that such nonvectorial reactions are intrinsically inefficient in ATP use. PMID:9521741

  1. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase/Visfatin Does Not Catalyze Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Formation in Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Nobumasa; Yamada, Kazuo; Shibata, Tomoko; Osago, Harumi; Tsuchiya, Mikako

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide (Nam) phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD synthesis, catalyzing nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) formation from Nam and 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). NAMPT has also been described as an adipocytokine visfatin with a variety of actions, although physiological significance of this protein remains unclear. It has been proposed that possible actions of visfatin are mediated through the extracellular formation of NMN. However, we did not detect NMN in mouse blood plasma, even with a highly specific and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Furthermore, there is no or little ATP, the activator of NAMPT, in extracellular spaces. We thus questioned whether visfatin catalyzes the in situ formation of NMN under such extracellular milieus. To address this question, we here determined Km values for the substrates Nam and PRPP in the NAMPT reaction without or with ATP using a recombinant human enzyme and found that 1 mM ATP dramatically decreases Km values for the substrates, in particular PRPP to its intracellular concentration. Consistent with the kinetic data, only when ATP is present at millimolar levels, NAMPT efficiently catalyzed the NMN formation at the intracellular concentrations of the substrates. Much lower concentrations of Nam and almost the absence of PRPP and ATP in the blood plasma suggest that NAMPT should not efficiently catalyze its reaction under the extracellular milieu. Indeed, NAMPT did not form NMN in the blood plasma. From these kinetic analyses of the enzyme and quantitative determination of its substrates, activator, and product, we conclude that visfatin does not participate in NMN formation under the extracellular milieus. Together with the absence of NMN in the blood plasma, our conclusion does not support the concept of “NAMPT-mediated systemic NAD biosynthesis.” Our study would advance current understanding of visfatin physiology. PMID:21826208

  2. Ground-State Destabilization in Orotate Phosphoribosyltransferases by Binding Isotope Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Schramm, Vern L.

    2011-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTs) form and break the N-ribosidic bond to pyrimidines by way of ribocation-like transition states (TSs) and therefore exhibit large α-secondary [1′-3H] kcat/Km kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). Substrate binding isotope effects (BIEs) with OPRTs report on the degree of ground state destabilization for these complexes and permit resolution of binding and transition state effects from the kcat/Km KIEs. The BIEs for [1′-3H]orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) interactions with the catalytic sites of Plasmodium falciparum and human OPRTs are 1.104 and 1.108, respectively. These large BIEs establish altered sp3 bond hybridization of C1′ toward the sp2 geometry of the transition states upon OMP binding. Thus, the complexes of these OPRTs distort OMP part of the way toward the transition state. As the [1′-3H]OMP kcat/Km KIEs are approximately 1.20, half of the intrinsic kcat/Km KIEs originate from BIEs. Orotidine, a slow substrate for these enzymes, binds to the catalytic site with no significant [1′ 3H]orotidine BIEs. Thus, OPRTs are unable to initiate ground-state destabilization of orotidine by altered C1′ hybridization because of the missing 5′-phosphate. However the kcat/Km KIEs for [1′-3H]orotidine are also approximately 1.20. The C1′-distortion for OMP happens in two steps, half upon binding and half on going from the Michaelis complex to the TS. With orotidine as substrate, there is no ground-state destabilization in the Michaelis complexes, but the C1′-distortion at the TS is equal to that of OMP. The large single barrier for TS formation with orotidine slows the rate of barrier crossing. PMID:21526795

  3. Thirdhand smoke causes DNA damage in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to thirdhand smoke (THS) is a newly described health risk. Evidence supports its widespread presence in indoor environments. However, its genotoxic potential, a critical aspect in risk assessment, is virtually untested. An important characteristic of THS is its ability to undergo chemical transformations during aging periods, as demonstrated in a recent study showing that sorbed nicotine reacts with the indoor pollutant nitrous acid (HONO) to form tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) such as 4-(methylnitrosamino)-4-(3-pyridyl)butanal (NNA) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). The goal of this study was to assess the genotoxicity of THS in human cell lines using two in vitro assays. THS was generated in laboratory systems that simulated short (acute)- and long (chronic)-term exposures. Analysis by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry quantified TSNAs and common tobacco alkaloids in extracts of THS that had sorbed onto cellulose substrates. Exposure of human HepG2 cells to either acute or chronic THS for 24h resulted in significant increases in DNA strand breaks in the alkaline Comet assay. Cell cultures exposed to NNA alone showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage in the same assay. NNA is absent in freshly emitted secondhand smoke, but it is the main TSNA formed in THS when nicotine reacts with HONO long after smoking takes place. The long amplicon–quantitative PCR assay quantified significantly higher levels of oxidative DNA damage in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT) and polymerase β (POLB) genes of cultured human cells exposed to chronic THS for 24h compared with untreated cells, suggesting that THS exposure is related to increased oxidative stress and could be an important contributing factor in THS-mediated toxicity. The findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that exposure to THS is genotoxic in human cell lines. PMID:23462851

  4. Transfer of cloned human class I major histocompatibility complex genes into HLA mutant human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y; Koller, B; Geraghty, D; Orr, H; Shaw, S; Kavathas, P; DeMars, R

    1986-01-01

    Three new kinds of recombinant DNA constructs were used to transfer cloned human class I HLA genes (A2 and B8) into unique HLA mutant lymphoblastoid cells: pHeBo(x): a class I gene, "x," in plasmid vector pHeBo, which contains a hygromycin resistance gene and Epstein-Barr virus oriP element that sustains extrachromosomal replication; pHPT(x): gene x in a vector with a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene; pHPTe(x): gene x in a vector with the HPRT gene and oriP element. Cell surface class I antigen expression was strong in transferents made with class I-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line mutants .144 (A-null), .53 (B-null), and .184 (A-null, B-null). Transferents expressing HLA-A2 were recognized specifically by HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. When introduced on either of the vectors with the Epstein-Barr virus oriP element, the class I gene replicated extrachromosomally and was lost at rates of 0.2 to 0.3 per cell division. When introduced with vector pHPT (lacking Epstein-Barr virus oriP), the B8 gene was inserted at different chromosomal locations. Introduction of the HLA-B8 gene failed to restore antigen expression by HLA-B-null mutant .174, providing evidence that, unlike mutants exemplified by .53, .144, and .184, some HLA antigen loss mutants are deficient in a trans-acting function needed for class I antigen expression. Of more general interest, the results obtained with HLA class I genes in vectors that replicate extrachromosomally suggest ways of relating genic expression to chromatin structure and function and of attempting to clone functional human centromeres. Images PMID:3023867

  5. The Small Molecule GMX1778 Is a Potent Inhibitor of NAD+ Biosynthesis: Strategy for Enhanced Therapy in Nicotinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase 1-Deficient Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Mark; Roulston, Anne; Bélec, Laurent; Billot, Xavier; Marcellus, Richard; Bédard, Dominique; Bernier, Cynthia; Branchaud, Stéphane; Chan, Helen; Dairi, Kenza; Gilbert, Karine; Goulet, Daniel; Gratton, Michel-Olivier; Isakau, Henady; Jang, Anne; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Koch, Elizabeth; Lavoie, Manon; Lawless, Michael; Nguyen, Mai; Paquette, Denis; Turcotte, Émilie; Berger, Alvin; Mitchell, Matthew; Shore, Gordon C.; Beauparlant, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    GMX1777 is a prodrug of the small molecule GMX1778, currently in phase I clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. We describe findings indicating that GMX1778 is a potent and specific inhibitor of the NAD+ biosynthesis enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). Cancer cells have a very high rate of NAD+ turnover, which makes NAD+ modulation an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Selective inhibition by GMX1778 of NAMPT blocks the production of NAD+ and results in tumor cell death. Furthermore, GMX1778 is phosphoribosylated by NAMPT, which increases its cellular retention. The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 can be bypassed with exogenous nicotinic acid (NA), which permits NAD+ repletion via NA phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (NAPRT1). The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 in cells with NAPRT1 deficiency, however, cannot be rescued by NA. Analyses of NAPRT1 mRNA and protein levels in cell lines and primary tumor tissue indicate that high frequencies of glioblastomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas are deficient in NAPRT1 and not susceptible to rescue with NA. As a result, the therapeutic index of GMX1777 can be widended in the treatment animals bearing NAPRT1-deficient tumors by coadministration with NA. This provides the rationale for a novel therapeutic approach for the use of GMX1777 in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:19703994

  6. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  7. Mutagenesis in human cells with accelerated H and Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy

    1994-01-01

    The overall goals of this research were to determine the risks of mutation induction and the spectra of mutations induced by energetic protons and iron ions at two loci in human lymphoid cells. During the three year grant period the research has focused in three major areas: (1) the acquisition of sufficient statistics for human TK6 cell mutation experiments using Fe ions (400 MeV/amu), Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and protons (250 MeV/amu); (2) collection of thymidine kinase- deficient (tk) mutants or hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient (hprt) mutants induced by either Fe 400 MeV/amu, Fe 600 MeV/amu, or H 250 MeV/amu for subsequent molecular analysis; and (3) molecular characterization of mutants isolated after exposure to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu). As a result of the shutdown of the BEVALAC heavy ion accelerator in December 1992, efforts were rearranged somewhat in time to complete our dose-response studies and to complete mutant collections in particular for the Fe ion beams prior to the shutdown. These goals have been achieved. A major effort was placed on collection, re-screening, and archiving of 3 different series of mutants for the various particle beam exposures: tk-ng mutants, tk-sg mutants, and hprt-deficient mutants. Where possible, groups of mutants were isolated for several particle fluences. Comparative analysis of mutation spectra has occured with characterization of the mutation spectrum for hprt-deficient mutants obtained after exposure of TK6 cells to Fe ions (600 MeV/amu) and a series of spontaneous mutants.

  8. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, Leads to Altered Carbohydrate Metabolism in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bo; Dong, Sucai; Shepard, Robert L; Kays, Lisa; Roth, Kenneth D; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Zhao, Genshi

    2015-06-19

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has been extensively studied due to its essential role in NAD(+) biosynthesis in cancer cells and the prospect of developing novel therapeutics. To understand how NAMPT regulates cellular metabolism, we have shown that the treatment with FK866, a specific NAMPT inhibitor, leads to attenuation of glycolysis by blocking the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step (Tan, B., Young, D. A., Lu, Z. H., Wang, T., Meier, T. I., Shepard, R. L., Roth, K., Zhai, Y., Huss, K., Kuo, M. S., Gillig, J., Parthasarathy, S., Burkholder, T. P., Smith, M. C., Geeganage, S., and Zhao, G. (2013) Pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an enzyme essential for NAD(+) biosynthesis, in human cancer cells: metabolic basis and potential clinical implications. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 3500-3511). Due to technical limitations, we failed to separate isotopomers of phosphorylated sugars. In this study, we developed an enabling LC-MS methodology. Using this, we confirmed the previous findings and also showed that NAMPT inhibition led to accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate but not glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and sedoheptulose 7-phosphate as previously thought. To investigate the metabolic basis of the metabolite formation, we carried out biochemical and cellular studies and established the following. First, glucose-labeling studies indicated that fructose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde, and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and erythrose via an aldolase reaction. Second, biochemical studies showed that aldolase indeed catalyzed these reactions. Third, glyceraldehyde- and erythrose-labeling studies showed increased incorporation of corresponding labels into fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate in FK866-treated cells. Fourth, NAMPT inhibition led to increased glyceraldehyde and erythrose levels in the cell. Finally, glucose-labeling studies showed accumulated fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in FK866-treated cells mainly derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Taken together, this study shows that NAMPT inhibition leads to attenuation of glycolysis, resulting in further perturbation of carbohydrate metabolism in cancer cells. The potential clinical implications of these findings are also discussed. PMID:25944913

  9. Dynamic architecture of the purinosome involved in human de novo purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kyoung, Minjoung; Russell, Sarah J; Kohnhorst, Casey L; Esemoto, Nopondo N; An, Songon

    2015-01-27

    Enzymes in human de novo purine biosynthesis have been demonstrated to form a reversible, transient multienzyme complex, the purinosome, upon purine starvation. However, characterization of purinosomes has been limited to HeLa cells and has heavily relied on qualitative examination of their subcellular localization and reversibility under wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative approaches, which are particularly compatible with human disease-relevant cell lines, are necessary to explicitly understand the purinosome in live cells. In this work, human breast carcinoma Hs578T cells have been utilized to demonstrate the preferential utilization of the purinosome under purine-depleted conditions. In addition, we have employed a confocal microscopy-based biophysical technique, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, to characterize kinetic properties of the purinosome in live Hs578T cells. Quantitative characterization of the diffusion coefficients of all de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes reveals the significant reduction of their mobile kinetics upon purinosome formation, the dynamic partitioning of each enzyme into the purinosome, and the existence of three intermediate species in purinosome assembly under purine starvation. We also demonstrate that the diffusion coefficient of the purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1, is not sensitive to purine starvation, indicating exclusion of the salvage pathway from the purinosome. Furthermore, our biophysical characterization of nonmetabolic enzymes clarifies that purinosomes are spatiotemporally different cellular bodies from stress granules and cytoplasmic protein aggregates in both Hs578T and HeLa cells. Collectively, quantitative analyses of the purinosome in Hs578T cells led us to provide novel insights for the dynamic architecture of the purinosome assembly. PMID:25540829

  10. Gold(I)-triphenylphosphine complexes with hypoxanthine-derived ligands: in vitro evaluations of anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    K?ikavov, Radka; Hoek, Jan; Van?o, Jn; Hutyra, Jakub; Dvo?k, Zden?k; Trvn?ek, Zden?k

    2014-01-01

    A series of gold(I) complexes involving triphenylphosphine (PPh3) and one N-donor ligand derived from deprotonated mono- or disubstituted hypoxanthine (HLn) of the general composition [Au(Ln)(PPh3)] (1-9) is reported. The complexes were thoroughly characterized, including multinuclear high resolution NMR spectroscopy as well as single crystal X-ray analysis (for complexes 1 and 3). The complexes were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines MCF7 (breast carcinoma), HOS (osteosarcoma) and THP-1 (monocytic leukaemia), which identified the complexes 4-6 as the most promising representatives, who antiproliferative activity was further tested against A549 (lung adenocarcinoma), G-361 (melanoma), HeLa (cervical cancer), A2780 (ovarian carcinoma), A2780R (ovarian carcinoma resistant to cisplatin), 22Rv1 (prostate cancer) cell lines. Complexes 4-6 showed a significantly higher in vitro anticancer effect against the employed cancer cells, except for G-361, as compared with the commercially used anticancer drug cisplatin, with IC50 ? 1-30 M. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in vitro by the assessment of the ability of the complexes to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?), in the lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage-like THP-1 cell model. The results of this study identified the complexes as auspicious anti-inflammatory agents with similar or better activity as compared with the clinically applied gold-based antiarthritic drug Auranofin. In an effort to explore the possible mechanisms responsible for the biological effect, the products of interactions of selected complexes with sulfur-containing biomolecules (L-cysteine and reduced glutathione) were studied by means of the mass-spectrometry study. PMID:25226034

  11. UV Radiation Induces Delayed Hyperrecombination Associated with Hypermutation in Human Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Stephen T.; Paffett, Kimberly S.; Shrivastav, Meena; Timmins, Graham S.; Morgan, William F.; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed genomic instability in human cells, including chromosomal abnormalities and hyperrecombination. Here, we investigate delayed genome instability of cells exposed to UV radiation. We examined homologous recombination-mediated reactivation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in p53-proficient human cells. We observed an ∼5-fold enhancement of delayed hyperrecombination (DHR) among cells surviving a low dose of UV-C (5 J/m2), revealed as mixed GFP+/− colonies. UV-B did not induce DHR at an equitoxic (75 J/m2) dose or a higher dose (150 J/m2). UV is known to induce delayed hypermutation associated with increased oxidative stress. We found that hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) mutation frequencies were ∼5-fold higher in strains derived from GFP+/− (DHR) colonies than in strains in which recombination was directly induced by UV (GFP+ colonies). To determine whether hypermutation was directly caused by hyperrecombination, we analyzed hprt mutation spectra. Large-scale alterations reflecting large deletions and insertions were observed in 25% of GFP+ strains, and most mutants had a single change in HPRT. In striking contrast, all mutations arising in the hypermutable GFP+/− strains were small (1- to 2-base) changes, including substitutions, deletions, and insertions (reminiscent of mutagenesis from oxidative damage), and the majority were compound, with an average of four hprt mutations per mutant. The absence of large hprt deletions in DHR strains indicates that DHR does not cause hypermutation. We propose that UV-induced DHR and hypermutation result from a common source, namely, increased oxidative stress. These two forms of delayed genome instability may collaborate in skin cancer initiation and progression. PMID:16880516

  12. In vitro mutational spectrum of cyclopenta[cd]pyrene in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, P; Melacrinos, A; Shukla, R

    1995-04-01

    Cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) is a widely distributed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with potent mutagenic and carcinogenic activity. In order to acquire an understanding of the mutagenic pathways of CPP, we studied mutations induced by this chemical in human cells. Four independent cultures of a human cell line expressing cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 (cell line MCL-5) were treated with CPP, and mutants at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus were selected en masse by 6-thioguanine (6TG) resistance. The kinds and positions of the mutations were analyzed using the combination of high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (hifi-PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The third exon of the HPRT gene was amplified from the 6TG-resistant cells using the hifi-PCR and the amplified fragment was subsequently analyzed by DGGE to separate mutant sequences from the wild-type sequence. Mutant bands were excised from the gel, amplified using PCR and sequenced. Sixteen different mutations were identified and consisted mostly of the G to T and A to T transversions. Other mutations identified included G to A and A to G transitions, a G to C transversion, and a single G deletion. Of these mutations, six occurred within a run of six guanines. The predominance of transversions involving a guanine or an adenine observed with CPP is similar to the data previously reported for the racemic mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), suggesting that the mechanisms of mutation induced by CPP may be similar to those induced by B[a]P. PMID:7728967

  13. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Christoffersen, Stig; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Mølgaard, Anne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-04-14

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic, and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) or the inhibitor adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its evolutionary origin in this family of PRTases. Only the N-terminal two-thirds of the polypeptide chain folds as a traditional type I PRTase with a five-stranded β-sheet surrounded by helices. The C-terminal third adopts an unusual three-helix bundle structure that together with the nucleobase-binding loop undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor ADP binds like the product AMP with both the α- and β-phosphates occupying the 5'-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide pH range, and the kinetic and ligand binding properties depend on both pH and the presence/absence of phosphate in the buffers. A slow hydrolysis of PRPP to ribose 5-phosphate and pyrophosphate, catalyzed by the enzyme, may be facilitated by elements in the C-terminal three-helix bundle part of the protein. PMID:25790177

  14. Inhibition of histidyl-tRNA-adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase complex formation by histidine and by guanosine tetraphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, J E; Parsons, S M

    1977-01-01

    Formation of the complex between the first enzyme of histidine biosynthesis from Salmonella typhimurium, ATP phosphoribosyltransferase [1-(5'-phosphoribosyl)-ATP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase; EC 2.4.2.17], and histidyl-tRNA is shown to be inhibited by L-histidine and by guanosine-5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate in the presence of histidine. Higher histodine levels make guanosine tetraphosphate a more effective inhibitor. Relatively high concentrations of guanosine-5'-triphosphate also inhibit complex formation, but this inhibition is not enhanced by histidine. The possible implications of these observations with respect to the gene regulatory activity of this enzyme are discussed. PMID:323857

  15. In silico analysis of the amido phosphoribosyltransferase inhibition by PY873, PY899 and a derivative of isophthalic acid.

    PubMed

    Batool, Sidra; Nawaz, Muhammad Sulaman; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2013-10-01

    Selectively decreasing the availability of precursors for the de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides is a valid approach towards seeking a cure for leukaemia. Nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are required by living cells for syntheses of RNA, DNA, and cofactors such as NADP(+), FAD(+), coenzyme A and ATP. Nucleotides contain purine and pyrimidine bases, which can be synthesized through salvage pathway as well. Amido phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), also known as glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase (GPAT), is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PPAT (phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase) gene. APRT catalyzes the first committed step of the de novo pathway using its substrate, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP). As APRT is inhibited by many folate analogues, therefore, in this study we focused on the inhibitory effects of three folate analogues on APRT activity. This is extension of our previous wet lab work to analyze and dissect molecular interaction and inhibition mechanism using molecular modeling and docking tools in the current study. Comparative molecular docking studies were carried out for three diamino folate derivatives employing a model of the human enzyme that was built using the 3D structure of Bacillus subtilis APRT (PDB ID; 1GPH) as the template. Binding orientation of interactome indicates that all compounds having nominal cluster RMSD in same active site's deep narrow polar fissure. On the basis of comparative conformational analysis, electrostatic interaction, binding free energy and binding orientation of interactome, we support the possibility that these molecules could behave as APRT inhibitors and therefore may block purine de novo biosynthesis. Consequently, we suggest that PY899 is the most active biological compound that would be a more potent inhibitor for APRT inhibition than PY873 and DIA, which also confirms previous wet lab report. PMID:23483322

  16. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  17. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  18. Determination of Xanthine in the Presence of Hypoxanthine by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Percio Augusto Mardini; Castro, Arnaldo Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    A stripping method for the determination of xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine at the submicromolar concentration levels is described. The method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation at the thin-film mercury electrode followed by a fast linear scan voltammetric measurement of the surface species. Optimum experimental conditions were found to be the use of 1.0 × 10−3 mol L−1 NaOH solution as supporting electrolyte, an accumulation potential of 0.00 V for xanthine and −0.50 V for hypoxanthine–copper, and a linear scan rate of 200 mV second−1. The response of xanthine is linear over the concentration ranges of 20–140 ppb. For an accumulation time of 30 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 36 ppt (2.3 × 10−10 mol L−1). Adequate conditions for measuring the xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine, copper and other metals, uric acid, and other nitrogenated bases were also investigated. The utility of the method is demonstrated by the presence of xanthine associated with hypoxanthine, uric acid, nitrogenated bases, ATP, and ssDNA. PMID:24940040

  19. Estimation of time since death by vitreous humor hypoxanthine, potassium, and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rognum, T O; Holmen, S; Musse, M A; Dahlberg, P S; Stray-Pedersen, A; Saugstad, O D; Opdal, S H

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of vitreous humor potassium (K(+)) has since the 1960s been recognized as an adjunct for estimation of time since death. In 1991 we introduced hypoxanthine (Hx) as a new marker. Furthermore we demonstrated that time since death estimation was more accurate when ambient temperature was included in the calculations, both for K(+) and for Hx. In this paper we present a refined method. The subjects consist of 132 cases with known time of death and ambient temperature. One sample from each subject was used in the calculations. Vitreous humor Hx levels were available in all subjects, while K(+) was measured in 106 of the subjects, due to insufficient volume of vitreous humor. Linear regression analysis was applied to model the correlation between vitreous humor Hx and K(+), taking the interactions with temperature into consideration. The diagrams published in 1991, which also included ambient temperature, estimated median time since death with range between the 10th and 90th percentile, whereas the linear regression analysis presented in this paper estimates mean time since death with a corresponding 95% interval of confidence. We conclude that time since death may be estimated with relatively high precision applying vitreous humor Hx and K(+) concentrations combined with ambient temperature. PMID:26994446

  20. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions. PMID:25945715

  1. Limited proteolysis of Salmonella typhimurium nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase reveals ATP-linked conformational change.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, M; Gross, J; Segura, E; Moore, W T; Grubmeyer, C

    1996-04-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase;EC 2.4.2.11) couples stoichiometric ATP hydrolysis with formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN) from nicotinic acid and alpha-D-5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). Trypsin rapidly inactivated the ATPase and NAMN synthesis activities of NAPRTase in parallel, with cleavages at Arg-384 and Lys-374 of the 399-residue protein. ATP and PRPP each provided protection against tryptic cleavage. Limited chymotryptic proteolysis of NAPRTase exhibited very similar behavior, with specific cleavage at Phe-382 and protection by substrates. Results suggest that a solvent-exposed loop encompassing Lys-374, Phe-382, and Arg-384 is protected by ATP- or PRPP-induced conformational changes. The ability of ATP to protect even under conditions in which enzyme phosphorylation was prevented by EDTA provides evidence for a distinct ATP-induced protein conformation that acts as an intermediate in energy coupling. PMID:8672421

  2. An ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of xanthine, hypoxanthine and uric acid based on Co doped CeO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lavanya, N; Sekar, C; Murugan, R; Ravi, G

    2016-08-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor has been fabricated using Co doped CeO2 nanoparticles for selective and simultaneous determination of xanthine (XA), hypoxanthine (HXA) and uric acid (UA) in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH5.0) for the first time. The Co-CeO2 NPs have been prepared by microwave irradiation method and characterized by Powder XRD, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM and VSM measurements. The electrochemical behaviours of XA, HXA and UA at the Co-CeO2 NPs modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry methods. The modified electrode exhibited remarkably well-separated anodic peaks corresponding to the oxidation of XA, HXA and UA over the concentration range of 0.1-1000, 1-600 and 1-2200μM with detection limits of 0.096, 0.36, and 0.12μM (S/N=3), respectively. For simultaneous detection by synchronous change of the concentrations of XA, HXA and UA, the linear responses were in the range of 1-400μM each with the detection limits of 0.47, 0.26, and 0.43μM (S/N=3), respectively. The fabricated sensor was further applied to the detection of XA, HXA and UA in human urine samples with good selectivity and high reproducibility. PMID:27157753

  3. A mycobacterial phosphoribosyltransferase promotes bacillary survival by inhibiting oxidative stress and autophagy pathways in macrophages and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Roy, Debasish; Alaridah, Nader; Saha, Pratip; Nongthomba, Upendra; Godaly, Gabriela; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sonawane, Avinash

    2015-05-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various strategies to modulate host immune responses to facilitate its persistence in macrophages. The M. tuberculosis cell wall contains numerous glycoproteins with unknown roles in pathogenesis. Here, by using Concanavalin A and LC-MS analysis, we identified a novel mannosylated glycoprotein phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by Rv3242c from M. tuberculosis cell walls. Homology modeling, bioinformatic analyses, and an assay of phosphoribosyltransferase activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing recombinant Rv3242c (MsmRv3242c) confirmed the mass spectrometry data. Using Mycobacterium marinum-zebrafish and the surrogate MsmRv3242c infection models, we proved that phosphoribosyltransferase is involved in mycobacterial virulence. Histological and infection assays showed that the M. marinum mimG mutant, an Rv3242c orthologue in a pathogenic M. marinum strain, was strongly attenuated in adult zebrafish and also survived less in macrophages. In contrast, infection with wild type and the complemented ΔmimG:Rv3242c M. marinum strains showed prominent pathological features, such as severe emaciation, skin lesions, hemorrhaging, and more zebrafish death. Similarly, recombinant MsmRv3242c bacteria showed increased invasion in non-phagocytic epithelial cells and longer intracellular survival in macrophages as compared with wild type and vector control M. smegmatis strains. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the Rv3242c- and mimG-mediated enhancement of intramacrophagic survival was due to inhibition of autophagy, reactive oxygen species, and reduced activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes. Infection with MsmRv3242c also activated the MAPK pathway, NF-κB, and inflammatory cytokines. In summary, we show that a novel mycobacterial mannosylated phosphoribosyltransferase acts as a virulence and immunomodulatory factor, suggesting that it may constitute a novel target for antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25825498

  4. Highly sensitive electrocatalytic biosensing of hypoxanthine based on functionalization of graphene sheets with water-soluble conducting graft copolymer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lei, Jianping; Pan, Rong; Xue, Yadong; Ju, Huangxian

    2010-10-15

    A novel electrocatalytic biosensing platform was designed by the functionalization of reduced graphene oxide sheets (RGO) with conducting polypyrrole graft copolymer, poly(styrenesulfonic acid-g-pyrrole) (PSSA-g-PPY), via π-π noncovalent interaction. The resulting nanocomposite could well disperse in water for at least 2 months with a solubility of 3.0 mg mL(-1). The nanocomposite was characterized with atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption, contact angle measurement, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Based on the advantageous functions of PSSA-g-PPY and RGO, the functional nanocomposite modified platinum electrode showed high electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide and uric acid in neutral media. Further, a hypoxanthine biosensor was constructed by combining the modified electrode with the enzymatic reaction of xanthine oxidase. The biosensor exhibited a wide linear response ranging from 3.0×10(-8) to 2.8×10(-5) M with a high sensitivity of 673±4 μA M(-1) cm(-2). The detection limit of 10nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was one order of magnitude lower than that reported previously. The assay results of hypoxanthine in fish samples were in a good agreement with the reference values. The water-soluble conducting copolymer could serve as an efficient species for functionalization and solubilization of graphene sheets in biosensing and biocatalytic applications. PMID:20729055

  5. Diagnosis of heterozygous states for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency based on detection of in vivo somatic mutants in blood T cells: application to screening of heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Hakoda, M; Yamanaka, H; Kamatani, N; Kamatani, N

    1991-01-01

    An accurate diagnosis of heterozygotes for autosomal recessive disorders with unknown mutations can be difficult. Using a unique phenomenon occurring in vivo, we designed a method for the diagnosis of heterozygotes for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency which makes way for a qualitative distinction between normal and heterozygous subjects. We cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells with 2,6-diaminopurine, an APRT-dependent cytotoxin, to search for in vivo mutational cells. Fifteen putative heterozygotes examined were found to possess such mutant cells at rather high frequencies; thus, a false negative diagnosis is unlikely. The analysis of genomic DNA in 82 resistant clones from two of the heterozygotes clarified that 64 (78%) had lost the germinally intact alleles. Thirteen members of APRT-deficient families were examined; eight proved to be heterozygotes. Among 425 individuals from two separate residential areas of Japan, two heterozygotes were found. The authenticity of the heterozygosity was validated by two separate methods for the two heterozygotes; hence, a false positive diagnosis can be ruled out. Our data showed a calculated heterozygote frequency of 0.47% (95% confidence limits; 0.05%-1.7%), a value compatible with that (1.2%) calculated from data concerning the incidence of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine urolithiasis. This novel genetic approach for identifying heterozygotes is now being tested to search for other enzyme deficiencies in humans. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1998341

  6. Increasing NAD Synthesis in Muscle via Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Is Not Sufficient to Promote Oxidative Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, David W.; Davis, James G.; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  7. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification studies of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRTase) from Baker's yeast catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate from phosphoribosyl {alpha}-1-pyrophosphate and nicotinate, concomitant with ATP hydrolysis. Using purified NaPRTase, initial velocity measurements were performed varying one substrate concentration at different fixed levels of the second substrate and maintaining the third substrate constant. Subsequently, an exchange of label was observed between ATP and ({sup 14}C)-ADP. This rate of exchange was inhibited by PRibPP and pyrophosphate. Incubations of NaPRTase with pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate followed by sodium borohydride reduction led to inactivation of the enzyme. Pyridoxal was a less effective inhibitor than pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate. The inactivation of the enzyme by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was reversible upon flow dialysis, whereas reduction of the enzyme-pyridoxal complex with sodium borohydride rendered the inhibition irreversible. The presence of ATP or PRibPP, with or with Mg{sup 2+}, provided protection against this inactivation, while a kinetic analysis revealed the inhibition to be competitive, and noncompetitive, respectively. One mole of ({sup 3}H)-pyridoxal phosphate was required to completely inactivate the enzyme, which was reduced in the presence of MgATP and MgPRibPP to 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. No incorporation of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was observed in the combination of both of the two substrates.

  8. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  9. A new paradigm for biochemical energy coupling. Salmonella typhimurium nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Vinitsky, A; Grubmeyer, C

    1993-12-01

    The pncB gene of Salmonella typhimurium was used to develop an overexpression system for nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.11), which forms nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN) and PPi from nicotinate and alpha-D-5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). NAPRTase hydrolyzes ATP in 1:1 molar stoichiometry to NAMN synthesis. Hydrolysis of ATP alters the ratio of products/substrates for the reaction nicotinate + PRPP <--> NAMN + PPi from its equilibrium value of 0.67 to a steady-state value of 1100. The energy for the maintenance of this ratio must come from ATP hydrolysis. However, in contrast to other ATP-utilizing enzymes, when all ATP is hydrolyzed the unfavorable product/substrate ratio collapses. ATP/ADP exchange results suggest that the overall reaction involves a phosphoenzyme (E-P) arising from E.ATP. Km values for nicotinate and PRPP each decreased by 200-fold when ATP was present to phosphorylate the enzyme. PPi stimulated the ATPase activity of the enzyme to Vmax values, suggesting that PPi formation during catalysis provides a trigger for cleavage of the putative E-P in the overall reaction and regenerates the low affinity form of the enzyme. A model is presented in which alternation of high and low affinity forms of NAPRTase provides a "steady-state" coupling between ATP hydrolysis and NAMN formation. PMID:7503993

  10. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. PMID:27018006

  11. Target enzyme mutations are the molecular basis for resistance towards pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) are promising cancer drugs currently in clinical trials in oncology, including APO866, CHS-828 and the CHS-828 prodrug EB1627/GMX1777, but cancer cell resistance to these drugs has not been studied in detail. Methods Here, we introduce an analogue of CHS-828 called TP201565 with increased potency in cellular assays. Further, we describe and characterize a panel of cell lines with acquired stable resistance towards several NAMPT inhibitors of 18 to 20,000 fold compared to their parental cell lines. Results We find that 4 out of 5 of the resistant sublines display mutations of NAMPT located in the vicinity of the active site or in the dimer interface of NAMPT. Furthermore, we show that these mutations are responsible for the resistance observed. All the resistant cell lines formed xenograft tumours in vivo. Also, we confirm CHS-828 and TP201565 as competitive inhibitors of NAMPT through docking studies and by NAMPT precipitation from cellular lysate by an analogue of TP201565 linked to sepharose. The NAMPT precipitation could be inhibited by addition of APO866. Conclusion We found that CHS-828 and TP201565 are competitive inhibitors of NAMPT and that acquired resistance towards NAMPT inhibitors can be expected primarily to be caused by mutations in NAMPT. PMID:21144000

  12. Cerebral Ischemia Is Exacerbated by Extracellular Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase via a Non-Enzymatic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue; Zhang, Xia-Yan; Xing, Qiong; Dong, Xu; Shi, Qiao-Juan; Huang, Peng; Lu, Yun-Bi; Wei, Er-Qing; Xia, Qiang; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Tang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (iNAMPT) in neuron has been known as a protective factor against cerebral ischemia through its enzymatic activity, but the role of central extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT) is not clear. Here we show that eNAMPT protein level was elevated in the ischemic rat brain after middle-cerebral-artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion, which can be traced to at least in part from blood circulation. Administration of recombinant NAMPT protein exacerbated MCAO-induced neuronal injury in rat brain, while exacerbated oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) induced neuronal injury only in neuron-glial mixed culture, but not in neuron culture. In the mixed culture, NAMPT protein promoted TNF-α release in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, while TNF-α neutralizing antibody protected OGD-induced, NAMPT-enhanced neuronal injury. Importantly, H247A mutant of NAMPT with essentially no enzymatic activity exerted similar effects on ischemic neuronal injury and TNF-α release as the wild type protein. Thus, eNAMPT is an injurious and inflammatory factor in cerebral ischemia and aggravates ischemic neuronal injury by triggering TNF-α release from glia cells, via a mechanism not related to NAMPT enzymatic activity. PMID:24392007

  13. [Influences of anti-allergic drugs on superoxide generation from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system or polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, T; Naito, Y; Takahashi, S; Tanigawa, T; Oyamada, H; Ueda, S; Takemura, T; Sugino, S; Kondo, M

    1989-06-01

    The influences of anti-allergic drugs on superoxide generation from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system or polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were studied by an electron spin resonance assay using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trapper. The intensity of DMPO-OOH signal generated from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system was not influenced by the presence of azelastine, ketotifen, disodium cromoglycate, mequitazine, or methylprednisolone, but it decreased in the presence of AA-673. A kinetic study showed that the second order rate constant for reaction between AA-673 and superoxide anion at pH 7.4 was 2.9 x 10(8)M-1S-1. The relative intensity of DMPO-OOH spin adduct generated from PMN stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan (OZ) significantly decreased in the presence of azelastine: from the PMN-PMA system, with 10.7 microM concentration of molar concentration causing 50% reduction of the signal intensity (IC50), while from the PMN-OZ system, with 10.5 microM concentration of IC50, and also decreased in the presence of mequitazine: from the PMN-PMA system, with 10.8 microM concentration of IC50, while from the PMN-OZ system, less than 2.0 microM concentration of IC50. These results suggest that some anti-allergic drugs may have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative actions due to scavenging superoxide radicals or due to inhibiting superoxide production. PMID:2574029

  14. Prototropic tautomerism and basic molecular principles of hypoxanthine mutagenicity: an exhaustive quantum-chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structures, relative stability order, and dipole moments of a complete family of 21 planar hypoxanthine (Hyp) prototropic molecular-zwitterionic tautomers including ylidic forms were computationally investigated at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in vacuum and in three different surrounding environments: continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ = 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interface of protein-nucleic acid interactions, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and water. The keto-N1HN7H tautomer was established to be the global minimum in vacuum and in continuum with ϵ = 4, while Hyp molecule exists as a mixture of the keto-N1HN9H and keto-N1HN7H tautomers in approximately equal amounts in DMSO and in water at T = 298.15 K. We found out that neither intramolecular tautomerization by single proton transfer in the Hyp base, nor intermolecular tautomerization by double proton transfer in the most energetically favorable Hyp·Hyp homodimer (symmetry C(2h)), stabilized by two equivalent N1H…O6 H-bonds, induces the formation of the enol tautomer (marked with an asterisk) of Hyp with cis-oriented O6H hydroxyl group relative to neighboring N1C6 bond. We first discovered a new scenario of the keto-enol tautomerization of Hyp · Hyp homodimer (C(2h)) via zwitterionic near-orthogonal transition state (TS), stabilized by N1⁺H…N1⁻ and O6⁺H…N1⁻ H-bonds, to heterodimer Hyp∗ · Hyp (C(s)), stabilized by O6H…O6 and N1H…N1 H-bonds. We first showed that Hyp∗ · Thy mispair (C(s)), stabilized by O6H…O4, N3H…N1, and C2H…O2 H-bonds, mimicking Watson-Crick base pairing, converts to the wobble Hyp · Thy base pair (C(s)), stabilized by N3H…O6 and N1H…O2 H-bonds, via high- and low-energy TSs and intermediate Hyp · Thy∗, stabilized by O4H…O6, N1H…N3, and C2H…O2 H-bonds. The most energetically favorable TS is the zwitterionic pair Hyp⁺ · Thy⁻ (C(s)), stabilized by O6⁺H…O4⁻, O6⁺H…N3⁻, N1⁺H…N3⁻, and N1⁺H…O2⁻ H-bonds. The authors expressed and substantiated the hypothesis, that the keto tautomer of Hyp is a mutagenic compound, while enol tautomer Hyp∗ does not possess mutagenic properties. The lifetime of the nonmutagenic tautomer Hyp∗ exceeds by many orders the time needed to complete a round of DNA replication in the cell. For the first time purine-purine planar H-bonded mispairs containing Hyp in the anti-orientation with respect to the sugar moiety--Hyp · Ade(syn), Hyp · Gua∗(syn), and Hyp · Gua(syn), that closely resembles the geometry of the Watson-Crick base pairs, have been suggested as the source of transversions. An influence of the surrounding environment (ϵ = 4) on the stability of studied complexes and corresponding TSs was estimated by means of the conductor-like polarizable continuum model. Electron-topological, structural, vibrational, and energetic characterictics of all conventional and nonconventional H-bonds in the investigated structures are presented. Presented data are key to understanding elementary molecular mechanisms of mutagenic action of Hyp as a product of the adenine deamination in DNA. PMID:22962845

  15. Conversion of a cosubstrate to an inhibitor: phosphorylation mutants of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, M; Lalo, D; Gross, J W; Grubmeyer, C

    1998-03-24

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase; EC 2.4.2.11) forms nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and PPi from 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and nicotinic acid (NA). The Vmax NAMN synthesis activity of the Salmonella typhimurium enzyme is stimulated about 10-fold by ATP, which, when present, is hydrolyzed to ADP and Pi in 1:1 stoichiometry with NAMN formed. The overall NAPRTase reaction involves phosphorylation of a low-affinity form of the enzyme by ATP, followed by generation of a high-affinity form of the enzyme, which then binds substrates and produces NAMN. Hydrolysis of E-P then regenerates the low-affinity form of the enzyme with subsequent release of products. Our earlier studies [Gross, J., Rajavel, M., Segura, E., and Grubmeyer, C. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 3917-3924] have shown that His-219 becomes phosphorylated in the N1 (pi) position by ATP. Here, we have mutated His-219 to glutamate and asparagine and determined the properties of the purified mutant enzymes. The mutant NAPRTases fail to carry out ATPase, autophosphorylation, or ADP/ATP exchanges seen with wild-type (WT) enzyme. The mutants do catalyze the slow formation of NAMN in the absence of ATP with rates and KM values similar to those of WT. In striking contrast to WT, NAMN formation by the mutant enzymes is competitively inhibited by ATP. Thus, the NAMN synthesis reaction may occur at a site overlapping that for ATP. Previous studies suggest that the yeast NAPRTase does not catalyze NAMN synthesis in the absence of ATP. We have cloned, overexpressed, and purified the yeast enzyme and report its kinetic properties, which are similar to those of the bacterial enzyme. PMID:9521740

  16. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor APO866 induces C6 glioblastoma cell death via autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Zhang, Lu; Shi, Qiao-Juan; Lu, Yun-Bi; Wu, Ming; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Ping

    2015-10-01

    APO866 is a potent inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and inhibits nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Our previous study showed that APO866 inhibits the proliferation of C6 glioblastoma cells, but failed to induce apoptosis. Since APO866 inhibits cellular metabolism and such metabolic stress is closely related with autophagy, thus we determined whether APO866 can induce autophagy in C6 glioblastoma cells and whether the autophagy induced by APO866 is pro-death or pro-survival. Using LC3 immunofluorescence imaging and transmission electron microscopy detection, we found that APO866 at 1-100 nM induced autophagy in C6 glioblastoma cells. APO866 at 1 nM mainly induced initial autophagic vacuoles. Whereas APO866 at 100 nM induced degrading autophagic vacuoles, as well as induced nuclei malformation and mitochondria swelling. In addition, APO866 concentration-dependently decreased the cell viability of C6 glioblastoma cells, and this effect was attenuated by autophagy inhibitors, including 3-methyladenine and LY294002. APO866 concentration-dependently decreased intracellular NAD level. Interestingly, APO866 at 1 nM slightly decreased intracellular NAD level, but dramatically increased autophagy-positive cells. The dramatical cell viability decreasing required the decreasing of intracellular NAD level to a very low threshold. Thus, our results indicated that APO866 induced pro-death autophagy in C6 glioblastoma cells by decreasing intracellular NAD, and low concentration of APO866 can be used as an autophagy inducer in autophagic-death sensitive glioblastoma. PMID:26601421

  17. Cloning and nucleic acid sequence of the Salmonella typhimurium pncB gene and structure of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Vinitsky, A; Teng, H; Grubmeyer, C T

    1991-01-01

    The pncB gene of Salmonella typhimurium, encoding nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase), was cloned on a 4.7-kb Sau3A fragment. The gene contains a 1,200-bp open reading frame coding for a 400-residue protein. Amino acid sequencing of the amino-terminal and two interior peptides of the purified protein confirmed the deduced sequence and revealed that the amino-terminal methionine residue was removed, giving a 399-residue mature protein of Mr 45,512. No signal sequence was observed in the predicted NAPRTase primary structure, suggesting that the enzyme is not periplasmic. The protein does not demonstrate clear sequence similarity to the other seven phosphoribosyltransferases of known primary structure and frustrates attempts to define a consensus 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate-binding region. The NAPRTase reaction is ATP stimulated, and the protein contains a carboxy-terminal sequence diagnostic of an ATP-binding site. An inverted repeat of the sequence TAAACAA observed in the proposed promoter region of pncB is also present in the promoter of nadA, which, like pncB, is also regulated by the NadR (NadI) repressor. The sequence may thus define an NadR repressor-binding site. PMID:1987148

  18. Cyto- and genotoxicity of ultrafine TiO2 particles in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing J; Sanderson, Barbara J S; Wang, He

    2007-04-01

    Titanium dioxide is frequently used in the production of paints, paper, plastics, welding rod-coating material, and cosmetics, because of its low toxicity. However, recent studies have shown that nano-sized or ultrafine TiO(2) (UF-TiO(2)) (<100 nm in diameter) can generate pulmonary fibrosis and lung tumor in rats. Cytotoxicity induced by UF-TiO(2) in rat lung alveolar macrophages was also observed. This generates great concern about the possible adverse effects of UF-TiO(2) for humans. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of UF-TiO(2) were investigated using the methyl tetrazolium cytotoxicity (MTT) assay, the population growth assay, the apoptosis assay by flow cytometry, the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, the comet assay, and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation assay. WIL2-NS cells were incubated for 6, 24 and 48 h with 0, 26, 65 and 130 microg/ml UF-TiO(2). Significant decreases in viability were seen in the MTT assay at higher doses; for example, 61, 7 and 2% relative viability at 130 microg/ml for 6, 24 and 48-h exposure (P<0.01). A dose-dependent relationship was observed, while a time-dependent relationship was seen only at the highest dose (130 microg/ml) after exposure for 24 and 48 h. Treatment with 130 microg/ml UF-TiO(2) induced approximately 2.5-fold increases in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (P<0.01). In addition, a significant reduction in the cytokinesis block proliferation index was observed by the CBMN assay (P<0.05). In the comet assay, treatment with 65 microg/ml UF-TiO(2) induced approximately 5-fold increases in olive tail moment (P<0.05). In the HPRT mutation assay, treatment with 130 microg/ml UF-TiO(2) induced approximately 2.5-fold increases in the mutation frequency (P<0.05). The results of this study indicate that UF-TiO(2) can cause genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in cultured human cells. PMID:17223607

  19. Identification of Stable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Analysis of Three-Dimensional Cultivated Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rauh, Juliane; Jacobi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The principles of tissue engineering (TE) are widely used for bone regeneration concepts. Three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of autologous human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on porous scaffolds is the basic prerequisite to generate newly formed bone tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a specific and sensitive analytical tool for the measurement of mRNA-levels in cells or tissues. For an accurate quantification of gene expression levels, stably expressed reference genes (RGs) are essential to obtain reliable results. Since the 3D environment can affect a cell's morphology, proliferation, and gene expression profile compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultivation, there is a need to identify robust RGs for the quantification of gene expression. So far, this issue has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the most stably expressed RGs for gene expression analysis of 3D-cultivated human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). For this, we analyzed the gene expression levels of n=31 RGs in 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs from six different donors compared with conventional 2D cultivation using qRT-PCR. MSCs isolated from bone marrow aspirates were cultivated on human cancellous bone cube scaffolds for 14 days. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expression of osteogenic marker genes. Expression levels of potential reference and target genes were quantified using commercially available TaqMan® assays. mRNA expression stability of RGs was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and using the algorithms of geNorm and NormFinder. Using both algorithms, we identified TATA box binding protein (TBP), transferrin receptor (p90, CD71) (TFRC), and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) as the most stably expressed RGs in 3D-cultivated BM-MSCs. Notably, genes that are routinely used as RGs, for example, beta actin (ACTB) and ribosomal protein L37a (RPL37A), were among the least stable genes. We recommend the combined use of TBP, TFRC, and HPRT1 for the accurate and robust normalization of qRT-PCR data of 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs. PMID:25000821

  20. Roles for cationic residues at the quinolinic acid binding site of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Bello, Zainab; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2010-02-23

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) forms nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN) from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). Previously determined crystal structures of QAPRTase.QA and QAPRTase.PA.PRPP complexes show positively charged residues (Arg118, Arg152, Arg175, Lys185, and His188) lining the QA binding site. To assess the roles of these residues in the Salmonella typhimurium QAPRTase reaction, they were individually mutated to alanine and the recombinant proteins overexpressed and purified from a recombineered Escherichia coli strain that lacks the QAPRTase gene. Gel filtration indicated that the mutations did not affect the dimeric aggregation state of the enzymes. Arg175 is critical for the QAPRTase reaction, and its mutation to alanine produced an inactive enzyme. The k(cat) values for R152A and K185A were reduced by 33-fold and 625-fold, and binding affinity of PRPP and QA to the enzymes decreased. R152A and K185A mutants displayed 116-fold and 83-fold increases in activity toward the normally inactive QA analogue, nicotinic acid (NA), indicating roles for these residues in defining the substrate specificity of QAPRTase. Moreover, K185A QAPRTase displayed a 300-fold higher k(cat)/K(m) for NA over the natural substrate QA. Pre-steady-state analysis of K185A with QA revealed a burst of nucleotide formation followed by a slower steady-state rate, unlike the linear kinetics of WT. Intriguingly, pre-steady-state analysis of K185A with NA produced a rapid but linear rate for NAMN formation. The result implies a critical role for Lys185 in the chemistry of the QAPRTase intermediate. Arg118 is an essential residue that reaches across the dimer interface. Mutation of Arg118 to alanine resulted in 5000-fold decrease in k(cat) value and a decrease in the binding affinity of QA and PRPP to R152A. Equimolar mixtures of R118A with inactive or virtually inactive mutants produced approximately 50% of the enzymatic activity of WT, establishing an interfacial role for Arg118 during catalysis. PMID:20047306

  1. Human hybrid hybridoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

  2. A human hybrid hybridoma.

    PubMed

    Tiebout, R F; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F; Stricker, E A; Zeijlemaker, W P

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. We have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. We fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1 kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxoid and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1 lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassays. Our results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. PMID:3119707

  3. Radioprotector WR1065 reduces radiation-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hill, C.K.; Peraino, C. ); Biserka, N. ); Wells, R.L. . Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1985-06-01

    N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR1065) protects against radiation-induced cell killing and mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells. WR1065 (4 mm) was found to be effective in protecting against radiation-induced cell lethality only if present during irradiation. No protective effect was observed if the protector was added within 5 min after irradiation or 3 h later. The effect of WR1065 on radiation-induced mutation, expressed as resistance to the cytotoxic purine analogue 6-thioguanine (HGPRT), was also investigated. This agent was effective in reducing radiation-induced mutations regardless of when it was administered. Following 10 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, the mutation frequencies observed per 10/sup 6/ survivors were 77 +- 8, 27 +- 6, 42 +- 7, and 42 +- 7 for radiation only, and WR1065 present during, immediately after, or 3 h after irradiation. These data suggest that although a segment of radiation-induced damage leading to reproductive death cannot be modulated through the postirradiation action of WR1065, processes leading to the fixation of gross genetic damage and mutation induction in surviving cells can be effectively altered and interfered with leading to a marked reduction in mutation frequency.

  4. Expression of Maternally and Embryonically Derived Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (Hprt) Activity in Mouse Eggs and Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Paul G.

    1983-01-01

    X-chromosome activity in early mouse development has been studied by a gene dosage method that involves measuring the activity level of the X-linked enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) in single eggs and embryos from XO females and from females heterozygous for In(X)1H, a paracentric inversion of the X chromosome. The HPRT activity in oocytes increased threefold over a 24-hr period beginning after ovulation. Afterward, the activity plateaued in unfertilized eggs but continued to increase for at least 66 hr in presumed OY embryos. Both before and after ovulation, the level of activity in unfertilized eggs from In(X)/X females was twice that from XO females, and the distributions of activity in eggs for both sets of females remained unimodal. Beginning with the two-cell stage, distributions of activity for embryos from In(X)/X females were trimodal, which is evidence for embryonic activity. It is proposed that activation of a maternal mRNA or proenzyme is responsible for the HPRT activity increase in oocytes and early embryos and is supplemented by dosage-dependent activity of the embryonic Hprt gene as early as the two-cell stage. PMID:6618165

  5. Localization of the gene that codes for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase on the genetic map of chromosome 8 of mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, T.B.; Borodin, P.M.; Zakiyan, S.M.

    1988-11-01

    Polymorphism of electrophoretic mobility of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) was found in Mus musculus bactrianus, a population of domestic mouse. The presence of intraspecies polymorphism allows localization of the gene that codes for this enzyme on the genetic map of the 8th chromosome. Two markers were utilized to map the Aprt gene: the plasmin esterase-1, which is coded by the gene Es-1 located at a distance of 26 morganids from the centromere; and the Robertsonian translocation Rb(8.17)1 Iem, which marks the centromere. Results of the linkage analysis showed the gene Aprt to be located on the genetic map of the 8th chromosome at a distance of 51 morganids from the centromere and 25 morganids distil of the gene Es-1. Also discussed in this work was the influence of emotional stress on the recombination process in the 8th chromosome.

  6. Cloning of a Drosophila melanogaster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase structural gene and deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D H; Edström, J E; Burnett, J B; Friedman, T B

    1987-01-01

    The Aprt locus of Drosophila melanogaster encodes the structural gene for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT). DNA cloned from microdissected salivary gland polytene chromosome region 62B7-12 was used in conjunction with chromosome walking and hybrid selection of mRNA to isolate the Aprt gene. Aprt lies at cytogenetic position 62B9 and is closely flanked by other genes of unknown function. Nucleotide sequencing shows that four APRT cDNAs have a common 5' terminus with an apparent cap consensus sequence but two different 3' sites of polyadenylation. The distribution of conserved amino acid sequences in APRT from vertebrates, insects and bacteria suggests that they may have shared a common ancestral gene for this ubiquitous enzyme. PMID:3125085

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase from porcine kidney in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Tae Gyun; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase) is a key enzyme in NAD biosynthesis; it catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN) from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. In order to elucidate the mechanism of NAMN biosynthesis, crystals of Sus scrofa QAPRTase (Ss-­QAPRTase) purified from porcine kidney in complex with NAMN were obtained and diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. The Ss-QAPRTase–NAMN cocrystals belonged to space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = 119.1, b = 119.1, c = 93.7 Å, γ = 120.0°. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were estimated as 3.10 Å3 Da–1 and 60.3%, respectively, assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:23192029

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase from porcine kidney in complex with nicotinate mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Kang, Gil Bu; Kim, Tae Gyun; An, Jun Yop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lee, Youngjin; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2012-12-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase) is a key enzyme in NAD biosynthesis; it catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NAMN) from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. In order to elucidate the mechanism of NAMN biosynthesis, crystals of Sus scrofa QAPRTase (Ss-QAPRTase) purified from porcine kidney in complex with NAMN were obtained and diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.1 Å resolution. The Ss-QAPRTase-NAMN cocrystals belonged to space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a=119.1, b=119.1, c=93.7 Å, γ=120.0°. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were estimated as 3.10 Å3 Da(-1) and 60.3%, respectively, assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:23192029

  9. A highly sensitive and automated method for the determination of hypoxanthine based on lab-on-valve approach using Fe3O4/MWCNTs/β-CD modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Lu; Tian, Tian; Yao, Guojun; Hu, Xiaoya; Yang, Chun; Xu, Qin

    2012-09-15

    A Fe(3)O(4)/multiwall carbon nanotubes/β-cyclodextrin (Fe(3)O(4)/MWCNTs/β-CD) modified electrode, for highly sensitive and automated hypoxanthine measurements, was developed in a sequential injection lab-on-valve system. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of hypoxanthine was investigated in phosphate buffer solution by cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry. The Fe(3)O(4)/MWCNTs/β-CD modified electrode exhibits preferably analytical characteristics in electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of hypoxanthine. Under optimized conditions, the log oxidation peak current intensity was proportional to log hypoxanthine concentration covering the range from 5.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-5) mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9965. A detection limit of 0.3×10(-8) mol L(-1) was achieved along with a sampling frequency of 20 h(-1). This hyphenated system offers some advantages in terms of rapidness, sensitivity and ease of manipulation. Its further applications were utilized for the determination of hypoxanthine in meat samples. PMID:22967631

  10. Xanthine oxidase inhibits growth of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P A; Human, L; Freese, J A

    1991-01-01

    Malaria parasites, unable to synthesize purine de novo, use host-derived hypoxanthine preferentially as purine source. In a previous study (1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:6562-6568), we noted that xanthine oxidase rapidly and completely depleted hypoxanthine in human erythrocytes, not by crossing the erythrocyte membrane, but rather by creating a concentration gradient which facilitated hypoxanthine efflux. We therefore investigated the ability of xanthine oxidase to inhibit growth of FCR-3, a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro. Parasites were cultured in human group O+ erythrocytes in medium supplemented, as required, with xanthine oxidase or chloroquine. Parasite viability was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled glycine and adenosine triphosphate-derived purine into protein and nucleic acid, respectively, by nucleic acid accumulation, by L-lactate production, and by microscopic appearance. On average, a 90% inhibition of growth was observed after 72 h of incubation in 20 mU/ml xanthine oxidase. Inhibition was notably greater than that exerted by 10(-7) M chloroquine (less than 10%) over a comparable period. The IC50 for xanthine oxidase was estimated at 0.2 mU/ml, compared to 1.5 x 10(-7) M for chloroquine. Inhibition was completely reversed by excess hypoxanthine, but was unaffected by oxygen radical scavengers, including superoxide dismutase and catalase. The data confirms that a supply of host-derived hypoxanthine is critical for nucleic acid synthesis in P. falciparum, and that depletion of erythrocyte hypoxanthine pools of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. Images PMID:1752946

  11. The role of human cytochrome P4503A4 in biotransformation of tissue-specific derivatives of 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole

    SciTech Connect

    Mesarosova, Monika; Valovicova, Zuzana; Srancikova, Annamaria; Krajcovicova, Zdenka; Milcova, Alena; Sokolova, Romana; Schmuczerova, Jana; Topinka, Jan; Gabelova, Alena

    2011-09-15

    The environmental pollutant 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) and its derivative, 5,9-dimethylDBC (DiMeDBC), produced significant and dose-dependent levels of micronuclei followed by a substantial increase in the frequency of apoptotic cells in the V79MZh3A4 cell line stably expressing the human cytochrome P450 (hCYP) 3A4. In contrast, neither micronuclei nor apoptosis were found in cells exposed to the sarcomagenic carcinogen, N-methylDBC (N-MeDBC). A slight but significant level of gene mutations and DNA adducts detected in V79MZh3A4 cells treated with N-MeDBC, only at the highest concentration (30 {mu}M), revealed that this sarcomagenic carcinogen was also metabolized by hCYP3A4. Surprisingly, DBC increased the frequency of 6-thioguanine resistant (6-TG{sup r}) mutations only at the highest concentration (30 {mu}M), while DiMeDBC failed to increase the frequency of these mutations. The resistance to 6-thioguanine is caused by the mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) gene. The molecular analysis of the coding region of Hprt gene showed a deletion of the entire exon 8 in DiMeDBC-induced 6-TG{sup r} mutants, while no changes in the nucleotide sequences were identified in 6-TG{sup r} mutants produced by DBC and N-MeDBC. Based on our results, we suggest that hCYP3A4 is involved in the metabolism of DBC and its tissue-specific derivatives. While hCYP3A4 probably plays an important role in biotransformation of the liver carcinogens, DBC and DiMeDBC, it might only have a marginal function in N-MeDBC metabolism. - Highlights: > DBC activation via CYP3A4 resulted in micronuclei, DNA adduct formation and mutations in V79MZh3A4 cells. > The CYP3A4-mediated DiMeDBC activation caused micronuclei followed by apoptosis in V79MZh3A4 cells. > The genotoxic effects produced by N-MeDBC in V79MZh3A4 cells were negligible. > The hCYP3A4 may play an important role in DBC and DiMeDBC metabolism. > The CYP3A4 might only have a marginal function in N-MeDBC metabolism.

  12. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and genetic damage will be needed.

  13. Simultaneous assay of glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine levels in a rat striatum using enzyme electrodes based on neutral red-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fen-Fen; Wan, Qiao; Li, Chen-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Xian, Yue-Zhong; Jin, Li-Tong; Yamamoto, Katsunobu

    2004-10-01

    An electrochemical method suitable for the simultaneous measurement of cerebral glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine concentrations from in vivo microdialysis sampling has been successfully performed for the first time using a neutral red-doped silica (NRDS) nanoparticle-derived enzyme sensor system. These uniform NRDS nanoparticles (about 50 +/- 3 nm) were prepared by a water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion method, and characterized by a TEM technique. The neutral red-doped interior maintained its high electron-activity, while the exterior nano-silica surface prevented the mediator from leaching out into the aqueous solution, and showed high biocompability. These nanoparticles were then mixing with the glucose oxidase (GOD), lactate oxidase (LOD), L-glutamate oxidase (L-GLOD) or xanthine oxidase (XOD), and immobilized on four glassy carbon electrodes, respectively. A thin Nafion film was coated on the enzyme layer to prevent interference from molecules such as ascorbic acid and uric acid in the dialysate. The high sensitivity of the NRDS modified enzyme electrode system enables the simultaneous monitoring of trace levels of glucose, L-glutamate, lactate and hypoxanthine in diluted dialysate samples from a rat striatum. PMID:15517210

  14. The pyrimidine biosynthesis operon of the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus includes genes for uracil phosphoribosyltransferase and uracil permease.

    PubMed Central

    Ghim, S Y; Neuhard, J

    1994-01-01

    A 3-kb DNA segment of the Bacillus caldolyticus genome including the 5' end end of the pyr cluster has been cloned and sequenced. The sequence revealed the presence of two open reading frames, pyrR and pyrP, located immediately upstream of the previously sequenced pyrB gene encoding the pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase. The pyrR and pyrP genes encoded polypeptides with calculated molecular masses of 19.9 and 45.2 kDa, respectively. Expression of these ORFs was confirmed by analysis of plasmid-encoded polypeptides in minicells. Sequence alignment and complementation analyses identified the pyrR gene product as a uracil phosphoribosyltransferase and the pyrP gene product as a membrane-bound uracil permease. By using promoter expression vectors, a 650-bp EcoRI-HincII fragment, including the 5' end of pyrR and its upstream region, was found to contain the pyr operon promoter. The transcriptional start point was located by primer extension at a position 153 bp upstream of the pyrR translation initiation codon, 7 bp 3' of a sequence resembling a sigma A-dependent Bacillus subtilis promoter. This established the following organization of the ten cistrons within the pyr operon: promoter-pyrR-pyrP-pyrB-pyrC-pyrAa-pyrA b-orf2-pyrD-pyrF-pyrE. The nucleotide sequences of the region upstream of pyrR and of the pyrR-pyrP and pyrP-pyrB intercistronic regions indicated that the transcript may form two mutually exclusive secondary structures within each of these regions. One of these structures resembled a rho-independent transcriptional terminator. The possible implication of these structures for pyrimidine regulation of the operon is discussed. Images PMID:8206848

  15. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is required for the calorie restriction-mediated improvements in oxidative stress, mitochondrial biogenesis, and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Ke, Sen-Fang; Zhou, Can-Can; Zhang, Sai-Long; Guan, Yun-Feng; Xu, Tian-Ying; Sheng, Chun-Quan; Wang, Pei; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most reproducible treatments for weight loss and slowing aging. However, how CR induces these metabolic alterations is not fully understood. In this work, we studied whether nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis, plays a role in CR-induced beneficial metabolic effects using a specific inhibitor of NAMPT (FK866). CR upregulated NAMPT mRNA and protein levels in rat skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Inhibition of NAMPT activity by FK866 in rats did not affect the SIRT1 upregulation by CR but suppressed the CR-induced SIRT1 activity and deacetylation of Forkhead box protein O1/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α. Inhibition of NAMPT activity by FK866 also attenuated the CR-induced SIRT3 activity, evidenced by deacetylation of superoxide dismutase-2. Furthermore, FK866 not only weakened the CR-induced decrease of oxidative stress (dichlorofluorescin signal, superoxide , and malondialdehyde levels), but also greatly attenuated the CR-induced improvements of antioxidative activity (total superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio) and mitochondrial biogenesis (mRNA levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1, cytochrome c oxidase IV, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and transcription factor A, mitochondrial and citrate synthase activity). At last, FK866 blocked the CR-induced insulin sensitizing, Akt signaling activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence that the CR-induced beneficial effects in oxidative stress, mitochondrial biogenesis, and metabolic adaptation require NAMPT. PMID:23946338

  16. Biochemical characterization of quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and inhibition of its activity by pyrazinamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Shibayama, Keigo; Rimbara, Emiko; Mori, Shigetarou

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis and a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. QAPRTase catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) through a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. The crystal structure of QAPRTase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtQAPRTase) has been determined; however, a detailed functional analysis of MtQAPRTase has not been published. Here, we analyzed the enzymatic activities of MtQAPRTase and determined the effect on catalysis of the anti-tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA). The optimum temperature and pH for MtQAPRTase activity were 60°C and pH 9.2. MtQAPRTase required bivalent metal ions and its activity was highest in the presence of Mg2+. Kinetic analyses revealed that the Km values for QA and PRPP were 0.08 and 0.39 mM, respectively, and the kcat values for QA and PRPP were 0.12 and 0.14 [s-1], respectively. When the amino acid residues of MtQAPRTase, which may interact with QA, were substituted with alanine residues, catalytic activity was undetectable. Further, PZA, which is an anti-tuberculosis drug and a structural analog of QA, markedly inhibited the catalytic activity of MtQAPRTase. The structure of PZA may provide the basis for the design of new inhibitors of MtQAPRTase. These findings provide new insights into the catalytic properties of MtQAPRTase. PMID:24949952

  17. Interactions at the 2 and 5 positions of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate are essential in Salmonella typhimurium quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Bello, Zainab; Stitt, Barbara; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2010-02-23

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) catalyzes an unusual phosphoribosyl transfer that is linked to a decarboxylation reaction to form the NAD precursor nicotinate mononucleotide, carbon dioxide, and pyrophosphate from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). Structural studies and sequence similarities with other PRTases have implicated Glu214, Asp235, Lys153, and Lys284 in contributing to catalysis through direct interaction with PRPP. The four residues were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis. A nadC deletant form of BL21DE3 was created to eliminate trace contamination by chromosomal QAPRTase. The mutant enzymes were readily purified and retained their dimeric aggregation state on gel filtration. Substitution of Lys153 with Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme, indicating its essential nature. Mutation of Glu214 to Ala or Asp caused at least a 4000-fold reduction in k(cat), with 10-fold increases in K(m) and K(D) values for PRPP. However, mutation of Glu214 to Gln had only modest effects on ligand binding and catalysis. pH profiles indicated that the deprotonated form of a residue with pK(a) of 6.9 is essential for catalysis. The WT-like pH profile of the E214Q mutant indicated that Glu214 is not that residue. Mutation of Asp235 to Ala did not affect ligand binding or catalysis. Mutation of Lys284 to Ala decreased k(cat) by 30-fold and increased K(m) and K(D) values for PRPP by 80-fold and at least 20-fold, respectively. The study suggests that Lys153 is necessary for catalysis and important for PRPP binding, Glu214 provides a hydrogen bond necessary for catalysis but does not act as a base or electrostatically to stabilize the transition state, Lys284 is involved in PRPP binding, and Asp235 is not essential. PMID:20047307

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Quinolinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Inhibition of Its Activity by Pyrazinamide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Shibayama, Keigo; Rimbara, Emiko; Mori, Shigetarou

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis and a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. QAPRTase catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) through a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. The crystal structure of QAPRTase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtQAPRTase) has been determined; however, a detailed functional analysis of MtQAPRTase has not been published. Here, we analyzed the enzymatic activities of MtQAPRTase and determined the effect on catalysis of the anti-tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA). The optimum temperature and pH for MtQAPRTase activity were 60°C and pH 9.2. MtQAPRTase required bivalent metal ions and its activity was highest in the presence of Mg2+. Kinetic analyses revealed that the Km values for QA and PRPP were 0.08 and 0.39 mM, respectively, and the kcat values for QA and PRPP were 0.12 and 0.14 [s-1], respectively. When the amino acid residues of MtQAPRTase, which may interact with QA, were substituted with alanine residues, catalytic activity was undetectable. Further, PZA, which is an anti-tuberculosis drug and a structural analog of QA, markedly inhibited the catalytic activity of MtQAPRTase. The structure of PZA may provide the basis for the design of new inhibitors of MtQAPRTase. These findings provide new insights into the catalytic properties of MtQAPRTase. PMID:24949952

  19. Substrate inhibition of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase by uracil can account for the uracil growth sensitivity of Leishmania donovani pyrimidine auxotrophs.

    PubMed

    Soysa, Radika; Wilson, Zachary N; Elferich, Johannes; Forquer, Isaac; Shinde, Ujwal; Riscoe, Michael K; Yates, Phillip A; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-10-11

    The pathogenic protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani is capable of both de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage of pyrimidines from the host milieu. Genetic analysis has authenticated L. donovani uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (LdUPRT), an enzyme not found in mammalian cells, as the focal enzyme of pyrimidine salvage because all exogenous pyrimidines that can satisfy the requirement of the parasite for pyrimidine nucleotides are funneled to uracil and then phosphoribosylated to UMP in the parasite by LdUPRT. To characterize this unique parasite enzyme, LdUPRT was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity. Kinetic analysis revealed apparent Km values of 20 and 99 μM for the natural substrates uracil and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, respectively, as well as apparent Km values 6 and 7 μM for the pyrimidine analogs 5-fluorouracil and 4-thiouracil, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography revealed the native LdUPRT to be tetrameric and retained partial structure and activity in high concentrations of urea. L. donovani mutants deficient in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, which require functional LdUPRT for growth, are hypersensitive to high concentrations of uracil, 5-fluorouracil, and 4-thiouracil in the growth medium. This hypersensitivity can be explained by the observation that LdUPRT is substrate-inhibited by uracil and 4-thiouracil, but 5-fluorouracil toxicity transpires via an alternative mechanism. This substrate inhibition of LdUPRT provides a protective mechanism for the parasite by facilitating purine and pyrimidine nucleotide pool balance and by sparing phosphoribosylpyrophosphate for consumption by the nutritionally indispensable purine salvage process. PMID:23986453

  20. Co-expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase for succinate production in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Chen, Xu; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Wan, Qing; Wu, Mingke; Zhang, Hanwen; Ma, Jiangfeng; Chen, Kequan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-03-01

    Succinate is not the dominant fermentation product from xylose in wild-type Escherichia coli K12. E. coli BA 203 is a lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA), pyruvate formate lyase (pflB), and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-carboxylase (ppc) deletion strain. To increase succinate accumulation and reduce byproduct formation, engineered E. coli BA204, in which ATP-forming PEP-carboxykinase (PEPCK) is overexpressed in BA203, was constructed and produced 2.17-fold higher succinate yield. To further improve the biomass and the consumption rate of xylose, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase), a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NAD(H), was also overexpressed. Thus, co-expression of PEPCK and NAPRTase in recombinant E. coli BA209 was investigated. In BA209, the pck gene and the pncB gene each have a trc promoter, hence, both genes are well expressed. During a 72-h anaerobic fermentation in sealed bottles, the total concentration of NAD(H) in BA209 was 1.25-fold higher than that in BA204, and the NADH/NAD+ ratio decreased from 0.28 to 0.11. During the exclusively anaerobic fermentation in a 3-L bioreactor, BA209 consumed 17.1 g L⁻¹ xylose and produced 15.5 g L⁻¹ succinate. Furthermore, anaerobic fermentation of corn stalk hydrolysate contained 30.1 g L⁻¹ xylose, 2.1 g L⁻¹ glucose and 1.5 g L⁻¹ arabinose, it produced a final succinate concentration of 17.2 g L⁻¹ with a yield of 0.94 g g⁻¹ total sugars. PMID:24564896

  1. Studies on the energy metabolism of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) erythrocytes: V. Utilization of hypoxanthine for the synthesis of adenine and guanine nucleotides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlenfalvay, N.C.; White, J.C.; Chadwick, E.; Lima, J.E. )

    1990-06-01

    High pressure liquid radiochromatography was used to test the ability of opossum erythrocytes to incorporate tracer amounts of (G-{sup 3}H) hypoxanthine (Hy) into ({sup 3}H) labelled triphosphates of adenine and guanine. In the presence of supraphysiologic (30 mM) phosphate which is optimal for PRPP synthesis, both ATP and GTP are extensively labelled. When physiologic (1 mM) medium phosphate is used, red cells incubated under an atmosphere of nitrogen accumulate ({sup 3}H) ATP in a linear fashion suggesting ongoing PRPP synthesis in red cells whose hemoglobin is deoxygenated. In contrast, a lesser increase of labelled ATP is observed in cells incubated under oxygen, suggesting that conditions for purine nucleotide formation from ambient Hy are more favorable in the venous circulation.

  2. Hypoxanthine uptake by skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cells from equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1)-null mice: effect of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bone, D B J; Antic, M; Quinonez, D; Hammond, J R

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous regulator of vascular tone. This activity of adenosine is terminated by its uptake and metabolism by microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC). The predominant transporter involved is ENT1 (equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype 1). MVEC also express the nucleobase transporter (ENBT1) which is involved in the cellular flux of adenosine metabolites such as hypoxanthine. Changes in either of these transport systems would impact the bioactivity of adenosine and its metabolism, including the formation of oxygen free radicals. MVEC isolated from skeletal muscle of ENT1(+/+) and ENT1(-/-) mice were subjected to oxidative stress induced by simulated ischemia/reperfusion or menadione. The functional activities of ENT1 and ENBT1 were assessed based on zero-trans influx kinetics of radiolabeled substrates. There was a reduction in the rate of ENBT1-mediated hypoxanthine uptake by ENT1(+/+) MVEC treated with menadione or after exposure to conditions that simulate ischemia/reperfusion. In both cases, the superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTMPyP attenuated the loss of ENBT1 activity, implicating superoxide radicals in the response. In contrast, MVEC isolated from ENT1(-/-) mice showed no reduction in ENBT1 activity upon treatment with menadione or simulated ischemia/reperfusion, but they did have a significantly higher level of catalase activity relative to ENT1(+/+) MVEC. These data suggest that ENBT1 activity is decreased in MVEC in response to the increased superoxide radical that is associated with ischemia/reperfusion injury. MVEC isolated from ENT1(-/-) mice do not show this reduction in ENBT1, possibly due to increased catalase activity. PMID:25448155

  3. Structural investigation of the biosynthesis of alternative lower ligands for cobamides by nicotinate mononucleotide: 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase from Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Cheong, C G; Escalante-Semerena, J C; Rayment, I

    2001-10-01

    Nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN):5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase (CobT) from Salmonella enterica plays a central role in the synthesis of alpha-ribazole, a key component of the lower ligand of cobalamin. Surprisingly, CobT can phosphoribosylate a wide range of aromatic substrates, giving rise to a wide variety of lower ligands in cobamides. To understand the molecular basis for this lack of substrate specificity, the x-ray structures of CobT complexed with adenine, 5-methylbenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, p-cresol, and phenol were determined. Furthermore, adenine, 5-methylbenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 2-hydroxypurine were observed to react with NaMN within the crystal lattice and undergo the phosphoribosyl transfer reaction to form product. Significantly, the stereochemistries of all products are identical to those found in vivo. Interestingly, p-cresol and phenol, which are the lower ligand in Sporomusa ovata, bound to CobT but did not react with NaMN. This study provides a structural explanation for how CobT can phosphoribosylate most of the commonly observed lower ligands found in cobamides with the exception of the phenolic lower ligands observed in S. ovata. This is accomplished with minor conformational changes in the side chains that constitute the 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole binding site. These investigations are consistent with the implication that the nature of the lower ligand is controlled by metabolic factors rather by the specificity of the phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:11441022

  4. Non-invasive molecular and functional imaging of cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fused with red fluorescence protein

    PubMed Central

    XING, LIGANG; DENG, XUELONG; KOTEDIA, KHUSHALI; ACKERSTAFF, ELLEN; PONOMAREV, VLADIMIR; LING, C. CLIFTON; KOUTCHER, JASON A.; LI, GLORIA C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) may improve the antitumoral effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and thereby enhance the potential of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy. For the applicability of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy in a clinical setting, it is essential to be able to monitor the transgene expression and function in vivo. Thus, we developed a preclinical tumor model to investigate the feasibility of using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and optical imaging to measure non-invasively CD and UPRT expression and function. Materials and methods Expression vectors of CD or CD/UPRT fused to monomeric DsRed (mDsRed) were constructed and rat prostate carcinoma (R3327-AT) cell lines stably expressing either CD/mDsRed or CD/UPRT/mDsRed were generated. The expression of the fusion proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The function of the fusion protein was confirmed in vitro by assessing 5-FC and 5-FU cytotoxicity. In vivo fluorine-19 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F MRS) was used to monitor the conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in mice bearing the R3327-CD/mDsRed and R3327-CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumor xenografts. Results Sensitivity to 5-FC and 5-FU was higher in cells stably expressing the CD/UPRT/mDsRed fusion gene than in cells stably expressing CD/mDsRed alone or wild-type cells. Whole tumor 19F MRS measurements showed rapid conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU within 20 min after 5-FC was administered intravenously in both CD/mDsRed and CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumors with subsequent anabolism to cytotoxic fluoronucleotides (FNucs). CD/UPRT/mDsRed tumor was more efficient in these processes. Conclusion This study demonstrates the utility of these tumor models stably expressing CD or CD/UPRT to non-invasively evaluate the efficacy of the transgene expression/activity by monitoring drug metabolism in vivo using MRS, with potential applications in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:18661431

  5. Association of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) Gene Polymorphisms and of Serum NAMPT Levels with Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Dou, Qingyu; Peng, Ying; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Kui; Lin, Jing; Dai, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lin; Rao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has crucial roles for myocardial development, cardiomyocyte energy metabolism and cell death/survival by regulating NAD⁺-dependent sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase. This study aimed to determine if the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NAMPT gene may affect the susceptibility and prognosis for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and to describe the association of serum NAMPT levels with clinical features of DCM. Three SNPs (rs61330082, rs2505568, and rs9034) were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in a case-control study of 394 DCM patients and 395 controls from China. Serum NAMPT levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The homozygote for the minor allele at rs2505568 and rs9034 could not be detected in this study. Rs9034 T allele and CT genotype were associated with increased DCM risk (OR: 1.63, 95% CI = 1.16-2.27, p = 0.005 and OR: 1.72, 95% CI = 1.20-2.50, p = 0.0027, respectively). Nominally significant decreased DCM risk was found to be associated with the A allele and AT genotype of rs2505568 (OR: 0.48, 95% CI = 0.35-0.67, p < 0.0001 and OR: 0.44, 95% CI = 0.31-0.62, p < 0.0001, respectively), but it should be interpreted with caution because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the control group. Of five haplotypes constructed, TAC (rs61330082-rs2505568-rs9034) was a protective haplotype to DCM (OR: 0.22, 95% CI = 0.13-0.39, p = 1.84 × 10(-8)). The Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that the rs9034 CT genotype (hazard ratio (HR): 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37-0.96, p = 0.03) was an independently multivariate predictor for longer overall survival in DCM patients. Serum NAMPT levels were significantly higher in the DCM group than controls (p < 0.0001) and gradually increased with the increase of New York Heart Association grade in DCM patients. However, there was a lack of association of the three SNPs with serum NAMPT levels. Spearman correlation test revealed that the NAMPT level was positively associated with brain natriuretic peptide (r = 0.56, p = 0.001), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (r = 0.293, p = 0.011) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (r = 0.294, p = 0.011). Our study suggested that NAMPT may play an important role in the development of DCM. PMID:26389889

  6. Photosensitized Oxidation of Hypoxanthine and Xanthine by Aluminum Phthalocyanine Tetrasulfonate. Role of the Alkylating Quinone 2,5-Dichloro-diaziridinyl-1,4-benzoquinone

    PubMed Central

    Alegria, Antonio E.; Inostroza, Yaritza; Kumar, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Photoirradiation of nitrogen-saturated aqueous solutions containing aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS4) at 675 nm in the presence of 2,5-dichloro-diaziridinyl-1,4-benzoquinone (AZDClQ) and hypoxanthine (HX) produces the oxidized HX derivatives, xanthine (X) and uric acid (UA). Concentrations of the AZDClQ semiquinone, X and UA increase at the expense of HX with an increase in irradiation time. Almost negligible decomposition of HX, as well as very low amounts of X, are detected if photolysis occurs under identical conditions but in the absence of AZDClQ. Addition of calf-thymus DNA produces quinone-DNA covalent adducts after photolysis of anaerobic samples containing quinone, DNA and AlPcS4, in the presence or absence of HX and at pH 5.5. However, larger amounts of quinone-DNA adducts are detected if HX is present. The results presented here could have applications in the photodynamic treatment of hypoxic tissues such as solid tumors, under conditions of high HX concentration, where Type-I pathways could be more important than singlet oxygen generation. PMID:18627517

  7. Matrix-isolation FT-IR study and theoretical calculations of the vibrational, tautomeric and H-bonding properties of hypoxanthine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaekers, R.; Maes, G.; Adamowicz, L.; Dkhissi, A.

    2001-01-01

    The neutral compound hypoxanthine is investigated using the technique of matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio methods. Two theoretical methods (RHF and DFT/B3-LYP) are compared for vibrational frequency prediction, and four methods (RHF//RHF, MP2//RHF, DFT//DFT and MP2//DFT) for prediction of the relative energies of the tautomers and the interaction energies of the complexes. All the possible tautomeric forms have been considered theoretically, and the results indicate that two oxo forms (O17 and O19) and one hydroxy form (H9-r1) are the three most stable forms. The experimental FT-IR spectra are consistent with this prediction, and nearly all the characteristic spectral features of these forms have been identified in the spectrum. A theoretical study of the H-bonded complexes of these three tautomers with water is also performed. Several structures have been found for each form and the results demonstrate that the closed complexes with two H-bonds are the most stable systems due to the H-bond cooperative effect.

  8. The role of the C-terminal region on the oligomeric state and enzymatic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Wanda M; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Defelipe, Lucas A; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier; Delfino, José M

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcHPRT) is a critical enzyme for the survival of the parasite. This work demonstrates that the full-length form in solution adopts a stable and enzymatically active tetrameric form, exhibiting large inter-subunit surfaces. Although this protein irreversibly aggregates during unfolding, oligomerization is reversible and can be modulated by low concentrations of urea. When the C-terminal region, which is predicted as a disordered stretch, is excised by proteolysis, TcHPRT adopts a dimeric state, suggesting that the C-terminal region acts as a main guide for the quaternary arrangement. These results are in agreement with X-ray crystallographic data presented in this work. On the other hand, the C-terminal region exhibits a modulatory role on the enzyme, as attested by the enhanced activity observed for the dimeric form. Bisphosphonates act as substrate-mimetics, uncovering long-range communications among the active sites. All in all, this work contributes to establish new ways applicable to the design of novel inhibitors that could eventually result in new drugs against parasitic diseases. PMID:26969784

  9. Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... film but are detected with ultrasound or computerized tomography (CT) scan, the stones will most likely be composed of uric acid. However, APRT deficiency and 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria is also a possible cause of the kidney stones. If you have radiolucent kidney stones you ...

  10. ANALYSIS OF X-RAY INDUCED HPRT MUTATIONS IN CHO CELLS: INSERTION AND DELETIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular alterations were examined in the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene of 41 independent X-ray-induced thioguanine-resistant (TGR) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clones. Rapid screening of the clones by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fo...

  11. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Compton, P J; Hooper, K; Smith, M T

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutation can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed. PMID:1954924

  12. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  13. Molecular analyses of in vivo hprt mutations in human T-lymphocytes: IV. Studies in newborns

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, M.J.; Nicklas, J.A.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to characterize in vivo gene mutations that occur during fetal development, molecular analyses were undertaken of mutant 6-thioguanine resistant T-lymphocytes isolated from placental cord blood samples of 13 normal male newborns. These mutant T-cells were studied to define hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene structural alterations and to determine T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns. Structural hprt alterations, as shown by Southern blot analyses, occurred in 85% of these mutant clones. These alterations consisted mostly of deletion of exons 2 and 3. These findings contrast with the 10-20% of gross structural alterations occurring randomly across the entire gene previously reported for T-cell mutants isolated from normal young adults. Iterative analyses of hprt structural alterations and TCR gene rearrangement patterns show that approximately one-third of the newborn derived mutants may have originated as pre- or intrathymic hprt mutations. This too contrasts with previous findings in adults where the background in vivo hprt mutations appeared to originate in postthymic T-lymphocytes.

  14. An insight into prototropism and supramolecular motifs in solid-state structures of allopurinol, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid. A ¹H-¹⁴N NQDR spectroscopy, hybrid DFT/QTAIM, and Hirshfeld surface-based study.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt

    2014-09-18

    Allopurinol (1,5-dihydro-4H-pyrazolo [3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-one), the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drugs applied for the treatment of gout and tumor lysis syndrome, recently discovered to have multifaceted therapeutic potential, and hypoxanthine which is a naturally occurring purine have been studied experimentally in the solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR double resonance. Twelve (14)N resonance frequencies have been detected at 295 K and assigned to two pairs of two kinds of nitrogen sites (-N═ and -NH) in each compound. The experimental results are supported by and interpreted with the help of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM)/density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The factors, such as the substituent effect, in particular the shift of nitrogen from position 7 (as in hypoxanthine) to position 8 (as in allopurinol), hybridization, possible prototropic tautomerism, and the pattern of intermolecular bonding, have been taken into account in (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR spectra interpretation. This study demonstrates the advantages of combining NQR, DFT/QTAIM, and Hirshfeld surface analysis to extract detailed information on electron density distribution and complex H-bonding networks in crystals of purinic type heterocycles, relevant in pharmacological processes. In the absence of X-ray data for xanthine, the NQR parameters supported by DFT/QTAIM calculations and Hirshfeld surface analysis were proved to be valuable tools for clarifying the details of crystalline packing and predicting an unsolved crystalline structure of xanthine. The influence of a decrease in purine ring conjugation level upon oxidation on the biological activity of allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme inhibitor, which blocks the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and subsequently xanthine to uric acid, is also discussed. PMID:25079386

  15. Analogues of ribose 5-phosphate and 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate. The preparation and properties of ribose 5-phosphorothioate and 5-phosphoribosyl 1-methylenediphosphonate

    PubMed Central

    Murray, A. W.; Wong, P. C. L.; Friedrichs, Beverly

    1969-01-01

    1. 5-Phosphoribosyl 1-methylenediphosphonate was isolated after reaction of ribose 5-phosphate and O-adenylyl methylenediphosphonate with 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells. 2. The analogue reacted with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase [Km (analogue)/Km (5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate) 0·17, 0·19 and 6·3 respectively; Vmax. (analogue)/Vmax. (5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate) 0·011, 0·26 and 1·1 respectively]. 3. The analogue was not a substrate for 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase or orotate phosphoribosyltransferase. 4. Ribose 5-phosphorothioate was synthesized by allowing ribose to react with thiophosphoryl chloride in triethyl phosphate. The analogue was a substrate for 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells. When this reaction was coupled to either adenine phosphoribosyltransferase or hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, adenosine 5′-phosphorothioate or inosine 5′-phosphorothioate was formed respectively. PMID:4309674

  16. The Salmonella typhimurium nadC gene: sequence determination by use of Mud-P22 and purification of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Hughes, K T; Dessen, A; Gray, J P; Grubmeyer, C

    1993-01-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium nadC gene and its product, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase), were characterized at the molecular and biochemical levels. Fusions of Mud-lac elements isolated in the nadC gene were converted to Mud-P22 insertions. Starting with six original Mud-lac fusions, the entire sequence of the nadC gene was readily obtained. The sequence shows a long open reading frame with two potential initiator methionines, one of which is preceded by the Shine-Dalgarno sequence GGAG-7-nucleotide-ATG. The protein predicted from this second open reading frame is 297 residues in length. The nadC gene was subcloned into a T7-based expression system, allowing for facile purification of the QAPRTase (EC 2.4.2.19) protein to homogeneity. Upon gel filtration, the protein gave an M(r) of 72,000, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gave a subunit M(r) of 35,000. Automated Edman degradation of several tryptic peptides confirmed the amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence. Chromatography of the apparently homogeneous enzyme on reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography resolved two protein species. One of these species failed to give an amino-terminal sequence, while the other yielded the amino-terminal sequence predicted by the second open reading frame and lacked the initiator methionine. The mass of the mature protein, predicted from its DNA sequence, was 32,428 Da. Electrospray mass spectrometry gave masses of 32,501 and 32,581 Da for the two peptides. Steady-state kinetics on the purified QAPRTase indicated Km values of 32 microM for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate and 20 microM for quinolinate. Vmax was 0.9 U/mg, similar to values reported for this enzyme by other sources. PMID:8419294

  17. The antiproliferative and cell cycle effects of 5,6,7, 8-tetrahydro-N5,N10-carbonylfolic acid, an inhibitor of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, are potentiated by hypoxanthine.

    PubMed

    Tonkinson, J L; Habeck, L L; Toth, J E; Mendelsohn, L G; Bewley, J; Shackelford, K A; Gates, S B; Ray, J; Chen, V J

    1998-10-01

    5,6,7,8-Tetrahydro-N5,N10-carbonylfolic acid (LY354899) has been demonstrated to inhibit the dehydrogenase activity of C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase. This compound was only moderately antiproliferative toward CCRF-CEM lymphocytic leukemia cells in culture, but induced apoptosis after long incubation times. Slightly greater potency was observed in CEM cells adapted to grow in low folate media. Cell cycle alterations induced by LY354899 were unique relative to antifolates that inhibit either the purine or thymidine de novo biosynthetic pathways. Based on the observed changes in DNA content, we hypothesized that inhibition of the dehydrogenase resulted in two temporally distinct events: the first was a purineless-like effect and the second was a thymineless-like effect that resulted in apoptosis. To test this hypothesis, we combined LY354899 with the purine salvage metabolite, hypoxanthine. This combination resulted in an earlier and more dramatic apoptotic response, indicating that the thymineless effect had been potentiated. Biochemical analysis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates confirmed that inhibition of the dehydrogenase activity initially resulted in decreased pools of deoxypurines and deoxypyrimidines, followed 16 hr later by an increase in deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) and a further decrease in deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP). These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of the dehydrogenase activity of C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase may represent a viable target for the development of novel antifolates. The results are discussed in terms of deoxypurine and deoxypyrimidine biosynthesis. PMID:9765352

  18. Selective removal of ATP degradation products from food matrices II: Rapid screening of hypoxanthine and inosine by molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion for evaluation of fish freshness.

    PubMed

    Cela-Prez, M C; Barbosa-Pereira, L; Vecino, X; Prez-Ameneiro, M; Lasagabaster Latorre, Aurora; Lpez-Vilario, J M; Gonzlez Rodrguez, M V; Moldes, A B; Cruz, J M

    2015-04-01

    A water compatible molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), synthesized using theophylline (TPH) as dummy-template and acrylamide (AM) as functional monomer, has been employed as supporting material in matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (MSPD-UPLC-PDA) for selective determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) derivatives in fish samples. ATP degradation products are used as freshness index for assessment of fish quality. The solid sample was directly blended with MIP in MSPD procedure resulting in sample disruption and subsequent adsorption of the compounds on the MIP. By using n-hexane and ammonium hydroxide aqueous solution at pH 9 as the washing and elution solvent, respectively, satisfactory recoveries and clean chromatograms have been obtained. Good linearity for hypoxanthine (HYP) and inosine (INO) has been observed with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.9987 and 0.9986, respectively. The recoveries of the two ATP derivatives at three different spiked levels ranged from 106.5% to 113.4% for HYP and from 103.1% to 111.2% for INO, with average relative standard deviations lower than 4.2% in both cases. This new method, which is rapid, simple and sensitive, can be used as an alternative tool to conventional tedious methods. PMID:25640126

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of whole human blood, blood plasma, and red blood cells: cellular processes and bioanalytical sensing.

    PubMed

    Premasiri, W R; Lee, J C; Ziegler, L D

    2012-08-01

    SERS spectra of whole human blood, blood plasma, and red blood cells on Au nanoparticle SiO(2) substrates excited at 785 nm have been observed. For the sample preparation procedure employed here, the SERS spectrum of whole blood arises from the blood plasma component only. This is in contrast to the normal Raman spectrum of whole blood excited at 785 nm and open to ambient air, which is exclusively due to the scattering of oxyhemoglobin. The SERS spectrum of whole blood shows a storage time dependence that is not evident in the non-SERS Raman spectrum of whole blood. Hypoxanthine, a product of purine degradation, dominates the SERS spectrum of blood after ~10-20 h of storage at 8 °C. The corresponding SERS spectrum of plasma isolated from the stored blood shows the same temporal release of hypoxanthine. Thus, blood cellular components (red blood cells, white blood cells, and/or platelets) are releasing hypoxanthine into the plasma over this time interval. The SERS spectrum of red blood cells (RBCs) excited at 785 nm is reported for the first time and exhibits well-known heme group marker bands as well as other bands that may be attributed to cell membrane components or protein denaturation contributions. SERS, as well as normal Raman spectra, of oxy- and met-RBCs are reported and compared. These SERS results can have significant impact in the area of clinical diagnostics, blood supply management, and forensics. PMID:22780445

  20. Analogues of 4-[(7-Bromo-2-methyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazolin-6-yl)methylprop-2-ynylamino]-N-(3-pyridylmethyl)benzamide (CB-30865) as potent inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt).

    PubMed

    Lockman, Jeffrey W; Murphy, Brett R; Zigar, Daniel F; Judd, Weston R; Slattum, Paul M; Gao, Zhong-Hua; Ostanin, Kirill; Green, Jeremy; McKinnon, Rena; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T; Fleischer, Tracey C; Boniface, J Jay; Shenderovich, Mark; Willardsen, J Adam

    2010-12-23

    We have shown previously that the target of the potent cytotoxic agent 4-[(7-bromo-2-methyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazolin-6-yl)methyl-prop-2-ynylamino]-N-(3-pyridylmethyl)benzamide (CB38065, 1) is nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). With its cellular target known we sought to optimize the biochemical and cellular Nampt activity of 1 as well as its cytotoxicity. It was found that a 3-pyridylmethylamide substituent in the A region was critical to cellular Nampt activity and cytotoxicity, although other aromatic substitution did yield compounds with submicromolar enzymatic inhibition. Small unsaturated groups worked best in the D-region of the molecule, with 3,3-dimethylallyl providing optimal potency. The E region required a quinazolin-4-one or 1,2,3-benzotriazin-4-one group for activity, and many substituents were tolerated at C² of the quinazolin-4-one. The best compounds showed subnanomolar inhibition of Nampt and low nanomolar cytotoxicity in cellular assays. PMID:21080724

  1. Comparative Study of 6-Mercaptopurine Metabolism in Human Leukemic Leukocytes and L1210 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Nakamura, Toru; Uchino, Haruto; Wakisaka, Gyoichi

    1977-01-01

    Leukocytes from patients with leukemia and L1210 cells from mice were examined for the rate of formation and cellular concentration of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, the rate of thioinosinic acid formation, and a number of selected enzymes involved in purine nucleotide synthesis. The amount of thioinosinic acid formed in L1210 cells was much higher than that in human leukemic leukocytes. In cell extracts, the synthesis of thioinosinic acid was similar in both cell types, and the amount of purine phosphoribosyltransferase was not rate limiting in either case. Much higher concentrations and rates of formation of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate were found in L1210 cells than in human leukemic leukocytes. The difference in response to 6-mercaptopurine between L1210 cells and human leukemic leukocytes might be attributed to their difference in supply of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate-amidotransferase was found to be high in L1210 cells, but was not detected in human leukemic leukocytes. PMID:921247

  2. PRTFDC1 Is a Genetic Modifier of HPRT-Deficiency in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Freeman, Kimberly G.; Edwards, Gaylen L.; Weinshenker, David; Thomas, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe X-linked neurological disorder caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). In contrast, HPRT-deficiency in the mouse does not result in the profound phenotypes such as self-injurious behavior observed in humans, and the genetic basis for this phenotypic disparity between HPRT-deficient humans and mice is unknown. To test the hypothesis that HPRT deficiency is modified by the presence/absence of phosphoribosyltransferase domain containing 1 (PRTFDC1), a paralog of HPRT that is a functional gene in humans but an inactivated pseudogene in mice, we created transgenic mice that express human PRTFDC1 in wild-type and HPRT-deficient backgrounds. Male mice expressing PRTFDC1 on either genetic background were viable and fertile. However, the presence of PRTFDC1 in the HPRT-deficient, but not wild-type mice, increased aggression as well as sensitivity to a specific amphetamine-induced stereotypy, both of which are reminiscent of the increased aggressive and self-injurious behavior exhibited by patients with LND. These results demonstrate that PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse and could therefore have important implications for unraveling the molecular etiology of LND. PMID:21818316

  3. PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Alaine C; Mitchell, Heather A; Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Freeman, Kimberly G; Edwards, Gaylen L; Weinshenker, David; Thomas, James W

    2011-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe X-linked neurological disorder caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). In contrast, HPRT-deficiency in the mouse does not result in the profound phenotypes such as self-injurious behavior observed in humans, and the genetic basis for this phenotypic disparity between HPRT-deficient humans and mice is unknown. To test the hypothesis that HPRT deficiency is modified by the presence/absence of phosphoribosyltransferase domain containing 1 (PRTFDC1), a paralog of HPRT that is a functional gene in humans but an inactivated pseudogene in mice, we created transgenic mice that express human PRTFDC1 in wild-type and HPRT-deficient backgrounds. Male mice expressing PRTFDC1 on either genetic background were viable and fertile. However, the presence of PRTFDC1 in the HPRT-deficient, but not wild-type mice, increased aggression as well as sensitivity to a specific amphetamine-induced stereotypy, both of which are reminiscent of the increased aggressive and self-injurious behavior exhibited by patients with LND. These results demonstrate that PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse and could therefore have important implications for unraveling the molecular etiology of LND. PMID:21818316

  4. MULTIPLE-ENDPOINT MUTAGENESIS WITH CHINESE HAMSTER OVARY (CHO) CELLS: EVALUATION WITH EIGHT CARCINOGENIC AND NON-CARCINOGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in culture, the authors have defined an assay, CHO/HGPRT, to quantify mutagen-induced cytotoxicity and mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) locus. This assay permits elucidation of the structure-activity r...

  5. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENICITY RESULTS FOR NINE COMPOUNDS EVALUATED AT THE HGPRT LOCUS IN THE STANDARD AND SUSPENSION CHO ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) assay which measures newly induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) locus has been widely used for mutagenesis testing. he insensitivity of the standard assay to some genotoxic agents has been speculated to be...

  6. Attenuated Variants of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinnah, H. A.; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Verdu, Alfonso; Larovere, Laura E.; Chen, Chung-Jen; Cossu, Antonello; Wu, Chien-Hui; Sampat, Radhika; Chang, Shun-Jen; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Nyhan, William; Harris, James C.; Reich, Stephen G.; Puig, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The classic form of the disease is described by a characteristic syndrome that includes overproduction of uric acid, severe generalized dystonia, cognitive disability and self-injurious behaviour. In addition to the…

  7. Attenuated Variants of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinnah, H. A.; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Verdu, Alfonso; Larovere, Laura E.; Chen, Chung-Jen; Cossu, Antonello; Wu, Chien-Hui; Sampat, Radhika; Chang, Shun-Jen; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Nyhan, William; Harris, James C.; Reich, Stephen G.; Puig, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The classic form of the disease is described by a characteristic syndrome that includes overproduction of uric acid, severe generalized dystonia, cognitive disability and self-injurious behaviour. In addition to the

  8. Characterization, evolutionary relationships, and chromosome location of processed mouse HPRT pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Isamat, M; Macleod, K F; King, A; McEwan, C; Melton, D W

    1988-07-01

    Studies on a cell line with amplified copies of the mouse hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene and HPRT gene transfer experiments revealed the existence of a nonfunctional HPRT-related sequence in the mouse genome. This sequence was isolated and found to be a processed HPRT pseudogene. With the exception of a small internal deletion, the pseudogene is believed to comprise a complete reverse transcript of HPRT mRNA, although the 3' end of the pseudogene was lost in the cloning process. A probe from a region flanking the mouse pseudogene was used to investigate the evolutionary relationships of mammalian HPRT pseudogenes. The pseudogenes in mouse and Chinese hamster appear to have a common origin, but no homology to any of the four known human HPRT pseudogenes was detected. A pseudogene-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to map the pseudogene to the distal end of mouse chromosome 17. PMID:2899912

  9. Small Duplication of HPRT 1 Gene May Be Causative For Lesh-Nyhan Disease in Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    BOROUJERDI, Razieh; SHARIATI, Mohsen; NADDAFNIA, Hosein; REZAEI, Hojatolah

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a rare inborn error of purine metabolism and is characterized by uric acid overproduction along with a variety of neurological manifestations that depend on a degree of the enzymatic deficiency. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive; thus, males are generally more affected and heterozygous females are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. More than 300 mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been detected. Diagnosis can be based on clinical and biochemical findings as well as enzymatic and molecular testing. Molecular diagnosis is the best way as it allows for faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. In this report, a new small duplication in the HPRT1 gene was found by sequencing, which has yet to be reported. PMID:25767547

  10. Small Duplication of HPRT 1 Gene May Be Causative For Lesh-Nyhan Disease in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Boroujerdi, Razieh; Shariati, Mohsen; Naddafnia, Hosein; Rezaei, Hojatolah

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a rare inborn error of purine metabolism and is characterized by uric acid overproduction along with a variety of neurological manifestations that depend on a degree of the enzymatic deficiency. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive; thus, males are generally more affected and heterozygous females are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. More than 300 mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been detected. Diagnosis can be based on clinical and biochemical findings as well as enzymatic and molecular testing. Molecular diagnosis is the best way as it allows for faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. In this report, a new small duplication in the HPRT1 gene was found by sequencing, which has yet to be reported. PMID:25767547

  11. Data in support of the mutagenic potential of the isoflavone irilone in cultured V79 cells

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Anne; Albrecht, Annette E.; Esch, Harald L.; Lehmann, Leane

    2015-01-01

    The isoflavone irilone is found in human plasma after ingestion of red clover-based dietary supplements, but information allowing safety assessment is rare. Here, data in support of the mutagenic potential of irilone in cultured V79 cells [1] are presented. These data include (i) a quantitative assessment of irilone in the culture medium during the cell culture experiments, (ii) changes in the mutation spectrum in cDNA of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of irilone-treated V79 cells, (iii) occurrence of karyorrhexis and apoptosis as well as (iv) number of micronucleated cells containing whole chromosomes or chromosomal fragments. Also exemplary micrographs, used for the fluorescence microscopic assessment of (iii) and (iv) are presented. PMID:26306322

  12. The three-dimensional structures of nicotinate mononucleotide:5,6- dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase (CobT) from Salmonella typhimurium complexed with 5,6-dimethybenzimidazole and its reaction products determined to 1.9 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheong, C G; Escalante-Semerena, J C; Rayment, I

    1999-12-01

    Nicotinate mononucleotide:5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase (CobT) from Salmonella typhimurium plays a central role in the synthesis of alpha-ribazole, which is a key component of the lower ligand of cobalamin. Two X-ray structures of CobT are reported here at 1.9 A resolution. First, a complex of CobT with 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, and second, a complex of CobT with its reaction products, nicotinate and alpha-ribazole-5'-phosphate. CobT was cocrystallized with 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) in the space group P2(1)2(1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = 72.1 A, b = 90.2 A, and c = 47.5 A and one protomer per asymmetric unit. Subsequently, the crystals containing DMB were soaked in nicotinate mononucleotide whereupon the physiological reaction occurred in the crystal lattice to yield nicotinate and alpha-ribazole-5'-phosphate. These studies show that CobT is a dimer where each subunit consists of two domains. The large domain is dominated by a parallel six-stranded beta-sheet with connecting alpha-helices that exhibit the topology of a Rossmann fold. The small domain is made from components of the N- and C-terminal sections of the polypeptide chain and contains a three-helix bundle. The fold of CobT is unrelated to the type I and II phosphoribosylpyrophosphate dependent transferases and does not appear to be related to any other protein whose structure is known. The enzyme active site is located in a large cavity formed by the loops at the C-terminal ends of the beta-strands and the small domain of the neighboring subunit. DMB binds in a hydrophobic pocket created in part by the neighboring small domain. This is consistent with the broad specificity of this enzyme for aromatic substrates [Trzebiatowski, J. R., Escalante-Semerena (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 17662-17667]. The binding site for DMB suggests that Glu317 is the catalytic base required for the reaction. The remainder of the cavity binds the nicotinate and ribose-5'-phosphate moieties, which are nestled within the loops at the ends of the beta-strands. Interestingly, the orientation of the substrate and products are opposite from that expected for a Rossmann fold. PMID:10587435

  13. Characterization of a TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159-ala Human Lymphoblast Clone

    SciTech Connect

    Chyall, L.: Gauny, S.; Kronenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    TK6 cells are a well-characterized human B-lymphoblast cell line derived from WIL-2 cells. A derivative of the TK6 cell line that was stably transfected to express a mutated form of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL (TK6-Bcl-xL gly-159- ala clone #38) is compared with the parent cell line. Four parameters were evaluated for each cell line: growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency, and frequency of spontaneous mutation to 6‑thioguanine resistance (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase locus) or trifluorothymidine resistance (thymidine kinase locus). We conclude that the mutated Bcl-xL protein did not affect growth under normal conditions, plating efficiency or spontaneous mutation frequencies at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus. Results at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus were inconclusive. A mutant fraction for TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells exposed to 150cGy of 160kVp x-rays was also calculated. Exposure to x-irradiation increased the mutant fraction of TK6‑Bcl-xL gly-159-ala clone #38 cells.

  14. Production of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against human alphafetoprotein, a hepatocellular tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Hwang, Jing-Min; Chen, Chien-Yuan

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study is to produce and purify monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against human alphafetoprotein (AFP). Hyperimmune ICR mice produced PAbs after injection with 0.5 mL pristane, and were injected with NS-1 myeloma cells 2 weeks later. Hyperimmune Balb/c mice were used for the production of MAbs. Mice were immunized four times, given a final boost, and their spleen cells were collected and fused with NS-1 myeloma cells under the presence of PEG 1500. The fused cells were then selected in the hypoxanthine, aminopterine, and thymidine (HAT)-RPMIX medium. Anti-AFP antibody-secreting hybridoma cell lines with high titer were cloned by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then subcloned by limiting dilution in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS), hypoxanthine, thymidine (HT)-RPMIX medium. Twelve murine hybridoma producing anti-AFP MAbs were obtained and designated as A73F3, A73E8, B73C5, A73G3, A73F8, 67B3, B73C2, B73E1, A73G2, B73G7, B73D7, and B73F4. Isotypes of these MAbs were identified as IgG(1) heavy chain and kappa light chain. The MAbs with high purity were obtained by affinity chromatography. The purity analysis of AFP and the MAbs was performed by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:12193284

  15. Inhibition of an NAD+ Salvage Pathway Provides Efficient and Selective Toxicity to Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Erin M.; Oleson, Bryndon J.; Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Diers, Anne R.; Hu, Qinghui; Sahoo, Daisy; Hogg, Neil; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Corbett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The tumorigenic potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is a major limitation to the widespread use of hPSC derivatives in the clinic. Here, we demonstrate that the small molecule STF-31 is effective at eliminating undifferentiated hPSCs across a broad range of cell culture conditions with important advantages over previously described methods that target metabolic processes. Although STF-31 was originally described as an inhibitor of glucose transporter 1, these data support the reclassification of STF-31 as a specific NAD+ salvage pathway inhibitor through the inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). These findings demonstrate the importance of an NAD+ salvage pathway in hPSC biology and describe how inhibition of NAMPT can effectively eliminate hPSCs from culture. These results will advance and accelerate the development of safe, clinically relevant hPSC-derived cell-based therapies. PMID:25834119

  16. Molecular Basis for the Inhibition of Human NMPRTase, a Novel Target for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Tao, X.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase) has a crucial role in the salvage pathway of NAD{sup +} biosynthesis, and a potent inhibitor of NMPRTase, FK866, can reduce cellular NAD+ levels and induce apoptosis in tumors. We have determined the crystal structures at up to 2.1-Angstroms resolution of human and murine NMPRTase, alone and in complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide or the inhibitor FK866. The structures suggest that Asp219 is a determinant of substrate specificity of NMPRTase, which is confirmed by our mutagenesis studies. FK866 is bound in a tunnel at the interface of the NMPRTase dimer, and mutations in this binding site can abolish the inhibition by FK866. Contrary to current knowledge, the structures show that FK866 should compete directly with the nicotinamide substrate. Our structural and biochemical studies provide a starting point for the development of new anticancer agents.

  17. Monochromosomal hybrids for the analysis of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Athwal, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    In this research project the authors proposed to develop rodent/human hybrid cell lines each containing a single different human chromosome. The human chromosomes will be marked with Ecogpt and stably maintained by selection in the hybrid cells. The experimental approach to produce the proposed cell lines involve the following: they will first transfer a cloned selectable marker, Ecogpt (an E. coli gene for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: XGPRT) to normal diploid human cells using a retroviral vector. The transferred gene will integrate at random into multiple sites in the recipient cell genome. Clonal cell lines from independent transgenotes will each carry the selectable marker integrated into a different site and perhaps a different chromosome. The chromosome carrying the selectable marker will then be transferred further to mouse cells by microcell fusion. In addition they also use directed integration of Ecogpt into the chromosome present in rodent cells, otherwise not marked with a selectable marker. This allows them to complete the bank of proposed cell line. The human chromosome, since it will be marked with a selectable marker, can be transferred to any other cell line of interest for complementation analysis. Clones of each cell line, containing varying size segments of the same chromosome produced by selection for the retention or loss of the selectable marker following x-irradiation or by metaphase chromosome transfer method will facilitate physical mapping and determination of gene order on a chromosome. 1 fig.

  18. Random isolation of gene activator elements from the human genome.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, H

    1986-01-01

    Long-range-acting gene activator elements were randomly isolated from the human genome by functional selection. HeLa cells were transfected with an enhancer trap, a plasmid containing an enhancerless xanthine-guanosine phosphoribosyltransferase (gpt) gene transcribed from the simian virus 40 early promoter, and stably transformed GPT+ cells were selected. From several transformants, human DNA sequences flanking the enhancer trap were cloned. Two gene activators (GA1 and GA2) were found in the cloned human DNAs. GA1 and GA2 showed strong enhancer activity both in a stable transformation assay and in a transient expression assay. They had functional properties similar to those of other known enhancers: GA1 and GA2 activated the expression of a linked gene over distances of at least 5 kilobases both upstream and downstream in an orientation-independent fashion. GA1 may be required for the initial establishment of gene activation but was not essential for the maintenance of active expression. GA1 and GA2 were active not only in HeLa cells but also in other types of human cells, such as neuroblastoma cells. This indicates a limited but relatively broad cell type specificity. The HeLa genome contains multiple copies of GA1, while GA2 exists once in the genome. Images PMID:3025643

  19. A human monoclonal IgG1 lambda anti-hepatitis B surface antibody. Production, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    Stricker, E A; Tiebout, R F; Lelie, P N; Zeijlemaker, W P

    1985-09-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a donor with a high titre of anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) antibodies were fused with a cell line that was positive for Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen and sensitive to hypoxanthine-aminopterine-thymidine. A cell line was established that produces a monoclonal IgG1 lambda anti-HBs antibody. Afterwards, it appeared that the anti-HBs antibody-producing cell line had arisen from Epstein-Barr virus transformation of the donor B cells. The cell line is capable of producing up to 60 micrograms/ml of the monoclonal antibody, which has a high avidity for HBs antigen (Ag) and recognizes both ad and ay subtypes. The antibody is useful as a reagent for the detection of HBsAg in human serum. Over 1000 patient sera have been tested with a conventional third-generation assay in parallel, and only a single discrepant serum was found. PMID:4048870

  20. Alzheimer's disease shares gene expression aberrations with purinergic dysregulation of HPRT deficiency (Lesch-Nyhan disease).

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hyuk; Friedmann, Theodore

    2015-03-17

    Transcriptomic studies of murine D3 embryonic stem (ES) cells deficient in the purinergic biosynthetic function hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and undergoing dopaminergic neuronal differentiation has demonstrated a marked shift from neuronal to glial gene expression and aberrant expression of multiple genes also known to be aberrantly expressed in Alzheimer's and other CNS disorders. Such genetic dysregulations may indicate some shared pathogenic metabolic mechanisms in diverse CNS diseases. PMID:25636690

  1. Carrier and prenatal diagnosis of Lesch-Nyhan disease due to a defect in HPRT gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosa J; Garcia, Marta G; Puig, Juan G

    2012-12-15

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is caused by lack of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity. Mutations in HPRT1 gene show variability in type and location within the gene, and in certain patients the HPRT coding sequence is normal and the molecular defect cannot be found. These patients presented a decreased HPRT1 expression of unknown cause. This is the first report of a carrier and prenatal diagnosis of LND due to a defect in HPRT gene expression regulation. PMID:23046577

  2. Nucleotide synthesis in human erythrocyte: correlations between purines and pyridines.

    PubMed

    Micheli, V; Sestini, S; Rocchigiani, M; Pescaglini, M; Ricci, C

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of erythrocyte synthesis of nicotinate and adenine nucleotides has been investigated. Some effectors of the two committed enzymes, nicotinate- and adenine phosphoribosyltransferases, have been identified on crude lysates and on partially purified preparations of the former. Enzyme characteristics have been correlated with the nucleotide synthesis achieved in intact cells incubated in suitable mediums containing (14-C)-nicotinate or adenine. Inorganic phosphate, Mg ions and adenine nucleotides proved to be important effectors of pyridine synthesis, whose products, in turn, do not influence adenine nucleotide production. The production of pyridine nucleotides is little lower than that of adenine nucleotides in intact cells, even if adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase activity appears to be much more limited, inside the cell, than nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:3593306

  3. The cobT gene of Salmonella typhimurium encodes the NaMN: 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of N1-(5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl)-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, an intermediate in the synthesis of the nucleotide loop of cobalamin.

    PubMed Central

    Trzebiatowski, J R; O'Toole, G A; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    1994-01-01

    We present in vitro evidence which demonstrates that CobT is the nicotinate nucleotide:5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.21) that catalyzes the synthesis of N1-(5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl)-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, a biosynthetic intermediate of the pathway that assembles the nucleotide loop of cobalamin in Salmonella typhimurium. Mutants previously isolated as DMB auxotrophs are shown by physical and genetic mapping studies and complementation studies to carry lesions in cobT. Explanations for this unexpected phenotype of cobT mutants are discussed. The expected nucleotide loop assembly phenotype of cobT mutants can be observed only in a specific genetic background, i.e., cobB deficient, an observation that is consistent with the existence of an alternative CobT function (G. A. O'Toole, M. R. Rondon, and J. C. Escalante-Semerena, J. Bacteriol. 175:3317-3326, 1993). Computer analysis of CobT homologs showed that at the amino acid level, enteric CobT proteins were 80% identical whereas Pseudomonas denitrificans and Rhizobium meliloti CobT proteins were 95% identical. Interestingly, the degree of identity between enteric and nonenteric CobT homologs was only 30%. The same pattern of homologies was reported for the S. typhimurium CobA, Escherichia coli BtuR, and P. denitrificans CobO proteins (S.-J. Suh and J.C. Escalante-Semerena, Gene 129:93-97, 1993), suggesting evolutionary divergence between the cob genes found in the enteric bacteria E. coli and S. typhimurium and those found in P. denitrificans and R. meliloti. Images PMID:8206834

  4. The cobT gene of Salmonella typhimurium encodes the NaMN: 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of N1-(5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl)-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, an intermediate in the synthesis of the nucleotide loop of cobalamin.

    PubMed

    Trzebiatowski, J R; O'Toole, G A; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    1994-06-01

    We present in vitro evidence which demonstrates that CobT is the nicotinate nucleotide:5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.21) that catalyzes the synthesis of N1-(5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl)-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, a biosynthetic intermediate of the pathway that assembles the nucleotide loop of cobalamin in Salmonella typhimurium. Mutants previously isolated as DMB auxotrophs are shown by physical and genetic mapping studies and complementation studies to carry lesions in cobT. Explanations for this unexpected phenotype of cobT mutants are discussed. The expected nucleotide loop assembly phenotype of cobT mutants can be observed only in a specific genetic background, i.e., cobB deficient, an observation that is consistent with the existence of an alternative CobT function (G. A. O'Toole, M. R. Rondon, and J. C. Escalante-Semerena, J. Bacteriol. 175:3317-3326, 1993). Computer analysis of CobT homologs showed that at the amino acid level, enteric CobT proteins were 80% identical whereas Pseudomonas denitrificans and Rhizobium meliloti CobT proteins were 95% identical. Interestingly, the degree of identity between enteric and nonenteric CobT homologs was only 30%. The same pattern of homologies was reported for the S. typhimurium CobA, Escherichia coli BtuR, and P. denitrificans CobO proteins (S.-J. Suh and J.C. Escalante-Semerena, Gene 129:93-97, 1993), suggesting evolutionary divergence between the cob genes found in the enteric bacteria E. coli and S. typhimurium and those found in P. denitrificans and R. meliloti. PMID:8206834

  5. The effect of nutritional state and allopurinol on nucleotide formation in enterocytes from the guinea pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gross, C J; Savaiano, D A

    1991-03-01

    The uptake of purine nucleosides (guanosine and hypoxanthine) and bases (guanine, hypoxanthine and adenine) and their incorporation into nucleotides were studied in enterocytes isolated from fed and 3-day fasted guinea pig jejunum. Both total uptake and synthesis of nucleotides were greater for these purines in the fasted, as compared to the fed state for the first 5 min, when the initial substrate concentration in the medium was 10 microM. Increased uptake did not result from a change in the relative distribution of synthesized nucleotides between the fed and fasted states. Reduced catabolism was observed in the medium by enterocytes from fasted as compared to fed animals after 1 min of incubation with both inosine and guanosine. Preincubation of enterocytes with allopurinol (a xanthine oxidase inhibitor) decreased total uptake but increased the formation of IMP from hypoxanthine. Xanthine oxidase activity measured in mucosa from fasted guinea pigs was lower than that from fed animals (6.29 vs. 9.30 nmol/min per mg protein, respectively). However, activities of the salvage enzymes adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase were not significantly different between the fed and fasted states. These data show that allopurinol treatment, and mucosal atrophy resulting from fasting, decrease xanthine oxidase activity and increase nucleotide synthesis from exogenous substrates in enterocytes from the guinea-pig small intestine, suggesting a regulatory function of mucosal xanthine oxidase in purine salvage by the small intestine. PMID:2009279

  6. End points for biomonitoring: assay sensitivity/selectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, C S; Zimmer, D M; Harbach, P R; Yu, R L

    1996-01-01

    Estimation of population exposure and biological impact of potential hazards are central reasons for performing biomonitoring. The sensitivity of the biomonitoring methods and the linkage of the measured phenomenon to human disease are also important, but often overlooked, considerations. We are conducting experiments to evaluate the sensitivity of hprt mutation measurement in the nonhuman primate, the cynomolgus monkey. Our findings demonstrate in the monkey that hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) mutations produced in vivo can be detected using technique originally worked out using human cells; cynomolgus monkeys were chosen to avoid many of the complications encountered in studying humans. Sequencing of mutants from the monkey using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction methods has led us to conclude that there is similarity of the spectra observed between the spontaneous mutations detected in the two species. However, more recent data suggest that due to low sensitivity, the method is probably not appropriate for routine biomonitoring of randomly selected populations. For example, the inability of the hprt mutation assay to detect some very potent mutagens in the monkey and the effects of the time-dependent pattern of mutant occurrence serve to urge caution in interpretation of elevation or lack of elevation in mutant frequency. Mechanisms for splitting and archiving samples of human tissues/blood from populations at risk may prove valuable as methods improve. PMID:8781375

  7. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.

    1986-03-01

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with /sup 35/S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants.

  8. Purine metabolism in myeloid precursor cells during maturation. Studies with the HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, D L; Webster, H K; Wright, D G

    1983-01-01

    In studies with the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60, we defined changes in intermediary purine metabolism that appear to contribute to the regulation of terminal maturation in myeloid cells. When HL-60 cells were exposed to compounds that induce maturation, consistent alterations in purine metabolism were found to occur within 24 h of culture. Perturbation of guanosine nucleotide synthesis and decreases of up to 50% in intracellular guanylate pool sizes were associated with the induced maturation of these cells in response to diverse inducing agents. While immature HL-60 cells were observed to synthesize purine nucleotides by both de novo and salvage pathways, the activity of both pathways decreased in cells induced to mature, although the relative contribution of purine salvage increased. Moreover, incorporation of the salvage pathway precursor, [14C]hypoxanthine from the intermediate, inosine monophosphate (IMP), into guanylates was reduced by approximately 65% in induced HL-60 cells, reflecting decreased activity of both hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase and IMP dehydrogenase. When various inhibitors of IMP dehydrogenase (mycophenolic acid, 3-deazaguanosine, and 2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) were evaluated for their effects upon HL-60 cells, each agent was found to induce the cells to mature morphologically and functionally. Like other inducers, these agents decreased HL-60 cell proliferation and caused the cells to acquire an ability to phagocytose opsonized yeast and reduce nitroblue tetrazolium. Each agent reduced intracellular guanosine nucleotide pool sizes and induced HL-60 cell maturation at micromolar concentrations. These observations suggest that the size of intracellular guanosine nucleotide pools, the biosynthesis of guanosine nucleotides, and the activity of IMP dehydrogenase may be central to the regulation of terminal maturation in myeloid cells. PMID:6139386

  9. In Vitro Evaluation of Genotoxic Effects under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. PMID:25853218

  10. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5' end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays. PMID:26217821

  11. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. PMID:25853218

  12. The clastogenicity of 4NQO is cell-type dependent and linked to cytotoxicity, length of exposure and p53 proficiency.

    PubMed

    Brüsehafer, Katja; Manshian, Bella B; Doherty, Ann T; Zaïr, Zoulikha M; Johnson, George E; Doak, Shareen H; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2016-03-01

    4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) is used as a positive control in various genotoxicity assays because of its known mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The chemical is converted into 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide and gives rise to three main DNA adducts, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4AQO, 3-(desoxyguanosin-N (2)-yl)-4AQO and 3-(deoxyadenosin-N (6)-yl)-4AQO. This study was designed to assess the shape of the dose-response curve at low concentrations of 4NQO in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines, MCL-5, AHH-1 and TK6 as well as the mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell line in vitro. Chromosomal damage was investigated using the in vitro micronucleus assay, while further gene mutation and DNA damage studies were carried out using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase forward mutation and comet assays. 4NQO showed little to no significant increases in micronucleus induction in the human lymphoblastoid cell lines, even up to 55±5% toxicity. A dose-response relationship could only be observed in the mouse lymphoma cell line L5178Y after 4NQO treatment, even at concentrations with no reduction in cell viability. Further significant increases in gene mutation and DNA damage induction were observed. Hence, 4NQO is a more effective point mutagen than clastogen, and its suitability as a positive control for genotoxicity testing has to be evaluated for every individual assay. PMID:26362870

  13. Molecular epidemiology studies on occupational and environmental exposure to mutagens and carcinogens, 1997-1999.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J; Binková, B

    2000-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a new and evolving area of research, combining laboratory measurement of internal dose, biologically effective dose, biologic effects, and influence of individual susceptibility with epidemiologic methodologies. Biomarkers evaluated were selected according to basic scheme: biomarkers of exposure--metabolites in urine, DNA adducts, protein adducts, and Comet assay parameters; biomarkers of effect--chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene, and the activation of oncogenes coding for p53 or p21 proteins as measured on protein levels; biomarkers of susceptibility--genetic polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2. DNA adducts measured by 32P-postlabeling are the biomarker of choice for the evaluation of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Protein adducts are useful as a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke (4-aminobiphenyl) or to smaller molecules such as acrylonitrile or 1,3-butadiene. Of the biomarkers of effect, the most common are cytogenetic end points. Epidemiologic studies support the use of chromosomal breakage as a relevant biomarker of cancer risk. The use of the Comet assay and methods analyzing oxidative DNA damage needs reliable validation for human biomonitoring. Until now there have not been sufficient data to interpret the relationship between genotypes, biomarkers of exposure, and biomarkers of effect for assessing the risk of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:10698723

  14. Data supporting the design and evaluation of a universal primer pair for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Valadan, Reza; Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Alhosseini-Abyazani, Mahdyieh Naghavi; Amjadi, Omolbanin; Rafiei, Alireza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) is a common housekeeping gene for sample normalization in the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain (qRT-PCR). However, co-amplification of HPRT1 pseudogenes may affect accurate results obtained in qRT-PCR. We designed a primer pair (HPSF) for pseudogene-free amplification of HPRT1 in qRT-PCR [1]. We showed specific amplification of HPRT1 mRNA in some common laboratory cell lines, including HeLa, NIH/3T3, CHO, BHK, COS-7 and VERO. This article provides data supporting the presence and location of HPRT1 pseudogenes within human and mouse genome, and the strategies used for designing primers that avoid the co-amplification of contaminating pseudogenes in qRT-PCR. In silico analysis of human genome showed three homologous sequences for HPRT1 on chromosomes 4, 5 and 11. The mRNA sequence of HPRT1 was aligned with the pseudogenes, and the primers were designed toward 5′ end of HPRT1 mRNA that was only specific to HPRT1 mRNA not to the pseudogenes. The standard curve plot generated by HPSF primers showed the correlation coefficient of 0.999 and the reaction efficiency of 99.5%. Our findings suggest that HPSF primers can be recommended as a candidate primer pair for accurate and reproducible qRT-PCR assays. PMID:26217821

  15. Differential effects of immunosuppressants and antibiotics on human monoclonal antibody production in SCID mouse ascites by five heterohybridomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, K; Arai, K

    1998-02-01

    SCID mice were inoculated with five human-mouse heterohybridomas derived by fusion of human lymph node lymphocytes from lung cancer patients with murine myeloma cells or human-mouse heteromyeloma cells, and the production of their human monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the mouse ascites was investigated. In a comparison of the effects of pretreatment by i.p. (intraperitoneal) injection of pristane and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the antibody production of three of the hybridomas, pristane pretreatment resulted in substantial antibody production by all three, and pretreatment with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in similar or slightly lower levels of antibody production by two of the hybridomas but none by the third. In a second series of experiments using four of the hybridomas with pristane pretreatment, the co-injection of either penicillin G and streptomycin or kanamycin together with the hybridoma at the time of i.p. inoculation resulted in enhanced MAb production by the two heterohybridomas that had been propagated in medium containing hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine (HAT) but not by the two that had been propagated in HAT-free medium. PMID:9523236

  16. Characterization of human hybridomas secreting antibody to tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Truitt, K E; Raubitschek, A A; Senyk, G; Wang, J C

    1983-01-01

    We have selected a thioguanine-resistant lymphoblastoid cell line (LTR228) that forms human-human hybrids with high efficiency. Fusions with peripheral B cells consistently yield one colony per 10(5) cells plated. To produce antitetanus monoclonal antibodies, we withdrew blood from persons who had recently received booster injections of tetanus toxoid. T cells were separated from peripheral mononuclear cells by 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide-induced rosette formation, given 1,500 rads (1 rad = 0.01 gray), and cultured in a 1:1 ratio with nonrosetting cells. After 3 days of pokeweed mitogen stimulation, heterokaryons were produced by a plate-fusion technique and cultured in Iscove's Dulbecco's minimal essential medium for 24 hr prior to hybrid selection. Colonies appeared after 10-14 days in hypoxanthine/azaserine supplemented medium. A direct binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with specific tetanus toxoid inhibition identified positive wells. The hybridomas were cloned twice in soft agarose and by limiting dilution. The subcloned hybridomas double every 26 hr (vs. every 16 hr for LTR228) and produce 1-5 micrograms of specific IgG, kappa antibody per 10(6) cells per ml per 24 hr. All subclones (almost 200) continue to secrete antibody after 11 months of continuous culture. Twelve representative subclones have near tetraploid amounts of DNA. From hybridomas grown in 5-liter spinner flasks, milligram quantities of the IgG, kappa antibody were purified by staphylococcus protein A affinity chromatography. Specific antibody from hybridoma cultures protected mice injected with 1,000 times the LD50 of tetanus toxin. Our cell line and associated techniques should permit the production of therapeutically important human monoclonal antibodies. Images PMID:6578513

  17. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation. PMID:26330291

  18. Escape from Het-6 Incompatibility in Neurospora Crassa Partial Diploids Involves Preferential Deletion within the Ectopic Segment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. L.; Yang, C. J.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Glass, N. L.

    1996-01-01

    Self-incompatible het-6(OR)/het-6(PA) partial diploids of Neurospora crassa were selected from a cross involving the translocation strain, T(IIL -> IIIR)AR18, and a normal sequence strain. About 25% of the partial diploids exhibited a marked increase in growth rate after 2 weeks, indicating that ``escape'' from het-6 incompatibility had occurred. Near isogenic tester strains with different alleles (het-6(OR) and het-6(PA)) were constructed and used to determine that 80 of 96 escape strains tested were het-6(PA), retaining the het-6 allele found in the normal-sequence LGII position; 16 were het-6(OR), retaining the allele in the translocated position. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 45 escape strains were examined with probes made from cosmids that spanned the translocated region. Along with electrophoretic analysis of chromosomes from three escape strains, RFLPs showed that escape is associated with deletion of part of one or the other of the duplicated DNA segments. Deletions ranged in size from ~70 kbp up to putatively the entire 270-kbp translocated region but always included a 35-kbp region wherein we hypothesize het-6 is located. The deletion spectrum at het-6 thus resembles other cases where mitotic deletions occur such as of tumor suppressor genes and of the hprt gene (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) in humans. PMID:8889517

  19. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    PubMed

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G F; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K; Gill, Andrew C; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  20. Gene duplication and inactivation in the HPRT gene family.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Alaine C; Sullivan, Robert T; Thomas, James W

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) is a key enzyme in the purine salvage pathway, and mutations in HPRT1 cause Lesch-Nyhan disease. The studies described here utilized targeted comparative mapping and sequencing, in conjunction with database searches, to assemble a collection of 53 HPRT1 homologs from 28 vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis of these homologs revealed that the HPRT gene family expanded as the result of ancient vertebrate-specific duplications and is composed of three groups consisting of HPRT1, phosphoribosyl transferase domain containing protein 1 (PRTFDC1), and HPRT1L genes. All members of the vertebrate HPRT gene family share a common intron-exon structure; however, we have found that the three gene groups have distinct rates of evolution and potentially divergent functions. Finally, we report our finding that PRTFDC1 was recently inactivated in the mouse lineage and propose the loss of function of this gene as a candidate genetic basis for the phenotypic disparity between HPRT-deficient humans and mice. PMID:16928426

  1. In vitro susceptibilities of Plasmodium falciparum to compounds which inhibit nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Queen, S A; Jagt, D L; Reyes, P

    1990-01-01

    A unique metabolic feature of malaria parasites is their restricted ability to synthesize nucleotides. These parasites are unable to synthesize the purine ring and must therefore obtain preformed purine bases and nucleosides from the host cell, the erythrocyte. On the other hand, pyrimidines must be synthesized de novo because of the inability of the parasites to salvage preformed pyrimidines. Thus, one would anticipate that the blockage of purine salvage or pyrimidine de novo synthesis should adversely affect parasite growth. This premise was tested in vitro with a total of 64 compounds, mostly purine and pyrimidine analogs, known to inhibit one or more steps of nucleotide synthesis. Of the 64 compounds, 22 produced a 50% inhibition of the growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at a concentration of 50 microM or less. Inhibition of the growth of chloroquine-resistant clones of P. falciparum did not differ significantly from that of the growth of chloroquine-susceptible clones. Two of the compounds which effectively inhibited parasite growth, 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine, were found to be potent competitive inhibitors of a key purine-salvaging enzyme (hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) of the parasite. PMID:2201255

  2. Expression of reference genes and T helper 17 associated cytokine genes in the equine intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hjertner, Bernt; Olofsson, Karin M; Lindberg, Ronny; Fuxler, Lisbeth; Fossum, Caroline

    2013-09-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with a T helper 17 response in intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in humans. The involvement of interleukin (IL)-17 or IL-23 in equine IBD has not been studied and most gene expression studies in the equine intestine have been limited to the use of a single non-validated reference gene. In this study, expression of the reference gene candidates β2 microglobulin (β2M), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), histone H2A type 1, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), 60S ribosomal protein L32 (RPL32), succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA) and transferrin receptor 1 protein coding (TFRC)in the equine intestine was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Three to four reference genes were adequate for normalisation of gene expression in the healthy duodenum, mid-jejunum, colon and rectum, although each segment required a unique combination of reference genes. No combination of the evaluated genes was optimal for the caecum and ileum. Another combination of reference genes (GAPDH, HPRT, RPL32 and SDHA) was optimal for normalisation of rectal samples from healthy and IBD-affected horses, indicating that reference genes should be re-evaluated if material from diseased specimens is analysed. Basal expression of IL-12p40, IL-17A and IL-23p19 was detected in each segment, which will enable gene expression studies of these cytokines by relative quantification. PMID:23810185

  3. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fladeby, Cathrine; Vik, Erik Sebastian; Laerdahl, Jon K; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription. PMID:23139746

  4. Inosine Nucleobase Acts as Guanine in Interactions with Protein Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Hajnic, Matea; Ruiter, Anita de; Polyansky, Anton A; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2016-05-01

    A central intermediate in purine catabolism, the inosine nucleobase hypoxanthine is also one of the most abundant modified nucleobases in RNA and plays key roles in the regulation of gene expression and determination of cell fate. It is known that hypoxanthine acts as guanine when interacting with other nucleobases and base pairs most favorably with cytosine. However, its preferences when it comes to interactions with amino acids remain unknown. Here we present for the first time the absolute binding free energies and the associated interaction modes between hypoxanthine and all standard, non-glycyl/non-prolyl amino acid side chain analogs as derived from molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling in high- and low-dielectric environments. We illustrate the biological relevance of the derived affinities by providing a quantitative explanation for the specificity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, a key enzyme in the purine salvage pathway. Our results demonstrate that in its affinities for protein side chains, hypoxanthine closely matches guanine, much more so than its precursor adenine. PMID:27093234

  5. Method for the production of human T-T cell hybrids and production suppressor factor by human T-T cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Platsoucas, C.

    1989-06-27

    This patent describes a method for production of human T-T cell hybrids which produce Suppressor Factor wherein cells of lymphoid origin are fused with comprises: (a) mixing cells from a first parent cell line comprising a non-mutagenized Jurkat lymoblastoid T cell line, wherein the Jurkat lymphoblastoid cells are not sensitive and cannot be killed by hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium, with a second parent cell comprising mitogen or alloantigen activated peripheral blood leukocyte T cells or purified T-cells, (b) allowing the first and second parent cells to fuse in the presence of polyethylene glycol for about 10-20 minutes with gentle agitation to generate hybrids in the cell mixture, (c) incubating the cell mixture containing the hybrids and the first and second parent cells, after removal of the polyethylene glycol, for periods of between one to sixty days at 37{sup 0} in 5% CO/sub 2/, (d) selecting for the hybrids by separating the hybrids from the first parent Jurkat lymphoblastoid cells by coloning in agar medium wherein the hybrids form colonies, (e) recovering the hybrids that form colonies in agar medium and expanding them in culture, and (f) determining the presence of Suppressor Factor in the culture and recovering the T-T cell hybrids which produce suppressor factor.

  6. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Simon P.; Franco, Nunzio F.; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A.; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Brew, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes. PMID:26114426

  7. Expression and regulation of INTELECTIN1 in human granulosa-lutein cells: role in IGF-1-induced steroidogenesis through NAMPT.

    PubMed

    Cloix, Lucie; Reverchon, Maxime; Cornuau, Marion; Froment, Pascal; Ramé, Christelle; Costa, Caroline; Froment, Gisèle; Lecomte, Pierre; Chen, Wenyong; Royère, Dominique; Guerif, Fabrice; Dupont, Joëlle

    2014-08-01

    INTELECTIN (ITLN) is an adipokine involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and inflammatory and immunity responses. Serum ITLN levels are lower in obese, diabetic, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women than in control subjects. ITLN has never been studied in ovarian cells. Here, we identified ITLN1 in human ovarian follicles and investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of its expression in response to the insulin sensitizers metformin and rosiglitazone, in human granulosa-lutein cells (hGLCs) and in a human ovarian granulosa-like tumor cell line (KGN). We also studied the effects of human recombinant ITLN1 (hRom1) on steroid production and on the activation of various signaling pathways. Using RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry, we found that INTL1 is present in human follicular cells. Using ELISA, we showed that INTL levels are similar in plasma and follicular fluid (FF) in control patients, whereas they are higher in FF than in plasma in PCOS patients. In KGN cells and hGLCs, insulin (10(-8) M), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1; 10(-8) M), and metformin (10(-2) M or 10(-3) M) increased INTL1 expression (mRNA and protein) after 12 and 24 h of stimulation. For metformin, this effect was mediated by adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (PRKA). Furthermore, hRom1 increased nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) expression in KGN and hGLCs. We also showed that hRom1 increased IGF-1-induced progesterone and estradiol secretion and this was associated with an increase in the STAR and CYP19A1 protein levels and an increase in IGF-1R signaling. Furthermore, all these data were abolished when NAMPT was knocked down in KGN cells, suggesting that INTL1 improves IGF-1-induced steroidogenesis through induction of NAMPT in hGLCs. PMID:24943040

  8. Capillary bioreactors based on human purine nucleoside phosphorylase: a new approach for ligands identification and characterization.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Donato, Augusto José; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2012-04-01

    The enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the discovery of new lead compounds employed on the treatment severe T-cell mediated disorders. Within this context, the development of new, direct, and reliable methods for ligands screening is an important task. This paper describes the preparation of fused silica capillaries human PNP (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). The activity of the obtained IMER is monitored on line in a multidimensional liquid chromatography system, by the quantification of the product formed throughout the enzymatic reaction. The K(M) value for the immobilized enzyme was about twofold higher than that measured for the enzyme in solution (255 ± 29.2 μM and 133 ± 14.9 μM, respectively). A new fourth-generation immucillin derivative (DI4G; IC(50)=40.6 ± 0.36 nM), previously identified and characterized in HsPNP free enzyme assays, was used to validate the IMER as a screening method for HsPNP ligands. The validated method was also used for mechanistic studies with this inhibitor. This new approach is a valuable tool to PNP ligand screening, since it directly measures the hypoxanthine released by inosine phosphorolysis, thus furnishing more reliable results than those one used in a coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assay. PMID:22099222

  9. Age-associated modifications of Base Excision Repair activities in human skin fibroblast extracts.

    PubMed

    Pons, Bénédicte; Belmont, Anne-Sophie; Masson-Genteuil, Gwénaëlle; Chapuis, Violaine; Oddos, Thierry; Sauvaigo, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) is the predominant repair pathway responsible for removal of so-called small DNA lesions such as abasic sites (AP site), uracil (U), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8oxoG), thymine glycol (Tg). In this study, we investigated effect of aging on excision efficacy of several endogenous base lesions and AP sites using an in vitro multiplexed fluorescent approach on support (parallelized oligonucleotide cleavage assay). Human fibroblasts nuclear extracts from 29 donors of different ages were characterized in their ability to simultaneously excise the different lesions. Clearly, three different groups of lesions emerged according to the efficiency of their cleavage: one exhibited very high cleavage efficiency (AP sites and U paired with G), one showed intermediate cleavage efficiency (U paired with A and Tg). The third group included 8oxoG, A paired with 8oxoG, T at CpG site and hypoxanthine (Hx) and displayed poor repair. Aging was significantly associated with modification of excision efficiency for AP sites, uracil, Tg and 8oxoG. Repair rate decreased for the first three lesions and the most drastic effects were observed for repair of U:A. Surprisingly, excision of 8oxoG increased with aging suggesting a completely different regulation or adaptation for the initiation step of this related specific repair pathway. PMID:20854835

  10. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by direct and indirect chemical agents in a human teratoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1989-01-01

    In the present work, we have extended the characterization of the P3 cell line, derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma, by studying the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by direct and indirect carcinogens. Several direct-acting carcinogens produce a dose-dependent increase in SCEs. Most notably, N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and 7{beta}, 8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9 {alpha},10{alpha}-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene produce increases in SCEs at dosages comparable to those used to induce mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. The indirect carcinogens elicit SCEs only when the P3 cells are cocultured with cells capable of metabolizing the indirect carcinogens to the active form. Human breast carcinoma (BJ-015) and rat hepatoma (RL12) cells are equally efficient in activating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the active form. This cell-mediated induction of SCEs is obtained when P3 cells are incubated with live, x-irradiated, or UV-irradiated BJ or RL cells. This P3 cell line is thus equally suitable to study the induction of mutations or the induction of SCEs with direct and indirect carcinogens. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Oral glycotoxins are a modifiable cause of dementia and the metabolic syndrome in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weijing; Uribarri, Jaime; Zhu, Li; Chen, Xue; Swamy, Shobha; Zhao, Zhengshan; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Simonaro, Calogera; Kuchel, George A; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Woodward, Mark; Striker, Gary E; Vlassara, Helen

    2014-04-01

    Age-associated dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are currently epidemic. Neither their cause nor connection to the metabolic syndrome (MS) is clear. Suppression of deacetylase survival factor sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a key host defense, is a central feature of AD. Age-related MS and diabetes are also causally associated with suppressed SIRT1 partly due to oxidant glycotoxins [advanced glycation end products (AGEs)]. Changes in the modern diet include excessive nutrient-bound AGEs, such as neurotoxic methyl-glyoxal derivatives (MG). To determine whether dietary AGEs promote AD, we evaluated WT mice pair-fed three diets throughout life: low-AGE (MG(-)), MG-supplemented low-AGE (MG(+)), and regular (Reg) chow. Older MG(+)-fed mice, similar to old Reg controls, developed MS, increased brain amyloid-β42, deposits of AGEs, gliosis, and cognitive deficits, accompanied by suppressed SIRT1, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, AGE receptor 1, and PPARγ. These changes were not due to aging or caloric intake, as neither these changes nor the MS were present in age-matched, pair-fed MG(-) mice. The mouse data were enhanced by significant temporal correlations between high circulating AGEs and impaired cognition, as well as insulin sensitivity in older humans, in whom dietary and serum MG levels strongly and inversely associated with SIRT1 gene expression. The data identify a specific AGE (MG) as a modifiable risk factor for AD and MS, possibly acting via suppressed SIRT1 and other host defenses, to promote chronic oxidant stress and inflammation. Because SIRT1 deficiency in humans is both preventable and reversible by AGE reduction, a therapeutic strategy that includes AGE reduction may offer a new strategy to combat the epidemics of AD and MS. PMID:24567379

  12. Gonococci causing disseminated gonococcal infection are resistant to the bactericidal action of normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Schoolnik, G K; Buchanan, T M; Holmes, K K

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility of strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to the bactericidal action of normal human sera was determined for isolates from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection and uncomplicated gonorrhea. Serum susceptibility was correlated with penicillin susceptibility and auxotype. 38 of 39 strains (97%) of N. gonorrhoeae from Seattle patients with disseminated gonococcal infection were resistant to the complement-dependent bactericidal action of normal human sera. 36 of these were inhibited by less than or equal to mug/ml of penicillin G and required arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil for growth on chemically defined medium (Arg-Hyx-Ura- auxotype). 12 of 43 isolates from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea were also of the Arg-Hyx-Ura-auxotype, inhibited by less than or equal to 0.030 mug/ml of penicillin G, and serum resistant. Of the 31 remaining strains of other auxotypes isolated from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea, 18 (58.1%) were sensitive to normal human sera in titers ranging from 2 to 2,048. The bactericidal action of normal human sera may prevent the dissemination of serum-sensitive gonococci. However, since only a small proportion of individuals infected by serum-resistant strains develop disseminated gonococcal infection, serum resistance appears to be a necessary but not a sufficient virulence factor for dissemination. Host factors such as menstruation and pharyngeal gonococcal infection may favor the dissemination of serum-resistant strains. Since serum-resistant Arg-Hyx-Ura strains are far more frequently isolated from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection than serum-resistant strains of other auxotypes, Arg-Hyx-Ura-strains may possess other virulence factors in addition to serum resistance. PMID:825532

  13. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  14. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Human Placenta-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured on Normal Tissue Culture Surface and Hyaluronan-Coated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tzyy Yue; Chen, Ying-Hui; Liu, Szu-Heng; Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Yu, Chen-Hsiang; Chang, Chiung-Hsin; Huang, Lynn L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous results showed that hyaluronan (HA) preserved human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PDMSC) in a slow cell cycling mode similar to quiescence, the pristine state of stem cells in vivo, and HA was found to prevent murine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from senescence. Here, stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC) proteomic profiling was used to evaluate the effects of HA on aging phenomenon in stem cells, comparing (1) old and young passage PDMSC cultured on normal tissue culture surface (TCS); (2) old passage on HA-coated surface (CHA) compared to TCS; (3) old and young passage on CHA. The results indicated that senescence-associated protein transgelin (TAGLN) was upregulated in old TCS. Protein CYR61, reportedly senescence-related, was downregulated in old CHA compared to old TCS. The SIRT1-interacting Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) increased by 2.23-fold in old CHA compared to old TCS, and is 0.48-fold lower in old TCS compared to young TCS. Results also indicated that components of endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) pathway were upregulated in old CHA compared to old TCS cells, potentially for overcoming stress to maintain cell function and suppress senescence. Our data points to pathways that may be targeted by HA to maintain stem cells youth. PMID:27057169

  15. Development of a high-throughput screening system for identification of novel reagents regulating DNA damage in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seunghee; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major inducer of skin aging and accumulated exposure to UV radiation increases DNA damage in skin cells, including dermal fibroblasts. In the present study, we developed a novel DNA repair regulating material discovery (DREAM) system for the high-throughput screening and identification of putative materials regulating DNA repair in skin cells. First, we established a modified lentivirus expressing the luciferase and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) genes. Then, human dermal fibroblast WS-1 cells were infected with the modified lentivirus and selected with puromycin to establish cells that stably expressed luciferase and HPRT (DREAM-F cells). The first step in the DREAM protocol was a 96-well-based screening procedure, involving the analysis of cell viability and luciferase activity after pretreatment of DREAM-F cells with reagents of interest and post-treatment with UVB radiation, and vice versa. In the second step, we validated certain effective reagents identified in the first step by analyzing the cell cycle, evaluating cell death, and performing HPRT-DNA sequencing in DREAM-F cells treated with these reagents and UVB. This DREAM system is scalable and forms a time-saving high-throughput screening system for identifying novel anti-photoaging reagents regulating DNA damage in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:26431110

  16. Assay method for monitoring the inhibitory effects of antimetabolites on the activity of inosinate dehydrogenase in intact human CEM lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1992-01-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to monitor the inhibition of inosinate (IMP) dehydrogenase by antimetabolites in intact human CEM lymphocytes. This method is based on the determination of 3H release from [2,8-3H]hypoxanthine ([2,8-3H]Hx) or [2,8-3H]inosine ([2,8-3H]Ino). The validity of this procedure was assessed by evaluating IMP dehydrogenase inhibition in intact CEM cells by the well-known IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors ribavirin, mycophenolic acid and tiazofurin. As reference materials, several compounds that are targeted at other enzymes in de novo purine nucleotide anabolism (i.e. hadacidine, acivicin) or catabolism (i.e. 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) were evaluated. There was a strong correlation between the inhibitory effects of the IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors (ribavirin, mycophenolic acid, tiazofurin) on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx and [2,8-3H]Ino in intact CEM cells and their ability to decrease intracellular GTP pool levels. The other compounds (hadacidine, acivicin, 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) had no marked effect on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx. Using this method, we demonstrated that the novel ribavirin analogue, 5-ethynyl-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylimidazole-4-carboxamide, is a potent inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase in intact cells. PMID:1359876

  17. Lesch-Nyhan disease: clinical experience with nineteen patients.

    PubMed

    Christie, R; Bay, C; Kaufman, I A; Bakay, B; Borden, M; Nyhan, W L

    1982-06-01

    The clinical phenotype in Lesch-Nyhan disease has been analyzed in 19 patients studied in hospital. In each case the diagnosis was made on the basis of inactivity of the enzyme hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in erythrocyte lysates. All had hyperuricemia, and the presence of 'orange sand' in the diaper was a prominent early complaint. All had self-mutilative behavior, of which the most characteristic form was biting the fingers or lips. All had the neurological syndrome of spasticity and choreoathetoid involuntary movements. All but one had less-than-normal intelligence. PMID:7095300

  18. [Natural resistance of Drosophila melanogaster cells to 6-mercaptopurine and 8-azaguanine].

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, E V; Kakpakov, V T

    1975-01-01

    The growth of cells and the activity of some enzymes in diploid embryonic cells of Drosophila and Mosquito which cultivated for a long time in the presence of 6-mercaptopurine and 8-azaguanine were studied. It is shown on the culture of Drosophila cells that a high level of the resistance to 6-mercaptopurine and 8-azaguanine correlates with the absence of hypoxanthine-guanine phyosphorybosyltransferase (HGPRT) in them. HGPRT activity was not also revealed in extracts obtained from flies of different lines, which draws to the conclusion on the natural resistance of Drosophila cells to hypoxanthine and quanine analogues. Similar resistance was found out in Mosquito cell lines Mos 20 A. The second enzyme of such a type, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, is present in the cells of all investigated lines. This fact explaines the retention of the sensitivity to adenine analogues in these cells. PMID:819323

  19. Monitoring the Response of the Human Urinary Metabolome to Brief Maximal Exercise by a Combination of RP-UPLC-MS and (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pechlivanis, Alexandros; Papaioannou, Konstantinos G; Tsalis, George; Saraslanidis, Ploutarchos; Mougios, Vassilis; Theodoridis, Georgios A

    2015-11-01

    The delineation of exercise biochemistry by utilizing metabolic fingerprinting has become an established strategy. We present a combined RP-UPLC-MS and (1)H NMR strategy, supplemented by photometric assays, to monitor the response of the human urinary metabolome to short maximal exercise. Seventeen male volunteers performed two identical sprint sessions on separate days, consisting of three 80 m maximal runs. Using univariate and multivariate analyses, we followed the fluctuation of 37 metabolites at 1, 1.5, and 2 h postexercise. 2-Hydroxyisovalerate, 2-hydroxybutyrate, 2-oxoisocaproate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, 2-oxoisovalerate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, alanine, pyruvate, and fumarate increased 1 h postexercise and then returned toward baseline. Lactate and acetate were higher than baseline at 1 and 1.5 h. Hypoxanthine and inosine remained above baseline throughout the postexercise period. Urate decreased at 1 h and increased at 1.5 h before returning to baseline. Valine, isoleucine, succinate, citrate, trimethylamine, trimethylamine N-oxide, tyrosine, and formate decreased at 1 h and/or 1.5 h postexercise and then returned to baseline. Creatinine gradually decreased over the sampling period. Glycine, 4-aminohippurate, and hippurate remained below baseline throughout the postexercise period. Our findings show that even one-half minute of maximal exercise elicited major perturbations in human metabolism, several of which persisted for at least 2 h. PMID:26419189

  20. Ex vivo Expansion of Human Adult Pancreatic Cells with Properties of Distributed Stem Cells by Suppression of Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Paré, JF; Sherley, JL

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for type I diabetes (T1D) might be improved if pancreatic stem cells were readily available for investigation. Unlike macroscopic islets, pancreatic tissue stem cells could more easily access the retroperitoneal pancreatic environment and thereby might achieve more effective pancreatic regeneration. Unfortunately, whether the adult pancreas actually contains renewing stem cells continues as a controversial issue in diabetes research. We evaluated a new method developed in our lab for expanding renewing distributed stem cells (DSCs) from adult tissues as a means to provide more evidence for adult pancreatic stem cells, and potentially advance their availability for future clinical investigation. The new method was designed to switch DSCs from asymmetric self-renewal to symmetric self-renewal, which promotes their exponential expansion in culture with reduced production of differentiated cells. Called suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK), the method uses natural purine metabolites to accomplish the self-renewal pattern shift. The SACK purine metabolites xanthine, xanthosine, and hypoxanthine were evaluated for promoting expansion of DSCs from the pancreas of adult human postmortem donors. Xanthine and xanthosine were effective for deriving both pooled and clonal populations of cells with properties indicative of human pancreatic DSCs. The expanded human cell strains had signature SACK agent-suppressible asymmetric cell kinetics, produced Ngn3+ bipotent precursors for α-cells and β-cells, and were non-tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. Our findings support the existence of pancreatic DSCs in the adult human pancreas and indicate a potential path to increasing their availability for future clinical evaluation. PMID:25197614

  1. Transfer of nonselectable genes into mouse teratocarcinoma cells and transcription of the transferred human. beta. -globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.F.; Mintz, B.

    1982-02-01

    Teratocarcinoma (TCC) stem cells can function as vehicles for the introduction of specific recombinant genes into mice. Because most genes do not code for a selectable marker, the authors investigated the transformation efficiency of vectors with a linked selectable gene. In one series, TCC cells first selected for thymidine kinase deficiency were treated with DNA from the plasmid vector PtkH..beta..1 containing the human genomic ..beta..-globin gene and the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus. A high transformation frequency was obtained after selection in hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium. Hybridization tests revealed that the majority of transformants had intact copies of the human gene among three to six total copies per cell. These were associated with cellular DNA sequences as judged from the presence of additional new restriction fragments and from stability of the sequences in tumors produced by injecting the cells subcutaneously. Total polyadenylate-containing RNA from cell cultures of two out of four transformants examined showed hybridization to the human gene probe: one RNA species resembled mature human ..beta..-globin mRNA transcripts; the others were of larger size. In differentiating tumors, various tissues, including hematopoietic cells of TCC provenance could be found. In a second model set of experiments, wild-type TCC cells were used to test a dominant-selection scheme with pSV-gpt vectors. Numerous transformants were isolated, and their transfected DNA was apparently stably integrated. Thus, any gene of choice can be transferred into TCC stem cells even without mutagenesis of the cells, and selected cell clones can be characterized. Cells of interest may then be introduced into early embryos to produce new mouse strains with predetermined genetic changes.

  2. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a wholly new…

  3. Humanizing the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dennis

    1983-01-01

    Reviews some of the steps taken at Shoreline Community College to develop cooperative programs involving vocational and academic faculty, including the creation of a Humanities Advisory Council. Briefly describes some of the cooperative programs, e.g., symposia on critical issues in higher education, guest lectures, and high school outreach. (AYC)

  4. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  5. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L; Bedford, Joel S

    2002-11-15

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci. PMID:12438223

  6. Humanity and human DNA.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Genetics has marked the second half of the 20th century by addressing such formidable problems as the identification of our genes and their role, their interaction with the environment, and even their therapeutic uses. The identification of genes raises questions about differences between humans and non-humans, as well as about the evolution towards trans-humanism and post-humanism. In practise, however, the main question concerns the limits of prenatal genetic diagnosis, not only on account of the seriousness of the affections involved but also because of the choice to be made between following-up the medical indication and engaging in a systematic public health strategy aimed at eliminating children with certain handicaps. History reminds us that genetic science has already been misused by political forces influenced by the ideas of eugenics, particularly in the Nazi period. We may wonder whether it is reasonable to formulate a judgement on the life of a child yet to be born, merely on the basis of a DNA analysis. My experience as a practising geneticist and my involvement in French politics forces me to stress the dangers of a new eugenics hiding behind a medical mask. As demonstrated by epigenetics, human beings cannot be reduced to their DNA alone. In our society, one of the problems concerns individuals whose lives may be considered by some as simply not worth living. Another problem is the place and the social significance of the handicapped amongst us. Fortunately, recent progresses in gene therapy, biotherapy, and even pharmacology, appear to be opening up promising therapeutic perspectives. We should bear in mind that the chief vocation of medical genetics, which fully belongs to the art of medicine, is to heal and to cure. This is precisely where genetics should concentrate its efforts software. PMID:22705070

  7. Human bites

    MedlinePlus

    Bites - human ... Human bites that break the skin, like all puncture wounds, have a high risk of infection. They ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than most animal ...

  8. Long-term efficiency of mesenchymal stromal cell-mediated CD-MSC/5FC therapy in human melanoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, L; Skolekova, S; Demkova, L; Bohovic, R; Matuskova, M

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) can be exploited as cellular delivery vehicles for the enzymes converting non-toxic prodrugs to toxic substances. Because of their inherent chemoresistance, they exert potent bystander and antitumor effect. Here we show that the human adipose tissue-derived MSC expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD-MSC) in combination with 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) mediated a long-term tumor-free survival in the 83.3% of tumor-bearing animals. CD-MSC/5FC treatment induced cytotoxicity against model human melanoma cells EGFP-A375. Only 4% of the therapeutic CD-MSC cells eliminated >98.5% of the tumor cells in vitro. Long-term tumor-free survival was confirmed in 15 out of the 18 animals. However, repeatedly used CD-MSC/5FC therapeutic regimen generated more aggressive and metastatic variant of the melanoma cells EGFP-A375/Rel3. These cells derived from the refractory xenotransplants exhibited increased resistance to the CD-MSC/5FC treatment, altered cell adhesion, migration, tumorigenic and metastatic properties. However, long-term curative effect was achieved by the augmentation of the CD-MSC/5FC regimen along with the inhibition of c-Met/hepatocyte growth factor signaling axis in this aggressive melanoma derivative. In summary, the CD-MSC/5FC regimen can be regarded as a very effective antitumor approach to achieve long-term tumor-free survival as demonstrated on a mouse model of aggressive human melanoma xenografts. PMID:25056607

  9. Pseudogenes as Weaknesses of ACTB (Actb) and GAPDH (Gapdh) Used as Reference Genes in Reverse Transcription and Polymerase Chain Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Yan; Luo, Dianzhong; Liao, D. Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The genes encoding β-actin (ACTB in human or Actb in mouse) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH in human or Gapdh in mouse) are the two most commonly used references for sample normalization in determination of the mRNA level of interested genes by reverse transcription (RT) and ensuing polymerase chain reactions (PCR). In this study, bioinformatic analyses revealed that the ACTB, Actb, GAPDH and Gapdh had 64, 69, 67 and 197 pseudogenes (PGs), respectively, in the corresponding genome. Most of these PGs are intronless and similar in size to the authentic mRNA. Alignment of several PGs of these genes with the corresponding mRNA reveals that they are highly homologous. In contrast, the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-1 gene (HPRT1 in human or Hprt in mouse) only had 3 or 1 PG, respectively, and the mRNA has unique regions for primer design. PCR with cDNA or genomic DNA (gDNA) as templates revealed that our HPRT1, Hprt and GAPDH primers were specific, whereas our ACTB and Actb primers were not specific enough both vertically (within the cDNA) and horizontally (compared cDNA with gDNA). No primers could be designed for the Gapdh that would not mis-prime PGs. Since most of the genome is transcribed, we suggest to peers to forgo ACTB (Actb) and GAPDH (Dapdh) as references in RT-PCR and, if there is no surrogate, to use our primers with extra caution. We also propose a standard operation procedure in which design of primers for RT-PCR starts from avoiding mis-priming PGs and all primers need be tested for specificity with both cDNA and gDNA. PMID:22927912

  10. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein-protein interactions with HPRT1.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S; Jackson, Brian C; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C

    2013-02-25

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. PMID:23348497

  11. Molecular characterization of Borrelia persica, the agent of tick borne relapsing fever in Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

    PubMed

    Safdie, Gracia; Farrah, Iba Y; Yahia, Reem; Marva, Esther; Wilamowski, Amos; Sawalha, Samer S; Wald, Naama; Schmiedel, Judith; Moter, Annette; Göbel, Ulf B; Bercovier, Herve; Abdeen, Ziad; Assous, Marc V; Fishman, Yolanta

    2010-01-01

    The identification of the Tick Borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) agent in Israel and the Palestinian Authority relies on the morphology and the association of Borrelia persica with its vector Ornithodoros tholozani. Molecular based data on B. persica are very scarce as the organism is still non-cultivable. In this study, we were able to sequence three complete 16S rRNA genes, 12 partial flaB genes, 18 partial glpQ genes, 16 rrs-ileT intergenic spacers (IGS) from nine ticks and ten human blood samples originating from the West Bank and Israel. In one sample we sequenced 7231 contiguous base pairs that covered completely the region from the 5'end of the 16S rRNA gene to the 5'end of the 23S rRNA gene comprising the whole 16S rRNA (rrs), and the following genes: Ala tRNA (alaT), Ile tRNA (ileT), adenylosuccinate lyase (purB), adenylosuccinate synthetase (purA), methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (mag), hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hpt), an hydrolase (HAD superfamily) and a 135 bp 5' fragment of the 23S rRNA (rrlA) genes. Phylogenic sequence analysis defined all the Borrelia isolates from O. tholozani and from human TBRF cases in Israel and the West Bank as B. persica that clustered between the African and the New World TBRF species. Gene organization of the intergenic spacer between the 16S rRNA and the 23S rRNA was similar to that of other TBRF Borrelia species and different from the Lyme disease Borrelia species. Variants of B. persica were found among the different genes of the different isolates even in the same sampling area. PMID:21124792

  12. Molecular Characterization of Borrelia persica, the Agent of Tick Borne Relapsing Fever in Israel and the Palestinian Authority

    PubMed Central

    Safdie, Gracia; Farrah, Iba Y.; Yahia, Reem; Marva, Esther; Wilamowski, Amos; Sawalha, Samer S.; Wald, Naama; Schmiedel, Judith; Moter, Annette; Göbel, Ulf B.; Bercovier, Herve; Abdeen, Ziad; Assous, Marc V.; Fishman, Yolanta

    2010-01-01

    The identification of the Tick Borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) agent in Israel and the Palestinian Authority relies on the morphology and the association of Borrelia persica with its vector Ornithodoros tholozani. Molecular based data on B. persica are very scarce as the organism is still non-cultivable. In this study, we were able to sequence three complete 16S rRNA genes, 12 partial flaB genes, 18 partial glpQ genes, 16 rrs-ileT intergenic spacers (IGS) from nine ticks and ten human blood samples originating from the West Bank and Israel. In one sample we sequenced 7231 contiguous base pairs that covered completely the region from the 5′end of the 16S rRNA gene to the 5′end of the 23S rRNA gene comprising the whole 16S rRNA (rrs), and the following genes: Ala tRNA (alaT), Ile tRNA (ileT), adenylosuccinate lyase (purB), adenylosuccinate synthetase (purA), methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (mag), hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hpt), an hydrolase (HAD superfamily) and a 135 bp 5′ fragment of the 23S rRNA (rrlA) genes. Phylogenic sequence analysis defined all the Borrelia isolates from O. tholozani and from human TBRF cases in Israel and the West Bank as B. persica that clustered between the African and the New World TBRF species. Gene organization of the intergenic spacer between the 16S rRNA and the 23S rRNA was similar to that of other TBRF Borrelia species and different from the Lyme disease Borrelia species. Variants of B. persica were found among the different genes of the different isolates even in the same sampling area. PMID:21124792

  13. Biomarker triplet NAMPT/VEGF/HER2 as a de novo detection panel for the diagnosis and prognosis of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanyan; Guo, Meiyan; Zhang, Lingyun; Xu, Tao; Wang, Li; Xu, Guoxiong

    2016-01-01

    The early detection of breast cancer, the most common malignant tumor disease in women worldwide, relies on mammography and self breast examination. Here we evaluated the concentration of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) in serum and their expression in breast tissues associated with the clinicopathological features of patients with benign and malignant breast tumors. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 proteins were overexpressed in breast tumors. The highest expression was observed in malignant tumors, low in benign tumors and negative in the adjacent normal tissue, indicating that the triplets may be progression markers and correlated with each other. The detection rate of NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 alone in tissue was 54.17, 64.58 and 60.42%, respectively, and was increased to about 79% in double combination and to 90% in triple combination. The basal levels of serum NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 in healthy controls were 94.90±4.24 pg/ml, 87.02±2.41 pg/ml and 1.12±0.04 ng/ml, respectively, measured by ELISA and found to be increased by 6.64-, 1.76- and 2.52-fold, respectively, in patients with malignant breast tumor. These elevated serum levels of NAMPT, VEGF and HER2 in patients were decreased after tumor removal, suggesting that these molecules are the indicators of treatment efficacy. The combined measurement of these triplets together may improve the sensitivity of breast cancer diagnosis and may potentially be used as a testing panel for the detection of malignant tumors, the assessment of treatment effectiveness and the monitoring of the disease progression in patients with breast cancer. Thus, we propose that the biomarker triplet NAMPT/VEGF/HER2 can be used as a de novo detection panel for the diagnosis and prognosis of human breast cancer. PMID:26531769

  14. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  15. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  16. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  17. Mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of five antitumor ellipticines in mammalian cells and their structure-activity relationships in Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarini, D.M.; Cros, S.; Paoletti, C.; Lecointe, P.; Hsie, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of five antitumor compounds (ellipticines) were investigated in the Chinese hamster ovary cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase assay and in six strains of Salmonella. All five compounds (ellipticine, 9-methoxyellipticine, 9-hydroxyellipticine, 9-aminoellipticine, and 2-methyl-9-hydroxyellipticinium) were cytotoxic and mutagenic in the Chinese hamster ovary cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase assay in the presence or absence of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver S9, and all except the last compound were mutagenic in Salmonella. Based on the reversion pattern obtained in various frame-shift and DNA repair-proficient (uvrB/sup +/) or -deficient (uvrB) strains of Salmonella in the presence or absence of S9, the first three compounds appear to cause frameshift mutations by both intercalation and covalent bonding with DNA; thus, these are classified as reactive intercalators. However, 9-aminoellipticine intercalates only weakly and may instead exert its mutagenic activity primarily (or exclusively) by forming a covalent adduct with DNA. Compared to the published antitumor data obtained in mice, the results in Salmonella and Chinese hamster ovary cells suggest that the ability of ellipticine, 9-methoxyellipticine, and 9-hydroxyellipticine to intercalate with DNA, induce frame-shift mutations, and cause cell killing is associated with and may be the basis for their antitumor activity. The observation that the ellipticines are mutagenic in mammalian cells suggests that these antitumor agents may be carcinogenic.

  18. Different mechanisms of radiation-induced loss of heterozygosity in two human lymphoid cell lines from a single donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, C.; Gauny, S. S.; Liu, W. C.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C. L.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Allelic loss is an important mutational mechanism in human carcinogenesis. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at an autosomal locus is one outcome of the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and can occur by deletion or by mitotic recombination. We report that mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes occurred in human lymphoid cells exposed to densely ionizing radiation. We used cells derived from the same donor that express either normal TP53 (TK6 cells) or homozygous mutant TP53 (WTK1 cells) to assess the influence of TP53 on radiation-induced mutagenesis. Expression of mutant TP53 (Met 237 Ile) was associated with a small increase in mutation frequencies at the hemizygous HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus, but the mutation spectra were unaffected at this locus. In contrast, WTK1 cells (mutant TP53) were 30-fold more susceptible than TK6 cells (wild-type TP53) to radiation-induced mutagenesis at the TK1 (thymidine kinase) locus. Gene dosage analysis combined with microsatellite marker analysis showed that the increase in TK1 mutagenesis in WTK1 cells could be attributed, in part, to mitotic recombination. The microsatellite marker analysis over a 64-cM region on chromosome 17q indicated that the recombinational events could initiate at different positions between the TK1 locus and the centromere. Virtually all of the recombinational LOH events extended beyond the TK1 locus to the most telomeric marker. In general, longer LOH tracts were observed in mutants from WTK1 cells than in mutants from TK6 cells. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the incidence of radi-ation-induced mutations is dependent on the genetic background of the cell at risk, on the locus examined, and on the mechanisms for mutation available at the locus of interest.

  19. A phosphoenzyme mimic, overlapping catalytic sites and reaction coordinate motion for human NAMPT

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Emmanuel S.; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3− as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site. PMID:19666527

  20. A Phosphoenzyme Mimic, Overlapping Catalytic Sites and Reaction Coordinate Motion for Human NAMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, E.; Ho, M; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3- as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site.

  1. Nucleosomes Are Translationally Positioned on the Active Allele and Rotationally Positioned on the Inactive Allele of the HPRT Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien; Yang, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    Differential chromatin structure is one of the hallmarks distinguishing active and inactive genes. For the X-linked human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (HPRT), this difference in chromatin structure is evident in the differential general DNase I sensitivity and hypersensitivity of the promoter regions on active versus inactive X chromosomes. Here we characterize the nucleosomal organization responsible for the differential chromatin structure of the active and inactive HPRT promoters. The micrococcal nuclease digestion pattern of chromatin from the active allele in permeabilized cells reveals an ordered array of translationally positioned nucleosomes in the promoter region except over a 350-bp region that is either nucleosome free or contains structurally altered nucleosomes. This 350-bp region includes the entire minimal promoter and all of the multiple transcription initiation sites of the HPRT gene. It also encompasses all of the transcription factor binding sites identified by either dimethyl sulfate or DNase I in vivo footprinting of the active allele. In contrast, analysis of the inactive HPRT promoter reveals no hypersensitivity to either DNase I or a micrococcal nuclease and no translational positioning of nucleosomes. Although nucleosomes on the inactive promoter are not translationally positioned, high-resolution DNase I cleavage analysis of permeabilized cells indicates that nucleosomes are rotationally positioned over a region of at least 210 bp on the inactive promoter, which coincides with the 350-bp nuclease-hypersensitive region on the active allele, including the entire minimal promoter. This rotational positioning of nucleosomes is not observed on the active promoter. These results suggest a model in which the silencing of the HPRT promoter during X chromosome inactivation involves remodeling a transcriptionally competent, translationally positioned nucleosomal array into a transcriptionally repressed architecture consisting of rotationally but not translationally positioned nucleosomal arrays. PMID:11604504

  2. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S.

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Genetic manipulation in Δku80 strains for functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein(1,2). The Δku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The Δku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale(1-4). Here, we report methods for using type I and type II Δku80Δhxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in Δku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human pathogens that cause malaria (Plasmodium sp.) and cryptosporidiosis (Cryptosporidium). PMID:23892917

  4. Severe pyridine nucleotide depletion in fibroblasts from Lesch-Nyhan patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, Lynette D; Jacomelli, Gabriella; Micheli, Vanna; Slade, Tina; Simmonds, H Anne

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between a complete deficiency of the purine enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and the neurobehavioural abnormalities in Lesch-Nyhan disease remains an enigma. In vitro studies using lymphoblasts or fibroblasts have evaluated purine and pyrimidine metabolism with conflicting results. This study focused on pyridine nucleotide metabolism in control and Lesch-Nyhan fibroblasts using radiolabelled salvage precursors to couple the extent of uptake with endocellular nucleotide concentrations. The novel finding, highlighted by specific culture conditions, was a marked NAD depletion in Lesch-Nyhan fibroblasts. ATP and GTP were also 50% of the control, as reported in lymphoblasts. A 6-fold greater incorporation of [(14)C]nicotinic acid into nicotinic acid- adenine dinucleotide by Lesch-Nyhan fibroblasts, with no unmetabolized substrate (20% in controls), supported disturbed pyridine metabolism, NAD depletion being related to utilization by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in DNA repair. Although pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were similar to controls, Lesch-Nyhan cells showed reduced [(14)C]cytidine/uridine salvage into UDP sugars. Incorporation of [(14)C]uridine into CTP by both was minimal, with more than 50% [(14)C]cytidine metabolized to UTP, indicating that fibroblasts, unlike lymphoblasts, lack active CTP synthetase, but possess cytidine deaminase. Restricted culture conditions may be neccesary to mimic the situation in human brain cells at an early developmental stage. Cell type may be equally important. NAD plus ATP depletion in developing brain could restrict DNA repair, leading to neuronal damage/loss by apoptosis, and, with GTP depletion, affect neurotransmitter synthesis and basal ganglia dopaminergic neuronal systems. Thus aberrant pyridine nucleotide metabolism could play a vital role in the pathophysiology of Lesch-Nyhan disease. PMID:11996669

  5. Loss of Dopamine Phenotype Among Midbrain Neurons in Lesch–Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Göttle, Martin; Prudente, Cecilia N.; Fu, Rong; Sutcliffe, Diane; Pang, Hong; Cooper, Deborah; Veledar, Emir; Glass, Jonathan D.; Gearing, Marla; Visser, Jasper E.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lesch–Nyhan disease (LND) is caused by congenital deficiency of the purine recycling enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt). Affected patients have a peculiar neurobehavioral syndrome linked with reductions of dopamine in the basal ganglia. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the anatomical basis for the reduced dopamine in human brain specimens collected at autopsy. Methods Histopathological studies were conducted using autopsy tissue from 5 LND cases and 6 controls. Specific findings were replicated in brain tissue from an HGprt-deficient knockout mouse using immunoblots, and in a cell model of HGprt deficiency by flow-activated cell sorting (FACS). Results Extensive histological studies of the LND brains revealed no signs suggestive of a degenerative process or other consistent abnormalities in any brain region. However, neurons of the substantia nigra from the LND cases showed reduced melanization and reduced immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. In the HGprt-deficient mouse model, immunohistochemical stains for TH revealed no obvious loss of midbrain dopamine neurons, but quantitative immunoblots revealed reduced TH expression in the striatum. Finally, 10 independent HGprt-deficient mouse MN9D neuroblastoma lines showed no signs of impaired viability, but FACS revealed significantly reduced TH immunoreactivity compared to the control parent line. Interpretation These results reveal an unusual phenomenon in which the neurochemical phenotype of dopaminergic neurons is not linked with a degenerative process. They suggest an important relationship between purine recycling pathways and the neurochemical integrity of the dopaminergic phenotype. PMID:24891139

  6. Carboxylated Short Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes But Not Plain and Multi-walled Short Carbon Nanotubes Show in vitro Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mrakovcic, Maria; Meindl, Claudia; Leitinger, Gerd; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) resemble asbestos fibers due to their high length to diameter ratio and they thus have genotoxic effects. Another parameter that might explain their genotoxic effects is contamination with heavy metal ions. On the other hand, short (1–2 μm) CNTs do not resemble asbestos fibers, and, once purified from contaminations, they might be suitable for medical applications. To identify the role of fiber thickness and surface properties on genotoxicity, well-characterized short pristine and carboxylated single-walled (SCNTs) and multi-walled (MCNTs) CNTs of different diameters were studied for cytotoxicity, the cell’s response to oxidative stress (immunoreactivity against hemoxygenase 1 and glutathione levels), and in a hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) assay using V79 chinese hamster fibroblasts and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. DNA repair was demonstrated by measuring immunoreactivity against activated histone H2AX protein. The number of micronuclei as well as the number of multinucleated cells was determined. CNTs acted more cytotoxic in V79 than in A549 cells. Plain and carboxylated thin (<8 nm) SCNTs and MCNTs showed greater cytotoxic potential and carboxylated CNTs showed indication for generating oxidative stress. Multi-walled CNTs did not cause HPRT mutation, micronucleus formation, DNA damage, interference with cell division, and oxidative stress. Carboxylated, but not plain, SCNTs showed indication for in vitro DNA damage according to increase of H2AX-immunoreactive cells and HPRT mutation. Although short CNTs presented a low in vitro genotoxicity, functionalization of short SCNTs can render these particles genotoxic. PMID:25505129

  7. Targeted insertion of two Mthfr promoters in mice reveals temporal- and tissue-specific regulation.

    PubMed

    Pickell, Laura; Wu, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Leclerc, Daniel; Friedman, Hana; Peterson, Alan C; Rozen, Rima

    2011-12-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a key enzyme in folate metabolism, synthesizes 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the main circulatory form of folate which is required for maintaining nontoxic levels of homocysteine and providing one-carbon units for methylation. A common 677C → T variant in MTHFR confers mild MTHFR deficiency and has been associated with a number of human disorders, including neural tube defects and vascular disease. Two promoters of Mthfr, designated as upstream and downstream promoters, are located upstream of a transcription start site cluster and have previously demonstrated cell-specific activities. In this study we used a unique approach for targeted, single-copy transgene insertion to generate transgenic mice carrying a Mthfr upstream or Mthfr downstream promoter-reporter construct located 5' to the endogenous Hprt (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase) locus. The Mthfr downstream promoter demonstrated activity in the neural tube, neural crest cells, dorsal root ganglia, heart, and endothelial cells of blood vessels in 10.5-days post coitum embryos and placentas. Upstream promoter activity was absent at this developmental stage. Postnatally, both promoters demonstrated activity in the brain stem, hippocampus, and thalamus of 1-week-old brain that became stronger in the adult. The Mthfr upstream promoter also showed activity in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex. Both promoters were active in male reproductive tissues, including 1-week-old epididymides, and there was upstream promoter-specific activity in the adult testis. Our investigation of Mthfr regulation in an in vivo mouse model revealed temporal- and tissue-specific regulation that supports important roles for MTHFR in the developing embryo, and in postnatal brain and male reproductive tissues. PMID:21769670

  8. Evaluation and validation of suitable reference genes for reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction studies in cholangiocarcinoma patients and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    YANG, JINGHUI; YANG, QIWEI; YU, SHAN; ZHANG, XUEWEN

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become a frequently used method in gene expression studies. The relative quantification method is an important and common method for the evaluation of RT-qPCR data. One of the key requirements of this method is to identify an applicable internal reference gene. However, to the best of our knowledge, no suitable reference genes have been identified for the genetic analysis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in humans and cell lines. In the present study, screening was conducted using 12 common reference genes, which were selected in order to provide an experimental basis for the study of the gene expression in CCA patients and cell lines. Tumor samples and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues from 20 patients with CCA were obtained for the present study. The stability and applicability of the 12 reference gene candidates were validated using GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software. Based on a comparison of the results, the following reference genes are recommended for various tissue groups: Total sample group, ribosomal protein L29; CCA tissue group, TATA-box binding protein; CCA cell line and tissue group, actin-β; CCA cell line group, 18S ribosomal RNA; CCA tissue and adjacent non-neoplastic tissue group, 5′-aminolevulinate synthase 1; and adjacent non-neoplastic tissue group, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1. The results of the search also clearly reveal that a systematic study regarding the selection of suitable reference genes for studying the target gene profiling in CCA tissues and cell lines has not been previously published. The present study may provide useful information for future studies that examine the gene expression of CCA for choosing suitable reference genes.

  9. Bis(benzyl)polyamine analogs inhibit the growth of chloroquine-resistant human malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum) in vitro and in combination with alpha-difluoromethylornithine cure murine malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Bitonti, A J; Dumont, J A; Bush, T L; Edwards, M L; Stemerick, D M; McCann, P P; Sjoerdsma, A

    1989-01-01

    A number of bis(benzyl)polyamine analogs were found to be potent inhibitors of both chloroquine-resistant and chloroquine-sensitive strains of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in vitro (IC50 values = 0.2-14 microM). Administration of one of the compounds, MDL 27695, which is N,N'-bis(3-[(phenylmethyl)amino]propyl)-1,7-diaminoheptane (C6H5CH2NH(CH2)3NH(CH2)7NH(CH2)3NHCH2C6H5), at 10-15 mg/kg i.p. three times per day for 3 days in combination with 2% alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO; eflornithine) in drinking water effected cures of 47/54 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. Cured mice were found to be immune upon rechallenge with the same P. berghei strain 4 months after the initial infection and drug-induced cure. MDL 27695 rapidly inhibited the incorporation of [3H]hypoxanthine into P. falciparum RNA and DNA, whereas the incorporation of [3H]isoleucine was not affected until much later. We conclude, therefore, that the major cytotoxic event may be direct binding of MDL 27695 to DNA with subsequent disruption of macromolecular biosynthesis and cell death. These compounds offer a lead in the search for new agents for chemotherapy of malaria. PMID:2463635

  10. Relative photomutagenicity of furocoumarins and limettin in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase assay in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Raquet, Nicole; Schrenk, Dieter

    2009-09-01

    Furocoumarins are phototoxic and photomutagenic natural plant constituents found in many medicinal plants and food items. Because plants contain mixtures of several furocoumarins, there is a need for a comparative risk assessment of a large number of furocoumarins. Little is known about the photomutagenicity of the structurally related family of coumarins, which are also abundant in many plant species. In this study, we analyzed the photomutagenic potency of the linear furocoumarins 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), the angular furocoumarin angelicin, and the coumarin limettin. Above certain concentrations, all test compounds were more or less phototoxic in the presence of UVA doses between 50 and 200 mJ/cm(2), 5-MOP being the most phototoxic compound. At nonphototoxic concentrations, linear correlations were found between concentration and mutagenicity at a UVA dose of 125 mJ/cm(2) for all test compounds including limettin. For 5-MOP, strictly linear correlations were also found for the relationships of mutagenicity vs concentration at various UVA doses or vs UVA dose at given concentrations, respectively. These data indicate that the photomutagenicity of 5-MOP is proportional to the UVA dose x concentration product for noncytotoxic combinations of both factors. They also suggest that the slope of the concentration-photomutagenicity correlation at a given UVA dose may provide a basis for comparison between individual compounds. Applying this concept, in vitro photomutagenicity equivalency factors at 125 mJ/cm(2) were as follows: 1.0 (5-MOP, reference compound), 0.25 (8-MOP), and 0.02 (angelicin and limettin, respectively). These findings provide a new concept for the description of the relative photomutagenic potency of coumarins and furocoumarins and indicate that, in V79 cells, 8-MOP is less photomutagenic and limettin and angelicin are much less photomutagenic than 5-MOP. PMID:19725558

  11. Human Issues in Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the report of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee in Human Rights which seeks to ease the plight of individual scientists, engineers, and medical personnel suffering severe repression. Case studies of instances of negligence of human rights are provided. (CP)

  12. Human cloning and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Birnbacher, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    Judging from the official documents dealing with the moral and legal aspects of human reproductive cloning there seems to be a nearly worldwide consensus that reproductive cloning is incompatible with human dignity. The certainty of this judgement is, however, not matched by corresponding arguments. Is the incompatibility of reproductive with human dignity an ultimate moral intuition closed to further argument? The paper considers several ways by which the intuition might be connected with more familiar applications of the concept of human dignity, and argues that there is no such connection. It concludes that the central objections to human reproductive cloning are not objections relating to dignity but objections relating to risk, especially the risks imposed on children born in the course of testing the method's safety. PMID:15820009

  13. Germ line variants of human N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase show impaired DNA repair activity and facilitate 1,N6-ethenoadenine-induced mutations.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Sanjay; Chetram, Mahandranauth A; Woodrick, Jordan; Mitra, Partha S; Manthena, Praveen V; Khatkar, Pooja; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Dixon, Monica; Karmahapatra, Soumendra K; Nuthalapati, Nikhil K; Gupta, Suhani; Narasimhan, Ganga; Mazumder, Raja; Loffredo, Christopher A; Üren, Aykut; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-02-20

    Human N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (hMPG) initiates base excision repair of a number of structurally diverse purine bases including 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine, hypoxanthine, and alkylation adducts in DNA. Genetic studies discovered at least eight validated non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) of the hMPG gene in human populations that result in specific single amino acid substitutions. In this study, we tested the functional consequences of these nsSNPs of hMPG. Our results showed that two specific arginine residues, Arg-141 and Arg-120, are important for the activity of hMPG as the germ line variants R120C and R141Q had reduced enzymatic activity in vitro as well as in mammalian cells. Expression of these two variants in mammalian cells lacking endogenous MPG also showed an increase in mutations and sensitivity to an alkylating agent compared with the WT hMPG. Real time binding experiments by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy suggested that these variants have substantial reduction in the equilibrium dissociation constant of binding (KD) of hMPG toward 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine-containing oligonucleotide (ϵA-DNA). Pre-steady-state kinetic studies showed that the substitutions at arginine residues affected the turnover of the enzyme significantly under multiple turnover condition. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy further showed that both variants had significantly decreased nonspecific (undamaged) DNA binding. Molecular modeling suggested that R141Q substitution may have resulted in a direct loss of the salt bridge between ϵA-DNA and hMPG, whereas R120C substitution redistributed, at a distance, the interactions among residues in the catalytic pocket. Together our results suggest that individuals carrying R120C and R141Q MPG variants may be at risk for genomic instability and associated diseases as a consequence. PMID:25538240

  14. Human Trafficking

    MedlinePlus

    ... Victims of human trafficking are subjected to force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of commercial sex, ... the commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion. or in which the person induced ...

  15. Human Endomucin

    PubMed Central

    Samulowitz, Ulrike; Kuhn, Annegret; Brachtendorf, Gertrud; Nawroth, Roman; Braun, Attila; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Böcker, Werner; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2002-01-01

    Endomucin is a typical sialomucin that we recently identified on the surface of mouse endothelial cells and on putative hematopoetic clusters of the dorsal aorta in the embryo. We have generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the extracellular part of human endomucin and polyclonal antibodies against the cytoplasmic part. Using immunohistochemistry endomucin was specifically detected on endothelial cells of blood and lymphatic vessels of all analyzed human tissues. In addition, the polyclonal antibodies stained the epithelium of the epidermis as well as epithelial and myoepithelial cells of the eccrine and apocrine glands in the skin. This nonendothelial staining could only be seen with a subset of mAbs if the staining procedure was amplified. Although high endothelial venules (HEVs) were not significantly stained with mAbs against endomucin, the polyclonal antibodies clearly detected endomucin on HEVs in lymphatic organs of the mouse and human, suggesting HEV-specific glycosylation affecting recognition by the mAbs. Indeed, endomucin isolated from human and mouse lymphoid organs carried the MECA-79 epitope that defines a set of L-selectin ligands on HEVs called peripheral node addressins. We conclude that human and mouse endomucin are endothelial sialomucins with the potential to function as L-selectin ligands. PMID:12000719

  16. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  17. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  18. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among

  19. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing

  20. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  1. Classical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donn; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot course in humanities team-taught by three teachers, two from a senior high-school and one from a junior high-school, in Brookfield, Wisconsin. The specific subject matter is Greek and Roman culture. The curriculum is outlined and the basic reading list is included. (CLK)

  2. Human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Richart, R M; Wright, T C

    1992-10-01

    In the past year, new data have been published on the molecular biology of human papillomavirus infections and their relationship to cervical neoplasia. As molecular techniques have become more sophisticated and as the molecular knowledge of human papilloma-virus infections has been pursued in greater depth, it is increasingly apparent that this human tumor DNA virus is similar to a number of other oncogenic DNA viruses that have been described and well studied. These viruses appear to act through a common pathway of producing oncogenic proteins that interfere with key signalling elements that normally control the process of cell division. With a better mechanistic knowledge, it should be possible to design new therapeutic approaches to treating human papillomavirus-associated disease that are directed toward specific cellular events such as turning off the production of E6 and E7 proteins or restoring the activity of pRB or p53. Increased attention has also been turned to immunologic aspects of HPV infections, and a number of groups are eagerly pursuing the possibility of using simple office-based procedures to detect specific proteins encoded for by the human papillomavirus open reading frames in an attempt to determine who has been infected, is actively infected, and has proteins being produced that are indicative of neoplasia. From the clinical point of view, the use of outpatient excisional techniques such as the loop electrosurgical excision procedure is rapidly supplanting ablative techniques because of their superior ability to identify early invasive carcinomas and adenocarcinomas in situ that have not been detected by colposcopy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1327250

  3. Human Mind in Human Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furth, Hans G.

    1996-01-01

    Claims that mind and mental objects form a societal mental structure enabling children to assimilate the society and become co-constructing members. Cites evidence that competence to create mental objects, symbols, and meanings separated from action is the evolutionary evolved human capacity for society and culture. Vygotsky's "natural" line of…

  4. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  5. Obesity-Related Metabolomic Analysis of Human Subjects in Black Soybean Peptide Intervention Study by Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography and Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jin Hee; Ahn, Chang-Won; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Kang Sung; Kwon, Dae Young

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify key metabolites related to weight reduction in humans by studying the metabolic profiles of sera obtained from 34 participants who underwent dietary intervention with black soybean peptides (BSP) for 12 weeks. This research is a sequel to our previous work in which the effects of BSP on BMI and blood composition of lipid were investigated. Sera of the study were subjected to ultra performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS), and the data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) score plots. Body mass index and percent body fat of the test group were reduced. Levels of betaine, benzoic acid, pyroglutamic acid, pipecolic acid, N-phenylacetamide, uric acid, l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine, and lysophosphatidyl cholines (lysoPCs) (C18:1, C18:2, C20:1, and C20:4) showed significant increases. Levels of l-proline, valine, l-leucine/isoleucine, hypoxanthine, glutamine, l-methionine, phenylpyruvic acid, several carnitine derivatives, and lysoPCs (C14:0, PC16:0, C15:0, C16:0, C17:1, C18:0, and C22:0) were significantly decreased. In particular, lysoPC 16:0 with a VIP value of 12.02 is esteemed to be the most important metabolite for evaluating the differences between the 2 serum samples. Our result confirmed weight-lowering effects of BSP, accompanied by favorable changes in metabolites in the subjects' blood. Therefore, this research enables us to better understand obesity and increases the predictability of the obesity-related risk by studying metabolites present in the blood. PMID:23862058

  6. Human Protothecosis

    PubMed Central

    Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Mayr, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    Human protothecosis is a rare infection caused by members of the genus Prototheca. Prototheca species are generally considered to be achlorophyllic algae and are ubiquitous in nature. The occurrence of protothecosis can be local or disseminated and acute or chronic, with the latter being more common. Diseases have been classified as (i) cutaneous lesions, (ii) olecranon bursitis, or (iii) disseminated or systemic manifestations. Infections can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, although more severe and disseminated infections tend to occur in immunocompromised individuals. Prototheca wickerhamii and Prototheca zopfii have been associated with human disease. Usually, treatment involves medical and surgical approaches; treatment failure is not uncommon. Antifungals such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, and amphotericin B are the most commonly used drugs to date. Among them, amphotericin B displays the best activity against Prototheca spp. Diagnosis is largely made upon detection of characteristic structures observed on histopathologic examination of tissue. PMID:17428884

  7. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  8. Human defensins.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Josef Johann; Unholzer, Angela; Schaller, Martin; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Korting, Hans Christian

    2005-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small, cationic, amphiphilic peptides of 12-50 amino acids with microbicidal activity against both bacteria and fungi. The eukaryotic antimicrobial peptides may be divided into four distinct groups according to their structural features: cysteine-free alpha-helices, extended cysteine-free alpha-helices with a predominance of one or two amino acids, loop structures with one intramolecular disulfide bond, and beta-sheet structures which are stabilised by two or three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Mammalian defensins are part of the last-mentioned group. The mammalian defensins can be subdivided into three main classes according to their structural differences: the alpha-defensins, beta-defensins and the recently described theta-defensins. Mammalian alpha-defensins are predominantly found in neutrophils and in small intestinal Paneth cells, whereas mammalian beta-defensins have been isolated from both leukocytes and epithelial cells. Recently, two novel human beta-defensins, human beta-defensin-3 (HBD-3), and human beta-defensin-4 (HBD-4) have been discovered. Similar to HBD-1 and HBD-2, HBD-3 has microbicidal activity towards the Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli) and the yeasts Candida albicans and Malassezia furfur. In addition, HBD-3 kills Gram-positive bacteria such as Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus, including multi-resistant S. aureus strains, and even vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. In contrast to HBD-1 and HBD-2, significant expression of HBD-3 has been demonstrated in non-epithelial tissues, such as leukocytes, heart and skeletal muscle. HBD-4 is expressed in certain epithelia and in neutrophils. Its bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa is stronger than that of the other known beta-defensins. Here we present an overview of human antimicrobial peptides with some emphasis on their antifungal properties. PMID:15821901

  9. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa. PMID:8976151

  10. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable

  11. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  12. Validation of Endogenous Control Genes for Gene Expression Studies on Human Ocular Surface Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bina; Mohammed, Imran; Hopkinson, Andrew; Dua, Harminder Singh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a panel of ten known endogenous control genes (ECG) with quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qPCR), for identification of stably expressed endogenous control genes in the ocular surface (OS) epithelial regions including cornea, limbus, limbal epithelial crypt and conjunctiva to normalise the quantitative reverse transcription PCR data of genes of interest expressed in above-mentioned regions. Method The lasermicrodissected (LMD) OS epithelial regions of cryosectioned corneoscleral buttons from the cadaver eyes were processed for RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis to detect genes of interest with qPCR. Gene expression of 10 known ECG—glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), beta actin (ACTB), peptidylprolyl isomerase (PPIA), TATA-box binding protein (TBP1), hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT1), beta glucuronidase (GUSB), Eucaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (18S), phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), ribosomal protein, large, P0 (RPLP0)—was measured in the OS epithelial regions by qPCR method and the data collected was further analysed using geNorm software. Results The expression stability of ECGs in the OS epithelial regions in increasing order as determined with geNorm software is as follows: ACTB<18Shuman OS epithelium and provide evidence for the use of PPIA-RPLP0 ECGs pair in quantitative reverse transcription PCR across the OS epithelium. PMID:21857920

  13. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  14. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  15. Human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  16. Human cooperation.

    PubMed

    Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-08-01

    Why should you help a competitor? Why should you contribute to the public good if free riders reap the benefits of your generosity? Cooperation in a competitive world is a conundrum. Natural selection opposes the evolution of cooperation unless specific mechanisms are at work. Five such mechanisms have been proposed: direct reciprocity, indirect reciprocity, spatial selection, multilevel selection, and kin selection. Here we discuss empirical evidence from laboratory experiments and field studies of human interactions for each mechanism. We also consider cooperation in one-shot, anonymous interactions for which no mechanisms are apparent. We argue that this behavior reflects the overgeneralization of cooperative strategies learned in the context of direct and indirect reciprocity: we show that automatic, intuitive responses favor cooperative strategies that reciprocate. PMID:23856025

  17. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  18. Efficacy of laser capture microdissection plus RT-PCR technique in analyzing gene expression levels in human gastric cancer and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Hiroshi; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Danenberg, Kathleen; Danenberg, Peter V; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase gene expressions are reported to be valid predictive markers for 5-fluorouracil sensitivity to gastrointestinal cancer. For more reliable predictability, their expressions in cancer cells and stromal cells in the cancerous tissue (cancerous stroma) have been separately investigated using laser capture microdissection. Methods Thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase mRNA in cancer cells and cancerous stroma from samples of 47 gastric and 43 colon cancers were separately quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after laser capture microdissection. Results In both gastric and colon cancers, thymidylate synthase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase mRNA expressions were higher (p < 0.0001, p <0.0001 respectively in gastric cancer and P = 0.0002, p < 0.0001 respectively in colon cancer) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase mRNA expressions were lower in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma (P = 0.0136 in gastric cancer and p < 0.0001 in colon cancer). In contrast, thymidine phosphorylase mRNA was higher in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma in gastric cancer (p < 0.0001) and lower in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma in colon cancer (P = 0.0055). Conclusion By using this method, we could estimate gene expressions separately in cancer cells and stromal cells from colon and gastric cancers, in spite of the amount of stromal tissue. Our method is thought to be useful for accurately evaluating intratumoral gene expressions. PMID:18652704

  19. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  20. Novel assay for simultaneous measurement of pyridine mononucleotides synthesizing activities allows dissection of the NAD(+) biosynthetic machinery in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zamporlini, Federica; Ruggieri, Silverio; Mazzola, Francesca; Amici, Adolfo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The redox coenzyme NAD(+) is also a rate-limiting co-substrate for several enzymes that consume the molecule, thus rendering its continuous re-synthesis indispensable. NAD(+) biosynthesis has emerged as a therapeutic target due to the relevance of NAD(+) -consuming reactions in complex intracellular signaling networks whose alteration leads to many neurologic and metabolic disorders. Distinct metabolic routes, starting from various precursors, are known to support NAD(+) biosynthesis with tissue/cell-specific efficiencies, probably reflecting differential expression of the corresponding rate-limiting enzymes, i.e. nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase, nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase. Understanding the contribution of these enzymes to NAD(+) levels depending on the tissue/cell type and metabolic status is necessary for the rational design of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating NAD(+) availability. Here we report a simple, fast and sensitive coupled fluorometric assay that enables simultaneous determination of the four activities in whole-cell extracts and biological fluids. Its application to extracts from various mouse tissues, human cell lines and plasma yielded for the first time an overall picture of the tissue/cell-specific distribution of the activities of the various enzymes. The screening enabled us to gather novel findings, including (a) the presence of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase in all examined tissues/cell lines, indicating that quinolinate and nicotinamide riboside are relevant NAD(+) precursors, and (b) the unexpected occurrence of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase in human plasma. PMID:25223558

  1. Lesch-Nyhan disease: from mechanism to model and back again

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a rare inherited disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). LND is characterized by overproduction of uric acid, leading to gouty arthritis and nephrolithiasis. Affected patients also have characteristic neurological and behavioral anomalies. Multiple cell models have been developed to study the molecular and metabolic aspects of LND, and several animal models have been developed to elucidate the basis for the neurobehavioral syndrome. The models have different strengths and weaknesses rendering them suitable for studying different aspects of the disease. The extensive modeling efforts in LND have questioned the concept that an ‘ideal’ disease model is one that replicates all of its features because the pathogenesis of different elements of the disease involves different mechanisms. Instead, the modeling efforts have suggested a more fruitful approach that involves developing specific models, each tailored for addressing specific experimental questions. PMID:19259384

  2. Differential diagnosis of cerebral palsy: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome without self-mutilation.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, G; McInnes, R R

    1984-01-01

    Athetotic cerebral palsy was diagnosed in a 6-month-old boy with no history of perinatal trauma. Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (i.e., complete deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase [HGPRT] ) was diagnosed only when the boy began biting his lower lip at the age of 10 years. It is suggested, on the basis of this case and others like it in the literature, that the delayed onset or absence of self-mutilation in patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome may be more common than has been previously suspected. In all males said to have cerebral palsy, HGPRT deficiency must be ruled out, preferably by measuring the ratio of uric acid to creatinine in a random urine specimen. PMID:6722697

  3. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. PMID:24863549

  4. NAD metabolism in HPRT-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacomelli, Gabriella; Di Marcello, Federica; Notarantonio, Laura; Sestini, Silvia; Cerboni, Barbara; Bertelli, Matteo; Pompucci, Giuseppe; Jinnah, Hyder A.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is virtually absent in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by uric acid accumulation and neurodevelopmental dysfunction. The biochemical basis for the neurological and behavioral abnormalities have not yet been completely explained. Prior studies of cells from affected patients have shown abnormalities of NAD metabolism. In the current studies, NAD metabolism was evaluated in HPRT gene knock-out mice. NAD content and the activities of the enzymes required for synthesis and breakdown of this coenzyme were investigated in blood, brain and liver of HPRT− and control mice. NAD concentration and enzyme activities were found to be significantly increased in liver, but not in brain or blood of the HPRT− mice. These results demonstrate that changes in NAD metabolism occur in response to HPRT deficiency depending on both species and tissue type. PMID:19319672

  5. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A T; van Zeeland, A A; Zwanenburg, T S

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, we have measured the influence of 3AB on DNA repair following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. Both acentric fragments and exchanges increase indicating that the presence of 3AB slows down the repair of DNA strand breaks (probably DNA double strand breaks), thus making breaks available for interaction with each other to give rise to exchanges. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. Most 3AB induced SCEs occur during the second cell cycle, in which DNA containing bromouridine (BU) is used as template for replication. BU containing DNA appears to be prone to errors during replication. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs by 3AB is correlated with the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of the cells. The frequencies of spontaneously occurring DNA single strand breaks in cells grown in BrdUrd containing medium are higher than in the cells grown in normal medium and this increase depends on the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of these cells. We have studied the extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations in A-T and FA cells. 3AB does not influence the frequencies of SCEs induced by UV or mitomycin C (MMC) in CHO cells. However, it increases the frequencies of SCEs induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Under the conditions in which 3AB increases the frequencies of spontaneously occurring as well as induced SCEs, it does not increase the frequencies of point mutations in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) locus. 3AB does not influence the amount of repair replication following dimethylsulphate (DMS) treatment of human fibroblasts, or UV irradiated human lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6317638

  6. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  7. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  8. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  9. Queuine, a tRNA anticodon wobble base, maintains the proliferative and pluripotent potential of HL-60 cells in the presence of the differentiating agent 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed Central

    French, B T; Patrick, D E; Grever, M R; Trewyn, R W

    1991-01-01

    6-Thioguanine (6-TG)-induced differentiation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (IMP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8)-deficient HL-60 cells is characterized by 2 days of growth, after which morphological differentiation proceeds. Addition of the tRNA wobble base queuine, in the presence of 6-TG, maintains the proliferative capability of the cells. The ability of 6-TG to induce differentiation correlates with c-myc mRNA down-regulation, but queuine has no effect on this parameter. Treatment with 6-TG for 2-3 days commits HL-60 cells to granulocytic differentiation, and, once committed, these cells do not respond to the monocytic inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Nonetheless, when cells are treated with queuine and 6-TG, they maintain the promyelocytic morphology and are capable of being induced down the monocytic pathway by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as indicated by stabilization of c-fms mRNA and cell adherence. In the absence of queuine, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate is incapable of inducing monocytic markers in the 6-TG-treated cells. The data presented indicate that 6-TG-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells is a tRNA-facilitated event and that the tRNA wobble base queuine is capable of maintaining both the proliferative and pluripotent potential of the cells. Images PMID:1988936

  10. Markerless Mutagenesis in Methanococcus maripaludis Demonstrates Roles for Alanine Dehydrogenase, Alanine Racemase, and Alanine Permease

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian C.; Leigh, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Among the archaea, Methanococcus maripaludis has the unusual ability to use l- or d-alanine as a nitrogen source. To understand how this occurs, we tested the roles of three adjacent genes encoding homologs of alanine dehydrogenase, alanine racemase, and alanine permease. To produce mutations in these genes, we devised a method for markerless mutagenesis that builds on previously established genetic tools for M. maripaludis. The technique uses a negative selection strategy that takes advantage of the ability of the M. maripaludis hpt gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase to confer sensitivity to the base analog 8-azahypoxanthine. In addition, we developed a negative selection method to stably incorporate constructs into the genome at the site of the upt gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations in the genes for alanine dehydrogenase and alanine permease lost the ability to grow on either isomer of alanine, while a mutant with an in-frame deletion mutation in the gene for alanine racemase lost only the ability to grow on d-alanine. The wild-type gene for alanine dehydrogenase, incorporated into the upt site, complemented the alanine dehydrogenase mutation. Hence, the permease is required for the transport of either isomer, the dehydrogenase is specific for the l isomer, and the racemase converts the d isomer to the l isomer. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all three genes had been acquired by lateral gene transfer from the low-moles-percent G+C gram-positive bacteria. PMID:15659675

  11. Adenine metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Sonali; Bopanna, Monnanda P; Bulusu, Vinay; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2010-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum lacks the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway and relies entirely on the salvage pathway to meet its purine nucleotide requirements. The entire flux for purine nucleotide biosynthesis in the parasite is believed to be through hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT), with the enzymes, adenosine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) being unannotated in the Plasmodium genome database. This manuscript reports on the studies carried out to explore bypass mechanisms, if any, for AMP synthesis in the intraerythrocyitc stages of the parasite life cycle. Uptake and subsequent incorporation of radiolabel adenine in the nucleotide pool of saponin released erythrocyte free parasites implicated the role of parasite encoded enzymes in adenine metabolism. To explore the route for AMP synthesis in the parasite, we have monitored adenine mediated supplementation of metabolic viability in saponin released hadacidin (N-formyl-N-hydroxyglycine) treated parasites. Our results implicate the role of an APRT like activity that enables parasite survival when the flux through the HGPRT pathway is blocked. PMID:20093117

  12. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  13. Special Section: Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  14. Humanism: A Christian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaasa, Harris; And Others

    As part of a four-college project to integrate the religious tradition with humanities teaching, humanism is discussed from a Christian perspective. Definitions of the terms humanism, religion, Christianity, and Christian humanism are provided. The latter is viewed as the issues surrounding the Christian approach to the dichotomy of good and evil…

  15. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  16. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans. PMID:20645472

  17. Mutagenic activity of high-energy 532 nm ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, J; Fatone, M; Hestdalen, C; Obringer, J W; Tillinghast, H S

    1997-04-01

    The mutagenic activity of green (532 nm) and infrared (1064 nm) ultra-short laser light pulses was tested in cultured Syrian hamster fibroblasts by a hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) mutagenesis assay. In 18 irradiation trials, cells were exposed to eight consecutive 100-ps pulses of either 532 nm or 1064 nm light from a Nd:YAG laser at average irradiances of 3.0 GW/cm2. The 532 nm irradiations produced Hprt mutations at an average observed frequency of 5.3-5.6 x 10(-6), 10-fold higher than control trials (P < 0.01), while 1064 nm irradiations produced only background (spontaneous mutation) frequencies. A HAT (hypoxanthine, aminopterin, thymidine) sensitivity test allowed us to infer that Hprt- clones, selected as 6-thioguanine-resistant clones, possessed mutations at the Hprt locus after 532 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The mutagenic effects of 532 nm high-energy laser pulses and not 1064 nm wavelengths are discussed in light of a two-photon absorption hypothesis. These preliminary findings suggest that 460-590 nm visible-light lasers may be mutagenic to mammalian cells either as a result of two-photon absorption or through some other photochemical process that damages DNA. PMID:9092930

  18. Biological effectiveness of nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons interacting in tissues near the bone- soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, Mark Randall

    1999-12-01

    High-energy protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR)-or generated by nuclear interactions of GCR heavy-ions with material-are capable of penetrating great thicknesses of shielding to irradiate humans in spacecraft or in lunar or Martian habitats. As protons interact with the nuclei of the elemental constituents of soft tissue and bone, low energy nuclei-target fragments-are emitted into the cells responsible for bone development and maintenance and for hematopoiesis. Leukemogenesis is the principal endpoint of concern because it is the most likely deleterious effect, and it has a short latency period and comparatively low survival rate, although other myelo- proliferative disorders and osteosarcoma also may be induced. A one-dimensional proton-target fragment transport model was used to calculate the energy spectra of fragments produced in bone and soft tissue, and present in marrow cavities at distances from a bone interface. In terms of dose equivalent, the target fragments are as significant as the incident protons. An average radiation quality factor was found to be between 1.8 and 2.6. Biological response to the highly non- uniform energy deposition of the target fragments is such that an alternative approach to conventional predictive risk assessment is needed. Alternative procedures are presented. In vitro cell response and relative biological effectiveness were calculated from the radial dose distribution of each fragment produced by 1-GeV protons using parameters of a modified Ion-Gamma- Kill (IGK) model of radiation action. The modelled endpoints were survival of C3H10t 1/2 and V79 cells, neoplastic transformation of C3H10t1/2 cells, and mutation of the X-linked hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus in V79 cells. The dose equivalent and cell responses increased by 10% or less near the interface. Since RBE increases with decreasing dose in the IGK model, comparisons with quality factors were made at dose levels 0.01 <= D [Gy] <= 2. Applying average quality factors derived herein to GCR exposures results in a <= 5% increase of in average quality. Calculated RBEs indicate that accepted quality factors for high-energy protons may be too low due to the relatively high effectiveness of the low-charged target fragments. Derived RBEs for target fragments increase the calculated biological effectiveness of GCR by 20% to 180%.

  19. Quantitative expression proteomics and phosphoproteomics profile of brain from PINK1 knockout mice: insights into mechanisms of familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Judy C; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Sultana, Rukhsana; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Büeler, Hansruedi; Butterfield, David Allan

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, neurodegenerative motor disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and presence of α-synuclein-containing protein aggregates. Mutations in the mitochondrial Ser/Thr kinase PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are associated with an autosomal recessive familial form of early-onset PD. Recent studies have suggested that PINK1 plays important neuroprotective roles against mitochondrial dysfunction by phosphorylating and recruiting Parkin, a cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase, to facilitate elimination of damaged mitochondria via autophagy-lysosomal pathways. Loss of PINK1 in cells and animals leads to various mitochondrial impairments and oxidative stress, culminating in dopaminergic neuronal death in humans. Using a 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis proteomics approach, the differences in expressed brain proteome and phosphoproteome between 6-month-old PINK1-deficient mice and wild-type mice were identified. The observed changes in the brain proteome and phosphoproteome of mice lacking PINK1 suggest that defects in signaling networks, energy metabolism, cellular proteostasis, and neuronal structure and plasticity are involved in the pathogenesis of familial PD. Mutations in PINK1 are associated with an early-onset form of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examines changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of the PINK1 knockout mouse brain. Alterations were noted in several key proteins associated with: increased oxidative stress, aberrant cellular signaling, altered neuronal structure, decreased synaptic plasticity, reduced neurotransmission, diminished proteostasis networks, and altered metabolism. 14-3-3ε, 14-3-3 protein epsilon; 3-PGDH, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase; ALDOA, aldolase A; APT1, acyl-protein thioesterase 1; CaM, calmodulin; CBR3, carbonyl reductase [NADPH] 3; ENO2, gamma-enolase; HPRT, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase; HSP70, heat-shock-related 70 kDa protein 2; IDHc, cytoplasmic isocitrate dehydrogenase [NADP+]; MAPK1, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1; MEK1, MAP kinase kinase 1; MDHc, cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase; NFM, neurofilament medium polypeptide; NSF, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein; PHB, prohibitin; PINK1, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1; PPIaseA, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A; PSA2, proteasome subunit alpha type-2; TK, transketolase; VDAC-2, voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2. PMID:25626353

  20. Boundaries of Humanities: Writing Medical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Gillie

    2008-01-01

    Literature and medicine is a discipline within medical humanities, which challenges medicine to reconfigure its scientific model to become interdisciplinary, and be disciplined by arts and humanities as well as science. The psychological, emotional, spiritual and physical are inextricably linked in people, inevitably entailing provisionality,

  1. Values for Human-to-Human Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Defines "values" and lists the eight values (stewardship, service, intellectual freedom, rationalism, literacy and learning, equity of access, privacy, democracy) derived by the author in an earlier work. Gives a brief history of the evolution of human-to-human reference service and discusses its future. Relates each of the author's eight values…

  2. Human Needs, Human Rights, and Authentic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Categorizes Maslow's human needs as survival needs and developmental or personhood needs; equates these needs with moral rights. Suggests that we have a moral obligation to help others enjoy their human rights, and that development agencies should expand their policies to encompass the development of both personhood and survival needs. (SV)

  3. Virtual Human project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Richard C.; Kruse, Kara L.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Hively, Lee M.; Fischer, K. N.; Munro, Nancy B.; Easterly, Clay E.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  4. Human factors in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, M.S.; Peay, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    There is a growing awareness among mining professionals that the human factor plays a significant role in safety and productivity. Since the 1960's, the science of human factors, or ergonomics, has been making inroads into the mining industry, and a considerable amount of research has documented human-factor-related mining problems and solutions. This report is directed toward summarizing the application of human factors to improving safety, productivity, and the general physical and psychological working conditions of miners and toward familiarizing the readers with the role of human factors in the mining industry and the benefits that can accrue by systematically applying available human factors principles and data.

  5. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  6. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information —> Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose in society. Pesticides ... pesticides than others. To reduce the risk of health problems from pesticides there are several things you ...

  7. Human Resource Accounting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  8. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  9. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  10. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Page Content Article Body According to ... Control and Prevention, there is an epidemic of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the United States. HPV is ...

  12. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  13. Financing Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juffras, Jason; Sawhill, Isabel V.

    This paper examines the government's role in financing human capital investments. It first examines why private investments in education, training, and other forms of human capital are likely to fall short of socially desirable levels. It then reviews past trends in public support for human resource investments. Finally, it discusses current…

  14. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  15. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences. PMID:23908778

  16. Human nature and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2009-03-01

    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes that altering or destroying human nature is in itself a bad thing. The second concern assumes that human nature provides a standard without which we cannot make coherent, defensible judgments about what is good. I will argue (1) that there is nothing wrong, per se, with altering or destroying human nature, because, on a plausible understanding of what human nature is, it contains bad as well as good characteristics and there is no reason to believe that eliminating some of the bad would so imperil the good as to make the elimination of the bad impermissible, and (2) that altering or destroying human nature need not result in the loss of our ability to make judgments about the good, because we possess a conception of the good by which we can and do evaluate human nature. I will argue that appeals to human nature tend to obscure rather than illuminate the debate over the ethics of enhancement and can be eliminated in favor of more cogent considerations. PMID:19161567

  17. Human Rights Resource Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrano, Elias, Comp.

    This document provides information about 25 programs/brochures which focus on human rights topics. Specific topics include: (1) counselor preparation; (2) multicultural awareness; (3) abuse and neglect; (4) Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; (5) self-awareness; (6) human rights awareness and human rights of students; (7) cultural diversity; (8)…

  18. Visible Human Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers @ NLM Mobile Gallery Site Navigation Home The Visible Human Project ® Overview The Visible Human Project ® is an outgrowth of the NLM's 1986 ... millimeter intervals. The long-term goal of the Visible Human Project ® is to produce a system of knowledge ...

  19. Research involving human subjects.

    PubMed

    Morin, Richard L

    2008-11-01

    This paper will discuss the history of human subjects in research and the subsequent regulations and requirements that now govern human subject research. Also presented are the requirements and definitions of the oversight bodies which govern human use research in the United States. PMID:18849688

  20. Esprit: A Humanities Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Donald G.; Capella, Barry John

    In March 1984, the first issue of "Esprit," a semi-annual humanities magazine for the 56 two-year colleges in New York State, was published. The magazine seeks to confront the apparent decline of student interest in the humanities, community doubts about the relevance of the humanities, and the seeming indifference to the special truths inherent…

  1. Expanding Human Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyean, Beverly-Colleene

    1983-01-01

    The human brain is capable of mastering skills far beyond those it is now used for. Three questions about the further evolution of human intelligence are raised: What will be the next step in human intelligence? How is the next step manifesting itself? How can we prepare for those changes? (IS)

  2. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  3. Human Rights Educational Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Gives a variety of educational resources on human rights that include videos, resource notebooks, books, publications, and websites along with short descriptions of the materials. Provides the contact information for a list of human-rights organizations, such as the Center for Human Rights Education and the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt…

  4. Literature in Humanities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marckwardt, Albert H., Ed.

    The 1966 National Council of Teachers of English Humanities Conference considered the place of the humanities in elementary and secondary education and the possible focus, content, and methods for presenting humanities programs. In this collection of papers given at the conference, leaders in various disciplines suggest the scope and magnitude of

  5. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  6. Humanities Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Mary Ann

    Designed as a model for a high school humanities program, this publication outlines a two-course, two-year elective in humanities for high school juniors and seniors. Introductory material includes an overview of the program and its history, credits, goals of the program, and an introduction to humanities. The major portion of the guide contains…

  7. Human factors in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, M.S.; Peay, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This Bureau of Mines report is directed toward summarizing the application of human factors to improving safety, productivity, and the general physical and psychological working conditions of miners and toward familiarizing readers with the role of human factors in the mining industry and the benefits that car accrue by systematically applying human factors principles and data.

  8. HUMAN USE INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...

  9. HUMAN USE INDEX (FUTURE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...

  10. Human Relations Ideabook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, Jean A.

    Intended for local human relations committees and commissions, this ideabook may serve as a do-it-yourself kit, a springboard for human relations action, showing concrete action steps that can be taken. Ideas and suggestions given in the booklet may be used to provide a basis for organizing a human relations committee; awaken the educational

  11. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  12. Human-technology Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Katharine M.

    Human-technology integration is the replacement of human parts and extension of human capabilities with engineered devices and substrates. Its result is hybrid biological-artificial systems. We discuss here four categories of products furthering human-technology integration: wearable computers, pervasive computing environments, engineered tissues and organs, and prosthetics, and introduce examples of currently realized systems in each category. We then note that realization of a completely artificial sytem via the path of human-technology integration presents the prospect of empirical confirmation of an aware artificially embodied system.

  13. Biological races in humans.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  14. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly. PMID:25051653

  15. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept. PMID:24979876

  16. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  17. Human hemoglobin genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  18. Computers and human intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Warnier, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    This text tackles a question central to the field of Artificial Intelligence: Is the computer capable of true, autonomous human behavior. After comparative analysis of human behavior and the science of computing, Warnier considers trends in the design of computer systems and concludes that the computer is not becoming a replacement for humans. Rather, developments in Artificial Intelligence are primarily directed to improving the computer's ability to perform complex tasks quickly and reliably.

  19. Human genes and diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book consists of 16 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Towards a complete linkage map of he X-chromosome; The role of HPRT genes in human disease; Human plasminogen activators. Genes and proteins structure; Metallothionein gene regulation in Menke's Disease; Molecular genetics of human B cell neoplasia, The erb-B related growth factors receptors, and Aldolase gene and protein families: structure, expression and molecular pathophysiology.

  20. Sustaining humans in space.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, G S; Hargens, A R

    1989-09-01

    One goal of NASA's Ames Research Center is to extend the presence of humans in space. Biomedical research, human performance, and life-support systems form the core of the Ames program. Major questions highlight how the effects of microgravity on living systems are modified by exercise, artificial gravity, autogenic feedback training, and nutrition. Bioengineering and life science studies include humans, animals, and plants. Ames investigators collaborate extensively with outside university and commercial scientists, both within the United States and internationally. PMID:11539815

  1. Human cloning 2001.

    PubMed

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable. PMID:12082212

  2. Perception of human motion.

    PubMed

    Blake, Randolph; Shiffrar, Maggie

    2007-01-01

    Humans, being highly social creatures, rely heavily on the ability to perceive what others are doing and to infer from gestures and expressions what others may be intending to do. These perceptual skills are easily mastered by most, but not all, people, in large part because human action readily communicates intentions and feelings. In recent years, remarkable advances have been made in our understanding of the visual, motoric, and affective influences on perception of human action, as well as in the elucidation of the neural concomitants of perception of human action. This article reviews those advances and, where possible, draws links among those findings. PMID:16903802

  3. The psychology of humanness.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures. PMID:23947277

  4. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  5. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  6. Human factors: Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, James P.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the Aeronautics Human Factors Research and Technology program are to provide the technology base and capability to design effective crew-cockpit systems and to advance solutions to human problems affecting air transport and rotorcraft effectiveness and safety. Advanced automation technologies, information display capabilities under computer control, and concern for the effects of human error in flight operations are elements which drive the directions of the program. Thus, the program has four thrusts: flight management, human engineering methods, rotorcraft, and subsonic transports.

  7. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  8. Health and Humanity: Humanities 401 Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Fraser; Taylor, Maxine

    A syllabus for the "Health and Humanities" interdisciplinary course at Northwestern State University, Louisiana, is presented. An introduction suggests that with the proliferation of technological advances in the field of health care, there is a need for reconsideration of many moral, ethical, legal, and humanistic questions. Information is…

  9. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  10. Human Sociobiology: Wilson's Fallacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrman, Nathaniel S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an introduction to and a critique of E.O. Wilson's new science of sociobiology, which focuses on explaining the social behavior of species as diverse as ants, apes, and humans. Suggests that Wilson has gone beyond his data in claiming that complex human behaviors such as altruism are caused to any extent by genetic, as opposed to…

  11. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement

  12. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  13. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  14. The Human Tendencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Margaret E.

    2000-01-01

    Maintains that children find their place in the world most securely by seeing themselves as part of the continuing work of creation. Considers how human tendencies, such as exploration, orientation, order, imagination, abstract thought, precision, repetition, self-control, and communication, allow humans to use the environment to meet various…

  15. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  16. Ecology and Human Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    "Ecology and Human Values" is an interdisciplinary course designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is…

  17. HSI in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggerman, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document examines the scope of Human Systems Integration (HSI) at NASA, and the implementation of HSI in the human space flight programs. Two areas of interest are the Responsibilities and the lessons learned from the International Space Station and the strategy and approach for the Crew Exploration Vehicle.

  18. Human rickettsialpox, southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Castro, Jorge E; Zavala-Velázquez, Jorge E; Peniche-Lara, Gaspar F; Sulú Uicab, Justo E

    2009-10-01

    The detection of Rickettsia akari in 2 human patients increased the diversity of rickettsioses affecting the public health in the southeast of Mexico. Rickettsialpox should be considered in the differential diagnosis with other febrile illnesses for the correct diagnosis and accurate treatment of this potential threat to human health. PMID:19861070

  19. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  20. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  1. Quantifying Human Performance Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askren, William B.; Regulinski, Thaddeus L.

    Human performance reliability for tasks in the time-space continuous domain is defined and a general mathematical model presented. The human performance measurement terms time-to-error and time-to-error-correction are defined. The model and measurement terms are tested using laboratory vigilance and manual control tasks. Error and error-correction…

  2. Human granulocytic Anaplasmosis, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Norio; Gaowa; Wuritu; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Wu, Dongxing; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Chiya, Seizou; Fukunaga, Kazutoshi; Funato, Toyohiko; Shiojiri, Masaaki; Nakajima, Hideki; Hamauzu, Yoshiji; Takano, Ai; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ando, Shuji; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    We retrospectively confirmed 2 cases of human Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection. Patient blood samples contained unique p44/msp2 for the pathogen, and antibodies bound to A. phagocytophilum antigens propagated in THP-1 rather than HL60 cells. Unless both cell lines are used for serodiagnosis of rickettsiosis-like infections, cases of human granulocytic anaplasmosis could go undetected. PMID:23460988

  3. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  4. Human ultralente insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Holman, R R; Steemson, J; Darling, P; Reeves, W G; Turner, R C

    1984-01-01

    The greater solubility of human insulin and its possible faster action have led to doubts about whether a sufficiently long acting formulation could be produced to provide a basal supply for diabetics. In a double blind crossover study in 18 diabetics human ultralente insulin was as effective as beef ultralente insulin in controlling basal plasma glucose concentrations (median 5.7 mmol/l (103 mg/100 ml) with human and 6.3 mmol/l (114 mg/100 ml) with beef ultralente insulin respectively). There was no significant difference between human and bovine insulin in the rise in plasma glucose concentration from 0400 to 0700 after an injection the previous morning and no difference between patients receiving an adequate or insufficient dose of human ultralente insulin. Bovine insulin antibody binding was reduced with human insulin (p less than 0.002), which suggests that human insulin is less antigenic than beef insulin. Once daily human ultralente insulin provides a suitable formulation for the basal insulin requirement of diabetics. Images p668-a PMID:6421424

  5. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can

  6. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups

  7. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  8. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  10. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  11. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  12. Human Nature and Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, Herbert William

    This paper is concerned with the development of a coherent unified theory for a science of curriculum--specifically, the development of logical consistency and compatibility with related fields in the formation of theory. Learning as a common human activity is subject to principles germane to human activity in general, as well as to universal…

  13. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  14. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed included: (1)…

  15. Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances

    2004-01-01

    The first human space flight, in the early 1960s, was aimed primarily at determining whether humans could indeed survive and function in micro-gravity. Would eating and sleeping be possible? What mental and physical tasks could be performed? Subsequent programs increased the complexity of the tasks the crew performed. Table 1 summarizes the history of U.S. space flight, showing the projects, their dates, crew sizes, and mission durations. With over forty years of experience with human space flight, the emphasis now is on how to design space vehicles, habitats, and missions to produce the greatest returns to human knowledge. What are the roles of the humans in space flight in low earth orbit, on the moon, and in exploring Mars?

  16. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  17. Pollution and human biology.

    PubMed

    Schell, Lawrence M; Burnitz, Kristopher K; Lathrop, Patrick W

    2010-06-01

    Industrial pollution is a relatively new component of the environment of humans and may constitute biological challenges to human adaptation. Extensive laboratory research shows that many pollutants are capable of modifying physiological systems in mammals. Studies of human populations provide substantial evidence that some pollutants can affect biological outcomes of traditional interest to human biologists (e.g. mortality, morbidity, growth, reproduction). Air pollution has been linked to increases in mortality and morbidity, and specific pollutants such as lead and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been associated with decreases in measures of sperm quality, changes in the character of menses, increased obesity and diabetes, and altered rates of sexual maturation, as well as other effects. However, the evidence is far from homogeneous. Nevertheless, to achieve the comprehensive and holistic approach characteristic of human biological research, investigators should include measures of pollutant exposure in their multicausal models. PMID:20412024

  18. Dogs catch human yawns.

    PubMed

    Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M; Senju, Atsushi; Shepherd, Alex J

    2008-10-23

    This study is the first to demonstrate that human yawns are possibly contagious to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Twenty-nine dogs observed a human yawning or making control mouth movements. Twenty-one dogs yawned when they observed a human yawning, but control mouth movements did not elicit yawning from any of them. The presence of contagious yawning in dogs suggests that this phenomenon is not specific to primate species and may indicate that dogs possess the capacity for a rudimentary form of empathy. Since yawning is known to modulate the levels of arousal, yawn contagion may help coordinate dog-human interaction and communication. Understanding the mechanism as well as the function of contagious yawning between humans and dogs requires more detailed investigation. PMID:18682357

  19. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  20. Human hepatocyte carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    SHIRAHA, HIDENORI; YAMAMOTO, KAZUHIDE; NAMBA, MASAYOSHI

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide; and its incidence rate is increasing. Clinical and molecular medical analyses have revealed substantial information on hepatocarcinogenesis. Hepatocarcinogenesis is a stepwise process during which multiple genes are altered. Genetic changes and their biological consequences in human HCC can be divided into at least 4 groups: i) tumor suppressor genes (p53, retinoblastoma, phosphatase tensin homolog and runt-related transcription factor 3), ii) oncogenes (myc, K-ras, BRAF), iii) reactivation of developmental pathways (Wnt, hedgehog), and iv) growth factors and their receptors (transforming growth factor-?, insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor). An experimental model of human hepatocarcinogenesis such as in vitro neoplastic transformation of human hepatocytes has not been successfully achieved yet, but several immortalized human hepatocyte cell lines have been established. These immortalized human hepatocytes will become useful tools for the elucidation of hepatocarcinogenesis, especially for the initial step of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:23426905

  1. Humanization of immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Rybak, S M; Hoogenboom, H R; Meade, H M; Raus, J C; Schwartz, D; Youle, R J

    1992-04-15

    The construction and expression of a chimeric gene encoding a mouse/human antibody to the human transferrin receptor fused to the gene for angiogenin, a human homolog of pancreatic RNase, are described. F(ab')2-like antibody-enzyme fusions were prepared by linking the gene for human angiogenin to a chimeric anti-transferrin receptor heavy chain gene. The antibody-enzyme fusion gene was introduced into a transfectoma that secretes the chimeric light chain of the same antibody, and cell lines were cloned that synthesize and secrete the antibody-enzyme fusion protein of the expected size at a concentration of 1-5 ng/ml. Culture supernatants from clones secreting the fusion protein caused inhibition of growth and protein synthesis of K562 cells that express the human transferrin receptor but not toward a non-human-derived cell line that lacks this receptor. Whereas excess antibody to the same receptor did not itself inhibit protein synthesis, it was able to completely prevent the protein synthesis inhibition caused by the fusion protein. These results indicate that the cytotoxicity is due to a transferrin receptor-mediated mechanism involving the angiogenin portion of the fusion protein and demonstrate the feasibility of constructing recombinant antibody-RNase molecules capable of killing tumor cells bearing the transferrin receptor. The significance of the acquired cytotoxicity of a mouse/human chimeric antibody linked to a human protein may bear importantly in human therapeutic strategies that use mouse antibodies linked to toxins from plants or bacteria to target tumor cells. It is expected that the humanization of immunotoxins will lead to less toxicity and immunogenicity than currently available reagents. PMID:1565609

  2. Human metapneumovirus and human bocavirus in children.

    PubMed

    Milder, Edmund; Arnold, John C

    2009-05-01

    Several new viruses have recently been described in children, including human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and human bocavirus (HBoV). hMPV has been established as a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children, often second only to respiratory syncytial virus as a cause of bronchiolitis in infants. Diagnostic tools have been developed for the clinician and effective treatment and prevention strategies are being investigated. HBoV was more recently identified. Although it was initially identified in the airway of children, high rates of codetection of other viral pathogens and detection of the virus in the stool have raised questions about the true role of HBoV as a cause of respiratory infections. A focus on epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnostic techniques for hMPV and HBoV is presented. PMID:19190535

  3. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology. PMID:25231441

  4. Archaea on Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J.; Auerbach, Anna K.; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  5. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  6. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  7. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-06-01

    The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

  8. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes. PMID:26395141

  9. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  10. Introduction to Human Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to “human factors engineering,” an applied science that seeks to optimize usability and safety of systems. Human factors engineering pursues this goal by aligning system design with the perceptual, cognitive, and physical capabilities of users. Human factors issues loom large in the diabetes management domain because patients and health care professionals interact with a complex variety of systems, including medical device hardware and software, which are themselves embedded within larger systems of institutions, people, and processes. Usability considerations must be addressed in these systems and devices to ensure safe and effective diabetes management. PMID:22538128

  11. The Concept of Being Human.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    This analysis of the relationship between humanism and humanitarianism outlines educational goals that should lead to a more humane world. Section 1, an outline of human life examines six substructures--human life, individuality, amenity, contact, actualization, and problems. A definition and examples of humanism in section 2 are elaborated into a…

  12. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  13. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  14. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  15. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  16. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  17. New Right Attacks Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuler, Nick Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Reflects upon the controversy between the values of humanism and of right-wing political groups, particularly with regard to educational objectives. Suggests ways in which humanists can make their voices heard. (DB)

  18. Human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 21, describes in detail the human X chromosome. X chromatin (or Barr body) formation, inactivation and reactivation of the X chromosome, X;Y translocations, and sex reversal are discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  20. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Share Compartir You are being redirected to the HPV Cancer Screening page. Please update your bookmarks to ...

  1. Teleoperator human factors study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The progress made on the Teleoperator Human Factors Study program is summarized. Technical and programmatic problems that were encountered were discussed along with planned activities. The report contains four sections: Work Performed, Future Work, Problems Encountered, and Cost Information

  2. Teleoperator human factors study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The progress made on the Teleoperator Human Factors Study program is summarized. Technical and programmatic problems that were encountered are discussed along with planned activity. Work performed, future work, problems encountered, and cost information comprise the topics addressed herein.

  3. Human Retrovirus Section

    Cancer.gov

    The Human Retrovirus Section, Vaccine Branch, studies the molecular biology and pathogenic mechanisms of HIV-1. We are interested in new vaccine approaches against AIDS and in identifying and validating new targets for antiviral therapies. Recent Activiti

  4. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  5. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  6. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  7. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  8. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative automation has shown the effectiveness of humans and machines directly interacting to perform tasks. To continue to advance this area of robotics, effective means need to be developed to allow natural ways for people to communicate and cooperate with robots just as they do with one another.

  9. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  10. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory. PMID:24151100

  11. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes. PMID:25704934

  12. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  13. Human cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bearzi, Claudia; Rota, Marcello; Hosoda, Toru; Tillmanns, Jochen; Nascimbene, Angelo; De Angelis, Antonella; Yasuzawa-Amano, Saori; Trofimova, Irina; Siggins, Robert W; Lecapitaine, Nicole; Cascapera, Stefano; Beltrami, Antonio P; D'Alessandro, David A; Zias, Elias; Quaini, Federico; Urbanek, Konrad; Michler, Robert E; Bolli, Roberto; Kajstura, Jan; Leri, Annarosa; Anversa, Piero

    2007-08-28

    The identification of cardiac progenitor cells in mammals raises the possibility that the human heart contains a population of stem cells capable of generating cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. The characterization of human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) would have important clinical implications for the management of the failing heart. We have established the conditions for the isolation and expansion of c-kit-positive hCSCs from small samples of myocardium. Additionally, we have tested whether these cells have the ability to form functionally competent human myocardium after infarction in immunocompromised animals. Here, we report the identification in vitro of a class of human c-kit-positive cardiac cells that possess the fundamental properties of stem cells: they are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent. hCSCs differentiate predominantly into cardiomyocytes and, to a lesser extent, into smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. When locally injected in the infarcted myocardium of immunodeficient mice and immunosuppressed rats, hCSCs generate a chimeric heart, which contains human myocardium composed of myocytes, coronary resistance arterioles, and capillaries. The human myocardium is structurally and functionally integrated with the rodent myocardium and contributes to the performance of the infarcted heart. Differentiated human cardiac cells possess only one set of human sex chromosomes excluding cell fusion. The lack of cell fusion was confirmed by the Cre-lox strategy. Thus, hCSCs can be isolated and expanded in vitro for subsequent autologous regeneration of dead myocardium in patients affected by heart failure of ischemic and nonischemic origin. PMID:17709737

  14. Human cardiac stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bearzi, Claudia; Rota, Marcello; Hosoda, Toru; Tillmanns, Jochen; Nascimbene, Angelo; De Angelis, Antonella; Yasuzawa-Amano, Saori; Trofimova, Irina; Siggins, Robert W.; LeCapitaine, Nicole; Cascapera, Stefano; Beltrami, Antonio P.; D'Alessandro, David A.; Zias, Elias; Quaini, Federico; Urbanek, Konrad; Michler, Robert E.; Bolli, Roberto; Kajstura, Jan; Leri, Annarosa; Anversa, Piero

    2007-01-01

    The identification of cardiac progenitor cells in mammals raises the possibility that the human heart contains a population of stem cells capable of generating cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. The characterization of human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) would have important clinical implications for the management of the failing heart. We have established the conditions for the isolation and expansion of c-kit-positive hCSCs from small samples of myocardium. Additionally, we have tested whether these cells have the ability to form functionally competent human myocardium after infarction in immunocompromised animals. Here, we report the identification in vitro of a class of human c-kit-positive cardiac cells that possess the fundamental properties of stem cells: they are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent. hCSCs differentiate predominantly into cardiomyocytes and, to a lesser extent, into smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. When locally injected in the infarcted myocardium of immunodeficient mice and immunosuppressed rats, hCSCs generate a chimeric heart, which contains human myocardium composed of myocytes, coronary resistance arterioles, and capillaries. The human myocardium is structurally and functionally integrated with the rodent myocardium and contributes to the performance of the infarcted heart. Differentiated human cardiac cells possess only one set of human sex chromosomes excluding cell fusion. The lack of cell fusion was confirmed by the Cre-lox strategy. Thus, hCSCs can be isolated and expanded in vitro for subsequent autologous regeneration of dead myocardium in patients affected by heart failure of ischemic and nonischemic origin. PMID:17709737

  15. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    The nation's efforts "to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system" was given renewed emphasis in January 1988, when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly when compared with past space activities.

  16. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  17. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  18. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  19. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  20. Potentiality and human embryos.

    PubMed

    Lizza, John P

    2007-09-01

    Consideration of the potentiality of human embryos to develop characteristics of personhood, such as intellect and will, has figured prominently in arguments against abortion and the use of human embryos for research. In particular, such consideration was the basis for the call of the US President's Council on Bioethics for a moratorium on stem cell research on human embryos. In this paper, I critique the concept of potentiality invoked by the Council and offer an alternative account. In contrast to the Council's view that an embryo's potentiality is determined by definition and is not affected by external conditions that may prevent certain possibilities from ever being realized, I propose an empirically grounded account of potentiality that involves an assessment of the physical and decisional conditions that may restrict an embryo's possibilities. In my view, some human embryos lack the potentiality to become a person that other human embryos have. Assuming for the sake of argument that the potential to become a person gives a being special moral status, it follows that some human embryos lack this status. This argument is then used to support Gene Outka's suggestion that it is morally permissible to experiment on 'spare' frozen embryos that are destined to be destroyed. PMID:17845464

  1. Cytokines in human milk.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past 30 years to investigate the protective functions of human milk strongly support the notion that breastfeeding prevents infantile infections, particularly those affecting the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, more recent clinical and experimental observations also suggest that human milk not only provides passive protection, but also can directly modulate the immunological development of the recipient infant. The study of this remarkable defense system in human milk has been difficult because of its biochemical complexity, the small concentration of certain bioactive components, the compartmentalization of some of these agents, the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes of milk during lactation, and the lack of specific reagents to quantify these agents. However, a host of bioactive substances, including hormones, growth factors, and immunological factors such as cytokines, have been identified in human milk. Cytokines are pluripotent polypeptides that act in autocrine/paracrine fashions by binding to specific cellular receptors. They operate in networks and orchestrate the development and functions of immune system. Several different cytokines and chemokines have been discovered in human milk in the past years, and the list is growing very rapidly. This article will review the current knowledge about the increasingly complex network of chemoattractants, activators, and anti-inflammatory cytokines present in human milk and their potential role in compensating for the developmental delay of the neonate immune system. PMID:20105664

  2. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physicians patient education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • ... HIV Testing • For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the ...

  3. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resize A A A Print Share Office for Human Research Protections The Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) provides leadership in the protection of the rights, welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in research conducted or supported by ...

  4. Introduction to the Human Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... Modules Resources Archived Modules Updates Introduction to the Human Body Human beings are arguably the most complex organisms on ... for the benefit of the total being. The human body is a single structure but it is ...

  5. Investigation of vital pathogenic target orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTase) from Thermus thermophilus HB8: Phylogenetic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Prabhu, Damodharan; Richard, Mariadasse; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2016-06-01

    Biosynthesis pathways of pyrimidine and purine are shown to play an important role in regular cellular activities. The biosynthesis can occur either through de novo or salvage pathways based on the requirement of the cell. The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway has been linked to several disorders and various autoimmune diseases. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) is an important enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of orotate to orotate monophosphate in the fifth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of 228 OPRTase sequences shows the distribution of proteins across different living forms of life. High structural similarities between Thermusthermophilus and other organisms kindled us to concentrate on OPRTase as an anti-pathogenic target. In this study, a homology model of OPRTase was constructed using 2P1Z as a template. About 100ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the conformational stability and dynamic patterns of the protein. The amino acid residues (Met1, Asp2, Glu43, Ala44, Glu47, Lys51, Ala157 and Leu158) lining in the binding site were predicted using SiteMap. Further, structure based virtual screening was performed on the predicted binding site using ChemBridge, Asinex, Binding, NCI, TosLab and Zinc databases. Compounds retrieved from the screening collections were manually clustered. The resultant protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, which further validates the binding modes of the hits. The study may provide better insight for designing potent anti-pathogenic agent. PMID:26861612

  6. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  7. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  8. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  9. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  10. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different

  11. Analysis of human metapneumovirus and human bocavirus viral load.

    PubMed

    Ricart, Silvia; Garcia-Garcia, Juan Jose; Anton, Andres; Pumarola, Tomas; Pons, Marti; Muoz-Almagro, Carmen; Marcos, Maria Angeles

    2013-09-01

    Viral load (VL) of human metapneumovirus and human bocavirus in infants <12 months admitted for bronchiolitis was analyzed. VL correlated with length of hospital stay in both viruses, human metapneumovirus VL with the duration oxygen therapy and human bocavirus VL inversely with days of respiratory effort before admission. Infants coinfected by other viruses were younger, but no differences were seen regarding VL. PMID:23538515

  12. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  13. Human Skin Fungal Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Findley, Keisha; Oh, Julia; Yang, Joy; Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton; Meyer, Jennifer A.; Schoenfeld, Deborah; Nomicos, Effie; Park, Morgan; Kong, Heidi H.; Segre, Julia A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional culture-based methods have incompletely defined the etiology of common recalcitrant human fungal skin diseases including athlete’s foot and toenail infections. Skin protects humans from invasion by pathogenic microorganisms, while providing a home for diverse commensal microbiota1. Bacterial genomic sequence data have generated novel hypotheses about species and community structures underlying human disorders2,3,4. However, microbial diversity is not limited to bacteria; microorganisms such as fungi also play major roles in microbial community stability, human health and disease5. Genomic methodologies to identify fungal species and communities have been limited compared with tools available for bacteria6. Fungal evolution can be reconstructed with phylogenetic markers, including ribosomal RNA gene regions and other highly conserved genes7. Here, we sequenced and analyzed fungal communities of 14 skin sites in 10 healthy adults. Eleven core body and arm sites were dominated by Malassezia fungi, with species-level classifications revealing greater topographical resolution between sites. By contrast, three foot sites, plantar heel, toenail, and toeweb, exhibited tremendous fungal diversity. Concurrent analysis of bacterial and fungal communities demonstrated that skin physiologic attributes and topography differentially shape these two microbial communities. These results provide a framework for future investigation of interactions between pathogenic and commensal fungal and bacterial communities in maintaining human health and contributing to disease pathogenesis. PMID:23698366

  14. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  15. The Human Aerodynamic Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary; Moyer, Zachary; Paterson, Eric; Edge, Brian

    2003-11-01

    The wake that trails behind a walking person in still air is, in effect, that of an irregular 3-D cylinder. At a brisk walking speed of 1.3 m/s (3 mph), the human wake is characterized by a Reynolds number of about 50,000. It is thus turbulent with underlying large-scale vortex motion. We show that buoyancy plays no role at this Reynolds number, even though it is dominant in the plume of a standing person. Computational Navier-Stokes solutions and laser-light-sheet experiments with a human subject reveal a large recirculation zone behind the torso and flow between the legs. The decay of a passive scalar introduced on the human body is found to be exponential with downstream distance. The volume flux in the human wake is roughly constant with downstream distance until the recirculation closes, whence it grows due to turbulent entrainment. Further experiments reveal the development of the wake from the human thermal plume as the Reynolds number (proportional to walking speed) is increased from zero to 50,000. These results pertain to the sensing of chemical traces in the wakes of walking persons for aviation security. Supported by FAA Grant 99-G-040.

  16. The human serum metabolome.

    PubMed

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L; Smith, Steven R; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  17. Human and murine erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiuli; Schulz, Vincent P.; Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Research into the fundamental mechanisms of erythropoiesis has provided critical insights into inherited and acquired disorders of the erythrocyte. Studies of human erythropoiesis have primarily utilized in-vitro systems, whereas murine models have provided insights from in-vivo studies. This report reviews recent insights into human and murine erythropoiesis gained from transcriptome-based analyses. Recent findings The availability of high-throughput genomic methodologies has allowed attainment of detailed gene expression data from cells at varying developmental and differentiation stages of erythropoiesis. Transcriptome analyses of human and murine reveal both stage and species-specific similarities and differences across terminal erythroid differentiation. Erythroid-specific long noncoding RNAs exhibit poor sequence conservation between human and mouse. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing reveal that complex, dynamic, stage-specific programs of alternative splicing program are utilized during terminal erythroid differentiation. Transcriptome data provide a significant resource for understanding mechanisms of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. Understanding these processes will provide innovative strategies to detect, diagnose, prevent, and treat hematologic disease. Summary Understanding the shared and different mechanisms controlling human and murine erythropoiesis will allow investigators to leverage the best model system to provide insights in normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. PMID:25719574

  18. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  19. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient. PMID:11684769

  20. Highlights of human toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Lawrence T.; Dorchies, Philippe; Morassin, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is a helminthozoonosis due to the migration of Toxocara species larvae through human organism. Humans become infected by ingesting either embryonated eggs from soil (geophagia, pica), dirty hands or raw vegetables, or larvae from undercooked giblets. The diagnosis relies upon sensitive immunological methods (ELISA or western-blot) which use Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens. Seroprevalence is high in developed countries, especially in rural areas, and also in some tropical islands. The clinical spectrum of the disease comprises four syndromes, namely visceral larva migrans, ocular larva migrans, and the more recently recognized "common" (in adults) and "covert" (in children) pictures. Therapy of ocular toxocariasis is primarily based upon corticosteroids use, when visceral larva migrans and few cases of common or covert toxocariasis can be treated by anthelmintics whose the most efficient appeared to be diethylcarbamazine. When diagnosed, all of these syndromes require thorough prevention of recontamination (especially by deworming pets) and sanitary education. PMID:11301585

  1. Human nutrition: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, N A

    2005-01-01

    In recent decades, much new evidence relating to the ape forerunners of modern humans has come to hand and diet appears to be an important factor. At some stage, there must have been a transition from a largely vegetarian ape diet to a modern human hunting economy providing significant amounts of meat. On an even longer evolutionary time scale the change was more complex. The mechanisms of evolutionary change are now better understood than they were in Darwin's time, thanks largely to great advances in genetics, both experimental and theoretical. It is virtually certain that diet, as a major component of the human environment, must have exerted evolutionary effects, but researchers still have little good evidence. PMID:17393680

  2. Uncovering the Human Methyltransferasome*

    PubMed Central

    Petrossian, Tanya C.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the human methyltransferasome. Primary sequences, predicted secondary structures, and solved crystal structures of known methyltransferases were analyzed by hidden Markov models, Fisher-based statistical matrices, and fold recognition prediction-based threading algorithms to create a model, or profile, of each methyltransferase superfamily. These profiles were used to scan the human proteome database and detect novel methyltransferases. 208 proteins in the human genome are now identified as known or putative methyltransferases, including 38 proteins that were not annotated previously. To date, 30% of these proteins have been linked to disease states. Possible substrates of methylation for all of the SET domain and SPOUT methyltransferases as well as 100 of the 131 seven-β-strand methyltransferases were surmised from sequence similarity clusters based on alignments of the substrate-specific domains. PMID:20930037

  3. Is humanity suicidal?

    PubMed

    Wilson, E O

    1993-01-01

    The world's fauna and flora has entered a crisis unparalleled since the end of the Mesozoic Era, with the extinction rate of species now elevated to more than a thousand times that existing before the coming of humanity. Scientists and policy makers are ill-prepared to moderate this hemorrhaging, because so little is known of the biology of the Earth's millions of species and because so little effort has been directed toward conservation thus far. With the vanished species will go great potential wealth in scientific knowledge, new products, ecosystems services, and part of the natural world in which the human species originated. The need for new research and improved management is thus urgent. If it is not met, humanity will likely survive, but in a world biologically impoverished for all time. PMID:8155855

  4. Whither medical humanities?

    PubMed

    Singh, Navjeevan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the medical humanities (MH) and their role in medical education is in its infancy in India. Students are initiated into professional (medical) education too early in life, usually at the expense of a basic grounding in the humanities, resulting in warped intellectual growth. The author, arguing against the wholesale import of foreign systems, advocates free inquiry by medical educators to evolve a humanities programme for medical students derived from our own cultural context. This essay describes the early experiences of efforts to make a beginning at the University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. The author reviews the various strategies used and the challenges of introducing the subject to the current generation of medical students. PMID:22864074

  5. Seaweed and human health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma S; Allsopp, Philip J; Magee, Pamela J; Gill, Chris I R; Nitecki, Sonja; Strain, Conall R; McSorley, Emeir M

    2014-03-01

    Seaweeds may have an important role in modulating chronic disease. Rich in unique bioactive compounds not present in terrestrial food sources, including different proteins (lectins, phycobiliproteins, peptides, and amino acids), polyphenols, and polysaccharides, seaweeds are a novel source of compounds with potential to be exploited in human health applications. Purported benefits include antiviral, anticancer, and anticoagulant properties as well as the ability to modulate gut health and risk factors for obesity and diabetes. Though the majority of studies have been performed in cell and animal models, there is evidence of the beneficial effect of seaweed and seaweed components on markers of human health and disease status. This review is the first to critically evaluate these human studies, aiming to draw attention to gaps in current knowledge, which will aid the planning and implementation of future studies. PMID:24697280

  6. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  7. Abortion and human rights.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus. PMID:20303830

  8. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  9. The Human Toxome Project

    PubMed Central

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Andersen, Melvin E.; Baghdikian, Christina; Boekelheide, Kim; Crofton, Kevin M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Kleensang, Andre; Li, Henghong; Livi, Carolina; Maertens, Alexandra; McMullen, Patrick D.; Rosenberg, Michael; Thomas, Russell; Vantangoli, Marguerite; Yager, James D.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Human Toxome Project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011–2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating and sharing molecular pathways of toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the responses of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are being phenotyped by transcriptomics and mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics. The bioinformatics tools for PoT deduction represent a core deliverable. A number of challenges for quality and standardization of cell systems, omics technologies and bioinformatics are being addressed. In parallel, concepts for annotation, validation and sharing of PoT information, as well as their link to adverse outcomes, are being developed. A reasonably comprehensive public database of PoT, the Human Toxome Knowledge-base, could become a point of reference for toxicological research and regulatory test strategies. PMID:25742299

  10. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  11. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  12. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  13. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  14. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  15. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  16. Human papillomavirus, human immunodeficiency virus and immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Denny, Lynette A; Franceschi, Silvia; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Heard, Isabelle; Moscicki, Anna Barbara; Palefsky, Joel

    2012-11-20

    The vast majority of women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will be co-infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). The interaction between the two sexually transmitted infections appears to be related to the alteration in cell-mediated immunity in HIV infected persons, increased susceptibility, and possibly reactivation of latent HPV infection. Linkage studies of HIV/AIDs and Cancer registries have indicated a 2- to 22-fold increase in cervical cancer in HIV-positive women compared to HIV-negative women. Data on the prevalence of HPV types in invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) suggest that the proportion of infection with types HPV16/18 (responsible for over 70% of all cervical cancers) is similar in HIV-negative and HIV-positive women. The biological interaction between HIV and HPV needs further elucidation, although there is some evidence that the presence of HPV infection may be associated with increased HIV transmission. Adolescents perinatally infected by HIV are known to have higher rates of HPV infection and also have been shown to seroconvert in response to HPV vaccination with the quadrivalent vaccine, albeit to lower titers than HIV-negative individuals. Anal cancer incidence is greatly increased in HIV-positive individuals, particularly in HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Screening for anal cancer precursors is feasible and effective; however, the impact on reduction of anal cancer remains to be demonstrated. There are ongoing studies on the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of current HPV vaccines in HIV-positive individuals and mature data are awaited. Male circumcision may be another approach to prevention of HPV transmission, which also requires further study. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:23199960

  17. Experimentation in human populations.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, S M

    1981-01-01

    This paper offers a definition of experimentation in the context of health related research on human populations, reviews the history of such experimentation, and discusses some issues relevant to health-related experimentation. The present role of experimentation in research on human beings developed from the continuing need to test all innovations in the treatment of human beings, and the empiricism pervading modern scientific research, 2 approaches which were combined in the pioneering clinical trials of Bradford Hall in Britain in the early 1960s. 4 areas in which the feasibility of health-related experimentation on human populations is frequently challenged are randomization, cost, population definition and availability, and observation of responses. Despite the need to avoid subjective bias in unit assignment and the high and uncontrollable variation in human subjects, randomization is not always accepted as necessary or feasible by researchers. Researchers must be convinced that there is no clear evidence of superiority of 1 treatment protocol over another in order to accept the randomization procedure. A major problem of cost is how to combine elements of financial cost with the risks of adverse effects. In some situations there is a need to establish a sequence of experiments which progress from limited to wider populations and from rigid to more flexible protocols. Similarly, statistical methods that utilize a partially sequential design are needed to minimize the exposure of subjects to inferior treatment while insuring that the experiment is not prematurely terminated. Even apparently objective responses may be affected by bias and human judgment. PMID:6912387

  18. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nation's efforts to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system was given renewed emphasis in January of 1988 when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance, in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly compared to past space activities. Missions to Mars, the Moon, and Phobos, as well as an observatory based on the dark side of the Moon are discussed.

  19. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  20. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  1. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  2. [Controversies about human cloning].

    PubMed

    Ziga, Jusuf

    2006-01-01

    Human cloning is one of the greatest scientific and research challenges that human kind faced so far. As much as we have reasons for excitement in front of achievements of the genetic engineering, also are great the fears about it. There is inevitable question: is the man aware where can cloning as an attack on a "natural laws for the life reproduction" can lead, or to say its impact on evolution diversities within kind that we belongs to. In this paper we have focus on finding the answer on the last question, with application of a multidisciplinary approach, which means not only scientific, but also ethical, as well as theology. PMID:16719236

  3. Mapping Human Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Chloe M.; Ren, Bing

    2013-01-01

    As the second dimension to the genome, the epigenome contains key information specific to every type of cells. Thousands of human epigenome maps have been produced in recent years thanks to rapid development of high throughput epigenome mapping technologies. In this review, we discuss the current epigenome mapping toolkit and utilities of epigenome maps. We focus particularly on mapping of DNA methylation, chromatin modification state and chromatin structures, and emphasize the use of epigenome maps to delineate human gene regulatory sequences and developmental programs. We also provide a perspective on the progress of the epigenomics field and challenges ahead. PMID:24074860

  4. [Human reservoirs of Pneumocystis].

    PubMed

    Wissmann, Gustavo; Morilla, Ruben; Friaza, Vicente; Calderón, Enrique; Varela, Jose M

    2010-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii, the fungal agent that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), is known to exclusively infect humans. Molecular studies have enabled detection of this fungus in individuals who have been colonized by P. jirovecii. Such colonization, found in several populations, seems to act as a human reservoir for the fungus. Various studies have reported mutations associated with sulfa resistance in P. jirovecii strains isolated from colonized patients, who can transmit the mutant genotype to PCP-susceptible individuals. The growing interest in P. jirovecii colonization may prompt the design of new prevention and management strategies for PCP. PMID:19403207

  5. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  6. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  7. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  8. Defining the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how the microbiome and its constituents are defined. This review highlights recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily time series datasets spanning months. Furthermore, emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes, and the possibility of enterotypes are discussed. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  9. Simulated human skin scales

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Julienne; Brighton, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Human skin scales which have been shed naturally bear a flora of microorganisms which is unknown until tested. To replace these scales in a study of the micro-environment of both the human body and of models a method has been devised of making synthetic scales which behave both physically and aerodynamically in a similar way to the natural material. The synthetic materials carry no natural flora and it is possible to include in them test markers of several kinds to assist in identification after dispersion. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4506999

  10. Human Rights: The Essential Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol; Hansen, Carol Rae; Wilde, Ralph; Bronkhorst, Daan; Moritz, Frederic A.; Rolle, Baptiste; Sherman, Rebecca; Southard, Jo Lynn; Wilkinson, Robert; Poole, Hilary, Ed.

    This reference work documents the history of human rights theory, explains each article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explores the contemporary human rights movement, and examines the major human rights issues facing the world today. This book is the first to combine historical and contemporary perspectives on these critical…

  11. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered

  12. Human Challenges in Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presents an overview using pictures some of the history of human exploration of the new frontiers of Earth and then examines some of the challenges to human exploration of space. Particular attention is given to the environmental factors and to the social and human factors that effect humans in space environments.

  13. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  14. Grass and human nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food products from animals that graze grasslands and consume diets high in forages are often better for human health than livestock fed diets with forages and concentrates. Meat from livestock that graze pastures in the United States frequently has less fat and higher concentrations of omega-3 fatty...

  15. Human thymic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, M; Landry, D; Montplaisir, S

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT Human thymic dendritic cells (DC) represent a member of the bone marrow-derived dendritic cell family. They have a dendritic shape and are found in small numbers mainly at the corticomedullary border and in medullary regions of the thymus. Human thymic DC were isolated by density gradient separation, followed by treatment with CD2, CD7, CD1, and CD11b mAb and immunobeads magnetic separation. The resulting population contains 60-75% brightly HLA-DR+ cells which present the morphological characteristics of DC observed in situ. Extensive phenotypic analysis confirmed that they are of mesenchymal origin and that some express CD11a and CD54 molecules. Freshly isolated DC do not stain with a wide variety of anti-T-B and -monocyte or -macrophage mAb. However, they acquire the CD1 molecule after a few days in culture. By using a cell sorter we obtained 90-95% of purified human thymic DC. Functional studies have shown that human thymic DC are potent activators in mixed lymphocyte reactions, act as accessory cells in mitogenic thymocyte proliferation, increase the thymocyte proliferative response to a toxin signal, and produce IL-1. They also formed spontaneous physical associations with thymocytes, which raises questions about the implication of DC in differentiation and/or maturation processes of thymocytes. PMID:9264338

  16. Human Ecology: Curriculum Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine commercially available programs which represent one aspect or a portion of the human ecology theme. Other information supplied for each program includes: program objectives; methods of instruction; specific subjects, grade, and ability levels; materials produced and purchasable; program implementation; teacher preparation; program…

  17. Human neurotrichinellosis, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasites of the genus Trichinella are globally-distributed, tissue-dwelling nematodes that predominantly infect mammals, though certain species are known to infect birds and reptiles as well. Human trichinellosis occurs by the ingestion of raw or improperly cooked meat harboring the infective muscl...

  18. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Human Social Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural “social signal transduction” pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving. PMID:25166010

  20. Human thimet oligopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Dando, P M; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have purified human thimet oligopeptidase to homogeneity from erythrocytes, and compared it with the enzyme from rat testis and chicken liver. An antiserum raised against rat thimet oligopeptidase also recognized the human and chicken enzymes, suggesting that the structure of the enzyme has been strongly conserved in evolution. Consistent with this, the properties of the human enzyme were very similar to those for the other species. Thus human thimet oligopeptidase also is a thiol-dependent metallo-oligopeptidase with M(r) about 75,000. Specificity for cleavage of a number of peptides was indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme, but Ki values for the four potent reversible inhibitors tested were lower. In discussing the results, we consider the determinants of the complex substrate specificity of thimet oligopeptidase. We question whether substrates containing more than 17 amino acid residues are cleaved, as has been suggested. We also point out that the favourable location of a proline residue and a free C-terminus in the substrate may be as important as the hydrophobic residues in the P2, P1 and P3' positions that have been emphasized in the past. Images Figure 1 PMID:8373360