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Sample records for human lung tissue

  1. Solubility of Freon 22 in human blood and lung tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Varene, N.; Choukroun, M.L.; Marthan, R.; Varene, P.

    1989-05-01

    The solubility of Freon 22 in human blood and lung tissue was determined using the chromatographic method of Wagner et al. In normal human blood, the mean Bunsen coefficient of solubility (alpha B) was 0.804 cm3 STPD.cm-3.ATA-1 at 37 degrees C. It increased with hematocrit (Hct) according to the equation alpha B = 0.274 Hct + 0.691. Tissue homogenates were prepared from macroscopically normal lung pieces obtained at thoracotomy from eight patients undergoing resection for lung carcinoma. The Bunsen solubility coefficients were 0.537 +/- 0.068 and 0.635 +/- 0.091 in washed and unwashed lung, respectively. These values can be used in the determination of both cardiac output and pulmonary tissue volume in humans by use of the rebreathing technique.

  2. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  3. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  4. 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus replicates in human lung tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Zengfeng; Fan, Xiaohui; Liu, Yuansheng; Wang, Jia; Zheng, Zuoyi; Chen, Rirong; Wang, Pui; Song, Wenjun; Chen, Honglin; Guan, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Replication activity of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in human lung cells was evaluated in this study. Twenty-two surgically removed human lung tissue samples were infected ex vivo with pandemic H1N1, A/California/04/2009, seasonal human H1N1 virus, A/ST/92/2009, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, A/Vietnam/1194/04. Examination of nucleoprotein (NP) protein expression and vRNA replication in infected human lung tissues showed that while CA/04 replication varied between tissue samples, overall, it replicated more efficiently than seasonal H1N1 but less efficiently than H5N1 virus. Double immunostaining for viral antigens and cellular markers indicated that CA/04 replicates in type II alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:20370480

  5. Thermal effect of endoscopic thermal vapour ablation on the lung surface in human ex vivo tissue

    PubMed Central

    Henne, Erik; Anderson, Joseph C.; Barry, Robert; Kesten, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: An investigation of the thermal effect and the potential for injury at the lung surface following thermal vapour ablation (InterVapor), an energy-based method of achieving endoscopic lung volume reduction. Methods: Heated water vapour was delivered to fifteen ex vivo human lungs using standard clinical procedure, and the thermal effect at the visceral pleura was monitored with an infrared camera. The time–temperature response was analysed mathematically to determine a cumulative injury quotient, which was compared to published thresholds. Results: The cumulative injury quotients for all 71 treatments of ex vivo tissue were found to be below the threshold for first degree burn and no other markers of tissue injury at the lung surface were observed. Conclusion: The safety profile for thermal vapour ablation is further supported by the demonstration that the thermal effect in a worst-case model is not expected to cause injury at the lung surface. PMID:22690896

  6. Resident Tissue-Specific Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Contribute to Fibrogenesis in Human Lung Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Natalie; Badri, Linda; Wettlaufer, Scott; Flint, Andrew; Sajjan, Uma; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Lama, Vibha N.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrotic obliteration of the small airways leading to progressive airflow obstruction, termed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), is the major cause of poor outcomes after lung transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a donor-derived population of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of human lung transplant recipients. Herein, we study the organ specificity of these cells and investigate the role of local mesenchymal progenitors in fibrogenesis after lung transplantation. We demonstrate that human lung allograft–derived MSCs uniquely express embryonic lung mesenchyme–associated transcription factors with a 35,000-fold higher expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor forkhead box (FOXF1) noted in lung compared with bone marrow MSCs. Fibrotic differentiation of MSCs isolated from normal lung allografts was noted in the presence of profibrotic mediators associated with BOS, including transforming growth factor-β and IL-13. MSCs isolated from patients with BOS demonstrated increased expression of α-SMA and collagen I when compared with non-BOS controls, consistent with a stable in vivo fibrotic phenotype. FOXF1 mRNA expression in the BAL cell pellet correlated with the number of MSCs in the BAL fluid, and myofibroblasts present in the fibrotic lesions expressed FOXF1 by in situ hybridization. These data suggest a key role for local tissue-specific, organ-resident, mesenchymal precursors in the fibrogenic processes in human adult lungs. PMID:21641374

  7. TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT. J Gallagher1, J Inmon1, S Schlaegle2, A Levine2, T Rogers3, J Scott1, F Green4, M Schenker5, K Pinkerton5 1NHEERL, US-EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2RJ Lee Group Inc, Monroeville, Pa, USA; ...

  8. Three Dimensional Imaging of Paraffin Embedded Human Lung Tissue Samples by Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Anna E.; Vasilescu, Dragos M.; Seal, Katherine A. D.; Keyes, Samuel D.; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Hogg, James C.; Sinclair, Ian; Warner, Jane A.; Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Lackie, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D) micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT) has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data. Methods FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4) were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm) was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging. Results The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15mm x 7mm). Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm) in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections. Conclusion We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis. PMID:26030902

  9. [Study of remanent magnetization of the human body: lung and liver tissues].

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Wang, H; Murai, Y; Soukejima, S; Kagamimori, S

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we used lung and liver tissue specimens distracted from tissue to investigate remanant magnetization, and found that specimens with a volume of 6 mm3 had an intensity of 10(-10) Am2, which was significantly stronger than the noise level of the superconducting magnetometer. This finding indicates that both lung and liver tissues contain magnetic materials. We speculated that biological magnetite is the magnetic material in these tissues. In addition, we found that lung tissue specimens with strong magnetization had correspondingly strong magnetized findings in the liver tissue specimens. In a comparison of magnetization in lung cancer tissue specimens and normal lung tissue, no significant relationship was noted, but two of the lung cancer tissue specimens showed strong magnetization. The number of lung cancer specimens studies was insufficient to investigate the relation between the magnetization (accumulation of magnetic materials) and lung cancer, and further studies are necessary. The magnetic properties of two lung cancer tissue specimens showing strong magnetization were further investigated, and an alternating field demagnetization experiment showed that their magnetization was composed of a unit stable vector, which indicates that the lung tissue may have been magnetized after the accumulation of magnetic materials. The Wohlfarth ratio (Moskowitz et al., 1989) of them was less than 0.5, which suggests that magnetic materials are distributed in clusters in lung tissue. PMID:11519186

  10. Distribution of particulate matter and tissue remodeling in the human lung.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, K E; Green, F H; Saiki, C; Vallyathan, V; Plopper, C G; Gopal, V; Hung, D; Bahne, E B; Lin, S S; Ménache, M G; Schenker, M B

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between intrapulmonary particle distribution of carbonaceous and mineral dusts and remodeling of the airways along anatomically distinct airway paths in the lungs of Hispanic males from the central valley of California. Lung autopsy specimens from the Fresno County Coroner's Office were prepared by intratracheal instillation of 2% glutaraldehyde at 30 cm H(2)O pressure. Two distinct airway paths into the apico-posterior and apico-anterior portions of the left upper lung lobe were followed. Tissue samples for histologic analysis were generally taken from the intrapulmonary second, fourth, sixth, and ninth airway generations. Parenchymal tissues beyond the 12th airway generation of each airway path were also analyzed. There was little evidence of visible particle accumulation in the larger conducting airways (generations 2-6), except in bronchial-associated lymphoid tissues and within peribronchial connective tissue. In contrast, terminal and respiratory bronchioles arising from each pathway revealed varying degrees of wall thickening and remodeling. Walls with marked thickening contained moderate to heavy amounts of carbonaceous and mineral dusts. Wall thickening was associated with increases in collagen and interstitial inflammatory cells, including dust-laden macrophages. These changes were significantly greater in first-generation respiratory bronchioles compared to second- and third-generation respiratory bronchioles. These findings suggest that accumulation of carbonaceous and mineral dust in the lungs is significantly affected by lung anatomy with the greatest retention in centers of lung acini. Furthermore, there is significant remodeling of this transitional zone in humans exposed to ambient particulate matter. PMID:11102298

  11. Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid recognition of human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yiping; Chen, Liru; Zhou, Wei; Chingin, Konstantin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhu, Tenggao; Wen, Hua; Ding, Jianhua; Xu, Jianjun; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry (TSI-MS) directly on small tissue samples has been shown to provide highly specific molecular information. In this study, we apply this method to the analysis of 38 pairs of human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue (cancer) and adjacent normal lung tissue (normal). The main components of pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, m/z 757.47), phosphatidylcholine (POPC, m/z 782.52), oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC, m/z 808.49), and arachidonic acid stearoyl phosphatidylcholine (SAPC, m/z 832.43), were identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Monte Carlo sampling partial least squares linear discriminant analysis (PLS-LDA) was used to distinguish full-mass-range mass spectra of cancer samples from the mass spectra of normal tissues. With 5 principal components and 30 – 40 Monte Carlo samplings, the accuracy of cancer identification in matched tissue samples reached 94.42%. Classification of a tissue sample required less than 1 min, which is much faster than the analysis of frozen sections. The rapid, in situ diagnosis with minimal sample consumption provided by TSI-MS is advantageous for surgeons. TSI-MS allows them to make more informed decisions during surgery. PMID:25961911

  12. Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid recognition of human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiping; Chen, Liru; Zhou, Wei; Chingin, Konstantin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhu, Tenggao; Wen, Hua; Ding, Jianhua; Xu, Jianjun; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-05-01

    Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry (TSI-MS) directly on small tissue samples has been shown to provide highly specific molecular information. In this study, we apply this method to the analysis of 38 pairs of human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue (cancer) and adjacent normal lung tissue (normal). The main components of pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, m/z 757.47), phosphatidylcholine (POPC, m/z 782.52), oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC, m/z 808.49), and arachidonic acid stearoyl phosphatidylcholine (SAPC, m/z 832.43), were identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Monte Carlo sampling partial least squares linear discriminant analysis (PLS-LDA) was used to distinguish full-mass-range mass spectra of cancer samples from the mass spectra of normal tissues. With 5 principal components and 30 - 40 Monte Carlo samplings, the accuracy of cancer identification in matched tissue samples reached 94.42%. Classification of a tissue sample required less than 1 min, which is much faster than the analysis of frozen sections. The rapid, in situ diagnosis with minimal sample consumption provided by TSI-MS is advantageous for surgeons. TSI-MS allows them to make more informed decisions during surgery.

  13. Characterizing the genetic basis of methylome diversity in histologically normal human lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianxin; Marconett, Crystal N.; Duan, Jubao; Hyland, Paula L.; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhaoming; Wheeler, William; Zhou, Beiyun; Campan, Mihaela; Lee, Diane S.; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Weiyin; Triche, Tim; Amundadottir, Laufey; Warner, Andrew; Hutchinson, Amy; Chen, Po-Han; Chung, Brian S.I.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Bergen, Andrew W.; Freedman, Mathew; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Borok, Zea; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tucker, Margaret A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The genetic regulation of the human epigenome is not fully appreciated. Here we describe the effects of genetic variants on the DNA methylome in human lung based on methylation-quantitative trait loci (meQTL) analyses. We report 34,304 cis- and 585 trans-meQTLs, a genetic-epigenetic interaction of surprising magnitude, including a regulatory hotspot. These findings are replicated in both breast and kidney tissues and show distinct patterns: cis-meQTLs mostly localize to CpG sites outside of genes, promoters, and CpG islands (CGIs), while trans-meQTLs are over-represented in promoter CGIs. meQTL SNPs are enriched in CTCF binding sites, DNaseI hypersensitivity regions and histone marks. Importantly, 4 of the 5 established lung cancer risk loci in European ancestry are cis-meQTLs and, in aggregate, cis-meQTLs are enriched for lung cancer risk in a genome-wide analysis of 11,587 subjects. Thus, inherited genetic variation may affect lung carcinogenesis by regulating the human methylome. PMID:24572595

  14. Lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoganson, David M; Bassett, Erik K; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Lung tissue engineering is an emerging field focused on the development of lung replacement devices and tissue to treat patients with end stage lung disease. Microfluidic based lung assist devices have been developed that have biomimetically designed vascular networks that achieve physiologic blood flow. Gas exchange in these devices occurs across a thin respiratory membrane. Designed for intrathoracic implantation as a bridge to transplant or destination therapy, these lung assist devices will allow ambulation and hospital discharge for patients with end stage lung disease. Decellularized lungs subsequently recellularized with epithelial and endothelial cells have been implanted in small animal models with demonstration of initial gas exchange. Further development of these tissues and scaling to large animal models will validate this approach and may be an organ source for lung transplantation. Initial clinical success has been achieved with decellularized tracheal implants using autologous stem cells. Development of microfluidic lung models using similar architecture to the lung assist device technology allows study of lung biology and diseases with manipulation of lung cells and respiratory membrane strain. PMID:24896347

  15. Serotype 1 and 8 Pneumococci Evade Sensing by Inflammasomes in Human Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fatykhova, Diana; Rabes, Anne; Machnik, Christoph; Guruprasad, Kunchur; Pache, Florence; Berg, Johanna; Toennies, Mario; Bauer, Torsten T.; Schneider, Paul; Schimek, Maria; Eggeling, Stephan; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Mitchell, Andrea M.; Hilker, Rolf; Hain, Torsten; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. The pore-forming toxin pneumolysin is a key virulence factor of S. pneumoniae, which can be sensed by the NLRP3 inflammasome. Among the over 90 serotypes, serotype 1 pneumococci (particularly MLST306) have emerged across the globe as a major cause of invasive disease. The cause for its particularity is, however, incompletely understood. We therefore examined pneumococcal infection in human cells and a human lung organ culture system mimicking infection of the lower respiratory tract. We demonstrate that different pneumococcal serotypes differentially activate inflammasome-dependent IL-1β production in human lung tissue and cells. Whereas serotype 2, 3, 6B, 9N pneumococci expressing fully haemolytic pneumolysins activate NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent responses, serotype 1 and 8 strains expressing non-haemolytic toxins are poor activators of IL-1β production. Accordingly, purified haemolytic pneumolysin but not serotype 1-associated non-haemolytic toxin activates strong IL-1β production in human lungs. Our data suggest that the evasion of inflammasome-dependent innate immune responses by serotype 1 pneumococci might contribute to their ability to cause invasive diseases in humans. PMID:26317436

  16. Serotype 1 and 8 Pneumococci Evade Sensing by Inflammasomes in Human Lung Tissue.

    PubMed

    Fatykhova, Diana; Rabes, Anne; Machnik, Christoph; Guruprasad, Kunchur; Pache, Florence; Berg, Johanna; Toennies, Mario; Bauer, Torsten T; Schneider, Paul; Schimek, Maria; Eggeling, Stephan; Mitchell, Timothy J; Mitchell, Andrea M; Hilker, Rolf; Hain, Torsten; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Hocke, Andreas C; Opitz, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. The pore-forming toxin pneumolysin is a key virulence factor of S. pneumoniae, which can be sensed by the NLRP3 inflammasome. Among the over 90 serotypes, serotype 1 pneumococci (particularly MLST306) have emerged across the globe as a major cause of invasive disease. The cause for its particularity is, however, incompletely understood. We therefore examined pneumococcal infection in human cells and a human lung organ culture system mimicking infection of the lower respiratory tract. We demonstrate that different pneumococcal serotypes differentially activate inflammasome-dependent IL-1β production in human lung tissue and cells. Whereas serotype 2, 3, 6B, 9N pneumococci expressing fully haemolytic pneumolysins activate NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent responses, serotype 1 and 8 strains expressing non-haemolytic toxins are poor activators of IL-1β production. Accordingly, purified haemolytic pneumolysin but not serotype 1-associated non-haemolytic toxin activates strong IL-1β production in human lungs. Our data suggest that the evasion of inflammasome-dependent innate immune responses by serotype 1 pneumococci might contribute to their ability to cause invasive diseases in humans. PMID:26317436

  17. Development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer for human lung tissue exploration

    PubMed Central

    Peyrot, Donald A.; Lefort, Claire; Steffenhagen, Marie; Mansuryan, Tigran; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Abi-Haidar, Darine; Sandeau, Nicolas; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Kruglik, Sergei G.; Thiberville, Luc; Louradour, Frédéric; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Several major lung pathologies are characterized by early modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrillar collagen and elastin network. We report here the development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer, compatible with an endoscopic use, primarily intended for the recording of second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) of both collagen and elastin. Fiber dispersion is accurately compensated by the use of a specific grism-pair stretcher, allowing laser pulse temporal width around 70 fs and excitation wavelength tunability from 790 to 900 nm. This spectrometer was used to investigate the excitation wavelength dependence (from 800 to 870 nm) of SHG and 2PEF spectra originating from ex vivo human lung tissue samples. The results were compared with spectral responses of collagen gel and elastin powder reference samples and also with data obtained using standard nonlinear microspectroscopy. The excitation-wavelength-tunable nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer presented in this study allows performing nonlinear spectroscopy of human lung tissue ECM through the elastin 2PEF and the collagen SHG signals. This work opens the way to tunable excitation nonlinear endomicroscopy based on both distal scanning of a single optical fiber and proximal scanning of a fiber-optic bundle. PMID:22567579

  18. Development of an Ex Vivo Tissue Platform To Study the Human Lung Response to Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Graham, Joseph G; Winchell, Caylin G; Kurten, Richard C; Voth, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute debilitating flu-like illness that can also present as chronic endocarditis. Disease typically occurs following inhalation of contaminated aerosols, resulting in an initial pulmonary infection. In human cells, C. burnetii generates a replication niche termed the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) by directing fusion with autophagosomes and lysosomes. C. burnetii requires this lysosomal environment for replication and uses a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to generate the large PV. However, we do not understand how C. burnetii evades the intracellular immune surveillance that triggers an inflammatory response. We recently characterized human alveolar macrophage (hAM) infection in vitro and found that avirulent C. burnetii triggers sustained interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Here, we evaluated infection of ex vivo human lung tissue, defining a valuable approach for characterizing C. burnetii interactions with a human host. Within whole lung tissue, C. burnetii preferentially replicated in hAMs. Additionally, IL-1β production correlated with formation of an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC)-dependent inflammasome in response to infection. We also assessed potential activation of a human-specific noncanonical inflammasome and found that caspase-4 and caspase-5 are processed during infection. Interestingly, although inflammasome activation is closely linked to pyroptosis, lytic cell death did not occur following C. burnetii-triggered inflammasome activation, indicating an atypical response after intracellular detection. Together, these studies provide a novel platform for studying the human innate immune response to C. burnetii. PMID:26902725

  19. Immunohistochemical localization of LLC1 in human tissues and its limited expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vishal; Choi, Yong-Bock; Hwang, Hai-Li; Lee, Jeong-Hwa; Park, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Hyun-Kyoung; Poojan, Shiv; Koh, Jae-Soo; Kim, Han-Seong; Hong, Kyeong-Man

    2015-09-01

    We have shown both LLC1 expression in the lung epithelium by in situ hybridization and its inactivation in lung cancer by epigenetic modification. However, LLC1 protein's cellular localization or its role in normal lung or cancer tissues has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody against recombinant LLC1 was produced, and immunohistochemical staining was performed on arrays including various human tissues, normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues for LLC1 localization. The immunohistochemical results showed LLC1 expression in the cilia of normal-airway epithelial cells and in the cytoplasm of type II pneumocytes in bronchiectatic patients, but no expression in most of the NSCLC tissues, which is consistent with our previous report positing LLC1 as a tumor suppressor. However, LLC1 over-expression in NSCLC cell lines NCI-H1299 and NCI-H23 did not show any change in proliferation or migration, which does not indicate any LLC1 tumor-suppressor role. As for the other human tissues, LLC1 was localized in renal tubular cells, pancreatic acinar cells, and epithelial cells of the stomach, duodenum, and gallbladder. In summary, our findings suggest that LLC1 is not a tumor suppressor, and that it is localized in the cilia of the normal lung epithelium but is absent in most NSCLC cases, probably due to the loss of cilia during lung carcinogenesis. PMID:25786037

  20. Global DNA methylation and PTEN hypermethylation alterations in lung tissues from human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianan; Jia, Xiaowei; Mei, Liangying; Zheng, Min; Yu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is a respiratory disease caused by long-term silica dust exposure. Our previous study has demonstrated that silica mediates the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN)/serine or threonine kinase (AKT)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/AP-1 pathway in human embryo lung fibroblasts (HELFs). The purpose of this study is to identify genome-wide aberrant DNA methylation profiling in lung tissues from silicosis patients. Methods We performed Illumina Human Methylation 450K Beadchip arrays to investigate the methylation alteration in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung specimens, immunohistochemistry to detect the level of c-Jun and PTEN proteins; methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR) to identify PTEN and c-Jun promoter methylation in HELFs. Results We found 86,770 CpG sites and 79,660 CpG sites significantly differed in methylation status in early-stage and advanced-stage compared with GEO normal lung methylation data. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis revealed the methylated status of MAPK signaling pathway was considered changed. The number of PTEN and c-Jun CpG promoter methylated-sites were increased in advanced-stage. Early-stage showed the positive expression of c-Jun and PTEN protein and negative or mild expression in advanced-stage. PTEN promoter was no differentially methylated and c-Jun promoter differed at 12 and 24 h in HELFs. Conclusions Abnormal DNA methylation on genome-scale was implicated in silicosis, and PTEN promoter hypermethylation might be associated with decrease of PTEN protein.

  1. Automated Decellularization of Intact, Human-Sized Lungs for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Price, Andrew P.; Godin, Lindsay M.; Domek, Alex; Cotter, Trevor; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Taylor, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an automated system that can be used to decellularize whole human-sized organs and have shown lung as an example. Lungs from 20 to 30 kg pigs were excised en bloc with the trachea and decellularized with our established protocol of deionized water, detergents, sodium chloride, and porcine pancreatic DNase. A software program was written to control a valve manifold assembly that we built for selection and timing of decellularization fluid perfusion through the airway and the vasculature. This system was interfaced with a prototypic bioreactor chamber that was connected to another program, from a commercial source, which controlled the volume and flow pressure of fluids. Lung matrix that was decellularized by the automated method was compared to a manual method previously used by us and others. Automation resulted in more consistent acellular matrix preparations as demonstrated by measuring levels of DNA, hydroxyproline (collagen), elastin, laminin, and glycosaminoglycans. It also proved highly beneficial in saving time as the decellularization procedure was reduced from days down to just 24 h. Developing a rapid, controllable, automated system for production of reproducible matrices in a closed system is a major step forward in whole-organ tissue engineering. PMID:24826875

  2. Evidence for tissue-resident mesenchymal stem cells in human adult lung from studies of transplanted allografts.

    PubMed

    Lama, Vibha N; Smith, Lisa; Badri, Linda; Flint, Andrew; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Murray, Susan; Wang, Zhuo; Liao, Hui; Toews, Galen B; Krebsbach, Paul H; Peters-Golden, Marc; Pinsky, David J; Martinez, Fernando J; Thannickal, Victor J

    2007-04-01

    The origin and turnover of connective tissue cells in adult human organs, including the lung, are not well understood. Here, studies of cells derived from human lung allografts demonstrate the presence of a multipotent mesenchymal cell population, which is locally resident in the human adult lung and has extended life span in vivo. Examination of plastic-adherent cell populations in bronchoalveolar lavage samples obtained from 76 human lung transplant recipients revealed clonal proliferation of fibroblast-like cells in 62% (106 of 172) of samples. Immunophenotyping of these isolated cells demonstrated expression of vimentin and prolyl-4-hydroxylase, indicating a mesenchymal phenotype. Multiparametric flow cytometric analyses revealed expression of cell-surface proteins, CD73, CD90, and CD105, commonly found on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Hematopoietic lineage markers CD14, CD34, and CD45 were absent. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. Cytogenetic analysis of cells from 7 sex-mismatched lung transplant recipients harvested up to 11 years after transplant revealed that 97.2% +/- 2.1% expressed the sex genotype of the donor. The presence of MSCs of donor sex identity in lung allografts even years after transplantation provides what we believe to be the first evidence for connective tissue cell progenitors that reside locally within a postnatal, nonhematopoietic organ. PMID:17347686

  3. Mean Organ Doses Resulting From Non-Human Primate Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation Prescribed to Mid-Line Tissue.

    PubMed

    Prado, Charlotte; Kazi, Abdul; Bennett, Alexander; MacVittie, Thomas; Prado, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Multi-organ dose evaluations and the effects of heterogeneous tissue dose calculations have been retrospectively evaluated following irradiation to the whole thorax and lung in non-human primates (NHP). A clinical-based approach was established to evaluate actual doses received in the heart and lungs during whole thorax lung irradiation. Anatomical structure and organ densities have been introduced in the calculations to show the effects of dose distribution through heterogeneous tissue. Mean organ doses received by non-human primates undergoing whole thorax lung irradiations were calculated using a treatment planning system that is routinely used in clinical radiation oncology. The doses received by non-human primates irradiated following conventional dose calculations have been retrospectively reconstructed using computerized tomography-based, heterogeneity-corrected dose calculations. The use of dose volume descriptors for irradiation to organs at risk and tissue exposed to radiation is introduced. Mean and partial-volume doses to lung and heart are presented and contrasted. The importance of exact dose definitions is highlighted, and the relevance of precise dosimetry to establish organ-specific dose response relationships in NHP models of acute and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure is emphasized. PMID:26425898

  4. Preclinical validation and imaging of Wnt-induced repair in human 3D lung tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Franziska E; Vierkotten, Sarah; Wagner, Darcy E; Burgstaller, Gerald; Costa, Rita; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by a progressive loss of lung tissue. Inducing repair processes within the adult diseased lung is of major interest and Wnt/β-catenin signalling represents a promising target for lung repair. However, the translation of novel therapeutic targets from model systems into clinical use remains a major challenge.We generated murine and patient-derived three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo lung tissue cultures (LTCs), which closely mimic the 3D lung microenvironment in vivo. Using two well-known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and CHIR 99021 (CT), we determined Wnt/β-catenin-driven lung repair processes in high spatiotemporal resolution using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, ELISA, (immuno)histological assessment, and four-dimensional confocal live tissue imaging.Viable 3D-LTCs exhibited preserved lung structure and function for up to 5 days. We demonstrate successful Wnt/β-catenin signal activation in murine and patient-derived 3D-LTCs from COPD patients. Wnt/β-catenin signalling led to increased alveolar epithelial cell marker expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression, as well as altered macrophage activity and elastin remodelling. Importantly, induction of surfactant protein C significantly correlated with disease stage (per cent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) in patient-derived 3D-LTCs.Patient-derived 3D-LTCs represent a valuable tool to analyse potential targets and drugs for lung repair. Enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signalling attenuated pathological features of patient-derived COPD 3D-LTCs. PMID:25929950

  5. Two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy enables multiplexed molecular imaging in the alveolar space of human lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajić, Nikola; Akram, Ahsan R.; Choudhary, Tushar R.; McDonald, Neil; Tanner, Michael G.; Pedretti, Ettore; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Scholefield, Emma; Girkin, John M.; Moore, Anne; Bradley, Mark; Dhaliwal, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a fast two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy system capable of simultaneously detecting several disease targets in intact human ex vivo lung tissue. We characterize the system for light throughput from the excitation light emitting diodes, fluorescence collection efficiency, and chromatic focal shifts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the instrument by imaging bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in ex vivo human lung tissue. We describe a mechanism of bacterial detection through the fiber bundle that uses blinking effects of bacteria as they move in front of the fiber core providing detection of objects smaller than the fiber core and cladding (˜3 μm). This effectively increases the measured spatial resolution of 4 μm. We show simultaneous imaging of neutrophils, monocytes, and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus) in ex vivo human lung tissue. The instrument has 10 nM and 50 nM sensitivity for fluorescein and Cy5 solutions, respectively. Lung tissue autofluorescence remains visible at up to 200 fps camera acquisition rate. The optical system lends itself to clinical translation due to high-fluorescence sensitivity, simplicity, and the ability to multiplex several pathological molecular imaging targets simultaneously.

  6. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R.; Foster, Timothy J.; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human

  7. Regional Mapping of Gas Uptake by Blood and Tissue in the Human Lung using Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Ruppert, Kai; Jiang, Yun; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; Shim, Y. Michael; Wang, Chengbo; Ruset, Iulian C.; Hersman, F. William; Altes, Talissa A.; Mugler, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a breath-hold acquisition for regional mapping of ventilation and the fractions of hyperpolarized xenon-129 (Xe129) dissolved in tissue (lung parenchyma and plasma) and red blood cells (RBCs), and to perform an exploratory study to characterize data obtained in human subjects. Materials and Methods A three-dimensional, multi-echo, radial-trajectory pulse sequence was developed to obtain ventilation (gaseous Xe129), tissue and RBC images in healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. Signal ratios (total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, RBC-to-gas and RBC-to-tissue) were calculated from the images for quantitative comparison. Results Healthy subjects demonstrated generally uniform values within coronal slices, and a gradient in values along the anterior-to-posterior direction. In contrast, images and associated ratio maps in smokers and asthmatics were generally heterogeneous and exhibited values mostly lower than those in healthy subjects. Whole-lung values of total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, and RBC-to-gas ratios in healthy subjects were significantly larger than those in diseased subjects. Conclusion Regional maps of tissue and RBC fractions of dissolved Xe129 were obtained from a short breath-hold acquisition, well tolerated by healthy volunteers and subjects with obstructive lung disease. Marked differences were observed in spatial distributions and overall amounts of Xe129 dissolved in tissue and RBCs among healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. PMID:23681559

  8. FORMATION OF SLOW-REACTING SUBSTANCE OF ANAPHYLAXIS IN HUMAN LUNG TISSUE AND CELLS BEFORE RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert A.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Goetzl, Edward J.; Austen, K. Frank

    1974-01-01

    The capacity to extract slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) from human lung tissue or cells after immunologic activation, together with the measurement of SRS-A in both the extract and the surrounding fluid, permits study of total SRS-A generation. That the material extracted is SRS-A was established by both differential bioassay and purification. SRS-A accumulation was entirely intracellular after limited IgE-dependent direct or reversed anaphylactic activation. Intracellular accumulation also generally preceded release, with generation of SRS-A continuing well beyond a plateau in the cellular SRS-A level and the release of preformed mediators. The quantity of SRS-A generated after immunologic activation was modulated by the introduction of exogenous cyclic nucleotides, revealing a site of cyclic nucleotide action distinct from that on mediator release. The capacity to determine not only the release of preformed mediators but also the generation of a newly formed mediator, the sum of SRS-A in cells and supernate, adds an additional dimension to the analysis of the cellular events of immediate hypersensitivity. PMID:4378429

  9. Use of human lung tissue for studies of structural changes associated with chronic ozone exposure: Opportunities and critical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1993-12-01

    Definitive information on the chronic effects of exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}) in humans is not available. There is a strong concern that ozone could produce chronic lung damage in humans on the basis that exposures are ubiquitous at levels that produce transient symptoms, function deficits, and lung inflammation in humans and chronic lung damage in laboratory animals. Both prospective and national population surveys suggest an association between chronic O{sub 3} exposure and reduced lung function, and a pilot investigation of autopsied lungs of accident victims in Los Angeles reported an unexpectedly high incidence of disease in the centriacinar region, the lung region known to receive the highest dose of inhaled O{sub 3}. This paper discusses the advantages and limitations of further studies of structural changes in human lung tissue in relation to chronic O{sub 3} exposure. The major advantages of such studies are that (a) measurable effects may be related to realistic chronic exposures, (b) the effects may be described quantitatively and compared directly to those obtained in chronic animal inhalation exposures, and (c) evidence for chronic effects may be obtained much more rapidly than in prospective studies. The major limitations are the difficulties in obtaining sufficient reliable information on residential history, physical activity out-of-doors, and smoking and other confounding exposures to lung irritants from next of kin, and limited availability of adequate air quality data for determining ambient concentrations at places of residence and/or outdoor exercise. The paper also discusses approaches to minimizing these limitations in the design of specific studies. 15 refs.

  10. Routes of conjugation in normal and cancerous tissue from human lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Gerald M.; Gibby, Elizabeth M.; Mehta, Rekha

    1981-06-01

    The selective toxicity of drugs leading to major advances in antibacterial chemotherapy has often resulted from the identification and exploitation of major biochemical differences between bacterial and mammalian species1. Similar progress has not been made in cancer chemotherapy, partly due to a lack of suitable biochemical differences between normal and cancerous tissue other than in DNA synthesis, but also because of many other problems such as those of metastases and resistance, and the presence in tumours of cells at different states of the cell cycle. Here we report a major biochemical difference in the routes of conjugation between normal lung and tumour tissue from patients with lung cancer. Conjugation with glucuronic acid and sulphate constitute two of the most important pathways of metabolism of drugs, other foreign compounds and hormonal steroids2,3. Using 1-naphthol as a model phenolic substrate, normal peripheral lung tissue formed almost exclusively the sulphate ester conjugate, 1-naphthyl sulphate, whereas tumour tissue from squamous carcinomas from the same patients formed predominantly the glucuronic acid conjugate, 1-naphthyl glucuronide. Such major biochemical differences may be exploitable in the design of selectively toxic cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. Buffer optimization for high resolution of human lung cancer tissue proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibeom; Pi, Kyungbae; Lee, Keeman

    2009-01-01

    A problem in proteomic analysis of lung cancer tissue is the presence of complex components of different histological backgrounds (squamous cell carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma). The efficient solubilization of protein components before two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is a very critical. Poor solubilization has been associated with a failure to detect proteins and diffuse, streaked and/or trailing protein spots. Here, we have optimized the solubilization of human lung cancer tissue to increase protein resolution. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) rehydration buffer containing a thiourea-urea mixture provided superior resolution, whereas a buffer without thiourea yielded consistently poor results. In addition, IEF rehydration buffers containing CHAPS and DTT gave superior resolution, whereas buffers containing Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and/or Triton X-100 did not. A tributylphosphine-containing buffer gave consistently poor results. Using optimized conditions, we used 2-D gel analysis of human lung cancer tissue to identify 11 differentially-expressed protein spots by MALDI-mass spectrometry. This study provides a methodological tool to study the complex mammalian proteomes. PMID:18800191

  12. Assessment of the effects of ultrasound-mediated glucose on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissues with the Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Huajiang; Wu, Guoyong; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Xiao

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-mediated analyte diffusion on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro and to find more effective sonophoretic (SP) delivery in combination with the optical clearing agents (OCAs) method to distinguish normal and diseased lung tissues. The permeability coefficients of SP in combination with OCAs diffusion in lung tissue were measured with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). 30% glucose and SP with a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 0.80 W/cm2 over a 3 cm probe was simultaneously applied for 15 min. Experimental results show that the mean permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP were found to be (2.01±0.21)×10-5 cm/s from normal lung (NL) tissue, (2.75±0.28)×10-5 cm/s from lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) tissue, (4.53±0.49)×10-5 cm/s from lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue, and (5.81±0.62)×10-5 cm/s from lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue, respectively. The permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP increase approximately 36.8%, 125.4%, and 189.1% for the LBG, LAT, and LSCC tissue compared with that for the NL tissue, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP between LBG and NL tissue (p<0.05), between LAT and NL tissue (p<0.05), and between LSCC and NL tissue (p<0.05). The results suggest that the OCT functional imaging technique to combine an ultrasound-OCAs combination method could become a powerful tool in early diagnosis and monitoring of changed microstructure of pathologic human lung tissue.

  13. Human lung tissue macrophages, but not alveolar macrophages, express matrix metalloproteinases after direct contact with activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Lacraz, S; Nicod, L P; Chicheportiche, R; Welgus, H G; Dayer, J M

    2001-04-01

    Human alveolar macrophages (AM) and lung tissue macrophages (LTM) have a distinct localization in the cellular environment. We studied their response to direct contact with activated T lymphocytes in terms of the production of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1), 92-kD gelatinase (MMP-9), and of TIMP-1, one of the counter-regulatory tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Either AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage or LTM obtained by mincing and digestion of lung tissue were exposed for 48 h to plasma membranes of T lymphocytes previously activated with phorbol myristate acetate and phytohemagglutinin for 24 h. Membranes of activated T cells strongly induced the production of MMP-1, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 exclusively in LTM but not in AM, whereas membranes from unstimulated T cells failed to induce the release of MMPs. Both populations of mononuclear phagocytes spontaneously released only small amounts of MMPs and TIMP-1. Similar results were obtained when MMP and TIMP-1 expression was analyzed at pretranslational and biosynthetic levels, respectively. Blockade experiments with cytokine antagonists revealed the involvement of T-cell membrane-associated interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in MMP production by LTM upon contact with T cells. These data suggest that the ability of lung macrophages to produce MMPs after direct contact with activated T cells is related to the difference in phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes and cell localization. In addition, these observations indicate that cell-cell contact represents an important biological mechanism in potentiating the inflammatory response of mononuclear phagocytes in the lungs. PMID:11306438

  14. Strategies for Whole Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Elizabeth A.; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sundaram, Sumati; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Tseng, Michelle K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds to support the engineering of functional lung tissue in vitro. Rendered acellular through the use of detergents and other reagents, the scaffolds are mounted in organ-specific bioreactors where cells in the scaffold are provided with nutrients and appropriate mechanical stimuli such as ventilation and perfusion. Though initial studies are encouraging, a great deal remains to be done to advance the field and transition from rodent lungs to whole human tissue engineered lungs. To do so, a variety of hurdles must be overcome. In particular, a reliable source of human-sized scaffolds, as well as a method of terminal sterilization of scaffolds, must be identified. Continued research in lung cell and developmental biology will hopefully help identify the number and types of cells that will be required to regenerate functional lung tissue. Finally, bioreactor designs must be improved in order to provide more precise ventilation stimuli and vascular perfusion in order to avoid injury to or death of the cells cultivated within the scaffold. Ultimately, the success of efforts to engineer a functional lung in vitro will critically depend on the ability to create a fully endothelialized vascular network that provides sufficient barrier function and alveolar-capillary surface area to exchange gas at rates compatible with healthy lung function. PMID:24691527

  15. Strategies for whole lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Calle, Elizabeth A; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sundaram, Sumati; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Tseng, Michelle K; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-05-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds to support the engineering of functional lung tissue in vitro. Rendered acellular through the use of detergents and other reagents, the scaffolds are mounted in organ-specific bioreactors where cells in the scaffold are provided with nutrients and appropriate mechanical stimuli such as ventilation and perfusion. Though initial studies are encouraging, a great deal remains to be done to advance the field and transition from rodent lungs to whole human tissue engineered lungs. To do so, a variety of hurdles must be overcome. In particular, a reliable source of human-sized scaffolds, as well as a method of terminal sterilization of scaffolds, must be identified. Continued research in lung cell and developmental biology will hopefully help identify the number and types of cells that will be required to regenerate functional lung tissue. Finally, bioreactor designs must be improved in order to provide more precise ventilation stimuli and vascular perfusion in order to avoid injury to or death of the cells cultivated within the scaffold. Ultimately, the success of efforts to engineer a functional lung in vitro will critically depend on the ability to create a fully endothelialized vascular network that provides sufficient barrier function and alveolar-capillary surface area to exchange gas at rates compatible with healthy lung function. PMID:24691527

  16. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  17. Dynamic OCT monitoring and quantification of light penetration enhancement for normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissues at different concentrations of glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shu-wen; Jin, Ying; Yu, Hui; Wu, Guo-yong

    2013-10-01

    We have evaluated the dynamic effects of the analyte diffusion on the 1/e light penetration depths of normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro, as well as have monitored and quantified the dynamic change in the light penetration depths of the mentioned human lung tissue after application of 25 % and 50 % glycerol solution, respectively. The light penetration depths of the analyte diffusion in the lung tissue are measured using the Fourierdomain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). Experimental results show that the application of glycerol as a chemical agent can significantly enhance light penetration depths into the human normal lung (NL), lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue. In-depth transport of the glycerol molecules in the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are faster than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), and the 1/e light penetration depths at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are smaller than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), respectively. Their differences in the maximal 1/e light penetration depths of the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a higher and a lower glycerol concentrations were only 8.8 %, 6.8 % and 4.7 %, respectively.

  18. Dynamic OCT monitoring and quantification of light penetration enhancement for normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissues at different concentrations of glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Shu-wen Tan; Ying Jin; Hui Yu; Guo-yong Wu

    2013-10-31

    We have evaluated the dynamic effects of the analyte diffusion on the 1/e light penetration depths of normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro, as well as have monitored and quantified the dynamic change in the light penetration depths of the mentioned human lung tissue after application of 25 % and 50 % glycerol solution, respectively. The light penetration depths of the analyte diffusion in the lung tissue are measured using the Fourierdomain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). Experimental results show that the application of glycerol as a chemical agent can significantly enhance light penetration depths into the human normal lung (NL), lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue. In-depth transport of the glycerol molecules in the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are faster than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), and the 1/e light penetration depths at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are smaller than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), respectively. Their differences in the maximal 1/e light penetration depths of the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a higher and a lower glycerol concentrations were only 8.8 %, 6.8 % and 4.7 %, respectively. (biophotonics)

  19. MICRO DOSE ASESSMENT OF INHALED PARTICLES IN HUMAN LUNGS: A STEP CLOSER TOWARDS THE TARGET TISSUE DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Inhaled particles deposit inhomogeneously in the lung and this may result in excessive deposition dose at local regions of the lung, particularly at the anatomic sites of bifurcations and junctions of the airways, which in turn leads to injuries to the tissues and adve...

  20. Comparative permeability and diffusion kinetics of cyclosporine A liposomes and propylene glycol solution from human lung tissue into human blood ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Trammer, Beatrice; Amann, Annette; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Tillmanns, Sascha; Keller, Manfred; Högger, Petra

    2008-11-01

    Aerolized cyclosporine A (CsA) has been successfully used for prevention of organ rejection in lung transplant recipients. Various formulations of CsA are available and so far no direct comparison of their pharmacokinetics has been performed. Since clinical studies are elaborate, we sought a way to predict the kinetic behaviour of a propylene glycol solution of CsA (CsA-PG) and a liposomal formulation (L-CsA). The permeability across the human bronchial cell line Calu-3 revealed low permeability for CsA with the apparent permeability for CsA-PG being twice as high as for L-CsA. Employing a previously described dialysis model, the diffusion of CsA from human lung tissue into human blood was determined ex vivo. Consistent with the cell culture model results, we observed that the degree and rate of drug transfer into human blood was more pronounced for CsA-PG than for L-CsA with the area under the curve (AUC) of CsA-PG being about 1.6 times higher than for the L-CsA formulation. The diffusion rate was more than 50% higher from CsA-PG than from the liposomes. To conclude, both model systems consistently revealed that L-CsA displayed clearly a prolonged release effect and favourable longer tissue retention than CsA-PG. PMID:18656538

  1. Three-Dimensional Engineered High Fidelity Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLA) as Targets for Human Respiratory Virus Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Deatly, A. M.; Suderman, M. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Chen, W.; Gupta, C. K.; Randolph, V. B.; Udem, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Unlike traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLA) (Goodwin et aI, 1992, 1993, 2000 and Nickerson et aI. , 2001,2002) offer high organ fidelity with the potential to emulate the infective dynamics of viruses and bacteria in vivo. Thus, utilizing NASA micro gravity Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology, in vitro human broncho-epithelial (HBE) TLAs were engineered to mimic in vivo tissue for study of human respiratory viruses. These 3D HBE TLAs were propagated from a human broncho-tracheal cell line with a mesenchymal component (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and either an adult human broncho-epithelial cell (BEAS-2B) or human neonatal epithelial cell (16HBE140-) as the overlying element. Resulting TLAs share several characteristic features with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including tight junctions, desmosomes and cilia (SEM, TEM). The presence of epithelium and specific lung epithelium markers furthers the contention that these HBE cells differentiate into TLAs paralleling in vivo tissues. A time course of infection of these 3D HBE TLAs with human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) wild type A2 strain, indicates that virus replication and virus budding are supported and manifested by increasing virus titer and detection of membrane-bound F and G glycoproteins. Infected 3D HBE TLAs remain intact for up to 12 days compared to infected 2D cultures that are destroyed in 2-3 days. Infected cells show an increased vacuolation and cellular destruction (by transmission electron microscopy) by day 9; whereas, uninfected cells remain robust and morphologically intact. Therefore, the 3D HBE TLAs mimic aspects of human respiratory epithelium providing a unique opportunity to analyze, for the first time, simulated in vivo viral infection independent of host immune response.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:22356987

  3. Broad distribution of the multidrug resistance-related vault lung resistance protein in normal human tissues and tumors.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, M A; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M J; Giaccone, G; Broxterman, H J; Meijer, C J; van der Valk, P; Scheper, R J

    1996-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. The lung resistance protein LRP is a newly described protein related to MDR in several in vitro models. LRP has been shown to be a strong predictor of poor response to chemotherapy and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and in ovarian carcinoma patients. Recently, based on a 57% and 88% amino acid identity with major vault proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum and Rattus norvegicus, respectively, we identified LRP as the human major vault protein, the main component of highly conserved cellular organelles named vaults. We have studied the immunohistochemical expression of LRP in freshly frozen normal human tissues and 174 cancer specimens of 28 tumor types. LRP was broadly distributed in normal and malignant cells, but distinct patterns of expression were noticed. High LRP expression was seen in bronchus, digestive tract, renal proximal tubules, keratinocytes, macrophages, and adrenal cortex whereas varying ing levels were observed in other organs. LRP was detected in all tumor types examined, but its frequency varied, fairly reflecting the chemosensitivity of different cancers. For example, low rates of LRP positivity were seen in testicular cancer, neuroblastoma, and acute myeloid leukemia; intermediate in ovarian cancer; and high in colon, renal, and pancreatic carcinomas. The wide occurrence of LRP in normal and transformed cells in humans, its similar distribution to that of vaults in other species, as well as the high level of conservation among eukaryotic cells of both the amino acid sequence of the major vault protein and the composition and structure of vaults, suggest that vault function is important to eukaryotic cells. PMID:8774142

  4. Morphometrical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in human pulmonary tissue destruction following penetrating low-velocity firearm injuries to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, Michael; Sperhake, Jan P; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2005-06-01

    This autopsy-based study investigated the morphological correlates of pulmonary tissue destruction following fatal penetrating gunshot wounds to the lungs using morphometry, histology, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy on whole human lungs fixed-expanded via formalin inflation. As the residue of temporary cavity formation, mantle-like hemorrhagic destruction zones were seen surrounding the missile track that showed an eccentric, conical extension enlarging toward subpleural lung segments. In addition, circumscribed, satellite-like bleeding zones at distances of up to 5.5 cm beyond the border of the permanent cavity were observed that corresponded to interstitial perivascular hemorrhages around larger and smaller pulmonary vessels on the micro-morphological level. These multifocal hemorrhages within macroscopically unaffected parts of pulmonary tissue at some distance from the actual missile track may represent unrecognized, life-threatening intrapulmonary bleeding sources in survivors, potentially leading to ventilation-perfusion mismatch and progressive lung failure. A further noticeable microscopic and ultrastructural finding was that of club-shaped distensions of ruptured alveolar septa strictly limited to the extent of the temporary cavity. These club-shaped distensions of ruptured alveolar septa seem to represent a special feature of alveolar architectural damage that can be explained by the dynamics of the temporary cavity formation: the radial acceleration and overdistension of tissue during temporary cavitation initiates stretch mechanisms of the displaced tissue, causing the alveolar septa to rupture with subsequent foreshortening and pursing of elastic alveolar fibers. PMID:25869951

  5. Cryopreserved Human Precision-Cut Lung Slices as a Bioassay for Live Tissue Banking. A Viability Study of Bronchodilation with Bitter-Taste Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Patel, Kruti R; Rosas, Ivan; Sanderson, Michael J; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-05-01

    Human precision-cut lung slices (hPCLSs) provide a unique ex vivo model for translational research. However, the limited and unpredictable availability of human lung tissue greatly impedes their use. Here, we demonstrate that cryopreservation of hPCLSs facilitates banking of live human lung tissue for routine use. Our results show that cryopreservation had little effect on overall cell viability and vital functions of immune cells, including phagocytes and T lymphocytes. In addition, airway contraction and relaxation in response to specific agonists and antagonists, respectively, were unchanged after cryopreservation. At the subcellular level, cryopreserved hPCLSs maintained Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory mechanisms for the control of airway smooth muscle cell contractility. To exemplify the use of cryopreserved hPCLSs in smooth muscle research, we provide evidence that bitter-taste receptor (TAS2R) agonists relax airways by blocking Ca(2+) oscillations in airway smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, the banking of cryopreserved hPCLSs provides a robust bioassay for translational research of lung physiology and disease. PMID:26550921

  6. Computational model of OCT in lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, David C.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2010-02-01

    Lung research may have significant impact on human health. As two examples, recovery from collapse of the alveoli and the severe post surgery declines in forced vital capacity in patients under the effects of anesthesia are both poorly understood. Optical imaging is important to lung research for its inherently high resolution. Microscopy and color imaging are fundamentals of medicine, but interior lung tissue is usually viewed either endoscopically or ex vivo, stained slices. Techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have become increasingly popular in medical imaging because of their sectioning and depth penetration. Since OCT has the ability to achieve higher depth penetration than confocal it is more widely used in lung imaging, despite the difficulty of interpreting the images due to the poor numerical aperture (NA). To understand light propagation through the highly reflective and refractive surfaces of the lung, we developed a Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation. FDTD solves a discrete approximation to Maxwell's equations. Initial simulations have shown that structure up to 30 - 40μm below the surface is clearly visible. Deeper structures are hard to interpret, because of light scattering, compounded by speckle associated with coherent detection. Further simulations and experimental imaging may lead to improved collection and processing of images at deeper levels.

  7. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we utilized multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of non-cancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from human. Our results show that the combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from non-cancerous lung tissues. Specifically, non-cancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI or SAAID) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55 +/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15 respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13 respectively. Intrinsic fluorescence ratio (FAD/NADH) of SCC and non-cancerous tissues are 0.40+/-0.05 and 0.53+/-0.05 respectively, the redox ratio of SCC diminishes significantly, indicating that increased cellular metabolic activity. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from non-cancerous tissues. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy may be used for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancers.

  8. Lung tissue classification using wavelet frames.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Sage, Daniel; Hidki, Asmâa; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Unser, Michael; Müller, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We describe a texture classification system that identifies lung tissue patterns from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD). This pattern recognition task is part of an image-based diagnostic aid system for ILDs. Five lung tissue patterns (healthy, emphysema, ground glass, fibrosis and microdules) selected from a multimedia database are classified using the overcomplete discrete wavelet frame decompostion combined with grey-level histogram features. The overall multiclass accuracy reaches 92.5% of correct matches while combining the two types of features, which are found to be complementary. PMID:18003452

  9. Contrast media are incomplete secretagogues acting on human basophils and mast cells isolated from heart and lung, but not skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Genovese, A; Stellato, C; Patella, V; Lamparter-Schummert, B; de Crescenzo, G; Adt, M; Marone, G

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media, in vitro mediator release induced by three iodinated contrast agents was examined using peripheral blood basophils and mast cells purified from human lung parenchyma, heart, and skin tissues. Three iodinated contrast agents, sodium and meglumine salts of ioxaglic acid, sodium and meglumine salts of ioxithalamic acid, and ioversol, were incubated with basophils purified from peripheral blood and human mast cells isolated and purified from different anatomical sites. Release of preformed (histamine and tryptase) and de novo synthesized mediators (prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene C4) into the supernatans was determined at various contrast medium concentrations after incubation for 60 min. Ioxaglate (0.2-0.3 M), ioxithalamate (0.3-0.5 M), and to a lesser extent ioversol (0.3-0.5 M) induced histamine release from basophils in a concentration-dependent manner. All three induced the release of preformed mediators (histamine and tryptase) from human lung, but not from skin mast cells. They also induced histamine and tryptase release from human heart mast cells. However, they did not induce the de novo synthesis of leukotriene C1 or prostaglandin D2 from human basophils or any type of mast cell examined. Cross-linking of IgE by anti-IgE induced the release of leukotriene C4 or prostaglandin D2 from human basophils or mast cells. Mannitol, an osmotic stimulus, induced the release of histamine from human basophils, but to a lesser extent from mast cells. These results show that different contrast media can differ in their ability to release mediators from enriched preparations of human basophils and mast cells. The three contrast agents examined act on basophils and mast cells as incomplete secretagogues, causing the release of preformed mediators, but not these novo synthesis of chemical mediators. It may be useful to measure plasma tryptase levels to detect adverse reactions caused by iodinated

  10. Influence of different sized nanoparticles combined with ultrasound on the optical properties of in vitro normal and cancerous human lung tissue studied with OCT and diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is concerned with the in vitro study of different sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles’ (NPs) penetration and accumulation in human normal lung (NL) tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue by the methods of continuous optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring and diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra measurement, and their evaluating the effects of TiO2 NPs in two sizes (60 nm and 100 nm) and their combination with ultrasound (US) on the optical properties of human NL and LAT tissue. Spectral measurements indicate that TiO2 NPs penetrate and accumulate into the tissues and thus induce enhancement of DR. The averaged and normalized OCT signal intensity suggests that light penetration depth is significantly enlarged by ultrasound. The average attenuation coefficient of NL tissue changes from 5.10  ±  0.26 mm-1 to 3.12  ±  0.43 mm-1 and 2.15  ±  0.54 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 5.54  ±  0.46 mm-1 to 3.24  ±  0.73 mm-1 and 2.69  ±  0.34 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The average attenuation coefficient of LAT tissue changes from 9.12  ±  0.54 mm-1 to 4.54  ±  0.39 mm-1 and 3.61  ±  0.38 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 9.79  ±  0.32 mm-1 to 5.12  ±  0.47 mm-1 and 4.89  ±  0.59 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The results suggest that the optical properties of NL and LAT tissues are greatly influenced by TiO2 NPs and their combination with ultrasound.

  11. Differentiation of xenografted human fetal lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Jelena; Floros, Joanna; Phelps, David S.; Wigdahl, Brian; Welsh, Patricia; Weisz, Judith; Shearer, Debra A.; Pree, Alphonse Leure du; Myers, Roland; Howett, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize xenografted human fetal lung tissue with respect to developmental stage-specific cytodifferentiation. Human fetal lung tissue (pseudoglandular stage) was grafted either beneath the renal capsule or the skin of athymic mice (NCr-nu). Tissues were analyzed from 3 to 42 days post-engraftment for morphological alterations by light and electron microscopy (EM), and for surfactant protein mRNA and protein by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry (ICC), respectively. The changes observed resemble those seen in human lung development in utero in many respects, including the differentiation of epithelium to the saccular stage. Each stage occurred over approximately one week in the graft in contrast to the eight weeks of normal in utero development. At all time points examined, all four surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D) were detected in the epithelium by ICC. Lamellar bodies were first identified by EM in 14 day xenografts. By day 21, a significant increase in lamellar body expression was observed. Cellular proliferation, as marked by PCNA ICC and elastic fiber deposition resembled those of canalicular and saccular in utero development. This model in which xenografted lung tissue in different stages of development is available may facilitate the study of human fetal lung development and the impact of various pharmacological agents on this process. PMID:17555893

  12. Bronchoalveolar Lavage and Lung Tissue Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongwei; Ziegler, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a simple but valuable and typically performed technique commonly used for studying the pathogenesis of lung diseases such as asthma and COPD. Cell counts can be combined with new methods for examining inflammatory responses, such as ELISA, Flow cytometric analysis, immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and HPLC to assess cellular expression for inflammatory cytokines and growth factor. Here we describe a basic procedure to collect BAL fluid and digest lung tissue for assessing a number of pulmonary components.

  13. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro. PMID:24734552

  14. Marrow cells as progenitors of lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Fine, Alan

    2004-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence showing that marrow-derived cells can engraft as differentiated epithelial cells of various tissues, including the lung. These findings challenge long-held views regarding the basic biology of stem cells. Elucidating the fundamental mechanisms controlling these processes is the major challenge of this field. Regardless, these experiments suggest new strategies for the treatment of chronic diseases. PMID:14757420

  15. CXCL12 induces connective tissue growth factor expression in human lung fibroblasts through the Rac1/ERK, JNK, and AP-1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Shih, Chung-Huang; Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Yuan-Jhih; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1) is a potent chemokine for homing of CXCR4+ fibrocytes to injury sites of lung tissue, which contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the roles of Rac1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in CXCL12-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. CXCL12 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in CTGF expression and CTGF-luciferase activity. CXCL12-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100), small interfering RNA of CXCR4 (CXCR4 siRNA), a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (RacN17), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), a p21-activated kinase inhibitor (PAK18), c-Jun siRNA, and an AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of cells with CXCL12 caused activations of Rac1, Rho, ERK, and c-Jun. The CXCL12-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by RacN17. Treatment of cells with PD98059 and SP600125 both inhibited CXCL12-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. CXCL12 caused the recruitment of c-Jun and c-Fos binding to the CTGF promoter. Furthermore, CXCL12 induced an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, a myofibroblastic phenotype, and actin stress fiber formation. CXCL12-induced actin stress fiber formation and α-SMA expression were respectively inhibited by AMD3100 and CTGF siRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCL12, acting through CXCR4, activates the Rac/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, which in turn initiates c-Jun phosphorylation, and recruits c-Jun and c-Fos to the CTGF promoter and ultimately induces CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, overexpression of CTGF mediates CXCL12-induced α-SMA expression. PMID:25121739

  16. Protein Signature of Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mehan, Michael R.; Ayers, Deborah; Thirstrup, Derek; Xiong, Wei; Ostroff, Rachel M.; Brody, Edward N.; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Gold, Larry; Jarvis, Thale C.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Wilcox, Sheri K.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related mortality. We applied a highly multiplexed proteomic technology (SOMAscan) to compare protein expression signatures of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues with healthy adjacent and distant tissues from surgical resections. In this first report of SOMAscan applied to tissues, we highlight 36 proteins that exhibit the largest expression differences between matched tumor and non-tumor tissues. The concentrations of twenty proteins increased and sixteen decreased in tumor tissue, thirteen of which are novel for NSCLC. NSCLC tissue biomarkers identified here overlap with a core set identified in a large serum-based NSCLC study with SOMAscan. We show that large-scale comparative analysis of protein expression can be used to develop novel histochemical probes. As expected, relative differences in protein expression are greater in tissues than in serum. The combined results from tissue and serum present the most extensive view to date of the complex changes in NSCLC protein expression and provide important implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22509397

  17. Myocardial Sleeve Tissues in Surgical Lung Specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Kamata, Tsugumasa; Iwasa, Takeshi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Left atrial myocardial extensions over the pulmonary veins (PVs), known as myocardial sleeves, are present in the physiological anatomy of most individuals. Although this structure has recently received clinical attention as a major origin of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF), it has not been documented in surgical specimens. Here, we examine incidentally identified myocardial sleeve tissue in routinely processed lung resection specimens to determine its incidence and diagnostic implications. Among 694 lung resection specimens with evaluable PV margins, myocardial sleeve tissue was identified in 26 cases (3.7%). The tissue was located within the adventitia of the PVs, mostly in margin preparations, and existed outside the pericardium in the majority of cases. Carcinoma infiltration of the sleeves was evident in 6 cases. No heart injuries were observed, and no tumors invaded the heart. Preoperative electrocardiography showed sinus rhythm in all cases, whereas postoperative monitoring revealed sinus rhythm in all patients except one who showed AF and flutter. Myocardial sleeve tissue is an underrecognized incidental finding in lung resection specimens, and it is not indicative of heart injury. Cancer infiltration into this tissue indicates neither heart invasion nor, by itself, invasion into the pericardium. Although surgical transection of the myocardial sleeve did not evoke immediate arrhythmia in most cases, the overall influence of this procedure on the postsurgical risk of AF remains to be determined in further studies involving extensive rhythm assessment. PMID:26099012

  18. Extracting alveolar structure of human lung tissue specimens based on surface skeleton representation from 3D micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimori, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Matsui, Eisuke; Fujii, Masashi; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a Micro CT system for understanding lung function at a high resolution of the micrometer order (up to 5µm in spatial resolution). Micro CT system enables the removal specimen of lungs to be observed at micro level, has expected a big contribution for micro internal organs morphology and the image diagnosis study. In this research, we develop system to visualize lung microstructures in three dimensions from micro CT images and analyze them. They characterize in that high CT value of the noise area is, and the difficulty of only using threshold processing to extract the alveolar wall of micro CT images. Thus, we are developing a method of extracting the alveolar wall with surface thinning algorithm. In this report, we propose the method which reduces the excessive degeneracy of figure which caused by surface thinning process. And, we apply this algorithm to the micro CT image of the actual pulmonary specimen. It is shown that the extraction of the alveolus wall becomes possible in the high precision.

  19. The Lung Tissue Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Marc A.; Dimitriu, Pedro A.; Hayashi, Shizu; Elliott, W. Mark; McDonough, John E.; Gosselink, John V.; Cooper, Joel; Sin, Don D.; Mohn, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Based on surface brushings and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, Hilty and coworkers demonstrated microbiomes in the human lung characteristic of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which have now been confirmed by others. Objectives: To extend these findings to human lung tissue samples. Methods: DNA from lung tissue samples was obtained from nonsmokers (n = 8); smokers without COPD (n = 8); patients with very severe COPD (Global Initiative for COPD [GOLD] 4) (n = 8); and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) (n = 8). The latter served as a positive control, with sterile water as a negative control. All bacterial community analyses were based on polymerase chain reaction amplifying 16S rRNA gene fragments. Total bacterial populations were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and bacterial community composition was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and pyrotag sequencing. Measurement and Main Results: Total bacterial populations within lung tissue were small (20–1,252 bacterial cells per 1,000 human cells) but greater in all four sample groups versus the negative control group (P < 0.001). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing distinguished three distinct bacterial community compositions: one common to the nonsmoker and smoker groups, a second to the GOLD 4 group, and the third to the CF-positive control group. Pyrotag sequencing identified greater than 1,400 unique bacterial sequences and showed an increase in the Firmicutes phylum in GOLD 4 patients versus all other groups (P < 0.003) attributable to an increase in the Lactobacillus genus (P < 0.0007). Conclusions: There is a detectable bacterial community within human lung tissue that changes in patients with very severe COPD. PMID:22427533

  20. Analysis of Lung Tissue Using Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. L.; Barrera, R.; Miranda, J.

    2002-08-01

    In this work a comparative study is presented of the contents of metals in lung tissue from healthy patients and with lung cancer, by means of two analytical techniques: Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The samples of cancerous tissue were taken from 26 autopsies made to individuals died in the National Institute of Respiratory Disease (INER), 22 of cancer and 4 of other non-cancer biopsies. When analyzing the entirety of the samples, in the cancerous tissues, there were increments in the concentrations of S (4%), K (635%), Co (85%) and Cu (13%). Likewise, there were deficiencies in the concentrations of Cl (59%), Ca (6%), Fe (26%) and Zn (7%). Only in the cancerous tissues there were appearances of P, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Br and Sr. The tissue samples were classified according to cancer types (adenocarcinomas, epidermoides and of small cell carcinoma), personal habits (smokers and alcoholic), genetic predisposition and residence place. There was a remarkable decrease in the concentration of Ca and a marked increment in the Cu in the epidermoide tissue samples with regard to those of adenocarcinoma or of small cells cancer. Also, decrements were detected in K and increments of Fe, Co and Cu in the sample belonging to people that resided in Mexico City with regard to those that resided in the State of Mexico.

  1. Preconditioning allows engraftment of mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Chava; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Klionsky, Yael Zlotnikov; Yaakov, Yasmin; Assayag, Miri; Biton, Inbal Eti; Tal, Orna; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Shneider, David; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, Oscar; Evron, Shmuel; Freud, Enrique; Shoseyov, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Berkman, Neville; Fibbe, Willem E; Hagin, David; Hillel-Karniel, Carmit; Krentsis, Irit Milman; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2015-08-01

    Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche. PMID:26168294

  2. Immunolocalization of elastase in human emphysematous lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, V V; Tsang, A; Kucich, U; Abrams, W R; Rosenbloom, J; Kimbel, P; Fallahnejad, M; Weinbaum, G

    1986-01-01

    The current working hypothesis concerning the pathogenesis of human pulmonary emphysema proposes that neutrophils migrate through the alveolar interstitium and degranulate, releasing proteolytic enzymes into the interstitium. These enzymes, in particular elastase, can bind to and degrade interstitial elastin. This report describes an immunohistochemical, ultrastructural technique that utilizes polyclonal antibodies to localize neutrophil elastase in human lungs. Using both the immunoperoxidase and the immunogold methods on thin, embedded sections of surgically resected human emphysematous lung tissue, elastase was localized in neutrophils in the lung interstitium and extracellularly in association with interstitial elastic fibers in human lungs that showed local emphysema of varying severity. Quantitative morphometric data were obtained from the lungs of eight patients undergoing lobectomy for removal of pulmonary carcinomas. Patients had preoperative forced expiratory volume (FEV1)% levels ranging from 55 to 77. There was a correlation between a quantitative measure of the local distribution of neutrophil elastase in contact with alveolar interstitial elastin and the local presence of emphysematous change as determined by mean linear intercept of the various histologic sections. These data support the validity of the "protease-protease inhibitor balance hypothesis" as an explanation of the pathogenesis of human pulmonary emphysema. Images PMID:3525610

  3. A classification framework for lung tissue categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Iavindrasana, Jimison; Hidki, Asmâa; Cohen, Gilles; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2008-03-01

    We compare five common classifier families in their ability to categorize six lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) but also normal tissue. The evaluated classifiers are Naive Bayes, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), J48 decision trees, Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The dataset used contains 843 regions of interest (ROI) of healthy and five pathologic lung tissue patterns identified by two radiologists at the University Hospitals of Geneva. Correlation of the feature space composed of 39 texture attributes is studied. A grid search for optimal parameters is carried out for each classifier family. Two complementary metrics are used to characterize the performances of classification. Those are based on McNemar's statistical tests and global accuracy. SVM reached best values for each metric and allowed a mean correct prediction rate of 87.9% with high class-specific precision on testing sets of 423 ROIs.

  4. Andes Hantavirus-Infection of a 3D Human Lung Tissue Model Reveals a Late Peak in Progeny Virus Production Followed by Increased Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and VEGF-A.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Karin B; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Gupta, Shawon; Ahlm, Clas; Svensson, Mattias; Klingström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), a severe acute disease with a 40% case fatality rate. Humans are infected via inhalation, and the lungs are severely affected during HPS, but little is known regarding the effects of ANDV-infection of the lung. Using a 3-dimensional air-exposed organotypic human lung tissue model, we analyzed progeny virus production and cytokine-responses after ANDV-infection. After a 7-10 day period of low progeny virus production, a sudden peak in progeny virus levels was observed during approximately one week. This peak in ANDV-production coincided in time with activation of innate immune responses, as shown by induction of type I and III interferons and ISG56. After the peak in ANDV production a low, but stable, level of ANDV progeny was observed until 39 days after infection. Compared to uninfected models, ANDV caused long-term elevated levels of eotaxin-1, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and VEGF-A that peaked 20-25 days after infection, i.e., after the observed peak in progeny virus production. Notably, eotaxin-1 was only detected in supernatants from infected models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that ANDV replication in lung tissue elicits a late proinflammatory immune response with possible long-term effects on the local lung cytokine milieu. The change from an innate to a proinflammatory response might be important for the transition from initial asymptomatic infection to severe clinical disease, HPS. PMID:26907493

  5. Andes Hantavirus-Infection of a 3D Human Lung Tissue Model Reveals a Late Peak in Progeny Virus Production Followed by Increased Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and VEGF-A

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, Karin B.; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Gupta, Shawon; Ahlm, Clas; Svensson, Mattias; Klingström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), a severe acute disease with a 40% case fatality rate. Humans are infected via inhalation, and the lungs are severely affected during HPS, but little is known regarding the effects of ANDV-infection of the lung. Using a 3-dimensional air-exposed organotypic human lung tissue model, we analyzed progeny virus production and cytokine-responses after ANDV-infection. After a 7–10 day period of low progeny virus production, a sudden peak in progeny virus levels was observed during approximately one week. This peak in ANDV-production coincided in time with activation of innate immune responses, as shown by induction of type I and III interferons and ISG56. After the peak in ANDV production a low, but stable, level of ANDV progeny was observed until 39 days after infection. Compared to uninfected models, ANDV caused long-term elevated levels of eotaxin-1, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and VEGF-A that peaked 20–25 days after infection, i.e., after the observed peak in progeny virus production. Notably, eotaxin-1 was only detected in supernatants from infected models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that ANDV replication in lung tissue elicits a late proinflammatory immune response with possible long-term effects on the local lung cytokine milieu. The change from an innate to a proinflammatory response might be important for the transition from initial asymptomatic infection to severe clinical disease, HPS. PMID:26907493

  6. Production of Fibronectin by the Human Alveolar Macrophage: Mechanism for the Recruitment of Fibroblasts to Sites of Tissue Injury in Interstitial Lung Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennard, Stephen I.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Bitterman, Peter B.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    1981-11-01

    Because cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are known to produce fibronectin and because alveolar macrophages are activated in many interstitial lung diseases, the present study was designed to evaluate a role for the alveolar macrophage as a source of the increased levels of fibronectin found in the lower respiratory tract in interstitial lung diseases and to determine if such fibronectin might contribute to the development of the fibrosis found in these disorders by being a chemoattractant for human lung fibroblasts. Production of fibronectin by human alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and maintained in short-term culture in serum-free conditions was demonstrated; de novo synthesis was confirmed by the incorporation of [14C]proline. This fibronectin had a monomer molecular weight of 220,000 and was antigenically similar to plasma fibronectin. Macrophages from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis produced fibronectin at a rate 20 times higher than did normal macrophages; macrophages from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis produced fibronectin at 10 times the normal rate. Macrophages from 6 of 10 patients with various other interstitial disorders produced fibronectin at rates greater than the rate of highest normal control. Human alveolar macrophage fibronectin was chemotactic for human lung fibroblasts, suggesting a functional role for this fibronectin in the derangement of the alveolar structures that is characteristic of these disorders.

  7. Solubility of inert gases in homogenates of canine lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, I H; Wagner, P D

    1979-06-01

    The solubility of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), ethane, cyclopropane, halothane, diethyl ether, and acetone in homogenates of dog lung tissue were measured and compared with values obtained in dog blood. The measurements were made to provide data for a method for determining distribution of ventilation, blood flow, and tissue volume (Physiologist 20: 95, 1977) and for reasons discussed, the blood was not washed from the tissue prior to homogenization. All gases except SF6 were significantly more soluble in blood than lung tissue, whereas SF6 was 3.7 times more soluble in tissue than blood. It was further found that SF6 is 5 times more soluble, and ethane is twice as soluble in tissue obtained from lungs containing blood than in tissue obtained from rinsed lungs, suggesting that measurements of parenchymal solubility made on tissue from sinsed lungs may be considerably in error for some lipid-soluble gases. PMID:224018

  8. Estimation of lung tissue incompressibility variation throughout respiration for tumor targeting in lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Samani, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Lung tissue incompressibility variation stems from significant air content variation in the tissue throughout respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility and its variation is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion during respiration is a major challenge in lung cancer treatment by external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion leads to areas of radiation over dosage for the lung normal tissues. Since no effective imaging modality is available for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer based modeling which has the capability for accurate tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. Lung tissue deformation estimation can be made using the lung Finite Element (FE) model where its accuracy depends on input tissue biomechanical properties including incompressibility parameter. In this research, an optimization algorithm is proposed to estimate the incompressibility parameter function in terms of respiration cycle time. In this algorithm, the incompressibility parameter and lung pressure values are varied systematically until optimal values, which result in maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT images of the lung, are achieved for each respiration time point. The simulated images are constructed using a reference image in conjunction with the deformation field obtained from the lung's FE model in each respiration time increment. We demonstrated that utilizing the calculated function along with respiratory system FE modeling leads to accurate tumor targeting, hence potentially improving lung radiotherapy outcome.

  9. Human lung and bladder carcinoma tumors as compared to their adjacent normal tissue have elevated AP-1 activity associated with the retinoblastoma gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Linardopoulos, S; Papadakis, E; Delakas, D; Theodosiou, V; Cranidis, A; Spandidos, D A

    1993-01-01

    Examination of the nucleotide sequence of the retinoblastoma (Rb) promoter revealed the presence of a DNA region highly homologous to the recognition site for the cellular transcription factor AP-1. A pair of complementary oligonucleotides containing the AP-1 site was synthesized and used in gel retardation assays to determine the role of the AP-1 protein in the regulation of the Rb gene expression. Using nuclear extracts from Hela cells as well as from lung and bladder tumors, we found specific binding of the AP-1 protein to this oligonucleotide. This binding is elevated in Hela cells, in 10/13 lung and 3/8 bladder tumors as compared to adjacent normal tissue. These results suggest that AP-1 could be implicated in Rb gene transcriptional regulation through its interaction with the AP-1 binding site of the Rb gene promoter. PMID:8476221

  10. Lung adenocarcinoma and human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ching; Chen, Jen-Hau; Richard, Kradin; Chen, Pao-Yang; Christiani, David C

    2004-09-15

    Over the past three decades, the incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has increased worldwide. Most individuals with lung adenocarcinoma (especially women) are nonsmokers. Reported risk factors for the development of lung adenocarcinoma include cigarette smoking; exposure to cooking fumes, air pollution, second-hand smoke, asbestos, and radon; nutritional status; genetic susceptibility; immunologic dysfunction; tuberculosis infection; and asthma. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a known risk factor for the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), but it has not been thoroughly assessed as a potential risk factor for the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. More than 50% of people are infected with HPV during their lifetimes, either via intrauterine or postnatal infection. Recent studies involving Taiwanese patients have demonstrated a possible association between HPV infection and the risk of developing pulmonary adenocarcinoma. HPV transmission pathways have not yet been conclusively identified. The observation of certain types of HPV in association with cervical and oral SCC raises the possibility of sexual transmission of HPV from the cervix to the oral cavity, with subsequent transmission to the larynx and then to the lung. HPV infection and metaplasia in lung tissue may increase an individual's susceptibility to the tumorigenesis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Further epidemiologic and pathologic investigations will be necessary to establish a causal relation. PMID:15368331

  11. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in human ex vivo and porcine in vivo lung cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sonography has become the imaging technique of choice for guiding intraoperative interventions in abdominal surgery. Due to artefacts from residual air content, however, videothoracoscopic and open intraoperative ultrasound-guided thermoablation of lung malignancies are impossible. Lung flooding is a new method that allows complete ultrasound imaging of lungs and their tumours. Methods Fourteen resected tumourous human lung lobes were examined transpleurally with B-mode ultrasound before (in atelectasis) and after lung flooding with isotonic saline solution. In two swine, the left lung was filled with 15 ml/kg isotonic saline solution through the left side of a double-lumen tube. Lung tumours were simulated by transthoracic ultrasound-guided injection of 5 ml of purified bovine serum albumin in glutaraldehyde, centrally into the left lower lung lobe. The rate of tumour detection, the severity of disability caused by residual gas, and sonomorphology of the lungs and tumours were assessed. Results The ex vivo tumour detection rate was 100% in flooded human lung lobes and 43% (6/14) in atelectatic lungs. In all cases of atelectasis, sonographic tumour imaging was impaired by residual gas. Tumours and atelectatic tissue were isoechoic. In 28% of flooded lungs, a little residual gas was observed that did not impair sonographic tumour imaging. In contrast to tumours, flooded lung tissue was hyperechoic, homogeneous, and of fine-grained structure. Because of the bronchial wall three-laminar structure, sonographic differentiation of vessels and bronchi was possible. In all cases, malignant tumours in the flooded lung appeared well-demarcated from the lung parenchyma. Adenocarcinoma, squamous, and large cell carcinomas were hypoechoic. Bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma was slightly hyperechoic. Transpleural sonography identifies endobronchial tumour growth and bronchial wall destruction. With transthoracic sonography, the flooded animal lung can be completely

  12. Histopathology of lung disease in the connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Vivero, Marina; Padera, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    The pathologic correlates of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to connective tissue disease (CTD) comprise a diverse group of histologic patterns. Lung biopsies in patients with CTD-associated ILD tend to demonstrate simultaneous involvement of multiple anatomic compartments of the lung. Certain histologic patterns tend to predominate in each defined CTD, and it is possible in many cases to confirm connective tissue-associated lung disease and guide patient management using surgical lung biopsy. This article will cover the pulmonary pathologies seen in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, myositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and mixed CTD. PMID:25836637

  13. Human models of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Alastair G.; McAuley, Danny F.; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Hind, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome. PMID:21357760

  14. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  15. Production and Assessment of Decellularized Pig and Human Lung Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Jean; Riddle, Michael; Vargas, Gracie; Schilagard, Tuya; Ma, Liang; Edward, Kert; La Francesca, Saverio; Sakamoto, Jason; Vega, Stephanie; Ogadegbe, Marie; Mlcak, Ronald; Deyo, Donald; Woodson, Lee; McQuitty, Christopher; Lick, Scott; Beckles, Daniel; Melo, Esther; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that acellular (AC) trachea-lung scaffolds can (1) be produced from natural rat lungs, (2) retain critical components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) such as collagen-1 and elastin, and (3) be used to produce lung tissue after recellularization with murine embryonic stem cells. The aim of this study was to produce large (porcine or human) AC lung scaffolds to determine the feasibility of producing scaffolds with potential clinical applicability. We report here the first attempt to produce AC pig or human trachea-lung scaffold. Using a combination of freezing and sodium dodecyl sulfate washes, pig trachea-lungs and human trachea-lungs were decellularized. Once decellularization was complete we evaluated the structural integrity of the AC lung scaffolds using bronchoscopy, multiphoton microscopy (MPM), assessment of the ECM utilizing immunocytochemistry and evaluation of mechanics through the use of pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Immunocytochemistry indicated that there was loss of collagen type IV and laminin in the AC lung scaffold, but retention of collagen-1, elastin, and fibronectin in some regions. MPM scoring was also used to examine the AC lung scaffold ECM structure and to evaluate the amount of collagen I in normal and AC lung. MPM was used to examine the physical arrangement of collagen-1 and elastin in the pleura, distal lung, lung borders, and trachea or bronchi. MPM and bronchoscopy of trachea and lung tissues showed that no cells or cell debris remained in the AC scaffolds. PFT measurements of the trachea-lungs showed no relevant differences in peak pressure, dynamic or static compliance, and a nonrestricted flow pattern in AC compared to normal lungs. Although there were changes in content of collagen I and elastin this did not affect the mechanics of lung function as evidenced by normal PFT values. When repopulated with a variety of stem or adult cells including human adult primary alveolar epithelial type II

  16. A study of photon interaction parameters in lung tissue substitutes.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, H C

    2014-04-01

    The study of photon interaction with different composite materials has become a topic of prime importance for radiation physicists. Some parameters of dosimetric interest are the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density; these help in the basic understanding of photon interactions with composite materials. The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff), and effective electron density (N el) must be identical for the phantom material and their tissue. In the present study, we have evaluated the photon interaction parameters such as (μ/ρ), Z eff and N el of 13 lung tissue substitutes. The variations of these parameters of lung tissue substitutes with photon energy are graphically represented. The photon interaction parameters of lung tissue substitutes are compared with that of lung tissue. The variation of photon interaction parameters of the studied lung tissue substitutes is similar that of the lung. Logically, it can be shown that Alderson lung is good substitute for lung than the other substitutes. PMID:24872609

  17. Overexpression of type VI collagen in neoplastic lung tissues

    PubMed Central

    VOILES, LARRY; LEWIS, DAVID E.; HAN, LING; LUPOV, IVAN P.; LIN, TSANG-LONG; ROBERTSON, MICHAEL J.; PETRACHE, IRINA; CHANG, HUA-CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Type VI collagen (COL6), an extracellular matrix protein, is important in maintaining the integrity of lung tissue. An increase in COL6 mRNA and protein deposition was found in the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, a chronic inflammatory condition with a strong association with lung cancer. In the present study, we demonstrated overexpression of COL6 in the lungs of non-small cell lung cancers. We hypothesized that excessive COL6 in the lung interstitium may exert stimulatory effects on the adjacent cells. In vitro stimulation of monocytes with COL6 resulted in the production of IL-23, which may promote tumor development in an environment of IL-23-mediated lung inflammation, where tissue modeling occurs concurrently with excessive COL6 production. In addition, COL6 was capable of stimulating signaling pathways that activate focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in lung epithelial cells, which may also facilitate the development of lung neoplasms. Taken together, our data suggest the potential role of COL6 in promoting lung neoplasia in diseased lungs where COL6 is overexpressed. PMID:25176343

  18. Correlation of circular RNA abundance with proliferation – exemplified with colorectal and ovarian cancer, idiopathic lung fibrosis, and normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Reiner, Agnes T.; Auer, Katharina; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Aust, Stefanie; Bachleitner-Hofmann, Thomas; Mesteri, Ildiko; Grunt, Thomas W.; Zeillinger, Robert; Pils, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Circular RNAs are a recently (re-)discovered abundant RNA species with presumed function as miRNA sponges, thus part of the competing endogenous RNA network. We analysed the expression of circular and linear RNAs and proliferation in matched normal colon mucosa and tumour tissues. We predicted >1,800 circular RNAs and proved the existence of five randomly chosen examples using RT-qPCR. Interestingly, the ratio of circular to linear RNA isoforms was always lower in tumour compared to normal colon samples and even lower in colorectal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, this ratio correlated negatively with the proliferation index. The correlation of global circular RNA abundance (the circRNA index) and proliferation was validated in a non-cancerous proliferative disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, ovarian cancer cells compared to cultured normal ovarian epithelial cells, and 13 normal human tissues. We are the first to report a global reduction of circular RNA abundance in colorectal cancer cell lines and cancer compared to normal tissues and discovered a negative correlation of global circular RNA abundance and proliferation. This negative correlation seems to be a general principle in human tissues as validated with three different settings. Finally, we present a simple model how circular RNAs could accumulate in non-proliferating cells. PMID:25624062

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of lung tissue from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and lung transplant donor lungs.

    PubMed

    Korfei, Martina; Schmitt, Sigrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Henneke, Ingrid; Markart, Philipp; Loeh, Benjamin; Mahavadi, Poornima; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Klepetko, Walter; Fink, Ludger; Bonniaud, Philippe; Preissner, Klaus T; Lochnit, Günter; Schaefer, Liliana; Seeger, Werner; Guenther, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and fatal disease for which no effective therapy exists to date. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying IPF, we performed comparative proteome analysis of lung tissue from patients with sporadic IPF (n = 14) and human donor lungs (controls, n = 10) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. Eighty-nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, from which 51 were up-regulated and 38 down-regulated in IPF. Increased expression of markers for the unfolded protein response (UPR), heat-shock proteins, and DNA damage stress markers indicated a chronic cell stress-response in IPF lungs. By means of immunohistochemistry, induction of UPR markers was encountered in type-II alveolar epithelial cells of IPF but not of control lungs. In contrast, up-regulation of heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was exclusively observed in proliferating bronchiolar basal cells and associated with aberrant re-epithelialization at the bronchiolo-alveolar junctions. Among the down-regulated proteins in IPF were antioxidants, members of the annexin family, and structural epithelial proteins. In summary, our results indicate that IPF is characterized by epithelial cell injury, apoptosis, and aberrant epithelial proliferation. PMID:21319792

  20. Trade in human tissue products.

    PubMed

    Tonti-Filippini, Nicholas; Zeps, Nikolajs

    2011-03-01

    Trade in human tissue in Australia is prohibited by state law, and in ethical guidelines by the National Health and Medical Research Council: National statement on ethical conduct in human research; Organ and tissue donation by living donors: guidelines for ethical practice for health professionals. However, trade in human tissue products is a common practice especially for: reconstructive orthopaedic or plastic surgery; novel human tissue products such as a replacement trachea created by using human mesenchymal stem cells; biomedical research using cell lines, DNA and protein provided through biobanks. Cost pressures on these have forced consideration of commercial models to sustain their operations. Both the existing and novel activities require a robust framework to enable commercial uses of human tissue products while maintaining community acceptability of such practices, but to date no such framework exists. In this article, we propose a model ethical framework for ethical governance which identifies specific ethical issues such as: privacy; unique value of a person's tissue; commodification of the body; equity and benefit to the community; perverse incentives; and "attenuation" as a potentially useful concept to help deal with the broad range of subjective views relevant to whether it is acceptable to commercialise certain human tissue products. PMID:21382003

  1. TISSUE SLICES IN THE STUDY OF LUNG METABOLISM AND TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung tissue slices are model systems for the study of pulmonary metabolism. Because of the speed and simplicity of slice preparation, lung slices have been used in studies of oxygen, amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid utilization and adenine nucleotide metabolism. Dose-response c...

  2. Regional differences in alveolar density in the human lung are related to lung height.

    PubMed

    McDonough, John E; Knudsen, Lars; Wright, Alexander C; Elliott, W Mark; Ochs, Matthias; Hogg, James C

    2015-06-01

    The gravity-dependent pleural pressure gradient within the thorax produces regional differences in lung inflation that have a profound effect on the distribution of ventilation within the lung. This study examines the hypothesis that gravitationally induced differences in stress within the thorax also influence alveolar density in terms of the number of alveoli contained per unit volume of lung. To test this hypothesis, we measured the number of alveoli within known volumes of lung located at regular intervals between the apex and base of four normal adult human lungs that were rapidly frozen at a constant transpulmonary pressure, and used microcomputed tomographic imaging to measure alveolar density (number alveoli/mm3) at regular intervals between the lung apex and base. These results show that at total lung capacity, alveolar density in the lung apex is 31.6 ± 3.4 alveoli/mm3, with 15 ± 6% of parenchymal tissue consisting of alveolar duct. The base of the lung had an alveolar density of 21.2 ± 1.6 alveoli/mm3 and alveolar duct volume fraction of 29 ± 6%. The difference in alveolar density can be negated by factoring in the effects of alveolar compression due to the pleural pressure gradient at the base of the lung in vivo and at functional residual capacity. PMID:25882386

  3. Biomarkers in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Bonella, Francesco; Costabel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews major biomarkers in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) with respect to their diagnostic and prognostic value in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). In some CTD such as systemic sclerosis (SSc), the incidence of ILD is up to two-third of patients, and currently ILD represents the leading cause of death in SSc. Because of the extremely variable incidence and outcome of ILD in CTD, progress in the discovery and validation of biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, patients' subtyping, response to treatment, or as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials is extremely important. In contrast to idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, autoantibodies play a crucial role as biomarkers in CTD-ILD because their presence is strictly linked to the pathogenesis and tissue damage. Patterns of autoantibodies, for instance, anticitrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARS) in polymyositis/dermatomyositis, have been found to correlate with the presence and occasionally with the course of ILD in CTD. Besides autoantibodies, an increase in serum or BALF of a biomarker of pulmonary origin may be able to predict or reflect the development of fibrosis, the impairment of lung function, and ideally also the prognosis. Promising biomarkers are lung epithelium-derived proteins such as KL-6 (Krebs von den Lungen-6), SP-D (surfactant protein-D), SP-A (surfactant protein-A), YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like protein 1 [CHI3L1] or cytokines such as CCL18 [chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 18]). In the future, genetic/epigenetic markers, such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and micro-RNA, may help to identify subtypes of patients with different needs of management and treatment strategies. PMID:24668534

  4. Lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity via protein disulfide isomerase-dependent tissue factor decryption.

    PubMed

    Lysov, Zakhar; Swystun, Laura L; Kuruvilla, Sara; Arnold, Andrew; Liaw, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy have an elevated risk for thrombosis. However, the mechanisms by which chemotherapy agents increase the risk for thrombosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) by which lung cancer chemotherapy agents cisplatin, carboplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel elicit increased tissue factor activity on endothelial cells, A549 cells, and monocytes. Tissue factor activity, tissue factor antigen, and phosphatidylserine exposure were measured on chemotherapy-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), A549 cells, and monocytes. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and cell surface free thiol levels were measured on HUVEC and A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. Treatment of HUVECs, A549 cells, and monocytes with lung cancer chemotherapy significantly increased cell surface tissue factor activity. However, elevated tissue factor antigen levels were observed only on cisplatin-treated and gemcitabine-treated monocytes. Cell surface levels of phosphatidylserine were increased on HUVEC and monocytes treated with cisplatin/gemcitabine combination therapy. Chemotherapy also resulted in increased cell surface levels of PDI and reduced cell surface free thiol levels. Glutathione treatment and PDI inhibition, but not phosphatidylserine inhibition, attenuated tissue factor activity. Furthermore, increased tissue factor activity was reversed by reducing cysteines with dithiothreitol. These studies are the first to demonstrate that lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity on endothelial cells and A549 cells by tissue factor decryption through a disulfide bond formation in a PDI-dependent mechanism. PMID:24911456

  5. Analytic Intermodel Consistent Modeling of Volumetric Human Lung Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Seyfi, Behnaz; Neylon, John; Santhanam, Anand P

    2015-10-01

    Human lung undergoes breathing-induced deformation in the form of inhalation and exhalation. Modeling the dynamics is numerically complicated by the lack of information on lung elastic behavior and fluid-structure interactions between air and the tissue. A mathematical method is developed to integrate deformation results from a deformable image registration (DIR) and physics-based modeling approaches in order to represent consistent volumetric lung dynamics. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation assumes the lung is a poro-elastic medium with spatially distributed elastic property. Simulation is performed on a 3D lung geometry reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset of a human subject. The heterogeneous Young's modulus (YM) is estimated from a linear elastic deformation model with the same lung geometry and 4D lung DIR. The deformation obtained from the CFD is then coupled with the displacement obtained from the 4D lung DIR by means of the Tikhonov regularization (TR) algorithm. The numerical results include 4DCT registration, CFD, and optimal displacement data which collectively provide consistent estimate of the volumetric lung dynamics. The fusion method is validated by comparing the optimal displacement with the results obtained from the 4DCT registration. PMID:26292034

  6. Role of the ABCE1 gene in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    REN, YI; LI, YINGHUI; TIAN, DALI

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter E1 (ABCE1), also known as RLI (RNase L inhibitor), is a new type of endoribonuclease inhibitor, which can specifically bind to RNase L and abolish its effect. ABCE1 binds to eIF2α and eIF5 to form a pre-translation initiation complex, suggesting its crucial role in cell growth, development and certain pathological processes. To probe the role of ABCE1 in the development and progress of human lung adenocarcinoma, we first detected the changes of its mRNA and protein expression in tissues, and found a high expression level of ABCE1 in human lung adenocarcinoma tissues and metastatic lymph nodes, which was also correlated with clinical stages. Moreover, human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were infected with lentiviral vectors containing ABCE1-specific shRNA, and resulted in significant inhibition of cell growth. Using microarray assay, a number of differentially expressed genes were found after ABCE1 suppression. Our results demonstrated the potential role of ABCE1 in human lung adenocarcinoma, which may provide some molecular basis for the mechanisms of development and progress of human lung adenocarcinoma, and help to find new pharmacological targets. PMID:22267055

  7. Advances in pulmonary therapy and drug development: Lung tissue engineering to lung-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Doryab, Ali; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Salehi-Najafabadi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Lung disease is one of the major causes of death, and the rate of pulmonary diseases has been increasing for decades. Although lung transplantation is the only treatment for majority of patients, this method has been limited due to lack of donors. Therefore, recently, attentions have increased to some new strategies with the aid of tissue engineering and microfluidics techniques not only for the functional analysis, but also for drug screening. In fact, in tissue engineering, the engineered tissue is able to grow by using the patient's own cells without intervention in the immune system. On the other hand, microfluidics devices are applied in order to evaluate drug screenings, function analysis and toxicity. This article reviews new advances in lung tissue engineering and lung-on-a-chip. Furthermore, future directions, difficulties and drawbacks of pulmonary therapy in these areas are discussed. PMID:26875777

  8. LUNG, ARSENIC EXPOSURE, AND TISSUE REMODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Specific Aim 1, we will develop a lung model of in utero arsenic exposure. We will assess the best graft conditions, including size, site and initial stage to ensure optimal graft survival and maturation. In addition, we will study the pharmacokinetic relationship between a...

  9. Lung cancer tissue diagnosis in poor lung function: addressing the ongoing percutaneous lung biopsy FEV1 paradox using Heimlich valve.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, R; Tavare, A N; Creamer, A; Creer, D; Vancheeswaran, R; Hare, S S

    2016-08-01

    Many centres continue to decline percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) in patients with poor lung function (particularly FEV1 <1 L) due to the theoretically increased risk of pneumothorax. This practice limits access to novel lung cancer therapies and minimally invasive surgical techniques. Our retrospective single-centre analysis of 212 patients undergoing PLB, all performed prospectively and blinded to lung function, demonstrates that using ambulatory Heimlich valve chest drain (HVCD) to treat significant postbiopsy pneumothorax facilitates safe, diagnostic, early discharge lung biopsy irrespective of lung function with neither FEV1 <1 L nor transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (TLCO) <40% predicted shown to be independent predictors of HVCD insertion or pneumothorax outcomes. Incorporating ambulatory HVCD into standard PLB practice thereby elegantly bridges the gap that currently exists between tissue diagnosis in patients with poor lung function and the advanced therapeutic options available for this cohort. PMID:26980011

  10. Cold ischemia-induced autophagy in rat lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XU; WU, JING-XIANG; YOU, XING-JI; ZHU, HONG-WEI; WEI, JIONG-LIN; XU, MEI-YING

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved pathway that permits recycling of nutrients within the cell and is rapidly upregulated during starvation or cell stress. Autophagy has been implicated in the pathophysiological process of warm ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat lung. Cold ischemia (CI) preservation for lung transplantation also exhibits cell stress and nutrient deprivation, however, little is known with regard to the involvement of autophagy in this process. In the present study, CI preservation-induced autophagy and apoptosis was investigated in the lungs of Sprague Dawley rats. Sprague Dawley rat lungs were flushed and preserved at 4°C (i.e. CI) for various durations (0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h). The levels of autophagy, autophagic cell death and apoptosis were measured at each time point following CI. The results revealed that autophagy was induced by CI preservation, which was initiated at 3 h, peaked at 6 h after CI and declined thereafter. Additionally, a coexistence of autophagic cell death and apoptosis was observed in rat lung tissues following prolonged CI. These findings demonstrate that autophagy is involved in the pathophysiological process of lung CI. Furthermore, autophagic cell death in addition to necrosis and apoptosis occurs following CI in the lung. CI preservation may therefore be a potential mechanism of lung injury during organ preservation prior to lung transplantation. PMID:25435100

  11. Radioactivity and lung cancer-mathematical models of radionuclide deposition in the human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The human respiratory tract is regarded as pathway for radionuclides and other hazardous airborne materials to enter the body. Radioactive particles inhaled and deposited in the lungs cause an irradiation of bronchial/alveolar tissues. At the worst, this results in a malignant cellular transformation and, as a consequence of that, the development of lung cancer. In general, naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., 222Rn, 40K) are attached to so-called carrier aerosols. The aerodynamic diameters of such radioactively labeled particles generally vary between several nanometers (ultrafine particles) and few micrometers, whereby highest particle fractions adopt sizes around 100 nm. Theoretical simulations of radioactive particle deposition in the human lungs were based on a stochastic lung geometry and a particle transport/deposition model using the random-walk algorithm. Further a polydisperse carrier aerosol (diameter: 1 nm–10 µm, ρ ≈ 1 g cm−3) with irregularly shaped particles and the effect of breathing characteristics and certain respiratory parameters on the transport of radioactive particles to bronchial/alveolar tissues were considered. As clearly shown by the results of deposition modeling, distribution patterns of radiation doses mainly depend on the size of the carrier aerosol. Ultrafine (< 10 nm) and large (> 2 µm) aerosol particles are preferentially deposited in the extrathoracic and upper bronchial region, whereas aerosol particles with intermediate size (10 nm–2 µm) may penetrate to deeper lung regions, causing an enhanced damage of the alveolar tissue by the attached radionuclides. PMID:22263097

  12. Induction of Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression by Hypoxia in Human Lung Fibroblasts via the MEKK1/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/GLI-2 and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi; Lin, Chien-huang; Chen, Jing-Yun; Li, Chien-Hua; Liu, Yu-Tin; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that hypoxia, GLI, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) contribute to pulmonary fibrosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We investigated the participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) kinase 1 (MEKK1)/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling in hypoxia-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Hypoxia time-dependently increased CTGF expression, which was attenuated by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) of GLI-1 (GLI-1 siRNA) and GLI-2 (GLI-2 siRNA) in both human lung fibroblast cell line (WI-38) and primary human lung fibroblasts (NHLFs). Moreover, GLI-1 siRNA and GLI-2 siRNA attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity, and the treatment of cells with hypoxia induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation. Furthermore, hypoxia-induced CTGF expression was reduced by an MEK inhibitor (PD98059), MEK1 siRNA, ERK inhibitor (U0126), ERK1 siRNA, and MEKK1 siRNA. Both PD98059 and U0126 significantly attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity. Hypoxia time-dependently increased MEKK1, ERK, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) also apparently inhibited hypoxia-induced CTGF expression. The treatment of cells with hypoxia induced ERK, GLI-1, or GLI-2 complex formation. Hypoxia-induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation into the nucleus was significantly attenuated by U0126. In addition, hypoxia-induced ERK Tyr204 phosphorylation was impeded by MEKK1 siRNA. Moreover, hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity was attenuated by cells transfected with AP-1 site mutation in a CTGF construct. Exposure to hypoxia caused a time-dependent phosphorylation of c-Jun, but not of c-Fos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that hypoxia induced the recruitment of c-Jun, GLI-1, and GLI-2 to the AP-1 promoter region of CTGF. Hypoxia-treated cells exhibited an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen production, which was blocked by GLI-1 siRNA and

  13. An ex vivo human lung model for ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy using lung flooding.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Frank; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Lesser, Thomas G

    2014-03-01

    The usability of an ex vivo human lung model for ablation of lung cancer tissue with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is described. Lung lobes were flooded with saline, with no gas remaining after complete atelectasis. The tumor was delineated sono-morphologically. Speed of sound, tissue density and ultrasound attenuation were measured for flooded lung and different pulmonary cancer tissues. The acoustic impedance of lung cancer tissue (1.6-1.9 mega-Rayleighs) was higher than that of water, as was its attenuation coefficient (0.31-0.44 dB/cm/MHz) compared with that of the flooded lung (0.12 dB/cm/MHz). After application of HIFU, the temperature in centrally located lung cancer surrounded by the flooded lung increased as high as 80°C, which is sufficient for treatment. On the basis of these preliminary results, ultrasound-guided HIFU ablation of lung cancer, by lung flooding with saline, appears feasible and should be explored in future clinical studies. PMID:24412177

  14. Polarimetric phenomenology of photons with lung cancer tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, G. C.; Marotta, S.; Narayan, C.; Petermann, J.; Shrestha, S.; Baluch, J.; Pingili, D.; Sheffer, D. B.; Zhang, L.; Zervakis, M.; Livanos, G.; Kounelakis, M.

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the polarimetric phenomenology of light interaction with healthy and early-stage lung cancer tissue samples by applying efficient polarimetric backscattering detection techniques combined with polarimetric exploratory data analysis. Preliminary results indicate that enhanced discrimination signatures can be obtained for certain types of early-stage lung cancers based on their depolarization, backscattered intensity and retardance characteristics.

  15. [Morphological, immunohistochemical and radiological manifestation of lung tissue remodeling at lung sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Kogan, E A; Kichigina, O N; Demura, S A; Osipenko, V I

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a group of diseases with chronic immune inflammation and granulomas formation in the lung, lymph nodes, and others organs. Under progress of disease remodeling of the lung tissue occurs and at 20-25% of patient with sarcoidosis lung fibrosis is developed. We studied biopsies from 50 patients with sarcoidosis and 10 biopsies of pathological intact lung tissue as a control group. Roentgenologic, morphologic and immunohistochemical methods with using of mono- and polyclonal antibody to MMP 1, 2, 9 and TIMP-1, PCNA, aSMA, apo-CAS were realized. The expression levels of growth factors, apoptosis, MMPs, TIMPs were different in various clinic-morphological courses of sarcoidosis. As a rule under sarcoidosis deep remodeling of lung tissue didn't occur in spite of granulomatous inflammation. Granulomatous process, alveolitis (bronchiolitis) and sclerotic changes resulted in alteration of the lung. Cells of sarcoidosis granulomas, produced low level of MMPs and TIMP can't induce evident fibrosis and so hypertension is absent or becomes apparent in the slight form. It apparently can be link with localization of pathologic process in lung tissue without any alterations in the bronchoalveolar zone. Alveolitis under sarcoidosis conditions is notable for low activity of inflammation and doesn't result in interstitial fibrosis developing. PMID:22937579

  16. Postmortem inflation and fixation of human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wright, B. M.; Slavin, G.; Kreel, L.; Callan, K.; Sandin, Brenda

    1974-01-01

    Wright, B. M., Slavin, G., Kreel, L., Callan, K., and Sandin, Brenda (1974).Thorax, 29, 189-194. Postmortem inflation and fixation of human lungs. A method of fixing lungs by inflating them with heated formalin vapour is described. This method facilitates postmortem correlations between radiographic and histological appearances. Images PMID:4598582

  17. Integrated quantitative proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of lung tumor and control tissue: a lung cancer showcase

    PubMed Central

    Huwer, Hanno; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Wesse, Tanja; Franke, Andre; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics analysis of paired cancer and control tissue can be applied to investigate pathological processes in tumors. Advancements in data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry allow for highly reproducible quantitative analysis of complex proteomic patterns. Optimized sample preparation workflows enable integrative multi-omics studies from the same tissue specimens. We performed ion mobility enhanced, data-independent acquisition MS to characterize the proteome of 21 lung tumor tissues including adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as compared to control lung tissues of the same patient each. Transcriptomic data were generated for the same specimens. The quantitative proteomic patterns and mRNA abundances were subsequently analyzed using systems biology approaches. We report a significantly (p = 0.0001) larger repertoire of proteins in cancer tissues. 12 proteins were higher in all tumor tissues as compared to matching control tissues. Three proteins, CAV1, CAV2, and RAGE, were vice versa higher in all controls. We also identified characteristic SCC and adenocarcinoma protein patterns. Principal Component Analysis provided evidence that not only cancer from control tissue but also tissue from adenocarcinoma and SCC can be differentiated. Transcriptomic levels of key proteins measured from the same matched tissue samples correlated with the observed protein patterns. The applied study set-up with paired lung tissue specimens of which different omics are measured, is generally suited for an integrated multi-omics analysis. PMID:26930711

  18. [Brown fat tissue in humans].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, L N; Elsukova, E I

    2002-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is universally present in mammals. Thermal production in such tissue is physiologically important for maintaining temperature homeostasis and regulation of body mass in small-size homoiotherms. At present it is clearly established that unlike other large mammals, brown adipose in man and primates is retained throughout the whole postnatal othogenesis. Therefore, BAT appears as a possible effector of pharmacogenetic protection from human excessive adiposis. Systematic reserach of various functioning aspects of this unique organ of mammals were started abroad as early as 1960-es, and are actively developing at present. Domestic research of energy circulation physiology and of thermoregulation developed mostly outside the brown adipose tissue. Therefore, the principal objective of this publication is to draw attention of experimental and clinical researches to an intriguing aspect of the issue of energy circulation in humans--the issue of brown adipose functioning. PMID:12004574

  19. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+), cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+), T-helper cells (CD4+), B cells (CD20+), macrophages (CD68+), mast cells (CD117+), mononuclear cells (CD11c+), plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+), B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+) and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+) compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells) in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition. PMID:26413839

  20. Surfactant protein D in human lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hartl, D; Griese, M

    2006-06-01

    The lung is continuously exposed to inhaled pollutants, microbes and allergens. Therefore, the pulmonary immune system has to defend against harmful pathogens, while an inappropriate inflammatory response to harmless particles must be avoided. In the bronchoalveolar space this critical balance is maintained by innate immune proteins, termed surfactant proteins. Among these, surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a central role in the pulmonary host defence and the modulation of allergic responses. Several human lung diseases are characterized by decreased levels of bronchoalveolar SP-D. Thus, recombinant SP-D has been proposed as a therapeutical option for cystic fibrosis, neonatal lung disease and smoking-induced emphysema. Furthermore, SP-D serum levels can be used as disease activity markers for interstitial lung diseases. This review illustrates the emerging role of SP-D translated from in vitro studies to human lung diseases. PMID:16684127

  1. Management of interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Stephen C; Danoff, Sonye K

    2016-01-01

    The lung is a common site of complications of systemic connective tissue disease (CTD), and lung involvement can present in several ways. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary hypertension are the most common lung manifestations in CTD. Although it is generally thought that interstitial lung disease develops later on in CTD it is often the initial presentation ("lung dominant" CTD). ILD can be present in most types of CTD, including rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis or dermatomyositis, Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. Despite similarities in clinical and pathologic presentation, the prognosis and treatment of CTD associated ILD (CTD-ILD) can differ greatly from that of other forms of ILD, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can present as a primary vasculopathy in pulmonary arterial hypertension or in association with ILD (PH-ILD). Therefore, detailed history, physical examination, targeted serologic testing, and, occasionally, lung biopsy are needed to diagnose CTD-ILD, whereas both non-invasive and invasive assessments of pulmonary hemodynamics are needed to diagnose pulmonary hypertension. Immunosuppression is the mainstay of treatment for ILD, although data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support specific treatments are lacking. Furthermore, treatment strategies vary according to the clinical situation-for example, the treatment of a patient newly diagnosed as having CTD-ILD differs from that of someone with an acute exacerbation of the disease. Immunosuppression is indicated only in select cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension related to CTD; more commonly, selective pulmonary vasodilators are used. For both diseases, comorbidities such as sleep disordered breathing, symptoms of dyspnea, and cough should be evaluated and treated. Lung transplantation should be considered in patients with advanced disease but is not always feasible because

  2. Association Between RT-Induced Changes in Lung Tissue Density and Global Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in computed tomography (CT)-defined lung tissue density and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing incidental partial lung RT were prospectively assessed for global (PFTs) and regional (CT and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) lung function before and, serially, after RT. The percent reductions in the PFT and the average changes in lung density were compared (Pearson correlations) in the overall group and subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Comparisons were also made between the CT- and SPECT-based computations using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 343 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 111 patients had a total of 203 concurrent post-RT evaluations of changes in lung density and PFTs available for the analyses, and 81 patients had a total of 141 concurrent post-RT SPECT images. The average increases in lung density were related to the percent reductions in the PFTs, albeit with modest correlation coefficients (range, 0.20-0.43). The analyses also indicated that the association between lung density and PFT changes is essentially equivalent to the corresponding association with SPECT-defined lung perfusion. Conclusion: We found a weak quantitative association between the degree of increase in lung density as defined by CT and the percent reduction in the PFTs.

  3. Extraction and Quantification of Carbon Nanotubes in Biological Matrices with Application to Rat Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Doudrick, Kyle; Corson, Nancy; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison; Herckes, Pierre; Halden, Rolf U.; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Extraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from biological matrices such as rat lung tissue is integral to developing a quantification method for evaluating the environmental and human health exposure and toxicity of CNTs. The ability of various chemical treatment methods, including Solvable (2.5% sodium hydroxide/surfactant mixture), ammonium hydroxide, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and proteinase K, to extract CNTs from rat lung tissue was evaluated. CNTs were quantified using programmed thermal analysis (PTA). Two CNTs were used to represent the lower (500°C) and upper (800°C) PTA limit of CNT thermal stability. The recovery efficiency of each of the eight chemical reagents evaluated was found to depend on the ability to (1) minimize oxidation of CNTs, (2) remove interfering background carbon from the rat lung tissue, and (3) separate the solid-phase CNTs from the liquid-phase dissolved tissue via centrifugation. A two-step extraction method using Solvable and proteinase K emerged as the optimal approach, enabling a recovery of 98 ± 15% of a 2.9 ± 0.19 µg CNT loading that was spiked into whole rat lungs. Due to its high yield and applicability to low organ burdens of nanomaterials, this extraction method is particularly well suited for in vivo studies to quantify clearance rates and retained CNTs in lungs and other organs. PMID:23992048

  4. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  5. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  6. Relationship Between Diseased Lung Tissues on Computed Tomography and Motion of Fiducial Marker Near Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Yuya; Nishioka, Noriko; Yasuda, Koichi; Fujima, Noriyuki; Torres, Mylin; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Ooyama, Noriko; Onimaru, Rikiya; Terae, Satoshi; Ooizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: For lung cancer patients with poor pulmonary function because of emphysema or fibrosis, it is important to predict the amplitude of internal tumor motion to minimize the irradiation of the functioning lung tissue before undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two board-certified diagnostic radiologists independently assessed the degree of pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis on computed tomography scans in 71 patients with peripheral lung tumors before real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy. The relationships between the computed tomography findings of the lung parenchyma and the motion of the fiducial marker near the lung tumor were investigated. Of the 71 patients, 30 had normal pulmonary function, and 29 had obstructive pulmonary dysfunction (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio of <70%), 6 patients had constrictive dysfunction (percentage of vital capacity <80%), and 16 had mixed dysfunction. Results: The upper region was associated with smaller tumor motion, as expected (p = .0004), and the presence of fibrosis (p = .088) and pleural tumor contact (p = .086) were weakly associated with tumor motion. The presence of fibrotic changes in the lung tissue was associated with smaller tumor motion in the upper region (p <.05) but not in the lower region. The findings of emphysema and pulmonary function tests were not associated with tumor motion. Conclusion: Tumors in the upper lung region with fibrotic changes have smaller motion than those in the upper region of the lungs without fibrotic changes. The tumor motion in the lower lung region was not significantly different between patients with and without lung fibrosis. Emphysema was not associated with the amplitude of tumor motion.

  7. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Varanou, A; Page, C P; Minger, S L

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac pathology, retinal dysfunction and lung and liver disease. The overall aim is to develop methods of application either of pure cell populations or of whole tissue parts to the diseased organ under investigation. In the field of pulmonary research, studies using human embryonic stem cells have succeeded in generating enriched cultures of type II pneumocytes in vitro. On account of their potential of indefinite proliferation in vitro, embryonic stem cells could be a source of an unlimited supply of cells available for transplantation and for use in gene therapy. Uncovering the ability to generate such cell types will expand our understanding of biological processes to such a degree that disease understanding and management could change dramatically. PMID:18724383

  8. Rituximab efficiently depletes B cells in lung tumors and normal lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    Joly-Battaglini, Albane; Hammarström, Clara; Stankovic, Branislava; Aamodt, Henrik; Stjärne, Johan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Øynebråten, Inger; Corthay, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 B-cell-specific antigen and is widely used as therapy for B-cell lymphoma. Since rituximab depletes both malignant and normal B cells, it is increasingly being used to treat various conditions in which normal B cells have a pathogenic role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. It is well-established that rituximab efficiently eliminates B cells in blood, lymph nodes, and spleen. In contrast, the effect of rituximab in non-lymphoid tissues remains poorly documented and is debated. Here, we report a rheumatoid arthritis patient who was treated with rituximab before receiving thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. Using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we show that rituximab efficiently depleted CD20-positive B cells in a primary lung tumor, in lung-associated lymph nodes, and in normal lung tissue. We conclude that rituximab may be very efficient at depleting normal B cells in the lungs. This property of rituximab may potentially be exploited for the treatment of conditions in which pathogenic B cells reside in the lungs. On the other hand, the clearance of lung B cells may provide an explanation for the rare cases of severe non-infectious pulmonary toxicity of rituximab. PMID:27081474

  9. On the preparation of lung strip for tissue mechanics measurement.

    PubMed

    Leite-Júnior, José Henrique; Rocco, Patricia R M; Faffe, Débora S; Romero, Pablo V; Zin, Walter A

    2003-03-28

    It is widely believed that it is fundamental to degas and/or rinse the lung prior to the measurement of the tissue mechanics, so that the undesirable effects of surfactant and localized gas trapping are eliminated. However, one could hypothesize that these mechanisms are bound to disappear in the in vitro preparation since the small tissue sample remains suspended oscillating in an organ bath. To investigate the real necessity to follow these procedures, dynamic mechanical properties were studied in strips of lungs previously rinsed with saline, degassed by ventilation with 100% O(2), or without any of these prior procedures. Resistance, elastance, hysteresivity, and the amounts of airway, blood vessel, and alveolar wall were computed. There was no difference in either tissue mechanics or morphology among the groups. In conclusion, the time-consuming degassing and rinsing steps are not necessary to adequately prepare lung tissue for in vitro mechanical analysis, and eliminating these steps potentially helps preserving the intact microstructure of the tissue. PMID:12660105

  10. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). PMID:26921406

  11. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10−8) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). PMID:26921406

  12. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI of the Human Lung

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, John P.; Altes, Talissa A.

    2012-01-01

    By permitting direct visualization of the airspaces of the lung, MR imaging using hyperpolarized gases provides unique strategies for evaluating pulmonary structure and function. Although the vast majority of research in humans has been performed using hyperpolarized 3He, recent contraction in the supply of 3He and consequent increases in price have turned attention to the alternative agent, hyperpolarized 129Xe. Compared to 3He, 129Xe yields reduced signal due to its smaller magnetic moment. Nonetheless, taking advantage of advances in gas-polarization technology, recent studies in humans using techniques for measuring ventilation, diffusion, and partial pressure of oxygen have demonstrated results for hyperpolarized 129Xe comparable to those previously demonstrated using hyperpolarized 3He. In addition, xenon has the advantage of readily dissolving in lung tissue and blood following inhalation, which makes hyperpolarized 129Xe particularly attractive for exploring certain characteristics of lung function, such as gas exchange and uptake, which cannot be accessed using 3He. Preliminary results from methods for imaging 129Xe dissolved in the human lung suggest that these approaches will provide new opportunities for quantifying relationships among gas delivery, exchange, and transport, and thus show substantial potential to broaden our understanding of lung disease. Finally, recent changes in the commercial landscape of the hyperpolarized-gas field now make it possible for this innovative technology to move beyond the research lab. PMID:23355432

  13. Drug-related death: adulterants from cocaine preparations in lung tissue and blood.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Evelyn; Mahler, Hellmut; Hartung, Benno; Plässer, Gerd; Daldrup, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The abuse of drugs such as street cocaine is known to cause a variety of toxic effects, some of which involve the lungs and often induce lethal complications. While the toxicity of cocaine itself is reviewed well, the influence of toxic effects of its adulterants on the human body is not thoroughly studied. Therefore, we examined heart blood, femoral vein blood and lung tissue from 11 cases for typically used adulterants in cocaine preparations and check whether if the concentrations in the lung tissue are higher than in the blood. The adulterants were isolated using solid-phase (SPE) and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and quantified via high-pressure-liquid-chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS). Five adulterants, i.e., phenacetin, lidocaine, diltiazem, levamisole and hydroxyzine, were detected. We found out that the concentration of these substances was often higher in the lung than in the analogous analysed body fluids. It should therefore be considered whether - for the determination in the cause of death - the lung should be examined in addition to heart blood, urine or brain tissue. PMID:25747329

  14. [Immunohistochemical Analysis of Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) Expression in Lung Tissue in Primary Lung Cancer Patients with High Serum KL-6 Levels].

    PubMed

    Yatsuyanagi, Eiji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Sato, Keisuke

    2015-09-01

    We investigated sialylated carbohydrate antigen( Krebs von den Lungen-6:KL-6) expression in lung tissue and correlation between the expression and serum KL-6 level in the patients with primary lung cancer. Thirty-four primary lung cancer patients with high serum KL-6 levels( >500 U/ml) were evaluated. A coexistence of interstitial pneumonia (IP) was histopathologically evaluated and an immunohistochemical staining using a mouse anti-human KL-6 antibody (mKL-6) was performed. A multiple regression analysis was also caluculated using a serum KL-6 level as a target variable and the histopathological and immunohistochemical factors (KL-6 expression in cancer tissue and IP tissue, coexistence of IP, tumor size, pathological staging) as descriptive variables. Twenty-two patients (64.7%) were histopathologically concomitant with IP. Cancer tissues were positively stained by mKL-6 in 32 patients (94.1%). Among them, 20 patients were concomitant with IP and all of their cancer tissues were more strongly stained by mKL-6 than IP tissues. Although considerable high rate of lung cancer patients might express the KL-6 in the cancer tissue, we could not reveal the relationship between the expression and serum KL-6 level by a multiple regression analysis. For revealing the mechanism of elevating serum KL-6 level in the patients with lung cancer, more detailed and powerful study is thought to be needed. PMID:26329623

  15. The association between human papillomavirus infection and female lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Huang, Jing-Yang; Tsai, Stella Ching-Shao; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Chou, Ming-Chih; Wu, Ming-Fang; Lee, Chun-Te; Jan, Cheng-Feng; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among Taiwanese women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been detected in lung cancer tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HPV infection and lung cancer among the Taiwanese women. The analytical data were collected from the longitudinal health insurance databases (LHID 2005 and 2010) of the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The study participants were 30 years and older and included 24,162 individuals who were identified with HPV infection from 2001 to 2004 and 1,026,986 uninfected individuals. Lung cancer incidence among infected and uninfected individuals was compared using the univariate and multivariate regression models. Among the total participants, 24,162 individuals were diagnosed with HPV. After adjusting for age, gender, low income, residential area, and comorbidity, the risk of lung cancer was higher in women (hazard ratio [HR] 1.263, 95% CI 1.015–1.571), while all cancer risks were high in both men and women with corresponding hazard ratios (HR) of 1.161 (95% CI 1.083–1.245) and HR 1.240 (95% CI 1.154–1.331), respectively. This study showed a significant increase in lung cancer risk among Taiwanese women who were exposed to HPV infection. PMID:27281096

  16. Organoids as a model system for studying human lung development and disease.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Rohan R; Abed, Soumeya; Draper, Jonathan S

    2016-05-01

    The lung is a complex organ comprising multiple cell types that perform a variety of vital processes, including immune defense and gas exchange. Diseases of the lung, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and lung cancer, together represent one of the largest causes of patient suffering and mortality. Logistical barriers that hamper access to embryonic, normal adult or diseased lung tissue currently hinder the study of lung disease. In vitro lung modeling represents an attractive and accessible avenue for investigating lung development, function and disease pathology, but accurately modeling the lung in vitro requires a system that recapitulates the structural features of the native lung. Organoids are stem cell-derived three-dimensional structures that are supported by an extracellular matrix and contain multiple cell types whose spatial arrangement and interactions mimic those of the native organ. Recently, organoids representative of the respiratory system have been generated from adult lung stem cells and human pluripotent stem cells. Ongoing studies are showing that organoids may be used to model human lung development, and can serve as a platform for interrogating the function of lung-related genes and signalling pathways. In a therapeutic context, organoids may be used for modeling lung diseases, and as a platform for screening for drugs that alleviate respiratory disease. Here, we summarize the organoid-forming capacity of respiratory cells, current lung organoid technologies and their potential use in future therapeutic applications. PMID:26721435

  17. Complex Sources of Variation in Tissue Expression Data: Analysis of the GTEx Lung Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    McCall, Matthew N; Illei, Peter B; Halushka, Marc K

    2016-09-01

    The sources of gene expression variability in human tissues are thought to be a complex interplay of technical, compositional, and disease-related factors. To better understand these contributions, we investigated expression variability in a relatively homogeneous tissue expression dataset from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) resource. In addition to identifying technical sources, such as sequencing date and post-mortem interval, we also identified several biological sources of variation. An in-depth analysis of the 175 genes with the greatest variation among 133 lung tissue samples identified five distinct clusters of highly correlated genes. One large cluster included surfactant genes (SFTPA1, SFTPA2, and SFTPC), which are expressed exclusively in type II pneumocytes, cells that proliferate in ventilator associated lung injury. High surfactant expression was strongly associated with death on a ventilator and type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. A second large cluster included dynein (DNAH9 and DNAH12) and mucin (MUC5B and MUC16) genes, which are exclusive to the respiratory epithelium and goblet cells of bronchial structures. This indicates heterogeneous bronchiole sampling due to the harvesting location in the lung. A small cluster included acute-phase reactant genes (SAA1, SAA2, and SAA2-SAA4). The final two small clusters were technical and gender related. To summarize, in a collection of normal lung samples, we found that tissue heterogeneity caused by harvesting location (medial or lateral lung) and late therapeutic intervention (mechanical ventilation) were major contributors to expression variation. These unexpected sources of variation were the result of altered cell ratios in the tissue samples, an underappreciated source of expression variation. PMID:27588449

  18. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  19. Stem cells--potential for repairing damaged lungs and growing human lungs for transplant.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Anne E; Rippon, Helen J

    2006-08-01

    Repair or regeneration of defective lung epithelium would be of great therapeutic potential. It is estimated by the British Lung Foundation that 1 in 7 people in the UK is affected by a lung disease and that 1 in 4 admissions to children's wards are as a result of respiratory problems. Potential cellular sources for the regeneration of lung tissue in vivo or lung tissue engineering in vitro include endogenous pulmonary epithelial stem cells, extrapulmonary circulating stem cells and embryonic stem cells. This article discusses the potential role of each of these stem cell types in future approaches to the treatment of lung injury and disease. PMID:16856797

  20. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  1. Detection and Localization of Pre-Cancerous Lesions and Early Lung Cancer Using Tissue Autofluorescence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jaclyn Yip-Chan

    In this work, two different yet related hypotheses were tested by experimental means as follows: (i) pre-cancerous and non-invasive (early) lung cancer can be detected and localized using the fluorescence properties of tumour localizing drugs at non-photosensitizing doses to skin tissue; (ii) significant differences exist in laser-induced autofluorescence between normal, pre-cancerous and cancerous tissues such that these differences alone can be exploited to detect and delineate early lung cancer without using exogenous drug(s). Exogenous fluorescent tumour markers such as hematoporphyrin derivatives (e.g. Photofrin) have been used to enhance to detection of occult lung lesions. Photofrin is preferentially retained in tumor tissues compared to the surrounding normal tissues; it fluoresces at 630 nm and 690 nm when excited at -405 nm. Based on this principle several imaging and non-imaging devices have been developed. However, wider clinical applications were limited due to the skin photosensitivity property of Photofrin. We have postulated that this could be solved by employing a much lower dose of Photofrin (0.25 mg/kg) which was believed to be less photosensitizing to human patients. This postulate was experimentally tested by ratio fluorometry and early lung cancers were detected with no false negative results and no apparent skin photosensitivity. An important finding in this study was that the mechanism for detection of early cancer was mainly due to the differences in the green autofluorescence between normal and malignant tissues, rather than fluorescence of tumour localizing drug. This discovery led to the second postulate of this thesis that tissue autofluorescence alone can be exploited for the detection of early lung cancer. The results indicated that algorithm(s) could be developed to clearly delineate early lesions from the normal tissues. Several algorithms were then tested using a non-imaging ratio fluorometer device and a prototype imaging

  2. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. PMID:21501697

  3. Selective Toll-Like Receptor Expression in Human Fetal Lung

    PubMed Central

    Petrikin, Joshua E; Gaedigk, Roger; Leeder, J Steven; Truog, William E

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical components of the innate immune system, acting as pattern recognition molecules and triggering an inflammatory response. TLR associated gene products are of interest in modulating inflammatory related pulmonary diseases of the neonate. The ontogeny of TLR related genes in human fetal lung has not been previously described and could elucidate additional functions and identify strategies for attenuating the effects of fetal inflammation. We examined the expression of 84 TLR related genes on 23 human fetal lung samples from three groups with estimated ages of 60 (57-59d), 90 (89-91d), and 130 (117-154d) days. Using a false detection rate algorithm, we identified 32 genes displaying developmental regulation with TLR2 having the greatest up-regulation of TLR genes (9.2 fold increase) and TLR4 unchanged. We confirmed the TLR2 up-regulation by examining an additional 133 fetal lung tissue samples with a fluorogenic polymerase chain reaction assay (TaqMan®) and found an exponential best-fit curve over the time studied. The best-fit curve predicts a 6.1 fold increase from 60d to 130d. We conclude that TLR2 is developmentally expressed from the early pseudoglandular stage of lung development to the canalicular stage. PMID:20581745

  4. Interpretation of autoantibody positivity in interstitial lung disease and lung-dominant connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Kawassaki, Alexandre de Melo; Baldi, Bruno Guedes

    2013-01-01

    The initial evaluation of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) primarily involves a comprehensive, active search for the cause. Autoantibody assays, which can suggest the presence of a rheumatic disease, are routinely performed at various referral centers. When interstitial lung involvement is the condition that allows the definitive diagnosis of connective tissue disease and the classical criteria are met, there is little debate. However, there is still debate regarding the significance, relevance, specificity, and pathophysiological role of autoimmunity in patients with predominant pulmonary involvement and only mild symptoms or formes frustes of connective tissue disease. The purpose of this article was to review the current knowledge of autoantibody positivity and to discuss its possible interpretations in patients with ILD and without clear etiologic associations, as well as to enhance the understanding of the natural history of an allegedly new disease and to describe the possible prognostic implications. We also discuss the proposition of a new term to be used in the classification of ILDs: lung-dominant connective tissue disease. PMID:24473767

  5. Modeling of the Nitric Oxide Transport in the Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Karamaoun, Cyril; Van Muylem, Alain; Haut, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    In the human lungs, nitric oxide (NO) acts as a bronchodilatator, by relaxing the bronchial smooth muscles and is closely linked to the inflammatory status of the lungs, owing to its antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air has been shown to be higher for asthmatic patients than for healthy patients. Multiple models have been developed in order to characterize the NO dynamics in the lungs, owing to their complex structure. Indeed, direct measurements in the lungs are difficult and, therefore, these models are valuable tools to interpret experimental data. In this work, a new model of the NO transport in the human lungs is proposed. It belongs to the family of the morphological models and is based on the morphometric model of Weibel (1963). When compared to models published previously, its main new features are the layered representation of the wall of the airways and the possibility to simulate the influence of bronchoconstriction (BC) and of the presence of mucus on the NO transport in lungs. The model is based on a geometrical description of the lungs, at rest and during a respiratory cycle, coupled with transport equations, written in the layers composing an airway wall and in the lumen of the airways. First, it is checked that the model is able to reproduce experimental information available in the literature. Second, the model is used to discuss some features of the NO transport in healthy and unhealthy lungs. The simulation results are analyzed, especially when BC has occurred in the lungs. For instance, it is shown that BC can have a significant influence on the NO transport in the tissues composing an airway wall. It is also shown that the relation between BC and the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air is complex. Indeed, BC might lead to an increase or to a decrease of this molar fraction, depending on the extent of the BC and on the possible presence of mucus. This should be confirmed experimentally and might

  6. Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Diseases: Unresolved Issues.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Irene Jarana; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-06-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) complicating connective tissue disorders, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Progress has been made in our understanding of these collective diseases; however, there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we describe the current views on epidemiology, clinical presentation, treatment, and prognosis in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-associated ILD. We also highlight several areas that remain unresolved and in need of further investigation, including interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, histopathologic phenotype, and pharmacologic management. A multidisciplinary and multidimensional approach to diagnosis, management, and investigation of CTD-associated ILD patients is essential to advance our understanding of the epidemiology and pathobiology of this challenging group of diseases. PMID:27231868

  7. Processing of CT images for analysis of diffuse lung disease in the lung tissue research consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Holmes, David; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC) is to improve the management of diffuse lung diseases through a better understanding of the biology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) including Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). Participants are subjected to a battery of tests including tissue biopsies, physiologic testing, clinical history reporting, and CT scanning of the chest. The LTRC is a repository from which investigators can request tissue specimens and test results as well as semi-quantitative radiology reports, pathology reports, and automated quantitative image analysis results from the CT scan data performed by the LTRC core laboratories. The LTRC Radiology Core Laboratory (RCL), in conjunction with the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR), has developed novel processing methods for comprehensive characterization of pulmonary processes on volumetric high-resolution CT scans to quantify how these diseases manifest in radiographic images. Specifically, the RCL has implemented a semi-automated method for segmenting the anatomical regions of the lungs and airways. In these anatomic regions, automated quantification of pathologic features of disease including emphysema volumes and tissue classification are performed using both threshold techniques and advanced texture measures to determine the extent and location of emphysema, ground glass opacities, "honeycombing" (HC) and "irregular linear" or "reticular" pulmonary infiltrates and normal lung. Wall thickness measurements of the trachea, and its branches to the 3 rd and limited 4 th order are also computed. The methods for processing, segmentation and quantification are described. The results are reviewed and verified by an expert radiologist following processing and stored in the public LTRC database for use by pulmonary researchers. To date, over 1200 CT scans have been processed by the RCL and the LTRC project is on target for recruitment of the

  8. [Comparative proteomic analysis of cancerous and adjacent normal lung tissues].

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Beom; Pi, Kyung Bae

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in industrialized countries. Unfortunately, most lung cancers are found too late for a cure, therefore early detection and treatment is very important. We have applied proteomic analysis by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting techniques for examination of cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous lung tissues from the same patient. The aim of the study was to find proteins, which could be used as biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring of this disease. Indeed, we found differences in expression of several proteins, related to various cellular activities, such as, chaperoning (e.g., GRP96, GRP78, HSP27), metabolism and oxidation stress (e.g., L-fucose, GST), cytoskeleton (e.g., tubulin beta 2/3, beta actin), cell adhesion (e.g., annexin A5/3), binding proteins (e.g., 14-3-3 theta) and signal transduction. These changes may be important for progression of carcinogenesis; they may be used as the molecular-support for future diagnostic markers. PMID:21395069

  9. Tissue Heterogeneity in IMRT Dose Calculation for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciuti, Katia; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia; Malatesta, Tiziana; Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria; Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina; Landoni, Valeria

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the {gamma} function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the {Gamma} analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable.

  10. Tissue heterogeneity in IMRT dose calculation for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasciuti, Katia; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia; Malatesta, Tiziana; Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria; Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina; Landoni, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the γ function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the Γ analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable. PMID:20970989

  11. Xenotransplantation Models to Study the Effects of Toxicants on Human Fetal Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Spade, Daniel J.; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Heger, Nicholas E.; Sanders, Jennifer A.; Saffarini, Camelia M.; Gruppuso, Philip A.; De Paepe, Monique E.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases that manifest throughout the lifetime are influenced by factors affecting fetal development. Fetal exposure to xenobiotics, in particular, may influence the development of adult diseases. Established animal models provide systems for characterizing both developmental biology and developmental toxicology. However, animal model systems do not allow researchers to assess the mechanistic effects of toxicants on developing human tissue. Human fetal tissue xenotransplantation models have recently been implemented to provide human-relevant mechanistic data on the many tissue-level functions that may be affected by fetal exposure to toxicants. This review describes the development of human fetal tissue xenotransplant models for testis, prostate, lung, liver, and adipose tissue, aimed at studying the effects of xenobiotics on tissue development, including implications for testicular dysgenesis, prostate disease, lung disease, and metabolic syndrome. The mechanistic data obtained from these models can complement data from epidemiology, traditional animal models, and in vitro studies to quantify the risks of toxicant exposures during human development. PMID:25477288

  12. Fibrocytes and the tissue niche in lung repair.

    PubMed

    Andersson-Sjöland, Annika; Nihlberg, Kristian; Eriksson, Leif; Bjermer, Leif; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    Human fibrocytes are bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells that express a variety of markers related to leukocytes, hematopoietic stem cells and a diverse set of fibroblast phenotypes. Fibrocytes can be recruited from the circulation to the tissue where they further can differentiate and proliferate into various mesenchymal cell types depending on the tissue niche. This local tissue niche is important because it modulates the fibrocytes and coordinates their role in tissue behaviour and repair. However, plasticity of a niche may be co-opted in chronic airway diseases such as asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and obliterative bronchiolitis. This review will therefore focus on a possible role of fibrocytes in pathological tissue repair processes in those diseases. PMID:21658209

  13. Generation of leukotrienes by purified human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    MacGlashan, D W; Schleimer, R P; Peters, S P; Schulman, E S; Adams, G K; Newball, H H; Lichtenstein, L M

    1982-01-01

    Although mediator release from mast cells and basophils plays a central role in the pathogenesis of human allergic disease, biochemical studies have been restricted to rat peritoneal mast cells and basophilic leukemia cells because they could be easily purified. We have used two new techniques of cell separation to purify human lung mast cells to 98% homogeneity. Lung cell suspensions were obtained by dispersion of chopped lung tissue with proteolytic enzymes. Mast cells were then purified from the suspensions by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation and affinity chromatography. The purified mast cells released both histamine and slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) (leukotriene C and D) during stimulation with goat anti-human IgE antibody. Moreover, these preparations were able to generate significant quantities of SRS-A (32 +/- 7 x 10(-17) LTD mole-equivalents/mast cell) at all stages of purification, indicating that a secondary cell is not necessary for the antigen-induced release of SRS. Images PMID:7119113

  14. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Clune, Jennifer K; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-induced ALI. Because of a growing body of literature demonstrating important pathophysiologic differences between ALI caused by different etiologies, we hypothesized that TF on myeloid cells may have distinct contributions to airspace inflammation and permeability between direct and indirect causes of ALI. To test this, we compared mice lacking TF on myeloid cells (TF(∆mye), LysM.Cre(+/-)TF(flox/flox)) to littermate controls during direct (bacterial pneumonia, ventilator-induced ALI, bleomycin-induced ALI) and indirect ALI (systemic LPS, cecal ligation and puncture). ALI was quantified by weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell number, cytokine concentration, protein concentration, and BAL procoagulant activity. There was no significant contribution of TF on myeloid cells in multiple models of experimental ALI, leading to the conclusion that TF in myeloid cells is not a major contributor to experimental ALI. PMID:26924425

  15. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, Ciara M.; Grove, Brandon S.; Clune, Jennifer K.; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B.; Bastarache, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-induced ALI. Because of a growing body of literature demonstrating important pathophysiologic differences between ALI caused by different etiologies, we hypothesized that TF on myeloid cells may have distinct contributions to airspace inflammation and permeability between direct and indirect causes of ALI. To test this, we compared mice lacking TF on myeloid cells (TF∆mye, LysM.Cre+/−TFflox/flox) to littermate controls during direct (bacterial pneumonia, ventilator-induced ALI, bleomycin-induced ALI) and indirect ALI (systemic LPS, cecal ligation and puncture). ALI was quantified by weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell number, cytokine concentration, protein concentration, and BAL procoagulant activity. There was no significant contribution of TF on myeloid cells in multiple models of experimental ALI, leading to the conclusion that TF in myeloid cells is not a major contributor to experimental ALI. PMID:26924425

  16. Quantification of Regional Interstitial Lung Disease from CT-derived Fractional Tissue Volume: A Lung Tissue Research Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Watharkar, Snehal S.; de Leon, Alberto Diaz; Garcia, Christine K.; Patel, Nova C.; Jordan, Kirk G.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Evaluation of chest CT is usually qualitative or semi-quantitative, resulting in subjective descriptions often by different observers over time and imprecise determinations of disease severity within distorted lobes. There is a need for standardized imaging biomarkers to quantify regional disease, maximize diagnostic yield, and facilitate multi-center comparisons. We applied lobe-based voxelwise image analysis to derive regional air (Vair) and tissue (Vtissue) volumes and fractional tissue volume (FTV=tissue/[tissue+air] volume) as internally standardized parameter for assessing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and Methods High-resolution CT was obtained at supine and prone end-inspiration and supine end-expiration in 29 patients with ILD and 20 normal subjects. Lobar Vair, Vtissue, and FTV were expressed along standard coordinate axes. Results In normal subjects from end-inspiration to end-expiration, total Vair declined 43%, FTV increased ~80% while Vtissue remained unchanged. With increasing ILD, Vair declined and Vtissue rose in all lobes; FTV increased with a peripheral-to-central progression inversely correlated to spirometry and lung diffusing capacity (R2=0.57–0.75, prone end-inspiration). Inter- and intra-lobar coefficients of variation (CVs) of FTV increased 84–148% in mild-to-moderate ILD, indicating greater spatial heterogeneity, then normalized in severe ILD. Analysis of discontinuous images incurs <3% error compared to consecutive images. Conclusions These regional attenuation-based biomarkers could quantify heterogeneous parenchymal disease in distorted lobes, detect mild ILD involvement in all lobes and describe the pattern of disease progression. The next step would be to study a larger series, examine reproducibility and follow longitudinal changes in correlation with clinical and functional indices. PMID:21596593

  17. A model of ventilation of the healthy human lung.

    PubMed

    Steimle, K L; Mogensen, M L; Karbing, D S; Bernardino de la Serna, J; Andreassen, S

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a model of the lung mechanics which simulates the pulmonary alveolar ventilation. The model includes aspects of: the alveolar geometry; pressure due to the chest wall; pressure due to surface tension determined by surfactant activity; pressure due to lung tissue elasticity; and pressure due to the hydrostatic effects of the lung tissue and blood. The cross-sectional area of the lungs in the supine position derived from computed tomography is used to construct a horizontally layered model, which simulates heterogeneous ventilation distribution from the non-dependent to the dependent layers of the lungs. The model is in agreement with experimentally measured hysteresis of the pressure-volume curve of the lungs, static lung compliance, changes in lung depth during breathing and density distributions at total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV). In the dependent layers of the lungs, alveolar collapse may occur at RV, depending on the assumptions concerning lung tissue elasticity at very low alveolar volumes. The model simulations showed that ventilation increased with depth in the lungs, although not as pronounced as observed experimentally. The model simulates alveolar ventilation including all of the mentioned components of the respiratory system and to be validated against all the above mentioned experimental data. PMID:20655612

  18. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  19. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  20. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  1. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI. PMID:25884207

  2. Autoradiographic localization of beta-adrenoceptors in asthmatic human lung

    SciTech Connect

    Spina, D.; Rigby, P.J.; Paterson, J.W.; Goldie, R.G. )

    1989-11-01

    The autoradiographic distribution and density of beta-adrenoceptors in human non-diseased and asthmatic bronchi were investigated using (125I)iodocyanopindolol (I-CYP). Analysis of the effects of the beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on I-CYP binding demonstrated that betaxolol (20 nM, beta 1-selective) had no significant effect on specific grain density in either nonasthmatic or asthmatic human bronchus, whereas ICI-118551 (20 nM, beta 2-selective) inhibited I-CYP binding by 85 +/- 9% and 89 +/- 3%, respectively. Thus, homogeneous populations of beta 2-adrenoceptors existed in bronchi from both sources. Large populations of beta-adrenoceptors were localized to the bronchial epithelium, submucosal glands, and airway smooth muscle. Asthmatic bronchial tissue featured epithelial damage with exfoliated cells associated with luminal mucus plugs. A thickened basement membrane and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia were also evident. High levels of specific I-CYP binding were also detected over asthmatic bronchial smooth muscle, as assessed by autoradiography and quantitation of specific grain densities. Isoproterenol and fenoterol were 10- and 13-fold less potent, respectively, in bronchi from asthmatic lung than in those from nonasthmatic lung. However, this attenuated responsiveness to beta-adrenoceptor agonists was not caused by reduced beta-adrenoceptor density in asthmatic airways. A defect may exist in the coupling between beta-adrenoceptors and postreceptor mechanisms in severely asthmatic lung.

  3. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Israel L.; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M.; Mariani, Alessandro W.; Fernandes, Flávio G.; Unterpertinger, Fernando V.; Canzian, Mauro; Jatene, Fabio B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. METHOD: Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex® was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. RESULTS: After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98). The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p = 0.035). The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H2O in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H2O in Group 2 (p = 0.816). The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p = 0.87). The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0), and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm2 and 137.50/mm2, respectively (p = 0.71). CONCLUSION: The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation. PMID:23018310

  4. ADH IB Expression, but Not ADH III, Is Decreased in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mutka, Sarah C.; Green, Lucia H.; Verderber, Evie L.; Richards, Jane P.; Looker, Doug L.; Chlipala, Elizabeth A.; Rosenthal, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous S-nitrosothiols, including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), mediate nitric oxide (NO)-based signaling, inflammatory responses, and smooth muscle function. Reduced GSNO levels have been implicated in several respiratory diseases, and inhibition of GSNO reductase, (GSNOR) the primary enzyme that metabolizes GSNO, represents a novel approach to treating inflammatory lung diseases. Recently, an association between decreased GSNOR expression and human lung cancer risk was proposed in part based on immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal GSNOR antibody. GSNOR is an isozyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family, and we demonstrate that the antibody used in those studies cross reacts substantially with other ADH proteins and may not be an appropriate reagent. We evaluated human lung cancer tissue arrays using monoclonal antibodies highly specific for human GSNOR with minimal cross reactivity to other ADH proteins. We verified the presence of GSNOR in ≥85% of specimens examined, and extensive analysis of these samples demonstrated no difference in GSNOR protein expression between cancerous and normal lung tissues. Additionally, GSNOR and other ADH mRNA levels were evaluated quantitatively in lung cancer cDNA arrays by qPCR. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings, GSNOR mRNA levels were not changed in lung cancer tissues, however the expression levels of other ADH genes were decreased. ADH IB mRNA levels were reduced (>10-fold) in 65% of the lung cancer cDNA specimens. We conclude that the previously reported results showed an incorrect association of GSNOR and human lung cancer risk, and a decrease in ADH IB, rather than GSNOR, correlates with human lung cancer. PMID:23285246

  5. ADH IB expression, but not ADH III, is decreased in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mutka, Sarah C; Green, Lucia H; Verderber, Evie L; Richards, Jane P; Looker, Doug L; Chlipala, Elizabeth A; Rosenthal, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous S-nitrosothiols, including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), mediate nitric oxide (NO)-based signaling, inflammatory responses, and smooth muscle function. Reduced GSNO levels have been implicated in several respiratory diseases, and inhibition of GSNO reductase, (GSNOR) the primary enzyme that metabolizes GSNO, represents a novel approach to treating inflammatory lung diseases. Recently, an association between decreased GSNOR expression and human lung cancer risk was proposed in part based on immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal GSNOR antibody. GSNOR is an isozyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family, and we demonstrate that the antibody used in those studies cross reacts substantially with other ADH proteins and may not be an appropriate reagent. We evaluated human lung cancer tissue arrays using monoclonal antibodies highly specific for human GSNOR with minimal cross reactivity to other ADH proteins. We verified the presence of GSNOR in ≥85% of specimens examined, and extensive analysis of these samples demonstrated no difference in GSNOR protein expression between cancerous and normal lung tissues. Additionally, GSNOR and other ADH mRNA levels were evaluated quantitatively in lung cancer cDNA arrays by qPCR. Consistent with our immunohistochemical findings, GSNOR mRNA levels were not changed in lung cancer tissues, however the expression levels of other ADH genes were decreased. ADH IB mRNA levels were reduced (>10-fold) in 65% of the lung cancer cDNA specimens. We conclude that the previously reported results showed an incorrect association of GSNOR and human lung cancer risk, and a decrease in ADH IB, rather than GSNOR, correlates with human lung cancer. PMID:23285246

  6. α-Klotho Expression in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kenneth; Groen, Arnoud; Molostvov, Guerman; Lu, Tzongshi; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Snead, David; James, Sean; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Ting, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Context: α-Klotho has emerged as a powerful regulator of the aging process. To date, the expression profile of α-Klotho in human tissues is unknown, and its existence in some human tissue types is subject to much controversy. Objective: This is the first study to characterize systemwide tissue expression of transmembrane α-Klotho in humans. We have employed next-generation targeted proteomic analysis using parallel reaction monitoring in parallel with conventional antibody-based methods to determine the expression and spatial distribution of human α-Klotho expression in health. Results: The distribution of α-Klotho in human tissues from various organ systems, including arterial, epithelial, endocrine, reproductive, and neuronal tissues, was first identified by immunohistochemistry. Kidney tissues showed strong α-Klotho expression, whereas liver did not reveal a detectable signal. These results were next confirmed by Western blotting of both whole tissues and primary cells. To validate our antibody-based results, α-Klotho-expressing tissues were subjected to parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (data deposited at ProteomeXchange, PXD002775) identifying peptides specific for the full-length, transmembrane α-Klotho isoform. Conclusions: The data presented confirm α-Klotho expression in the kidney tubule and in the artery and provide evidence of α-Klotho expression across organ systems and cell types that has not previously been described in humans. PMID:26280509

  7. Thorium isotopes in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Stehney, A.F.; Lucas, H.F.

    1991-12-31

    Concentrations of {sup 232}Th and activity ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th were determined in autopsy samples from five former employees of a thorium refinery. The ranges of {sup 232}Th activity concentrations (mBq g{sup {minus}1}) were 0.17--94 in lungs, 3.9--1210 in pulmonary lymph nodes, 0.14--1.19 in bones, 0.015--0.68 in liver, 0.97--5.8 in spleen, and 0.009--0.068 in kidneys. These concentrations are 10 to 1000 times greater than have been reported for persons not occupationally exposed to Th. In most of the samples, the ratios of {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th activity at death of the subject were 0.1--0.2 and 0.2--0.4, respectively. Thorium-228 to {sup 228}Ra activity ratios ({plus_minus} standard errors) of 0.86 {plus_minus} 0.11 in lungs and 1.18 {plus_minus} 0.13 in lymph nodes of one subject were obtained by calculation from ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th.

  8. HOPE-fixation of lung tissue allows retrospective proteome and phosphoproteome studies.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Olga; Abidi, Nada; Klawonn, Frank; Wissing, Josef; Nimtz, Manfred; Kugler, Christian; Steinert, Michael; Goldmann, Torsten; Jänsch, Lothar

    2014-11-01

    Hepes-glutamic acid buffer-mediated organic solvent protection effect (HOPE)-fixation has been introduced as an alternative to formalin fixation of clinical samples. Beyond preservation of morphological structures for histology, HOPE-fixation was demonstrated to be compatible with recent methods for RNA and DNA sequencing. However, the suitability of HOPE-fixed materials for the inspection of proteomes by mass spectrometry so far remained undefined. This is of particular interest, since proteins constitute a prime resource for drug research and can give valuable insights into the activity status of signaling pathways. In this study, we extracted proteins from human lung tissue and tested HOPE-treated and snap-frozen tissues comparatively by proteome and phosphoproteome analyses. High confident data from accurate mass spectrometry allowed the identification of 2603 proteins and 3036 phosphorylation sites. HOPE-fixation did not hinder the representative extraction of proteins, and investigating their biochemical properties, covered subcellular localizations, and cellular processes revealed no bias caused by the type of fixation. In conclusion, proteome as well as phosphoproteome data of HOPE lung samples were qualitatively equivalent to results obtained from snap-frozen tissues. Thus, HOPE-treated tissues match clinical demands in both histology and retrospective proteome analyses of patient samples by proteomics. PMID:24702127

  9. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  10. Prognostic significance of tissue miR-345 downregulation in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liming; Li, Xiaojie; Chen, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background: MiRNAs might function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in the tumorigenesis process. Dysregulation of miR-345 is a frequent event in many types of human cancers. However, the tissue miR-345 expression level in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its potential clinical significance remains unknown. Materials and methods: Real-time PCR was conducted to evaluate the expression level of miR-345 in NSCLC tissues as well as cell lines. Then the association between tissue miR-345 expression level and clinical outcome was investigated. Results: The expression level of miR-345 was significantly decreased in NSCLC tissues and cell lines compared with the controls (P<0.05; P<0.01). Tissue miR-345 expression level was associated with various clinicopathological parameters including LN metastasis (P=0.012), distant metastasis (P=0.007), TNM stage (P=0.008) and grade (P=0.030). In addition, the NSCLC patients in thelow tissue miR-345 expression group had significantly shorter 5-year overall survival time than those in the high tissue miR-345expression group (P=0.016). Multivariate analysis showed that tissue miR-345 was an independent risk factor for NSCLC (HR=3.921, 95% CI: 2.285-10.540; P=0.008). Conclusions: The expression level of miR-345 was reduced in NSCLC tissues and cell lines. Low tissue miR-345 expression was associated with progression and poor prognosis of NSCLC, indicating that tissue miR-345 may serve as a novel prognostic marker in NSCLC. PMID:26885027

  11. Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua-qing; Xu, Mei-lin; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Cong-hua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

  12. Formaldehyde induces lung inflammation by an oxidant and antioxidant enzymes mediated mechanism in the lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso dos Santos; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Ligeiro; Breithaupt-Faloppa, Ana Cristina; Bertoni, Jônatas de Almeida; Oliveira-Filho, Ricardo Martins; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Marcourakis, Tânia; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan

    2011-12-15

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an indoor and outdoor pollutant widely used by many industries, and its exposure is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in the airways. Our previous studies have demonstrated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lung inflammation induced by FA inhalation but did not identify source of the ROS. In the present study, we investigate the effects of FA on the activities and gene expression of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and 2, catalase (CAT), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2. The hypothesized link between NADPH-oxidase, nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase, the lung inflammation after FA inhalation was also investigated. For experiments, male Wistar rats were submitted to FA inhalation (1%, 90 min daily) for 3 consecutive days. The treatments with apocynin and indomethacin before the FA exposure reduced the number of neutrophils recruited into the lung. Moreover, the treatments with apocynin and indomethacin blunted the effect of FA on the generation of IL-1β, while the treatments with L-NAME and apocynin reduced the generation of IL-6 by lung explants when compared to the untreated group. FA inhalation increased the levels of NO and hydrogen peroxide by BAL cells cultured and the treatments with apocynin and l-NAME reduced these generations. FA inhalation did not modify the activities of GPX, GR, GST and CAT but reduced the activity of SOD when compared to the naïve group. Significant increases in SOD-1 and -2, CAT, iNOS, cNOS and COX-1 expression were observed in the FA group compared to the naïve group. The treatments with apocynin, indomethacin and L-NAME reduced the gene expression of antioxidant and oxidant enzymes. In conclusion, our results indicate that FA causes a disruption of the physiological balance between oxidant and antioxidant enzymes in lung tissue, most likely favoring the

  13. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs. PMID:27085470

  14. Use of human tissue explants to study human infectious agents

    PubMed Central

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The study of human cell–cell and cell–pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture is critical for deciphering the mechanisms of many normal and pathogenic processes. This protocol describes methods for culturing and infecting explants of human tissues to study the pathogenesis of human infectious agents and their local interactions. The protocol relies on the use of fresh human tissues dissected into small blocks or biopsies that are cultured at the liquid–air interface on collagen rafts. These tissue blocks retain their cytoarchitecture and support productive infection of various pathogens without exogenous stimulation. Experimental details for setting up cultures of human tonsils, lymph nodes and cervicovaginal and rectosigmoid tissues, including protocols for their infection with HIV-1 and other pathogens, are described here. Using this protocol, culture and infections can be set up in 3–6 h and be maintained for 2–3 weeks, depending on the tissue used. PMID:19197269

  15. Histamine release by Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) from lung tissue in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Nicholls, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Evans, Elizabeth and Nicholls, P. J. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 28-30. Histamine release by Western red cedar(Thuja plicata)from lung tissue in vitro. Various respiratory symptoms have previously been observed in workers exposed to dust from Western red cedar (Thuja plicata). Although an allergic basis for these effects has been proposed, the possibility that the dust may contain a pharmacologically active agent was investigated. Aqueous extracts of two samples of red cedar released significant amounts of histamine from pig and human lung in vitro. For one of these samples, using pig lung, a dose-response relation was found over a narrow range of concentrations. These dusts possessed the same order of histamine-releasing activity as a sample of cotton dust. Potassium cyanide reduced the release of histamine caused by low concentrations of Western red cedar. Similar effects of cyanide on the histamine-releasing activity of cotton dust and compound 48/80 were observed. It is possible that release of histamine in the lungs and upper respiratory tract occurs on inhalation of dust from Western red cedar and this may be a contributory factor to the development of respiratory symptoms in workers exposed to the dust of this wood. PMID:4132384

  16. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  17. Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma: a large animal model for human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Gehad; Wallace, William A H; Dagleish, Mark P; Cousens, Chris; Griffiths, David J

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Recent progress in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of this disease has resulted in novel therapeutic strategies targeting specific groups of patients. Further studies are required to provide additional advances in diagnosis and treatment. Animal models are valuable tools for studying oncogenesis in lung cancer, particularly during the early stages of disease where tissues are rarely available from human cases. Mice have traditionally been used for studying lung cancer in vivo, and a variety of spontaneous and transgenic models are available. However, it is recognized that other species may also be informative for studies of cancer. Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a naturally occurring lung cancer of sheep caused by retrovirus infection and has several features in common with adenocarcinoma of humans, including a similar histological appearance and activation of common cell signaling pathways. Additionally, the size and organization of human lungs are much closer to those of sheep lungs than to those of mice, which facilitates experimental approaches in sheep that are not available in mice. Thus OPA presents opportunities for studying lung tumor development that can complement conventional murine models. Here we describe the potential applications of OPA as a model for human lung adenocarcinoma with an emphasis on the various in vivo and in vitro experimental systems available. PMID:25991702

  18. Connective tissue growth factor stimulates the proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts during paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhizhou; Sun, Zhaorui; Liu, Hongmei; Ren, Yi; Shao, Danbing; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Jinfeng; Wolfram, Joy; Wang, Feng; Nie, Shinan

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that paraquat (PQ) poisoning can cause severe lung injury during the early stages of exposure, finally leading to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an essential growth factor that is involved in tissue repair and pulmonary fibrogenesis. In the present study, the role of CTGF was examined in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ poisoning. Histological examination revealed interstitial edema and extensive cellular thickening of interalveolar septa at the early stages of poisoning. At 2 weeks after PQ administration, lung tissue sections exhibited a marked thickening of the alveolar walls with an accumulation of interstitial cells with a fibroblastic appearance. Masson's trichrome staining revealed a patchy distribution of collagen deposition, indicating pulmonary fibrogenesis. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of tissue samples demonstrated that CTGF expression was significantly upregulated in the PQ-treated group. Similarly, PQ treatment of MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cells caused an increase in CTGF in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of CTGF to MRC-5 cells triggered cellular proliferation and migration. In addition, CTGF induced the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as was evident from increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen. These findings demonstrate that PQ causes increased CTGF expression, which triggers proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts. Therefore, CTGF may be important in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrogenesis, rendering this growth factor a potential pharmacological target for reducing lung injury. PMID:25815693

  19. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Cancer.gov

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  20. Silencing Aurora-A with siRNA inhibits cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ning; Shi, Shunbin; Wang, Hongzhen; Wu, Guangzhou; Wang, Yunliang; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuanhua; Wang, Jinzhi

    2016-09-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is an oncogenic serine/threonine kinase, it plays important roles in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. In this study, we investigated the expression of AURKA in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, the role of small interference RNA targeting AURKA on growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines in vitro. The AURKA is highly expressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knock down AURKA expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines H1299 and A549. The results indicated that depletion of AURKA could inhibit cell growth, cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The potential mechanisms of AURKA inhibition induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis are associated with downregulated RAF-1, CCND2, CCND3, CDK4, PAK4, EGFR and upregulated WEE1 expression. Furthermore, AURKA knockdown cooperated with vincristine (VCR) to repress A549 cell proliferation. Therefore, AURKA plays important roles in the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, which suggests that AURKA could be a promising tool for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. PMID:27571708

  1. Species-specific metastasis of human tumor cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse engrafted with human tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, E; Namikawa, R

    1995-01-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to gamma-irradiation or to interleukin 1 alpha. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7753860

  2. Species-Specific Metastasis of Human Tumor Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Engrafted with Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Namikawa, Reiko

    1995-05-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to γ-irradiation or to interleukin 1α. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process.

  3. Fallout sup 3 H in human tissue at Akita, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.; Itoh, M.; Ueno, K.; Katsumata, T.; Sakanoue, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The {sup 3}H concentration in Japanese human tissue samples is reported in this paper. Four brain, 10 liver, and nine lung samples from 11 cases were collected from Akita Prefecture in northern Japan from January to July 1986. The median of free-water {sup 3}H concentration was similar in these tissues and agreed well with the concentrations in the diet, including tap water. The median specific activity ratio of tissue-bound {sup 3}H to free-water {sup 3}H was 1.1 and was slightly lower than that in the diet. The specific activity ratio was also lower than that reported in the United States and significantly lower than in Italy.

  4. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  5. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W; Basse, Per H; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A; Greenberger, Joel S; Socinski, Mark A; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  6. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  7. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  8. Short-term hypoxic exposure at rest and during exercise reduces lung water in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Eric M; Beck, Kenneth C; Hulsebus, Minelle L; Breen, Jerome F; Hoffman, Eric A; Johnson, Bruce D

    2006-12-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxic exercise increase pulmonary arterial pressure, cause pulmonary capillary recruitment, and may influence the ability of the lungs to regulate fluid. To examine the influence of hypoxia, alone and combined with exercise, on lung fluid balance, we studied 25 healthy subjects after 17-h exposure to 12.5% inspired oxygen (barometric pressure = 732 mmHg) and sequentially after exercise to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer with 12.5% inspired oxygen. We also studied subjects after a rapid saline infusion (30 ml/kg over 15 min) to demonstrate the sensitivity of our techniques to detect changes in lung water. Pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) and alveolar-capillary conductance (D(M)) were determined by measuring the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide and nitric oxide. Lung tissue volume and density were assessed using computed tomography. Lung water was estimated by subtracting measures of Vc from computed tomography lung tissue volume. Pulmonary function [forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume after 1 s (FEV(1)), and forced expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (FEF(50))] was also assessed. Saline infusion caused an increase in Vc (42%), tissue volume (9%), and lung water (11%), and a decrease in D(M) (11%) and pulmonary function (FVC = -12 +/- 9%, FEV(1) = -17 +/- 10%, FEF(50) = -20 +/- 13%). Hypoxia and hypoxic exercise resulted in increases in Vc (43 +/- 19 and 51 +/- 16%), D(M) (7 +/- 4 and 19 +/- 6%), and pulmonary function (FVC = 9 +/- 6 and 4 +/- 3%, FEV(1) = 5 +/- 2 and 4 +/- 3%, FEF(50) = 4 +/- 2 and 12 +/- 5%) and decreases in lung density and lung water (-84 +/- 24 and -103 +/- 20 ml vs. baseline). These data suggest that 17 h of hypoxic exposure at rest or with exercise resulted in a decrease in lung water in healthy humans. PMID:16902060

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy and cryoimaging of rat lung tissue mitochondrial redox state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Audi, S.; Staniszewski, K.; Maleki, S.; Ranji, M.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the utility of optical cryoimaging and fluorometry to evaluate tissue redox state of the mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) in intact rat lungs. The ratio (NADH/FAD), referred to as mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), is a measure of the lung tissue mitochondrial redox state. Isolated rat lungs were connected to a ventilation-perfused system. Surface NADH and FAD fluorescence signals were acquired before and after lung perfusion in the absence (control perfusate) or presence of potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) to reduce the mitochondrial respiratory chain (state 5 respiration). Another group of lungs were perfused with control perfusate or KCN-containing perfusate as above, after which the lungs were deflated and frozen rapidly for subsequent 3D cryoimaging. Results demonstrate that lung treatment with KCN increased lung surface NADH signal by 22%, decreased FAD signal by 8%, and as result increased RR by 31% as compared to control perfusate (baseline) values. Cryoimaging results also show that KCN increased mean lung tissue NADH signal by 37%, decreased mean FAD signal by 4%, and increased mean RR by 47%. These results demonstrate the utility of these optical techniques to evaluate the effect of pulmonary oxidative stress on tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact lungs.

  10. Cortisol in human tissues at different stages of life.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Benedetto, C; Fabris, C; Giraudi, G F; Testori, O; Bertino, E; Marozio, L; Varvello, G; Arisio, R; Ariano, M; Emanuel, A

    1996-01-01

    Aim of the work was to measure the cortisol level in human tissues at different stages of life, by means of radioimmunoassay and by chromatography. Viable samples of 13 different tissues were obtained during surgical intervention from 30 to 70 years old patients of either sex. Mean tissue cortisol concentration was 78 +/- 35 ng/g, ranging from 20 +/- 10 ng/g in the thyroid to 124 +/- 76 ng/g in the kidney. Similar values were measured in the corresponding tissues from not decayed corpses, so that paired values could be mediated. However the pancreas, and corrupted autopsy tissues, gave nil or exceedingly high cortisol concentration values; in some cases, opposite extreme values were measured in different organs of the same body. Cortisol concentration was also measured in 11 sound different tissues of spontaneously aborted or stillbirth fetuses, between 16 and 36 weeks of gestation. Mean value was 63 +/- 27 ng/g, ranging from 30 +/- 25 ng/g in the liver to 104 +/- 52 ng/g in the lungs. Also in fetuses nil or exceedingly high cortisol values occurred in altered tissues. One hundred and fourteen samples of limbs and carcasses of 7 to 12 gestational weeks embryos, obtained from voluntary abortions, were also examined: 20% gave nil result, in the remaining mean cortisol concentration was 32 ng/g. In 33 samples of embryos' mixed viscera, RIA and chromatography gave unreliable exceedingly high values. The nil and the exceedingly high values measured in the altered autoptic tissue specimens were inconsistent with the cortisol blood level measured in the patients, as were those measured in embryonic tissues with the acknowledged blood and adrenals cortisol levels at that stage of life. Thus cortisol may be measured by RIA and by chromatography in sound tissues, while the values obtained in the pancreas, in corrupted tissues, and in embryonal viscera do not represent the hormonal milieu, but are likely artifacts due to impeachment of the diagnostic system. PMID:8884541

  11. Enhanced Lung Epithelial Specification of Human iPSCs on Decellularized Lung Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Sarah E.; Ren, Xi; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Guyette, Jacques P.; Mou, Hongmei; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Mathisen, Douglas J.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Ott, Harald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Whole lung scaffolds can be created by perfusion decellularization of cadaveric donor lungs. The resulting matrices can then be recellularized to regenerate functional organs. This study evaluates the capacity of acellular lung scaffolds to support recellularization with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived lung progenitors. Methods Whole rat and human lungs were decellularized by constant-pressure perfusion with 0.1% SDS solution. Resulting lung scaffolds were either cryosectioned into slices or left intact. Human iPSCs were differentiated to definitive endoderm, anteriorized to a foregut fate, and then ventralized to an Nkx2.1-expressing population. Cells were seeded onto slices and whole lungs, which were maintained under constant-perfusion biomimetic culture. Lineage specification was assessed by quantitative PCR and immunofluorescent staining. Regenerated left lungs were transplanted in orthotopic position. Results Activin-A treatment followed by TGF-β inhibition induced differentiation of human iPSCs to anterior foregut endoderm as confirmed by FOXA2, SOX17, and SOX2 expression. Cells cultured on decellularized lung slices demonstrated proliferation and lineage commitment after 5 days. Nkx2.1-expressing cells were identified at 40–60% efficiency. Within whole lung scaffolds and under perfusion culture, cells further up-regulated Nkx2.1 expression. After orthotopic transplantation, grafts were perfused and ventilated via host vasculature and airways. Conclusions Decellularized lung matrix supports the culture and lineage commitment of human iPSC-derived lung progenitor cells. Whole organ scaffolds and biomimetic culture enable co-seeding of iPSC-derived endothelial and epithelial progenitors and enhance early lung fate. Orthotopic transplantation may enable further in vivo graft maturation. PMID:25149047

  12. Comparison of DNA adducts from exposure to complex mixtures in various human tissues and experimental systems

    PubMed Central

    Lewtas, Joellen; Mumford, Judy; Everson, Richard B.; Hulka, Barbara; Wilcosky, Tim; Kozumbo, Walter; Thompson, Claudia; George, Michael; Dobiáš, Lubomir; Šrám, Radim; Li, Xueming; Gallagher, Jane

    1993-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic compounds emitted from tobacco smoke are compared to industrial pollution sources (e.g., coke ovens and aluminum smelters), smoky coal burning, and urban air pollution. Exposures to coke oven emissions and smoky coal, both potent rodent skin tumor initiators and lung carcinogens in humans, result in high levels of DNA adducts compared to tobacco smoke in the in vitro calf thymus DNA model system, in cultured lymphocytes, and in the mouse skin assay. Using tobacco smoke as a model in human studies, we have compared relative DNA adduct levels detected in blood lymphocytes, placental tissue, bronchoalveolar lung lavage cells, sperm, and autopsy tissues of smokers and nonsmokers. Adduct levels in DNA isolated from smokers were highest in human heart and lung tissue with smaller but detectable differences in placental tissue and lung lavage cells. Comparison of the DNA adduct levels resulting from human exposure to different complex mixtures shows that emissions from coke ovens, aluminum smelters, and smoky coal result in higher DNA adduct levels than tobacco smoke exposure. These studies suggest that humans exposed to complex combustion mixtures will have higher DNA adduct levels in target cells (e.g., lung) as compared to nontarget cells (e.g., lymphocytes) and that the adduct levels will be dependent on the genotoxic and DNA adduct-forming potency of the mixture. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 1.FIGURE 2.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 4. PMID:8319665

  13. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  14. Bag-of-features approach for improvement of lung tissue classification in diffuse lung disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Noriji; Fukui, Motofumi; Isozaki, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    Many automated techniques have been proposed to classify diffuse lung disease patterns. Most of the techniques utilize texture analysis approaches with second and higher order statistics, and show successful classification result among various lung tissue patterns. However, the approaches do not work well for the patterns with inhomogeneous texture distribution within a region of interest (ROI), such as reticular and honeycombing patterns, because the statistics can only capture averaged feature over the ROI. In this work, we have introduced the bag-of-features approach to overcome this difficulty. In the approach, texture images are represented as histograms or distributions of a few basic primitives, which are obtained by clustering local image features. The intensity descriptor and the Scale Invariant Feature Transformation (SIFT) descriptor are utilized to extract the local features, which have significant discriminatory power due to their specificity to a particular image class. In contrast, the drawback of the local features is lack of invariance under translation and rotation. We improved the invariance by sampling many local regions so that the distribution of the local features is unchanged. We evaluated the performance of our system in the classification task with 5 image classes (ground glass, reticular, honeycombing, emphysema, and normal) using 1109 ROIs from 211 patients. Our system achieved high classification accuracy of 92.8%, which is superior to that of the conventional system with the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) feature especially for inhomogeneous texture patterns.

  15. Relevance of particle-induced rat lung tumors for assessing lung carcinogenic hazard and human lung cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1997-01-01

    Rats and other rodents are exposed by inhalation to identify agents that might present hazards for lung cancer in humans exposed by inhalation. In some cases, the results are used in attempts to develop quantitative estimates of human lung cancer risk. This report reviews evidence for the usefulness of the rat for evaluation of lung cancer hazards from inhaled particles. With the exception of nickel sulfate, particulate agents thought to be human lung carcinogens cause lung tumors in rats exposed by inhalation. The rat is more sensitive to carcinogenesis from nonfibrous particles than mice or Syrian hamsters, which have both produced false negatives. However, rats differ from mice and nonhuman primates in both the pattern of particle retention in the lung and alveolar epithelial hyperplastic responses to chronic particle exposure. Present evidence warrants caution in extrapolation from the lung tumor response of rats to inhaled particles to human lung cancer hazard, and there is considerable uncertainty in estimating unit risks for humans from rat data. It seems appropriate to continue using rats in inhalation carcinogenesis assays of inhaled particles, but the upper limit of exposure concentrations must be set carefully to avoid false-positive results. A positive finding in both rats and mice would give greater confidence that an agent presents a carcinogenic hazard to man, and both rats and mice should be used if the agent is a gas or vapor. There is little justification for including Syrian hamsters in assays of the intrapulmonary carcinogenicity of inhaled agents. PMID:9400748

  16. Activation of the Canonical Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Pathway during Lung Morphogenesis and Adult Lung Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sountoulidis, Alexandros; Stavropoulos, Athanasios; Giaglis, Stavros; Apostolou, Eirini; Monteiro, Rui; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.; Chen, Huaiyong; Stripp, Barry R.; Mummery, Christine; Andreakos, Evangelos; Sideras, Paschalis

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) has been implicated in early lung development, adult lung homeostasis and tissue-injury repair. However, the precise mechanism of action and the spatio-temporal pattern of BMP-signaling during these processes remains inadequately described. To address this, we have utilized a transgenic line harboring a BMP-responsive eGFP-reporter allele (BRE-eGFP) to construct the first detailed spatiotemporal map of canonical BMP-pathway activation during lung development, homeostasis and adult-lung injury repair. We demonstrate that during the pseudoglandular stage, when branching morphogenesis progresses in the developing lung, canonical BMP-pathway is active mainly in the vascular network and the sub-epithelial smooth muscle layer of the proximal airways. Activation of the BMP-pathway becomes evident in epithelial compartments only after embryonic day (E) 14.5 primarily in cells negative for epithelial-lineage markers, located in the proximal portion of the airway-tree, clusters adjacent to neuro-epithelial-bodies (NEBs) and in a substantial portion of alveolar epithelial cells. The pathway becomes activated in isolated E12.5 mesenchyme-free distal epithelial buds cultured in Matrigel suggesting that absence of reporter activity in these regions stems from a dynamic cross-talk between endoderm and mesenchyme. Epithelial cells with activated BMP-pathway are enriched in progenitors capable of forming colonies in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. As lung morphogenesis approaches completion, eGFP-expression declines and in adult lung its expression is barely detectable. However, upon tissue-injury, either with naphthalene or bleomycin, the canonical BMP-pathways is re-activated, in bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells respectively, in a manner reminiscent to early lung development and in tissue areas where reparatory progenitor cells reside. Our studies illustrate the dynamic activation of canonical BMP-pathway during lung

  17. Quantitative Anatomy of the Growing Lungs in the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Szpinda, Michał; Siedlaczek, Waldemar; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Badura, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Using anatomical, digital, and statistical methods we examined the three-dimensional growth of the lungs in 67 human fetuses aged 16–25 weeks. The lung dimensions revealed no sex differences. The transverse and sagittal diameters and the base circumference were greater in the right lungs while the lengths of anterior and posterior margins and the lung height were greater in the left lungs. The best-fit curves for all the lung parameters were natural logarithmic models. The transverse-to-sagittal diameter ratio remained stable and averaged 0.56 ± 0.08 and 0.52 ± 0.08 for the right and left lungs, respectively. For the right and left lungs, the transverse diameter-to-height ratio significantly increased from 0.74 ± 0.09 to 0.92 ± 0.08 and from 0.56 ± 0.07 to 0.79 ± 0.09, respectively. The sagittal diameter-to-height ratio significantly increased from 1.41 ± 0.23 to 1.66 ± 0.18 in the right lung, and from 1.27 ± 0.17 to 1.48 ± 0.22 in the left lung. In the fetal lungs, their proportionate increase in transverse and sagittal diameters considerably accelerates with relation to the lung height. The lung dimensions in the fetus are relevant in the evaluation of the normative pulmonary growth and the diagnosis of pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:26413517

  18. Combinational feature optimization for classification of lung tissue images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Zhukov, Tatyana; Zhang, Jianying; Tockman, Melvyn; Qian, Wei

    2010-03-01

    A novel approach to feature optimization for classification of lung carcinoma using tissue images is presented. The methodology uses a combination of three characteristics of computational features: F-measure, which is a representation of each feature towards classification, inter-correlation between features and pathology based information. The metadata provided from pathological parameters is used for mapping between computational features and biological information. Multiple regression analysis maps each category of features based on how pathology information is correlated with the size and location of cancer. Relatively the computational features represented the tumor size better than the location of the cancer. Based on the three criteria associated with the features, three sets of feature subsets with individual validation are evaluated to select the optimum feature subset. Based on the results from the three stages, the knowledgebase produces the best subset of features. An improvement of 5.5% was observed for normal Vs all abnormal cases with Az value of 0.731 and 74/114 correctly classified. The best Az value of 0.804 with 66/84 correct classification and improvement of 21.6% was observed for normal Vs adenocarcinoma.

  19. Design and Synthesis of an Artificial Pulmonary Pleura for High Throughput Studies in Acellular Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Fenn, Spencer L.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Marks, Elliot R.; Borg, Zachary; Saunders, Patrick; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Whole organ decellularization of complex organs, such as lungs, presents a unique opportunity for use of acellular scaffolds for ex vivo tissue engineering or for studying cell-extracellular matrix interactions ex vivo. A growing body of literature investigating decellularizing and recellularizing rodent lungs has provided important proof of concept models and rodent lungs are readily available for high throughput studies. In contrast, comparable progress in large animal and human lungs has been impeded owing to more limited availability and difficulties in handling larger tissue. While the use of smaller segments of acellular large animal or human lungs would maximize usage from a single lung, excision of small acellular segments compromises the integrity of the pleural layer, leaving the terminal ends of blood vessels and airways exposed. We have developed a novel pleural coating using non-toxic ionically crosslinked alginate or photocrosslinked methacrylated alginate which can be applied to excised acellular lung segments, permits inflation of small segments, and significantly enhances retention of cells inoculated through cannulated airways or blood vessels. Further, photocrosslinking methacrylated alginate, using eosin Y and triethanolamine (TEOA) at 530nm wavelength, results in a mechanically stable pleural coating that permits effective cyclic 3-dimensional stretch, i.e. mechanical ventilation, of individual segments. PMID:25750684

  20. Characterizing and Diminishing Autofluorescence in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Human Respiratory Tissue.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Richter, Anke; Becker, Steven; Moyer, Jenna E; Sandouk, Aline; Skinner, Jeff; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-04-10

    Tissue autofluorescence frequently hampers visualization of immunofluorescent markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded respiratory tissues. We assessed nine treatments reported to have efficacy in reducing autofluorescence in other tissue types. The three most efficacious were Eriochrome black T, Sudan black B and sodium borohydride, as measured using white light laser confocal Λ(2) (multi-lambda) analysis. We also assessed the impact of steam antigen retrieval and serum application on human tracheal tissue autofluorescence. Functionally fitting this Λ(2) data to 2-dimensional Gaussian surfaces revealed that steam antigen retrieval and serum application contribute minimally to autofluorescence and that the three treatments are disparately efficacious. Together, these studies provide a set of guidelines for diminishing autofluorescence in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human respiratory tissue. Additionally, these characterization techniques are transferable to similar questions in other tissue types, as demonstrated on frozen human liver tissue and paraffin-embedded mouse lung tissue fixed in different fixatives. PMID:24722432

  1. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  2. Cloning of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Walls, G. A.; Twentyman, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    We have carried out a comparison of two different methods for cloning human lung cancer cells. The method of Courtenay & Mills (1978) generally gave higher plating efficiencies (PE) than the method of Carney et al. (1980). The number of colonies increased with incubation time in both methods and the weekly medium replenishment in the Courtenay method was advantageous for longer incubation times of several weeks. In the Courtenay method, the use of August rat red blood cells (RBC) and low oxygen tension were both found to be necessary factors for maximum plating efficiency. The usefulness of heavily irradiated feeder cells in improving PE is less certain; each cell type may have its own requirement. PMID:3904799

  3. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  4. Evidence that human class Theta glutathione S-transferase T1-1 can catalyse the activation of dichloromethane, a liver and lung carcinogen in the mouse. Comparison of the tissue distribution of GST T1-1 with that of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST in human.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, P J; Pulford, D J; Harrison, D J; Green, T; Hayes, J D

    1997-01-01

    The cDNA encoding human glutathione S-transferase (GST) T1 has been expressed as two recombinant forms in Escherichia coli that could be purified by affinity chromatography on either IgG-Sepharose or nickel-agarose; one form of the transferase was synthesized from the pALP 1 expression vector as a Staphylococcus aureus protein A fusion, whereas the other form was synthesized from the pET-20b expression vector as a C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged recombinant. The yields of the two purified recombinant proteins from E. coli cultures were approx. 15 mg/l for the protein A fusion and 25 mg/l for the C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged GST T1-1. The purified recombinant proteins were catalytically active, although the protein A fusion was typically only 5-30% as active as the histidine-tagged GST. Both recombinant forms could catalyse the conjugation of glutathione with the model substrates 1,2-epoxy-3-(4'-nitrophenoxy)propane,4-nitrobenzyl chloride and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide but were inactive towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid and 1-menaphthyl sulphate. Recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to exhibit glutathione peroxidase activity and could catalyse the reduction of cumene hydroperoxide. In addition, recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to conjugate glutathione with dichloromethane, a pulmonary and hepatic carcinogen in the mouse. Immunoblotting with antibodies raised against different transferase isoenzymes showed that GST T1-1 is expressed in a large number of human organs in a tissue-specific fashion that differs from the pattern of expression of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST. Most significantly, GST T1-1 was found in only low levels in human pulmonary soluble extract of cells, suggesting that in man the lung has little capacity to activate the volatile dichloromethane. PMID:9307035

  5. Expression and clinicopathological implication of DcR3 in lung cancer tissues: a tissue microarray study with 365 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Luo, Jie; He, Rongquan; Huang, Wenting; Li, Zuyun; Li, Ping; Dang, Yiwu; Chen, Gang; Li, Shikang

    2016-01-01

    Background Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) has been reported to be involved in different cancers. However, few related researches have been accomplished on the role of DcR3 in lung cancer. Objective To explore the expression level and clinicopathological implication of DcR3 protein in lung cancer tissues. Materials and methods Immunohistochemistry was used to examine DcR3 protein expression in lung cancer (n=365) and normal lung tissues (n=26). The relationships between DcR3 expression and clinical parameters were further investigated. Furthermore, the diagnostic and clinicopathological value of DcR3 mRNA was analyzed based on The Cancer Genome Atlas database in lung cancer patients. Results Compared to normal lung tissues, DcR3 expression was significantly higher in lung cancer (P=0.007) tissues, including small-cell lung cancer (P=0.001) and non-small-cell lung cancer (P=0.008). In addition, DcR3 expression was related to tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P<0.001), tumor diameter (P=0.007), distant metastasis (P<0.001), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001) in lung cancers. When concerning non-small-cell lung cancer, consistent correlations between DcR3 expression and TNM stage (P<0.001), tumor diameter (P=0.019), distant metastasis (P<0.001), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001) were found. Simultaneously, in small-cell lung cancer, TNM stage (P=0.004) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.005) were also associated with DcR3 expression. Additionally, receiver operator characteristic curve revealed that the area under curve (AUC) of DcR3 was 0.637 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.531–0.742) for lung cancer. Furthermore, DcR3 was overexpressed in both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma tissues than in noncancerous lung tissues (all P<0.0001) based on the data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. AUC of DcR3 was 0.726 (95% CI 0.644–0.788) for lung adenocarcinoma patients and 0.647 (95% CI 0.566–0.728) for squamous cell carcinoma patients. DcR3 expression was also related to

  6. DETECTION OF HUMAN LUNG EPITHELIA CELL GROWTH FACTORS PRODUCED BY A LUNG CARCINOMA CELL LINE: USE IN CULTURE OF PRIMARY SOLID LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum-free medium conditioned for 72 h by a human undifferentiated adenocarcinoma of lung, Cal u 6, stimulated the colony formation of normal human bronchial epithelial cells, newly cultured cells from human solid lung tumors, and established human lung tumor cell lines, includin...

  7. Expression of a phosphorylated form of ATF4 in lung and non-small cell lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chui-Feng; Miao, Yuan; Lin, Xu-Yong; Zhang, Di; Wang, En-Hua

    2014-01-01

    ATF4 is a member of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein family of basic zipper-containing proteins, a family of transcription factors phosphorylated at serines residues by protein kinase A. The family has been proved to be able to stimulate the transcription of the genes containing CRE elements. Elevated ATF4 expression was detected in some tumors including breast carcinoma compared to their corresponding nontumor tissues. p-ATF4 (ser 245), a phosphorylated form of ATF4 protein at serine 245 site, was believed to be an active type of this protein. However, its expression and clinical significance in malignant tumors including non-small cell lung cancer were not reported up to date. In the current study, we investigate the expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in non-small cell lung cancer using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. p-ATF4 (ser 245) immunostaining was detected in nucleus and cytoplasm in cancer cells and normal lung epithelial cells. Compared to bronchial epithelium and submucosal glands (total positive rate, 14.6% (12/82)), there was increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in non-small cell lung cancer cells (total positive rate, 42.7% (35/82)) (p < 0.05). In addition, increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM stages (III and IV) in non-small cell lung cancer (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescent staining confirmed nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in lung and cancer tissues, and also in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines including NCI-H157 and LTE cells. These results indicate that increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) may contribute to cancer development of non-small cell lung cancer and may be a potential cancer marker. PMID:23975372

  8. Tissue Specificity of Human Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kryukova, Olga V.; Tikhomirova, Victoria E.; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Evdokimov, Valery V.; Kalantarov, Gavreel F.; Trakht, Ilya N.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Gusakov, Alexander V.; Uporov, Igor V.; Kost, Olga A.; Danilov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), which metabolizes many peptides and plays a key role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling, as well as in reproductive functions, is expressed as a type-1 membrane glycoprotein on the surface of endothelial and epithelial cells. ACE also presents as a soluble form in biological fluids, among which seminal fluid being the richest in ACE content - 50-fold more than that in blood. Methods/Principal Findings We performed conformational fingerprinting of lung and seminal fluid ACEs using a set of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to 17 epitopes of human ACE and determined the effects of potential ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these two different ACEs. Patterns of mAbs binding to ACEs from lung and from seminal fluid dramatically differed, which reflects difference in the local conformations of these ACEs, likely due to different patterns of ACE glycosylation in the lung endothelial cells and epithelial cells of epididymis/prostate (source of seminal fluid ACE), confirmed by mass-spectrometry of ACEs tryptic digests. Conclusions Dramatic differences in the local conformations of seminal fluid and lung ACEs, as well as the effects of ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these ACEs, suggest different regulation of ACE functions and shedding from epithelial cells in epididymis and prostate and endothelial cells of lung capillaries. The differences in local conformation of ACE could be the base for the generation of mAbs distingushing tissue-specific ACEs. PMID:26600189

  9. Soft tissue metastases and lung cancer recurrence detected by Tc-99m depreotide scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Miliziano, John S; Bradley, Yong C

    2002-06-01

    A 63-year-old woman with previously treated stage I lung cancer was reexamined 5 years later for recurrence. A conventional work-up using computed tomographic scanning and transbronchial biopsy showed nothing abnormal. A Tc-99m depreotide scan, however, led to a noninvasive diagnosis of lung cancer recurrence with metastases, and it directed a noninvasive tissue diagnosis. PMID:12045431

  10. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  11. Lipogenesis in liver, lung and adipose tissue of rats fed with oleoylanilide.

    PubMed Central

    Casals, C; Garcia-Barreno, P; Municio, A M

    1983-01-01

    Oleoylanilide was administered orally to groups of rats according to different patterns. Subcellular fractionation of liver, lung and adipose tissue was then carried out in order to study the main enzyme activities involved in the lipogenesis. The observed findings indicate that adipose tissue and lung are the main target organs for the anilide, adipose tissue being involved in a general decrease of the enzyme activities, whereas transacylation reaction exhibits the most marked depletion of all the enzyme activities in the lung. The enzyme activities in liver were not markedly affected by this oral administration, although some data support the existence of a latent liver toxicity. These data suggest that oleoylanilide has the capacity to alter lipid metabolism of lung and adipose tissue to a considerable extent, whereas no major effect was produced in the liver. This different organ response could be related to the lymphatic gland via absorption of the substance. PMID:6882376

  12. Toxic effects of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the liver and lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, L; Yousefi Babadi, V; Espanani, H R

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are magnetic nanoparticles which have widespread application in MRI and heat therapy of cancer as contrast elements. They are also used effectively for drug and gene delivery because of effective penetrating to the cells and tissues. However, these features cause Fe2O3 nanoparticles have toxic effects that are not completely understood yet. In this study, effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on lung tissue in adult male Wistar rats were studied. We used pulmonary inhalation method for nanoparticle administration and used ether as a helper. Our results showed administered nanoparticles penetrated to the circulation and rapidly reached to liver and created serious inflammation in lung and liver tissues. This study used two different nanoparticle doses (20 and 40 mg/kg) and two exposing numbers (7 and 14 times). Results showed significant enhancement of free radicals and reduction of the GSH in lung tissue. Histological studies showed nanoparticle treatment of rats caused pulmonary emphysema, interstitial hyperemia and inflammation in lungs. By increasing the administrated dose lung tissue showed all of the mentioned symptoms with increased intensity. Nanoparticle exposition causes presence of neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils in the lung tissue that confirmed there is a serious pathologic condition. Hepatic cells injuries cause penetration of the hepatic enzymes in to the blood serum (Tab. 2, Fig. 4, Ref. 32). Text in PDF www.elis.sk. PMID:26084739

  13. Low levels of tissue factor lead to alveolar hemorrhage, potentiating murine acute lung injury and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Bastarache, J.A.; Sebag, S. C.; Clune, J.K.; Grove, B.S.; Lawson, W.E.; Janz, D. R.; Roberts, L. J.; Dworski, R; Mackman, N.; Ware, L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Systemic blockade of Tissue Factor (TF) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) in animal models of sepsis but the effects of global TF deficiency are unknown. Hypothesis We used mice with complete knockout of mouse TF and low levels (~1%) of human TF (LTF mice) to test the hypothesis that global TF deficiency attenuates lung inflammation in direct lung injury. Methods LTF mice were treated with 10 μg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle administered by direct intratracheal (IT) injection and studied at 24 hours. Results Contrary to our hypothesis, LTF mice had increased lung inflammation and injury as measured by bronchoalveolar lavage cell count (3.4 × 105 WT LPS versus 3.3 × 105 LTF LPS, p=0.947) and protein (493 μg/ml WT LPS versus 1014 μg/ml LTF LPS, p=0.006), proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12, p<0.035 WT LPS versus LTF LPS) and histology compared to wild type mice. LTF mice also had increased hemorrhage and free hemoglobin in the airspace accompanied by increased oxidant stress as measured by lipid peroxidation products (F2-Isoprostanes and Isofurans). Conclusions These findings indicate that global TF deficiency does not confer protection in a direct lung injury model. Rather, TF deficiency causes increased intra-alveolar hemorrhage following LPS leading to increased lipid peroxidation. Strategies to globally inhibit tissue factor may be deleterious in patients with ALI. PMID:23033361

  14. COMPARISON OF LUNG ANTIOXIDANT LEVELS IN HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Basal lung concentrations of ascorbic acid (AA), nonprotein sulfhydryls (NPSH), and a-tocopherol (a-T) were determined in rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, hamsters, mice, domestic pigs and sheep, and in human lung samples obtained from cancer surgery patients. Significant differences ...

  15. DEPOSITION PATTERNS OF POLYDISPERSE AEROSOLS WITHIN HUMAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of airborne pharmaceuticals in the treatment of lung diseases can may be improved with the selective deposition of inhaled drugs. erein, a validated mathematical model is used to examine the effects of aerosol polydispersity upon deposition in the human lung. ocalize...

  16. MicroRNA Profile of Lung Tumor Tissues Is Associated with a High Risk Plasma miRNA Signature.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Orazio; Verri, Carla; Pastorino, Ugo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Boeri, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Many studies have reported that alterations in miRNA expression are involved in several human tumors. We have previously identified a circulating miRNA signature classifier (MSC) able to discriminate lung cancer with more aggressive features. In the present work, microarray miRNA profiling of tumor tissues collected from 19 lung cancer patients with an available MSC result were perform in order to find a possible association between miRNA expression and the MSC risk level. Eleven tissue mature miRNAs and six miRNA precursors were observed to be associated with the plasma MSC risk level of patients. Not one of these miRNAs was included in the MSC algorithm. A pathway enrichment analysis revealed a role of these miRNA in the main pathways determining lung cancer aggressiveness. Overall, these findings add to the knowledge that tissue and plasma miRNAs behave as excellent diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, which may find rapid application in clinical settings. PMID:27600084

  17. Expression of Carcinoembryonic Cell Adhesion Molecule 6 and Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Lungs of Human Infants with Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Linda W; Gonzalez, Robert; Barrette, Anne Marie; Wang, Ping; Dobbs, Leland; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-12-01

    The membrane protein carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM6) is expressed in the epithelium of various tissues, participating in innate immune defense, cell proliferation and differentiation, with overexpression in gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic and lung tumors. It is developmentally and hormonally regulated in fetal human lung, with an apparent increased production in preterm infants with respiratory failure. To further examine the expression and cell localization of CEACAM6, we performed immunohistochemical and biochemical studies in lung specimens from infants with and without chronic lung disease. CEACAM6 protein and mRNA were increased ~4-fold in lungs from infants with chronic lung disease as compared with controls. By immunostaining, CEACAM6 expression was markedly increased in the lung parenchyma of infants and children with a variety of chronic lung disorders, localizing to hyperplastic epithelial cells with a ~7-fold elevated proliferative rate by PCNA staining. Some of these cells also co-expressed membrane markers of both type I and type II cells, which is not observed in normal postnatal lung, suggesting they are transitional epithelial cells. We suggest that CEACAM6 is both a marker of lung epithelial progenitor cells and a contributor to the proliferative response after injury due to its anti-apoptotic and cell adhesive properties. PMID:26374831

  18. Coming to terms with tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in the lung.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Y S; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2015-10-01

    Lung diseases such as emphysema, interstitial fibrosis, and pulmonary vascular diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality, but despite substantial mechanistic understanding, clinical management options for them are limited, with lung transplantation being implemented at end stages. However, limited donor lung availability, graft rejection, and long-term problems after transplantation are major hurdles to lung transplantation being a panacea. Bioengineering the lung is an exciting and emerging solution that has the ultimate aim of generating lung tissues and organs for transplantation. In this article we capture and review the current state of the art in lung bioengineering, from the multimodal approaches, to creating anatomically appropriate lung scaffolds that can be recellularized to eventually yield functioning, transplant-ready lungs. Strategies for decellularizing mammalian lungs to create scaffolds with native extracellular matrix components vs. de novo generation of scaffolds using biocompatible materials are discussed. Strengths vs. limitations of recellularization using different cell types of various pluripotency such as embryonic, mesenchymal, and induced pluripotent stem cells are highlighted. Current hurdles to guide future research toward achieving the clinical goal of transplantation of a bioengineered lung are discussed. PMID:26254424

  19. NEW TECHNIQUES FOR IMAGING AND ANALYZING LUNG TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent technological revolution in the field of imaging techniques has provided pathologists and toxicologists with an expanding repertoire of analytical techniques for studying the interaction between the lung and the various exogenous materials to which it is exposed. Analy...

  20. Comparative Microscopic Study of Human and Rat Lungs After Overexposure to Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    ANTONINI, JAMES M.; ROBERTS, JENNY R.; SCHWEGLER-BERRY, DIANE; MERCER, ROBERT R.

    2015-01-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2 mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  1. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  2. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  3. Microstructural Analysis of Peripheral Lung Tissue through CPMG Inter-Echo Time R2 Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Felix T; Kampf, Thomas; Buschle, Lukas R; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Ziener, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    Since changes in lung microstructure are important indicators for (early stage) lung pathology, there is a need for quantifiable information of diagnostically challenging cases in a clinical setting, e.g. to evaluate early emphysematous changes in peripheral lung tissue. Considering alveoli as spherical air-spaces surrounded by a thin film of lung tissue allows deriving an expression for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill transverse relaxation rates R2 with a dependence on inter-echo time, local air-tissue volume fraction, diffusion coefficient and alveolar diameter, within a weak field approximation. The model relaxation rate exhibits the same hyperbolic tangent dependency as seen in the Luz-Meiboom model and limiting cases agree with Brooks et al. and Jensen et al. In addition, the model is tested against experimental data for passively deflated rat lungs: the resulting mean alveolar radius of RA = 31.46 ± 13.15 μm is very close to the literature value (∼34 μm). Also, modeled radii obtained from relaxometer measurements of ageing hydrogel foam (that mimics peripheral lung tissue) are in good agreement with those obtained from μCT images of the same foam (mean relative error: 0.06 ± 0.01). The model's ability to determine the alveolar radius and/or air volume fraction will be useful in quantifying peripheral lung microstructure. PMID:26544068

  4. Microstructural Analysis of Peripheral Lung Tissue through CPMG Inter-Echo Time R2 Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Felix T.; Kampf, Thomas; Buschle, Lukas R.; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Ziener, Christian H.

    2015-01-01

    Since changes in lung microstructure are important indicators for (early stage) lung pathology, there is a need for quantifiable information of diagnostically challenging cases in a clinical setting, e.g. to evaluate early emphysematous changes in peripheral lung tissue. Considering alveoli as spherical air-spaces surrounded by a thin film of lung tissue allows deriving an expression for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill transverse relaxation rates R2 with a dependence on inter-echo time, local air-tissue volume fraction, diffusion coefficient and alveolar diameter, within a weak field approximation. The model relaxation rate exhibits the same hyperbolic tangent dependency as seen in the Luz-Meiboom model and limiting cases agree with Brooks et al. and Jensen et al. In addition, the model is tested against experimental data for passively deflated rat lungs: the resulting mean alveolar radius of RA = 31.46 ± 13.15 μm is very close to the literature value (∼34 μm). Also, modeled radii obtained from relaxometer measurements of ageing hydrogel foam (that mimics peripheral lung tissue) are in good agreement with those obtained from μCT images of the same foam (mean relative error: 0.06 ± 0.01). The model’s ability to determine the alveolar radius and/or air volume fraction will be useful in quantifying peripheral lung microstructure. PMID:26544068

  5. Determination of U in Japanese human tissues by the fission track method

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; Yamakawa, A.; Seki, R.; Ikeda, N.

    1985-11-01

    Uranium in several human tissues (lung, liver, kidney, muscle, spleen, heart, cerebrum and bones) from Japanese in the Tokyo area was determined by the fission track method. The average U content was the highest in lung with 1.70 ppb wet, and decreased in the order of lung greater than bones greater than heart and muscle greater than kidney greater than liver and spleen, showing markedly different tendencies from the description in the 1982 UNSCEAR Report (UNSCEAR82). Correlations were observed between U content in lung and in other tissues. These data suggest that the contribution of inhalation of U to its total intake is not negligible. The total body burden of U for the ICRP Reference Man (ICRP74) was estimated to be about 40 micrograms, which is rather small compared with the average normal burden of 90 micrograms currently accepted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP79).

  6. Frequency domain optical tomography in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuqi; Wang, Yao; Pei, Yaling; Zhu, Wenwu; Hu, Jenhun; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, a reconstruction algorithm for frequency-domain optical tomography in human tissue is presented. A fast and efficient multigrid finite difference (MGFD) method is adopted as a forward solver to obtain the simulated detector responses and the required imaging operator. The solutions obtained form MGFD method for 3D problems with weakly discontinuous cocoefficients are compared with analyzed solutions to determine the accuracy of the numerical method. Simultaneous reconstruction of both absorption and scattering coefficients for tissue-like media is accomplished by solving a perturbation equation using the Born approximation. This solution is obtained by a conjugate gradient descent method with Tikhonov regularization. Two examples are given to show the quality of the reconstruction results. Both involve the examination of anatomically accurate optical models of tissue derived from segmented 3D magnetic resonance images to which have been assigned optical coefficients to the designated tissue types. One is a map of a female breast containing two small 'added pathologies', such as tumors. The other is a map of the brain containing a 'local bleeding' area, representing a hemorrhage. The reconstruction results show that the algorithm is computationally practical and can yield qualitatively correct geometry of the objects embedded in the simulated human tissue. Acceptable results are obtaiend even when 10% noise is present in the data.

  7. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2011-01-01

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Z(eff). These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues. With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials for skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, cortical bone, and lung tissue are also discussed. It is observed that water and MS20 are good tissue equivalent materials for skeletal muscle in the extended energy range. PMID:22089011

  8. The potential for resident lung mesenchymal stem cells to promote functional tissue regeneration: understanding microenvironmental cues.

    PubMed

    Foronjy, Robert F; Majka, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases. PMID:23626909

  9. Expression and clinical significance of A‐kinase anchor protein 4 in lung adenocarcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kang; Yu, Xiao‐Yun; Yu, Zhuang; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The A‐kinase anchor proteins (AKAP) are a growing family of scaffolding proteins involved in the occurrence, proliferation, and metastasis of tumors by controlling intracellular signals. In this study, the expression and significance of AKAP4 were analyzed in patients with lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent non‐cancerous tissues. Methods Using reverse transcriptase‐polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, AKAP4 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression levels were measured in 108 cases of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent non‐cancerous tissues. Results AKAP4 mRNA and protein were expressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, but not in adjacent non‐cancerous tissues. The expression of AKAP4 mRNA and protein was closely associated with lymphatic metastasis (P < 0.05), but had no relationship with stage, differentiation degree, gender, age or smoking (P > 0.05). AKAP4 expression had an adverse effect on the overall survival rate (P < 0.05). Conclusion The expression of AKAP4 was high in lung adenocarcinoma tissue, which may be closely related to the lymphatic metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma. AKAP4 may be a novel lung adenocarcinoma molecule marker and a predictor of poor prognosis. PMID:27148411

  10. Radiographic comparison of human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Michels, D B; Friedman, P J; West, J B

    1979-10-01

    Human lung shape was measured during zero gravity (0 G) to decide whether the normal vertical regional differences in ventilation are due directly to distortion of the elastic lung by its own weight, or instead, due indirectly to the effect of gravity on the shape of the rib cage and diaphragm. This was important because we previously established that weightlessness virtually abolishes the normal topographical inequality of ventilation (J. Appl. Physiol.: Respirat. Environ. Exercise Physiol. 45: 987-998, 1978). Chest radiographs were made after 10 s of a weightless flight trajectory aboard a NASA-Ames Research Center Learjet in both posterior-anterior and left lateral projections on five seated volunteers at residual volume, functional residual capacity, and total lung capacity. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle, and lower lung regions. We found no significant differences between any of the normal gravity (1 G) and o G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at o G (mean changes generally less than 3% or about 0.5 cm). By contrast, Grassino et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 39: 997-1003, 1975) found no change in the vertical distribution of ventilation after voluntarily changing lung dimensions by more than 1 cm by moving the abdomen in or out. We conclude that gravity produces the topographical distribution of ventilation in the upright human lung by distorting the elastic lung tissue within the chest rather than by altering the shape of the rib cage and diaphragm. PMID:511694

  11. COMPUTER MODEL OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY TO COMPLEMENT SPECT ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol therapy protocols could be improved if inhaled pharmacologic drugs were selectively deposited within the human lung. he targeted delivery to specific sites, such as receptors and sensitive airway cells, would enhance the efficacies of airborne pharmaceuticals. he high res...

  12. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps)☆

    PubMed Central

    Mancia, Annalaura; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; McFee, Wayne E.; Newton, Danforth A.; Baatz, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a “living” tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. PMID:21501697

  13. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  14. Optical imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact rat lungs in two models of pulmonary oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Maleki, Sepideh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Audi, Said; Ranji, Mahsa

    2012-04-01

    Ventilation with enhanced fractions of O(2) (hyperoxia) is a common and necessary treatment for hypoxemia in patients with lung failure, but prolonged exposure to hyperoxia causes lung injury. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung tissue is common in lung transplant or crush injury to the chest. These conditions are associated with apoptosis and decreased survival of lung tissue. The objective of this work is to use cryoimaging to evaluate the effect of exposure to hyperoxia and IR injury on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in rats. The autofluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are electron carriers in ATP generation. These intrinsic fluorophores were imaged for rat lungs using low-temperature fluorescence imaging (cryoimaging). Perfused lungs from four groups of rats were studied: normoxia (control), control perfused with an mitochondrial complex IV inhibitor (potassium cyanide, KCN), rats exposed to hyperoxia (85% O(2)) for seven days, and from rats subjected to lung IR in vivo 24 hours prior to study. Each lung was sectioned sequentially in the transverse direction, and the images were used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In KCN perfused lungs the respiratory chain was more reduced, whereas hyperoxic and IR lung tissue have a more oxidized respiratory chain than control lung tissue, consistent with previously measured mitochondrial dysfunction in both hyperoxic and IR lungs. PMID:22559688

  15. Optical imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact rat lungs in two models of pulmonary oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Maleki, Sepideh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Audi, Said; Ranji, Mahsa

    2012-04-01

    Ventilation with enhanced fractions of O2 (hyperoxia) is a common and necessary treatment for hypoxemia in patients with lung failure, but prolonged exposure to hyperoxia causes lung injury. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung tissue is common in lung transplant or crush injury to the chest. These conditions are associated with apoptosis and decreased survival of lung tissue. The objective of this work is to use cryoimaging to evaluate the effect of exposure to hyperoxia and IR injury on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in rats. The autofluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are electron carriers in ATP generation. These intrinsic fluorophores were imaged for rat lungs using low-temperature fluorescence imaging (cryoimaging). Perfused lungs from four groups of rats were studied: normoxia (control), control perfused with an mitochondrial complex IV inhibitor (potassium cyanide, KCN), rats exposed to hyperoxia (85% O2) for seven days, and from rats subjected to lung IR in vivo 24 hours prior to study. Each lung was sectioned sequentially in the transverse direction, and the images were used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In KCN perfused lungs the respiratory chain was more reduced, whereas hyperoxic and IR lung tissue have a more oxidized respiratory chain than control lung tissue, consistent with previously measured mitochondrial dysfunction in both hyperoxic and IR lungs.

  16. Towards a porous media model of the human lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGroot, Christopher T.; Straatman, Anthony G.

    2012-05-01

    In this article, progress towards building a complete porous media model of the human lung is discussed. While the recent trend in computational fluid dynamics studies of airflow in the human lung has been to continually increase the size and detail of the airway tree under consideration, it is proposed in this work that simulating flow in the human lung as a coupled fluid-porous system is an effective method to simulate the flow in the whole lung. Under the proposed modeling paradigm, a truncated airway tree constitutes a fluid region which is coupled to a porous region that represents the remainder of the lung volume, containing small airways and alveoli. The first part of this work describes pore-level simulations conducted in an alveolated duct geometry, which are present in large quantities in the human lung, to determine its permeability. Next, volume-averaged simulations incorporating the results of the pore-level simulations and using a realistic lung geometry based on computed tomography images are discussed along with future directions for this work.

  17. Lung tissue engineering and preservation of alveolar microstructure using a novel casting method.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, A-M; Sabetkish, N; Sabetkish, S; Tavangar, S M; Hossein Beigi, R S; Talebi, M A; Akbarzadeh, A; Nikfarjam, L

    2015-02-01

    We used a rat model to decellularize and seed alveolar cells on a three-dimensional lung scaffold to preserve alveolar microarchitecture. We verified the preservation of terminal respiratory structure by casting and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the casts after decellularization. Whole lungs were obtained from 12 healthy Sprague-Dawley rats, cannulated through the trachea under sterile conditions, and decellularized using a detergent-based method. Casting of both natural and decellularized lungs was performed to verify preservation of the inner microstructure of scaffolds for further cell seeding. Alveolar cell seeding was performed using green fluorescent protein (GFP) lung cells and non-GFP lung cells, and a peristaltic pump. We assessed cell seeding using histological and immunohistochemical staining, and enzymatic evaluation. All cellular components were removed completely from the scaffolds, and histological staining and SEM of casts were used to verify the preservation of tissue structure. Tensile tests verified conservation of biomechanical properties. The hydroxyproline content of decellularized lungs was similar to native lung. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluations showed effective cell seeding on decellularized matrices. Enzymatic measurement of trypsin and alpha 1 antitrypsin suggested the potential functional properties of the regenerated lungs. Casts produced by our method have satisfactory geometrical properties for further cell seeding of lung scaffolds. Preservation of micro-architecture and terminal alveoli that was confirmed by SEM of lung casts increases the probability of an effective cell seeding process. PMID:25268847

  18. Engineering tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, CM; Azarin, SM; Ji, L; De Pablo, JJ; Palecek, SP

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) biology now offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineers, as these cells are capable of proliferating indefinitely and differentiating to many clinically relevant cell types. Novel culture methods capable of exerting spatial and temporal control over the stem cell microenvironment allow for more efficient expansion of hESCs, and significant advances have been made toward improving our understanding of the biophysical and biochemical cues that direct stem cell fate choices. Effective production of lineage specific progenitors or terminally differentiated cells enables researchers to incorporate hESC derivatives into engineered tissue constructs. Here, we describe current efforts using hESCs as a cell source for tissue engineering applications, highlighting potential advantages of hESCs over current practices as well as challenges which must be overcome. PMID:18194458

  19. Persistent Human Cosavirus Infection in Lung Transplant Recipient, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Campanini, Giulia; Rovida, Francesca; Meloni, Federica; Cascina, Alessandro; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Piralla, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Human cosavirus is a novel picornavirus recently identified in feces from children in southern Asia. We report infection with human cosavirus in a patient in the Mediterranean area. The patient was an adult double lung transplant recipient who had chronic diarrhea associated with persistent infection with human cosavirus. PMID:24047954

  20. Toward in vivo lung's tissue incompressibility characterization for tumor motion modeling in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Samani, Abbas

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility parameter variations resulting from air content variation throughout respiration is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion is a major challenge in lung cancer radiotherapy, especially with external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion may lead to areas of radiation overdosage for normal tissue. Given the unavailability of imaging modality that can be used effectively for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer assisted approach based on tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. This approach involves lung biomechanical model where its fidelity depends on input tissue properties. This investigation shows that considering variable tissue incompressibility parameter is very important for predicting tumor motion accurately, hence improving the lung radiotherapy outcome. Methods: First, an in silico lung phantom study was conducted to demonstrate the importance of employing variable Poisson's ratio for tumor motion predication. After it was established that modeling this variability is critical for accurate tumor motion prediction, an optimization based technique was developed to estimate lung tissue Poisson's ratio as a function of respiration cycle time. In this technique, the Poisson's ratio and lung pressure value were varied systematically until optimal values were obtained, leading to maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT lung images. This technique was applied in an ex vivo porcine lung study where simulated images were constructed using the end exhale CT image and deformation fields obtained from the lung's FE modeling of each respiration time increment. To model the tissue, linear elastic and Marlow hyperelastic material models in conjunction with variable Poisson's ratio were used. Results: The phantom study showed that

  1. Alpha-dispersion in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2010-04-01

    Beta dispersion is found in living tissue in the kilohertz - megahertz range and is caused by the cellular structure of biological materials with low frequency properties caused by cell membranes. Alpha dispersion is found in the hertz range and the causes are not so well known. Alpha dispersions are the first to disappear when tissue dies. Tissue data have often been based upon excised specimen from animals and are therefore not necessarily representative for human tissue alpha dispersions. Here we present data obtained with non-invasive skin surface electrodes for different segments of the living human body. We found alpha dispersions in all cases; the ankle-wrist results had the smallest. Large alpha dispersions were found where the distance between the electrodes and muscle masses was small, e.g. on the calf. Further studies on electrode technique and reciprocity, electrode positioning, statistical variations, gender, age and bodily constitutions are necessary in order to reveal more about the alpha dispersion, its appearance and disappearance.

  2. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, D.A.; Roggli, V.L. )

    1989-05-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predicted nickel concentrations that were in the range of those of persons without known nickel exposure. Nickel is a suspected carcinogen and has been associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract cancer among nickel workers. However, before the nickel content of cigarettes can be implicated in the etiology of lung cancer, further studies are needed to evaluate the independent effects of smoking and exposure to nickel.

  3. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does notmore » improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.« less

  4. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does not improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.

  5. Multimodal imaging of lung tissue using optical coherence tomography and two photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Geissler, Stefan; Meissner, Sven; Schnabel, Christian; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    In the context of protective artificial ventilation strategies for patients with severe lung diseases, the contribution of ventilator settings to tissue changes on the alveolar level of the lung is still a question under debate. To understand the impact of respiratory settings as well as the dynamic process of respiration, high-resolution monitoring and visualization of the dynamics of lung alveoli are essential. An instrument allowing 3D imaging of lung tissue as well as imaging of functional constituents, such as elastin fibers, in in situ experimental conditions is presented in this study using a combination of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and fiber-guided two photon microscopy. In a comparative study, fixed lung tissue, stained with sulforhodamine B for elastin fibers, was used to illustrate the ability of fiber-guided two photon excitation and single photon excitation for the visualization of elastin fibers within the tissue. Together with the fast 3D imaging capability of OCT, a new tool is given for the monitoring of alveolar lung dynamics in future in vivo experiments.

  6. Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Tumor, Adjacent, and Normal Tissues of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhenzhu; Shen, Yanting; Lu, Jiafeng; Xie, Xueying; Ge, Qinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major type of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression profiles of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma (AC), one major subtype of NSCLC. In this study, the miRNAs were detected in normal, adjacent, and tumor tissues by next-generation sequencing. Then the expression levels of differential miRNAs were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In the results, 259, 401, and 389 miRNAs were detected in tumor, adjacent, and normal tissues of pooled AC samples, respectively. In addition, for the first time we have found that miR-21-5p and miR-196a-5p were gradually upregulated from normal to adjacent to tumor tissues; miR-218-5p was gradually downregulated with 2-fold or greater change in AC tissues. These 3 miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Lastly, we predicted target genes of these 3 miRNAs and enriched the potential functions and regulatory pathways. The aberrant miR-21-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-218-5p may become biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. This research may be useful for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis and the study of pathology in lung cancer. PMID:27247934

  7. Lung tissue flap repairs esophagus defection with an inner chitosan tube stent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Shi, Wen-Jun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To repair the partial esophagus defect with a chitosan stent, a new esophageal prosthesis made of pulmonary tissue with vascular pedicle. METHODS: Fifteen Japanese big ear white rabbits were divided into experimental group (n = 10) and control group (n = 5). Esophagus defect in rabbits of experimental group was repaired using lung tissue flap with a chitosan tube stent, gross and histological appearance was observed at week 2, 4 and 8 after operation, and barium sulphate X-ray screen was performed at week 10 after operation. Esophagus defect of rabbits in control group was repaired using lung tissue flap with no chitosan tube stent, gross and histological appearance was observed at week 2, 4 and 8 after operation, and barium sulphate X-ray screen was performed at week 10 after operation. RESULTS: In the experimental group, 6 rabbits survived for over two weeks, the lung tissue flap healed esophageal defection, and squamous metaplasia occurred on the surface of lung tissue flap. At week 10 after operation, barium sulphate examination found that barium was fluent through the esophagus with no stricture or back stream, the creeping was good. In the control group, 4 rabbits survived for two weeks, the lung tissue flap healed esophageal defection with fibrous tissue hyperplasia, barium sulphate examination found that barium was fluent through the esophagus with a slight stricture or back stream, and the creeping was not good at week 10 after operation. CONCLUSION: Esophagus defect can be repaired using lung tissue flap with an inner chitosan tube stent. PMID:19322927

  8. Decay-Accelerating Factor Mitigates Controlled Hemorrhage-Instigated Intestinal and Lung Tissue Damage and Hyperkalemia in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J.; Simovic, Milomir; Li, Yansong; Moratz, Chantal; Falabella, Michael; Tsokos, George C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of complement system has been associated with tissue injury after hemorrhage and resuscitation in rats and swine. This study investigated whether administration of human recombinant decay-accelerating factor (DAF; a complement regulatory protein that inhibits classical and alternative pathways) reduces tissue damage in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock. Methods Male Yorkshire swine assigned to four groups were subjected to controlled, isobaric hemorrhage over 15 minutes to a target mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg. Hypotension was maintained for 20 minutes followed by a bolus intravenous injection of DAF or vehicle then animals were observed for 200 minutes. Blood chemistry and physiological parameters were recorded. Tissue samples from lung and small intestine were subjected to histopathological evaluation and detection of tissue deposition of complement proteins by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Results Administration of DAF significantly reduced intestinal and lung tissue damage in a dose-dependent manner (5, 25, and 50 µg/kg). In addition, DAF treatment improved hemorrhage-induced hyperkalemia. The protective effects of DAF appear to be related to its ability to reduce tissue complement activation and deposition on affected tissues. Conclusions DAF treatment decreased tissue complement activation and deposition in hemorrhaged animals and attenuated tissue damage at 200 minutes post treatment. The observed beneficial effects of DAF treatment on tissue injury after 20 minutes of severe hypotension presents an attractive model of small volume resuscitation, particularly in situations with a restrictive medical logistical footprint such as far-forward access to first responders in the battlefield or in remote rural or mountainous environments. PMID:21795874

  9. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Ryuta; Carlson, Bradley A.; Tsuji, Petra A.; Lee, Byeong Jae; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2015-01-01

    A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system. PMID:26569310

  10. The significance of PIWI family expression in human lung embryogenesis and non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alfons; Tejero, Rut; Viñolas, Nuria; Cordeiro, Anna; Marrades, Ramon M.; Fuster, Dolors; Caritg, Oriol; Moises, Jorge; Muñoz, Carmen; Molins, Laureano; Ramirez, Josep; Monzo, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The expression of Piwi-interacting RNAs, small RNAs that bind to PIWI proteins, was until recently believed to be limited to germinal stem cells. We have studied the expression of PIWI genes during human lung embryogenesis and in paired tumor and normal tissue prospectively collected from 71 resected non-small-cell lung cancer patients. The mRNA expression analysis showed that PIWIL1 was highly expressed in 7-week embryos and downregulated during the subsequent weeks of development. PIWIL1 was expressed in 11 of the tumor samples but in none of the normal tissue samples. These results were validated by immunohistochemistry, showing faint cytoplasmic reactivity in the PIWIL1-positive samples. Interestingly, the patients expressing PIWIL1 had a shorter time to relapse (TTR) (p = 0.006) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0076) than those without PIWIL1 expression. PIWIL2 and 4 were downregulated in tumor tissue in comparison to the normal tissue (p < 0.001) and the patients with lower levels of PIWIL4 had shorter TTR (p = 0.048) and OS (p = 0.033). In the multivariate analysis, PIWIL1 expression emerged as an independent prognostic marker. Using 5-Aza-dC treatment and bisulfite sequencing, we observed that PIWIL1 expression could be regulated in part by methylation. Finally, an in silico study identified a stem-cell expression signature associated with PIWIL1 expression. PMID:25742785

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of Transcriptome Sequencing Data in the Lung Tissues of COPD Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Do; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease characterized by airflow limitation. Although airway inflammation and oxidative stress are known to be important in the pathogenesis of COPD, the mechanism underlying airflow obstruction is not fully understood. Gene expression profiling of lung tissue was performed to define the molecular pathways that are dysregulated in COPD. Methods. RNA was isolated from lung tissues obtained from 98 subjects with COPD and 91 control subjects with normal spirometry. The RNA samples were processed with RNA-seq using the HiSeq 2000 system. Genes expressed differentially between the two groups were identified using Student's t-test. Results. After filtering for genes with zero counts and noncoding genes, 16,676 genes were evaluated. A total of 2312 genes were differentially expressed between the lung tissues of COPD and control subjects (false discovery rate corrected q < 0.01). The expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation and protein catabolism was reduced and genes related to chromatin modification were dysregulated in lung tissues of COPD subjects. Conclusions. Oxidative phosphorylation, protein degradation, and chromatin modification were the most dysregulated pathways in the lung tissues of COPD subjects. These findings may have clinical and mechanistic implications in COPD. PMID:25834810

  12. NRF2/miR-140 signaling confers radioprotection to human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Zhang, Yongshu; Yao, Yuan; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Qun

    2015-12-01

    Breast and lung cancer patients who are treated with radiotherapy often have severe side effects, including radiation-induced lung damage and secondary cancers. Activation of the NRF2 pathway is a well-known mechanism that protects cells against radiation induced oxidative stress, but its role in radiation-induced lung damage is not well understood. Using human lung fibroblasts (HLFs) we found that ionizing radiation (IR) leads to BRCA1-dependent activation of NRF2 through the inhibition of KEAP1 function, promoting the nuclear accumulation of NRF2, and activating critical radioprotective mechanisms. We discovered that NRF2 directly binds to the miR-140 promoter and increases its expression in response to IR treatment. Gain and loss of function studies further showed the ability of miR-140 to regulate lung fibroblast self-renewal upon irradiation, a potential mechanism to contribute to the regulation of DNA repair. We verified our in vitro findings using primary lung fibroblast cultures from wild type and Nrf2 (KO) mice. Using these models we showed that IR induces overexpression of Brca1, Nrf2 and miR-140 in lung tissue after irradiation. These data reveal a novel radioprotective mechanism in which IR promotes NRF2 nuclear translocation and subsequent activation of miR-140 transcription in HLFs. PMID:26300493

  13. NRF2/miR-140 signaling confers radioprotection to human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Zhang, Yongshu; Yao, Yuan; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Breast and lung cancer patients who are treated with radiotherapy often have severe side effects, including radiation-induced lung damage and secondary cancers. Activation of the NRF2 pathway is a well-known mechanism that protects cells against radiation induced oxidative stress, but its role in radiation-induced lung damage is not well understood. Using human lung fibroblasts (HLFs) we found that ionizing radiation (IR) leads to BRCA1-dependent activation of NRF2 through the inhibition of KEAP1 function, promoting the nuclear accumulation of NRF2, and activating critical radioprotective mechanisms. We discovered that NRF2 directly binds to the miR-140 promoter and increases its expression in response to IR treatment. Gain and loss of function studies further showed the ability of miR-140 to regulate lung fibroblast self-renewal upon irradiation, a potential mechanism to contribute to the regulation of DNA repair. We verified our in vitro findings using primary lung fibroblast cultures from wild type and Nrf2 (KO) mice. Using these models we showed that IR induces overexpression of Brca1, Nrf2 and miR-140 in lung tissue after irradiation. These data reveal a novel radioprotective mechanism in which IR promotes NRF2 nuclear translocation and subsequent activation of miR-140 transcription in HLFs. PMID:26300493

  14. Correlation of Apical Fluid-Regulating Channel Proteins with Lung Function in Human COPD Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meimi; Liu, Shan-Lu; Huang, Yao; Idell, Steven; Li, Xiumin; Ji, Hong-Long

    2014-01-01

    Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and aquaporin 5 (AQP5) proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI) and II (ATII)-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD. PMID:25329998

  15. Regional Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Stuhr, Kelly; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To describe regional lung tissue density changes in normal lung tissue of patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 179 post-SBRT follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 62 patients who received SBRT between 2003 and 2009 were studied. Median prescription dose was 54 Gy (range, 30-60 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions. SBRT-induced lung density changes on post-SBRT follow-up CT were evaluated at approximately 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after treatment. Dose-response curves (DRC) were generated for SBRT-induced lung damage by averaging CT number (HU) changes for regions of the lungs receiving the same dose at 5-Gy intervals. Results: For all follow-up interval periods, CT numbers linearly increased with dose until 35 Gy and were constant thereafter. For 3, 18, 24, and 30 months, the rate of relative electron density increase with dose was approximately 0.24% per Gy. At 6 months, the rate was also similar below 20 Gy but then rose to 0.6% per Gy above this threshold. After 6 months, DRCs were mostly time-independent. When split between patients treated with 3 fractions of 12 to 20 Gy (median, 20 Gy; average tumor volume, 12 {+-} 16 cm{sup 3}) and with >3 fractions of 6 to 12.5 Gy (median, 9 Gy; average tumor volume, 30 {+-} 40 cm{sup 3}), DRCs differed significantly. In both cases, CT changes at 3, 18, 24, and 30 months were identical to those of the population DRC; however, patients who received >3 fractions showed 6-month CT changes that were more than twice those for the group that received 3 fractions. Conclusions: This analysis of SBRT-induced normal lung density changes indicates that lung normal tissue has more pronounced self-limited acute effects than late effects. Differences in acute CT changes following treatments in 3 fractions were considerably less than for treatments in >3 fractions.

  16. Immunohistochemical Detection of Markers for Translational Studies of Lung Disease in Pigs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K; Lambertz, Allyn M; Reznikov, Leah R; Ofori-Amanfo, Georgina K; Karp, Phil H; McCray, Paul B; Welsh, Michael J; Stoltz, David A

    2016-04-01

    Genetically engineered pigs are increasingly recognized as valuable models for the study of human disease. Immunohistochemical study of cellular markers of disease is an important tool for the investigation of these novel models so as to evaluate genotype and treatment differences. Even so, there remains a lack of validated markers for pig tissues that can serve as a translational link to human disease in organs such as the lung. Herein, we evaluate markers of cellular inflammation (cluster of differentiation [CD]3, CD79a, B cell lymphoma [BCL] 6, ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule [IBA]1, and myeloperoxidase) and those that may be involved with tissue remodeling (alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-tubulin-III, lactoferrin, mucin [MUC]5AC, MUC5B, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR]) for study of lung tissues. We compare the utility of these markers between pig and human lungs to validate translational relevance of each marker. Our results suggest these markers can be a useful addition in the pathological evaluation of porcine models of human disease. PMID:26511846

  17. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.

    2005-08-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  18. Sorption studies of human keratinized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, G. K.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Water content is known to be the most important single parameter for keratinized tissue to remain its vital functions. In that sense, a general knowledge of the water binding properties is of great interest, and a reliable measurement setup must be found. Also, revealing the sorption properties of human keratinized tissues is vital towards a calibration of susceptance based skin hydration measurements that already is an important diagnostic tool in clinical dermatology, and we will see that any hysteresis will complicate such a calibration further. In this study we investigated the sorption properties of keratinized tissues such as human epidermal stratum corneum (SC), hair and nail. The study was performed under controlled environmental conditions with a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument, and the water uptake of the keratinized test samples was measured as the relative humidity in the ambient air was altered step-wisely. In this study, vital and characteristic water sorption properties such as the isotherm, relative water uptake, and hysteresis were investigated and will be discussed.

  19. Expression of secretory phospholipase A2 enzymes in lungs of humans with pneumonia and their potential prostaglandin-synthetic function in human lung-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Seiko; Murakami, Makoto; Mitsuishi, Michiko; Komiyama, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Kudo, Ichiro

    2005-04-01

    Although a number of sPLA2 (secretory phospholipase A2) enzymes have been identified in mammals, the localization and functions of individual enzymes in human pathologic tissues still remain obscure. In the present study, we have examined the expression and function of sPLA2s in human lung-derived cells and in human lungs with pneumonia. Group IID, V and X sPLA2s were expressed in cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and normal human pulmonary fibroblasts with distinct requirement for cytokines (interleukin-1b, tumour necrosis factor a and interferon-g). Lentivirus- or adenovirus-mediated transfection of various sPLA2s into BEAS-2B or normal human pulmonary fibroblast cells revealed that group V and X sPLA2s increased arachidonate release and prostaglandin production in both cell types, whereas group IIA and IID sPLA2s failed to do so. Immunohistochemistry of human lungs with pneumonia demonstrated that group V and X sPLA2s were widely expressed in the airway epithelium, interstitium and alveolar macrophages, in which group IID sPLA2 was also positive, whereas group IIA sPLA2 was restricted to the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle layers and bronchial chondrocytes, and group IIE and IIF sPLA2s were minimally detected. These results suggest that group V and X sPLA2s affect lung pathogenesis by facilitating arachidonate metabolism or possibly through other functions. PMID:15509193

  20. 27-Hydroxycholesterol accelerates cellular senescence in human lung resident cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Togo, Shinsaku; Koarai, Akira; Abe, Kyoko; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Numakura, Tadahisa; Onodera, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Rie; Sato, Kei; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Tamada, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshinori; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    Cellular senescence is reportedly involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We previously showed that 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) is elevated in the airways of COPD patients compared with those in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether lung fibroblasts of COPD patients are senescent and to determine the effects of 27-OHC on senescence of lung resident cells, including fibroblasts and airway epithelial cells. Localization of senescence-associated proteins and sterol 27-hydroxylase was investigated in the lungs of COPD patients by immunohistochemical staining. To evaluate whether 27-OHC accelerates cellular senescence, lung resident cells were exposed to 27-OHC. Senescence markers and fibroblast-mediated tissue repair were investigated in the 27-OHC-treated cells. Expression of senescence-associated proteins was significantly enhanced in lung fibroblasts of COPD patients. Similarly, expression of sterol 27-hydroxylase was significantly upregulated in lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages in these patients. Treatment with the concentration of 27-OHC detected in COPD airways significantly augmented expression of senescence-associated proteins and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, and delayed cell growth through the prostaglandin E2-reactive nitrogen species pathway. The 27-OHC-treated fibroblasts impaired tissue repair function. Fibroblasts from lungs of COPD patients showed accelerated senescence and were more susceptible to 27-OHC-induced cellular senescence compared with those of healthy subjects. In conclusion, 27-OHC accelerates cellular senescence in lung resident cells and may play a pivotal role in cellular senescence in COPD. PMID:27036870

  1. [Biochemical and histological research on lung tissue in experimental carbon disulfide exposure].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A; Petrova, S; Donchev, N

    1987-01-01

    During an experiment on two species of test animals (guinea pigs and white male rats) is studied the effect of carbon sulfide on the biochemical and structural characteristic of the lung. Duration of the experiments 30 days with guinea pigs and 90 days-white male rats. A complex of biochemical and histological methods is applied. Disturbances in the metabolic processes of the lung are established: a) raised activity of the hydrolytic enzymes; b) increased activity of the glycolytic enzymes and c) stronger protein synthesis. The observed metabolic disturbances are based, most probably, on the circulation infringements, occurring in the lung tissue under the effect of carbon sulfide. PMID:3441458

  2. Ex Vivo Perfusion Treatment of Infection in Human Donor Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, D; Cypel, M; Bonato, R; Machuca, T N; Iskender, I; Hashimoto, K; Linacre, V; Chen, M; Coutinho, R; Azad, S; Martinu, T; Waddell, T K; Hwang, D M; Husain, S; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2016-04-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a platform to treat infected donor lungs with antibiotic therapy before lung transplantation. Human donor lungs that were rejected for transplantation because of clinical concern regarding infection were randomly assigned to two groups. In the antibiotic group (n = 8), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h with high-dose antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 400 mg or azithromycin 500 mg, vancomycin 15 mg/kg, and meropenem 2 g). In the control group (n = 7), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h without antibiotics. A quantitative decrease in bacterial counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was found in all antibiotic-treated cases but in only two control cases. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were significantly lower in the antibiotic group compared with the control group. EVLP with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy significantly improved pulmonary oxygenation and compliance and reduced pulmonary vascular resistance. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were strongly correlated with levels of perfusates tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β and macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β at 12 h. In conclusion, EVLP treatment of infected donor lungs with broad-spectrum antibiotics significantly reduced BAL bacterial counts and endotoxin levels and improved donor lung function. PMID:26730551

  3. Regulation of Na+ channels in frog lung epithelium: a target tissue for aldosterone action.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H; Clauss, W

    1990-04-01

    Sodium transport across isolated lung tissue of the frog Xenopus laevis was measured in Ussing chambers under voltage-clamp conditions. Perfusing the lungs with NaCl-Ringer's solutions on both sides, a basal distinct amiloride-blockable Na+ current was present. Incubating the lungs with 1 mumol/l aldosterone from the pleural side raised the short circuit current after a 1-h latent period. Maximal values were reached after 4-5 h of aldosterone treatment, at which time the transepithelial Na+ current was more than doubled compared to the control. The stimulatory effect was totally inhibited when the aldosterone treatment was preceded by incubation of the lung tissues with spironolactone in 2000-fold excess. In the presence of amiloride (0.5-8 mumol/l) in the alveolar compartment, a Lorentzian noise component appeared in the power spectrum of the fluctuations in the short circuit current. This enabled the calculation of single Na+ channel current and Na+ channel density under both experimental conditions. Aldosterone stimulation did not change single Na+ channel current. On the other hand, the number of conducting Na+ channels increased in parallel with the transepithelial Na+ transport. This suggests that the alveolar epithelium may be a physiological target tissue for aldosterone. Since fluid absorption in the lung is secondary to active Na+ transport, aldosterone may be a potent regulator for maintaining the relatively fluid-free state of the lumen of the lung in some cases of fluid accumulation. PMID:2162035

  4. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  5. Ectopic Intrathoracic Hepatic Tissue and Accessory Lung Lobe Aplasia in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Lande, Rachel; Dvorak, Laura; Gardiner, David W; Bahr, Anne

    2015-01-01

    A 6 yr old male Yorkshire terrier was presented for an ~6 yr history of progressive cough and dyspnea. Thoracic radiographs revealed a 6 cm diameter mass within the right caudal thorax. Thoracic ultrasound identified an intrathoracic mass ultrasonographically consistent with liver tissue and a chronic diaphragmatic hernia was suspected. Exploratory laparotomy was performed, but no evidence of a diaphragmatic hernia was identified. Thoracic exploration identified abnormal lung parenchyma. The accessory lung lobe was removed using a stapling devise near its base. The consolidated mass had the gross appearance of liver and was histologically identified as ectopic hepatic tissue. Ectopic hepatic tissue, unlike ectopic splenic and pancreatic tissue, is rare and generally has a subdiaphragmatic distribution. This solitary case report demonstrates that ectopic intrathoracic hepatic tissue should be considered a differential diagnosis for a caudal mediastinal mass. PMID:26355587

  6. Beyond volutrauma in ARDS: the critical role of lung tissue deformation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) consists of tissue damage and a biological response resulting from the application of inappropriate mechanical forces to the lung parenchyma. The current paradigm attributes VILI to overstretching due to very high-volume ventilation (volutrauma) and cyclic changes in aeration due to very low-volume ventilation (atelectrauma); however, this model cannot explain some research findings. In the present review, we discuss the relevance of cyclic deformation of lung tissue as the main determinant of VILI. Parenchymal stability resulting from the interplay of respiratory parameters such as tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure or respiratory rate can explain the results of different clinical trials and experimental studies that do not fit with the classic volutrauma/atelectrauma model. Focusing on tissue deformation could lead to new bedside monitoring and ventilatory strategies. PMID:21489320

  7. Histopathology effects of nickel nanoparticles on lungs, liver, and spleen tissues in male mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdari, Marziyeh; Ziaee Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh

    2014-09-01

    Because of the classification of the nickel compounds as carcinogenic substances, there is a need for in vivo tests to nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) for observing their effects on health experimentally. Spherical NiNPs with 10 nm in diameter and 75 ppm concentration were applied for investigating their toxicities within male albino mice as an in vivo model. We randomly made sham group, control group, and 75 ppm group (with five animals in each group). Then, the nanoparticles were injected into mice intraperitonealy for 7 days and after that their lungs, liver, and spleen were removed for histopathological observations. At the end of the test, section microscopic observations of liver, spleen, and lung in sham and control groups showed normal tissues but these tissues underwent significant abnormal effects in 75 ppm group. NiNPs can cause undesirable effects in lungs, liver, and spleen tissues with same condition of this study.

  8. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P. Viergever, Max A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Rikxoort, Eva M. van; Brown, Matthew S.; Jong, Pim A. de; Ginneken, Bram van

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  9. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior. PMID:26586376

  10. Finite Element Modeling of Human Placental Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mao; Manoogian, Sarah; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for a large portion of placental abruption and fetal losses. To better understand the material properties of the human placenta, a Finite Element (FE) model of human placenta tissue was created and verified using data from uniaxial tension tests. Sixty-four tensile tests at three different strain rates of 7% strain/s, 70% strain/s, and 700% strain/s from six whole human placentas were used for model development. Nominal stresses were calculated by dividing forces at the grips by the original cross-sectional area. Nominal strains were calculated by dividing cross-head displacement by the original gauge length. A detailed methodology for interpreting experimental data for application to material model development is presented. A model of the tension coupon was created in LS-DYNA and stretched in the same manner as the uniaxial tension tests. The behavior of the material was optimized to the uniaxial tension test using a multi-island genetic algorithm. The results demonstrate good correlation between experiments and the model, with an average difference of 2% between the optimized FE and experimental first principal stress at the termination state. The material parameters found in this study can be utilized in FE models of placental tissues for behavior under dynamic loading. PMID:20184849

  11. ACID AIR AND AEROBIOLOGY RELATED TO THE MATURING HUMAN LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of 'acid air' on human health was studied by considering the effects of hygroscopicity upon aerosol deposition in the lung as a function of human subject age. Children are a critical sub-population to be incorporated into health effects analyses following ambient expos...

  12. Intra-vital microscopy of lung tissue: A simulation based analysis of the image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Schirrmann, Kerstin; Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kirsten, Lars; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    In the course of pulmonary research, understanding alveolar tissue dynamics plays a critical role in the treatment of patients suffering from acute lung diseases. As a gold standard technique for monitoring micro scale changes of lung tissue, real-time intra-vital microscopy (IVM) has been established to evaluate the behavior of the alveolar tissue. To allow profound qualitative and quantitative conclusions, characteristic features of the obtained images have to be thoroughly understood. These factors are strongly influenced by the imaging setup and physiological condition of the lung. To circumvent misinterpretations, a ray-tracing approach has been applied in this study using an idealized geometry of the mouse lung parenchyma deduced from optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a complementary imaging technique. Basic features of IVM images are double ring structures and disappearing of alveoli related to liquid infiltration. Ray propagation analysis reveals the formation of these features by two major reflection processes: partial reflection and total internal reflection. The results give rise to quantification errors of the alveolar area related to reflexes misinterpreted as alveolar borders and should further be used to yield a correction factor for future IVM lung tissue studies.

  13. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter–driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter’s tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP’s gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter–driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk–carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk–carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27322500

  14. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Lin, Mien-Chun; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27322500

  15. Hair growth promoting potential of phospholipids purified from porcine lung tissues.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Su; Jeon, Byung-Suk; Jeon, Yeon-Jeong; Yoon, Byung-Il; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-03-01

    BP201, porcine lung tissue-derived phospholipids, consists of phosphatidylcholine as a major phospholipid species. BP201 promoted hair growth after application onto the shaved backs of BALB/c and C3H mice. Its effect was enhanced when applied together with minoxidil (MNX) in C3H mice. When the tissue specimens prepared from the shaved skins of BP201-treated and control mice were microscopically examined, the total numbers of hair follicles in both anagen and telogen phases of BP201-treated mice were significantly higher than those of control mice. The numbers of hair follicles in the anagen phase of BP201-treated mice were also higher than those of control mice. In combination with MNX, BP201 further increased the total number of hair follicles, but did not alter the percentage of hair follicles in the anagenic phase. BP201 also increased the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells. Collectively, BP201 possesses hair growth promoting potential, which would suggest its use singly or in combination for hair growth products. PMID:25767686

  16. Hair Growth Promoting Potential of Phospholipids Purified from Porcine Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Su; Jeon, Byung-Suk; Jeon, Yeon-Jeong; Yoon, Byung-Il; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    BP201, porcine lung tissue-derived phospholipids, consists of phosphatidylcholine as a major phospholipid species. BP201 promoted hair growth after application onto the shaved backs of BALB/c and C3H mice. Its effect was enhanced when applied together with minoxidil (MNX) in C3H mice. When the tissue specimens prepared from the shaved skins of BP201-treated and control mice were microscopically examined, the total numbers of hair follicles in both anagen and telogen phases of BP201-treated mice were significantly higher than those of control mice. The numbers of hair follicles in the anagen phase of BP201-treated mice were also higher than those of control mice. In combination with MNX, BP201 further increased the total number of hair follicles, but did not alter the percentage of hair follicles in the anagenic phase. BP201 also increased the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells. Collectively, BP201 possesses hair growth promoting potential, which would suggest its use singly or in combination for hair growth products. PMID:25767686

  17. The histone demethylase PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuzhou; Pan, Xufeng; Zhao, Heng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PHF8 overexpresses in human NSCLC and predicts poor survival. • PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell growth and transformation. • PHF8 regulates apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. • PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer. • MiR-21 is critically essential for PHF8 function in human lung cancer cells. - Abstract: PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing protein and erases repressive histone marks including H4K20me1 and H3K9me1/2. It binds to H3K4me3, an active histone mark usually located at transcription start sites (TSSs), through its plant homeo-domain, and is thus recruited and enriched in gene promoters. PHF8 is involved in the development of several types of cancer, including leukemia, prostate cancer, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Herein we report that PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PHF8 is up-regulated in human NSCLC tissues, and high PHF8 expression predicts poor survival. Our in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrate that PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation and cellular transformation. We found that PHF8 knockdown induces DNA damage and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer, and miR-21 knockdown blocks the effects of PHF8 on proliferation and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. In summary, PHF8 promotes lung cancer cell growth and survival by regulating miR-21.

  18. Aortic Carboxypeptidase-Like Protein Is Expressed in Fibrotic Human Lung and its Absence Protects against Bleomycin-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schissel, Scott L.; Dunsmore, Sarah E.; Liu, Xiaoli; Shine, Robert W.; Perrella, Mark A.; Layne, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis include proliferating fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, as well as excessive collagen matrix deposition. In addition, both myofibroblast contraction and remodeling of the collagen-rich matrix contribute to the abnormal structure and function of the fibrotic lung. Little is known, however, about collagen-associated proteins that promote fibroblast and myofibroblast retention, as well as the proliferation of these cells on the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP), a collagen-associated protein with a discoidin-like domain, is expressed at high levels in human fibrotic lung tissue and human fibroblasts, and that its expression increases markedly in the lungs of bleomycin-injured mice. Importantly, ACLP-deficient mice accumulated significantly fewer myofibroblasts and less collagen in the lung after bleomycin injury, as compared with wild-type controls, despite equivalent levels of bleomycin-induced inflammation. ACLP that is secreted by lung fibroblasts was retained on fibrillar collagen, and ACLP-deficient lung fibroblasts that were cultured on collagen exhibited changes in cell spreading, proliferation, and contraction of the collagen matrix. Finally, the addition of recombinant discoidin-like domain of ACLP to cultured ACLP-deficient lung fibroblasts restored cell spreading and increased the contraction of collagen gels. Therefore, both ACLP and its discoidin-like domain may be novel targets for anti-myofibroblast-based therapies for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19179605

  19. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  20. Oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in mice: impact on lung tissue and diaphragm muscle*,**

    PubMed Central

    de Carlos, Samanta Portão; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Patricio, Patrícia Damiani; Graciano, Thaise; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; Valença, Samuel; Chiappa, Adriana Meira Guntzel; Cipriano, Gerson; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Chiappa, Gaspar Rogério da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate oxidative damage (lipid oxidation, protein oxidation, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS], and carbonylation) and inflammation (expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin [p-AMPK and p-mTOR, respectively]) in the lung parenchyma and diaphragm muscles of male C57BL-6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 7, 15, 30, 45, or 60 days. METHODS: Thirty-six male C57BL-6 mice were divided into six groups (n = 6/group): a control group; and five groups exposed to CS for 7, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control mice, CS-exposed mice presented lower body weights at 30 days. In CS-exposed mice (compared with control mice), the greatest differences (increases) in TBARS levels were observed on day 7 in diaphragm-muscle, compared with day 45 in lung tissue; the greatest differences (increases) in carbonyl levels were observed on day 7 in both tissue types; and sulfhydryl levels were lower, in both tissue types, at all time points. In lung tissue and diaphragm muscle, p-AMPK expression exhibited behavior similar to that of TBARS. Expression of p-mTOR was higher than the control value on days 7 and 15 in lung tissue, as it was on day 45 in diaphragm muscle. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CS exposure produces oxidative damage, not only in lung tissue but also (primarily) in muscle tissue, having an additional effect on respiratory muscle, as is frequently observed in smokers with COPD. PMID:25210964

  1. Changes in lung composition and regional perfusion and tissue distribution in patients with ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Jonathan; Jones, Andrew T; Hansell, David M; Hoffman, Eric A; Evans, Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    Background & objective ARDS is characterised by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and refractory hypoxemia attributed to V/Q mismatch. We used dynamic CT to characterise changes in lung composition, regional perfusion and tissue distribution in patients with ARDS in comparison to healthy subjects. Methods The Fick principle was applied to serial attenuation measurements constructed from sequential CT images acquired during the passage of a bolus of iodinated contrast medium in healthy subjects (n=3) and patients with ARDS (n=11). Perfusion was calculated by the Mullani-Gould method and mapped throughout both lungs. Gradients of perfusion and tissue density against vertical height were constructed. Results In comparison to normal individuals, the tissue component of lungs from patients with ARDS was significantly increased (p<0.05). Blood fraction was unchanged. There was a discernable gradient in tissue density from non dependent to dependent regions in the patients with ARDS that was significantly different from controls. The proportion of perfusion applied to consolidated areas (ie shunt) correlated significantly (p<0.05) with the severity of hypoxaemia. Conclusions In patients with ARDS there are changes in both lung composition and the distribution of tissue and perfusion that may account in part for the physiological changes that define the syndrome. PMID:21883676

  2. Monte Carlo estimation of dose difference in lung from 192Ir brachytherapy due to tissue inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Gialousis, G; Dimitriadis, A; Yakoumakis, E

    2011-09-01

    Lung brachytherapy using high-dose rate (192)Ir technique is a well-established technique of radiation therapy. However, many commercial treatment planning systems do not have the ability to consider the inhomogeneity of lung in relation to normal tissue. Under such circumstances dose calculations for tissues and organs at risk close to the target are inaccurate. The purpose of the current study was to estimate the dose difference due to tissue inhomogeneity using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP-5. Results showed that there was a relative sub dosage by treatment planning systems calculations in neighbouring tissues around the radioactive source due to inhomogeneity ignorance. The presence of lung instead of normal tissue resulted in an increase in relative dose, which approached 8 % at 4-cm distance from the source. Additionally, the relative increase was small for the lung (2.1 %) and larger for organs at risk such as the heart (6.8 %) and bone marrow (7.6 %). PMID:21831865

  3. A reevaluation of CD22 expression in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pop, Laurentiu M; Barman, Stephen; Shao, Chunli; Poe, Jonathan C; Venturi, Guglielmo M; Shelton, John M; Pop, Iliodora V; Gerber, David E; Girard, Luc; Liu, Xiao-yun; Behrens, Carmen; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Richardson, James A; Minna, John D; Tedder, Thomas F; Vitetta, Ellen S

    2014-01-01

    CD22 is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed by mature B cells. It inhibits signal transduction by the B-cell receptor and its coreceptor CD19. Recent reports indicate that most human lung cancer cells and cell lines express CD22, making it an important new therapeutic target for lung cancer. The objective of our studies was to independently validate these results with the goal of testing the efficacy of our CD22 immunotoxins on lung cancer cell lines. As determined by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, we found that levels of CD22 mRNA in a panel of human lung cancer cell lines were 200 to 60,000-fold lower than those observed in the human CD22(+) Burkitt lymphoma cells, Daudi. Using flow cytometry with a panel of CD22 monoclonal antibodies and Western blot analyses, we could not detect surface or intracellular expression of CD22 protein in a panel of lung cancer cell lines. In addition, the in vitro proliferation of the lung tumor cell lines was not affected by either CD22 antibodies or our highly potent anti-CD22 immunotoxin. In contrast, CD22(+) Daudi cells expressed high levels of CD22 mRNA and protein, and were sensitive to our CD22 immunotoxin. Importantly, primary non-small cell lung cancers from more than 250 patient specimens did not express detectable levels of CD22 protein as assessed by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that CD22 is not expressed at measurable levels on the surface of lung cancer cells, and that these cells cannot be killed by anti-CD22 immunotoxins. PMID:24395821

  4. Parallel Computation of Airflow in the Human Lung Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehun; Tawhai, Merryn; Hoffman, Eric. A.

    2005-11-01

    Parallel computations of airflow in the human lung based on domain decomposition are performed. The realistic lung model is segmented and reconstructed from CT images as part of an effort to build a normative atlas (NIH HL-04368) documenting airway geometry over 4 decades of age in healthy and disease-state adult humans. Because of the large number of the airway generation and the sheer complexity of the geometry, massively parallel computation of pulmonary airflow is carried out. We present the parallel algorithm implemented in the custom-developed characteristic-Galerkin finite element method, evaluate the speed-up and scalability of the scheme, and estimate the computing resources needed to simulate the airflow in the conducting airways of the human lungs. It is found that the special tree-like geometry enables the inter-processor communications to occur among only three or four processors for optimal parallelization irrespective of the number of processors involved in the computation.

  5. Application of peptide displaying phage as a novel diagnostic probe for human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Ju, Eun Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2016-04-01

    Despite the increasing lung cancer-associated death rate, its therapy has been constrained by impasse of early diagnosis. To apply non-invasive imaging for potential cancer diagnosis system, we screened human lung adenocarcinoma-specific peptides using the phage display technique. For in vivo phage-displayed peptide screening, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was injected through tail vein to lung adenocarcinoma cell-derived xenograft mouse model. Through four rounds of biopanning, a specific peptide sequence (CAKATCPAC) was screened out with the highest frequency and was named as Pep-1, and it was analyzed for its targeting ability as an imaging probe by in vitro competitive assay to test its cell-binding ability, immunohistochemical detection in the tumor tissue, and in vivo NIR fluorescent optical imaging. The specificity of Pep-1 toward lung cancer was ensured by in vivo imaging using xenograft animals of various cancer types. The results suggest that Pep-1 is a promising diagnostic lead molecule for rapid and accurate detection of human lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it was found that the targeting ability was much enhanced by ionizing radiation in both cell-derived and patient-derived lung adenocarcinoma xenografts, suggesting the possibility of applying Pep-1 for prognostic diagnosis after radiotherapy. Taken together, this study suggests that Pep-1 possesses a specific-targeting ability for human lung adenocarcinoma and that this peptide could be directly used as a clinically applicable imaging probe. PMID:26759016

  6. Deposition of large particles in human lung.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, M; Falk, R; Linnman, L; Philipson, K; Camner, P

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four nonsmoking males, all without history of pulmonary disease, were randomly divided into four groups of six subjects each. The subjects in each group inhaled monodisperse Teflon particles labelled with 111In (half-life 2.83 days); 8.2, 11.5, 13.7 and 16.4 micron aerodynamic diameter, respectively. Radioactivity in head and throat, lung and stomach was determined after 0, 3 and 24 hrs using a profile scanner. For some subjects radioactivity was also determined using a whole-body scanner at 3.5 and 24 hrs. After the 24-hr determination the subjects inhaled labelled Teflon particles again, this time with a filter in front of the mouth. Average values for total deposition in the body, obtained using a profile scanner, whole-body scanner and filter measurements, agreed fairly well. Lung retention values obtained by whole-body and profile scanning also agreed well. The average deposition in the lung, expressed as a percentage of total deposition, was 49, 31, 21 and 13% for the four particle sizes (8.2-16.4 micron). Alveolar deposition, determined as retention at 24 hrs and expressed in percent of total deposition, was 15, 4, 4 and 1%. For the smallest particle sizes the deposition values agreed with earlier investigations. However, for the larger particles the two deposition values were higher than expected when compared to earlier studies. PMID:3102217

  7. Hippocampus and epilepsy: findings from human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Miles, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including (1) temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, (2) cortical dysplasias, (3) epilepsies associated with tumors and (4) developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patient with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum an output region which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide, restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions so suppressing interictal activity. PMID

  8. Hippocampus and epilepsy: Findings from human tissues.

    PubMed

    Huberfeld, G; Blauwblomme, T; Miles, R

    2015-03-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several focal epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, cortical dysplasias, epilepsies associated with tumors and developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patients with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in the neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum, an output region, which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells, which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions and consequently suppressing interictal

  9. The association between human papillomavirus infection and female lung cancer: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Huang, Jing-Yang; Tsai, Stella Ching-Shao; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Chou, Ming-Chih; Wu, Ming-Fang; Lee, Chun-Te; Jan, Cheng-Feng; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among Taiwanese women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been detected in lung cancer tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HPV infection and lung cancer among the Taiwanese women. The analytical data were collected from the longitudinal health insurance databases (LHID 2005 and 2010) of the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The study participants were 30 years and older and included 24,162 individuals who were identified with HPV infection from 2001 to 2004 and 1,026,986 uninfected individuals. Lung cancer incidence among infected and uninfected individuals was compared using the univariate and multivariate regression models. Among the total participants, 24,162 individuals were diagnosed with HPV. After adjusting for age, gender, low income, residential area, and comorbidity, the risk of lung cancer was higher in women (hazard ratio [HR] 1.263, 95% CI 1.015-1.571), while all cancer risks were high in both men and women with corresponding hazard ratios (HR) of 1.161 (95% CI 1.083-1.245) and HR 1.240 (95% CI 1.154-1.331), respectively. This study showed a significant increase in lung cancer risk among Taiwanese women who were exposed to HPV infection. PMID:27281096

  10. Second-hand smoke and human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, there has been growing concern about potential health consequences of exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS). Despite SHS being established as a risk factor for lung cancer development, the estimated risk has remained small yet somehow debatable. Human exposure to SHS is complicated because of temporal variabilities in source, composition, and concentration of SHS. The temporality of exposure to SHS is important for human lung carcinogenesis with a latency of many years. To explore the causal effect of SHS in lung carcinogenesis, exposure assessments should estimate chronic exposure to SHS on an individual basis. However, conventional exposure assessment for SHS relies on one-off or short-term measurements of SHS indices. A more reliable approach would be to use biological markers that are specific for SHS exposure and pertinent to lung cancer. This approach requires an understanding of the underlying mechanisms through which SHS could contribute to lung carcinogenesis. This Review is a synopsis of research on SHS and lung cancer, with special focus on hypothetical modes of action of SHS for carcinogenesis, including genotoxic and epigenetic effects. PMID:18598930

  11. Improved OCT imaging of lung tissue using a prototype for total liquid ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for imaging subpleural alveoli in animal models to gain information about dynamic and morphological changes of lung tissue during mechanical ventilation. The quality of OCT images can be increased if the refraction index inside the alveoli is matched to the one of tissue via liquid-filling. Thereby, scattering loss can be decreased and higher penetration depth and tissue contrast can be achieved. Until now, images of liquid-filled lungs were acquired in isolated and fixated lungs only, so that an in vivo measurement situation is not present. To use the advantages of liquid-filling for in vivo imaging of small rodent lungs, it was necessary to develop a liquid ventilator. Perfluorodecalin, a perfluorocarbon, was selected as breathing fluid because of its refraction index being similar to the one of water and the high transport capacity for carbon dioxide and oxygen. The setup is characterized by two independent syringe pumps to insert and withdraw the fluid into and from the lung and a custom-made control program for volume- or pressure-controlled ventilation modes. The presented results demonstrate the liquid-filling verified by optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy (IVM) and the advantages of liquid-filling to OCT imaging of subpleural alveoli.

  12. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; You, Zongbing

    2008-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma) on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands), epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin), oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain, hepatocytes, or lymphocytes

  13. Biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers in the human lung.

    PubMed Central

    Sébastien, P

    1994-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of experimental data on the pulmonary biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers (MMVSF), but human data are seriously lacking. Our knowledge in this field is essentially limited to a few reports of measurements of fibers retained in lung tissue samples taken at autopsy from workers manufacturing these products. Three types of exposure were studied: fibrous glass, mineral wool, and refractory ceramic fibers. Overall, the available data do not provide evidence for substantial long-term retention of fibers in the human lung after occupational exposure to MMVSF dusts. A word of caution, however; the amount of data supporting the previous statement is much greater for fibrous glass than for either mineral wool or refractory ceramic fibers. There is no human data on the key question of the kinetics of pulmonary clearance of inhaled MMVSF. PMID:7882938

  14. Retention patterns of asbestos fibres in lung tissue among asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Albin, M; Pooley, F D; Strömberg, U; Attewell, R; Mitha, R; Johansson, L; Welinder, H

    1994-01-01

    Retention patterns in lung tissue (determined by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry) of chrysotile, tremolite, and crocidolite fibres were analysed in 69 dead asbestos cement workers and 96 referents. There was an accumulation of tremolite with time of employment. Among workers who died within three years of the end of exposure, the 13 with high tremolite concentrations had a significantly longer duration of exposure than seven in a low to intermediate category (medians 32 v 20 years; p = 0.018, one sided). Crocidolite showed similar patterns of accumulation. In workers who died more than three years after the end of exposure, there were no correlations between concentrations of amphibole fibres and time between the end of exposure and death. Chrysotile concentrations among workers who died shortly after the end of exposure were higher than among the referents (median difference in concentrations 13 million fibres (f)/g dry weight; p = 0.033, one sided). No quantitative differences in exposure (duration or intensity) could be shown between workers with high and low to intermediate concentrations. Interestingly, all seven workers who had had a high intensity at the end of exposure (> 2.5 f/ml), had low to intermediate chrysotile concentrations at death, whereas those with low exposure were evenly distributed (31 subjects in both concentration categories); hence, there was a dependence between last intensity of exposure and chrysotile concentration (p = 0.014). Among 14 workers with a high average intensity of exposure, both those (n = 5) with high tissue concentrations of chrysotile and those (n = 10) with high tissue concentrations of tremolite fibres had more pronounced fibrosis than those with low to intermediate concentrations (median fibrosis grades for chrysotile: 2 v 1, p = 0.021; for tremolite: 2 v 0.5, p = 0.012). Additionally, workers who died shortly after the end of exposure with high concentrations of chrysotile and

  15. Retention patterns of asbestos fibres in lung tissue among asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Albin, M; Pooley, F D; Strömberg, U; Attewell, R; Mitha, R; Johansson, L; Welinder, H

    1994-03-01

    Retention patterns in lung tissue (determined by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry) of chrysotile, tremolite, and crocidolite fibres were analysed in 69 dead asbestos cement workers and 96 referents. There was an accumulation of tremolite with time of employment. Among workers who died within three years of the end of exposure, the 13 with high tremolite concentrations had a significantly longer duration of exposure than seven in a low to intermediate category (medians 32 v 20 years; p = 0.018, one sided). Crocidolite showed similar patterns of accumulation. In workers who died more than three years after the end of exposure, there were no correlations between concentrations of amphibole fibres and time between the end of exposure and death. Chrysotile concentrations among workers who died shortly after the end of exposure were higher than among the referents (median difference in concentrations 13 million fibres (f)/g dry weight; p = 0.033, one sided). No quantitative differences in exposure (duration or intensity) could be shown between workers with high and low to intermediate concentrations. Interestingly, all seven workers who had had a high intensity at the end of exposure (> 2.5 f/ml), had low to intermediate chrysotile concentrations at death, whereas those with low exposure were evenly distributed (31 subjects in both concentration categories); hence, there was a dependence between last intensity of exposure and chrysotile concentration (p = 0.014). Among 14 workers with a high average intensity of exposure, both those (n = 5) with high tissue concentrations of chrysotile and those (n = 10) with high tissue concentrations of tremolite fibres had more pronounced fibrosis than those with low to intermediate concentrations (median fibrosis grades for chrysotile: 2 v 1, p = 0.021; for tremolite: 2 v 0.5, p = 0.012). Additionally, workers who died shortly after the end of exposure with high concentrations of chrysotile and

  16. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... balloon-like tissues (blebs) that cause lung collapse ( pneumothorax ) Wedge resection, to remove part of a lobe ... Treat injuries that cause lung tissue to collapse ( pneumothorax or hemothorax ) Treat permanently collapsed lung tissue ( atelectasis ) ...

  17. High concentrations of chromium in lung tissue from lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Anttila, S.; Kokkonen, P.; Paeaekkoe PRai; Rainio, P.; Kalliomaeki, P.L.P.; Pallon, J.; Malmqvist, K.; Pakarinen, P.; Naentoe, V.Su.; Sutinen, S.

    1989-02-01

    The pulmonary chromium content was determined by plasma atomic emission spectrometer (DCP-AES) from 53 lung cancer and 43 control patients, and compared with smoking habits, severity of emphysema and occupational history. The chromium content from the lung cancer patients was higher than that from the smoking (P less than 0.025) or nonsmoking control patients (6.4 +/- 4.3, 4.0 +/- 4.0, and 2.2 +/- 0.6 microgram/g dry weight, respectively). A positive correlation between the pulmonary chromium and smoking time (P less than 0.025) and the severity of emphysema (P less than 0.001) was found in the control but not in the cancer patients. The difference in the pulmonary chromium content was greatest between those lung cancer and control patients who were light smokers or had mild emphysema. This group of lung cancer patients included subjects with occupational exposure to chromium. The possibility of occupational cancer should be considered especially with light smokers. The grade of emphysema and metals such as chromium accumulating from tobacco could serve as objective indicators of smoking.

  18. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  19. Synchrotron-based dynamic computed tomography of tissue motion for regional lung function measurement

    PubMed Central

    Dubsky, Stephen; Hooper, Stuart B.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Fouras, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    During breathing, lung inflation is a dynamic process involving a balance of mechanical factors, including trans-pulmonary pressure gradients, tissue compliance and airway resistance. Current techniques lack the capacity for dynamic measurement of ventilation in vivo at sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to allow the spatio-temporal patterns of ventilation to be precisely defined. As a result, little is known of the regional dynamics of lung inflation, in either health or disease. Using fast synchrotron-based imaging (up to 60 frames s−1), we have combined dynamic computed tomography (CT) with cross-correlation velocimetry to measure regional time constants and expansion within the mammalian lung in vivo. Additionally, our new technique provides estimation of the airflow distribution throughout the bronchial tree during the ventilation cycle. Measurements of lung expansion and airflow in mice and rabbit pups are shown to agree with independent measures. The ability to measure lung function at a regional level will provide invaluable information for studies into normal and pathological lung dynamics, and may provide new pathways for diagnosis of regional lung diseases. Although proof-of-concept data were acquired on a synchrotron, the methodology developed potentially lends itself to clinical CT scanning and therefore offers translational research opportunities. PMID:22491972

  20. Airway mechanics and lung tissue viscoelasticity: effects of altered blood hematocrit in the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Peták, Ferenc; Fodor, Gergely H; Babik, Barna; Habre, Walid

    2016-07-01

    The contribution of the hematocrit (Hct) of the blood in the pulmonary vasculature to the overall lung mechanics has not been characterized. We therefore set out to establish how changes of the Hct level in the pulmonary circulation affect the airway and lung tissue viscoelastic properties. The Hct level of the blood in an isolated perfused rat lung model was randomly altered. Intermediate (26.5%), followed by low (6.6%) or normal (43.7%), Hct was set in two consecutive sequences. The pulmonary capillary pressure was maintained constant throughout the experiment, and the pulmonary hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously. The airway resistance (Raw), the viscous (G) and elastic (H) parameters, and the hysteresivity (η = G/H) of the lung tissues were obtained from measurements of forced oscillatory input impedance data. Raw was not affected by the alterations of the Hct levels. As concerns the lung tissues, the decrease of Hct to intermediate or low levels resulted in close to proportional decreases in the viscoelastic parameters G [16.5 ± 7.7% (SD), 12.1 ± 9.5%, P < 0.005] and H (13.2 ± 8.6%, 10.8 ± 4.7%, P < 0.001). No significant changes in η were detected in a wide range of Hct, which indicates that coupled processes cause alterations in the resistive and elastic properties of the lungs following Hct changes in the pulmonary circulation. The diminishment of the viscous and elastic parameters of the pulmonary parenchyma following a reduction of blood Hct demonstrates the significant contribution of the red blood cells to the overall lung viscoelasticity. PMID:27283919

  1. Histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in human blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, Michael; Paulsen, Friedrich; Petri, Susan; Madea, Burkhard; Puschel, Klaus; Turk, Elisabeth E

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this autopsy-based study was to investigate the pathology of human blast lung injury using histology, Fat Red 7B staining, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy on lung specimens from eight medicolegal autopsy cases of fatal close-range detonations of chemical explosives. The micromorphologic equivalents of human blast lung injury can be summarized as follows: diffuse alveolar overdistension, circumscribed interstitial hemorrhages showing a cufflike pattern around pulmonary vessels, venous air embolism, bone marrow embolism, and pulmonary fat embolism. Hemorrhages within the lung parenchyma that were present in this study in blast victims without coexisting blunt or penetrating chest trauma must be regarded as potentially life-threatening intrapulmonary bleeding sites in survivors. In addition, the potential clinical importance of the presence of massive pulmonary fat embolism, which has, to the best of our knowledge, not been described previously in human blast lung injury, must be emphasized because pulmonary fat embolism may be a leading cause of the rapid respiratory deterioration with progressive hypoxia and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in blast victims who survive. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that air embolism presenting in blast victims is not a mere ventilation-induced artifact. PMID:12842857

  2. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the Environment and Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a False Discovery Rate (FDR) ≤0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR=0.12). Sixty-three (~28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, p-value<0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study’s results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  3. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the environment and genetics in lung cancer etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR = 0.12). Sixty-three (∼ 28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, P-value < 0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, and WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, and UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, and MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study's results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  4. DISPERSION OF AEROSOL BOLUSES IN THE HUMAN LUNG: DEPENDENCE ON LUNG VOLUME, BOLUS VOLUME, AND GENDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dispersion of aerosol boluses in the human lungs has been studied in health and disease by other investigators as a means of investigating convective mixing. owever, there are only limited data on the roles played in dispersion by critical factors such as the volume of inhale...

  5. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    PubMed

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  6. Perinatal Exposure to Insecticide Methamidophos Suppressed Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines Responding to Virus Infection in Lung Tissues in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Akihiko; Akashi, Toshi; Takeshita, Tomomi; Kuroki, Nao; Shibata, Asami; Hongo, Satoko; Hashiguchi, Seiko; Konno, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Methamidophos, a representative organophosphate insecticide, is regulated because of its severe neurotoxicity, but it is suspected of contaminating agricultural foods in many countries due to illicit use. To reveal unknown effects of methamidophos on human health, we evaluated the developmental immunotoxicity of methamidophos using a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection mouse model. Pregnant mice were exposed to methamidophos (10 or 20 ppm) in their drinking water from gestation day 10 to weaning on postnatal day 21. Offsprings born to these dams were intranasally infected with RSV. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after infection were significantly decreased in offspring mice exposed to methamidophos. Treatment with methamidophos did not affect the pulmonary viral titers but suppressed moderately the inflammation of lung tissues of RSV-infected offspring, histopathologically. DNA microarray analysis revealed that gene expression of the cytokines in the lungs of offspring mice exposed to 20 ppm of methamidophos was apparently suppressed compared with the control. Methamidophos did not suppress IL-6 production in RSV-infected J774.1 cell cultures. Thus, exposure of the mother to methamidophos during pregnancy and nursing was suggested to cause an irregular immune response in the lung tissues in the offspring mice. PMID:24369005

  7. Biodegradability of para-aramid respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates (RFP) in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Reed, K L; Stonehuerner, J D; Ghio, A J; Webb, T R

    2006-01-01

    Using both in vivo (inhalation) and in vitro (cell culture) studies, we previously reported that p-aramid respirable fibers (RFP--defined as respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates) are biodegraded in lungs and lung cells of rats following exposures. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether shortening mechanisms of p-aramid RFP biodegradability are also operative in human lung cells. Cultures of human A549 lung epithelial cells (A549), primary alveolar macrophages (HBAL) (collected via bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL]) from volunteers), and co-cultures (Co) of the A549 and HBAL were incubated with p-aramid RFP for either 1 h, 1 day, or 1 week to assess RFP shortening. Lengths of RFP were measured using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation, digestion of culture tissue components, and processing. Similar to findings using rat lung cells, only slight RFP shortening was measured in A549 cultures at 1-day and 1-week post-incubation. More importantly, in HBAL and Co groups, greater transverse cleavage of p-aramid RFP was measured at 1-day and 1-week postexposure compared to 1-h HBAL or Co groups, or in any A549 groups. In contrast, cellulose RFP, a biopersistent reference control fiber, were not measurably shortened under similar circumstances. Second, p-aramid RFP were incubated either with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), or acellular BAL fluids from human volunteers or rats and processed for SEM analysis of RFP lengths. Mean lengths of p-aramid RFP incubated with human or rat BAL fluids were substantially decreased compared to PBS. Similar to our findings with rat lung cells, components of human lung fluids coat the p-aramid RFP as a prerequisite for subsequent enzymatic cleavage by human phagocytic lung cells and this finding reinforces the concept that inhaled p-aramid RFP are likely to be biodegradable in the lungs of humans. PMID:16237190

  8. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  9. Association between human papillomavirus and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Deng, Fang; Qian, Li-Ting; Meng, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Yang; Shan, Wu-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Bao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in lung cancer patients; however, few studies have investigated this association in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients undergoing gefitinib treatment. The present study investigated the association between HPV and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 95 advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients were enrolled in the study. The HPV infection status and presence of EGFR mutations in tumor tissue was evaluated. Patient clinical characteristics were also determined and compared with HPV infection and EGFR mutation status to analyze their impact on progression-free survival. HPV DNA was identified in 27/95 (28.4%) lung adenocarcinoma tumors and was most common in patients with lymph node metastasis (P=0.016). A total of 44/95 (46.3%) cases exhibited EGFR mutations, which were predominantly observed in female patients and non-smokers. The presence of HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (P=0.012) and multivariate analysis also revealed that HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (odds ratio=3.971) in advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Patients with both HPV infections and EGFR mutations exhibit a marked decrease in the risk of lung cancer progression when compared with those without HPV infection or EGFR mutations (adjusted HR=0.640; 95% confidence interval: 0.488–0.840; P=0.001). HPV infection was significantly associated with EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. Furthermore, patients with HPV infections exhibited the longest progression-free survival times, which may be due to good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor- or platinum-based-adjuvant therapy in these patients. Patients with EGFR mutations exhibited a better prognosis when compared with those exhibiting wild-type EGFR, regardless of HPV status. PMID:27602120

  10. Antimicrobial proteins and peptides in human lung diseases: A friend and foe partnership with host proteases.

    PubMed

    Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Andrault, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Lung antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are major sentinels of innate immunity by preventing microbial colonization and infection. Nevertheless bactericidal activity of AMPs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is compromised in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF) and asthma. Evidence is accumulating that expression of harmful human serine proteases, matrix metalloproteases and cysteine cathepsins is markedely increased in these chronic lung diseases. The local imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors compromises lung tissue integrity and function, by not only degrading extracellular matrix components, but also non-matrix proteins. Despite the fact that AMPs are somewhat resistant to proteolytic degradation, some human proteases cleave them efficiently and impair their antimicrobial potency. By contrast, certain AMPs may be effective as antiproteases. Host proteases participate in concert with bacterial proteases in the degradation of key innate immunity peptides/proteins and thus may play immunomodulatory activities during chronic lung diseases. In this context, the present review highlights the current knowledge and recent discoveries on the ability of host enzymes to interact with AMPs, providing a better understanding of the role of human proteases in innate host defense. PMID:26341472

  11. BIOMARKERS OF HEALTH EFFECTS IN THE HUMAN LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little information exists about retained particle/metal burden in human lung and associated biomarkers of internal dose/indicators of health effects. We have shown that anatomical remodeling of the terminal and respiratory bronchioles occur at sites of particle deposition. We ext...

  12. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS. Jung-il Choi*, Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; C. S. Kim, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab. RTP, NC 27711

    Partic...

  13. Mathematical model of the human lungs during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, R. V.

    2012-08-01

    Modeling of the human lungs during phonation is considered. The main relationships during physiological phonation process and air passage through vocal folds are established. Results of investigation are presented for statements of various types corresponding to different intonation patterns of the statement.

  14. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF HUMAN LUNG STRUCTURES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the structure of the human lung has salient health effects applications. he clinical issues encompass (1) aerosol therapy, delivery of inhaled particles to enhance the efficacies of pharmacologic drugs, and (2) nuclear medicine, where planar gamma camera imaging, SPE...

  15. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance Images
    T. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  16. Rapid detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from bacterial culture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jyoti; Dixit, Shivendra Kumar; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to detect Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from a bacterial culture. Introduction: M. haemolytica is one of the most important and well-established etiological agents of pneumonia in sheep and other ruminants throughout the world. Accurate diagnosis of M. haemolytica primarily relies on bacteriological examination, biochemical characteristics and, biotyping and serotyping of the isolates. In an effort to facilitate rapid M. haemolytica detection, polymerase chain reaction assay targeting Pasteurella haemolytica serotype-1 specific antigens (PHSSA), Rpt2 and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes were used to detect M. haemolytica directly from lung tissues and from bacterial culture. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 archived lung tissues from sheep that died of pneumonia on an organized farm were used. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) based on two-amplicons targeted PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica were used for identification of M. haemolytica isolates in culture from the lung samples. All the 12 lung tissue samples were tested for the presence M. haemolytica by PHSSA and Rpt2 genes based PCR and its confirmation by sequencing of the amplicons. Results: All the 12 lung tissue samples tested for the presence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica by mPCR were found to be positive. Amplification of 12S rRNA gene fragment as internal amplification control was obtained with each mPCR reaction performed from DNA extracted directly from lung tissue samples. All the M. haemolytica were also positive for mPCR. No amplified DNA bands were observed for negative control reactions. All the three nucleotide sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank (Accession No. KJ534629, KJ534630 and KJ534631). Sequencing of the amplified products revealed the identity of 99-100%, with published sequence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica available in the NCBI database. Sheep specific mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequence

  17. Modeling the effect of refraction on OCT imaging of lung tissue: a ray-tracing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabchi, Fatemeh N.; Golabchi, Ali; Brooks, Dana H.; Gouldstone, Andrew; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Determining the structure of lung tissue is difficult in ex-vivo samples. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can image alveoli but ignores optical effects that distort the images. For example, light refracts and changes speed at the alveolar air-tissue surface. We employ ray-tracing to model OCT imaging with directional and speed changes included, using spherical shapes in 2D. Results show apparent thickening of inter-aveolar walls and distortion of shape and depth. Our approach suggests a correction algorithm by combining the model with image analysis. Distortion correction will allow inference of tissue mechanical properties and deeper imaging.

  18. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Gary E.; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; Naqa, Issam El; Low, Daniel A.

    2007-06-15

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log

  19. Data on CUX1 isoforms in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lung and systemic sclerosis skin tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tetsurou; Fragiadaki, Maria; Shi-Wen, Xu; Ponticos, Markella; Khan, Korsa; Denton, Christopher; Garcia, Patricia; Bou-Gharios, George; Yamakawa, Akio; Morimoto, Chikao; Abraham, David

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains complementary figures related to the research article entitled, "Transforming growth factor-β-induced CUX1 isoforms are associated with fibrosis in systemic sclerosis lung fibroblasts" (Ikeda et al. (2016) [2], http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrep.2016.06.022), which presents that TGF-β increased CUX1 binding in the proximal promoter and enhancer of the COL1A2 and regulated COL1. Further, in the scleroderma (SSc) lung and diffuse alveolar damage lung sections, CUX1 localized within the α- smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive cells (Fragiadaki et al., 2011) [1], "High doses of TGF-beta potently suppress type I collagen via the transcription factor CUX1" (Ikeda et al., 2016) [2]. Here we show that CUX1 isoforms are localized within α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in SSc skin and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) lung tissue sections. In particular, at the granular and prickle cell layers in the SSc skin sections, CUX1 and α-SMA are co-localized. In addition, at the fibrotic loci in the IPF lung tissue sections, CUX1 localized within the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive cells. PMID:27583344

  20. The correlation of tissue motion within the lung: implications on fiducial based treatments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan L.; Yang, Deshan; Lee, Andrew; Mayse, Martin L.; Low, Dan A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2011-01-01

    In radiation therapy many motion management and alignment techniques rely on the accuracy of an internal fiducial acting as a surrogate for target motion within the lung. Although fiducials are routinely used as surrogates for tumor motion, the extent to which varying spatial locations in the lung move similarly to other locations has yet to be quantitatively analyzed. In an attempt to analyze the motion correlation throughout the lung, ten primary lung cancer patients underwent IRB-approved 4DCT scans in the supine position. Deformable registration produced motion vectors for each voxel between exhalation and inhalation. Modeling was performed for each vector and all surrounding vectors within the lung in order to determine the mean 3D Euclidean distance necessary for an implanted fiducial to correlate with surrounding tissue motion to within 3 mm (left lower: 1.7 cm, left upper: 2.1 cm, right lower 1.6 cm, and right upper 2.9 cm). No general implantation rule of where to position a fiducial with respect to the tumor was found as the motion is highly patient and lobe specific. Correlation maps are presented showcasing spatial anisotropy of the motion of tissue surrounding the tumor. PMID:22047363

  1. Surface fluorescence studies of tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Staniszewski, Kevin; Audi, Said H; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-04-01

    We designed a fiber-optic-based optoelectronic fluorometer to measure emitted fluorescence from the auto-fluorescent electron carriers NADH and FAD of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The ratio of NADH to FAD is called the redox ratio (RR = NADH/FAD) and is an indicator of the oxidoreductive state of tissue. We evaluated the fluorometer by measuring the fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD at the surface of isolated, perfused rat lungs. Alterations of lung mitochondrial metabolic state were achieved by the addition of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler) into the perfusate recirculating through the lung. Rotenone- or KCN-containing perfusate increased RR by 21 and 30%, respectively. In contrast, PCP-containing perfusate decreased RR by 27%. These changes are consistent with the established effects of rotenone, KCN, and PCP on the redox status of the ETC. Addition of blood to perfusate quenched NADH and FAD signal, but had no effect on RR. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs, and suggests the potential of fluorometry for use in in vivo experiments to extract a sensitive measure of lung tissue health in real-time. PMID:23238793

  2. Optical studies of tissue mitochondrial redox in isolated perfused rat lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, M.

    2012-02-01

    Through the monitoring of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide), the redox state of metabolism can be probed in real time in many intact organs, but its use has not been fully developed in lungs. The ratio of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), referred to as the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), can be used as a quantitative metabolic marker of tissue. We have designed a fluorometer that can be used to monitor lung surface NADH and FAD fluorescence in isolated perfused lungs. Surface fluorescence NADH and FAD signals were acquired in the absence (control) and presence of pentachlorophenol (PCP), rotenone, and potassium cyanide (KCN). Rotenone, an inhibitor of complex I, increased RR by 18%, predominantly due to an increase in NADH signal. KCN, an inhibitor of complex IV reduced the chain and resulted in an increase of 33% in RR, as a result of 23% increase in NADH and 8% in FAD . PCP, an uncoupler which oxidizes the respiratory chain, decreased RR by 18% as a result of 14% decrease in NADH signal and 4% increase in FAD signal. These results demonstrate the ability of surface fluorometry to detect changes in lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs.

  3. Structural and Biomechanical Properties of the Exchange Tissue of the Avian Lung.

    PubMed

    Maina, John N

    2015-10-01

    The blood capillaries (BC) and the air capillaries (ACs) are the terminal gas exchange units of the avian lung. The minuscule structures are astonishingly strong. It is only recently that the morphologies and the biomechanical properties of the BCs and the ACs were investigated. Regarding size and shape, the BCs and the ACs differ remarkably. While they were previously claimed to be tubular (cylindrical) in shape, the ACs are rather rotund structures which interconnect across short, narrow passageways. Atypical of those in other tissues, the BCs in the exchange tissue of the avian lung comprise of distinct segments which are about as long as they are wide and which are coupled in three-dimensions. The thin blood-gas barrier (BGB) which separates the ACs from the BCs is peculiarly strong. The causes of the strengths of the ACs and the BCs in general and the BGB in particular are varied and controversial. Here, the recent morphological and physiological findings on the structure, biomechanical properties, and the strengths of the respiratory units of the avian lung and the BGB have been critically examined. Also, in light of the new morphological findings of the ACs and the BCs, the functional model which is currently in use to assess the gas exchange efficiency of the avian lung should be revised and the inappropriateness of the terms 'blood capillary' and 'air capillary' for the gas exchange units of the avian lung is pointed out. PMID:25857723

  4. The correlation of tissue motion within the lung: implications on fiducial based treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan L.; Yang Deshan; Lee, Andrew; Mayse, Martin L.; Low, Dan A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2011-11-15

    In radiation therapy many motion management and alignment techniques rely on the accuracy of an internal fiducial acting as a surrogate for target motion within the lung. Although fiducials are routinely used as surrogates for tumor motion, the extent to which varying spatial locations in the lung move similarly to other locations has yet to be quantitatively analyzed. In an attempt to analyze the motion correlation throughout the lung, ten primary lung cancer patients underwent IRB-approved 4DCT scans in the supine position. Deformable registration produced motion vectors for each voxel between exhalation and inhalation. Modeling was performed for each vector and all surrounding vectors within the lung in order to determine the mean 3D Euclidean distance necessary for an implanted fiducial to correlate with surrounding tissue motion to within 3 mm (left lower: 1.7 cm, left upper: 2.1 cm, right lower 1.6 cm, and right upper 2.9 cm). No general implantation rule of where to position a fiducial with respect to the tumor was found as the motion is highly patient and lobe specific. Correlation maps are presented showcasing spatial anisotropy of the motion of tissue surrounding the tumor.

  5. Airway and tissue impedances of canine lungs after step volume changes.

    PubMed

    Bates, J H; Donoso, F A; Peslin, R

    1993-10-01

    We investigated the changes in pulmonary mechanics in five anesthetized paralyzed tracheostomized open-chest dogs after step changes in lung volume. We applied small-amplitude (10-ml) volume oscillations at 6 Hz at the tracheal opening for 50-s periods, during which we applied a step volume change of 250, 500, or 750 ml to the lungs. Alveolar capsule measurements of alveolar pressure allowed us to calculate cycle-by-cycle values for airway resistance (Raw) and reactance (Xaw) and lung tissue resistance (Rti) and reactance (Xti). Before the step changes in lung volume, when transpulmonary pressure (Ptp) had a mean value of 0.65 kPa, Raw was markedly greater than Rti. The situation was reversed after the step changes, however, when Raw decreased and Rti increased. Both Raw and Xaw showed negative dependences on Ptp and hence on airway caliber, as expected, and also decreased transiently after the step volume changes, almost certainly due to a vagally mediated bronchodilation reflex. Both Rti and Xti showed clear linear dependences on Ptp and were themselves tightly coupled. Furthermore, our estimate of bulk modulus for lung tissue at 6 Hz is comparable to its previously reported values at much lower oscillation frequencies. PMID:8282590

  6. New techniques for imaging and analyzing lung tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Roggli, V L; Ingram, P; Linton, R W; Gutknecht, W F; Mastin, P; Shelburne, J D

    1984-01-01

    The recent technological revolution in the field of imaging techniques has provided pathologists and toxicologists with an expanding repertoire of analytical techniques for studying the interaction between the lung and the various exogenous materials to which it is exposed. Analytical problems requiring elemental sensitivity or specificity beyond the range of that offered by conventional scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis are particularly appropriate for the application of these newer techniques. Electron energy loss spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and laser microprobe mass analysis each offer unique advantages in this regard, but also possess their own limitations and disadvantages. Diffraction techniques provide crystalline structural information available through no other means. Bulk chemical techniques provide useful cross-checks on the data obtained by microanalytical approaches. It is the purpose of this review to summarize the methodology of these techniques, acknowledge situations in which they have been used in addressing problems in pulmonary toxicology, and comment on the relative advantages and disadvantages of each approach. It is necessary for an investigator to weigh each of these factors when deciding which technique is best suited for any given analytical problem; often it is useful to employ a combination of two or more of the techniques discussed. It is anticipated that there will be increasing utilization of these technologies for problems in pulmonary toxicology in the decades to come. Images FIGURE 3. A FIGURE 3. B FIGURE 3. C FIGURE 3. D FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 7. A FIGURE 7. B FIGURE 8. A FIGURE 8. B FIGURE 8. C FIGURE 9. A FIGURE 9. B FIGURE 10. PMID:6090115

  7. Mineral fibres, fibrosis, and asbestos bodies in lung tissue from deceased asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Albin, M; Johansson, L; Pooley, F D; Jakobsson, K; Attewell, R; Mitha, R

    1990-01-01

    Lung tissue from 76 deceased asbestos cement workers (seven with mesothelioma) exposed to chrysotile asbestos and small amounts of amphiboles, has been studied by transmission electron microscopy, together with lung tissue from 96 controls. The exposed workers with mesothelioma had a significantly higher total content of asbestos fibre in the lungs than those without mesothelioma, who in turn, had higher concentrations than the controls (medians 189, 50, and 29 x 10(6) fibres/g (f/g]. Chrysotile was the major type of fibre. The differences were most pronounced for the amphibole fibres (62, 4.7, and 0.15 f/g), especially crocidolite (54, 1.8 and less than 0.001 f/g), but were evident also for tremolite (2.9, less than 0.001, and less than 0.001 f/g) and anthophyllite (1.7, less than 0.001, and less than 0.001 f/g). For amosite, there was no statistically significant difference between lungs from workers with and without mesothelioma; the lungs of workers had, however, higher concentrations than the controls. Strong correlations were found between duration of exposure and content of amphibole fibres in the lungs. Asbestos bodies, counted by light microscopy, were significantly correlated with the amphibole but not with the chrysotile contents. Fibrosis was correlated with the tremolite but not the chrysotile content in lungs from both exposed workers and controls. Overall, similar results were obtained using fibre counts and estimates of mass. PMID:2173948

  8. Effects of superimposed tissue weight on regional compliance of injured lungs.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Mariangela; Derosa, Savino; Tannoia, Angela; Rylander, Christian; Fiore, Tommaso; Larsson, Anders; Hedenstierna, Göran; Perchiazzi, Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT), together with image analysis technologies, enable the construction of regional volume (VREG) and local transpulmonary pressure (PTP,REG) maps of the lung. Purpose of this study is to assess the distribution of VREG vs PTP,REG along the gravitational axis in healthy (HL) and experimental acute lung injury conditions (eALI) at various positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEPs) and inflation volumes. Mechanically ventilated pigs underwent inspiratory hold maneuvers at increasing volumes simultaneously with lung CT scans. eALI was induced via the iv administration of oleic acid. We computed voxel-level VREG vs PTP,REG curves into eleven isogravitational planes by applying polynomial regressions. Via F-test, we determined that VREG vs PTP,REG curves derived from different anatomical planes (p-values<1.4E-3), exposed to different PEEPs (p-values<1.5E-5) or subtending different lung status (p-values<3E-3) were statistically different (except for two cases of adjacent planes). Lung parenchyma exhibits different elastic behaviors based on its position and the density of superimposed tissue which can increase during lung injury. PMID:26976688

  9. Optical pathology of human brain metastasis of lung cancer using combined resonance Raman and spatial frequency spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Pu, Yang; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Ke; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has become widely used for diagnostic purpose of breast, lung and brain cancers. This report introduced a new approach based on spatial frequency spectra analysis of the underlying tissue structure at different stages of brain tumor. Combined spatial frequency spectroscopy (SFS), Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic method is used to discriminate human brain metastasis of lung cancer from normal tissues for the first time. A total number of thirty-one label-free micrographic images of normal and metastatic brain cancer tissues obtained from a confocal micro- Raman spectroscopic system synchronously with examined RR spectra of the corresponding samples were collected from the identical site of tissue. The difference of the randomness of tissue structures between the micrograph images of metastatic brain tumor tissues and normal tissues can be recognized by analyzing spatial frequency. By fitting the distribution of the spatial frequency spectra of human brain tissues as a Gaussian function, the standard deviation, σ, can be obtained, which was used to generate a criterion to differentiate human brain cancerous tissues from the normal ones using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. This SFS-SVM analysis on micrograph images presents good results with sensitivity (85%), specificity (75%) in comparison with gold standard reports of pathology and immunology. The dual-modal advantages of SFS combined with RR spectroscopy method may open a new way in the neuropathology applications.

  10. A robust tool for discriminative analysis and feature selection in paired samples impacts the identification of the genes essential for reprogramming lung tissue to adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. The most common type of lung cancer is lung adenocarcinoma (AC). The genetic mechanisms of the early stages and lung AC progression steps are poorly understood. There is currently no clinically applicable gene test for the early diagnosis and AC aggressiveness. Among the major reasons for the lack of reliable diagnostic biomarkers are the extraordinary heterogeneity of the cancer cells, complex and poorly understudied interactions of the AC cells with adjacent tissue and immune system, gene variation across patient cohorts, measurement variability, small sample sizes and sub-optimal analytical methods. We suggest that gene expression profiling of the primary tumours and adjacent tissues (PT-AT) handled with a rational statistical and bioinformatics strategy of biomarker prediction and validation could provide significant progress in the identification of clinical biomarkers of AC. To minimise sample-to-sample variability, repeated multivariate measurements in the same object (organ or tissue, e.g. PT-AT in lung) across patients should be designed, but prediction and validation on the genome scale with small sample size is a great methodical challenge. Results To analyse PT-AT relationships efficiently in the statistical modelling, we propose an Extreme Class Discrimination (ECD) feature selection method that identifies a sub-set of the most discriminative variables (e.g. expressed genes). Our method consists of a paired Cross-normalization (CN) step followed by a modified sign Wilcoxon test with multivariate adjustment carried out for each variable. Using an Affymetrix U133A microarray paired dataset of 27 AC patients, we reviewed the global reprogramming of the transcriptome in human lung AC tissue versus normal lung tissue, which is associated with about 2,300 genes discriminating the tissues with 100% accuracy. Cluster analysis applied to these genes resulted in four distinct gene groups

  11. Proteomics. Tissue-based map of the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Mathias; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Oksvold, Per; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Åsa; Kampf, Caroline; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Asplund, Anna; Olsson, IngMarie; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Navani, Sanjay; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Odeberg, Jacob; Djureinovic, Dijana; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia; Alm, Tove; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Rockberg, Johan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M; Hamsten, Marica; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Persson, Lukas; Johansson, Fredric; Zwahlen, Martin; von Heijne, Gunnar; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik

    2015-01-23

    Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body. PMID:25613900

  12. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  13. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  14. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  15. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  16. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  17. Biphasic positive airway pressure minimizes biological impact on lung tissue in mild acute lung injury independent of etiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIVENT) is a partial support mode that employs pressure-controlled, time-cycled ventilation set at two levels of continuous positive airway pressure with unrestricted spontaneous breathing. BIVENT can modulate inspiratory effort by modifying the frequency of controlled breaths. Nevertheless, the optimal amount of inspiratory effort to improve respiratory function while minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury during partial ventilatory assistance has not been determined. Furthermore, it is unclear whether the effects of partial ventilatory support depend on acute lung injury (ALI) etiology. This study aimed to investigate the impact of spontaneous and time-cycled control breaths during BIVENT on the lung and diaphragm in experimental pulmonary (p) and extrapulmonary (exp) ALI. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study of 60 adult male Wistar rats. Mild ALI was induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide either intratracheally (ALIp) or intraperitoneally (ALIexp). After 24 hours, animals were anesthetized and further randomized as follows: (1) pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) with tidal volume (Vt) = 6 ml/kg, respiratory rate = 100 breaths/min, PEEP = 5 cmH2O, and inspiratory-to-expiratory ratio (I:E) = 1:2; or (2) BIVENT with three spontaneous and time-cycled control breath modes (100, 75, and 50 breaths/min). BIVENT was set with two levels of CPAP (Phigh = 10 cmH2O and Plow = 5 cmH2O). Inspiratory time was kept constant (Thigh = 0.3 s). Results BIVENT was associated with reduced markers of inflammation, apoptosis, fibrogenesis, and epithelial and endothelial cell damage in lung tissue in both ALI models when compared to PCV. The inspiratory effort during spontaneous breaths increased during BIVENT-50 in both ALI models. In ALIp, alveolar collapse was higher in BIVENT-100 than PCV, but decreased during BIVENT-50, and diaphragmatic injury was lower during BIVENT-50 compared

  18. Repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10 induces lipid reshaping in lung parenchyma and in extra-pulmonary tissues.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Farina, Francesca; Montorfano, Gigliola; Pani, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Cristina; Sancini, Giulio; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Adverse health effects of air pollution attributed mainly to airborne particulate matter have been well documented in the last couple of decades. Short term exposure, referring to a few hours exposure, to high ambient PM10 concentration is linked to increased hospitalization rates for cardiovascular events, typically 24 h after air pollution peaks. Particulate matter exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Previously, we have demonstrated that repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10sum in BALB/c mice leads to respiratory tract inflammation, creating in lung a condition which could potentially evolve in a systemic toxic reaction. Additionally, plasma membrane and tissue lipids are easily affected by oxidative stress and directly correlated with inflammatory products. With this aim, in the present investigation using the same model, we analyzed the toxic potential of PM10sum exposure on lipid plasma membrane composition, lipid peroxidation and the mechanisms of cells protection in multiple organs such as lung, heart, liver and brain. Obtained results indicated that PM10 exposure led to lung lipid reshaping, in particular phospholipid and cholesterol content increases; concomitantly, the generation of oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation. In liver we found significant changes in lipid content, mainly due to an increase of phosphatidylcholine, and in total fatty acid composition with a more pronounced level of docosahexaenoic acid; these changes were statistically correlated to lung molecular markers. Heart and brain were similarly affected; heart was significantly enriched in triglycerides in half of the PM10sum treated mice. These results demonstrated a direct involvement of PM10sum in affecting lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in peripheral tissues that might be related to the serious systemic air-pollution effects on human health. PMID:25259850

  19. Immunohistochemical detection of IgM and IgG in lung tissue of dogs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS).

    PubMed

    Schuller, Simone; Callanan, John J; Worrall, Sheila; Francey, Thierry; Schweighauser, Ariane; Kohn, Barbara; Klopfleisch, Robert; Posthaus, Horst; Nally, Jarlath E

    2015-06-01

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a severe form of leptospirosis. Pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Lung tissues from 26 dogs with LPHS, 5 dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage due to other causes and 6 healthy lungs were labelled for IgG (n=26), IgM (n=25) and leptospiral antigens (n=26). Three general staining patterns for IgG/IgM were observed in lungs of dogs with LPHS with most tissues showing more than one staining pattern: (1) alveolar septal wall staining, (2) staining favouring alveolar surfaces and (3) staining of intra-alveolar fluid. Healthy control lung showed no staining, whereas haemorrhagic lung from dogs not infected with Leptospira showed staining of intra-alveolar fluid and occasionally alveolar septa. Leptospiral antigens were not detected. We conclude that deposition of IgG/IgM is demonstrable in the majority of canine lungs with naturally occurring LPHS, similar to what has been described in other species. Our findings suggest involvement of the host humoral immunity in the pathogenesis of LPHS and provide further evidence to support the dog as a natural disease model for human LPHS. PMID:25963899

  20. Imaging the Human Body: Micro- and Nanostructure of Human Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert

    Computed tomography based on X-rays is known to provide the best spatial resolution of all clinical three-dimensional imaging facilities and currently reaches a fraction of a millimeter. Better spatial and density resolution is obtained by means of micro computed tomography well established in the field of materials science. It is also very supportive imaging human tissues down to the level of individual cells (Lareida et al. J. Microsc. 234:95, 2009). The article demonstrates the power of micro computed tomography for imaging parts of the human body such as teeth, inner ear, cerebellum, tumors, and urethral tissue with conventional X-ray sources and synchrotron radiation facilities in absorption and phase contrast modes. The second part of the chapter relies on scanning X-ray scattering of tooth slices (Müller et al. Eur. J. Clin. Nanomed. 3:30, 2010) to uncover the presence of nanostructures including their anisotropy and orientation. This imaging technique gives unrivalled insights for medical experts, which will have a major influence on fields such as dental and incontinence treatments.

  1. DT-diaphorase and cytochrome B5 reductase in human lung and breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Marín, A.; López de Cerain, A.; Hamilton, E.; Lewis, A. D.; Martinez-Peñuela, J. M.; Idoate, M. A.; Bello, J.

    1997-01-01

    The level of expression of enzymes that can activate or detoxify bioreductive agents within tumours has emerged as an important feature in the development of these anti-tumour compounds. The levels of two such reductase enzymes have been determined in 19 human non-small-cell lung tumours and 20 human breast tumours, together with the corresponding normal tissue. DT-diaphorase (DTD) enzyme levels (both expression and activity) were determined in these samples. Cytochrome b5 reductase (Cytb5R) activity was also assessed. With the exception of six patients, the levels of DTD activity were below 45 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) in the normal tissues assayed. DTD tumour activity was extremely variable, distinguishing two different groups of patients, one with DTD activity above 79 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) and the other with levels that were in the same range as found for the normal tissues. In 53% of the lung tumour samples, DTD activity was increased with respect to the normal tissue by a factor of 2.4-90.3 (range 79-965 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). In 70% of the breast tumour samples, DTD activity was over 80 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) (range 83-267 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). DTD expression measured by Western blot correlated well with the enzyme activity measured in both tumour and normal tissues. The levels of the other reductase enzyme, Cytb5R, were not as variable as those for DTD, being in the same range in both tumour and normal tissue or slightly higher in the normal tissues. The heterogeneous nature of DTD activity and expression reinforces the need to measure enzyme levels in individual patients before therapy with DTD-activated bioreductive drugs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9328153

  2. Human Skin Cells Are More Sensitive than Human Lung Cells to the Cytotoxic and Cell Cycle Arresting Impacts of Particulate and Soluble Hexavalent Chromium.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Holmes, Amie L; Wise, Sandra S; Young, Jamie L; Wise, James T F; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-07-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a known human lung carcinogen, with solubility playing an important role in its carcinogenic potency. Dermal exposure to Cr(VI) is common and has been associated with skin damage; however, no link between chromate exposure and skin cancer has been found. In this study, we compared the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) and its impacts on cell cycle progression in human lung and skin fibroblasts. We found human skin cells arrested earlier in their cell cycle and exhibit more cytotoxicity than human lung cells, despite taking up similar amounts of Cr. These outcomes are consistent with a hypothesis that different cellular and molecular responses underlie the differences in carcinogenic outcome in these two tissues. PMID:25805272

  3. Molecular and histological changes in cerebral cortex and lung tissues under the effect of tramadol treatment.

    PubMed

    Awadalla, Eatemad A; Salah-Eldin, Alaa-Eldin

    2016-08-01

    Tramadol abuse is one of the most frequent health problems in Egypt and worldwide. In most cases, tramadol abused by men face a problem with premature ejaculation. Tramadol like other opioids induces a decrease in plasma antioxidant levels, which may reflect a failure of the antioxidant defense mechanism against oxidative damage. The present work aimed to study the possible deleterious effects of oral administration of tramadol on brain and lung tissues in rats. Twenty adult male albino rats were divided into two groups; a control administered with normal saline and tramadol-treated (40mg/kg b.w.) group for 20 successive days. At the end of experimental period, blood was collected and specimens from brains and lungs were taken for histopathological and molecular studies. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in serum of control and tramadol-treated groups. Brain and lung specimens were histopathological evaluated using light microscopy. The expression levels of apoptotic related genes; Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 were study in brain and lung tissues using RT-PCR analysis. We recorded a significant increase MDA level, while antioxidant enzymes; GSH, SOD and CAT were significantly decreased after tramadol-treatment. The obtained results revealed that tramadol induced a remarkable histomorphological changes in rats' brains (cerebral cortex and hippocampus) and severe histopathological changes in rats' lung when compared to that of control. On molecular level, the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax and Caspase-3 showed a significant increase whereas the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased markedly indicating that tramadol is harmful at cellular level and can induce apoptotic changes in brain tissues. Our data confirmed the risk of increased oxidative stress, neuronal and pulmonary damage due to tramadol abuse. Although tramadol is reported to be effective in pain management, its toxicity should

  4. Gene Electrotransfer in 3D Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer into the skin is of particular interest for the development of medical applications including DNA vaccination, cancer treatment, wound healing or treatment of local skin disorders. However, such clinical applications are currently limited due to poor understanding of the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer within human tissue. Nowadays, most studies are carried out in rodent models but rodent skin varies from human skin in terms of cell composition and architecture. We used a tissue-engineering approach to study gene electrotransfer mechanisms in a human tissue context. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were cultured according to the self-assembly method to produce 3D reconstructed human dermal tissue. In this study, we showed that cells of the reconstructed cutaneous tissue were efficiently electropermeabilized by applying millisecond electric pulses, without affecting their viability. A reporter gene was successfully electrotransferred into this human tissue and gene expression was detected for up to 48h. Interestingly, the transfected cells were solely located on the upper surface of the tissue, where they were in close contact with plasmid DNA solution. Furthermore, we report evidences that electrotransfection success depends on plasmid mobility within tissue- rich in collagens, but not on cell proliferation status. In conclusion, in addition to proposing a reliable alternative to animal experiments, tissue engineering produces valid biological tool for the in vitro study of gene electrotransfer mechanisms in human tissue. PMID:27029947

  5. Aerosol Deposition in the Human Lung in Reduced Gravity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The deposition of aerosol in the human lung occurs mainly through a combination of inertial impaction, gravitational sedimentation, and diffusion. For 0.5- to 5-μm-diameter particles and resting breathing conditions, the primary mechanism of deposition in the intrathoracic airways is sedimentation, and therefore the fate of these particles is markedly affected by gravity. Studies of aerosol deposition in altered gravity have mostly been performed in humans during parabolic flights in both microgravity (μG) and hypergravity (∼1.6G), where both total deposition during continuous aerosol mouth breathing and regional deposition using aerosol bolus inhalations were performed with 0.5- to 3-μm particles. Although total deposition increased with increasing gravity level, only peripheral deposition as measured by aerosol bolus inhalations was strongly dependent on gravity, with central deposition (lung depth<200 mL) being similar between gravity levels. More recently, the spatial distribution of coarse particles (mass median aerodynamic diameter≈5 μm) deposited in the human lung was assessed using planar gamma scintigraphy. The absence of gravity caused a smaller portion of 5-μm particles to deposit in the lung periphery than in the central region, where deposition occurred mainly in the airways. Indeed, 5-μm-diameter particles deposit either by inertial impaction, a mechanism most efficient in the large and medium-sized airways, or by gravitational sedimentation, which is most efficient in the distal lung. On the contrary, for fine particles (∼1 μm), both aerosol bolus inhalations and studies in small animals suggest that particles deposit more peripherally in μG than in 1G, beyond the reach of the mucociliary clearance system. PMID:24870702

  6. Sulf-2, a heparan sulfate endosulfatase, promotes human lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; van Zante, Annemieke; Singer, Mark S.; Xue, Qing; Wang, Yang-Qing; Tsay, Durwin; He, Biao; Jablons, David M.; Rosen, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) bind to multiple growth factors/morphogens and regulate their signaling. 6-O-sulfation (6S) of glucosamine within HS-chains is critical for many of these ligand interactions. Sulf-1 and Sulf-2, which are extracellular neutral-pH sulfatases, provide a novel post-synthetic mechanism for regulation of HSPG function by removing 6S from intact HS-chains. The Sulfs can thereby modulate several signaling pathways, including the promotion of Wnt signaling. We found induction of SULF2 transcripts and Sulf-2 protein in human lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the two major classes of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). We confirmed widespread Sulf-2 protein expression in tumor cells of 10/10 surgical specimens of human lung squamous carcinomas. We studied five Sulf-2+ NSCLC cell lines, including two which were derived by cigarette-smoke transformation of bronchial epithelial cells. shRNA-mediated Sulf-2 knockdown in these lines caused an increase in 6S on their cell surface and in parallel reversed their transformed phenotype in vitro, eliminated autocrine Wnt signaling, and strongly blunted xenograft tumor formation in nude mice. Conversely, forced Sulf-2 expression in non-malignant bronchial epithelial cells produced a partially transformed phenotype. Our findings support an essential role for Sulf-2 in lung cancer, the leading cancer killer. PMID:19855436

  7. Toward a comprehensive interpretation of intravital microscopy images in studies of lung tissue dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Schirrmann, Kerstin; Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kirsten, Lars; Koch, Edmund

    2015-06-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is a well-established imaging technique for real-time monitoring of microscale lung tissue dynamics. Although accepted as a gold standard in respiratory research, its characteristic image features are scarcely understood, especially when trying to determine the actual position of alveolar walls. To allow correct interpretation of these images with respect to the true geometry of the lung parenchyma, we analyzed IVM data of alveoli in a mouse model in comparison with simultaneously acquired optical coherence tomography images. Several IVM characteristics, such as double ring structures or disappearing alveoli in regions of liquid filling, could be identified and related to the position of alveoli relative to each other. Utilizing a ray tracing approach based on an idealized geometry of the mouse lung parenchyma, two major reflection processes could be attributed to the IVM image formation: partial reflection and total internal reflection between adjacent alveoli. Considering the origin of the reflexes, a model was developed to determine the true position of alveolar walls within IVM images. These results allow thorough understanding of IVM data and may serve as a basis for the correction of alveolar sizes for more accurate quantitative analysis within future studies of lung tissue dynamics.

  8. Comparative Pathobiology of Environmentally Induced Lung Cancers in Humans and Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in humans worldwide. Environmental factors play an important role in the epidemiology of these cancers. Rodents are the most common experimental model to study human lung cancers and are frequently used in bioassays to identify environmental exposure hazards associated with lung cancer. Lung tumors in rodents are common, particularly in certain strains of mice. Rodent lung tumors are predominantly bronchioloalveolar carcinomas and usually follow a progressive continuum of hyperplasia to adenoma to carcinoma. Human lung cancers are phenotypically more diverse and broadly constitute 2 types: small cell lung cancers or non-small cell lung cancers. Rodent lung tumors resulting from exposure to environmental agents are comparable to certain adenocarcinomas that are a subset of human non-small cell lung cancers. Human pulmonary carcinomas differ from rodent lung tumors by exhibiting greater morphologic heterogeneity (encompassing squamous cell, neuroendocrine, mucinous, sarcomatoid, and multiple cell combinations), higher metastatic rate, higher stromal response, aggressive clinical behavior, and lack of a clear continuum of proliferative lesions. In spite of these differences, rodent lung tumors recapitulate several fundamental aspects of human lung tumor biology at the morphologic and molecular level especially in lung cancers resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. PMID:25351923

  9. Nonlinear histogram binning for quantitative analysis of lung tissue fibrosis in high-resolution CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-03-01

    Diffuse lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), can be characterized and quantified by analysis of volumetric high resolution CT scans of the lungs. These data sets typically have dimensions of 512 x 512 x 400. It is too subjective and labor intensive for a radiologist to analyze each slice and quantify regional abnormalities manually. Thus, computer aided techniques are necessary, particularly texture analysis techniques which classify various lung tissue types. Second and higher order statistics which relate the spatial variation of the intensity values are good discriminatory features for various textures. The intensity values in lung CT scans range between [-1024, 1024]. Calculation of second order statistics on this range is too computationally intensive so the data is typically binned between 16 or 32 gray levels. There are more effective ways of binning the gray level range to improve classification. An optimal and very efficient way to nonlinearly bin the histogram is to use a dynamic programming algorithm. The objective of this paper is to show that nonlinear binning using dynamic programming is computationally efficient and improves the discriminatory power of the second and higher order statistics for more accurate quantification of diffuse lung disease.

  10. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  11. Resolvin D1 prevents smoking-induced emphysema and promotes lung tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang-Hyun; Park, Tai Sun; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Sei Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Emphysema is an irreversible disease that is characterized by destruction of lung tissue as a result of inflammation caused by smoking. Resolvin D1 (RvD1), derived from docosahexaenoic acid, is a novel lipid that resolves inflammation. The present study tested whether RvD1 prevents smoking-induced emphysema and promotes lung tissue regeneration. Materials and methods C57BL/6 mice, 8 weeks of age, were randomly divided into four groups: control, RvD1 only, smoking only, and smoking with RvD1 administration. Four different protocols were used to induce emphysema and administer RvD1: mice were exposed to smoking for 4 weeks with poly(I:C) or to smoking only for 24 weeks, and RvD1 was injected within the smoking exposure period to prevent regeneration or after completion of smoking exposure to assess regeneration. The mean linear intercept and inflammation scores were measured in the lung tissue, and inflammatory cells and cytokines were measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Results Measurements of mean linear intercept showed that RvD1 significantly attenuated smoking-induced lung destruction in all emphysema models. RvD1 also reduced smoking-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, which causes the structural derangements observed in emphysema. In the 4-week prevention model, RvD1 reduced the smoking-induced increase in eosinophils and interleukin-6 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In the 24-week prevention model, RvD1 also reduced the increased neutrophils and total cell counts induced by smoking. Conclusion RvD1 attenuated smoking-induced emphysema in vivo by reducing inflammation and promoting tissue regeneration. This result suggests that RvD1 may be useful in the prevention and treatment of emphysema. PMID:27313451

  12. Development of an inhalable, stimuli-responsive particulate system for delivery to deep lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yasmine; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Tammam, Salma; Lamprecht, Alf; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Schmidt, Annette; Sollazzo, Silvio; Mathur, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer, the deadliest solid tumor among all types of cancer, remains difficult to treat. This is a result of unavoidable exposure to carcinogens, poor diagnosis, the lack of targeted drug delivery platforms and limitations associated with delivery of drug to deep lung tissues. Development of a non-invasive, patient-convenient formula for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics to cancer in deep lung tissue is the aim of this study. The formulation consisted of inhalable polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/maltodextrin (MD)-based microparticles (MPs) encapsulating chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with either drug only or drug and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Drug release from CS NPs was enhanced with the aid of MNPs by a factor of 1.7 in response to external magnetic field. Preferential toxicity by CS NPs was shown towards tumor cells (A549) in comparison to cultured fibroblasts (L929). The prepared spray freeze dried (SFD) powders for CS NPs and CS MNPs were of the same size at ∼6μm. They had a fine particle fraction (FPF≤5.2μm) of 40-42% w/w and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 5-6μm as determined by the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). SFD-MPs of CS MNPs possess higher MMAD due to the high density associated with encapsulated MNPs. The developed formulation demonstrates several capabilities including tissue targeting, controlled drug release, and the possible imaging and diagnostic values (due to its MNPs content) and therefore represents an improved therapeutic platform for drug delivery to cancer in deep lung tissue. PMID:27244047

  13. FOXP3(+)Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in lung tissues of mice with asthma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wu, Xianbo; Zhu, Haiyan; Xie, Yiqiang; Tang, Songqi; Jiang, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Immunocyte imbalances, particularly of Th1 and Th2 type helper T (Th) cells, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases like asthma. Recent studies have suggested an important role for the balance between Th17 cells and FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). However, whether this balance is important in asthma remains unknown. This study sought to detect the populations of T cell subtypes (Th1, Th2, FOXP3(+) Treg, Th17) in lung tissue of a mouse model of asthma to understand the significance of immunocyte balances in the disease. An asthma model was generated by sensitizing ten pathogen-free BALB/c mice using a standard ovalbumin challenge; ten other mice were challenged with PBS to serve as a control group. Total white cells and differential cell counts were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and percentages of T cell subtypes were determined using flow cytometry. The severity of inflammation in lung tissue was evaluated in tissue sections, and airway hyperresponsiveness was assessed by unrestrained plethysmography. In mice with asthma, compared to those in the control group, total white cell, eosinophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte cell counts were higher, and lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were more severe (P<0.05), indicating that the model of asthma was successfully generated. Further, mice with asthma had higher percentages of Th2 and Th17 cells and lower percentages of Th1 and Foxp3(+) Treg cells in lung tissue (P<0.05). Consequently, the ratios of Th1/Th2 cells and FOXP3(+)Treg/Th17 cells were higher in the asthma group (P<0.05). Thus, in addition to the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells, an imbalance of FOXP3(+)Treg/Th17 cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26064325

  14. FOXP3+Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in lung tissues of mice with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wu, Xianbo; Zhu, Haiyan; Xie, Yiqiang; Tang, Songqi; Jiang, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Immunocyte imbalances, particularly of Th1 and Th2 type helper T (Th) cells, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases like asthma. Recent studies have suggested an important role for the balance between Th17 cells and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). However, whether this balance is important in asthma remains unknown. This study sought to detect the populations of T cell subtypes (Th1, Th2, FOXP3+ Treg, Th17) in lung tissue of a mouse model of asthma to understand the significance of immunocyte balances in the disease. An asthma model was generated by sensitizing ten pathogen-free BALB/c mice using a standard ovalbumin challenge; ten other mice were challenged with PBS to serve as a control group. Total white cells and differential cell counts were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and percentages of T cell subtypes were determined using flow cytometry. The severity of inflammation in lung tissue was evaluated in tissue sections, and airway hyperresponsiveness was assessed by unrestrained plethysmography. In mice with asthma, compared to those in the control group, total white cell, eosinophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte cell counts were higher, and lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were more severe (P<0.05), indicating that the model of asthma was successfully generated. Further, mice with asthma had higher percentages of Th2 and Th17 cells and lower percentages of Th1 and Foxp3+ Treg cells in lung tissue (P<0.05). Consequently, the ratios of Th1/Th2 cells and FOXP3+Treg/Th17 cells were higher in the asthma group (P<0.05). Thus, in addition to the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells, an imbalance of FOXP3+Treg/Th17 cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26064325

  15. Automated characterization of normal and pathologic lung tissue by topological texture analysis of multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Fink, C.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Reliable and accurate methods for objective quantitative assessment of parenchymal alterations in the lung are necessary for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. Two major types of alterations are pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis, emphysema being characterized by abnormal enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal, nonrespiratory bronchiole, accompanied by destructive changes of the alveolar walls. The main characteristic of fibrosis is coursening of the interstitial fibers and compaction of the pulmonary tissue. With the ability to display anatomy free from superimposing structures and greater visual clarity, Multi-Detector-CT has shown to be more sensitive than the chest radiograph in identifying alterations of lung parenchyma. In automated evaluation of pulmonary CT-scans, quantitative image processing techniques are applied for objective evaluation of the data. A number of methods have been proposed in the past, most of which utilize simple densitometric tissue features based on the mean X-ray attenuation coefficients expressed in terms of Hounsfield Units [HU]. Due to partial volume effects, most of the density-based methodologies tend to fail, namely in cases, where emphysema and fibrosis occur within narrow spatial limits. In this study, we propose a methodology based upon the topological assessment of graylevel distribution in the 3D image data of lung tissue which provides a way of improving quantitative CT evaluation. Results are compared to the more established density-based methods.

  16. State-of-the-Art Imaging of the Lung for Connective Tissue Disease (CTD).

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Seki, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the respiratory system is common in connective tissue diseases (CTDs), and the resultant lung injury can affect every part of the lung: the pleura, alveoli, interstitium, vasculature, lymphatic tissue, and large and/or small airways. Most of the parenchymal manifestations of CTD are similar to those found in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), especially idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, and can be classified using the same system. Although there is some overlap, each CTD is associated with a characteristic pattern of pulmonary involvement. For this reason, thin-section CT as well as pulmonary function tests and serum markers are utilized for diagnosis, disease severity assessment, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of ILD associated with CTD. In addition, newly developed pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures have been recommended as useful alternative imaging options for patients with CTD. This review article will (1) address radiological findings for chest radiography and conventional or thin-section CT currently used for six major types of CTD, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis), polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome and mixed connective tissue disease; (2) briefly deal with radiation dose reduction for thin-section CT examination; and (3) discuss clinically applicable or state-of-the-art MR imaging for CTD patients. PMID:26483318

  17. Three-dimensional simultaneous optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy for investigation of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Meissner, Sven; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-07-01

    Although several strategies exist for a minimal-invasive treatment of patients with lung failure, the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome still reaches 30% at minimum. This striking number indicates the necessity of understanding lung dynamics on an alveolar level. To investigate the dynamical behavior on a microscale, we used three-dimensional geometrical and functional imaging to observe tissue parameters including alveolar size and length of embedded elastic fibers during ventilation. We established a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy system that is able to monitor the distension of alveolar tissue and elastin fibers simultaneously within three dimensions. The OCT system can laterally resolve a 4.9 μm line pair feature and has an approximately 11 μm full-width-half-maximum axial resolution in air. confocal fluorescence microscopy visualizes molecular properties of the tissue with a resolution of 0.75 μm (laterally), and 5.9 μm (axially) via fluorescence detection of the dye sulforhodamine B specifically binding to elastin. For system evaluation, we used a mouse model in situ to perform lung distension by application of different constant pressure values within the physiological regime. Our method enables the investigation of alveolar dynamics by helping to reveal basic processes emerging during artificial ventilation and breathing.

  18. Diagnosis and prevalence of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma in lung tissues of naturally infected farm sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Ganesh G.; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to detect ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) in sheep flocks affected with pulmonary disorders at organized farm. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 sheep died naturally were thoroughly examined for the lesions of OPA during necropsy. Tissue sections from affected portion of the lungs from each animal were collected aseptically and divided into two parts; one each for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and another for histopathology. Results: On PCR examination of lung tissues, six sheep (8%) were found to be positive for JSRV. Two of them were 3-6 months of age and did not show clinical signs/gross lesions of OPA. Four adult sheep positive on PCR revealed characteristic lesions of OPA on gross and histopathological examination. Conclusion: In the absence of known specific antibody response to the infection with JSRV, there is no diagnostic serological test available. The PCR assay employed in this study on lung tissues, using primers based on the U3 region of the viral long terminal repeat for JSRV would be helpful in the screening of preclinical and clinical cases of OPA in sheep. PMID:27182131

  19. Transplantation of a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesman, Ayelet; Habib, Manhal; Caspi, Oren; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Levenberg, Shulamit; Gepstein, Lior

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration strategies have been hampered by the lack of sources for human cardiomyocytes (CMs) and by the significant donor cell loss following transplantation. We assessed the ability of a three-dimensional tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle to engraft in the in vivo rat heart and to promote functional vascularization. Human embryonic stem cell-derived CMs alone or with human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) and embryonic fibroblasts (triculture constructs) were seeded onto biodegradable porous scaffolds. The resulting tissue constructs were transplanted to the in vivo rat heart and formed cardiac tissue grafts. Immunostaining studies for human-specific CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin demonstrated the formation of both donor (human) and host (rat)-derived vasculature within the engrafted triculture tissue constructs. Intraventricular injection of fluorescent microspheres or lectin resulted in their incorporation by human-derived vessels, confirming their functional integration with host coronary vasculature. Finally, the number of blood vessels was significantly greater in the triculture tissue constructs (60.3 +/- 8/mm(3), p < 0.05) when compared with scaffolds containing only CMs (39.0 +/- 14.4/mm(3)). In conclusion, a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle can be established ex vivo and transplanted in vivo to form stable grafts. By utilizing a multicellular preparation we were able to increase biograft vascularization and to show that the preexisting human vessels can become functional and contribute to tissue perfusion. PMID:19642856

  20. Expression of aquaporins in bronchial tissue and lung parenchyma of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aquaporins AQP1 and AQP5 are highly expressed in the lung. Recent studies have shown that the expression of these proteins may be mechanistically involved in the airway inflammation and in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of AQP1 and AQP5 in the bronchial tissue and the lung parenchyma of patients with COPD and COPD-resistant smokers. Methods Using a case–control design, we selected a group of 15 subjects with COPD and 15 resistant smokers (smokers without COPD) as a control, all of whom were undergoing lung resection surgery due to a lung neoplasm. We studied the expression of AQP1 and AQP5 in the bronchial tissue and the lung parenchyma by means of immunohistochemistry and reverse-transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction. Tissue expression of AQP1 and AQP5 was semi-quantitatively assessed in terms of intensity and expression by immunohistochemistry using a 4-point scale ranging from 0 (none) to 3 (maximum). Results There were no significant differences in gene expression between COPD patients and resistant smokers both in the bronchial tissue and in the lung parenchyma. However, AQP1 gene expression was 2.41-fold higher in the parenchyma of smokers with COPD compared to controls, whereas the AQP5 gene showed the opposite pattern, with a 7.75-fold higher expression in the bronchus of smokers with COPD compared with controls. AQP1 and AQP5 proteins were preferentially expressed in endothelial cells, showing a higher intensity for AQP1 (66.7% of cases with an intensity of 3, and 93.3% of subjects with an extension of 3 among patients with COPD). Subtle interstitial disease was associated with type II pneumocyte hyperplasia and an increased expression of AQP1. Conclusions This study provides pilot observations on the differences in AQP1 and AQP5 expression between COPD patients and COPD-resistant smokers. Our findings suggest a potential role for AQP1 in the

  1. The expression of the Hu (paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis/sensory neuronopathy) antigen in human normal and tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, J.; Furneaux, H. M.; Cordon-Cardo, C.; Posner, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis, the authors have studied the expression of the Hu antigen (a neuronal protein identified by the serum of patients with small cell lung cancer and paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis/sensory neuronopathy) in normal human tissues and 115 tumors of different histologic types. In normal tissue, the Hu antigen is highly restricted to the nervous system. In lung tumors, the Hu antigen is restricted in its expression to all small cell carcinomas. A few other neuroendocrine-related tumors, especially neuroblastomas (50%), also express the antigen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1415481

  2. PIXE analysis of mineral matter in thin sections of human lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annegarn, H. J.; Pillay, A. E.; Da Vies, J. C. A.; Faure, D.; Sellschop, J. P. F.

    1988-12-01

    It is postulated that insoluble mineral residues in the lungs of deceased miners may provide a quantitative measure of the integrated lifetime dust exposure. For epidemiological surveys rapid instrumental techniques are required to analyse representative samples of lung tissue. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been evaluated for analysis of microtomed slices of wax-embedded lung and lymph node (Hilar gland) tissue from deceased miners. The 50 μm slices, mounted on Mylar backings and placed in a He atmosphere, were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons. PIXE analysis provided adequate sensitivity for key mineral elements including Si, Cr and Ti. The porous, nonuniform nature of lung tissue made it impossible to measure the tissue mass in the irradiated area, preventing the calculation of mass concentrations. Instead, biological sulphur was used as an internal standard, assuming that the fraction of S in soft, fat-free tissue is constant. Results are presented for lung and lymph node tissue from gold, chrome, copper, platinum and asbestos miners. Si mineral residues in lymph node tissue were found to be concentrated by a factor 50 relative to lung. Cr residues were clearly observed in the chrome miner's lung, but no excess of Cu was present in the copper miner's lung. There is evidence of preferential Si removal relative to Ti. Results warrant further development of PIXE for scanning of large numbers of lung samples prepared in the above manner.

  3. Fluorescence Lifetimes of Normal and Carcinomatous Human Nasopharyngeal Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Li, H.; Li, B.; Chen, R.; Zheng, G.; Song, C.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of normal and carcinomatous in vitro human nasopharyngeal tissues are compared. By fitting the time-resolved emission with exponential decays, mean lifetimes were obtained. There were marked differences between the lifetimes of the carcinomatous and the normal tissues. Thus, early diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is possible. In general, comprehensive information from human tissue autofluorescence can be acquired via both time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectra.

  4. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role. PMID:24719460

  5. The human transcriptome across tissues and individuals

    PubMed Central

    Melé, Marta; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Reverter, Ferran; DeLuca, David S.; Monlong, Jean; Sammeth, Michael; Young, Taylor R.; Goldmann, Jakob M; Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Johnson, Rory; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Djebali, Sarah; Niarchou, Anastasia; Wright, Fred A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Calvo, Miquel; Getz, Gad; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation and posttranscriptional processing underlie many cellular and organismal phenotypes. We used RNA sequence data generated by Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project to investigate the patterns of transcriptome variation across individuals and tissues. Tissues exhibit characteristic transcriptional signatures that show stability in postmortem samples. These signatures are dominated by a relatively small number of genes—which is most clearly seen in blood—though few are exclusive to a particular tissue and vary more across tissues than individuals. Genes exhibiting high interindividual expression variation include disease candidates associated with sex, ethnicity, and age. Primary transcription is the major driver of cellular specificity, with splicing playing mostly a complementary role; except for the brain, which exhibits a more divergent splicing program. Variation in splicing, despite its stochasticity, may play in contrast a comparatively greater role in defining individual phenotypes. PMID:25954002

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus.

  7. Measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong

    2003-01-01

    Experimental techniques for measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue are presented, respectively. Optical penetration depth can be obtained from the measurement of the relative fluence-depth distribution inside the target tissue. The depth of normal and carcinomatous human lung tissues irradiated with the wavelengths of 406.7, 632.8 and 674.4 nm in vitro are respectively determined. In addition, a novel simple method based on total internal reflection for measuring the refractive index of biotissue in vivo is developed, and the refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color are measured. Their refractive indices are almost same and the average is 1.533.

  8. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  9. Real-time soft tissue motion estimation for lung tumors during radiotherapy delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross; Keall, Paul

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To provide real-time lung tumor motion estimation during radiotherapy treatment delivery without the need for implanted fiducial markers or additional imaging dose to the patient.Methods: 2D radiographs from the therapy beam's-eye-view (BEV) perspective are captured at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz with a frame grabber allowing direct RAM access to the image buffer. An in-house developed real-time soft tissue localization algorithm is utilized to calculate soft tissue displacement from these images in real-time. The system is tested with a Varian TX linear accelerator and an AS-1000 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device operating at a resolution of 512 × 384 pixels. The accuracy of the motion estimation is verified with a dynamic motion phantom. Clinical accuracy was tested on lung SBRT images acquired at 2 fps.Results: Real-time lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images without fiducial markers is successfully demonstrated. For the phantom study, a mean tracking error <1.0 mm [root mean square (rms) error of 0.3 mm] was observed. The tracking rms accuracy on BEV images from a lung SBRT patient (≈20 mm tumor motion range) is 1.0 mm.Conclusions: The authors demonstrate for the first time real-time markerless lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images alone. The described system can operate at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz and does not require prior knowledge to establish traceable landmarks for tracking on the fly. The authors show that the geometric accuracy is similar to (or better than) previously published markerless algorithms not operating in real-time.

  10. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%-25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  11. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%–25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  12. Quantifying Heterogeneity in Emphysema from High Resolution Computed Tomography: A Lung Tissue Research Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, Dan M.; Patel, Nova C.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objective To quantify spatial distribution of emphysema using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), we applied semi-automated analysis with internal attenuation calibration to measure regional air volume, tissue volume, and fractional tissue volume (FTV=tissue/[air+tissue] volume) in well-characterized patients studied by the Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC). Methods HRCT was obtained at supine end-inspiration and end-expiration, and prone end-inspiration from 31 patients with mild, moderate, severe, or very severe emphysema (stages II–V, FEV1>75%, 51–75%, 21–50% and ≤20% predicted, respectively). Control data were from 20 healthy non-smokers (stage I). Each lobe was analyzed separately. Heterogeneity of FTV was assessed from coefficients of variation (CV) within and among lobes, and the kurtosis and skewness of FTV histograms. Results In emphysema, lobar air volume increased up to 177% except in the right middle lobe. Lobar tissue volume increased up to 107% in mild-moderate stages then normalized in advanced stages. Normally, FTV was up to 82% higher in lower than upper lobes. In mild-moderate emphysema, lobar FTV increased by up to 74% above normal at supine inspiration. In severe emphysema FTV declined below normal in all lobes and positions in correlation with pulmonary function (p<0.05). Markers of FTV heterogeneity increased steadily with disease stage in correlation with pulmonary function (p<0.05); the pattern is distinct from that seen in interstitial lung disease (ILD). Conclusion CT-derived biomarkers differentiate the spatial patterns of emphysema distribution and heterogeneity from that in ILD. Early emphysema is associated with elevated tissue volume and FTV, consistent with hyperemia, inflammation or atelectasis. PMID:23122057

  13. Predicting DNA methylation level across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Baoshan; Wilker, Elissa H.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Byun, Hyang-Min; Wong, Kenny C. C.; Motta, Valeria; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Schwartz, Joel; Cookson, William O. C. M.; Khabbaz, Kamal; Mittleman, Murray A.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Liang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Differences in methylation across tissues are critical to cell differentiation and are key to understanding the role of epigenetics in complex diseases. In this investigation, we found that locus-specific methylation differences between tissues are highly consistent across individuals. We developed a novel statistical model to predict locus-specific methylation in target tissue based on methylation in surrogate tissue. The method was evaluated in publicly available data and in two studies using the latest IlluminaBeadChips: a childhood asthma study with methylation measured in both peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and lymphoblastoid cell lines; and a study of postoperative atrial fibrillation with methylation in PBL, atrium and artery. We found that our method can greatly improve accuracy of cross-tissue prediction at CpG sites that are variable in the target tissue [R2 increases from 0.38 (original R2 between tissues) to 0.89 for PBL-to-artery prediction; from 0.39 to 0.95 for PBL-to-atrium; and from 0.81 to 0.98 for lymphoblastoid cell line-to-PBL based on cross-validation, and confirmed using cross-study prediction]. An extended model with multiple CpGs further improved performance. Our results suggest that large-scale epidemiology studies using easy-to-access surrogate tissues (e.g. blood) could be recalibrated to improve understanding of epigenetics in hard-to-access tissues (e.g. atrium) and might enable non-invasive disease screening using epigenetic profiles. PMID:24445802

  14. Predicting DNA methylation level across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshan; Wilker, Elissa H; Willis-Owen, Saffron A G; Byun, Hyang-Min; Wong, Kenny C C; Motta, Valeria; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Schwartz, Joel; Cookson, William O C M; Khabbaz, Kamal; Mittleman, Murray A; Moffatt, Miriam F; Liang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Differences in methylation across tissues are critical to cell differentiation and are key to understanding the role of epigenetics in complex diseases. In this investigation, we found that locus-specific methylation differences between tissues are highly consistent across individuals. We developed a novel statistical model to predict locus-specific methylation in target tissue based on methylation in surrogate tissue. The method was evaluated in publicly available data and in two studies using the latest IlluminaBeadChips: a childhood asthma study with methylation measured in both peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and lymphoblastoid cell lines; and a study of postoperative atrial fibrillation with methylation in PBL, atrium and artery. We found that our method can greatly improve accuracy of cross-tissue prediction at CpG sites that are variable in the target tissue [R(2) increases from 0.38 (original R(2) between tissues) to 0.89 for PBL-to-artery prediction; from 0.39 to 0.95 for PBL-to-atrium; and from 0.81 to 0.98 for lymphoblastoid cell line-to-PBL based on cross-validation, and confirmed using cross-study prediction]. An extended model with multiple CpGs further improved performance. Our results suggest that large-scale epidemiology studies using easy-to-access surrogate tissues (e.g. blood) could be recalibrated to improve understanding of epigenetics in hard-to-access tissues (e.g. atrium) and might enable non-invasive disease screening using epigenetic profiles. PMID:24445802

  15. A hypothesis on the mechanism of trauma of lung tissue subjected to impact load.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Yen, R T; Tao, Z L; Liu, S Q

    1988-02-01

    When a compressive impact load is applied on the chest, as in automobile crash or bomb explosion, the lung may be injured and show evidences of edema and hemorrhage. Since soft tissues have good strength in compression, why does a compression wave cause edema? Our hypothesis is that tensile and shear stresses are induced in the alveolar wall on rebound from compression, and that the maximum principal stress (tensile) may exceed critical values for increased permeability of the epithelium to small solutes, or even fracture. Furthermore, small airways may collapse and trap gas in alveoli at a critical strain, causing traumatic atelectasis. The collapsed airways reopen at a higher strain after the wave passes, during which the expansion of the trapped gas will induce additional tension in the alveolar wall. To test this hypothesis, we made three new experiments: (1), measuring the effect of transient overstretch of the alveolar membrane on the rate of lung weight increase; (2) determining the critical pressure for reopening collapsed airways of rabbit lung subjected to cyclic compression and expansion; (3) cyclic compression of lung with trachea closed. We found that in isolated rabbit lung overstretching increases the rate of edema fluid formation, that the critical strain for airway reopening is higher than that for closing, and that these critical strains are strain-rate dependent, but independent of the state of the trachea, whether it is open or closed. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is presented to show that the maximum principal (tensile) stress is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum initial compressive stress at certain localities of the lung.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3279269

  16. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  17. Dendritic Cells and Monocytes with Distinct Inflammatory Responses Reside in Lung Mucosa of Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Rankin, Gregory; Lepzien, Rico; Pourazar, Jamshid; Behndig, Annelie F; Ahlm, Clas; Blomberg, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Every breath we take contains potentially harmful pathogens or allergens. Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are essential in maintaining a delicate balance of initiating immunity without causing collateral damage to the lungs because of an exaggerated inflammatory response. To document the diversity of lung mononuclear phagocytes at steady-state, we performed bronchoscopies on 20 healthy subjects, sampling the proximal and distal airways (bronchial wash and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively), as well as mucosal tissue (endobronchial biopsies). In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, we identified subpopulations of monocytes, myeloid DCs (MDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs in the lung mucosa. Intermediate monocytes and MDCs were highly frequent in the airways compared with peripheral blood. Strikingly, the density of mononuclear phagocytes increased upon descending the airways. Monocytes from blood and airways produced 10-fold more proinflammatory cytokines than MDCs upon ex vivo stimulation. However, airway monocytes were less inflammatory than blood monocytes, suggesting a more tolerant nature. The findings of this study establish how to identify human lung mononuclear phagocytes and how they function in normal conditions, so that dysregulations in patients with respiratory diseases can be detected to elucidate their contribution to immunity or pathogenesis. PMID:27183618

  18. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  19. Natural innate cytokine response to immunomodulators and adjuvants in human precision-cut lung slices

    SciTech Connect

    Switalla, S.; Lauenstein, L.; Prenzler, F.; Knothe, S.; Foerster, C.; Fieguth, H.-G.; Pfennig, O.; Schaumann, F.; Martin, C.; Guzman, C.A.; Ebensen, T.; Mueller, M.; Hohlfeld, J.M.; Krug, N.; Braun, A.; Sewald, K.

    2010-08-01

    Prediction of lung innate immune responses is critical for developing new drugs. Well-established immune modulators like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can elicit a wide range of immunological effects. They are involved in acute lung diseases such as infections or chronic airway diseases such as COPD. LPS has a strong adjuvant activity, but its pyrogenicity has precluded therapeutic use. The bacterial lipopeptide MALP-2 and its synthetic derivative BPPcysMPEG are better tolerated. We have compared the effects of LPS and BPPcysMPEG on the innate immune response in human precision-cut lung slices. Cytokine responses were quantified by ELISA, Luminex, and Meso Scale Discovery technology. The initial response to LPS and BPPcysMPEG was marked by coordinated and significant release of the mediators IL-1{beta}, MIP-1{beta}, and IL-10 in viable PCLS. Stimulation of lung tissue with BPPcysMPEG, however, induced a differential response. While LPS upregulated IFN-{gamma}, BPPcysMPEG did not. This traces back to their signaling pathways via TLR4 and TLR2/6. The calculated exposure doses selected for LPS covered ranges occurring in clinical studies with human beings. Correlation of obtained data with data from human BAL fluid after segmental provocation with endotoxin showed highly comparable effects, resulting in a coefficient of correlation > 0.9. Furthermore, we were interested in modulating the response to LPS. Using dexamethasone as an immunosuppressive drug for anti-inflammatory therapy, we found a significant reduction of GM-CSF, IL-1{beta}, and IFN-{gamma}. The PCLS-model offers the unique opportunity to test the efficacy and toxicity of biological agents intended for use by inhalation in a complex setting in humans.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were

  1. A quantitative comparison analysis of diatoms in the lung tissues and the drowning medium as an indicator of drowning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Ma, Yanbin; Liu, Chao; Wen, Jinfeng; Hu, Sunlin; Shi, He; Zhu, Lingyun

    2016-08-01

    The presence of diatoms in the lung tissues, internal organs and bone marrow is considered as the supportive evidence in the diagnosis of death by drowning. Generally, the diatoms detected in the lung tissues are regarded as insignificant since these diatoms can be detected in the lung tissues of the postmortem immersion bodies. In this study, we analyzed the relationships between the numbers of the diatoms in the lung tissues and the drowning medium. We made a comparison analysis between the diatoms in the lung tissues and the drowning medium using the ratio of diatom numbers in both samples (L/D ratio), utilizing Microwave Digestion - Vacuum Filtration - Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy method. Our data indicate that the L/D ratios in victims of the drowning group were higher than the postmortem immersion group. A higher L/D ratio provides valuable information about the cause of death in drowning victims. Quantitative diatom analysis in the lung tissues, especially combined with the diatom analysis of the drowning medium, provides supportive evidence in determining if a body recovered in water was due to drowning or not. PMID:27266652

  2. Human lung cancer cells express functionally active Toll-like receptor 9

    PubMed Central

    Droemann, Daniel; Albrecht, Dirk; Gerdes, Johannes; Ulmer, Artur J; Branscheid, Detlev; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Dalhoff, Klaus; Zabel, Peter; Goldmann, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    Background CpG-oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN), which induce signaling through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), are currently under investigation as adjuvants in therapy against infections and cancer. CpG-ODN function as Th-1 adjuvants and are able to activate dendritic cells. In humans TLR9 has been described to be strongly expressed in B-lymphocytes, monocytes, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and at low levels in human respiratory cells. We determined whether a direct interaction of bacterial DNA with the tumor cells themselves is possible and investigated the expression and function of TLR9 in human malignant solid tumors and cell lines. TLR9 expression by malignant tumor cells, would affect treatment approaches using CpG-ODN on the one hand, and, on the other hand, provide additional novel information about the role of tumor cells in tumor-immunology. Methods The expression of TLR9 in HOPE-fixed non-small lung cancer, non-malignant tissue and tumor cell lines was assessed using immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR and DNA-sequencing. Apoptosis and chemokine expression was detected by FACS analysis and the Bio-Plex system. Results We found high TLR9 signal intensities in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in the majority of lung cancer specimens as well as in all tested tumor cell lines. In contrast to this non-malignant lung tissues showed only sporadically weak expression. Stimulation of HeLa and A549 cells with CpG-ODN induced secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and reduction of spontaneous and tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced apoptosis. Conclusions Here we show that TLR9 is expressed in a selection of human lung cancer tissues and various tumor cell lines. The expression of functionally active TLR9 in human malignant tumors might affect treatment approaches using CpG-ODN and shows that malignant cells can be regarded as active players in tumor-immunology. PMID:15631627

  3. Evaluation of brachytherapy lung implant dose distributions from photon-emitting sources due to tissue heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used for permanent implantation to treat lung cancer. However, the current brachytherapy dose calculation formalism assumes a homogeneous water medium without considering the influence of radiation scatter or tissue heterogeneities. The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effects of tissue heterogeneities for permanent lung brachytherapy. Methods: The MCNP5 v1.40 radiation transport code was used for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Point sources with energies of 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV were simulated to cover the range of pertinent brachytherapy energies and to glean dosimetric trends independent of specific radionuclide emissions. Source positions from postimplant CT scans of five patient implants were used for source coordinates, with dose normalized to 200 Gy at the center of each implant. With the presence of fibrosis (around the implant), cortical bone, lung, and healthy tissues, dose distributions and {sub PTV}DVH were calculated using the MCNP *FMESH4 tally and the NIST mass-energy absorption coefficients. This process was repeated upon replacing all tissues with water. For all photon energies, 10{sup 9} histories were simulated to achieve statistical errors (k = 1) typically of 1%. Results: The mean PTV doses calculated using tissue heterogeneities for all five patients changed (compared to dose to water) by only a few percent over the examined photon energy range, as did PTV dose at the implant center. The {sub PTV}V{sub 100} values were 81.2%, 90.0% (as normalized), 94.3%, 93.9%, 92.7%, and 92.2% for 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV source photons, respectively. Relative to water, the maximum bone doses were higher by factors of 3.7, 5.1, 5.2, 2.4, 1.2, and 1.0 The maximum lung doses were about 0.98, 0.94, 0.91, 0.94, 0.97, and 0.99. Relative to water, the maximum healthy tissue doses at the mediastinal position were higher by factors of 9.8, 2.2, 1.3, 1.1, 1.1, and

  4. Uptake, accumulation, and egress of erythromycin by tissue culture cells of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J R; Johnson, P; Miller, M F

    1985-01-01

    The ability of erythromycin A base to penetrate and accumulate in tissue culture cells of human origin was investigated. The antibiotic was highly concentrated by early passage cells of normal bronchus, kidney, liver, lung, and skin and by cancer cells derived from breast, liver, and lung. Intracellular levels 4 to 12 times that of the extracellular milieu were obtained in both early-passage and transformed cells. The total quantity of erythromycin accumulated depended on the extracellular concentration of antibiotic, but the cellular/extracellular ratios were, for the most part, independent of the initial extracellular drug concentration. In all cell types tested, the accumulated antibiotic rapidly egressed when cells were incubated in antibiotic-free medium. Bioactivity assays demonstrated that the expelled drug was unmetabolized, fully active antibiotic. The concentration of erythromycin by a variety of human cell types probably accounts, in part, for the effectiveness of the antibiotic against intracellular parasites such as Legionella and Chlamydia spp. PMID:3994346

  5. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Theriot, Corey; Zalesak, Selina; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of reactive dust, containing 1-2% of respirable fine dust (< 3 microns). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents through inhalation to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans and to identify the mechanisms and potential pathways involved in lunar dust-induced toxicity. Ccl3, Ccl12, Cxcl2, Cxcl5, Itgb8, Tnf, Ldhc, Clec4e, Bmp7, and Smad6, showed persistently significant expression changes in the lung tissue. The expression of several of these genes were dose- and time- dependent, and were significantly correlated with other pathological. Our previous data showed that no pathological changes were detected in low dose groups. However, several genes, primarily produced by lung epithelial, were significantly altered persistently in response to low-dose dust exposure. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity, contributing not only the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also understandings of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  6. CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tian Jun; Gao, Fei; Yang, Tian; Thakur, Asmitanand; Ren, Hui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting; Chen, Ming Wei

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. •CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. •CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer.

  7. Benefit of adjunctive tacrolimus in connective tissue disease-interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Witt, Leah J; Demchuk, Carley; Curran, James J; Strek, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of adjunctive tacrolimus therapy with conventional immunosuppression in patients with severe connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). We included patients from our interstitial lung disease (ILD) registry with CTD-ILD, in whom tacrolimus was added to corticosteroids and an additional immunosuppressive agent. Demographic data, clinical features, lung function, radiographic images, and pathologic findings were reviewed. Effectiveness was assessed by comparing pulmonary function tests (PFTs) closest to tacrolimus initiation to PFTs approximately 6-12 months later. Corticosteroid dose at these time points was also evaluated. We report adverse events attributed to tacrolimus. Seventeen patients with CTD-ILD were included in adverse event analysis; twelve were included in efficacy analysis. Length of tacrolimus therapy ranged from 6 to 110 months (mean 38.8 months ± 31.4). The mean improvement in percent predicted total lung capacity was 7.5% ± 11.7 (p = 0.02). Forced vital capacity mean improvement was 7.4% ± 12.5 (p = 0.06). The average decrease in corticosteroid dose at follow-up was 20.3 mg ± 25.2 (p = 0.02) with complete discontinuation in six patients. No patients experienced a life-threatening adverse event attributed to tacrolimus. Tacrolimus can be effective and is well tolerated as an adjunctive therapy and allows tapering of corticosteroids. PMID:26762710

  8. Potential Role of the Gut/Liver/Lung Axis in Alcohol-Induced Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Veronica L.; Beier, Juliane I.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2015-01-01

    Both Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD) and alcohol-related susceptibility to acute lung injury are estimated to account for the highest morbidity and mortality related to chronic alcohol abuse and, thus, represent a focus of intense investigation. In general, alcohol-induced derangements to both organs are considered to be independent and are often evaluated separately. However, the liver and lung share many general responses to damage, and specific responses to alcohol exposure. For example, both organs possess resident macrophages that play key roles in mediating the immune/inflammatory response. Additionally, alcohol-induced damage to both organs appears to involve oxidative stress that favors tissue injury. Another mechanism that appears to be shared between the organs is that inflammatory injury to both organs is enhanced by alcohol exposure. Lastly, altered extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition appears to be a key step in disease progression in both organs. Indeed, recent studies suggest that early subtle changes in the ECM may predispose the target organ to an inflammatory insult. The purpose of this chapter is to review the parallel mechanisms of liver and lung injury in response to alcohol consumption. This chapter will also explore the potential that these mechanisms are interdependent, as part of a gut-liver-lung axis. PMID:26437442

  9. High-Resolution Phase-Contrast Imaging of Submicron Particles in Unstained Lung Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittny, J. C.; Barré, S. F.; Mokso, R.; Haberthür, D.; Semmler-Behnke, M.; Kreyling, W. G.; Tsuda, A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-01

    To access the risks and chances of deposition of submicron particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung, a precise three-dimensional (3D)-localization of the sites of deposition is essential—especially because local peaks of deposition are expected in the acinar tree and in individual alveoli. In this study we developed the workflow for such an investigation. We administered 200-nm gold particles to young adult rats by intratracheal instillation. After fixation and paraffin embedding, their lungs were imaged unstained using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) at the beamline TOMCAT (Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland) at sample detector distances of 2.5 mm (absorption contrast) and of 52.5 mm (phase contrast). A segmentation based on a global threshold of grey levels was successfully done on absorption-contrast images for the gold and on the phase-contrast images for the tissue. The smallest spots containing gold possessed a size of 1-2 voxels of 370-nm side length. We conclude that a combination of phase and absorption contrast SRXTM imaging is necessary to obtain the correct segmentation of both tissue and gold particles. This method will be used for the 3D localization of deposited particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung.

  10. Lung cancer diagnosis and staging in the minimally invasive age with increasing demands for tissue analysis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Daniel B.; Wright, Jeffrey; VanderLaan, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of patients with lung cancer in recent decades has increasingly relied on minimally invasive tissue sampling techniques, such as endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) needle aspiration, transbronchial biopsy, and transthoracic image guided core needle biopsy. These modalities have been shown to have low complication rates, and provide adequate cellular material for pathologic diagnosis and necessary ancillary molecular testing. As an important component to a multidisciplinary team approach in the care of patients with lung cancer, these minimally invasive modalities have proven invaluable for the rapid and safe acquisition of tissue used for the diagnosis, staging, and molecular testing of tumors to identify the best evidence-based treatment plan. The continuous evolution of the field of lung cancer staging and treatment has translated into improvements in survival and quality of life for patients. Although differences in clinical practice between academic and community hospital settings still exist, improvements in physician education and training as well as adoption of technological advancements should help narrow this gap going forward. PMID:26380180

  11. Arsenic Species in Scute (Shell Plate) and Lung Tissues of Desert Tortoises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. L.; Berry, K.; Jacobson, E. R.; Rytuba, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is federally listed as a threatened species, and its numbers have been in decline for at least two decades. Portions of protected desert tortoise habitats coincide with anthropogenic features such as historic mines and military bases that are potential sources of ingested or inhaled arsenic. Previous studies of necropsied desert tortoise specimens collected from the Mojave Desert have shown a statistically significant link between elevated tissue levels of arsenic (As) and the occurrence of clinical disease states. Synchrotron-based, microbeam X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) and X-ray fluorescence mapping (XRF) were the primary techniques used to identify As species in these tissues. Specimens have been analyzed from a mining-impacted area (Kelly-Rand Mining district, Kern County), and from sites on or adjacent to military bases (National Training Center, Ft Irwin, and Edwards AFB). XRF maps showed that scute sections sliced perpendicular to the exposed surface contain one or more diffuse bands of As(III) coordinated by oxygen instead of sulfur. This As(III) species is identical in all individuals, suggesting that it represents metabolized As. In contrast, the exterior surface and edges of scute sections contained As-rich particles of varying oxidation state and species, suggesting an exogenous origin. Particles contained reduced As in sulfides (Cu sulfide or arsenide) and As(V) in ferric sulfates and/or ferric arsenates. XAFS spectra of many As(V)-rich particles were close visual matches to spectra of known arsenic-bearing minerals or phases such as scorodite, jarosite, and arsenic adsorbed to iron (hydr)oxides. At least one, and more commonly 3-5 exogeneous As-rich particles were found in the formalin-preserved lung tissue sections examined, suggesting that such particles were relatively common. Pentavalent As was observed in forms similar to those encountered on scute sections. As(III) was observed in

  12. Small airway remodeling in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a study in autopsy lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Airway dysfunction in patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is evidenced by expiratory flow limitation and dynamic hyperinflation. These functional alterations have been attributed to closure/obstruction of small airways. Airway morphological changes have been reported in experimental models of acute lung injury, characterized by epithelial necrosis and denudation in distal airways. To date, however, no study has focused on the morphological airway changes in lungs from human subjects with ARDS. The aim of this study is to evaluate structural and inflammatory changes in distal airways in ARDS patients. Methods We retrospectively studied autopsy lung tissue from subjects who died with ARDS and from control subjects who died of non pulmonary causes. Using image analysis, we quantified the extension of epithelial changes (normal, abnormal and denudated epithelium expressed as percentages of the total epithelium length), bronchiolar inflammation, airway wall thickness, and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein content in distal airways. The Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test was used to compare data between the ARDS and control groups. Bonferroni adjustments were used for multiple tests. The association between morphological and clinical data was analyzed by Pearson rank test. Results Thirty-one ARDS patients (A: PaO2/FiO2 ≤200, 45 ± 14 years, 16 males) and 11 controls (C: 52 ± 16 years, 7 males) were included in the study. ARDS airways showed a shorter extension of normal epithelium (A:32.9 ± 27.2%, C:76.7 ± 32.7%, P < 0.001), a larger extension of epithelium denudation (A:52.6 ± 35.2%, C:21.8 ± 32.1%, P < 0.01), increased airway inflammation (A:1(3), C:0(1), P = 0.03), higher airway wall thickness (A:138.7 ± 54.3 μm, C:86.4 ± 33.3 μm, P < 0.01), and higher airway content of collagen I, fibronectin, versican and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) compared to controls (P ≤0.03). The extension of normal epithelium

  13. 3-D segmentation of human sternum in lung MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Pazokifard, Banafsheh; Sowmya, Arcot

    2013-01-01

    A fully automatic novel algorithm is presented for accurate 3-D segmentation of the human sternum in lung multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) images. The segmentation result is refined by employing active contours to remove calcified costal cartilage that is attached to the sternum. For each dataset, costal notches (sternocostal joints) are localized in 3-D by using a sternum mask and positions of the costal notches on it as reference. The proposed algorithm for sternum segmentation was tested on 16 complete lung MDCT datasets and comparison of the segmentation results to the reference delineation provided by a radiologist, shows high sensitivity (92.49%) and specificity (99.51%) and small mean distance (dmean=1.07 mm). Total average of the Euclidean distance error for costal notches positioning in 3-D is 4.2 mm. PMID:24110446

  14. Silencing of AP-4 inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and promotes apoptosis in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    HU, XUANYU; GUO, WEI; CHEN, SHANSHAN; XU, YIZHUO; LI, PING; WANG, HUAQI; CHU, HEYING; LI, JUAN; DU, YUWEN; CHEN, XIAONAN; ZHANG, GUOJUN; ZHAO, GUOQIANG

    2016-01-01

    Activating enhancer-binding protein (AP)-4 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, and is involved in tumor biology. However, the role of AP-4 in human lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of AP-4 in human lung cancer tissues and cells was investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and it was observed that the level of AP-4 was increased in tumor tissues and cells compared with their normal counterparts. AP-4 expression was knocked down by transfection with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in lung cancer cells, and this indicated that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 inhibited cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis by modulating the expression of p21 and cyclin D1. The results of the present study suggest that AP-4 may be an oncoprotein that has a significant role in lung cancer, and that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 may have therapeutic potential as a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27313685

  15. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  16. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  17. Common SIRT1 variants modify the effect of abdominal adipose tissue on aging-related lung function decline.

    PubMed

    Curjuric, Ivan; Imboden, Medea; Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier; Gerbase, Margaret W; Haun, Margot; Keidel, Dirk; Kumar, Ashish; Pons, Marco; Rochat, Thierry; Schikowski, Tamara; Schindler, Christian; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kronenberg, Florian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M

    2016-06-01

    Lung function is an independent predictor of mortality and serves as an aging marker in never smokers. The protein sirtuin-1 of gene SIRT1 has profound anti-inflammatory effects and regulates metabolic pathways. Its suggested longevity effects on lower organisms remain poorly studied in humans. In 1132 never smokers of the population-based SAPALDIA cohort, we investigated associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs730821, rs10997868, rs10823116) of SIRT1 and aging-related lung function decline over 11 years in terms of change in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75 % of FVC (FEF25-75) using multiple linear regression models. Interactions between the SIRT1 SNPs and adiposity parameters (body mass index (BMI), its change and weight gain) were tested by including multiplicative interaction terms into the models. SIRT1 polymorphisms exhibited no main effects, but modified the association between obesity measures and FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75 decline (p = 0.009-0.046). Per risk allele, FEV1/FVC decline was accelerated up to -0.5 % (95 % CI -1.0 to 0 %) and -0.7 % (-1.3 to -0.2 %) over interquartile range increases in BMI (2.4 kg/m(2)) or weight (6.5 kg), respectively. For FEF25-75 decline, corresponding estimates were -57 mL/s (-117 to 4 mL/s) and -76 mL/s (-1429 to -9 mL/s). Interactions were not present in participants with genetically lowered C-reactive protein concentrations. Genetic variation in SIRT1 might therefore affect lung function and human longevity by modifying subclinical inflammation arising from abdominal adipose tissue. PMID:27125385

  18. Three-dimensional scaffolds of acellular human and porcine lungs for high throughput studies of lung disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Sokocevic, Dino; DeSarno, Michael; Borg, Zachary; Parsons, Charles; Brooks, Elice M.; Platz, Joseph; Khalpey, Zain; Hoganson, David M.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying Wai; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular scaffolds from complex whole organs such as lung are being increasingly studied for ex vivo organ generation and for in vitro studies of cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We have established effective methods for efficient de- and recellularization of large animal and human lungs including techniques which allow multiple small segments (∼1–3cm3) to be excised that retain 3-dimensional lung structure. Coupled with the use of a synthetic pleural coating, cells can be selectively physiologically inoculated via preserved vascular and airway conduits. Inoculated segments can be further sliced for high throughput studies. Further, we demonstrate thermography as a powerful noninvasive technique for monitoring perfusion decellularization and for evaluating preservation of vascular and airway networks following human and porcine lung decellularization. Collectively, these techniques are a significant step forward as they allow high throughput in vitro studies from a single lung or lobe in a more biologically relevant, three-dimensional acellular scaffold. PMID:24411675

  19. Sex-specific Differences in Hyperoxic Lung Injury in Mice: Implications for Acute and Chronic Lung Disease in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2014-01-01

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO2>0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2 alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC-MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. CytochromeP450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F>M) and VEGF (M>F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. PMID:23792423

  20. Depth-resolved fluorescence of human ectocervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-04-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence of normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within 120um depth were investigated utilizing a portable confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of all ectocervical tissue samples, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed, which created serious interference in seeking the correlation between tissue fluorescence and tissue pathology. While from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer, the measured NADH fluorescence induced by 355nm excitation and FAD fluorescence induced by 457nm excitation were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. The ratios between NADH over FAD fluorescence increased statistically in the CIN epithelial relative to the normal and HPV epithelia, which indicated increased metabolic activity in precancerous tissue. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  1. Analysis of human breast tissues with Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Jianhong; Yu, Fan; Sun, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to study normal, benign and malignant human breast tissues. The Raman spectrum of normal breast tissue recorded with 514.5 nm line of Ar + laser excitation contains features attributed to carotenoids and lipids. The CH II bending mode near 1447 cm -1 in normal tissue shifts up to 1454 cm -1 in diseased tissues (benign and malignant). The band near 1660 cm -1 in normal tissue is narrow and sharp; whereas the band is broaden in the diseased tissues. In the region of C-H stretching mode, the 2902-/2860-cm -1 intensity ratio shows differences among normal, benign and malignant breast tissues. The ratio is the smallest in carcinoma tissue. The observed spectra differences may be used to probe breast lesion. The results show that Raman spectroscopic technique may have clinical applications.

  2. Interaction of Mycoplasma pneumoniae with human lung fibroblasts: characterization of the in vitro model.

    PubMed Central

    Gabridge, M G; Taylor-Robinson, D; Davies, H A; Dourmashkin, R R

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of pathogenic Mycoplasma pneumoniae and host cells was studied in cell cultures of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. A comparison of results obtained with fibroblasts in a monolayer format and with hamster tracheal explant cultures indicated that the former can bind significantly larger numbers of mycoplasmas. In addition, the attachment was 96% specific, that is, mediated through a neuraminidase-sensitive receptor on the host cell. Uptake of mycoplasmas was directly related to the number of mycoplasma cells present in the inoculum, and attachment was virtually complete within a 30-min period at 37 degrees C. High doses of M. pneumoniae induced a marked cytopathic effect, whereas doses of less than or equal to 10(6) colony-forming units per ml produced grossly observable cell damage that was moderate and variable. Transmission electron microscopy studies indicated that attachment of M. pneumoniae to the surface of lung fibroblasts occurred with the specialized terminal structure or binding site oriented closest to the epithelial cell surface. The filamentous mycoplasma cells were spatially arranged in several configurations and were not limited to a vertical orientation. The advantages and disadvantages of human lung fibroblast monolayer cultures, in reference to other in vitro models are discussed. A new mycoplasma agar medium (G-200 agar) with a defined tissue culture base and 10% horse serum is also described. Images PMID:113348

  3. Characterization of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Jun; Kohyama, Tadashi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established three patient-paired sets of CAFs and NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs and NFs were analyzed using three-dimensional co-culture experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs showed higher {alpha}-SMA expression than NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs were implicated in invasion and differentiation of lung cancer cells. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, and targeting of CAFs could be a novel strategy for cancer treatment. However, the characteristics of human CAFs still remain to be better defined. In this study, we established patient-matched CAFs and normal fibroblasts (NFs), from tumoral and non-tumoral portions of resected lung tissue from lung cancer patients. CAFs showed higher {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression than NFs, and CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we employed three-dimensional co-culture assay with A549 lung cancer cells, where CAFs were more potent in inducing collagen gel contraction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of co-cultured collagen gel revealed that CAFs had the potential to increase invasion of A549 cells compared to NFs. These observations provide evidence that lung CAFs have the tumor-promoting capacity distinct from NFs.

  4. Early and late effects of prenatal corticosteroid treatment on the microRNA profiles of lung tissue in rats

    PubMed Central

    YU, HONG-REN; LI, SUNG-CHOU; TSENG, WAN-NING; TAIN, YOU-LIN; CHEN, CHIH-CHENG; SHEEN, JIUNN-MING; TIAO, MAO-MENG; KUO, HO-CHANG; HUANG, CHAO-CHENG; HSIEH, KAI-SHENG; HUANG, LI-TUNG

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have been administered to mothers at risk of premature delivery to induce maturation of preterm fetal lungs and prevent the development of respiratory distress syndrome. Micro (mi)RNAs serve various crucial functions in cell proliferation, differentiation and organ development; however, few studies have demonstrated an association between miRNAs and lung development. The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in the miRNA profiles of rat lung tissue following prenatal glucocorticoid therapy for fetal lung development. The differences in miRNA expression profiles were compared between postnatal days 7 (D7) and 120 (D120) rat lung tissues, followed by validation using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The miRNA profiles of rat lung tissues following prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) therapy were also investigated. miRNAs with 2-fold changes were selected for further analysis. At D120, 6 upregulated and 6 downregulated miRNAs were detected, compared with D7. Among these differentially expressed miRNAs, miR-101-3p and miR-99b-5p were associated with the lowest and highest expressions of miRNA at D7, respectively. A limited impact on the miRNA profiles of rat lung tissues was observed following prenatal DEX treatment, which may help to further clarify the mechanisms underlying normal lung development. However, the results of the present study cannot entirely elucidate the effects of prenatal DEX treatment on the lung development of premature infants, and further studies investigating the impact of prenatal corticosteroids on fetal lung miRNA profiles are required. PMID:26997989

  5. A Case of Benign Metastasizing Leiomyoma with Multiple Metastasis to the Soft Tissue, Skeletal Muscle, Lung and Breast

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ji Hoon; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Dae Cheol; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kwon, Hyuk Chan; Kim, Jae Seok

    2006-01-01

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is composed of well-differentiated smooth muscle cells and dense connective tissue. BML affects middle-aged women who have had previous hysterectomies due to a histologically benign-appearing uterine leiomyoma. We report here on a case of BML from the uterine leiomyoma in a 39-year-old woman that involved the soft tissues, skeletal muscles, lungs and breasts. She underwent a hysterectomy for the uterine leiomyoma, double oophorectomy for hormonal ablation and lung wedge resection to confirm the diagnosis. The microscopic findings of the breast and lung tumor were similar to those of the benign uterine leiomyoma. Therefore, we consider that these lesions were breast and pulmonary metastases of the uterine leiomyoma. We report here on a rare case of benign metastasizing uterine leiomyoma that involved the soft tissue, skeletal muscles, lungs and breasts, and we include a review of the relevant literature. PMID:17017672

  6. Identification of progesterone receptor in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S N; Welter, B H; Mantzke, K A; Price, T M

    1998-02-01

    Sex steroids are postulated to play a role in adipose tissue regulation and distribution, because the amount and location of adipose tissue changes during puberty and menopause. Because of the nature of adipose tissue, receptors for the female sex steroids have been difficult to demonstrate. To date, estrogen receptor messenger RNA and protein have been identified in human subcutaneous adipose tissue, but the presence of progesterone receptor (PR) has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrate PR message by Northern blot analysis in RNA isolated from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of premenopausal women. These preliminary studies revealed that PR messenger RNA levels are higher in the stromal-vascular fraction as opposed to the adipocyte fraction. Western blot analysis demonstrates both PR protein isoforms (human PR-A and human PR-B) in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, total PR could be quantitated. These studies substantiate that sex steroid receptors are present in human adipose tissue, thereby providing a direct route for regulation of adipose tissue by female sex steroids. PMID:9467566

  7. Expression of cytochrome P450 2A13 in human non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Fan, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most important causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Human cytochrome P450 2A13 enzyme (CYP2A13) is predominantly expressed in the respiratory tract and could catalyze various carcinogens. In this study, we quantified CYP2A13 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and examined the relation between CYP2A13 and clinicopathologic factors. Thirty-five paired lung cancer and normal tissues were studied for the expression of the CYP2A13 gene by using real-time PCR and Western blotting assays. We also investigated the relationship between CYP2A13 expression and clinicopathologic factors such as age, gender, histology and lymph node status in tumor tissues. SPSS (17.0) statistical software was applied for data analysis. The real-time PCR results showed that there was no significant difference in the CYP2A13 mRNA transcript levels between tumor and paired normal tissues in the 35 samples and in 12 paired squamous cell carcinomas. In adenocarcinoma, the expression of CYP2A13 mRNA in tumor tissues was 12.5% of that in adjacent tissues (P < 0.05) and it was not associated with age, gender, histology and lymph node status of the patients. The amounts of CYP2A13 proteins detected by Western blotting assays correlated well with those of the corresponding mRNAs. In conclusion, the expression of CYP2A13 was downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma. CYP2A13 may be involved in the development and progression of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23720675

  8. An optimized disaggregation method for human lung tumors that preserves the phenotype and function of the immune cells.

    PubMed

    Quatromoni, Jon G; Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Hancock, Wayne W; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy

    2015-01-01

    Careful preparation of human tissues is the cornerstone of obtaining accurate data in immunologic studies. Despite the essential importance of tissue processing in tumor immunology and clinical medicine, current methods of tissue disaggregation have not been rigorously tested for data fidelity. Thus, we critically evaluated the current techniques available in the literature that are used to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies. We discovered that these approaches are successful at digesting cellular attachments and ECMs; however, these methods frequently alter the immune cell composition and/or expression of surface molecules. We thus developed a novel approach to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies by combining gentle mechanical manipulation with an optimized cocktail of enzymes used at low doses. This enzymatic digestion cocktail optimized cell yield and cell viability, retrieved all major tumor-associated cell populations, and maintained the expression of cell-surface markers for lineage definition and in vivo effector functions. To our knowledge, we present the first rigorously tested disaggregation method designed for human lung tumors. PMID:25359999

  9. An optimized disaggregation method for human lung tumors that preserves the phenotype and function of the immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Quatromoni, Jon G.; Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Hancock, Wayne W.; Albelda, Steven M.; Eruslanov, Evgeniy

    2015-01-01

    Careful preparation of human tissues is the cornerstone of obtaining accurate data in immunologic studies. Despite the essential importance of tissue processing in tumor immunology and clinical medicine, current methods of tissue disaggregation have not been rigorously tested for data fidelity. Thus, we critically evaluated the current techniques available in the literature that are used to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies. We discovered that these approaches are successful at digesting cellular attachments and ECMs; however, these methods frequently alter the immune cell composition and/or expression of surface molecules. We thus developed a novel approach to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies by combining gentle mechanical manipulation with an optimized cocktail of enzymes used at low doses. This enzymatic digestion cocktail optimized cell yield and cell viability, retrieved all major tumor-associated cell populations, and maintained the expression of cell-surface markers for lineage definition and in vivo effector functions. To our knowledge, we present the first rigorously tested disaggregation method designed for human lung tumors. PMID:25359999

  10. TBI lung dose comparisons using bilateral and anteroposterior delivery techniques and tissue density corrections.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Daniel W; Wang, Iris Z; Lakeman, Tara; Hales, Lee D; Singh, Anurag K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares lung dose distributions for two common techniques of total body photon irradiation (TBI) at extended source-to-surface distance calculated with, and without, tissue density correction (TDC). Lung dose correction factors as a function of lateral thorax separation are approximated for bilateral opposed TBI (supine), similar to those published for anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) techniques in AAPM Report 17 (i.e., Task Group 29). 3D treatment plans were created retrospectively for 24 patients treated with bilateral TBI, and for whom CT data had been acquired from the head to the lower leg. These plans included bilateral opposed and AP-PA techniques- each with and without - TDC, using source-to-axis distance of 377 cm and largest possible field size. On average, bilateral TBI requires 40% more monitor units than AP-PA TBI due to increased separation (26% more for 23 MV). Calculation of midline thorax dose without TDC leads to dose underestimation of 17% on average (standard deviation, 4%) for bilateral 6 MV TBI, and 11% on average (standard deviation, 3%) for 23 MV. Lung dose correction factors (CF) are calculated as the ratio of midlung dose (with TDC) to midline thorax dose (without TDC). Bilateral CF generally increases with patient separation, though with high variability due to individual uniqueness of anatomy. Bilateral CF are 5% (standard deviation, 4%) higher than the same corrections calculated for AP-PA TBI in the 6 MV case, and 4% higher (standard deviation, 2%) for 23 MV. The maximum lung dose is much higher with bilateral TBI (up to 40% higher than prescribed, depending on patient anatomy) due to the absence of arm tissue blocking the anterior chest. Dose calculations for bilateral TBI without TDC are incorrect by up to 24% in the thorax for 6 MV and up to 16% for 23 MV. Bilateral lung CF may be calculated as 1.05 times the values published in Table 6 of AAPM Report 17, though a larger patient pool is necessary to better

  11. National Human Adipose Tissue Survey (Nhats)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background:

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s National Human Monitoring Program (NHMP), established by the U.S. Public Health Service in 1967, used an exposure-based approach to assess human exposure to toxic substances. Its primary component was the Natio...

  12. N-Cadherin, ADAM-10 and Aquaporin 1 expression in lung tissue exposed to fluoro-edenite fibers: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Imbesi, Rosa; Rapisarda, Venerando; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Castorina, Sergio; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Fluoro-edenite (FE) fibers are similar to other amphibole asbestos fibers. The scientific relevance of FE is due to its ability to lead to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis in lung tissue shown after its inhalation. These fibers stimulate aberrant host cell proliferation and induce the release of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen and nitrite species, which results in DNA damage. In previous studies, we showed that FE induces functional modifications in sheep and human lung fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells, where the overexpression of several molecules probably involved in pathological cellular mechanisms induced by FE exposition have been detected. However, the mechanisms of cellular and molecular toxicity and the cellular response to FE fibers are still not well known. N-cadherin, ADAM-10 and AQP1 are molecules involved in carcinogenesis and in inflammatory process. In this study we analyzed, through immunohistochemistry, their expression in the lung tissue of sheep exposed to FE. Our results showed different patterns of immunolabeling for N-cadherin, ADAM-10 and AQP1. N-cadherin and ADAM-10 were more expressed in FE exposed lung tissue, when compared with the control. On the contrary, AQP1 was more expressed in non exposed lung tissue. These results suggest that N-Cadherin, ADAM-10 and AQP1 are probably involved in different pathological processes induced by FE fiber exposition. The aim of the study was to better understand the mechanisms of cellular and molecular toxicity and of cellular response to FE fibers in order to identify, in the future, a possible therapeutic intervention in cases of FE-associated pathogenesis. PMID:25757887

  13. Tissue Proteomics Reveals Differential and Compartment-Specific Expression of the Homologs Transgelin and Transgelin-2 in Lung Adenocarcinoma and Its Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Jung-hyun; Roehrl, Michael H. A.; Wang, Julia Y.

    2009-01-01

    Discovery of tissue-specific biomarkers for human cancer is crucial for early diagnosis and molecular understanding of the disease. To overcome the limitations posed by the large dynamic concentration range and compositional complexity of tissue biomacromolecules, we applied heparin affinity fractionation for proteomic enrichment. Comparing the proteomes of five paired samples of normal lung and pulmonary adenocarcinoma tissue by 2-D difference gel electrophoresis, 14 spots were found to be differentially expressed. From these candidate spots, three proteins overexpressed in cancer were identified by mass spectrometry as transgelin (TAGLN, SM22-α, WS3-10), transgelin-2 (TAGLN2), and cyclophilin A (PPIA). Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that both TAGLN2 and PPIA were upregulated at transcriptional level. Differential protein expression levels were validated by Western blot analysis using an independent set of 10 paired lung adenocarcinoma samples. Using immunohistochemistry on human tissue sections, we discovered that overexpression of TAGLN was strictly localized to the tumor-induced reactive myofibroblastic stromal tissue compartment, whereas overexpression of TAGLN2 was exclusively localized to the neoplastic glandular compartment. Thus, the highly homologous protein pair TAGLN and TAGLN2 displayed mutually exclusive, compartment-specific cell type expression regulation in tumor stroma vs. neoplastic epithelial cells. Our data further suggest that TGLN may be a marker of active stromal remodeling in the vicinity of invasive carcinomas. It may shed light on mechanisms of tumor-stroma interaction and could be useful for early diagnosis, treatment guidance, and treatment response monitoring. PMID:19848416

  14. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Downregulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-D Expression in Human Lung Fibroblasts via the Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Osorio, Juan C; Risquez, Cristobal; Wang, Hao; Shi, Ying; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Morse, Danielle; Rosas, Ivan O; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D, a member of the VEGF family, induces both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis by activating VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and VEGFR-3 on the surface of endothelial cells. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has been shown to stimulate VEGF-A expression in human lung fibroblast via the Smad3 signaling pathway and to induce VEGF-C in human proximal tubular epithelial cells. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on VEGF-D regulation are unknown. To investigate the regulation of VEGF-D, human lung fibroblasts were studied under pro-fibrotic conditions in vitro and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) lung tissue. We demonstrate that TGF-β1 downregulates VEGF-D expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human lung fibroblasts. This TGF-β1 effect can be abolished by inhibitors of TGF-β type I receptor kinase and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), but not by Smad3 knockdown. In addition, VEGF-D knockdown in human lung fibroblasts induces G1/S transition and promotes cell proliferation. Importantly, VEGF-D protein expression is decreased in lung homogenates from IPF patients compared with control lung. In IPF lung sections, fibroblastic foci show very weak VEGF-D immunoreactivity, whereas VEGF-D is abundantly expressed within alveolar interstitial cells in control lung. Taken together, our data identify a novel mechanism for downstream signal transduction induced by TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts, through which they may mediate tissue remodeling in IPF. PMID:24515257

  15. Predictions of ozone absorption in human lungs from newborn to adult

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Graham, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry models for gases mainly have been used to predict absorption in adult humans and laboratory animals. The lack of lower respiratory tract (LRT) lung models for children has discouraged the application of theoretical gaseous dosimetry to this important sub-population. To fill this gap the authors have used several sources of data on age dependent LRT volumes, age dependent airway dimensions, a model of an adult tracheobronchial region, and a model of the adult acinus to construct theoretical LRT lung models for humans from birth to adult. An ozone (O{sub 3}) dosimetry model was then used to estimate the regional and local uptake of O{sub 3} in the (theoretical) LRTs of children and adults. For sedentary breathing, the LRT distribution of absorbed O{sub 3}, the percent uptake (76 to 85%), and the centriacinar O{sub 3} tissue dose are not very sensitive to age. For maximal work during exercise, predicted uptakes range from 83 to 91%, and the regional percent uptakes are more dependent on age than during quiet breathing. In general, total O{sub 3} absorption per minute increases with age. Regardless of age and state of breathing, the largest tissue dose of O{sub 3} is predicted to occur in the centriacinar region, where many animal studies show the maximal morphological damage due to O{sub 3}.

  16. Aerosolized human extracellular superoxide dismutase prevents hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chih-Ching; Lai, Yi-Wen; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Lai, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Wei; Kuan, Yu-Ping; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2011-01-01

    An important issue in critical care medicine is the identification of ways to protect the lungs from oxygen toxicity and reduce systemic oxidative stress in conditions requiring mechanical ventilation and high levels of oxygen. One way to prevent oxygen toxicity is to augment antioxidant enzyme activity in the respiratory system. The current study investigated the ability of aerosolized extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) to protect the lungs from hyperoxic injury. Recombinant human EC-SOD (rhEC-SOD) was produced from a synthetic cassette constructed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Female CD-1 mice were exposed in hyperoxia (FiO2>95%) to induce lung injury. The therapeutic effects of EC-SOD and copper-zinc SOD (CuZn-SOD) via an aerosol delivery system for lung injury and systemic oxidative stress at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of hyperoxia were measured by bronchoalveolar lavage, wet/dry ratio, lung histology, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in lung and liver tissues. After exposure to hyperoxia, the wet/dry weight ratio remained stable before day 2 but increased significantly after day 3. The levels of oxidative biomarker 8-oxo-dG in the lung and liver were significantly decreased on day 2 (P<0.01) but the marker in the liver increased abruptly after day 3 of hyperoxia when the mortality increased. Treatment with aerosolized rhEC-SOD increased the survival rate at day 3 under hyperoxia to 95.8%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (57.1%), albumin treated group (33.3%), and CuZn-SOD treated group (75%). The protective effects of EC-SOD against hyperoxia were further confirmed by reduced lung edema and systemic oxidative stress. Aerosolized EC-SOD protected mice against oxygen toxicity and reduced mortality in a hyperoxic model. The results encourage the use of an aerosol therapy with EC-SOD in intensive care units to reduce oxidative injury in patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, including acute

  17. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  18. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.S.

    1991-09-01

    One hundred and forty-seven bronchial samples (generations 3--6) from 66 patients (62 usable; 36 female, 26 male; median age 61) have been dissected by generation from fixed surgical lung specimens obtained after the removal of pathological lesions. In addition, one hundred and fifty-six mongol dog bronchi (generations 2--6) dissected from different lobes of 26 dog lungs have also been similarly prepared. One hundred and twenty-seven human samples have been completely processed for electron microscopy and have yielded 994 electron micrographs of which 655 have been entered into the Computerized Stereological Analysis System (COSAS) and been used for the measurement of the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface. Similarly 328 micrographs of dog epithelium from 33 bronchial samples have been used to measure the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface and have been entered into COSAS. Using the COSAS planimetry program, we continue to expand our established data bases which describe the volume density and nuclear numbers per electron micrograph for 5 cell types of the human bronchial epithelial lining of men and women, as well as smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers and similar parameters for the same 5 epithelial cell types of dog bronchi. Our micrographs of human bronchial epithelium have allowed us to analyze the recent suggestion that the DNA of lymphocytes may be subject to significant damage from Rn progeny while within the lung. Since the last progress report three papers have been submitted for publication. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  20. A mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, prevents the accumulation of hyaluronan in lung tissue injured by ionizing irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, K.; Bjermer, L.; Hellstroem, S.H.; Henriksson, R.; Haellgren, R. )

    1990-02-01

    Irradiation with a single dose of 30 Grey on the basal regions of the lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats induced a peribronchial and alveolar inflammation. Infiltration of mast cells in the edematous alveolar interstitial tissue and also in the peribronchial tissue were characteristic features of the lesion. The appearance of mast cells was already seen 4 wk after irradiation and by weeks 6 to 8 there was a heavy infiltration. The staining properties suggested that they were connective tissue-type mast cells. The infiltration of mast cells was paralleled by an accumulation of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) in the alveolar interstitial tissue 6 and 8 wk after irradiation. The recovery of hyaluronan (HA) during bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of the lungs also increased at this time. Treatment with a mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, induced a distinct reduction of granulated mast cells in the alveolar tissue. Regular treatment with compound 48/80 from the time of irradiation considerably reduced the HA recovery during BAL and the HA accumulation in the interstitial tissue but did not affect the interstitial infiltration of mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. By contrast, an accumulation of HA in the alveolar interstitial space was induced when compound 48/80 was given not until mast cell infiltration of the lung had started. The effects of compound 48/80 indicate that the connective tissue response after lung irradiation is dependent on whether or not mast cell degranulation is induced before or after the mast cell infiltration of the alveolar tissue.

  1. GENETIC ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HUMAN CHITINASES AND LUNG FUNCTION IN COPD

    PubMed Central

    Aminuddin, F.; Akhabir, L.; Stefanowicz, D.; Paré, P.D.; Connett, J.E.; Anthonisen, N.R.; Fahy, J.V.; Seibold, M.A.; Burchard, E.G.; Eng, C.; Gulsvik, A.; Bakke, P.; Cho, M. H.; Litonjua, A.; Lomas, D.A.; Anderson, W. H.; Beaty, T.H.; Crapo, J.D.; Silverman, E.K.; Sandford, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Two primary chitinases have been identified in humans – acid mammalian chitinase (AMCase) and chitotriosidase (CHIT1). Mammalian chitinases have been observed to affect the host’s immune response. The aim of this study was to test for association between genetic variation in the chitinases and phenotypes related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Polymorphisms in the chitinase genes were selected based on previous associations with respiratory diseases. Polymorphisms that were associated with lung function level or rate of decline in the Lung Health Study (LHS) cohort were analyzed for association with COPD affection status in four other COPD case-control populations. Chitinase activity and protein levels were also related to genotypes. In the Caucasian LHS population, the baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was significantly different between the AA and GG genotypic groups of the AMCase rs3818822 polymorphism. Subjects with the GG genotype had higher AMCase protein and chitinase activity compared with AA homozygotes. For CHIT1 rs2494303, a significant association was observed between rate of decline in FEV1 and the different genotypes. In the African American LHS population, CHIT1 rs2494303 and AMCase G339T genotypes were associated with rate of decline in FEV1. Although a significant effect of chitinase gene alleles was found on lung function level and decline in the LHS, we were unable to replicate the associations with COPD affection status in the other COPD study groups. PMID:22200767

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Host Defense in the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Charles, Tysheena P; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-04-01

    Immunosuppression associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection impacts all components of host defense against pulmonary infection. Cells within the lung have altered immune function and are important reservoirs for HIV infection. The host immune response to infected lung cells further compromises responses to a secondary pathogenic insult. In the upper respiratory tract, mucociliary function is impaired and there are decreased levels of salivary immunoglobulin A. Host defenses in the lower respiratory tract are controlled by alveolar macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. As HIV infection progresses, lung CD4 T cells are reduced in number causing a lack of activation signals from CD4 T cells and impaired defense by macrophages. CD8 T cells, on the other hand, are increased in number and cause lymphocytic alveolitis. Specific antibody responses by B-lymphocytes are decreased and opsonization of microorganisms is impaired. These observed defects in host defense of the respiratory tract explain the susceptibility of HIV-infected persons for oropharyngeal candidiasis, bacterial pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and other opportunistic infections. PMID:26974294

  3. Asbestos content of lung tissue in patients with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma: A study of 42 cases.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Kraynie, Alyssa; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N; Oury, Tim D; Roggli, Victor L

    2016-01-01

    Lung tissue from 42 peritoneal mesothelioma cases was analyzed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry. There were 34 men and 8 women with a mean age of 61 ± 10 years. Also, 17% of cases had histologically confirmed asbestosis, and 26% had only parietal pleural plaques. The asbestos body count exceeded our normal range in 22 of 42 cases (52%). Cases with asbestos-related pulmonary disease had higher fiber burdens than those without. The vast majority of fibers were commercial amphiboles (amosite with lesser amounts of crocidolite). These findings concur with previously published epidemiological observations. PMID:27281118

  4. Normal Human Lung Epithelial Cells Inhibit Transforming Growth Factor-β Induced Myofibroblast Differentiation via Prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Epa, Amali P.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Wahl, Lindsay A.; Lyda, Elizabeth; Kottmann, R. M.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive disease with very few effective treatments. The key effector cells in fibrosis are believed to be fibroblasts, which differentiate to a contractile myofibroblast phenotype with enhanced capacity to proliferate and produce extracellular matrix. The role of the lung epithelium in fibrosis is unclear. While there is evidence that the epithelium is disrupted in IPF, it is not known whether this is a cause or a result of the fibroblast pathology. We hypothesized that healthy epithelial cells are required to maintain normal lung homeostasis and can inhibit the activation and differentiation of lung fibroblasts to the myofibroblast phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we employed a novel co-culture model with primary human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts to investigate whether epithelial cells inhibit myofibroblast differentiation. Measurements and Main Results In the presence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, fibroblasts co-cultured with epithelial cells expressed significantly less α-smooth muscle actin and collagen and showed marked reduction in cell migration, collagen gel contraction, and cell proliferation compared to fibroblasts grown without epithelial cells. Epithelial cells from non-matching tissue origins were capable of inhibiting TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation in lung, keloid and Graves’ orbital fibroblasts. TGF-β promoted production of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in lung epithelial cells, and a PGE2 neutralizing antibody blocked the protective effect of epithelial cell co-culture. Conclusions We provide the first direct experimental evidence that lung epithelial cells inhibit TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation and pro-fibrotic phenotypes in fibroblasts. This effect is not restricted by tissue origin, and is mediated, at least in part, by PGE2. Our data support the hypothesis that the epithelium plays a crucial role in maintaining lung homeostasis

  5. The novel miR-9500 regulates the proliferation and migration of human lung cancer cells by targeting Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, J K; Jung, H Y; Lee, J M; Yi, H; Oh, S-H; Ko, H Y; Yoo, H; Kim, H-R; Song, H; Kim, S; Kim, J K

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs have crucial roles in lung cancer cell development. They regulate cell growth, proliferation and migration by mediating the expression of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. We identified and characterized the novel miR-9500 in human lung cancer cells. The miR-9500 forms a stem-loop structure and is conserved in other mammals. The expression levels of miR-9500 were reduced in lung cancer cells and lung cancer tissues compared with normal tissues, as verified by TaqMan miRNA assays. It was confirmed that the putative target gene, Akt1, was directly suppressed by miR-9500, as demonstrated by a luciferase reporter assay. The miR-9500 significantly repressed the protein expression levels of Akt1, as demonstrated via western blot, but did not affect the corresponding mRNA levels. Akt1 has an important role in lung carcinogenesis, and depletion of Akt1 has been shown to have antiproliferative and anti-migratory effects in previous studies. In the current study, the overexpression of miR-9500 inhibited cell proliferation and the expression of cell cycle-related proteins. Likewise, the overexpression of miR-9500 impeded cell migration in human lung cancer cells. In an in vivo assay, miR-9500 significantly suppressed Fluc expression compared with NC and ASO-miR-9500, suggesting that cell proliferation was inhibited in nude mice. Likewise, miR-9500 repressed tumorigenesis and metastasis by targeting Akt1. These data indicate that miR-9500 might be applicable for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24658401

  6. Detection of Burkholderia cepacia DNA from artificially infected EDTA-blood and lung tissue comparing different DNA isolation methods.

    PubMed

    Merk, S; Meyer, H; Greiser-Wilke, I; Sprague, L D; Neubauer, H

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial DNA (Burkholderia cepacia) was prepared from artificially infected equine ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-blood and lung tissue by using four standard methods (lysis buffer containing proteinase K, phenol/chloroform/isoamylalcohol-extraction, microwave-treatment, heat treatment) and six commercially available kits (Puregene, High Pure PCR Template Preparation Kit, InstaGene, QiaAmp Tissue Kit, DNAzol and Elu-Quik). After a subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR), their efficacy and sensitivity were compared. Concerning the detection limits, the simple lysis with a proteinase K-containing buffer led to the best results for EDTA-blood as well as for artificially infected lung tissue. PMID:16907960

  7. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  8. Tissue-based imaging model of human trabecular meshwork.

    PubMed

    Chu, Edward R; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tan, James C H

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a tissue-based model of the human trabecular meshwork (TM) using viable postmortem corneoscleral donor tissue. Two-photon microscopy is used to optically section and image deep in the tissue to analyze cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) within the original three-dimensional (3D) environment of the TM. Multimodal techniques, including autofluorescence (AF), second harmonic generation (SHG), intravital dye fluorescence, and epifluorescence, are combined to provide unique views of the tissue at the cellular and subcellular level. SHG and AF imaging are non-invasive tissue imaging techniques with potential for clinical application, which can be modeled in the system. We describe the following in the tissue-based model: analysis of live cellularity to determine tissue viability; characteristics of live cells based on intravital labeling; features and composition of the TM's structural ECM; localization of specific ECM proteins to regions such as basement membrane; in situ induction and expression of tissue markers characteristic of cultured TM cells relevant to glaucoma; analysis of TM actin and pharmacological effects; in situ visualization of TM, inner wall endothelium, and Schlemm's canal; and application of 3D reconstruction, modeling, and quantitative analysis to the TM. The human model represents a cost-effective use of valuable and scarce yet available human tissue that allows unique cell biology, pharmacology, and translational studies of the TM. PMID:24517246

  9. Identification and Characterization of Potential Biomarkers by Quantitative Tissue Proteomics of Primary Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiung-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Hsueh, Chuen; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Chin-Ching; Yu, Jau-Song; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed to increase patient survival. In this study, we identified/quantified 1763 proteins from paired adenocarcinoma (ADC) tissues with different extents of lymph node (LN) involvement using an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. Based on a bioinformatics analysis and literature search, we selected six candidates (ERO1L, PABPC4, RCC1, RPS25, NARS, and TARS) from a set of 133 proteins that presented a 1.5-fold increase in expression in ADC tumors without LN metastasis compared with adjacent normal tissues. These six proteins were further verified using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analyses. The protein levels of these six candidates were higher in tumor tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. The ERO1L and NARS levels were positively associated with LN metastasis. Importantly, ERO1L overexpression in patients with early-stage ADC was positively correlated with poor survival, suggesting that ERO1L overexpression in primary sites of early-stage cancer tissues indicates a high risk for cancer micrometastasis. Moreover, we found that knockdown of either ERO1L or NARS reduced the viability and migration ability of ADC cells. Our results collectively provide a potential biomarker data set for ADC diagnosis/prognosis and reveal novel roles of ERO1L and NARS in ADC progression. PMID:27161446

  10. Progesterone and estrogen receptor expression and activity in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Garban, Diana C.; Mah, Vei; Alavi, Mohammad; Maresh, Erin L.; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Bagryanova, Lora; Horvath, Steve; Chia, David; Garon, Edward; Goodglick, Lee; Pietras, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in male and female patients in the US. Although it is clear that tobacco smoking is a major cause of lung cancer, about half of all women with lung cancer worldwide are never-smokers. Despite a declining smoking population, the incidence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predominant form of lung cancer, has reached epidemic proportions particularly in women. Emerging data suggest that factors other than tobacco, namely endogenous and exogenous female sex hormones, have a role in stimulating NSCLC progression. Aromatase, a key enzyme for estrogen biosynthesis, is expressed in NSCLC. Clinical data show that women with high levels of tumor aromatase (and high intratumoral estrogen) have worse survival than those with low aromatase. The present and previous studies also reveal significant expression and activity of estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ) in both extranuclear and nuclear sites in most NSCLC. We now report further on the expression of progesterone receptor (PR) transcripts and protein in NSCLC. PR transcripts were significantly lower in cancerous as compared to non-malignant tissue. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of PR was observed in the nucleus and/or extranuclear compartments in the majority of human tumor specimens examined. Combinations of estrogen and progestins administered in vitro cooperate in promoting tumor secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and, consequently, support tumor-associated angiogenesis. Further, dual treatment with estradiol and progestin increased the numbers of putative tumor stem/progenitor cells. Thus, ER- and/or PR-targeted therapies may offer new approaches to manage NSCLC. PMID:21600232

  11. Widespread expression of serum amyloid A in histologically normal human tissues. Predominant localization to the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Urieli-Shoval, S; Cohen, P; Eisenberg, S; Matzner, Y

    1998-12-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute-phase reactant whose level in the blood is elevated to 1000-fold as part of the body's responses to various injuries, including trauma, infection, inflammation, and neoplasia. As an acute-phase reactant, the liver has been considered to be the primary site of expression. However, limited extrahepatic SAA expression was described in mouse tissues and in cells of human atherosclerotic lesions. Here we describe nonradioactive in situ hybridization experiments revealing that the SAA mRNA is widely expressed in many histologically normal human tissues. Expression was localized predominantly to the epithelial components of a variety of tissues, including breast, stomach, small and large intestine, prostate, lung, pancreas, kidney, tonsil, thyroid, pituitary, placenta, skin epidermis, and brain neurons. Expression was also observed in lymphocytes, plasma cells, and endothelial cells. RT-PCR analysis of selected tissues revealed expression of the SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4 genes but not of SAA3, consistent with expression of these genes in the liver. Immunohistochemical staining revealed SAA protein expression that co-localized with SAA mRNA expression. These data indicate local production of the SAA proteins in histologically normal human extrahepatic tissues. PMID:9815279

  12. Effective atomic numbers for low-energy total photon interactions in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Yang, N C; Leichner, P K; Hawkins, W G

    1987-01-01

    A new method is introduced in which the total photon interaction cross sections per electron of human tissues are used to define effective atomic numbers for blood, bone, brain, fat, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, ovary, pancreas, spleen, and water. These effective atomic numbers are equal within 4% from 10 to 200 keV in each soft tissue, whereas for bones of different chemical compositions the variation ranges from 2.86% to 5.03%. This effective atomic number definition is less energy dependent than a previous definition based on the total photon interaction cross section per atom averaged over all elements in the tissue, from which the computed effective atomic numbers varied by as much as 50% (in bone) as a function of photon energy over the energy range from 10 to 200 keV. PMID:3683305

  13. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  14. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  15. Respiratory epithelial cell expression of human transforming growth factor-alpha induces lung fibrosis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Korfhagen, T R; Swantz, R J; Wert, S E; McCarty, J M; Kerlakian, C B; Glasser, S W; Whitsett, J A

    1994-01-01

    Increased production of EGF or TGF-alpha by the respiratory epithelial cells has been associated with the pathogenesis of various forms of lung injury. Growth factors and cytokines are thought to act locally, via paracrine and autocrine mechanisms, to stimulate cell proliferation and matrix deposition by interstitial lung cells resulting in pulmonary fibrosis. To test whether TGF-alpha mediates pulmonary fibrotic responses, we have generated transgenic mice expressing human TGF-alpha under control of regulatory regions of the human surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene. Human TGF-alpha mRNA was expressed in pulmonary epithelial cells in the lungs of the transgenic mice. Adult mice bearing the SP-C-TGF-alpha transgene developed severe pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrotic lesions were observed in peribronchial, peribronchiolar, and perivascular regions, as well as subjacent to pleural surfaces. Lesions consisted of fibrous tissue that included groups of epithelial cells expressing endogenous SP-C mRNA, consistent with their identification as distal respiratory epithelial cells. Peripheral fibrotic regions consisted of thickened pleura associated with extensive collagen deposition. Alveolar architecture was disrupted in the transgenic mice with loss of alveoli in the lung parenchyma. Pulmonary epithelial cell expression of TGF-alpha in transgenic mice disrupts alveolar morphogenesis and produces fibrotic lesions mediated by paracrine signaling between respiratory epithelial and interstitial cells of the lung. Images PMID:8163670

  16. Radiographic Comparison of Human Lung Shape During Normal Gravity and Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; Friedman, P. J.; West, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Chest radiographs in five seated normal volunteers at 1 G and 0 G were made with a view toward comparing human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle and lower lung regions. No significant differences were found between any of the 1-G and 0-G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at 0 G. The evidence that gravity causes regional differences in ventilation by direct action on the lung is consistent with the theoretical analysis of West and Matthews (1972).

  17. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  18. Transient proteolytic modification of mesenchymal stromal cells increases lung clearance rate and targeting to injured tissue.

    PubMed

    Kerkelä, Erja; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Mäkelä, Tuomas; Raki, Mari; Kambur, Oleg; Kilpinen, Lotta; Nikkilä, Janne; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Pernu, Roni; Pietilä, Mika; Takalo, Reijo; Juvonen, Tatu; Bergström, Kim; Kalso, Eija; Valmu, Leena; Laitinen, Saara; Lehenkari, Petri; Nystedt, Johanna

    2013-07-01

    Systemic infusion of therapeutic cells would be the most practical and least invasive method of administration in many cellular therapies. One of the main obstacles especially in intravenous delivery of cells is a massive cell retention in the lungs, which impairs homing to the target tissue and may decrease the therapeutic outcome. In this study we showed that an alternative cell detachment of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with pronase instead of trypsin significantly accelerated the lung clearance of the cells and, importantly, increased their targeting to an area of injury. Cell detachment with pronase transiently altered the MSC surface protein profile without compromising cell viability, multipotent cell characteristics, or immunomodulative and angiogenic potential. The transient modification of the cell surface protein profile was sufficient to produce effective changes in cell rolling behavior in vitro and, importantly, in the in vivo biodistribution of the cells in mouse, rat, and porcine models. In conclusion, pronase detachment could be used as a method to improve the MSC lung clearance and targeting in vivo. This may have a major impact on the bioavailability of MSCs in future therapeutic regimes. PMID:23734061

  19. Transient Proteolytic Modification of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increases Lung Clearance Rate and Targeting to Injured Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hakkarainen, Tanja; Mäkelä, Tuomas; Raki, Mari; Kambur, Oleg; Kilpinen, Lotta; Nikkilä, Janne; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Pernu, Roni; Pietilä, Mika; Takalo, Reijo; Juvonen, Tatu; Bergström, Kim; Kalso, Eija; Valmu, Leena; Laitinen, Saara; Lehenkari, Petri; Nystedt, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Systemic infusion of therapeutic cells would be the most practical and least invasive method of administration in many cellular therapies. One of the main obstacles especially in intravenous delivery of cells is a massive cell retention in the lungs, which impairs homing to the target tissue and may decrease the therapeutic outcome. In this study we showed that an alternative cell detachment of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with pronase instead of trypsin significantly accelerated the lung clearance of the cells and, importantly, increased their targeting to an area of injury. Cell detachment with pronase transiently altered the MSC surface protein profile without compromising cell viability, multipotent cell characteristics, or immunomodulative and angiogenic potential. The transient modification of the cell surface protein profile was sufficient to produce effective changes in cell rolling behavior in vitro and, importantly, in the in vivo biodistribution of the cells in mouse, rat, and porcine models. In conclusion, pronase detachment could be used as a method to improve the MSC lung clearance and targeting in vivo. This may have a major impact on the bioavailability of MSCs in future therapeutic regimes. PMID:23734061

  20. The expression of P-selectin in inflammatory and non-inflammatory lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, C; Brinkmann, B

    1997-01-01

    An initial attachment of leucocytes to blood vessel walls is mediated by selectins. A feature of adhesion mediated by P-selectin is the "rolling" of leucocytes on the endothelium. The time dependent expression of p-selectin in lung tissue was investigated in five groups of cases with different causes of death: carbon-monoxide and cyanide intoxication (n = 11), drowning (n = 5), hanging (n = 9), pneumonia (n = 13) and polytrauma with blunt thorax trauma (n = 14). In paraffin-embedded archival specimens immunostaining was achieved using an adapted APAAP-immunoperoxidase technique together with a wet autoclave method. P-selectin detection was scored by a semiquantitative method evaluating the intensity and incidence of positively stained endothelial cells. The distribution pattern of endothelial P-selectin of blood vessels in cases of pneumonia and septic shock were heterogenius and weak. In one case with lung contusion (survival time 3 h) moderate infiltrates of granulocytes were found near to septal and subpleural hemorrhages. In these inflammatory areas the positive endothelial immunostaining of small vessels was often weaker than in other lung segments or compared to the intensely stained platelets in corresponding vessels. PMID:9228566

  1. Cell structure and proliferative activity of organ cultures of normal embryonic lung tissue of mice resistant (C57BL) and predisposed (A) to lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, T.S.; Gor'kova, T.G.

    1985-08-01

    Local factors such as proliferative activity and the numerical ratio between epithelial and mesenchymal cells, and also the character of interaction between the tissue components in ontogeny may play an important role in the realization of sensitivity of mice of a particular line to the development of lung tumors. These characteristics of lung tissue in mice of lines A and C57BL are investigated under normal conditions and during induced carcinogenesis. Results are given of a comparative study of the relative numbers of epithelial and mesenchymal cells in organ cultures of embryonic lungs. /sup 3/H-thymidine was added to the cultures on the 14th day of the experiment in a concentration of 1 microCi/m1 medium. An autoradiographic study of the cultures was performed.

  2. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  3. Leukotriene B4 release by human lung macrophages via receptor- not voltage-operated Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Finney-Hayward, T K; Bahra, P; Li, S; Poll, C T; Nicholson, A G; Russell, R E K; Ford, P A; Westwick, J; Fenwick, P S; Barnes, P J; Donnelly, L E

    2009-05-01

    Increased numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in the lung is a key feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The major neutrophil chemotactic agent in the airways of COPD patients is leukotriene (LT)B(4) and is released by macrophages. The present study examines the role and mechanism of Ca(2+) in platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated LTB(4) release from human lung macrophages. Macrophages were isolated from lung tissue of subjects undergoing lung resection surgery and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were obtained from nonsmokers, smokers without obstruction and COPD patients. Cells were stimulated with PAF and LTB(4) release and [Ca(2+)](i) was measured. Lung macrophages and MDM released LTB(4) following stimulation with PAF (mean effective concentration: 0.08+/-0.06 microM (n = 5) versus 0.17+/-0.12 microM (n = 17), respectively). Compared with MDM, lung macrophages released approximately eight-fold more LTB(4). Neither smoking nor COPD altered MDM responses. PAF-stimulated LTB(4) release was abrogated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid suggesting a role for extracellular Ca(2+). This was substantiated by using store-operated channel blockers econazole, SK&F96365 and Gd(3+). However, econazole and SK&F96365 were more effective in MDM than lung macrophages. Neither LOE908 nor nifedipine could attenuate this response. These data suggest that platelet-activating factor-stimulated leukotriene B(4) release from human lung macrophages is mediated, in part, by Ca(2+) influx through receptor- but not voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. PMID:19164358

  4. Assessment of tumour viability in human lung cancer xenografts with texture-based image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Holopainen, Tanja; Wang, Yinhai; Grote, Anne; Lundin, Mikael; Alitalo, Kari; Lundin, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Aims To build and evaluate an automated method for assessing tumour viability in histological tissue samples using texture features and supervised learning. Methods H&E-stained sections (n=56) of human non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma xenografts were digitised with a whole-slide scanner. A novel image analysis method based on local binary patterns and a support vector machine classifier was trained with a set of sample regions (n=177) extracted from the whole-slide images and tested with another set of images (n=494). The extracted regions, or single-tissue entity images, were chosen to represent as pure as possible examples of three morphological tissue entities: viable tumour tissue, non-viable tumour tissue and mouse host tissue. Results An agreement of 94.5% (area under the curve=0.995, kappa=0.90) was achieved to classify the single-tissue entity images in the test set (n=494) into the viable tumour and non-viable tumour tissue categories. The algorithm assigned 250 of the 252 non-viable and 219 of the 242 of viable sample regions to the correct categories, respectively. This corresponds to a sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 99.2%. Conclusions The proposed image analysis-based tumour viability assessment resulted in a high agreement with expert annotations. By providing extraction of detailed information of the tumour microenvironment, the automated method can be used in preclinical research settings. The method could also have implications in cancer diagnostics, cancer outcome prognostics and prediction. PMID:26021331

  5. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.S.

    1991-03-01

    One hundred and thirty-one bronchial samples from 62 patients have been dissected by generation from fixed surgical lung specimens obtained after the removal of pathological lesions. Complete patient records including occupational and smoking histories, as well as possible exposure to radon, are obtained. In addition, one hundred and sixty-two mongol dog bronchi dissected from different lobes of 23 dog lungs have also been similarly prepared. Ninety-four human samples have been completely processed for electron microscopy and have yielded 994 electron micrographs of which 532 have been entered into the Computerized Stereological Analysis System (COSAS) and been used for the measurement of the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface. Similarly 240 micrographs of dog epithelium from 31 bronchial samples have been entered into COSAS. We have, using the COSAS planimetry program, established data bases which describe the volume density and nuclear numbers per electron micrograph for 5 cell types of the human bronchial epithelial lining of men and women, as well as smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers and similar parameters for the epithelial cell types of dog bronchi. The data are being used to develop weighting factors for dosimetry and radon risk analysis. 26 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.S.

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and twenty one bronchial samples from 58 patients (54 useable; 32 female, 22 male; median age 61) have been dissected by generation from fixed surgical lung specimens obtained after the removal of pathological lesions. Complete patient records including occupational and smoking histories, as well as possible exposure to radon, are being kept. In addition, mongol dog bronchi dissected from different lobes of 23 dog lungs have been used to establish protocols. Ninety human samples have been completely processed for electron microscopy and have yielded 913 electron micrographs of which 471 have been entered into the Computerized Stereological Analysis System (COSAS) and used for the measurement of the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface. We have, using the COSAS planimetry program, established a small data base which describes the volume density and nuclear numbers per electron micrograph for 5 cell types of the human bronchial epithelial lining of men and women, as well as smokers, nonsmokers and ex-smokers. The data is being used to develop weighting factors for dosimetry and radon risk analysis. The electron micrographs of dog bronchial epithelium are unanalyzed as yet. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Efficient In Vitro Electropermeabilization of Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2015-10-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technic for gene delivery. However, its use in clinical applications is limited since little is known about the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer in the complex environment occurring in a tissue. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in that process. Tumor ECM composition was shown to modulate in vivo gene electrotransfer efficiency. In order to assess the effects of ECM composition and organization, as well as intercellular junctions and communication, in normal tissue response to electric pulses, we developed an innovative three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human connective tissue model. 3D human dermal tissue was reconstructed in vitro by a tissue engineering approach and was representative of in vivo cell organization since cell-cell contacts were present as well as complex ECM. This human cell model presented multiple layers of primary dermal fibroblasts embedded in a native, collagen-rich ECM. This dermal tissue could become a useful tool to study skin DNA electrotransfer mechanisms. As proof of the concept, we show here that the cells within this standardized 3D tissue can be efficiently electropermeabilized by milliseconds electric pulses. We believe that a better comprehension of gene electrotransfer in such a model tissue would help improve electrogene therapy approaches such as the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccination. PMID:25788148

  8. Expression of WNT5A in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Its Control by TGF-β and WNT7B in Human Lung Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Newman, Donna R; Sills, W Shane; Hanrahan, Katherine; Ziegler, Amanda; Tidd, Kathleen McGinnis; Cook, Elizabeth; Sannes, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    The wingless (Wnt) family of signaling ligands contributes significantly to lung development and is highly expressed in patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). We sought to define the cellular distribution of Wnt5A in the lung tissue of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and the signaling ligands that control its expression in human lung fibroblasts and IPF myofibroblasts. Tissue sections from 40 patients diagnosed with IPF or UIP were probed for the immunolocalization of Wnt5A. Further, isolated lung fibroblasts from normal or IPF human lungs, adenovirally transduced for the overexpression or silencing of Wnt7B or treated with TGF-β1 or its inhibitor, were analyzed for Wnt5A protein expression. Wnt5A was expressed in IPF lungs by airway and alveolar epithelium, smooth muscle cells, endothelium, and myofibroblasts of fibroblastic foci and throughout the interstitium. Forced overexpression of Wnt7B with or without TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased Wnt5A protein expression in normal human smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts but not in IPF myofibroblasts where Wnt5A was already highly expressed. The results demonstrate a wide distribution of Wnt5A expression in cells of the IPF lung and reveal that it is significantly increased by Wnt7B and TGF-β1, which, in combination, could represent key signaling pathways that modulate the pathogenesis of IPF. PMID:26538547

  9. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  10. Parametric and nonparametric nonlinear system identification of lung tissue strip mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Westwick, D T; Ingenito, E P; Lutchen, K R; Suki, B

    1999-01-01

    Lung parenchyma is a soft biological material composed of many interacting elements such as the interstitial cells, extracellular collagen-elastin fiber network, and proteoglycan ground substance. The mechanical behavior of this delicate structure is complex showing several mild but distinct types of nonlinearities and a fractal-like long memory stress relaxation characterized by a power-law function. To characterize tissue nonlinearity in the presence of such long memory, we investigated the robustness and predictive ability of several nonlinear system identification techniques on stress-strain data obtained from lung tissue strips with various input wave forms. We found that in general, for a mildly nonlinear system with long memory, a nonparametric nonlinear system identification in the frequency domain is preferred over time-domain techniques. More importantly, if a suitable parametric nonlinear model is available that captures the long memory of the system with only a few parameters, high predictive ability with substantially increased robustness can be achieved. The results provide evidence that the first-order kernel of the stress-strain relationship is consistent with a fractal-type long memory stress relaxation and the nonlinearity can be described as a Wiener-type nonlinear structure for displacements mimicking tidal breathing. PMID:10468239

  11. Design, synthesis, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a chemical delivery system for drug targeting to lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Saah, M; Wu, W M; Eberst, K; Marvanyos, E; Bodor, N

    1996-05-01

    We espouse the application of a novel chemical delivery system (CDS) approach to a delivery mechanism for drug targeting to lung tissue using the 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentyl moiety of lipoic acid as the "targetor moiety". The synthesis and the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a CDS modeling the lipoyl and other ester derivatives of chlorambucil (an antineoplastic agent) and cromolyn (a bischromone used in antiasthma prophylaxis) as compared with their respective parent drugs are described. The chlorambucil CDS was synthesized by esterifying the alcohol derivative of lipoic acid with chlorambucil using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as the coupling agent. The cromolyn CDS was prepared by a multistep synthetic procedure culminating in the reaction of the alkyl bromide derivative of lipoic acid with the disodium salt of the bischromone compound. All the esters were highly lipophilic unlike the parent compounds. The in-vitro kinetic and in-vivo pharmacokinetic studies showed that the respective CDSs were sufficiently stable in buffer and biological media, hydrolyzed rapidly into the respective active parent drugs, and significantly enhanced delivery and retention of the active compound to lung tissue in comparison with the underivatized parent compounds used in conventional therapy. PMID:8742941

  12. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (< 3 micron), that is respirable. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  13. Epigenetic clustering of lung adenocarcinomas based on DNA methylation profiles in adjacent lung tissue: Its correlation with smoking history and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takashi; Arai, Eri; Kohno, Takashi; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Soejima, Kenzo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Kanai, Yae

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the significance of DNA methylation alterations during lung carcinogenesis. Infinium assay was performed using 139 paired samples of non-cancerous lung tissue (N) and tumorous tissue (T) from a learning cohort of patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs). Fifty paired N and T samples from a validation cohort were also analyzed. DNA methylation alterations on 1,928 probes occurred in N samples relative to normal lung tissue from patients without primary lung tumors, and were inherited by, or strengthened in, T samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using DNA methylation levels in N samples on all 26,447 probes subclustered patients into Cluster I (n = 32), Cluster II (n = 35) and Cluster III (n = 72). LADCs in Cluster I developed from the inflammatory background in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in heavy smokers and were locally invasive. Most patients in Cluster II were non-smokers and had a favorable outcome. LADCs in Cluster III developed in light smokers were most aggressive (frequently showing lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and an advanced pathological stage), and had a poor outcome. DNA methylation levels of hallmark genes for each cluster, such as IRX2, HOXD8, SPARCL1, RGS5 and EI24, were again correlated with clinicopathological characteristics in the validation cohort. DNA methylation profiles reflecting carcinogenetic factors such as smoking and COPD appear to be established in non-cancerous lung tissue from patients with LADCs and may determine the aggressiveness of tumors developing in individual patients, and thus patient outcome. PMID:24921089

  14. Epigenetic clustering of lung adenocarcinomas based on DNA methylation profiles in adjacent lung tissue: Its correlation with smoking history and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takashi; Arai, Eri; Kohno, Takashi; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Soejima, Kenzo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Kanai, Yae

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the significance of DNA methylation alterations during lung carcinogenesis. Infinium assay was performed using 139 paired samples of non-cancerous lung tissue (N) and tumorous tissue (T) from a learning cohort of patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs). Fifty paired N and T samples from a validation cohort were also analyzed. DNA methylation alterations on 1,928 probes occurred in N samples relative to normal lung tissue from patients without primary lung tumors, and were inherited by, or strengthened in, T samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using DNA methylation levels in N samples on all 26,447 probes subclustered patients into Cluster I (n = 32), Cluster II (n = 35) and Cluster III (n = 72). LADCs in Cluster I developed from the inflammatory background in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in heavy smokers and were locally invasive. Most patients in Cluster II were non-smokers and had a favorable outcome. LADCs in Cluster III developed in light smokers were most aggressive (frequently showing lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and an advanced pathological stage), and had a poor outcome. DNA methylation levels of hallmark genes for each cluster, such as IRX2, HOXD8, SPARCL1, RGS5 and EI24, were again correlated with clinicopathological characteristics in the validation cohort. DNA methylation profiles reflecting carcinogenetic factors such as smoking and COPD appear to be established in non-cancerous lung tissue from patients with LADCs and may determine the aggressiveness of tumors developing in individual patients, and thus patient outcome. PMID:24921089

  15. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.S.

    1992-09-01

    Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by [alpha] particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

  16. Lung tissue proteomics identifies elevated transglutaminase 2 levels in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ohlmeier, Steffen; Nieminen, Pentti; Gao, Jing; Kanerva, Tinja; Rönty, Mikko; Toljamo, Tuula; Bergmann, Ulrich; Mazur, Witold; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by irreversible airflow limitation. Cigarette smoking represents the main risk factor, but the specific mechanisms of COPD are not completely understood. Our aim was to identify COPD-specific proteomic changes involved in disease onset and severity. A comparative proteomic analysis of 51 lung tissues from nonsmokers, smokers, smokers with mild to moderate (stage I-II) COPD, severe to very severe COPD (stage III-IV), and patients with α-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) was performed by cysteine-specific two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with mass spectrometry. Selected COPD-specific changes were validated by immunoblotting and further by ELISA in 120 induced sputum and plasma samples from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD (stage I-III). Altogether 82 altered proteins were identified comprising COPD-, AATD-, and IPF-specific, overlapping, and unspecific changes. Cathepsin D (CTSD), dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DPYSL2), transglutaminase 2 (TGM2), and tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 (TPP1) were validated as COPD-specific. TGM2 was not associated with smoking and correlated with COPD severity in lung tissue. TGM2 levels in sputum and plasma were elevated in patients with COPD (stage II-III) and correlated with lung function. In conclusion, new proteins related to COPD onset and severity could be identified with TGM2 being a novel potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for COPD. Further studies in carefully characterized cohorts are required to validate the identified changes. PMID:27084846

  17. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  18. Mechanical Forces Accelerate Collagen Digestion by Bacterial Collagenase in Lung Tissue Strips

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Eunice; Sato, Susumu; Takahashi, Ayuko; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Blute, Todd A.; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Most tissues in the body are under mechanical tension, and while enzymes mediate many cellular and extracellular processes, the effects of mechanical forces on enzyme reactions in the native extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. We hypothesized that physiological levels of mechanical forces are capable of modifying the activity of collagenase, a key remodeling enzyme of the ECM. To test this, lung tissue Young's modulus and a nonlinearity index characterizing the shape of the stress-strain curve were measured in the presence of bacterial collagenase under static uniaxial strain of 0, 20, 40, and 80%, as well as during cyclic mechanical loading with strain amplitudes of ±10 or ±20% superimposed on 40% static strain, and frequencies of 0.1 or 1 Hz. Confocal and electron microscopy was used to determine and quantify changes in ECM structure. Generally, mechanical loading increased the effects of enzyme activity characterized by an irreversible decline in stiffness and tissue deterioration seen on both confocal and electron microscopic images. However, a static strain of 20% provided protection against digestion compared to both higher and lower strains. The decline in stiffness during digestion positively correlated with the increase in equivalent alveolar diameters and negatively correlated with the nonlinearity index. These results suggest that the decline in stiffness results from rupture of collagen followed by load transfer and subsequent rupture of alveolar walls. This study may provide new understanding of the role of collagen degradation in general tissue remodeling and disease progression. PMID:27462275

  19. Physiological and biochemical markers of alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction in perfused human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Frank, James A.; Briot, Raphael; Lee, Jae Woo; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Uchida, Tokujiro; Matthay, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    To study air space fluid clearance (AFC) under conditions that resemble the clinical setting of pulmonary edema in patients, we developed a new perfused human lung preparation. We measured AFC in 20 human lungs rejected for transplantation and determined the contribution of AFC to lung fluid balance. AFC was then compared with air space and perfusate levels of a biological marker of epithelial injury. The majority of human lungs rejected for transplant had intact basal (75%) and β2-adrenergic agonist-stimulated (70%) AFC. For lungs with both basal and stimulated AFC, the basal AFC rate was 19 ± 10%/h, and the β2-adrenergic-stimulated AFC rate was 43 ± 13%/h. Higher rates of AFC were associated with less lung weight gain (Pearson coefficient −0.90, P < 0.0001). Air space and perfusate levels of the type I pneumocyte marker receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were threefold and sixfold higher, respectively, in lungs without basal AFC compared with lungs with AFC (P < 0.05). These data show that preserved AFC is a critical determinant of favorable lung fluid balance in the perfused human lung, raising the possibility that β2-agonist therapy to increase edema fluid clearance may be of value for patients with acute lung injury and pulmonary edema. Also, although additional studies are needed, a biological marker of alveolar epithelial injury may be useful clinically in predicting preserved AFC. PMID:17351061

  20. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Lindsay M.; Sandri, Brian J.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Meyer, Carolyn M.; Price, Andrew P.; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases. PMID:26954258