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Sample records for human lupus autoimmunity

  1. Autoimmunity induced by human cytomegalovirus in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a common herpesvirus that is linked to autoimmunity, especially in genetically predisposed persons. The article by Hsieh and colleagues in a previous issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy suggests that a C-terminal peptide of the human cytomegalovirus protein pp65 is highly immunogenic in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and that antibodies against this peptide cross-react with nuclear proteins and double-stranded DNA, which are highly frequent autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. These observations highlight the fact that immunization with one small cytomegalovirus-specific peptide results in multiple autoreactive antibodies, probably through molecular mimicry and epitope spreading, in genetically predisposed persons. PMID:22277352

  2. Glomerular autoimmune multicomponents of human lupus nephritis in vivo: α-enolase and annexin AI.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2014-11-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti-α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti-α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti-α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti-α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum. PMID:24790181

  3. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo: α-Enolase and Annexin AI

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D’Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino

    2014-01-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti–α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti–α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti–α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti–α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum. PMID:24790181

  4. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti-α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti-α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti-α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  5. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti–α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti–α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti–α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  6. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  7. Immunodeficiency and autoimmunity: lessons from systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Alexandros P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that systemic autoimmunity and immunodeficiency are not separate entities, but rather interconnected processes. Immunodeficiency results from distinct defects of the immune response and primarily presents as infections, but also frequently with autoimmune features. Systemic autoimmunity is the combined effect of multiple genetic variations, infectious and immunoregulatory factors that result in dominant autoimmune manifestations in addition to frequent and opportunistic infections. The overlap in disease manifestations and symptoms suggests that immunodeficiency should be considered in the presence of autoimmunity, and vice versa. In this review, we present the shared or similar aspects of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity using systemic lupus erythematosus as a paradigm and discuss the implications for clinical care. PMID:22177735

  8. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B.; Martin, Kayla A.; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW) was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+), and the (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3), was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  9. Epigenetic mechanisms in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hedrich, Christian M.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenic origin of autoimmune diseases can be traced to both genetic susceptibility and epigenetic modifications arising from exposure to the environment. Epigenetic modifications influence gene-expression and alter cellular functions without modifying the genomic sequence. CpG-DNA methylation, histone-tail modifications, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are the main epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases is essential for the introduction of effective, target-directed, and tolerated therapies. In this review, we summarize recent findings that signify the importance of epigenetic modifications in autoimmune disorders while focusing on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss future directions in basic research, autoimmune diagnostics, and applied therapy. PMID:21885342

  10. The SLAM family member CD48 (Slamf2) protects lupus-prone mice from autoimmune nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Anna E.; Njoroge, Sarah W.; Feliu, Marianela; Cook, Alexis; Selig, Martin K.; Latchman, Yvette E.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Colvin, Robert B.; Paul, Elahna

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the SLAM family of leukocyte cell surface regulatory molecules have been associated with lupus-like phenotypes in both humans and mice. The murine Slamf gene cluster lies within the lupus-associated Sle1b region of mouse chromosome 1. Non-autoreactive C57BL/6 (B6) mice that have had this region replaced by syntenic segments from other mouse strains (i.e. 129, NZB and NZW) are B6 congenic strains that spontaneously produce non-nephritogenic lupus-like autoantibodies. We have recently reported that genetic ablation of the SLAM family member CD48 (Slamf2) drives full-blown autoimmune disease with severe proliferative glomerulonephritis (CD48GN) in B6 mice carrying 129 sequences of the Sle1b region (B6.129CD48-/-). We also discovered that BALB/c mice with the same 129-derived CD48-null allele (BALB.129CD48-/-) have neither nephritis nor anti-DNA autoantibodies, indicating that strain specific background genes modulate the effects of CD48 deficiency. Here we further examine this novel model of lupus nephritis in which CD48 deficiency transforms benign autoreactivity into fatal nephritis. CD48GN is characterized by glomerular hypertrophy with mesangial expansion, proliferation and leukocytic infiltration. Immune complexes deposit in mesangium and in sub-endothelial, sub-epithelial and intramembranous sites along the glomerular basement membrane. Afflicted mice have low grade proteinuria, intermittent hematuria and their progressive renal injury manifests with elevated urine NGAL levels and with uremia. In contrast to the lupus-like B6.129CD48-/- animals, neither BALB.129CD48-/- mice nor B6 × BALB/c F1.129CD48-/- progeny have autoimmune traits, indicating that B6-specific background genes modulate the effect of CD48 on lupus nephritis in a recessive manner. PMID:21561736

  11. Autoimmune thyroid disease in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, D; Isenberg, D

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To report the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid antibodies in 300 patients with SLE, followed up at our centre between 1978 and 2000, by a retrospective analysis of case notes. Results: The prevalence (5.7%) of hypothyroidism in our cohort was higher than in the normal population (1%), while that of hyperthyroidism (1.7%) was not significantly different. Overall 42/300 (14%) of our cohort had thyroid antibodies, rising to 15/22 (68%) in the subgroup who also had thyroid disease (p<0.001). Both antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies were detected. The antibodies were found in equally high frequency in the hyperthyroid subgroup (80% patients), whereas in the hypothyroid subgroup antimicrosomal antibodies were more frequent than antithyroglobulin antibodies (64% v 41%). There was no significant difference in the frequency with which antimicrosomal or antithyroglobulin antibodies were detected between the hyperthyroid and hypothyroid subgroups (p>0.2). Conclusion: Our patients with SLE had a prevalence of hypothyroidism, but not hyperthyroidism, greater than that of the normal population. The presence of either condition was associated with a higher frequency of both antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies. PMID:11779764

  12. Human papillomavirus vaccine and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Mariele; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Soriano, Alessandra; Manna, Raffaele; Maoz-Segal, Ramit; Kivity, Shaye; Doria, Andrea; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and autoimmune manifestations compatible with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or SLE-like disease, the medical history of six women who presented with SLE or SLE-like disease following HPV immunization was collected. Data regarding type of vaccine, number of immunization, family and personal, clinical and serological features, as well as response to treatments were analyzed. In the reported cases, several common features were observed, such as personal or familial susceptibility to autoimmunity or adverse response to a prior dose of the vaccine, both of which may be associated with a higher risk of post-vaccination autoimmunity. Favorable response to immunosuppressant was observed in all patients. In the current study, a temporal association between immunization with HPV vaccine and the appearance of a spectrum of SLE-like conditions is reported. Additionally, among the patients described, several common features were observed that may enable better identification of subjects at risk. Further studies are required to assess the safety of immunization with the HPV vaccine in patients with autoimmune-rheumatic diseases or in subject at risk of autoimmunity as well as the potential beneficial effect of preventive immunosuppressants. PMID:23624585

  13. Silica-Triggered Autoimmunity in Lupus-Prone Mice Blocked by Docosahexaenoic Acid Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg I.; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lock, Adam L.; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (cSiO2, quartz) is etiologically linked to systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) and other human autoimmune diseases (ADs). In the female NZBWF1 mouse, a widely used animal model that is genetically prone to lupus, short-term repeated intranasal exposure to cSiO2 triggers premature initiation of autoimmune responses in the lungs and kidneys. In contrast to cSiO2’s triggering action, consumption of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) prevents spontaneous onset of autoimmunity in this mouse strain. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of DHA will prevent cSiO2-triggered autoimmunity in the female NZBWF1 mouse. Mice (6 wk old) were fed isocaloric AIN-93G diets containing 0.0, 0.4, 1.2 or 2.4% DHA. Two wk after initiating feeding, mice were intranasally instilled with 1 mg cSiO2 once per wk for 4 wk and maintained on experimental diets for an additional 12 wk. Mice were then sacrificed and the lung, blood and kidney assessed for markers of inflammation and autoimmunity. DHA was incorporated into lung, red blood cells and kidney from diet in a concentration-dependent fashion. Dietary DHA dose-dependently suppressed cSiO2-triggered perivascular leukocyte infiltration and ectopic lymphoid tissue neogenesis in the lung. DHA consumption concurrently inhibited cSiO2–driven elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, B-cell proliferation factors, IgG and anti-dsDNA Ig in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma. DHA’s prophylactic effects were further mirrored in reduced proteinuria and glomerulonephritis in cSiO2-treated mice. Taken together, these results reveal that DHA consumption suppresses cSiO2 triggering of autoimmunity in female NZBWF1 mice as manifested in the lung, blood and kidney. Our findings provide novel insight into how dietary modulation of the lipidome might be used to prevent or delay triggering of AD by cSiO2. Such knowledge opens the

  14. Silica-Triggered Autoimmunity in Lupus-Prone Mice Blocked by Docosahexaenoic Acid Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bates, Melissa A; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg I; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lock, Adam L; Harkema, Jack R; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (cSiO2, quartz) is etiologically linked to systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) and other human autoimmune diseases (ADs). In the female NZBWF1 mouse, a widely used animal model that is genetically prone to lupus, short-term repeated intranasal exposure to cSiO2 triggers premature initiation of autoimmune responses in the lungs and kidneys. In contrast to cSiO2's triggering action, consumption of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) prevents spontaneous onset of autoimmunity in this mouse strain. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of DHA will prevent cSiO2-triggered autoimmunity in the female NZBWF1 mouse. Mice (6 wk old) were fed isocaloric AIN-93G diets containing 0.0, 0.4, 1.2 or 2.4% DHA. Two wk after initiating feeding, mice were intranasally instilled with 1 mg cSiO2 once per wk for 4 wk and maintained on experimental diets for an additional 12 wk. Mice were then sacrificed and the lung, blood and kidney assessed for markers of inflammation and autoimmunity. DHA was incorporated into lung, red blood cells and kidney from diet in a concentration-dependent fashion. Dietary DHA dose-dependently suppressed cSiO2-triggered perivascular leukocyte infiltration and ectopic lymphoid tissue neogenesis in the lung. DHA consumption concurrently inhibited cSiO2-driven elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, B-cell proliferation factors, IgG and anti-dsDNA Ig in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma. DHA's prophylactic effects were further mirrored in reduced proteinuria and glomerulonephritis in cSiO2-treated mice. Taken together, these results reveal that DHA consumption suppresses cSiO2 triggering of autoimmunity in female NZBWF1 mice as manifested in the lung, blood and kidney. Our findings provide novel insight into how dietary modulation of the lipidome might be used to prevent or delay triggering of AD by cSiO2. Such knowledge opens the possibility

  15. Early, transient depletion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells ameliorates autoimmunity in a lupus model

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Sarah L.; Riggs, Jeffrey M.; Gilfillan, Susan; Bugatti, Mattia; Vermi, William; Kolbeck, Roland; Unanue, Emil R.; Sanjuan, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of lupus. However, this conclusion has been largely based on a correlative link between the copious production of IFN-α/β by pDCs and the IFN-α/β “signature” often seen in human lupus patients. The specific contribution of pDCs to disease in vivo has not been investigated in detail. For this reason, we generated a strain of BXSB lupus-prone mice in which pDCs can be selectively depleted in vivo. Early, transient ablation of pDCs before disease initiation resulted in reduced splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, impaired expansion and activation of T and B cells, reduced antibodies against nuclear autoantigens and improved kidney pathology. Amelioration of pathology coincided with decreased transcription of IFN-α/β–induced genes in tissues. PDC depletion had an immediate impact on the activation of immune cells, and importantly, the beneficial effects on pathology were sustained even though pDCs later recovered, indicating an early pDC contribution to disease. Together, our findings demonstrate a critical function for pDCs during the IFN-α/β–dependent initiation of autoimmune lupus and point to pDCs as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of SLE. PMID:25180065

  16. Endogenous interleukin (IL)-17A promotes pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity and lupus nephritis induced by pristane.

    PubMed

    Summers, S A; Odobasic, D; Khouri, M B; Steinmetz, O M; Yang, Y; Holdsworth, S R; Kitching, A R

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is increased both in serum and in kidney biopsies from patients with lupus nephritis, but direct evidence of pathogenicity is less well established. Administration of pristane to genetically intact mice results in the production of autoantibodies and proliferative glomerulonephritis, resembling human lupus nephritis. These studies sought to define the role of IL-17A in experimental lupus induced by pristane administration. Pristane was administered to wild-type (WT) and IL-17A(-/-) mice. Local and systemic immune responses were assessed after 6 days and 8 weeks, and autoimmunity, glomerular inflammation and renal injury were measured at 7 months. IL-17A production increased significantly 6 days after pristane injection, with innate immune cells, neutrophils (Ly6G(+)) and macrophages (F4/80(+)) being the predominant source of IL-17A. After 8 weeks, while systemic IL-17A was still readily detected in WT mice, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were diminished in the absence of endogenous IL-17A. Seven months after pristane treatment humoral autoimmunity was diminished in the absence of IL-17A, with decreased levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Renal inflammation and injury was less in the absence of IL-17A. Compared to WT mice, glomerular IgG, complement deposition, glomerular CD4(+) T cells and intrarenal expression of T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated proinflammatory mediators were decreased in IL-17A(-/-) mice. WT mice developed progressive proteinuria, but functional and histological renal injury was attenuated in the absence of IL-17A. Therefore, IL-17A is required for the full development of autoimmunity and lupus nephritis in experimental SLE, and early in the development of autoimmunity, innate immune cells produce IL-17A. PMID:24528105

  17. An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Boccuti, Viera; Perrone, Antonio; D'Introno, Alessia; Campobasso, Anna; Sangineto, Moris; Sabbà, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune disorders are known to be more frequent in women and often associated each others, but it is rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in a single patient. Recently, the concept of multiple autoimmune syndrome has been introduced to describe patients with at least three autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a young man with a clinical history of psychiatric symptoms and celiac disease (CD) who was diagnosed to have other two autoimmune disorders: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual upon different patterns: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE. PMID:27383232

  18. SLE - Complex cytokine effects in a complex autoimmune disease: tumor necrosis factor in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aringer, Martin; Smolen, Josef S

    2003-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine and a B-cell growth factor. It has numerous possible effects on T lymphocytes and dendritic cells, and it influences apoptosis. These differential effects may in part explain why patients under TNF-blocker therapy can develop autoantibodies to nuclear antigens, and may shed some light on the finding that low TNF fosters autoimmune disease in some mouse strains. On the contrary, TNF is increased in the blood and in the inflamed kidneys of systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Several studies in lupus-prone mice other than the F1 generation of New Zealand Black mice crossed with New Zealand White mice suggest that TNF is highly proinflammatory in the efferent limb and is potentially detrimental in lupus organ disease. Therefore, TNF blockade probably constitutes an efficacious therapeutic option. PMID:12823847

  19. Inflammasomes and human autoimmunity: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chin-An; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-07-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein complexes composed of a NOD-like receptor (NLR)/an AIM-like receptor (ALR), the adapter molecule apoptosis-associated speck-like protein that contains a CARD (ASC), and caspase-1. Active caspase-1 cleaves pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18 to IL-1β and IL-18, resulting in inflammation. Genetic mutations in inflammasomes were first recognized to result in autoinflammatory diseases, which are characterized by the absence of both autoantibodies and autoreactive-T/B cells. However, there is increasing attention being placed on genetic polymorphisms that are involved in the components of inflammasomes, and these have implications for innate immunity and the natural history of autoimmune diseases. For example, while the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 1 (NLRP1) haplotypes contributes to susceptibility to developing vitiligo; there are other single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that alters the susceptibility and severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Indeed, there are multiple factors that contribute to lowering the threshold of immunity and inflammasomes play a key role in this threshold. For example, IL-1β and IL-18 further perpetuate Th17 responses and endothelial cell damage, which potentiate a number of autoimmune diseases, including synovitis in RA, cardiovascular disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). There is also increasing data on the role of innate immunity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in lupus nephritis, and in a variety of autoimmune pathologies in which activation of the innate immune system is the driver for the adaptive system. Indeed, it is likely that the chronic pathology of autoimmunity is mediated in part by otherwise innocent bystander cells, augmented by inflammasomes. PMID:26005048

  20. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  1. Association of autoimmune hepatitis and systemic lupus erythematodes: A case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Beisel, Claudia; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Teufel, Andreas; Lohse, Ansgar W

    2014-01-01

    Liver test abnormalities have been described in up to 60% of patients with systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) at some point during the course of their disease. Prior treatment with potentially hepatotoxic drugs or viral hepatitis is commonly considered to be the main cause of liver disease in SLE patients. However, in rare cases elevated liver enzymes may be due to concurrent autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). To distinguish whether the patient has primary liver disease with associated autoimmune clinical and laboratory features resembling SLE - such as AIH - or the elevation of liver enzymes is a manifestation of SLE remains a difficult challenge for the treating physician. Here, we present six female patients with complex autoimmune disorders and hepatitis. Patient charts were reviewed in order to investigate the complex relationship between SLE and AIH. All patients had coexisting autoimmune disease in their medical history. At the time of diagnosis of AIH, patients presented with arthralgia, abdominal complaints, cutaneous involvement and fatigue as common symptoms. All patients fulfilled the current diagnostic criteria of both, AIH and SLE. Remission of acute hepatitis was achieved in all cases after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to this case study a literature review was conducted. PMID:25253972

  2. Autoimmune Myelofibrosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Koduri, Prasad R; Parvez, Mohammad; Kaza, Sashidhar; Vanajakshi, S

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) is a rare entity of steroid-responsive bone marrow fibrosis that accompanies a variety of autoimmune diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Rarely it may occur in patients with autoimmune markers but no definable autoimmune disease (Primary-AIMF). We report the cases of two young women with SLE-associated AIMF (SLE-AIMF). The first patient was a young woman who had pancytopenia, massive splenomegaly and reticulin fibrosis in the marrow biopsy. The pancytopenia and splenomegaly resolved completely within weeks of treatment with corticosteroids. Repeat marrow biopsy showed marked regression of marrow fibrosis. The second patient was a young woman with fever, anasarca, bicytopenia and reticulin fibrosis in the marrow biopsy. Steroid therapy resulted in rapid clinical improvement and resolution of pancytopenia. A review of the literature revealed a total of 30 patients with SLE-AIMF reported to-date. Patients with SLE-AIMF are young women with SLE and blood cytopenia who are found to have increased bone marrow reticulin on marrow biopsy. Steroid therapy results in rapid hematological recovery and regression of marrow fibrosis. Whether AIMF is one of several hematological complications of SLE, or represents a unique and distinct subset of patients with SLE in not clear. Prospective studies with longer follow-up are needed to better define the prevalence and clinical spectrum of SLE-AIMF. PMID:27429532

  3. Interferon regulatory factor 5 in human autoimmunity and murine models of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Eames, Hayley L; Corbin, Alastair L; Udalova, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor of the immune system, playing important roles in modulating inflammatory immune responses in numerous cell types including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. As well as driving the expression of type I interferon in antiviral responses, IRF5 is also crucial for driving macrophages toward a proinflammatory phenotype by regulating cytokine and chemokine expression and modulating B-cell maturity and antibody production. This review highlights the functional importance of IRF5 in a disease setting, by discussing polymorphic mutations at the human Irf5 locus that lead to susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In concordance with this, we also discuss lessons in IRF5 functionality learned from murine in vivo models of autoimmune disease and inflammation and hypothesize that modulation of IRF5 activity and expression could provide potential therapeutic benefits in the clinic. PMID:26207886

  4. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    If you have lupus, your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can damage your joints, skin, blood vessels and organs. There are many kinds of lupus. The most common type, systemic lupus erythematosus, affects ...

  5. Ascending paresis as presentation of an unusual association between necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    García-Reynoso, Marco Julio; Veramendi-Espinoza, Liz Eliana; Ruiz-Garcia, Henry Jeison

    2014-01-01

    A 45 year-old man went to the emergency room due to disease duration of 15 days of insidious onset and progressive course. It began with symmetrical weakness and pain in feet and ankles that extends upward to the knees. Later, this progressed to paraparesis with Creatine phosphokinase levels of 44,270 U/L and respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation. Electromyography and muscle biopsy of quadriceps were made. The patient responded to corticotherapy in pulses and supporting management. The presentation of ascending paresis suggested the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. However, the degree of muscle involvement with rhabdomyolysis explains the neurological damage by itself. The biopsy revealed pathological criteria for necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), as well as other clinical and laboratory evidence. Patient disease continued and reached criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the NAM and SLE association. PMID:23906548

  6. Silica Triggers Inflammation and Ectopic Lymphoid Neogenesis in the Lungs in Parallel with Accelerated Onset of Systemic Autoimmunity and Glomerulonephritis in the Lupus-Prone NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition and environmental factors influence the development of human autoimmune disease. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica (cSiO2) has been etiologically linked to increased incidence of autoimmunity, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that early repeated short-term cSiO2 exposure will modulate both latency and severity of autoimmunity in the lupus-prone female NZBWF1 mouse. Weekly intranasal exposure to cSiO2 (0.25 and 1.0 mg) for 4 wk beginning at 9 wk of age both reduced latency and increased intensity of glomerulonephritis. cSiO2 elicited robust inflammatory responses in the lungs as evidenced by extensive perivascular and peribronchial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration consisting of IgG-producing plasma cells, and CD45R+ and CD3+ lymphocytes that were highly suggestive of ectopic lymphoid tissue (ELT). In addition, there were elevated concentrations of immunoglobulins and the cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. cSiO2-associated kidney and lung effects paralleled dose-dependent elevations of autoantibodies and proinflammatory cytokines in plasma. Taken together, cSiO2-induced pulmonary inflammation and ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the NZBWF1 mouse corresponded closely to systemic inflammatory and autoimmune responses as well as the early initiation of pathological outcomes in the kidney. These findings suggest that following airway exposure to crystalline silica, in mice genetically prone to SLE, the lung serves as a platform for triggering systemic autoimmunity and glomerulonephritis. PMID:25978333

  7. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  8. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  9. B cells are required for lupus nephritis in the polygenic, Fas-intact MRL model of systemic autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, O T; Madaio, M P; Shlomchik, M J

    1999-10-01

    B cells are required for both the expression of lupus nephritis and spontaneous T cell activation/memory cell accumulation in MRL-Faslpr mice (MRL/lpr). Autoimmunity in the MRL/lpr strain is the result of Fas-deficiency and multiple background genes; however, the precise roles of background genes vs Fas-deficiency have not been fully defined. Fas-deficiency (i.e., the lpr defect) is required in B cells for optimal autoantibody expression, raising the possibility that the central role for B cells in MRL/lpr mice may not extend to MRL/+ mice and, thus, to lupus models that do not depend on Fas-deficiency ("polygenic lupus"). To address this issue, B cell-deficient, Fas-intact MRL/+ mice (JHd-MRL/) were created; and disease was evaluated in aged animals (>9 mo). The JHd-MRL/+ animals did not develop nephritis or vasculitis at a time when the B cell-intact littermates had severe disease. In addition, while activated/memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells accumulated in B cell-intact mice, such accumulation was substantially inhibited in the absence of B cells. This effect appeared to be restricted to the MRL strain because it was not seen in B cell-deficient BALB/c mice (JHd-BALB) of similar ages. The results indicate that B cells are essential in promoting systemic autoimmunity in a Fas-independent model. Therefore, B cells have an important role in pathogenesis, generalizable to lupus models that depend on multiple genes even when Fas expression is intact. The results provide further rationale for B cell suppression as therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:10490951

  10. Reduced proportions of natural killer T cells are present in the relatives of lupus patients and are associated with autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Wither, Joan; Cai, Yong-chun; Lim, Sooyeol; McKenzie, Tamara; Roslin, Nicole; Claudio, Jaime O; Cooper, Glinda S; Hudson, Thomas J; Paterson, Andrew D; Greenwood, Celia MT; Gladman, Dafna; Pope, Janet; Pineau, Christian A; Smith, C Douglas; Hanly, John G; Peschken, Christine; Boire, Gilles; Fortin, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is a genetically complex disease. Currently, the precise allelic polymorphisms associated with this condition remain largely unidentified. In part this reflects the fact that multiple genes, each having a relatively minor effect, act in concert to produce disease. Given this complexity, analysis of subclinical phenotypes may aid in the identification of susceptibility alleles. Here, we used flow cytometry to investigate whether some of the immune abnormalities that are seen in the peripheral blood lymphocyte population of lupus patients are seen in their first-degree relatives. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from the subjects, stained with fluorochrome-conjugated monoclonal antibodies to identify various cellular subsets, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results We found reduced proportions of natural killer (NK)T cells among 367 first-degree relatives of lupus patients as compared with 102 control individuals. There were also slightly increased proportions of memory B and T cells, suggesting increased chronic low-grade activation of the immune system in first-degree relatives. However, only the deficiency of NKT cells was associated with a positive anti-nuclear antibody test and clinical autoimmune disease in family members. There was a significant association between mean parental, sibling, and proband values for the proportion of NKT cells, suggesting that this is a heritable trait. Conclusions The findings suggest that analysis of cellular phenotypes may enhance the ability to detect subclinical lupus and that genetically determined altered immunoregulation by NKT cells predisposes first-degree relatives of lupus patients to the development of autoimmunity. PMID:18783591

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family ...

  12. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  13. Cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Laman, S D; Provost, T T

    1994-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that demonstrates cutaneous, systemic, or both cutaneous and systemic manifestations. This article reviews the cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus. PMID:8153399

  14. [Multiple autoimmune syndrome. Reynolds-syndrome (acral scleroderma, primary biliary cirrhosis, Sjögren syndrome) associated with the lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Müller, F B; Groth, W; Mahrle, G

    2004-05-01

    A female patient presented with acral scleroderma, Sjögren syndrome, antibodies specific for primary biliary cirrhosis and clinical as well as histological features of lichen planus and subacute lupus erythematosus. In addition an euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis was found. Her findings correspond to type II of the multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and can be described as an association of Reynolds syndrome and the lupus erythematosus/lichen planus-overlap syndrome. PMID:15138654

  15. The role of molecular mimicry and other factors in the association of Human Endogenous Retroviruses and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Trela, Malgorzata; Nelson, Paul N; Rylance, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) have been implicated in autoimmune and other diseases. Molecular mimicry has been postulated as a potential mechanism of autoimmunity. Exogenous viruses have also been reported to be associated with the same diseases, as have genetic and environmental factors. If molecular mimicry were to be shown to be an initiating mechanism of some autoimmune diseases, then therapeutic options of blocking antibodies and peptides might be of benefit in halting diseases at the outset. Bioinformatic and molecular modelling techniques have been employed to investigate molecular mimicry and the evidence for the association of HERVs and autoimmunity is reviewed. The most convincing evidence for molecular mimicry is in rheumatoid arthritis, where HERV K-10 shares amino acid sequences with IgG1Fc, a target for rheumatoid factor. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an example of a condition associated with several autoantibodies, and several endogenous and exogenous viruses have been reported to be associated with the disease. The lack of a clear link between one virus and this condition, and the spectrum of clinical manifestations, suggests that genetic, environmental and the inflammatory response to a virus or viruses might also be major factors in the pathogenesis of lupus and other autoimmune conditions. Where there are strong associations between a virus and an autoimmune condition, such as in hepatitis C and cryoglobulinaemia, the use of bioinformatics and molecular modelling can also be utilized to help to understand the role of molecular mimicry in how HERVs might trigger disease. PMID:26818264

  16. Epratuzumab for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D J; Goldenberg, D M

    2013-04-01

    Epratuzumab (EMab, UCB, Immunomedics) is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting CD22 that is being studied in clinical trials for patients with a variety of rheumatic and hematologic conditions, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An overview of its mechanism of action is followed by a summary of completed lupus studies, and a preview of studies in progress. The agent clearly has anti-inflammatory activity and is a potentially useful agent in the management of autoimmune disorders. PMID:23553783

  17. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus; Prinz, Jörg C

    2015-12-14

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8(+) T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02-restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8(+) T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02-positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02-positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02-presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8(+) T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8(+) T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  18. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell–mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8+ T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02–restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8+ T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02–positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02–positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02–presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8+ T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8+ T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8+ T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  19. Regulation of Autoimmune Germinal Center Reactions in Lupus-Prone BXD2 Mice by Follicular Helper T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Uk; Lim, Hoyong; Jung, Ha Eun; Wetsel, Rick A.; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    BXD2 mice spontaneously develop autoantibodies and subsequent glomerulonephritis, offering a useful animal model to study autoimmune lupus. Although initial studies showed a critical contribution of IL-17 and Th17 cells in mediating autoimmune B cell responses in BXD2 mice, the role of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells remains incompletely understood. We found that both the frequency of Th17 cells and the levels of IL-17 in circulation in BXD2 mice were comparable to those of wild-type. By contrast, the frequency of PD-1+CXCR5+ Tfh cells was significantly increased in BXD2 mice compared with wild-type mice, while the frequency of PD-1+CXCR5+Foxp3+ follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells was reduced in the former group. The frequency of Tfh cells rather than that of Th17 cells was positively correlated with the frequency of germinal center B cells as well as the levels of autoantibodies to dsDNA. More importantly, CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells isolated from BXD2 mice induced the production of IgG from naïve B cells in an IL-21-dependent manner, while CCR6+ CD4+ T cells failed to do so. These results together demonstrate that Tfh cells rather than Th17 cells contribute to the autoimmune germinal center reactions in BXD2 mice. PMID:25768299

  20. Autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis: a newly described entity that is not exclusive of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Charli-Joseph, Yann; Rodríguez-Acosta, Elva Dalia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses have long been known to be associated with autoinmune systemic diseases. Recently, a small number of cases of a disorder distinct from Sweet syndrome or bullous lupus erythematosus (LE) have been described as specifically related to systemic LE under diverse terms, including nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis, nonbullous neutrophilic LE, and Sweet-like neutrophilic dermatosis. We describe 7 patients that developed urticarial lesions in the context of a known or concurrently diagnosed autoimmune connective tissue disease. Of a total of 7 patients, 6 were afflicted by systemic LE and 1 by rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren syndrome. Histological findings in all patients included an interstitial and perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate with leukocytoclasia, vacuolar alteration along the dermal-edidermal junction, and no vasculitis. Most patients had active systemic disease at the time of the cutaneous eruption. Skin lesions resolved rapidly after the administration of immunomodulating agents. In conclusion, we provide additional evidence of the existence of a recently defined nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis in the context of autoimmune connective tissue diseases and propose the term autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis as an appropriate designation. Furthermore, we believe that this entity should prompt physicians to screen the presence of an active systemic disorder in afflicted patients. PMID:23518639

  1. A Genomic Approach to Human Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in the use of DNA-based microarrays. These techniques permit to assess RNA abundance on a genome-wide scale. Medical applications emerged in the field of cancer, with studies of both solid tumors and hematological malignancies leading to the development of tests that are now used to personalize therapeutic options. Microarrays have also been used to analyze the blood transcriptome in a wide range of diseases. In human autoimmune diseases, these studies are showing potential for identifying therapeutic targets as well as biomarkers for diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and response to treatment. More quantitative and sensitive high throughput RNA profiling methods are starting to be available and will be necessary for transcriptome analyses to become routine tests in the clinical setting. We expect this to crystallize within the coming decade, as they become part of the personalized medicine armamentarium. PMID:20192809

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus in association with ulcerative colitis: related autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Stevens, H P; Ostlere, L S; Rustin, M H

    1994-03-01

    We report a patient who developed urticaria, angio-oedema and polyarthropathy secondary to the hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, a year prior to the onset of ulcerative colitis. Ten years later, primary sclerosing cholangitis and the antiphospholipid syndrome developed concomitantly. We believe this patient represents only the second reported case of idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) occurring in association with ulcerative colitis. PMID:8148283

  3. Defining and analyzing geoepidemiology and human autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Yinon; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2010-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases cumulatively affect 5-10% of the industrial world population and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In recent decades rates are rising worldwide, and autoimmunity can no longer be associated solely with the more developed "Western" countries. Geoepidemiology of autoimmune diseases portrays the burden of these illnesses across various regions and ethnic populations. Furthermore, Geoepidemiology may yield important clues to the genetic and triggering environmental mechanisms of autoimmunity. In this review we compiled and discuss in depth abundant geoepidemiological data pertaining to four major autoimmune conditions, namely type-1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, autoimmune thyroid disease, and inflammatory bowel disease. The following key results manifested in this review: 1) Ethno-geographic gradients in autoimmune disease risk are attributable to a complex interplay of genetic and environmental pressures. 2) Industrial regions, particularly Northern Europe and North America, still exhibit the highest rates for most autoimmune diseases. 3) Methods particularly useful in demonstrating the significant influence of genetic and environmental factors include comparative ethnic differences studies, migration studies, and recognition of 'hotspots'. 4) Key environmental determinants of geographical differences include diminished ultraviolet radiation exposure, Western or affluence-related lifestyle, infection exposure, environmental pollutants, nutritional factors and disease-specific precipitants (e.g., iodine exposure). PMID:20034761

  4. Implication of human endogenous retroviruses in the development of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Balada, Eva; Vilardell-Tarrés, Miquel; Ordi-Ros, Josep

    2010-08-01

    Retroviruses can exist in an endogenous form, in which viral sequences are integrated into the human germ line and are vertically transmitted in a Mendelian fashion. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), probably representing footprints of ancient germ-cell retroviral infections, occupy about 1% of the human genome. Some HERVs emerged in the genome over 25 million years ago, while others have appeared rather recently, at about the time of hominid and ape lineages divergence. Although some of these elements show mutations and deletions, some HERVs are transcriptionally active and produce functional proteins. Some medical conditions, such as cancer and autoimmune diseases, are linked to the transcription of some of the HERVs genes, to the expression of HERVs proteins (that may act as superantigens, for example), and/or to the development of antibodies against them that might cross-react with our own proteins. Their genetic sequences may also be, totally or partially, integrated into genes that regulate the immune response. These mechanisms could give rise to autoimmune diseases, such as lupus erythematosus, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis, among others. This review is aimed at discussing evidence for a possible role of HERVs in the etiopathogenesis of different autoimmune diseases. PMID:20635879

  5. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  6. Toll-like receptor 8 deletion accelerates autoimmunity in a mouse model of lupus through a Toll-like receptor 7-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Lan; Manzin-Lorenzi, Céline; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder characterized by increased levels of lymphocyte activation, antigen presentation by dendritic cells, and the formation of autoantibodies. This leads to immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Toll-like receptor 7 (T7) and TLR9 localize to the endosomal compartment and play important roles in the generation of autoantibodies against nuclear components, as they recognize RNA and DNA, respectively. In contrast, very little is known about endogenous TLR8 activation in mice. We therefore tested whether TLR8 could affect autoimmune responses in a murine model of lupus. We introduced a Tlr8 null mutation into C57BL/6 mice congenic for the Nba2 (NZB autoimmunity 2) locus and bearing the Yaa (Y-linked autoimmune acceleration) mutation containing a tlr8 duplicated gene, and monitored disease development, autoantibody production, and glomerulonephritis-associated mortality. Cellular responses were investigated in female Nba2.TLR8−/− mice bearing no copy of tlr8. The TLR8 deficiency accelerated disease progression and mortality, increased the number of circulating antibodies and activated monocytes, and heightened cellular responses to TLR7 ligation. TLR8-deficient antigen-presenting cells exhibited increased levels of MHC class II expression. The ability of dendritic cells to present antigens to allogeneic T cells after TLR7 ligation was also improved by TLR8 deficiency. TLR8 deletion accelerated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice in response to TLR7 activation. Antigen-presenting cell function seemed to play a key role in mediating the effects of TLR8 deficiency. PMID:25424423

  7. The IRF5-TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share.

    PubMed

    Kottyan, Leah C; Zoller, Erin E; Bene, Jessica; Lu, Xiaoming; Kelly, Jennifer A; Rupert, Andrew M; Lessard, Christopher J; Vaughn, Samuel E; Marion, Miranda; Weirauch, Matthew T; Namjou, Bahram; Adler, Adam; Rasmussen, Astrid; Glenn, Stuart; Montgomery, Courtney G; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Xie, Gang; Coltescu, Catalina; Amos, Chris; Li, He; Ice, John A; Nath, Swapan K; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Rischmueller, Maureen; Lester, Sue; Brun, Johan G; Gøransson, Lasse G; Harboe, Erna; Omdal, Roald; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S; Vyse, Tim; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Brennan, Michael T; Lessard, James A; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Kvarnström, Marika; Illei, Gabor G; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Eriksson, Per; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L; Segal, Barbara M; Merrill, Joan T; James, Judith A; Guthridge, Joel M; Scofield, R Hal; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gilkeson, Gary; Kamen, Diane L; Jacob, Chaim O; Kimberly, Robert; Brown, Elizabeth; Edberg, Jeffrey; Alarcón, Graciela S; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Freedman, Barry I; Niewold, Timothy; Stevens, Anne M; Tsao, Betty P; Ying, Jun; Mayes, Maureen D; Gorlova, Olga Y; Wakeland, Ward; Radstake, Timothy; Martin, Ezequiel; Martin, Javier; Siminovitch, Katherine; Moser Sivils, Kathy L; Gaffney, Patrick M; Langefeld, Carl D; Harley, John B; Kaufman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-15

    Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5-TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5-TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10(-49); OR = 1.38-1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10(-27)-10(-32), OR = 1.7-1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5-TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5-TNPO3. PMID:25205108

  8. Toll-like receptors in autoimmunity with special reference to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Vandana D; Das, Swaptagni; Surve, Prathamesh; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2012-05-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family plays a fundamental role in host innate immunity by mounting a rapid and potent inflammatory response to pathogen infection. TLRs recognize distinct microbial components and activate intracellular signaling pathways that induce expression of host inflammatory genes. Several studies have indicated that TLRs are implicated in many inflammatory and immune disorders. Extensive research in the past decade to understand TLR-mediated mechanisms of innate immunity has enabled pharmaceutical companies to begin to develop novel therapeutics for the purpose of controlling an inflammatory disease. The roles of TLRs in the development of autoimmune diseases have been studied. TLR7 and TLR9 have key roles in production of autoantibodies and/or in development of systemic autoimmune disease. It remains to be determined their role in apoptosis, in the pathogenesis of RNA containing immune complexes, differential expression of TLRs by T regulatory cells. PMID:23162288

  9. Oxidative DNA damage and cellular sensitivity to oxidative stress in human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, S; Harris, G; Denman, M A; Blake, D R; Winyard, P G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To estimate the extent of genomic DNA damage and killing of lymphocytes by reactive oxygen intermediates in autoimmune diseases. METHODS--8-Oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a promutagenic DNA lesion induced by reactive oxygen intermediates, was measured by high performance liquid chromatography, coupled with electrochemical detection, in hydrolysates of DNA which had been extracted from lymphocyte and polymorphonuclear leucocyte fractions of human blood. In addition, human primary blood lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A were assayed for cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide on day 0, by assessing cell proliferation during seven days of culture. RESULTS--Constitutive 8-oxodG was detectable (mean (2 SEM) moles 8-oxodG/10(6) moles deoxyguanosine) in DNA isolated from normal human blood lymphocytes (68 (8), n = 26) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (118 (24), n = 24). Lymphocyte DNA from donors with the following inflammatory autoimmune diseases contained significantly higher levels of 8-oxodG than that from healthy donors: rheumatoid arthritis (98 (16)), systemic lupus erythematosus (137 (28)), vasculitis (100 (32)), and Behçet's disease (92 (19)). Lymphocyte 8-oxodG levels in non-autoimmune controls and patients with scleroderma were not significantly different from those of healthy controls. The levels of 8-oxodG were significantly higher in the DNA from normal polymorphonuclear leucocytes than in paired DNA samples from normal lymphocytes, but there were no differences between levels of 8-oxodG in polymorphonuclear leucocytes from normal subjects and the patients studied. Levels of 8-oxodG did not correlate with disease duration, disease severity, or age. Lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, but not those with scleroderma, also showed cellular hypersensitivity to the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. CONCLUSION--There was increased genomic DNA damage, and increased susceptibility to

  10. LAPping up dead cells to prevent lupus nephritis: a novel role for noncanonical autophagy in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jeremy S; Ross, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis remain poorly understood. A recent study demonstrates that deficiencies in the immune system's ability to degrade scavenged dead cells via noncanonical autophagy is sufficient to break immune tolerance and produce features commonly seen in lupus, including circulating autoantibodies, inflammatory cytokines, and nephritis. This work provides a possible mechanism for the association of polymorphisms in autophagy genes with the risk of lupus. PMID:27418084

  11. Autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in Colombians: a call for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Reyes, Benjamin; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana M; Camacho-Rodríguez, Bernardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This was a case study in which 3 patients with autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV) were evaluated and described. All the patients were women. Diagnosis consisted of HLA-B27 enthesitis related arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematous, respectively. Our results highlight the risk of developing ASIA after HPV vaccination and may serve to increase the awareness of such a complication. Factors that are predictive of developing autoimmune diseases should be examined at the population level in order to establish preventive measures in at-risk individuals for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. PMID:25962455

  12. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression. PMID:27493014

  13. The indirect costs of systemic autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and sarcoidosis: a summary of 2012 real-life data from the Social Insurance Institution in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Paweł P; Malinowski, Krzysztof P

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and sarcoidosis are three different autoimmune systemic diseases that generate a significant burden to society due to treatment costs and also those caused by a work disability or absenteeism among patients. Relevant 2012 data referring to the three components of absenteeism produced by autoimmune systemic diseases, sick leave, short-term and long-term work disability, were obtained from the Social Insurance Institution in Poland (PSII). By applying the Human Capital Approach using gross domestic product per capita, gross value added per worker and gross income per worker in 2012, total indirect costs for the diseases were calculated. All costs were presented in euros and were valid for 2012. The PSII recorded 1600 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 500 patients with systemic sclerosis and 2700 patients with sarcoidosis in the 2012 - total indirect costs were as high as 7,260,595, 2,268,571 and 4,027,575 EUR, respectively. Costs were estimated using gross domestic product per capita; 17,485,412, 5,463,312 and 9,699,455 EUR, accordingly, calculated using gross value added per worker and 5,346,933, 1,670,648 and 2,966,034 EUR estimated using gross income per worker, respectively. Considering only data on absenteeism gathered by the PSII we can conclude that the three autoimmune systemic diseases bore great indirect costs. Their social burden for Poland could be even greater when considering presenteeism as well as other components of absenteeism such as loss of unpaid work, a gray economy or loss of leisure time. PMID:26153642

  14. Control of Cytokine Production by Human Fc Gamma Receptors: Implications for Pathogen Defense and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Vogelpoel, Lisa T. C.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.; de Jong, Esther C.; den Dunnen, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Control of cytokine production by immune cells is pivotal for counteracting infections via orchestration of local and systemic inflammation. Although their contribution has long been underexposed, it has recently become clear that human Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), which are receptors for the Fc region of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, play a critical role in this process by controlling tissue- and pathogen-specific cytokine production. Whereas individual stimulation of FcγRs does not evoke cytokine production, FcγRs cell-type specifically interact with various other receptors for selective amplification or inhibition of particular cytokines, thereby tailoring cytokine responses to the immunological context. The physiological function of FcγR-mediated control of cytokine production is to counteract infections with various classes of pathogens. Upon IgG opsonization, pathogens are simultaneously recognized by FcγRs as well as by various pathogen-sensing receptors, leading to the induction of pathogen class-specific immune responses. However, when erroneously activated, the same mechanism also contributes to the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we discuss control of cytokine production as a novel function of FcγRs in human innate immune cells in the context of homeostasis, infection, and autoimmunity and address the possibilities for future therapeutic exploitation. PMID:25759693

  15. Auto-antibodies to vascular endothelial cadherin in humans: association with autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Bouillet, L; Baudet, A E; Deroux, A; Sidibé, A; Dumestre-Perard, C; Mannic, T; Treillard, B; Arboleas, M A; Chiquet, C A; Gulino-Debrac, D G; Vilgrain, I Y

    2013-11-01

    To identify patients with autoimmune diseases who are at high risk of developing vascular cell dysfunction, early biomarkers must be identified. This study was designed to detect and characterize circulating autoantibodies to VE-cadherin (AAVEs) in patients with early-stage autoimmune diseases. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to capture autoantibodies, using a recombinant human VE-cadherin fragment covering the extracellular domains as a target antigen. AAVEs specificity for the target antigen was confirmed by western blotting. Basal AAVEs levels were determined for healthy donors (n=75). Sera from patients (n=100) with various autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (n=23), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n=31), systemic sclerosis (n=30), and Behçet's disease (BD, n=16) were also tested. Levels of AAVEs were significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (P<0.0001), SLE (P<0.05), and BD (P<0.05) populations than in healthy subjects. Purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) from a BD patient with exceptionally high AAVEs levels recognized the EC1-4 fragment in western blots. Further characterization of the epitopes recognized by AAVEs showed that BD patients had antibodies specific for the EC3 and EC4 domains, whereas SLE patients preferentially recognized the EC1 fragment. This suggests that distinct epitopes of human VE-cadherin might be recognized in different immune diseases. Purified IgG from BD patients was found to induce endothelial cell retraction, redistribution of VE-cadherin, and cause the formation of numerous intercellular gaps. Altogether, these data demonstrate a potential pathogenic effect of AAVEs isolated from patients with dysimmune disease. This is the first description of AAVEs in humans. Because regions EC1 and EC3-4 have been shown to be involved in homophilic VE-cadherin interactions, AAVEs produced in the course of dysimmune diseases might be specific biomarkers for endothelial injury, which is part of the

  16. Superantigen influence in conjunction with cytokine polymorphism potentiates autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Dar, Sajad Ahmad; Janahi, Essam Mohammed Ahmed; Haque, Shafiul; Akhter, Naseem; Jawed, Arshad; Wahid, Mohd; Ramachandran, Vishnampettai Ganapathysubramanian; Bhattacharya, Sambit Nath; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Das, Shukla

    2016-08-01

    Risk posed by microbial superantigens in triggering or exacerbating SLE in genetically predisposed individuals, thereby altering the response to its treatment strategies, has not been studied. Using streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin B as prototype superantigens, we have demonstrated that they profoundly affect the magnitude of polyclonal T cell response, particularly CD4(+) T cells and expression of CD45RA and CD45RO, and cytokine secretion in vitro in SLE patient PBMCs. Also, reduced proportions of FoxP3 expressing CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells were detected in SLE as compared to healthy control PBMCs. Furthermore, polymorphism in IL-10 and TGF-β showed significant association with SLE in our study population. These results indicate that accumulation of superantigen-reactive T cells and cytokine polymorphism may cause disease exacerbation, relapse, or therapeutic resistance in SLE patients. Attempts to contain colonizing and/or superantigen-producing microbial agents in SLE patients in addition to careful monitoring of their therapy may be worthwhile in decreasing disease severity or preventing frequent relapses. The study suggests that superantigen interference in conjunction with cytokine polymorphism may play a role in immune dysregulation, thereby contributing to autoimmunity in SLE. Therefore, changes in T cell phenotypes and cytokine secretion might be good indicators of therapeutic efficacy in these patients. PMID:26676360

  17. Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells promote interleukin-17 production from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, S; Hu, J; Chen, Y; Yuan, T; Hu, H; Li, S

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation instigated by interleukin (IL)-17-producing cells is central to the development and pathogenesis of several human autoimmune diseases and animal models of autoimmunity. The expansion of IL-17-producing cells from healthy donors is reportedly promoted by mesenchymal stem cells derived from fetal bone marrow. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) were examined for their effects on lymphocytes from healthy donors and from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Significantly higher levels of IL-17 were produced when CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors were co-cultured with hUC-MSCs than those that were cultured alone. Blocking experiments identified that this effect might be mediated partially through prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) and IL-1β, without IL-23 involvement. We then co-cultured hUC-MSCs with human CD4(+) T cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Ex-vivo inductions of IL-17 by hUC-MSCs in stimulated lymphocytes were significantly higher in SLE patients than in healthy donors. This effect was not observed for IL-23. Taken together, our results represent that hUC-MSCs can promote the IL-17 production from CD4(+) T cells in both healthy donor and SLE patients. PGE2 and IL-1β might also be partially involved in the promotive effect of hUC-MSCs. PMID:26507122

  18. Natural human antibodies to synthetic peptide autoantigens: correlations with age and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Marchalonis, J J; Schluter, S F; Wilson, L; Yocum, D E; Boyer, J T; Kay, M M

    1993-01-01

    M reactivities to both band 3 and Tcr beta peptides than do normals, with this effect being less pronounced in the distinct autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Studies of normal humans ranging in age from 20 to 90 years suggest two major patterns for the IgM natural antibody response to synthetic peptides giving high response. The first is that the level of IgM reactivity is high early in life and remains high throughout. The second pattern is one in which the reaction is high in younger individuals, but diminishes substantially in the latter decades of life.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8514202

  19. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus: incidence, management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2011-05-01

    The generation of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus has been associated with the use of certain drugs in humans. Early reports suggested that procainamide and hydralazine were associated with the highest risk of developing lupus, quinidine with a moderate risk and all other drugs were considered low or very low risk. More recently, drug-induced lupus has been associated with the use of the newer biological modulators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors and interferons. The clinical features and laboratory findings of TNFα inhibitor-induced lupus are different from that of traditional drug-induced lupus or idiopathic lupus, and standardized criteria for the diagnosis of drug-induced lupus have not been established. The mechanism(s) responsible for the development of drug-induced lupus may vary depending on the drug or even on the patient. Besides lupus, other autoimmune diseases have been associated with drugs or toxins. Diagnosis of drug-induced lupus requires identification of a temporal relationship between drug administration and symptom development, and in traditional drug-induced lupus there must be no pre-existing lupus. Resolution of symptoms generally occurs after cessation of the drug. In this review, we will discuss those drugs that are more commonly associated with drug-induced lupus, with an emphasis on the new biologicals and the difficulty of making the diagnosis of drug-induced lupus against a backdrop of the autoimmune diseases that these drugs are used to treat. Stimulation of the immune system by these drugs to cause autoimmunity may in fact be associated with an increased effectiveness in treating the pathology for which they are prescribed, leading to the dilemma of deciding which is worse, the original disease or the adverse effect of the drug. Optimistically, one must hope that ongoing research in drug development and in pharmacogenetics will help to treat patients with the maximum

  20. Human parvovirus B19 and autoimmune diseases. Review of the literature and pathophysiological hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Page, Cyril; François, Catherine; Goëb, Vincent; Duverlie, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    A number of arguments support the role played by PVB19 in autoimmunity, in the broad sense of the term essentially derived from numerous clinical case reports and/or small series over the past 20-30 years in the medical literature. PVB19 can induce a very broad spectrum of autoantibody production, especially including: anti-soluble nuclear antigen antibodies, antiphospholipid antibodies anti-native DNA antibodies, antilymphocyte antibody, anticardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. Notably acute PVB19 infection can mimic or stimulate autoimmune systemic diseases as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. However, at the present time, there is no formal scientific evidence demonstrating a direct role of PVB19 in autoimmunity, bearing in mind that there are also no formal arguments against it. Further large studies are needed to understand the eventual role of PVB19 in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26433772

  1. Immunogenicity and safety of the human papillomavirus vaccine in patients with autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    Whereas safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines in healthy women have been shown in several randomised controlled clinical trials and in post marketing analyses, only few data exist in patients affected by autoimmune diseases. These issues are significant as autoimmune conditions are recognised as a risk factor for the persistence of HPV infection. Herein we review and systematise the existing literature to assess immunogenicity and safety of HPV vaccination in patients with autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The results of our literature revision suggest that the HPV vaccines are efficacious and safe in most of the patients affected by autoimmune diseases. Yet, some points of concern remain to be tackled, including the effects of concomitant therapies, the risk of disease exacerbation and the cost-effectiveness of such immunisation programmes in these populations. PMID:26036945

  2. ABIN1 Dysfunction as a Genetic Basis for Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Caster, Dawn J.; Korte, Erik A.; Nanda, Sambit K.; McLeish, Kenneth R.; Oliver, Rebecca K.; G'Sell, Rachel T.; Sheehan, Ryan M.; Freeman, Darrell W.; Coventry, Susan C.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Scofield, R. Hal; Adrianto, Indra; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Tsao, Betty P.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T.; Harley, John B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vila, Luis M.; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Cohen, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The genetic factors underlying the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus are largely unknown, although animal studies indicate that nuclear factor (NF)-κB is involved. We reported previously that a knockin mouse expressing an inactive form of ABIN1 (ABIN1[D485N]) develops lupus-like autoimmune disease and demonstrates enhanced activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in immune cells after toll-like receptor stimulation. In the current study, we show that ABIN1[D485N] mice develop progressive GN similar to class III and IV lupus nephritis in humans. To investigate the clinical relevance of ABIN1 dysfunction, we genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding ABIN1, TNIP1, in samples from European-American, African American, Asian, Gullah, and Hispanic participants in the Large Lupus Association Study 2. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and cases of systemic lupus erythematosus without nephritis revealed strong associations with lupus nephritis at rs7708392 in European Americans and rs4958881 in African Americans. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and healthy controls revealed a stronger association at rs7708392 in European Americans but not at rs4958881 in African Americans. Our data suggest that variants in the TNIP1 gene are associated with the risk for lupus nephritis and could be mechanistically involved in disease development via aberrant regulation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. PMID:23970121

  3. B-cell targeted therapies in human autoimmune diseases: an updated perspective.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Michael J; Monroe, John G; Chan, Andrew C

    2010-09-01

    The advent of therapies that specifically target the B-lymphocyte lineage in human disease has rejuvenated interest in the mechanistic biology by which B cells mediate autoimmunity. B cells have a multitude of effector functions including production of self-reactive antibodies, ability to present antigen to T lymphocytes in the context of costimulation, involvement in generation and maintenance of neo-organogenesis at sites of disease, and opposing function through production of both immunostimulatory and immunomodulatory cytokines. In this review, we first discuss the role of B cells in driving autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren's syndrome, and discuss how studies in these diseases have revealed differentially important roles for the multiple B-cell effector functions. These data reveal the complex and interrelated roles of B cells working in concert with other components of the innate and adaptive immune system to drive pathogenesis. We then focus on data from mouse and human in which B cells in the setting of disease have been targeted with drugs directed against CD20, CD22, and the BAFF (B-cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family)/APRIL (a proliferation inducing ligand) pathways. Pre-clinical studies in animal models in addition to and clinical trials targeting B cells have added further to the understanding of the differential roles B cells play in disease both through demonstration of clinical efficacy in the context of B-cell depletion or modulation, and also by failure of B-cell targeting in some diseases and disease patient subgroups. Moving forward, it will be imperative to apply these lessons to new interventional trials to ensure better targeting of the B-cell lineage and concomitantly better selection of patients most likely to benefit from these therapies. PMID:20727041

  4. Diet, microbiota and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vieira, S M; Pagovich, O E; Kriegel, M A

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (the gut microbiota) influence the development of autoimmunity in rodent models. Since humans have co-evolved with commensals for millennia, it is likely that people, who are genetically predisposed to autoimmunity, harbor gut microbial communities that similarly influence the onset and/or severity of disease. Beyond the current efforts to identify such disease-promoting or -preventing commensals ("pathobionts" or "symbionts"), it will be important to determine what factors modulate them. Dietary changes are known to affect both the composition and function of the gut microbial communities, which in turn can alter the innate and adaptive immune system. In this review, we focus on the relationships between diet, microbiota, and autoimmune diseases. We hypothesize that the beneficial and life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction on a variety of autoimmune models including lupus might partly be mediated by its effects on the gut microbiome and associated virome, the collection of all viruses in the gut. We give recent examples of the immunomodulatory potential of select gut commensals and their products or diet-derived metabolites in murine models of arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Lastly, we summarize the published phenotypes of germ-free mouse models of lupus and speculate on any role of the diet-sensitive microbiome and virome in systemic lupus and the related antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:24763536

  5. Autoantibodies with Enzymatic Properties in Human Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wootla, Bharath; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Kaveri, Srini V.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. In addition to this plethora of functions, some antibodies express enzymatic activity. Antibodies endowed with enzymatic properties have been described in human autoimmune manifestations for more than a decade in a variety of disorders such as autoimmune thyroiditis, systemic erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS) and acquired hemophilia (AH). Antibodies isolated from these conditions were able to specifically hydrolyze thyroglobulin, DNA, RNA, myelin basic protein (MBP), and factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. The therapeutic relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:21624820

  6. Network Analysis Identifies Proinflammatory Plasma Cell Polarization for Secretion of ISG15 in Human Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Care, Matthew A; Stephenson, Sophie J; Barnes, Nicholas A; Fan, Im; Zougman, Alexandre; El-Sherbiny, Yasser M; Vital, Edward M; Westhead, David R; Tooze, Reuben M; Doody, Gina M

    2016-08-15

    Plasma cells (PCs) as effectors of humoral immunity produce Igs to match pathogenic insult. Emerging data suggest more diverse roles exist for PCs as regulators of immune and inflammatory responses via secretion of factors other than Igs. The extent to which such responses are preprogrammed in B-lineage cells or can be induced in PCs by the microenvironment is unknown. In this study, we dissect the impact of IFNs on the regulatory networks of human PCs. We show that core PC programs are unaffected, whereas PCs respond to IFNs with distinctive transcriptional responses. The IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) system emerges as a major transcriptional output induced in a sustained fashion by IFN-α in PCs and linked both to intracellular conjugation and ISG15 secretion. This leads to the identification of ISG15-secreting plasmablasts/PCs in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, ISG15-secreting PCs represent a distinct proinflammatory PC subset providing an Ig-independent mechanism of PC action in human autoimmunity. PMID:27357150

  7. Network Analysis Identifies Proinflammatory Plasma Cell Polarization for Secretion of ISG15 in Human Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Care, Matthew A.; Stephenson, Sophie J.; Barnes, Nicholas A.; Fan, Im; Zougman, Alexandre; El-Sherbiny, Yasser M.; Vital, Edward M.; Westhead, David R.; Tooze, Reuben M.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cells (PCs) as effectors of humoral immunity produce Igs to match pathogenic insult. Emerging data suggest more diverse roles exist for PCs as regulators of immune and inflammatory responses via secretion of factors other than Igs. The extent to which such responses are preprogrammed in B-lineage cells or can be induced in PCs by the microenvironment is unknown. In this study, we dissect the impact of IFNs on the regulatory networks of human PCs. We show that core PC programs are unaffected, whereas PCs respond to IFNs with distinctive transcriptional responses. The IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) system emerges as a major transcriptional output induced in a sustained fashion by IFN-α in PCs and linked both to intracellular conjugation and ISG15 secretion. This leads to the identification of ISG15-secreting plasmablasts/PCs in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, ISG15-secreting PCs represent a distinct proinflammatory PC subset providing an Ig-independent mechanism of PC action in human autoimmunity. PMID:27357150

  8. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis. PMID:26676359

  9. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4+ T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level. PMID:27534821

  10. Overexpression of membrane-bound fas ligand (CD95L) exacerbates autoimmune disease and renal pathology in pristane-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Bossaller, Lukas; Rathinam, Vijay A K; Bonegio, Ramon; Chiang, Ping-I; Busto, Patricia; Wespiser, Adam R; Caffrey, Daniel R; Li, Quan-Zhen; Mohan, Chandra; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Latz, Eicke; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2013-09-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Fas death receptor or its ligand result in a lymphoproliferative syndrome and exacerbate clinical disease in most lupus-prone strains of mice. One exception is mice injected with 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD), a hydrocarbon oil commonly known as pristane, which induces systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease. Although Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) interactions have been strongly implicated in the activation-induced cell death of both lymphocytes and other APCs, FasL can also trigger the production of proinflammatory cytokines. FasL is a transmembrane protein with a matrix metalloproteinase cleavage site in the ectodomain. Matrix metalloproteinase cleavage inactivates membrane-bound FasL and releases a soluble form reported to have both antagonist and agonist activity. To better understand the impact of FasL cleavage on both the proapoptotic and proinflammatory activity of FasL, its cleavage site was deleted through targeted mutation to produce the deleted cleavage site (ΔCS) mouse line. ΔCS mice express higher levels of membrane-bound FasL than do wild-type mice and fail to release soluble FasL. To determine to what extent FasL promotes inflammation in lupus mice, TMPD-injected FasL-deficient and ΔCS BALB/c mice were compared with control TMPD-injected BALB/c mice. We found that FasL deficiency significantly reduced the early inflammatory exudate induced by TMPD injection. In contrast, ΔCS mice developed a markedly exacerbated disease profile associated with a higher frequency of splenic neutrophils and macrophages, a profound change in anti-nuclear Ab specificity, and markedly increased proteinuria and kidney pathology compared with controls. These results demonstrate that FasL promotes inflammation in TMPD-induced autoimmunity, and its cleavage limits FasL proinflammatory activity. PMID:23918976

  11. Dissection of the role of MHC class II A and E genes in autoimmune susceptibility in murine lupus models with intragenic recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danqing; Fujio, Keishi; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Jingyuan; Tada, Norihiro; Sudo, Katsuko; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Shira, Toshikazu; Hirose, Sachiko

    2004-09-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multigenic autoimmune disease, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II polymorphism serves as a key genetic element. In SLE-prone (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice, the MHC H-2(d/z) heterozygosity (H-2(d) of NZB and H-2(z) of NZW) has a strong impact on disease; thus, congenic H-2(d/d) homozygous F(1) mice do not develop severe disease. In this study, we used Ea-deficient intra-H-2 recombination to establish A(d/d)-congenic (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice, with or without E molecule expression, and dissected the role of class II A and E molecules. Here we found that A(d/d) homozygous F(1) mice lacking E molecules developed severe SLE similar to that seen in wild-type F1 mice, including lupus nephritis, autoantibody production, and spontaneously occurring T cell activation. Additional evidence revealed that E molecules prevent the disease in a dose-dependent manner; however, the effect is greatly influenced by the haplotype of A molecules, because wild-type H-2(d/z) F(1) mice develop SLE, despite E molecule expression. Studies on the potential of dendritic cells to present a self-antigen chromatin indicated that dendritic cells from wild-type F(1) mice induced a greater response of chromatin-specific T cells than did those from A(d/d) F(1) mice, irrespective of the presence or absence of E molecules, suggesting that the self-antigen presentation is mediated by A, but not by E, molecules. Our mouse models are useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms by which MHC class II regions regulate the process of autoimmune responses. PMID:15361580

  12. Understanding Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat lupus? What causes lupus? What are the risk factors for developing lupus? How does lupus affect the nervous system? What is the history of lupus? Is stress related to lupus? Can hormones trigger the development ...

  13. Sex differences in the expression of lupus-associated miRNAs in splenocytes from lupus-prone NZB/WF1 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A majority of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), occur predominantly in females. Recent studies have identified specific dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) in both human and murine lupus, implying an important contribution of these miRNAs to lupus pathogenesis. However, to date, there is no study that examined sex differences in miRNA expression in immune cells as a plausible basis for sex differences in autoimmune disease. This study addresses this aspect in NZB/WF1 mice, a classical murine lupus model with marked female bias, and further investigates estrogen regulation of lupus-associated miRNAs. Methods The Taqman miRNA assay system was used to quantify the miRNA expression in splenocytes from male and female NZB/WF1 mice at 17–18, 23, and 30 weeks (wks) of age. To evaluate potential estrogen's effect on lupus-associated miRNAs, 6-wk-old NZB/WF1 male mice were orchidectomized and surgically implanted with empty (placebo) or estrogen implants for 4 and 26 wks, respectively. To assess the lupus status in the NZB/WF1 mice, serum anti-dsDNA autoantibody levels, proteinuria, and renal histological changes were determined. Results The sex differences in the expression of lupus-associated miRNAs, including the miR-182-96-183 cluster, miR-155, miR-31, miR-148a, miR-127, and miR-379, were markedly evident after the onset of lupus, especially at 30 wks of age when female NZB/WF1 mice manifested moderate to severe lupus when compared to their male counterparts. Our limited data also suggested that estrogen treatment increased the expression of aforementioned lupus-associated miRNAs, with the exception of miR-155, in orchidectomized male NZB/WF1 mice to a similar level in age-matched intact female NZB/WF1 mice. It is noteworthy that orchiectomy, itself, did not affect the expression of lupus-associated miRNAs. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrated sex differences in the expression of lupus

  14. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  15. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  16. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. B Cell Signature during Inactive Systemic Lupus Is Heterogeneous: Toward a Biological Dissection of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Blaison, Gilles; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Dembele, Doulaye; Ruer-Laventie, Julie; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Pasquali, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosous (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with an important clinical and biological heterogeneity. B lymphocytes appear central to the development of SLE which is characterized by the production of a large variety of autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia. In mice, immature B cells from spontaneous lupus prone animals are able to produce autoantibodies when transferred into immunodeficient mice, strongly suggesting the existence of intrinsic B cell defects during lupus. In order to approach these defects in humans, we compared the peripheral B cell transcriptomas of quiescent lupus patients to normal B cell transcriptomas. When the statistical analysis is performed on the entire group of patients, the differences between patients and controls appear quite weak with only 14 mRNA genes having a false discovery rate ranging between 11 and 17%, with 6 underexpressed genes (PMEPA1, TLR10, TRAF3IP2, LDOC1L, CD1C and EGR1). However, unforced hierarchical clustering of the microarrays reveals a subgroup of lupus patients distinct from both the controls and the other lupus patients. This subgroup has no detectable clinical or immunological phenotypic peculiarity compared to the other patients, but is characterized by 1/an IL-4 signature and 2/the abnormal expression of a large set of genes with an extremely low false discovery rate, mainly pointing to the biological function of the endoplasmic reticulum, and more precisely to genes implicated in the Unfolded Protein Response, suggesting that B cells entered an incomplete BLIMP1 dependent plasmacytic differentiation which was undetectable by immunophenotyping. Thus, this microarray analysis of B cells during quiescent lupus suggests that, despite a similar lupus phenotype, different biological roads can lead to human lupus. PMID:21886837

  18. The IRF5–TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share

    PubMed Central

    Kottyan, Leah C.; Zoller, Erin E.; Bene, Jessica; Lu, Xiaoming; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Rupert, Andrew M.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Vaughn, Samuel E.; Marion, Miranda; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Namjou, Bahram; Adler, Adam; Rasmussen, Astrid; Glenn, Stuart; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Xie, Gang; Coltescu, Catalina; Amos, Chris; Li, He; Ice, John A.; Nath, Swapan K.; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Rischmueller, Maureen; Lester, Sue; Brun, Johan G.; Gøransson, Lasse G.; Harboe, Erna; Omdal, Roald; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S.; Vyse, Tim; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Brennan, Michael T.; Lessard, James A.; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Kvarnström, Marika; Illei, Gabor G.; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Eriksson, Per; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Segal, Barbara M.; Merrill, Joan T.; James, Judith A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Hal Scofield, R.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Gilkeson, Gary; Kamen, Diane L.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kimberly, Robert; Brown, Elizabeth; Edberg, Jeffrey; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Freedman, Barry I.; Niewold, Timothy; Stevens, Anne M.; Tsao, Betty P.; Ying, Jun; Mayes, Maureen D.; Gorlova, Olga Y.; Wakeland, Ward; Radstake, Timothy; Martin, Ezequiel; Martin, Javier; Siminovitch, Katherine; Moser Sivils, Kathy L.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5–TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5–TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10−49; OR = 1.38–1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10−27–10−32, OR = 1.7–1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5–TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5–TNPO3. PMID:25205108

  19. Human adjuvant disease: remission of silicone induced autoimmune disease after explanation of breast augmentation.

    PubMed Central

    kaiser, W; Biesenbach, G; Stuby, U; Grafinger, P; Zazgornik, J

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases following silicone or paraffin implantation are rarely encountered complications of plastic surgery. A 42 year old woman is presented who developed clinical and immunological features of systemic lupus erythematosus 11 years after silicone augmentation. After explanation antinuclear antibody titres decreased from 1/1280 to 1/160, C4 complement fraction and the previously raised angiotensin converting enzyme normalised in step with clinical improvement. It is important that plastic surgeons and rheumatologists should be aware of this possible association. PMID:2256743

  20. A case of human immunodeficiency virus infection with cerebellar ataxia that suggested by an association with autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Shigeto; Kondo, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-04-28

    We report a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that showed subacute progressive cerebellar ataxia without HIV encephalopathy or other encephalopathies, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or encephalitis of other human herpes virus (HHV) infections. A 43-year-old man exhibited unsteady gait. Neurological examination disclosed ataxia of the trunk and lower extremities. Personality change and dementia were absent. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormal finding, including of the cerebellum. The serum HIV-1-RNA was 1.2 × 10(5) copies/ml, and the absolute CD4 lymphocyte count was 141 cells/ml. Remarkably, the serum anti-Yo antibody, as an anti-cerebellar antibody of paraneoplastic syndrome, and anti-gliadin antibody, associated with celiac disease or gluten ataxia, were positive. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulin G index was 1.2 (< 0.8), and oligoclonal bands were present. PCR of the CSF was negative for HIV, JC virus, other HHVs, and mycosis. Previous reports presented HIV-infected patients with concurrent autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, vasculitis, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis, Graves' disease, and hepatic diseases. These might have been present in patients with a CD4 T lymphocyte count of more than 200 cells/ml. On the other hand, paraneoplastic syndrome, gluten ataxia, cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy might manifest as autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. As regards the association of HIV infection and autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, a previous report suggested that anti-gliadin antibody was detected in about 30% of HIV-infected children, though there is no reference to an association with cerebellar ataxia. Moreover, to our knowledge, detection of anti-Yo antibody in an HIV-infected patient with cerebellar ataxia has not been reported

  1. The intricate role of complement component C4 in human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Chung, Erwin K; Zhou, Bi; Lhotta, Karl; Hebert, Lee A; Birmingham, Daniel J; Rovin, Brad H; Yu, C Yung

    2004-01-01

    It was observed about 50 years ago that low serum complement activity or low protein concentrations of complement C4 concurred with disease activities of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Complete deficiencies of complement components C4A and C4B, albeit rare in human populations, are among the strongest genetic risk factors for SLE or lupus-like disease, across HLA haplotypes and racial backgrounds. However, whether heterozygous or partial deficiency of C4A (C4AQ0) or C4B (C4BQ0) is a predisposing factor for SLE has been a highly controversial topic. In this review we critically analyzed past epidemiologic studies on deficiency of C4A or C4B in human SLE. Cumulative results from more than 35 different studies revealed that heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A were present in 40-60% of SLE patients from almost all ethnic groups or races investigated, which included northern and central Europeans, Anglo-Saxons, Caucasians in the US, African Americans, Asian Chinese, Koreans and Japanese. In addition, French SLE and control populations had relatively low frequencies of C4AQ0, but the difference between the patient and control groups was statistically significant. The relative risk of C4AQ0 in SLE varied between 2.3 and 5.3 among different ethnic groups. In Caucasian and African SLE patients, the two major causes for C4AQ0 are (1) the presence of a mono-S RCCX (RP-C4-CYP21-TNX) module with a single, short C4B gene in the major histocompatibility complex; and (2) a 2-bp insertion into the sequence for codon 1213 at exon 29 of the mutant C4A gene. Both mono-S structures and 2-bp insertion in exon 29 are absent or extremely rare in the C4AQ0 of Oriental SLE patients. The highly significant association of C4AQ0 with SLE across multiple HLA haplotypes and ethnic groups, and the presence of different mechanisms leading to a C4A protein deficiency among SLE patients suggested that deficiency or low expression level of C4A protein is a primary risk factor for SLE

  2. Prolactin, systemic lupus erythematosus, and autoreactive B cells: lessons learnt from murine models.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhrajit; Tieng, Arlene; Pepeljugoski, K Peter; Zandamn-Goddard, Gisele; Peeva, Elena

    2011-02-01

    The predominant prevalence of autoimmune diseases in women of reproductive age has led to the investigation of the effects of sex hormones on immune regulation and in autoimmune diseases, in particular the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease lupus. The female hormone prolactin has receptors beyond the reproductive axis including immune cells, and it is thought to promote autoimmunity in human and murine lupus. Induced hyperprolactinemia in experimental lupus models, regardless of gender, exacerbates disease activity and leads to premature death. Prolactin treatment in mice that are not prone to develop lupus leads to the development of a lupus-like phenotype. Persistent mild-moderate hyperprolactinemia alters the selection of the naïve B cell repertoire. Recent studies demonstrate that prolactin impairs all three mechanisms of B cell tolerance induction (negative selection, receptor editing, and anergy) and thereby contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. The effects of prolactin are genetically determined as shown by the differential response to the hormone in the different mice strains. Bromocriptine, a drug that inhibits prolactin secretion, abrogates some of the immune effects of this hormone. Further research is required to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in immune effects of prolactin and to develop novel targeted treatments for SLE patients with prolactin-responsive disease. PMID:19937157

  3. Liver injury correlates with biomarkers of autoimmunity and disease activity and represents an organ system involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxin; Yu, Jianghong; Oaks, Zachary; Marchena-Mendez, Ivan; Francis, Lisa; Bonilla, Eduardo; Aleksiejuk, Phillip; Patel, Jessica; Banki, Katalin; Landas, Steve K; Perl, Andras

    2015-10-01

    Liver disease (LD), defined as ≥ 2-fold elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT), was examined in a longitudinal study of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Among 435 patients, 90 (20.7%) had LD with a greater prevalence in males (15/39; 38.5%) than females (75/396; 18.9%; p = 0.01). SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was greater in LD patients (7.8 ± 0.7) relative to those without (5.8 ± 0.3; p = 0.0025). Anti-smooth muscle antibodies, anti-DNA antibodies, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anti-phospholipid syndrome were increased in LD. An absence of LD was noted in patients receiving rapamycin relative to azathioprine, cyclosporine A, or cyclophosphamide. An absence of LD was also noted in patients treated with N-acetylcysteine. LFTs were normalized and SLEDAI was diminished with increased prednisone use in 76/90 LD patients over 12.1 ± 2.6 months. Thus, LD is attributed to autoimmunity and disease activity, it responds to prednisone, and it is potentially preventable by rapamycin or N-acetylcysteine treatment. PMID:26160213

  4. Purine receptor antagonist modulates serology and affective behaviors in lupus-prone mice: evidence of autoimmune-induced pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, David A.; Sakic, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Neurologic and psychiatric (NP) manifestations are severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). As commonly seen in patients, spontaneous disease onset in the MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/ J (MRL-lpr) mouse model of NP-SLE is accompanied by increased autoantibodies, proinflammatorycytokines and behavioral dysfunction which precede neuroinflammation and structural brain lesions. The role of purinergic receptors in the regulation of immunity and behavior remains largely unexplored in the field of neuropsychiatry. To examine the possibility that purinoception is involved in the development of affective behaviors, the P2X purinoceptor antagonist, suramin, was administered to lupus-prone mice from 5 to 14 weeks of age. In addition to food and water measures, novel object and sucrose preference tests were performed to assess neophobic anxiety- and anhedonic-like behaviors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines were employed in immunopathological analyses. Changes in dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA1 region were examined by a Golgi impregnation method. Suramin significantly lowered serum ANA and prevented behavioral deficits, but did not prevent neuronal atrophy in MRL-lpr animals. In a new batch of asymptomatic mice, systemic administration of corticosterone was found to induce aberrations in CA1 dendrites, comparable to the “stress” of chronic disease. The precise mechanism(s) through which purine receptor inhibition exerted beneficial effects is not known. The present data supports the hypothesis that activation of the peripheral immune system induces nociceptive-related behavioral symptomatology which is attenuated by the analgesic effects of suramin. Hypercortisolemia may also initiate neuronal damage, and metabolic perturbations may underlie neuro-immuno-endocrine imbalances in MRL-lpr mice. PMID:18601998

  5. Hippocampal Damage in Mouse and Human Forms of Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, David A.; Woulfe, John; Sur, Monalisa; Cyr, Michael; Sakic, Boris

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is frequently accompanied by neuropsychiatric (NP) and cognitive deficits of unknown etiology. By using autoimmune MRL-lpr mice as an animal model of NP-SLE, we examine the relationship between autoimmunity, hippocampal damage, and behavioral dysfunction. Fluoro Jade B (FJB) staining and anti-ubiquitin (anti-Ub) immunocytochemistry were used to assess neuronal damage in young (asymptomatic) and aged (diseased) mice, while spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) was used to estimate the severity of hippocampal dysfunction. The causal relationship between autoimmunity and neuropathology was tested by prolonged administration of the immunosuppressive drug cyclophosphamide (CY). In comparison to congenic MRL +/+ controls, SAB acquisition rates and performance in the “reversal” trial were impaired in diseased MRL-lpr mice, suggesting limited use of the spatial learning strategy. FJB-positive neurons and anti-Ub particles were frequent in the CA3 region. Conversely, CY treatment attenuated the SAB deficit and overall FJB staining. Similarly to mouse brain, the hippocampus from a patient who died from NP-SLE showed reduced neuronal density in the CA3 region and dentate gyrus, as well as increased FJB positivity in these regions. Gliosis and neuronal loss were observed in the gray matter, and T lymphocytes and stromal calcifications were common in the choroid plexus. Taken together, these results suggest that systemic autoimmunity induces significant hippocampal damage, which may underlie affective and cognitive deficits in NP-SLE. PMID:15301441

  6. THE CAROLINA LUPUS STUDY (CLU)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carolina Lupus (CLU) Study, an epidemiologic study of risk factors for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a severe, chronic, systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately affects women and African-Americans. The CLU Study focuses on measures of endogenous hormone ex...

  7. Amyloid-DNA composites of bacterial biofilms stimulate autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Paul M.; Rapsinski, Glenn J.; Wilson, R. Paul; Oppong, Gertrude O.; Sriram, Uma; Goulian, Mark; Buttaro, Bettina; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania; Tükel, Çagla

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on the human microbiome has established that commensal and pathogenic bacteria can influence obesity, cancer, and autoimmunity through mechanisms mostly unknown. We found that a component of bacterial biofilms, the amyloid protein curli, irreversibly formed fibers with bacterial DNA during biofilm formation. This interaction accelerated amyloid polymerization and created potent immunogenic complexes that activated immune cells, including dendritic cells, to produce cytokines such as Type I interferons, which are pathogenic in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). When given systemically, curli-DNA composites triggered immune activation and production of autoantibodies in lupus-prone and wild-type mice. We also found that the infection of lupus-prone mice with curli-producing bacteria triggered higher autoantibody titers compared to curli-deficient bacteria. These data provide a mechanism by which the microbiome and biofilm-producing enteric infections may contribute to the progression of SLE and point to a potential molecular target for treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:26084027

  8. Induction of a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease in mice by a common human anti-DNA idiotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlovic, S.; Brocke, S.; Meshorer, A.; Mozes, E. ); Shoenfeld, Y.; Bakimer, R. ); Ben-Bassat, M. )

    1988-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered to be the quintessential autoimmune disease. It has not been possible to induce SLE in animal models by DNA immunization or by challenge with anti-DNA antibodies. The authors report a murine model of SLE-like disease induced by immunization of C3H.SW female mice with a common human monoclonal anti-DNA idiotype (16/6 idiotype). Following a booster injection with the 16/6 idiotype, high levels of murine anti-16/6 and anti-anti-16/6 antibodies (associated with anti-DNA activity) were detected in the sera of the immunized mice. Elevated titers of autoantibodies reacting with DNA, poly(I), poly(dT), ribonucleoprotein, autoantigens (Sm, SS-A (Ro), and SS-B (La)), and cardiolipin were noted. The serological findings were associated with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, leukopenia, proteinuria, immune complex deposition in the glomerular mesangium, and sclerosis of the glomeruli. The immune complexes in the kidneys were shown to contain the 16/6 idiotype. This experimental SLE-like model may be used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying SLE.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and skin autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Eli; Delgado, Jorge-Shmuel

    2014-02-14

    Autoimmune skin diseases are characterized by dysregulation of the immune system resulting in a loss of tolerance to skin self-antigen(s). The prolonged interaction between the bacterium and host immune mechanisms makes Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) a plausible infectious agent for triggering autoimmunity. Epidemiological and experimental data now point to a strong relation of H. pylori infection on the development of many extragastric diseases, including several allergic and autoimmune diseases. H. pylori antigens activate cross-reactive T cells and induce autoantibodies production. Microbial heat shock proteins (HSP) play an important role of in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases because of the high level of sequence homology with human HSP. Eradication of H. pylori infection has been shown to be effective in some patients with chronic autoimmune urticaria, psoriasis, alopecia areata and Schoenlein-Henoch purpura. There is conflicting and controversial data regarding the association of H. pylori infection with Behçet's disease, scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. No data are available evaluating the association of H. pylori infection with other skin autoimmune diseases, such as vitiligo, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. The epidemiological and experimental evidence for a possible role of H. pylori infection in skin autoimmune diseases are the subject of this review. PMID:24587626

  10. Assessment of attachment behaviour to human caregivers in wolf pups (Canis lupus lupus).

    PubMed

    Hall, Nathaniel J; Lord, Kathryn; Arnold, Anne-Marie K; Wynne, Clive D L; Udell, Monique A R

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggested that 16-week old dog pups, but not wolf pups, show attachment behaviour to a human caregiver. Attachment to a caregiver in dog pups has been demonstrated by differential responding to a caregiver compared to a stranger in the Ainsworth Strange Situation Test. We show here that 3-7 week old wolf pups also show attachment-like behaviour to a human caregiver as measured by preferential proximity seeking, preferential contact, and preferential greeting to a human caregiver over a human stranger in a modified and counterbalanced version of the Ainsworth Strange Situation Test. In addition, our results show that preferential responding to a caregiver over a stranger is only apparent following brief isolation. In initial episodes, wolf pups show no differentiation between the caregiver and the stranger; however, following a 2-min separation, the pups show proximity seeking, more contact, and more greeting to the caregiver than the stranger. These results suggest intensive human socialization of a wolf can lead to attachment--like responding to a human caregiver during the first two months of a wolf pup's life. PMID:25447510

  11. Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reihl, Alec M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with multiple tissue manifestations. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of conventional DC and plasmacytoid DC in the development of both murine lupus and human SLE. In the past decade, studies using selective DC depletions have demonstrated critical roles of DC in lupus progression. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggest activation of DC by self-antigens in lupus pathogenesis, followed by breakdown of immune tolerance to self. Potential treatment strategies targeting DC have been developed. However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which DC modulate lupus pathogenesis that require further investigations. PMID:27034965

  12. Lupus Nephritis: Animal Modeling of a Complex Disease Syndrome Pathology

    PubMed Central

    McGaha, Tracy L; Madaio, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Nephritis as a result of autoimmunity is a common morbidity associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). There is substantial clinical and industry interest in medicinal intervention in the SLE nephritic process; however, clinical trials to specifically treat lupus nephritis have not resulted in complete and sustained remission in all patients. Multiple mouse models have been used to investigate the pathologic interactions between autoimmune reactivity and SLE pathology. While several models bear a remarkable similarity to SLE-driven nephritis, there are limitations for each that can make the task of choosing the appropriate model for a particular aspect of SLE pathology challenging. This is not surprising given the variable and diverse nature of human disease. In many respects, features among murine strains mimic some (but never all) of the autoimmune and pathologic features of lupus patients. Although the diversity often limits universal conclusions relevant to pathogenesis, they provide insights into the complex process that result in phenotypic manifestations of nephritis. Thus nephritis represents a microcosm of systemic disease, with variable lesions and clinical features. In this review, we discuss some of the most commonly used models of lupus nephritis (LN) and immune-mediated glomerular damage examining their relative strengths and weaknesses, which may provide insight in the human condition. PMID:25722732

  13. Inhibition of SHP2 ameliorates the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianxun; Zeng, Li-Fan; Bronson, Roderick; Finnell, Michele; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Kontaridis, Maria I.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a devastating multisystemic autoimmune disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain elusive. Some patients with Noonan syndrome, a congenital disorder predominantly caused by gain-of-function mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase SH2 domain–containing PTP (SHP2), have been shown to develop SLE, suggesting a functional correlation between phosphatase activity and systemic autoimmunity. To test this directly, we measured SHP2 activity in spleen lysates isolated from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and found it was markedly increased compared with that in control mice. Similar increases in SHP2 activity were seen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from lupus patients relative to healthy patients. To determine whether SHP2 alters autoimmunity and related immunopathology, we treated MRL/lpr mice with an SHP2 inhibitor and found increased life span, suppressed crescentic glomerulonephritis, reduced spleen size, and diminished skin lesions. SHP2 inhibition also reduced numbers of double-negative T cells, normalized ERK/MAPK signaling, and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F, 2 cytokines involved in SLE-associated organ damage. Moreover, in cultured human lupus T cells, SHP2 inhibition reduced proliferation and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F, further implicating SHP2 in lupus-associated immunopathology. Taken together, these data identify SHP2 as a critical regulator of SLE pathogenesis and suggest targeting of its activity as a potent treatment for lupus patients. PMID:27183387

  14. Lupus - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lupus ... The following organizations are good resources for information on systemic lupus erythematosus : The Lupus Foundation of America -- www.lupus.org The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ...

  15. Variation in Microbiome LPS Immunogenicity Contributes to Autoimmunity in Humans.

    PubMed

    Vatanen, Tommi; Kostic, Aleksandar D; d'Hennezel, Eva; Siljander, Heli; Franzosa, Eric A; Yassour, Moran; Kolde, Raivo; Vlamakis, Hera; Arthur, Timothy D; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Uibo, Raivo; Mokurov, Sergei; Dorshakova, Natalya; Ilonen, Jorma; Virtanen, Suvi M; Szabo, Susanne J; Porter, Jeffrey A; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gevers, Dirk; Cullen, Thomas W; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-05-01

    According to the hygiene hypothesis, the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases in western countries may be explained by changes in early microbial exposure, leading to altered immune maturation. We followed gut microbiome development from birth until age three in 222 infants in Northern Europe, where early-onset autoimmune diseases are common in Finland and Estonia but are less prevalent in Russia. We found that Bacteroides species are lowly abundant in Russians but dominate in Finnish and Estonian infants. Therefore, their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures arose primarily from Bacteroides rather than from Escherichia coli, which is a potent innate immune activator. We show that Bacteroides LPS is structurally distinct from E. coli LPS and inhibits innate immune signaling and endotoxin tolerance; furthermore, unlike LPS from E. coli, B. dorei LPS does not decrease incidence of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Early colonization by immunologically silencing microbiota may thus preclude aspects of immune education. PMID:27133167

  16. Beyond Apoptosis in Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Lood, Christian; Elkon, Keith B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by autoantibodies directed against nuclear autoantigens normally concealed from immune recognition in healthy individuals. Here we summarize recently identified mechanisms of abnormal cell death leading to exposure and aberrant processing of nucleoprotein self antigens, and discuss their role in the SLE pathogenesis. Recent findings During the past few years, the unveiling of several new forms of cell death has expanded our understanding beyond the simple view of “apoptotic” versus “necrotic” cell death. SLE patients show abnormalities in cell death at several levels, including increased rates of apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, as well as reduced clearance of dying cells. These abnormalities lead to an increased autoantigen burden and also antigen modifications, such as nucleic acid oxidation that increase the inflammatory properties of self antigens. Recent investigations have highlighted the role of opsonins in determining the immunogenic versus tolerogenic characteristics of self antigens. Summary Dysregulation of different forms of programmed cell death contributes to increased exposure, availability, and immunogenic characteristic of intracellular self antigens, which all participate in development of lupus autoimmunity. As our understanding of abnormalities of cell death in SLE advances, potential therapeutic opportunities await human implementation. PMID:25036095

  17. Low-dose exposure to inorganic mercury accelerates disease and mortality in acquired murine lupus.

    PubMed Central

    Via, Charles S; Nguyen, Phuong; Niculescu, Florin; Papadimitriou, John; Hoover, Dennis; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2003-01-01

    Inorganic mercury (iHg) is known to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible rodent strains. Additionally, in inbred strains of mice prone to autoimmune disease, iHg can accelerate and exacerbate disease manifestations. Despite these well-known links between iHg and autoimmunity in animal models, no association between iHg alone and autoimmune disease in humans has been documented. However, it is possible that low-level iHg exposure can interact with disease triggers to enhance disease expression or susceptibility. To address whether exposure to iHg can alter the course of subsequent acquired autoimmune disease, we used a murine model of acquired autoimmunity, lupus-like chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in which autoimmunity is induced using normal, nonautoimmune prone donor and F1 recipient mice resistant to Hg-induced autoimmunity. Our results indicate that a 2-week exposure to low-dose iHg (20 or 200 micro g/kg every other day) to donor and host mice ending 1 week before GVHD induction can significantly worsen parameters of disease severity, resulting in premature mortality. iHg pretreatment clearly worsened chronic lupus-like disease, rather than GVHD worsening iHg immunotoxicity. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that low-level, nontoxic iHg preexposure may interact with other risk factors, genetic or acquired, to promote subsequent autoimmune disease development. PMID:12896845

  18. Immune complexes activate human endothelium involving the cell-signaling HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of lupus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenping; Jiao, Yulian; Cui, Bin; Gao, Xuejun; Xia, Yu; Zhao, Yueran

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of immune complexes (ICs), which contain a complex mixture of autoantigens nucleic acids, nucleic acids-associated proteins and corresponding autoantibodies. In SLE, ICs are deposited in multiple organs. Vasculopathy and vasculitis in SLE are typical complications and are associated with deposition of ICs on endothelium, endothelial activation and inflammatory cell infiltration. However, the effects of ICs on endothelial cells and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that ICs upregulated cell surface expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), increased the secretion of the chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the proinflammatoy cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and promoted the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 in human endothelial cells (P<0.05). ICs also increased transendothelial migration of monocytes (P<0.05). One of the mechanisms underlying these activating effects of ICs on human endothelial cells involves cell signaling by high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)-RAGE axis, as these effects can be partially blocked by HMGB1 A-box, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), SB203580, PD98059, Bay 117082 (P<0.05) and co-treatment with these agents (P<0.05). In conclusion, ICs elicit proinflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and alter their function involving cellular signaling via the HMGB1-RAGE axis in the pathogenesis of SLE vasculitis. PMID:23628898

  19. Annotation: PANDAS--A Model for Human Autoimmune Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedo, Susan E.; Grant, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus infections (PANDAS) is a recently recognized syndrome in which pre-adolescent children have abrupt onsets of tics and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, a recurring and remitting course of illness temporally related to streptococcal infections, and associated…

  20. [Genetics of lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Günther, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus is a prototypic autoimmune disease that can be triggered in genetically predisposed individuals by environmental exposures. The disease is based on an uncontrolled activation of the immune system that recognizes self antigens and induces inflammatory disease flares. The multifactorial pathogenesis is based on a polygenic model of inheritance with multiple various susceptibility genes elevating the disease risk. Many of these polymorphisms have been recently identified by genome-wide association studies. Monogenic forms of lupus erythematosus are rare. The identification of their underlying pathogenesis is important for the recognition of main mechanistic pathways in lupus as demonstrated by the history of defects in the complement system. The monogenic, autosomal dominant inherited familial chilblain lupus is characterized by cold-induced infiltrates on acral locations occurring in early childhood. Molecular exploration of the disease pathogenesis revealed that autoimmunity and especially lupus erythematosus can be induced by defects in intracellular elimination of nucleic acids and the subsequent type I-IFN-dependent activation of the innate immune system. This mechanism extends the concept of lupus pathogenesis: both defects in the extra- and intracellular elimination of autoantigens can lead to activation of the innate and adaptive immune system. PMID:25659384

  1. A case-control study of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine-associated autoimmune adverse events.

    PubMed

    Geier, David A; Geier, Mark R

    2015-07-01

    GARDASIL (Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA) is a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. An epidemiological study was undertaken to evaluate concerns about the potential for HPV4 vaccination to induce serious autoimmune adverse events (SAAEs). The vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS) database was examined for adverse event reports associated with vaccines administered from January 2006 through December 2012 to recipients between 18 and 39 years old with a listed residence in the USA and a specified female gender. It was observed that cases with the SAAE outcomes of gastroenteritis (odds ratio (OR) = 4.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-18.5), arthritis (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.4-4.3), systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.5-20.5), vasculitis (OR = 4, 95% CI = 1.01-16.4), alopecia (OR = 8.3, 95% CI = 4.5-15.9), or CNS conditions (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.04-2.9) were significantly more likely than controls to have received HPV4 vaccine (median onset of SAAE symptoms from 6 to 55 days post-HPV4 vaccination). Cases with the outcomes of Guillain-Barre syndrome (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.42-1.3) or thrombocytopenia (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 0.48-3.5) were no more likely than controls to have received HPV4 vaccine. Cases with the general health outcomes of infection (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.27-1.7), conjunctivitis (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.29-2.7), or diarrhea (OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.83-1.22) were no more likely than controls to have received HPV4 vaccine. Previous case series of SAAEs and biological plausibility support the observed results. Additional studies should be conducted to further evaluate the potential biological mechanisms involved in HPV4 vaccine-associated SAAEs in animal model systems, and to examine the potential epidemiological relationship between HPV4 vaccine-associated SAAEs in other databases and populations. PMID:25535199

  2. Interaction of Intestinal Microorganisms with the Human Host in the Framework of Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; Hevia, Arancha; González, Sonia; Margolles, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are caused by a complex interaction of environmental-, genetic-, and sex-related factors. Although SLE has traditionally been considered independent from the microbiota, recent work published during the last 5 years suggests a strong connection between SLE and the composition of our gut commensals as one of the main environmental factors linked to this disease. Preliminary data have evidenced that (i) interaction of certain microbial-derived molecules with specific cell receptors and (ii) the influence of certain commensal microorganisms over specific immune cell subsets plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE and SLE-like diseases. In addition, epigenetic changes driven by certain microbial groups have been recently proposed as an additional link between gut microbiota and SLE. As immune responses elicited against commensal bacteria are deeply dependent on the composition of the latter, and as microbial populations can be modified by dietary interventions, identifying the precise gut microorganisms responsible for worsening the SLE symptoms is of crucial importance for this and other SLE-related diseases, including antiphospholipid syndrome or lupus nephritis. In this minireview, the current knowledge on the relationships between microbes and SLE and SLE-related diseases is compiled and discussed. PMID:26635808

  3. Interaction of Intestinal Microorganisms with the Human Host in the Framework of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Borja; Hevia, Arancha; González, Sonia; Margolles, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are caused by a complex interaction of environmental-, genetic-, and sex-related factors. Although SLE has traditionally been considered independent from the microbiota, recent work published during the last 5 years suggests a strong connection between SLE and the composition of our gut commensals as one of the main environmental factors linked to this disease. Preliminary data have evidenced that (i) interaction of certain microbial-derived molecules with specific cell receptors and (ii) the influence of certain commensal microorganisms over specific immune cell subsets plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE and SLE-like diseases. In addition, epigenetic changes driven by certain microbial groups have been recently proposed as an additional link between gut microbiota and SLE. As immune responses elicited against commensal bacteria are deeply dependent on the composition of the latter, and as microbial populations can be modified by dietary interventions, identifying the precise gut microorganisms responsible for worsening the SLE symptoms is of crucial importance for this and other SLE-related diseases, including antiphospholipid syndrome or lupus nephritis. In this minireview, the current knowledge on the relationships between microbes and SLE and SLE-related diseases is compiled and discussed. PMID:26635808

  4. M. paratuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 65 and Human Diseases: Bridging Infection and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Coad Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the known infectious cause of Johne's disease, an enteric inflammatory disease mostly studied in ruminant animals. MAP has also been implicated in the very similar Crohn's disease of humans as well as sarcoidosis. Recently, MAP has been associated with juvenile sarcoidosis (Blau syndrome), autoimmune diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. While it is intuitive to implicate MAP in granulomatous diseases where the microbe participates in the granuloma, it is more difficult to assign a role for MAP in diseases where autoantibodies are a primary feature. MAP may trigger autoimmune antibodies via its heat shock proteins. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (HSP65) is an immunodominant protein that shares sequential and conformational elements with several human host proteins. This molecular mimicry is the proposed etiopathology by which MAP stimulates autoantibodies associated with autoimmune (type 1) diabetes, autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. This paper proposes that MAP is a source of mycobacterial HSP65 and acts as a trigger of autoimmune disease. PMID:23056923

  5. Exhausted Cytotoxic Control of Epstein-Barr Virus in Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Martin; Sauce, Delphine; Deback, Claire; Arnaud, Laurent; Mathian, Alexis; Miyara, Makoto; Boutolleau, David; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Papagno, Laura; Appay, Victor; Amoura, Zahir; Gorochov, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) pathology has long been associated with an increased Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) seropositivity, viremia and cross-reactive serum antibodies specific for both virus and self. It has therefore been postulated that EBV triggers SLE immunopathology, although the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigate whether frequent peaks of EBV viral load in SLE patients are a consequence of dysfunctional anti-EBV CD8+ T cell responses. Both inactive and active SLE patients (n = 76 and 42, respectively), have significantly elevated EBV viral loads (P = 0.003 and 0.002, respectively) compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 29). Interestingly, less EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are able to secrete multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and MIP-1β) in inactive and active SLE patients compared to controls (P = 0.0003 and 0.0084, respectively). Moreover, EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are also less cytotoxic in SLE patients than in controls (CD107a expression: P = 0.0009, Granzyme B release: P = 0.0001). Importantly, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific responses were not found significantly altered in SLE patients. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBV-specific CD8+ T cell impairment is a consequence of their Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) receptor up-regulation, as blocking this pathway reverses the dysfunctional phenotype. Finally, prospective monitoring of lupus patients revealed that disease flares precede EBV reactivation. In conclusion, EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in SLE patients are functionally impaired, but EBV reactivation appears to be an aggravating consequence rather than a cause of SLE immunopathology. We therefore propose that autoimmune B cell activation during flares drives frequent EBV reactivation, which contributes in a vicious circle to the perpetuation of immune activation in SLE patients. PMID:22028659

  6. Exhausted cytotoxic control of Epstein-Barr virus in human lupus.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Martin; Sauce, Delphine; Deback, Claire; Arnaud, Laurent; Mathian, Alexis; Miyara, Makoto; Boutolleau, David; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Papagno, Laura; Appay, Victor; Amoura, Zahir; Gorochov, Guy

    2011-10-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) pathology has long been associated with an increased Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) seropositivity, viremia and cross-reactive serum antibodies specific for both virus and self. It has therefore been postulated that EBV triggers SLE immunopathology, although the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigate whether frequent peaks of EBV viral load in SLE patients are a consequence of dysfunctional anti-EBV CD8+ T cell responses. Both inactive and active SLE patients (n = 76 and 42, respectively), have significantly elevated EBV viral loads (P = 0.003 and 0.002, respectively) compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 29). Interestingly, less EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are able to secrete multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and MIP-1β) in inactive and active SLE patients compared to controls (P = 0.0003 and 0.0084, respectively). Moreover, EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are also less cytotoxic in SLE patients than in controls (CD107a expression: P = 0.0009, Granzyme B release: P = 0.0001). Importantly, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific responses were not found significantly altered in SLE patients. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBV-specific CD8+ T cell impairment is a consequence of their Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) receptor up-regulation, as blocking this pathway reverses the dysfunctional phenotype. Finally, prospective monitoring of lupus patients revealed that disease flares precede EBV reactivation. In conclusion, EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in SLE patients are functionally impaired, but EBV reactivation appears to be an aggravating consequence rather than a cause of SLE immunopathology. We therefore propose that autoimmune B cell activation during flares drives frequent EBV reactivation, which contributes in a vicious circle to the perpetuation of immune activation in SLE patients. PMID:22028659

  7. miR-155 Deficiency Ameliorates Autoimmune Inflammation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Targeting S1pr1 in Faslpr/lpr Mice.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qian; Li, Jiangxia; Dang, Jie; Bian, Xianli; Shan, Shan; Yuan, Jupeng; Qian, Yanyan; Liu, Zhaojian; Liu, Guangyi; Yuan, Qianqian; Liu, Na; Ma, Xiaochun; Gao, Fei; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) was previously found involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases and the inflammatory response; however, the detailed mechanism of miR-155 in SLE is not fully understood. To explore the in vivo role of miR-155 in the pathogenesis of SLE, miR-155-deficient Fas(lpr/lpr) (miR-155(-/-)Fas(lpr/lpr)) mice were obtained by crossing miR-155(-/-) and Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. Clinical SLE features such as glomerulonephritis, autoantibody levels, and immune system cell populations were compared between miR-155(-/-)Fas(lpr/lpr) and Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. Microarray analysis, RT-PCR, Western blot, and luciferase reporter gene assay were used to identify the target gene of miR-155. miR-155(-/-)Fas(lpr/lpr) mice showed milder SLE clinical features than did Fas(lpr/lpr)mice. As compared with Fas(lpr/lpr) mice, miR-155(-/-)Fas(lpr/lpr) mice showed less deposition of total IgA, IgM, and IgG and less infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Moreover, the serum levels of IL-4 and IL-17a, secreted by Th2 and Th17 cells, were lower in miR-155(-/-)Fas(lpr/lpr) than Fas(lpr/lpr) mice; the CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell ratio was restored in miR-155(-/-)Fas(lpr/lpr) mice as well. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) was found as a new target gene of miR-155 by in vitro and in vivo studies; its expression was decreased in SLE patients and Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. miR-155(-/-)Fas(lpr/lpr) mice are resistant to the development of SLE by the regulation of the target gene S1pr1. miR-155 might be a new target for therapeutic intervention in SLE. PMID:25911753

  8. Dietary amino acid-induced systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, A; Bardana, E J

    1991-05-01

    The effects of dietary manipulations on autoimmune disease are understood poorly. In this article, we detail our experience with a human subject who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia while participating in a research study that required the ingestion of alfalfa seeds. Subsequent experimental studies in primates ingesting alfalfa sprout seeds and L-canavanine (a prominent amino acid constituent of alfalfa) is presented. The results of these studies indicate a potential toxic and immunoregulatory role of L-canavanine in the induction of a systemic lupus-like disease in primates. PMID:1862241

  9. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  10. CD8(+) T cells in human autoimmune arthritis: the unusual suspects.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Alessandra; van Wijk, Femke

    2016-07-01

    CD8(+) T cells are key players in the body's defence against viral infections and cancer. To date, data on the role of CD8(+) T cells in autoimmune diseases have been scarce, especially when compared with the wealth of research on CD4(+) T cells. However, growing evidence suggests that CD8(+) T-cell homeostasis is impaired in human autoimmune diseases. The contribution of CD8(+) T cells to autoimmune arthritis is indicated by the close association of MHC class I polymorphisms with disease risk, as well as the correlation between CD8(+) T-cell phenotype and disease outcome. The heterogeneous phenotype, resistance to regulation and impaired regulatory function of CD8(+) T cells - especially at the target organ - might contribute to the persistence of autoimmune inflammation. Moreover, newly identified populations of tissue-resident CD8(+) T cells and their interaction with antigen-presenting cells might have a key role in disease pathology. In this Review, we assess the link between CD8(+) T cells, autoimmune arthritis and the basis of their homeostatic changes under inflammatory conditions. Improved insight into CD8(+) T cell-specific pathogenicity will be essential for a better understanding of autoimmune arthritis and the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27256711

  11. Circulating non-human microfilaria in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Greene, B M; Otto, G F; Greenough, W B

    1978-09-01

    A 12-yr-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus requiring steroid therapy was found to have a circulating microfilaria during an exacerbation of her illness. Morphologically, the microfilaria does not correspond precisely with any previously described species, though similarities exist between the patient's microfilaria and those of Dipetalonema reconditum of the dog and D. interstitium of the grey squirrel. The organism reported here is probably an undescribed species from a wild mammal. Although the association may be merely coincidental, this case suggests that compromised immunity might have led to this unusual infection with a non-human filaria. PMID:568893

  12. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  13. Btk inhibition treats TLR7/IFN driven murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrew T; Pereira, Albertina; Fu, Kai; Samy, Eileen; Wu, Yin; Liu-Bujalski, Lesley; Caldwell, Richard; Chen, Yi-Ying; Tian, Hui; Morandi, Federica; Head, Jared; Koehler, Ursula; Genest, Melinda; Okitsu, Shinji L; Xu, Daigen; Grenningloh, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is expressed in a variety of immune cells and previous work has demonstrated that blocking Btk is a promising strategy for treating autoimmune diseases. Herein, we utilized a tool Btk inhibitor, M7583, to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Btk inhibition in two mouse lupus models driven by TLR7 activation and type I interferon. In BXSB-Yaa lupus mice, Btk inhibition reduced autoantibodies, nephritis, and mortality. In the pristane-induced DBA/1 lupus model, Btk inhibition suppressed arthritis, but autoantibodies and the IFN gene signature were not significantly affected; suggesting efficacy was mediated through inhibition of Fc receptors. In vitro studies using primary human macrophages revealed that Btk inhibition can block activation by immune complexes and TLR7 which contributes to tissue damage in SLE. Overall, our results provide translational insight into how Btk inhibition may provide benefit to a variety of SLE patients by affecting both BCR and FcR signaling. PMID:26821304

  14. C5a alters blood–brain barrier integrity in a human in vitro model of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Parikh, Neil U; Woodruff, Trent M; Jarvis, James N; Lopez, Molly; Hennon, Teresa; Cunningham, Patrick; Quigg, Richard J; Schwartz, Stanley A; Alexander, Jessy J

    2015-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) plays a crucial role in brain homeostasis, thereby maintaining the brain environment precise for optimal neuronal function. Its dysfunction is an intriguing complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder where neurological complications occur in 5–50% of cases and is associated with impaired BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in SLE and is an important part of the clinical profile. Our earlier studies demonstrated that C5a generated by complement activation caused the loss of brain endothelial layer integrity in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the translational potential of these studies to a human system. To assess this, we used a two dimensional in vitro BBB model constructed using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells and astroglial cells, which closely emulates the in vivo BBB allowing the assessment of BBB integrity. Increased permeability monitored by changes in transendothelial electrical resistance and cytoskeletal remodelling caused by actin fiber rearrangement were observed when the cells were exposed to lupus serum and C5a, similar to the observations in mice. In addition, our data show that C5a/C5aR1 signalling alters nuclear factor-κB translocation into nucleus and regulates the expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-5 and zonula occludens 1 in this setting. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C5a regulates BBB integrity in a neuroinflammatory setting where it affects both endothelial and astroglial cells. In addition, we also demonstrate that our previous findings in a mouse model, were emulated in human cells in vitro, bringing the studies one step closer to understanding the translational potential of C5a/C5aR1 blockade as a promising therapeutic strategy in SLE and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26059553

  15. An evolutionary analysis of RAC2 identifies haplotypes associated with human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Manuela; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Agliardi, Cristina; Biasin, Mara; Cagliani, Rachele; Fumagalli, Matteo; Caputo, Domenico; Cassinotti, Andrea; Ardizzone, Sandro; Zanzottera, Milena; Bolognesi, Elisabetta; Riva, Stefania; Kanari, Yasuyoshi; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Clerici, Mario

    2011-12-01

    The human RAC2 gene encodes a small GTP-binding protein with a pivotal role in immune activation and in the induction of peripheral immune tolerance through restimulation-induced cell death (RICD). Different human pathogens target the protein product of RAC2, suggesting that the gene may be subject to natural selection, and that variants in RAC2 may affect immunological phenotypes in humans. We scanned the genomic region encompassing the entire transcription unit for the presence of putative noncoding regulatory elements conserved across mammals. This information was used to select two RAC2 gene regions and analyze their intraspecific genetic diversity. Results suggest that a region covering the 3' untranslated region has been a target of multiallelic balancing selection (or diversifying selection), and three major RAC2 haplogroups occur in human populations. Haplotypes belonging to one of these clades are associated with increased susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (P = 0.022) and earlier onset of disease symptoms (P = 0.025). This same haplogroup is significantly more common in patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls (P = 0.048). These data reinforce recent evidences that susceptibility alleles/haplotypes are shared among multiple autoimmune disorders and support a causal "role for RAC2" variants in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Other genes with a role in RICD have previously been associated with autoimmunity in humans, suggesting that this pathway and RAC2 may represent novel therapeutic targets in autoimmune disorders. PMID:21680873

  16. Defective selection of thymic regulatory T cells accompanies autoimmunity and pulmonary infiltrates in Tcra-deficient mice double transgenic for human La/SS-B and human La-specific T cell receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Yaciuk, Jane C.; Pan, Yujun; Schwarz, Karen; Pan, Zi-jian; Maier-Moore, Jacen S.; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Lawrence, Christina; Farris, A. Darise

    2014-01-01

    A human La/SS-B (hLa)-specific TCR/hLa neo-self antigen double transgenic mouse model was developed and used to investigate cellular tolerance and autoimmunity to the ubiquitous RNA-binding La antigen often targeted in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Extensive thymic clonal deletion of CD4+ T cells occurred in H-2k/k double transgenic mice presenting high levels of the I-Ek-restricted hLa T cell epitope. In contrast, deletion was less extensive in H-2k/b double transgenic mice presenting lower levels of the epitope, and some surviving thymocytes were positively selected as thymic regulatory T cells (tTreg). These mice remained serologically tolerant to hLa and healthy. H-2k/b double transgenic mice deficient of all endogenous Tcra genes, a deficiency known to impair Treg development and function, produced IgG anti-hLa autoantibodies and displayed defective tTreg development. These autoimmune mice had interstitial lung disease characterized by lymphocytic aggregates containing transgenic T cells with an activated, effector memory phenotype. Salivary gland infiltrates were notably absent. Thus, expression of nuclear hLa antigen induces thymic clonal deletion and tTreg selection, and lymphocytic infiltration of the lung is a consequence of La-specific CD4+ T cell autoimmunity. PMID:25582858

  17. Docosahexaenoic acid-enriched fish oil attenuates kidney disease and prolongs median and maximal life span of autoimmune lupus-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Halade, Ganesh V; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Barnes, Jeffery; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of individual components of fish oils (FO) in various human inflammatory diseases still remains unresolved, possibly due to low levels of n-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or lower ratio of DHA to EPA. Since FO enriched with DHA (FO-DHA) or EPA (FO-EPA) has become available recently, we investigated their efficacy on survival and inflammatory kidney disease in a well-established animal model of human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Results show for the first time that FO-DHA dramatically extends both the median (658 days) and maximal (848 days) lifespan of (NZB × NZW)F1 (B × W) mice. In contrast, FO-EPA fed mice had a median and maximal lifespan of ~384 and 500 days, respectively. Investigations into possible survival mechanisms revealed that FO-DHA (Vs. FO-EPA) lowers serum anti-dsDNA antibodies, IgG deposition in kidneys, and proteinuria. Further, FO-DHA lowered LPS-mediated increases in serum IL-18 levels and caspase-1-dependent cleavage of pro-IL-18 to mature IL-18 in kidneys. Moreover, FO-DHA suppressed LPS-mediated PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB activations in kidney. These data indicate that DHA, but not EPA, is the most potent n-3 fatty acid that suppresses glomerulonephritis and extends lifespan of SLE-prone short-lived B × W mice, possibly via inhibition of IL-18 induction and IL-18-dependent signaling. PMID:20368275

  18. Development and management of systemic lupus erythematosus in an HIV-infected man with hepatitis C and B co-infection following interferon therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The association of human immunodeficiency virus and immune dysfunction leading to development of autoimmune markers is well described, but human immunodeficiency virus infection is relatively protective for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. In contrast, development of systemic lupus erythematosus with hepatitis C and with interferon therapy is well described in a number of case reports. We here describe the first case of systemic lupus erythematosus developing in a man infected with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and hepatitis B co-infection where the onset seems to have been temporally related to interferon therapy. Case presentation We report the occurrence of systemic lupus erythematosus complicating interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C in a 47-year-old asplenic male with haemophilia co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B. He presented with a truncal rash, abdominal pains and headache and later developed grade IV lupus nephritis requiring haemodialysis, mycophenolate mofetil and steroid therapy. We were able to successfully withdraw dialysis and mycophenolate while maintaining stable renal function. Conclusion Interferon-α is critical in antiviral immunity against hepatitis C but also acts as a pathogenic mediator for systemic lupus erythematosus, a condition associated with activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells that are depleted in human immunodeficiency virus infection. The occurrence of auto-antibodies and lupus-like features in the coinfections with hepatitis C require careful assessment. Immunosuppressant therapy for lupus risks exacerbating underlying infections in patients with concurrent human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C. PMID:19830165

  19. Human ITCH E3 ubiquitin ligase deficiency causes syndromic multisystem autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Naomi J; Molleston, Jean P; Strauss, Kevin A; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A; Squires, Robert H; Rider, Nicholas L; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R; Cummings, Oscar W; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G

    2010-03-12

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  20. Human ITCH E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Deficiency Causes Syndromic Multisystem Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Naomi J.; Molleston, Jean P.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A.; Squires, Robert H.; Rider, Nicholas L.; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Morton, D. Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  1. Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health

    SciTech Connect

    Silbergeld, Ellen K. . E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A.; Nyland, Jennifer F.

    2005-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

  2. Human lymph-node CD8+ T cells display an altered phenotype during systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Hähnlein, Janine; van Kuijk, Bo J; Choi, Ivy Y; van Boven, Leonard J; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P; van Baarsen, Lisa G

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies are focused on auto-reactive CD4+ T cells, the precise role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmunity is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to provide more insight into the phenotype and function CD8+ T cells during the development of autoimmune disease by studying CD8+ T cells in human lymph-node biopsies and peripheral blood obtained during the earliest phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we show that lymphoid pro-inflammatory CD8+ T cells exhibit a less-responsive phenotype already during the earliest phases of autoimmunity compared with healthy individuals. We found an increase in CD8+ memory T cells in lymphoid tissue during the earliest phases of autoimmunity, even before clinical onset of RA, accompanied by an increased frequency of non-circulating or recently activated (CD69+) CD8+ T cells in lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood. Importantly, lymphoid pro-inflammatory CD8+IL-17A+ T cells displayed a decreased capacity of cytokine production, which was related to disease activity in early RA patients. In addition, a decreased frequency of regulatory CD8+IL-10+ T cells in peripheral blood was also related to disease activity in early RA patients. Our results suggest that different CD8+ T-cell subsets are affected already during the earliest phases of systemic autoimmunity. PMID:27195110

  3. 77 FR 9678 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers and Autoimmune Disease AGENCY... autoimmune disease. The Licensed Field of Use includes the use of the antibodies in the form of an... disease such as lupus and Sjogren's syndrome. The specific antibodies covered by this technology...

  4. Mechanisms of impaired regulation by CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in human autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jane Hoyt

    2011-01-01

    A lack of regulatory T (TReg) cells that express CD4, CD25 and forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) results in severe autoimmunity in both mice and humans. Since the discovery of TReg cells, there has been intense investigation aimed at determining how they protect an organism from autoimmunity and whether defects in their number or function contribute to the development of autoimmunity in model systems. The next phase of investigation — that is, to define the role that defects in TReg cells have in human autoimmunity — is now underway. This Review summarizes our progress so far towards understanding the role of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ TReg cells in human autoimmune diseases and the impact that this knowledge might have on the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. PMID:21107346

  5. Lupus and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan N; Witter, Frank R; Petri, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disproportionately affects women in their reproductive age years. Pregnancy in this systemic autoimmune disease has long been associated with poor obstetric outcomes. However, the frequency of pregnancy loss in lupus has dropped to a level commensurate with that of the general US population. The outcomes of lupus pregnancies are better if conception is delayed until the disease has been inactive for at least 6 months, and the medication regimen has been adjusted in advance. Pregnancy in lupus is prone to complications, including flares of disease activity during pregnancy or in the postpartum period, preeclampsia, miscarriage, stillbirth, intrauterine growth retardation, and preterm birth. Active lupus nephritis poses the greatest risk. The recognition of a lupus flare during pregnancy may be difficult because the signs and symptoms may mimic those of normal pregnancy. Monitoring should include baseline and monthly laboratory tests, serial ultrasonography, fetal surveillance tests, and fetal m-mode echocardiography for mothers with SS-A (Ro) or SS-B (La) antibodies. In the absence of any signs or symptoms of active SLE, affected patients require no specific treatment during pregnancy. If hydroxychloroquine was in use before conception, it should be maintained throughout pregnancy. If a woman with SLE has antiphospholipid antibodies, prophylactic treatment with aspirin and/or low-molecular weight heparin is indicated to prevent fetal loss. Lupus flares during pregnancy are generally treated with hydroxychloroquine, low-dose prednisone, pulse intravenous methylprednisolone, and azathioprine. High-dose prednisone and cyclophosphamide are reserved for severe lupus complications but are associated with significant pregnancy-related complications and poor obstetrical outcomes. PMID:22112525

  6. Human autoimmunity after lymphocyte depletion is caused by homeostatic T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Joanne L.; Thompson, Sara A. J.; Loh, Priscilla; Davies, Jessica L.; Tuohy, Orla C.; Curry, Allison J.; Azzopardi, Laura; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant; Fahey, Michael T.; Compston, Alastair; Coles, Alasdair J.

    2013-01-01

    The association between lymphopenia and autoimmunity is recognized, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood and have not been studied systematically in humans. People with multiple sclerosis treated with the lymphocyte-depleting monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab offer a unique opportunity to study this phenomenon; one in three people develops clinical autoimmunity, and one in three people develops asymptomatic autoantibodies after treatment. Here, we show that T-cell recovery after alemtuzumab is driven by homeostatic proliferation, leading to the generation of chronically activated (CD28−CD57+), highly proliferative (Ki67+), oligoclonal, memory-like CD4 and CD8 T cells (CCR7−CD45RA− or CCR7−CD45RA+) capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines. Individuals who develop autoimmunity after treatment are no more lymphopenic than their nonautoimmune counterparts, but they show reduced thymopoiesis and generate a more restricted T-cell repertoire. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that homeostatic proliferation drives lymphopenia-associated autoimmunity in humans. PMID:24282306

  7. Multi-antibody composition in lupus nephritis: isotype and antigen specificity make the difference.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Alice; Vaglio, Augusto; Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Cavagna, Lorenzo; Moroni, Gabriella; Franceschini, Franco; Allegri, Landino; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Candiano, Giovanni; Pesce, Giampaola; Ravelli, Angelo; Puppo, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Tincani, Angela; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Research on autoimmune processes involved in glomerulonephritis has been for years based on experimental models. Recent progress in proteomics has radically modified perspectives: laser microdissection and proteomics were crucial for an in vivo analysis of autoantibodies eluted from human biopsies. Lupus nephritis has been the subject of recent independent researches. Main topics have been the definition of renal autoimmune components in human lupus biopsies; methods were laser capture of glomeruli and/or of single cells (CD38+ or Ki-67+) from tubulointerstitial areas as starting step followed by elution and characterization of renal antibodies by proteomics. The innovative approach highlighted different panels of autoantibodies deposited in glomeruli and in tubulo-interstitial areas that actually represented the unique autoimmune components in these patients. IgG2 was the major isotype; new podocyte proteins (αenolase, annexin AI) and already known implanted molecules (DNA, histone 3, C1q) were their target antigens in glomeruli. Vimentin was the antigen in tubulo-interstitial areas. Matching renal autoantibodies with serum allowed the definition of a typical autoantibody serum map that included the same anti-αenolase, anti-annexin AI, anti-DNA, and anti-histone 3 IgG2 already detected in renal tissue. Serum levels of specific autoantibodies were tenfold increased in patients with lupus nephritis allowing a clear differentiation from both rheumatoid arthritis and other glomerulonephritis. In all cases, targeted antigens were characterized as components of lupus NETosis. Matching renal/serum autoantibody composition in vivo furnishes new insights on human lupus nephritis and allows to refine composition of circulating antibodies in patients with lupus. A thoughtful passage from bench to bedside of new knowledge would expand our clinical and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25888464

  8. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  9. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  10. MicroRNA in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pauley, Kaleb M.; Cha, Seunghee; Chan, Edward K.L.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small conserved non-coding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by targeting the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for degradation or translational repression. miRNA-mediated gene regulation is critical for normal cellular functions such as the cell cycle, differentiation, and apoptosis, and as much as one-third of human mRNAs may be miRNA targets. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that miRNAs play a vital role in the regulation of immunological functions and the prevention of autoimmunity. Here we review the many newly discovered roles of miRNA regulation in immune functions and in the development of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Specifically, we discuss the involvement of miRNA regulation in innate and adaptive immune responses, immune cell development, T regulatory cell stability and function, and differential miRNA expression in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:19303254

  11. Possible Role of Human Herpesvirus 6 as a Trigger of Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Broccolo, Francesco; Fusetti, Lisa; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection is common and has a worldwide distribution. Recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been reclassified into two distinct species based on different biological features (genetic, antigenic, and cell tropism) and disease associations. A role for HHV-6A/B has been proposed in several autoimmune disorders (AD), including multiple sclerosis (MS), autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The focus of this review is to discuss the above-mentioned AD associated with HHV-6 and the mechanisms proposed for HHV-6A/B-induced autoimmunity. HHV-6A/B could trigger autoimmunity by exposing high amounts of normally sequestered cell antigens, through lysis of infected cells. Another potential trigger is represented by molecular mimicry, with the synthesis of viral proteins that resemble cellular molecules, as a mechanism of immune escape. The virus could also induce aberrant expression of histocompatibility molecules thereby promoting the presentation of autoantigens. CD46-HHV-6A/B interaction is a new attractive mechanism proposed: HHV-6A/B (especially HHV-6A) could participate in neuroinflammation in the context of MS by promoting inflammatory processes through CD46 binding. Although HHV-6A/B has the ability to trigger all the above-mentioned mechanisms, more studies are required to fully elucidate the possible role of HHV-6A/B as a trigger of AD. PMID:24282390

  12. Comparative effects of n-3, n-6 and n-9 unsaturated fatty acid-rich diet consumption on lupus nephritis, autoantibody production and CD4+ T cell-related gene responses in the autoimmune NZBWF1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Pestka, James J; Vines, Laura L; Bates, Melissa A; He, Kaiyu; Langohr, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypical autoimmune disease, correlates with the onset and severity of kidney glomerulonephritis. There are both preclinical and clinical evidence that SLE patients may benefit from consumption of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) found in fish oil, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we employed the NZBWF1 SLE mouse model to compare the effects of dietary lipids on the onset and severity of autoimmune glomerulonephritis after consuming: 1) n-3 PUFA-rich diet containing docosahexaenoic acid-enriched fish oil (DFO), 2) n-6 PUFA-rich Western-type diet containing corn oil (CRN) or 3) n-9 monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-rich Mediterranean-type diet containing high oleic safflower oil (HOS). Elevated plasma autoantibodies, proteinuria and glomerulonephritis were evident in mice fed either the n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets, however, all three endpoints were markedly attenuated in mice that consumed the n-3 PUFA diet until 34 wk of age. A focused PCR array was used to relate these findings to the expression of 84 genes associated with CD4+ T cell function in the spleen and kidney both prior to and after the onset of the autoimmune nephritis. n-3 PUFA suppression of autoimmunity in NZBWF1 mice was found to co-occur with a generalized downregulation of CD4+ T cell-related genes in kidney and/or spleen at wk 34. These genes were associated with the inflammatory response, antigen presentation, T cell activation, B cell activation/differentiation and leukocyte recruitment. Quantitative RT-PCR of representative affected genes confirmed that n-3 PUFA consumption was associated with reduced expression of CD80, CTLA-4, IL-10, IL-18, CCL-5, CXCR3, IL-6, TNF-α and osteopontin mRNAs in kidney and/or spleens as compared to mice fed n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets. Remarkably, many of the genes identified in this study are currently under consideration as biomarkers and/or biotherapeutic targets for SLE and other autoimmune

  13. MicroRNA regulation of lymphocyte tolerance and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Laura J.; Ansel, K. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cell-intrinsic cues that permit self-reactivity in lymphocytes, and therefore autoimmunity, requires an understanding of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression in these cells. In this Review, we address seminal and recent research on microRNA (miRNA) regulation of central and peripheral tolerance. Human and mouse studies demonstrate that the PI3K pathway is a critical point of miRNA regulation of immune cell development and function that affects the development of autoimmunity. We also discuss how miRNA expression profiling in human autoimmune diseases has inspired mechanistic studies of miRNA function in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes, and asthma. PMID:26030228

  14. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Wesley H.; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  15. Autoimmune activation toward embryo implantation is rare in immune-privileged human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Haller-Kikkatalo, Kadri; Altmäe, Signe; Tagoma, Aili; Uibo, Raivo; Salumets, Andres

    2014-09-01

    Human embryo implantation represents embryo apposition, adhesion to the endometrial epithelium, and invasion into the stromal extracellular matrix within 1 to 2 days during days 6 to 9 after ovulation. The major molecular mechanisms mediating implantation include adhesion molecules, including mucins, selectins, integrins, and cadherins; extracellular matrix components, such as laminins and collagens and their degrading enzymes; phospholipids and immune regulatory molecules, including prostaglandins, cytokines; and immunosuppressive molecules expressed by invasive trophoblasts and endometrial cells. Many of these molecules are the targets for autoimmune reactions in autoimmune diseases and cancer; however, the relevance of those in immune-mediated implantation failure has not been defined. In this review, we will describe the molecules involved in 2-day event of human embryo implantation, which may also be involved in immune system activation and subsequently cause immune-mediated implantation failure. We speculate that the data in the literature are limited concerning antiendometrial antibodies because the endometrium might be taken as an immune-privileged site that avoids autoimmune activation that might harm the implantation process. Antibodies affecting human fertility in ways other than impairing implantation are outside the scope of the current article and will not be discussed. PMID:24959819

  16. Human FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Makoto; Gorochov, Guy; Ehrenstein, Michael; Musset, Lucile; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Amoura, Zahir

    2011-10-01

    Since the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells in mice, significant progress has been made in the definitions of the phenotype and the function of human Treg cells in health and in pathological conditions. Recent advances in the field leading to a better molecular definition of Treg subsets in humans and the description of the dynamics of differentiation of Treg cells should bring new insights in the understanding of human chronic systemic autoimmune diseases. How Treg cells are compromised in these diseases is a challenging issue because the elucidation of the mechanisms leading to such anomaly might lead to promising novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:21621000

  17. Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality?

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Y; Diana, J; Ghazarian, L; Beaudoin, L; Lehuen, A

    2013-01-01

    T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We also discuss the promise of NK T cell manipulations: restoration of function, specific activation, depletion and the relevance of these treatments to human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23199318

  18. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk. PMID:21871974

  19. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  20. Structure and specificity of T cell receptors expressed by potentially pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibody-inducing T cells in human lupus.

    PubMed Central

    Desai-Mehta, A; Mao, C; Rajagopalan, S; Robinson, T; Datta, S K

    1995-01-01

    The production of potentially pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies in SLE is driven by special, autoimmune T helper (Th) cells. Herein, we sequenced the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chain genes expressed by 42 autoimmune Th lines from lupus patients that were mostly CD4+ and represented the strongest inducers of such autoantibodies. These autoimmune TCRs displayed a recurrent motif of highly charged residues in their CDR3 loops that were contributed by N-nucleotide additions and also positioned there by the recombination process. Furthermore, Th lines from four of the five patients showed a marked increase in the usage of the V alpha 8 gene family. Several independent Th lines expressed identical TCR alpha and/or beta chain sequences indicating again antigenic selection. 10 of these Th lines could be tested further for antigenic specificity. 4 of the 10 pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibody-inducing Th lines responded to the non-histone chromosomal protein HMG and two responded to nucleosomal histone proteins; all presented by HLA-DR molecules. Another Th line responded to purified DNA more than nucleosomes. Thus, these autoimmune Th cells of lupus patients respond to charged epitopes in various DNA-binding nucleoproteins that are probably processed and presented by the anti-DNA B cells they selectively help. PMID:7860735

  1. Progesterone and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Grant C.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human immune systems is most apparent in the female predominance of certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Epidemiologic, observational and experimental evidence strongly suggest sex steroids are important modulators of genetic risk in human AD. In this regard, the roles of progesterone (Pg), an immunomodulatory female sex steroid, are poorly understood. Several lines of investigation indicate Pg and synthetic progestins impact risk of AD and immune-mediated injury in different ways depending on their concentrations and their engagement of various Pg receptors expressed in immune organs, immune cells or tissues targeted by immune attack. At low physiologic levels, Pg may enhance interferon-alpha (IFN-α) pathways important in SLE pathogenesis. Commonly used synthetic progestins may have the opposite effect. At pregnancy levels, Pg may suppress disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) via inhibition of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 pathways and induction of anti-inflammatory molecules. Importantly, Pg’s immunomodulatory effects differ from those of estrogens and androgens. An additional layer of complexity arises from apparent interdependence of sex hormone signaling pathways. Identifying mechanisms by which Pg and other sex steroids modulate risk of AD and immune-mediated injury will require clarification of their cellular and molecular targets in vivo. These future studies should be informed by recent genetic discoveries in human AD, particularly those revealing their sex-specific genetic associations. PMID:22193289

  2. Lupus nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000481.htm Lupus nephritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus nephritis is a kidney disorder which is a complication ...

  3. A novel human autoimmune syndrome caused by combined hypomorphic and activating mutations in ZAP-70.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alice Y; Punwani, Divya; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Cowan, Morton J; Olson, Jean L; Mathes, Erin F; Sunderam, Uma; Fu, Shu Man; Srinivasan, Rajgopal; Kuriyan, John; Brenner, Steven E; Weiss, Arthur; Puck, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    A brother and sister developed a previously undescribed constellation of autoimmune manifestations within their first year of life, with uncontrollable bullous pemphigoid, colitis, and proteinuria. The boy had hemophilia due to a factor VIII autoantibody and nephrotic syndrome. Both children required allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), which resolved their autoimmunity. The early onset, severity, and distinctive findings suggested a single gene disorder underlying the phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing performed on five family members revealed the affected siblings to be compound heterozygous for two unique missense mutations in the 70-kD T cell receptor ζ-chain associated protein (ZAP-70). Healthy relatives were heterozygous mutation carriers. Although pre-HCT patient T cells were not available, mutation effects were determined using transfected cell lines and peripheral blood from carriers and controls. Mutation R192W in the C-SH2 domain exhibited reduced binding to phosphorylated ζ-chain, whereas mutation R360P in the N lobe of the catalytic domain disrupted an autoinhibitory mechanism, producing a weakly hyperactive ZAP-70 protein. Although human ZAP-70 deficiency can have dysregulated T cells, and autoreactive mouse thymocytes with weak Zap-70 signaling can escape tolerance, our patients' combination of hypomorphic and activating mutations suggested a new disease mechanism and produced previously undescribed human ZAP-70-associated autoimmune disease. PMID:26783323

  4. A novel human autoimmune syndrome caused by combined hypomorphic and activating mutations in ZAP-70

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Alice Y.; Punwani, Divya; Kadlecek, Theresa A.; Cowan, Morton J.; Olson, Jean L.; Mathes, Erin F.; Sunderam, Uma; Man Fu, Shu; Srinivasan, Rajgopal; Kuriyan, John; Brenner, Steven E.; Weiss, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    A brother and sister developed a previously undescribed constellation of autoimmune manifestations within their first year of life, with uncontrollable bullous pemphigoid, colitis, and proteinuria. The boy had hemophilia due to a factor VIII autoantibody and nephrotic syndrome. Both children required allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), which resolved their autoimmunity. The early onset, severity, and distinctive findings suggested a single gene disorder underlying the phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing performed on five family members revealed the affected siblings to be compound heterozygous for two unique missense mutations in the 70-kD T cell receptor ζ-chain associated protein (ZAP-70). Healthy relatives were heterozygous mutation carriers. Although pre-HCT patient T cells were not available, mutation effects were determined using transfected cell lines and peripheral blood from carriers and controls. Mutation R192W in the C-SH2 domain exhibited reduced binding to phosphorylated ζ-chain, whereas mutation R360P in the N lobe of the catalytic domain disrupted an autoinhibitory mechanism, producing a weakly hyperactive ZAP-70 protein. Although human ZAP-70 deficiency can have dysregulated T cells, and autoreactive mouse thymocytes with weak Zap-70 signaling can escape tolerance, our patients’ combination of hypomorphic and activating mutations suggested a new disease mechanism and produced previously undescribed human ZAP-70–associated autoimmune disease. PMID:26783323

  5. Toll-Like Receptor and Accessory Molecule mRNA Expression in Humans and Mice as Well as in Murine Autoimmunity, Transient Inflammation, and Progressive Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Santhosh Kumar Vankayala; Günthner, Roman; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The cell type-, organ-, and species-specific expression of the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are well described, but little is known about the respective expression profiles of their accessory molecules. We therefore determined the mRNA expression levels of LBP, MD2, CD36, CD14, granulin, HMGB1, LL37, GRP94, UNC93b1, TRIL, PRAT4A, AP3B1, AEP and the respective TLRs in human and mouse solid organs. Humans and mice displayed significant differences between their respective mRNA expression patterns of these factors. In addition, the expression profiles in transient tissue inflammation upon renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, in spleens and kidneys from mice with lupus-like systemic autoimmunity, and in progressive tissue fibrosis upon unilateral ureteral obstruction were studied. Several TLR co-factors were specifically regulated during the different phases of these disease entities, suggesting a functional involvement in the disease process. Thus, the organ- and species-specific expression patterns need to be considered in the design and interpretation of studies related to TLR-mediated innate immunity, which seems to be involved in the tissue injury phase, in the phase of tissue regeneration, and in progressive tissue remodelling. PMID:23803655

  6. A loss-of-function variant of PTPN22 is associated with reduced risk of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Valeria; Tsai, Sophia J.; Rueda, Blanca; Fiorillo, Edoardo; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Dasgupta, Jhimli; Hartiala, Jaana; Zhao, Lei; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Arnett, Frank C.; Wu, Hui; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Tsao, Betty P.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; He, Yantao; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Xiaojiang S.; Martin, Javier; Bottini, Nunzio

    2009-01-01

    A gain-of-function R620W polymorphism in the PTPN22 gene, encoding the lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase LYP, has recently emerged as an important risk factor for human autoimmunity. Here we report that another missense substitution (R263Q) within the catalytic domain of LYP leads to reduced phosphatase activity. High-resolution structural analysis revealed the molecular basis for this loss of function. Furthermore, the Q263 variant conferred protection against human systemic lupus erythematosus, reinforcing the proposal that inhibition of LYP activity could be beneficial in human autoimmunity. PMID:18981062

  7. Induction of Regulatory t Cells by Low Dose il2 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Psoriasis; Behcet's Disease; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Takayasu's Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Autoimmune Hepatitis; Sclerosing Cholangitis

  8. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Samuel E; Foley, Corinne; Lu, Xiaoming; Patel, Zubin H; Zoller, Erin E; Magnusen, Albert F; Williams, Adrienne H; Ziegler, Julie T; Comeau, Mary E; Marion, Miranda C; Glenn, Stuart B; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan; Stevens, Anne M; Freedman, Barry I; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Kamen, Diane L; Brown, Elizabeth E; Gilkeson, Gary S; Alarcón, Graciela S; Reveille, John D; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Moser, Kathy L; Criswell, Lindsey A; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R Hal; Kimberly, Robert P; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Binjoo, Young; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Vyse, Timothy J; Guthridge, Joel M; Namjou, Bahram; Gaffney, Patrick M; Langefeld, Carl D; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Harley, Isaac T W; Harley, John B; Kottyan, Leah C

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR) in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb) common haplotype marking a single causal variant that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3' UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 × 10(-10), OR 0.81 (0.75-0.86). Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 202 kb. Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR); we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity. PMID:25620976

  9. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  10. The emergence of systemic lupus erythematosus in hypothyroid patients: two case reports and mini review.

    PubMed

    Bakr, A; Laimon, W; El-Ziny, M A; Hammad, A; El-Hawary, A K; Elsharkawy, A A; El-Refaey, A M; Salem, N A; El-Mougy, A; Zedan, M M; Aboelenin, H M; Eid, R; Sarhan, A

    2014-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-systemic autoimmune disease that involves almost all the organs in the human body and is characterized by auto antibodies formation. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are organ-specific diseases that are associated with a production of a variety of antibodies such as antinuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-Ro antibodies, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, and others. The diagnosis of AITD in patients with SLE is well known, but the reverse is rarely reported. We present two cases of adolescent girls in whom SLE evolved one year after being diagnosed with hypothyroidism. PMID:24569395

  11. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  12. Unscrambling the role of human parvovirus B19 signaling in systemic autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Gregory J; Zouali, Moncef

    2006-11-30

    Despite enormous progress in understanding how the immune system works, the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases still remains unclear. Growing evidence indicates that infectious agents can be potent initial triggers, subverting and exploiting host cell signaling pathways. This role is exemplified by the association of parvovirus B19 (B19) with human autoimmune disease. Infection with this common virus exhibits striking similarities with systemic autoimmune diseases, and can be associated with elevated serum autoantibody titers. The B19 virus produces proline-rich, 11-kDa proteins that have been implicated in modulation of host signaling cascades involved in virulence and pathogenesis. Additionally, B19 produces a non-structural protein (NS1) that functions as a transcription regulator by directly binding the p6 promoter and the Sp1/Sp3 transcription factors. The protein is also involved in DNA replication, cell cycle arrest and initiation of apoptotic damage, particularly in erythroid cells. When transfected to non-permissive cells, NS1 recruits the mitochondria cell death pathway. It is even more remarkable that NS1 functions as a trans-acting transcription activator for the IL6 promoter, up-regulating IL6 expression in host cells. Hence, B19 infection may play a pivotal role in triggering inflammatory disorders. By promoting apoptotic damage and trans-activating pro-inflammatory cytokine promoters, B19 may break the delicate balance between cell survival and apoptosis, and may contribute to immune deregulation. Understanding the mechanisms used by B19 to alter the cell signaling machinery may provide further insight into the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases develop. PMID:16764828

  13. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by antisense oligonucleotides targeting complement factor B improves lupus nephritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Tamar R; Hettrick, Lisa A; Johnson, Robert B; Hung, Gene; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andrew; Henry, Scott P; Adamson, Peter; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that manifests in widespread complement activation and deposition of complement fragments in the kidney. The complement pathway is believed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis and in the development of lupus nephritis. Complement factor B is an important activator of the alternative complement pathway and increasing evidence supports reducing factor B as a potential novel therapy to lupus nephritis. Here we investigated whether pharmacological reduction of factor B expression using antisense oligonucleotides could be an effective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis. We identified potent and well tolerated factor B antisense oligonucleotides that resulted in significant reductions in hepatic and plasma factor B levels when administered to normal mice. To test the effects of factor B antisense oligonucleotides on lupus nephritis, we used two different mouse models, NZB/W F1 and MRL/lpr mice, that exhibit lupus nephritis like renal pathology. Antisense oligonucleotides mediated reductions in circulating factor B levels were associated with significant improvements in renal pathology, reduced glomerular C3 deposition and proteinuria, and improved survival. These data support the strategy of using factor B antisense oligonucleotides for treatment of lupus nephritis in humans. PMID:26307001

  14. C1q and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Walport, M J; Davies, K A; Botto, M

    1998-08-01

    In this chapter we review the association between SLE and C1q. In the first part of the chapter we discuss the clinical associations of C1q deficiency, and tabulate the available information in the literature relating to C1q deficiency and autoimmune disease. Other clinical associations of C1q deficiency are then considered, and we mention briefly the association between other genetically determined complement deficiencies and lupus. In the review we explore the relationship between C1q consumption and lupus and we discuss the occurrence of low molecular weight (7S) C1q in lupus, which raises the possibility that increased C1q turnover in the disease may result in unbalanced chain synthesis of the molecule. Anti-C1q antibodies are also strongly associated with severe SLE affecting the kidney, and with hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis, and these associations are also examined. We address the question of how C1q deficiency may cause SLE, discussing the possibility that this may be due to abnormalities of immune complex processing, which have been well characterised in a umber of different human models. There is clear evidence that immune complex processing is abnormal in patients with hypocomplementaemia, and this is compatible with the hypothesis that ineffective immune complex clearance could cause tissue injury, and this may in turn stimulate an autoantibody response. We have also considered the possibility that C1q-C1q receptor interactions are critical in the regulation of apoptosis, and we explore the hypothesis that dysregulation of apoptosis could explain important features in the development of autoimmune disease associated with C1q deficiency. An abnormally high rate of apoptosis, or defective clearance of apoptotic cells, could promote the accumulation of abnormal cellular products that might drive an autoimmune response. Anti-C1q antibodies have been described in a number of murine models of lupus, and these are also briefly discussed. We focus

  15. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha suppresses autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, J; Seino, H; Abo, T; Tanaka, S; Shintani, S; Ohta, S; Tamura, K; Sawai, T; Nobunaga, T; Oteki, T

    1989-01-01

    We previously reported that administration of a streptococcal preparation (OK-432) inhibited insulitis and development of autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and BB rats as animals models of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, we screened various cytokines that could be induced by OK-432 in vivo, for their preventive effect against diabetes in NOD mice. Among recombinant mouse IFN gamma, human IL1 alpha, human IL2, mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and human TNF alpha, only human TNF alpha suppressed insulitis and significantly (P less than 0.001) inhibited development of diabetes. NOD mice were the lowest producers of the mRNA of TNF and serum TNF on stimulation with OK-432 or with IFN gamma plus LPS, compared with C57BL/6, C3H/He, and Balb/c mice. The results imply a role for low productivity of TNF in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Images PMID:2794065

  16. Siglec-1-positive plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in human peripheral blood: A semi-mature and myeloid-like subset imbalanced during protective and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Theresa R; Taddeo, Adriano; Winter, Oliver; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Mälzer, Julia-Nora; Domingo, Cristina; Biesen, Robert; Alexander, Tobias; Thiel, Andreas; Radbruch, Andreas; Hiepe, Falk; Gerl, Velia

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a central role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as IFN-α producers and promoters of T-cell activation or tolerance. Here, we demonstrated by flow-cytometry and confocal microscopy that Siglec-1, a molecule involved in the regulation of adaptive immunoresponses, is expressed in a subset of semi-mature, myeloid-like pDCs in human blood. These pDCs express lower BDCA-2 and CD123 and higher HLA-DR and CD11c than Siglec-1-negative pDCs and do not produce IFN-α via TLR7/TLR9 engagement. In vitro, Siglec-1 expression was induced in Siglec-1-negative pDCs by influenza virus. Proportions of Siglec-1-positive/Siglec-1-negative pDCs were higher in SLE than in healthy controls and correlated with disease activity. Healthy donors immunized with yellow fever vaccine YFV-17D displayed different kinetics of the two pDC subsets during protective immune response. PDCs can be subdivided into two subsets according to Siglec-1 expression. These subsets may play specific roles in (auto)immune responses. PMID:26674280

  17. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  18. Chrysin suppresses human CD14(+) monocyte-derived dendritic cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ge, Zhenzhen; Xue, Zhenyi; Huang, Wenjing; Mei, Mei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Yan; Li, Wen; Zhang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zimu; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Huafeng; Cai, Jinzhen; Yao, Zhi; Zhang, Rongxin; Da, Yurong

    2015-11-15

    Chrysin, a naturally flavonoid of plant, has various biological activities. However, the effects of chrysin on dendritic cells (DCs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that chrysin inhibited human DC differentiation, maturation, function and the expression of the Th1 cells polarizing cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12p35 form DCs. In addition, chrysin ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, by reducing CNS inflammation and demyelination. Furthermore, chrysin suppressed DCs and Th1 cells in the EAE mice. Taken together, chrysin exerts anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, and suggests a possible therapeutic application of chrysin in MS. PMID:26531689

  19. AKT isoforms modulate Th1-like Treg generation and function in human autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Kitz, Alexandra; de Marcken, Marine; Gautron, Anne-Sophie; Mitrovic, Mitja; Hafler, David A; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita

    2016-08-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) exhibit plasticity, which dictates their function. Secretion of the inflammatory cytokine IFNγ, together with the acquisition of a T helper 1 (Th1)-like effector phenotype as observed in cancer, infection, and autoimmune diseases, is associated with loss of Treg suppressor function through an unknown mechanism. Here, we describe the signaling events driving the generation of human Th1-Tregs. Using a genome-wide gene expression approach and pathway analysis, we identify the PI3K/AKT/Foxo1/3 signaling cascade as the major pathway involved in IFNγ secretion by human Tregs. Furthermore, we describe the opposing roles of AKT isoforms in Th1-Treg generation ex vivo Finally, we employ multiple sclerosis as an in vivo model with increased but functionally defective Th1-Tregs. We show that the PI3K/AKT/Foxo1/3 pathway is activated in ex vivo-isolated Tregs from untreated relapsing-remitting MS patients and that blockade of the pathway inhibits IFNγ secretion and restores the immune suppressive function of Tregs. These data define a fundamental pathway regulating the function of human Tregs and suggest a novel treatment paradigm for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27312110

  20. Mutation of POL B Causes Lupus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Senejani, Alireza G.; Liu, Yanfeng; Kidane, Dawit; Maher, Stephen E.; Zeiss, Caroline J; Park, Hong-Jae; Kashgarian, Michael; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Zelterman, Daniel; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A replication study of a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggested that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) linked to the POLB gene is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This SNP is correlated with decreased POLB expression (Pol β). To determine if decreased Pol β activity results in SLE, we constructed a mouse model of POLB that encodes an enzyme with slow DNA polymerase activity. Pol β is a key enzyme in the base excision repair (BER) pathway.. We show that mice expressing this hypomorphic POLB allele develop autoimmune pathology strongly resembling SLE. Of note, the immunoglobulin heavy chain junctions from the POL BY265C/C mice have shorter lengths, and somatic hypermutation is dramatically increased. These results demonstrate that decreased Pol β activity during the generation of immune diversity leads to lupus-like disease in mice and suggest that decreased expression of Pol β in humans is an underlying cause of SLE. PMID:24388753

  1. GWAS implicates a role for quantitative immune traits and threshold effects in risk for human autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Peter K.; Diamond, Betty; Plenge, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association studies in human autoimmune disorders has provided a long list of alleles with rather modest degrees of risk. A large fraction of these associations are likely due to either quantitative differences in gene expression or amino acid changes that regulate quantitative aspects of the immune response. While functional studies are still lacking for most of these associations, we present examples of autoimmune disease risk alleles that influence quantitative changes in lymphocyte activation, cytokine signaling and dendritic cell function. The analysis of immune quantitative traits associated with autoimmune loci is clearly going to be an important component of understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. This will require both new and more efficient ways of characterizing the normal immune system, as well as large population resources with which genotype-phenotype correlations can be convincingly demonstrated. Future development of new therapies will depend on understanding the mechanistic underpinnings of immune regulation by these new risk loci. PMID:23026397

  2. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress. PMID:22194706

  3. [Recent advance in genetics of systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuebing; Chen, Sunle; Shen, Nan

    2002-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototype systemic autoimmune disease and genetic component seems to play an important role in disease susceptibility. Studies from murine models have shown that about 30 loci are related to the disease. Meanwhile, 50 loci have been found in linkage to SLE in human genomic studies, especially 1q23-24, 1q41-42, 2q37, 4p16-15.2, 6p21-11 and 16q13. A lot of candidate genes contribute to the disease susceptibility and different combinations of genes at multiple loci in individual patient may result in the development of diverse clinical features. PMID:12476427

  4. Possible Role of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yang, Jie; Lu, Yu-wei; Wu, Song; Wang, Ming-rui; Zhu, Ji-min

    2015-09-01

    As a member of superantigens (SAgs) produced by Staphylococcus aureus, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a exotoxin superantigen that can regulate the activity of immunomodulatory and pro-inflammatory cell types. In addition, SEB plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders either by initiating the autoimmune process or by inducing a relapse in an individual in clinical remission from an autoimmune disorder. SEB can directly activate T lymphocytes, leading to the release of cytokines, superoxides, or other mediators of inflammation either directly or indirectly, because of its unique ability to cross-link human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and T cell receptors (TCR), forming a trimolecular complex. This review discusses the potential effects of SEB in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, and explores some updated therapeutic medications to neutralize SEB. PMID:26086678

  5. Vitamin D and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Neumann, Shana G; Soriano, Alessandra; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the contribution of vitamin D deficiency to autoimmunity. Several studies have shown an association between low levels of vitamin D and autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Vitamin D receptor ligands can mediate immunosuppressive effects. It has been suggested that low levels of this hormone contribute to the immune activation in lupus and other autoimmune diseases. This review updates and summarizes the literature on the association between vitamin D and SLE, and discusses the various correlations between vitamin D and SLE activity, clinical expressions, serology, and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptors. PMID:27228639

  6. EBV and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ascherio, Alberto; Munger, Kassandra L

    2015-01-01

    Although a role of EBV in autoimmunity is biologically plausible and evidence of altered immune responses to EBV is abundant in several autoimmune diseases, inference on causality requires the determination that disease risk is higher in individuals infected with EBV than in those uninfected and that in the latter it increases following EBV infection. This determination has so far been possible only for multiple sclerosis (MS) and, to some extent, for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), whereas evidence is either lacking or not supportive for other autoimmune conditions. In this chapter, we present the main epidemiological findings that justify the conclusion that EBV is a component cause of MS and SLE and possible mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:26424654

  7. Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Triggered by Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kolm, I.; Pawlik, E.; Eggmann, N.; Kamarachev, J.; Kerl, K.; French, L.E.; Hofbauer, G.F.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The origin of collagen autoimmune diseases is not fully understood. Some studies postulate a mechanism of molecular mimicry or heterologous immunity following viral infections triggering autoimmunity. Apart from infections, other exogenous factors such as visible light or X-rays have been reported to incite autoimmunity. Case Report We report a case of histologically and serologically confirmed subacute lupus erythematosus (SCLE) following radiotherapy for breast cancer. Discussion The close temporal and spatial correlation between radiotherapy and onset of SCLE in this patient suggests that an autoimmune reaction may have been triggered locally by functionally altering the immune system and breaking self-tolerance. PMID:24019776

  8. Autoimmunity in 2013.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The peer-reviewed publications in the field of autoimmunity published in 2013 represented a significant proportion of immunology articles and grew since the previous year to indicate that more immune-mediated phenomena may recognize an autoimmune mechanism and illustrated by osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. As a result, our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity is becoming the paradigm for translational research in which the progress in disease pathogenesis for both tolerance breakdown and inflammation perpetuation is rapidly followed by new treatment approaches and clinical management changes. The similarities across the autoimmune disease spectrum outnumber differences, particularly when treatments are compared. Indeed, the therapeutics of autoimmune diseases are based on a growing armamentarium that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small molecules which act by targeting molecular markers or intracellular mediators with high specificity. Among the over 100 conditions considered as autoimmune, the common grounds are well illustrated by the data reported for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis or by the plethora of studies on Th17 cells and biomarkers, particularly serum autoantibodies. Further, we are particularly intrigued by studies on the genomics, epigenetics, and microRNA at different stages of disease development or on the safe and effective use of abatacept acting on the costimulation of T and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We are convinced that the data published in 2013 represent a promising background for future developments that will exponentially impact the work of laboratory and clinical scientists over the next years. PMID:24819586

  9. Cutting Edge: Autoimmune Disease Risk Variant of STAT4 Confers Increased Sensitivity to IFN-α in Lupus Patients In Vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Kirou, Kyriakos A.; MacDermott, Emma J.; Barillas-Arias, Lilliana; Crow, Mary K.; Niewold, Timothy B.

    2009-01-01

    Increased IFN-α signaling is a primary pathogenic factor in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). STAT4 is a transcription factor that is activated by IFN-α signaling, and genetic variation of STAT4 has been associated with risk of SLE and rheumatoid arthritis. We measured serum IFN-α activity and simultaneous IFN-α-induced gene expression in PBMC in a large SLE cohort. The risk variant of STAT4 (T allele; rs7574865) was simultaneously associated with both lower serum IFN-α activity and greater IFN-α-induced gene expression in PBMC in SLE patients in vivo. Regression analyses confirmed that the risk allele of STAT4 was associated with increased sensitivity to IFN-α signaling. The IFN regulatory factor 5 SLE risk genotype was associated with higher serum IFN-α activity; however, STAT4 showed dominant influence on the sensitivity of PBMC to serum IFN-α. These data provide biologic relevance for the risk variant of STAT4 in the IFN-α pathway in vivo. PMID:19109131

  10. Patterns of Exposure of Iberian Wolves (Canis lupus) to Canine Viruses in Human-Dominated Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; López-Bao, José Vicente; García, Emilio J; Oleaga, Álvaro; Llaneza, Luis; Palacios, Vicente; de la Torre, Ana; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Dubovi, Edward J; Esperón, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Wildlife inhabiting human-dominated landscapes is at risk of pathogen spill-over from domestic species. With the aim of gaining knowledge in the dynamics of viral infections in Iberian wolves (Canis lupus) living in anthropized landscapes of northern Spain, we analysed between 2010 and 2013 the samples of 54 wolves by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for exposure to four pathogenic canine viruses: canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus-2 (CPV), canine adenovirus 1 and 2 (CAV-1 and CAV-2) and canine herpesvirus. Overall, 76% of the studied wolves presented evidence of exposure to CPV (96% by HI, 66% by PCR) and 75% to CAV (75% by virus neutralization (VN), 76% by PCR, of which 70% CAV-1 and 6% CAV-2). This represents the first detection of CAV-2 infection in a wild carnivore. CPV/CAV-1 co-infection occurred in 51% of the wolves. The probability of wolf exposure to CPV was positively and significantly correlated with farm density in a buffer zone around the place where the wolf was found, indicating that rural dogs might be the origin of CPV infecting wolves. CPV and CAV-1 appear to be enzootic in the Iberian wolf population, which is supported by the absence of seasonal and inter-annual variations in the proportion of positive samples detected. However, while CPV may depend on periodical introductions by dogs, CAV-1 may be maintained within the wolf population. All wolves were negative for exposure to CDV (by VN and PCR) and CHV (by PCR). The absence of acquired immunity against CDV in this population may predispose it to an elevated rate of mortality in the event of a distemper spill-over via dogs. PMID:26589403

  11. IFN-γ licenses CD11b(+) cells to induce progression of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Shaabani, Namir; Honke, Nadine; Dolff, Sebastian; Görg, Boris; Khairnar, Vishal; Merches, Katja; Duhan, Vikas; Metzger, Sabine; Recher, Mike; Barthuber, Carmen; Hardt, Cornelia; Proksch, Peter; Häussinger, Dieter; Witzke, Oliver; Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S

    2015-08-01

    Autoantibodies are a hallmark of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). High titers of anti-nuclear antibodies are used as surrogate marker for SLE, however their contribution to pathogenesis remains unclear. Using murine model of SLE and human samples, we studied the effect of immune stimulation on relapsing of SLE. Although autoantibodies bound to target cells in vivo, only additional activation of CD8(+) T cells converted this silent autoimmunity into overt disease. In mice as well as in humans CD8(+) T cells derived IFN-γ enhanced expression of Fc-receptors on CD11b(+) cells. High expression of Fc-receptors allowed CD11b(+) cells to bind to antibody covered target cells and to destroy them in vivo. We found that autoantibodies induce clinically relevant disease when adaptive immunity, specific for disease non-related antigen, is activated. PMID:26094774

  12. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  13. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H.

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  14. Conditioned Medium from the Stem Cells of Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Chiaki; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Jin, Shijie; Parajuli, Bijay; Hattori, Hisashi; Suzumura, Akio; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a major neuroinflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. Current MS treatments, including immunomodulators and immunosuppressants, do not result in complete remission. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp. Both SHED and SHED-conditioned medium (SHED-CM) exhibit immunomodulatory and regenerative activities and have the potential to treat various diseases. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of SHED-CM in treating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. EAE mice treated with a single injection of SHED-CM exhibited significantly improved disease scores, reduced demyelination and axonal injury, and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression in the spinal cord, which was associated with a shift in the microglia/macrophage phenotype from M1 to M2. SHED-CM also inhibited the proliferation of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD4(+) T cells, as well as their production of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Treatment of EAE mice with the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9, a major component of SHED-CM, recapitulated the effects of SHED-CM treatment. Our data suggest that SHED-CM and secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 may be novel therapeutic treatments for autoimmune diseases, such as MS. PMID:27053763

  15. Intersection of population variation and autoimmunity genetics in human T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chun Jimmie; Feng, Ting; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Raj, Towfique; Wilson, Michael T; Asinovski, Natasha; McCabe, Cristin; Lee, Michelle H; Frohlich, Irene; Paik, Hyun-il; Zaitlen, Noah; Hacohen, Nir; Stranger, Barbara; De Jager, Philip; Mathis, Diane; Regev, Aviv; Benoist, Christophe

    2014-09-12

    T lymphocyte activation by antigen conditions adaptive immune responses and immunopathologies, but we know little about its variation in humans and its genetic or environmental roots. We analyzed gene expression in CD4(+) T cells during unbiased activation or in T helper 17 (T(H)17) conditions from 348 healthy participants representing European, Asian, and African ancestries. We observed interindividual variability, most marked for cytokine transcripts, with clear biases on the basis of ancestry, and following patterns more complex than simple T(H)1/2/17 partitions. We identified 39 genetic loci specifically associated in cis with activated gene expression. We further fine-mapped and validated a single-base variant that modulates YY1 binding and the activity of an enhancer element controlling the autoimmune-associated IL2RA gene, affecting its activity in activated but not regulatory T cells. Thus, interindividual variability affects the fundamental immunologic process of T helper activation, with important connections to autoimmune disease. PMID:25214635

  16. The persistent challenge of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2011-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus has long been considered the prototypic autoimmune disease. Although the etiology remains enigmatic, there has been vigorous definition of the clinical features and the natural history. In this issue, we review the persistent challenge of lupus nephritis and, in particular, features of diagnosis as well as treatment options. It is clear that major therapeutic advances have occurred but there is still a considerable unmet need in the population. This issue does not review all the clinical problems of lupus nephritis, but rather attempts to place the most recent data in perspective for the clinician. PMID:20811786

  17. Immunopathogenesis of environmentally induced lupus in mice.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, V M; Satoh, M; Richards, H B; Yoshida, H; Shaw, M; Jennette, J C; Reeves, W H

    1999-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune syndrome defined by clinical and serologic features, including arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and certain autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear ribonucleoprotein (nRNP)/Smith antigen (Sm), DNA, and ribosomal P. Although lupus is considered primarily a genetic disorder, we recently demonstrated the induction of a syndrome strikingly similar to spontaneous lupus in many nonautoimmune strains of mice exposed to the isoprenoid alkane pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane), a component of mineral oil. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane leads to the formation of lipogranulomas consisting of phagocytic cells that have engulfed the oil and collections of lymphocytes. Subsequently, pristane-treated BALB/c and SJL mice develop autoantibodies characteristic of SLE, including anti-nRNP/Sm, antiribosomal P, anti-Su, antichromatin, anti-single-stranded DNA, and anti-double-stranded DNA. This is accompanied by a severe glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition, mesangial or mesangiocapillary proliferation, and proteinuria. All inbred mice examined appear to be susceptible to this novel form of chemically induced lupus. Pristane-induced lupus is the only inducible model of autoimmunity associated with the clinical syndrome as well as with the characteristic serologic abnormalities of SLE. Defining the immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced lupus in mice may provide insight into the causes of spontaneous (idiopathic) lupus and also may lead to information concerning possible risks associated with the ingestion or inhalation of mineral oil and exposure to hydrocarbons in the environment. PMID:10502537

  18. Aluminum in the central nervous system (CNS): toxicity in humans and animals, vaccine adjuvants, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C A; Tomljenovic, L

    2013-07-01

    We have examined the neurotoxicity of aluminum in humans and animals under various conditions, following different routes of administration, and provide an overview of the various associated disease states. The literature demonstrates clearly negative impacts of aluminum on the nervous system across the age span. In adults, aluminum exposure can lead to apparently age-related neurological deficits resembling Alzheimer's and has been linked to this disease and to the Guamanian variant, ALS-PDC. Similar outcomes have been found in animal models. In addition, injection of aluminum adjuvants in an attempt to model Gulf War syndrome and associated neurological deficits leads to an ALS phenotype in young male mice. In young children, a highly significant correlation exists between the number of pediatric aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines administered and the rate of autism spectrum disorders. Many of the features of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity may arise, in part, from autoimmune reactions, as part of the ASIA syndrome. PMID:23609067

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    Disseminated lupus erythematosus; SLE; Lupus; Lupus erythematosus; Butterfly rash-SLE; Discoid lupus ... Mouth sores. Sensitivity to sunlight. Skin rash: A "butterfly" rash in about half the people with SLE. ...

  20. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular

  1. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  2. Autoimmune basal ganglia disorders.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    The basal ganglia are deep nuclei in the brain that include the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Pathological processes involving the basal ganglia often result in disorders of movement and behavior. A number of different autoimmune disorders predominantly involve the basal ganglia and can result in movement and psychiatric disorders. The classic basal ganglia autoimmune disorder is Sydenham chorea, a poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder. Resurgence in the interest in Sydenham chorea is the result of the descriptions of other poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders including tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder, broadly termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection. Encephalitic processes affecting the basal ganglia are also described including the syndromes basal ganglia encephalitis, encephalitis lethargica, and bilateral striatal necrosis. Last, systemic autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome can result in chorea or parkinsonism. Using paradigms learned from other autoantibody associated disorders, the authors discuss the autoantibody hypothesis and the role of systemic inflammation in autoimmune basal ganglia disorders. Identification of these entities is important as the clinician has an increasing therapeutic repertoire to modulate or suppress the aberrant immune system. PMID:22832771

  3. [Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus with unusual manifestation of lupus-associated panniculitis].

    PubMed

    Hashemie, H; Klossowski, N; Oommen, P T; Neubert, J; Homey, B; Hoff, N-P; Reifenberger, J; Meller, S

    2015-10-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) is a rare multisystem autoimmune disease with broad heterogeneity of clinical manifestations. Diagnosing JSLE is often very challenging. This life-threatening, unpredictable, and relapsing disease, which may affect various organ systems, requires interdisciplinary, lifelong care. Here, we report the case of a 13-year-old patient with JSLE suffering from recurrent arthralgia, lupus panniculitis, and rashes that were successfully treated with hydroxychloroquine and prednisolone. PMID:26335858

  4. Environmentally induced autoimmune diseases: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T; Richardson, B

    1999-01-01

    Environmental and other xenobiotic agents can cause autoimmunity. Examples include drug-induced lupus, toxic oil syndrome, and contaminated l-tryptophan ingestion. Numerous mechanisms, based on (italic)in vitro(/italic) evidence and animal models, have been proposed to explain how xenobiotics induce or accelerate autoimmunity. The majority of these can be divided into three general categories. The first is those inhibiting the processes involved in establishing tolerance by deletion. Inhibiting deletion can result in the release of newly generated autoreactive cells into the periphery. The second mechanism is the modification of gene expression in the cells participating in the immune response, permitting lymphocytes to respond to signals normally insufficient to initiate a response or allowing the antigen-presenting cells to abnormally stimulate a response. Abnormal gene expression can thus disrupt tolerance maintained by suppression or anergy, permitting activation of autoreactive cells. The third is the modification of self-molecules such that they are recognized by the immune system as foreign. Examples illustrating these concepts are presented, and related mechanisms that have the potential to similarly affect the immune system are noted. Some mechanisms appear to be common to a variety of agents, and different mechanisms appear to produce similar diseases. However, evidence that any of these mechanisms are actually responsible for xenobiotic-induced human autoimmune disease is still largely lacking, and the potential for numerous and as yet unidentified mechanisms also exists. PMID:10502539

  5. Oxidative Stress and Treg and Th17 Dysfunction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji; Yang, Xue; Zou, Hejian; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that involves multiple organ systems. The pathogenic mechanisms that cause SLE remain unclear; however, it is well recognized that the immune balance is disturbed and that this imbalance contributes to the autoimmune symptoms of SLE. Oxidative stress represents an imbalance between the production and manifestation of reactive oxygen species and the ability of the biological system to readily detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. In humans, oxidative stress is involved in many diseases, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, and autoimmune diseases. Numerous studies have confirmed that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. This review mainly focuses on the recent research advances with respect to oxidative stress and regulatory T (Treg)/helper T 17 (Th17) cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27597882

  6. Oxidative Stress and Treg and Th17 Dysfunction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that involves multiple organ systems. The pathogenic mechanisms that cause SLE remain unclear; however, it is well recognized that the immune balance is disturbed and that this imbalance contributes to the autoimmune symptoms of SLE. Oxidative stress represents an imbalance between the production and manifestation of reactive oxygen species and the ability of the biological system to readily detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. In humans, oxidative stress is involved in many diseases, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, and autoimmune diseases. Numerous studies have confirmed that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. This review mainly focuses on the recent research advances with respect to oxidative stress and regulatory T (Treg)/helper T 17 (Th17) cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27597882

  7. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  8. Pre-B cell leukemia homeobox 1 is associated with lupus susceptibility in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Carla M.; Li, Shiwu; Liang, Shujuan; Yin, Yiming; Potula, Hari Hara S.K.; Xu, Zhiwei; Sengupta, Mayami; Chen, Yifang; Butfiloski, Edward; Baker, Henry; Chang, Lung-Ji; Dozmorov, Igor; Sobel, Eric S.; Morel, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Sle1a.1 is part of the Sle1 susceptibility locus, which has the strongest association with lupus nephritis in the NZM2410 mouse model. Here we show that Sle1a.1 results in the production of activated and autoreactive CD4+ T cells. In addition, Sle1a.1 expression reduces the peripheral regulatory T cell (Treg) pool, as well as induces a defective response of CD4+ T cells to the retinoic acid (RA) expansion of TGFβ-induced Tregs. At the molecular level, Sle1a.1 corresponds to an increased expression of a novel splice isoform of Pbx1, Pbx1-d. Pbx1-d over-expression is sufficient to induce an activated/inflammatory phenotype in Jurkat T cells, and to decrease their apoptotic response to RA. PBX1-d is expressed more frequently in the CD4+ T cells from lupus patients than from healthy controls, and its presence correlates with an increased central memory T cell population. These findings indicate that Pbx1 is a novel lupus susceptibility gene that regulates T cell activation and tolerance. PMID:22180614

  9. Treating Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Investigator Grants, Fellowships and Career Development Awards & Prizes Peer-Reviewed Grant Program LIFELINE Grant Program 2015 ... Postal Code: Spam Control Text: Please leave this field empty Get social Facebook Twitter Instgram Lupus.org ...

  10. Proinsulin multi-peptide immunotherapy induces antigen-specific regulatory T cells and limits autoimmunity in a humanized model.

    PubMed

    Gibson, V B; Nikolic, T; Pearce, V Q; Demengeot, J; Roep, B O; Peakman, M

    2015-12-01

    Peptide immunotherapy (PIT) is a targeted therapeutic approach, involving administration of disease-associated peptides, with the aim of restoring antigen-specific immunological tolerance without generalized immunosuppression. In type 1 diabetes, proinsulin is a primary antigen targeted by the autoimmune response, and is therefore a strong candidate for exploitation via PIT in this setting. To elucidate the optimal conditions for proinsulin-based PIT and explore mechanisms of action, we developed a preclinical model of proinsulin autoimmunity in a humanized HLA-DRB1*0401 transgenic HLA-DR4 Tg mouse. Once proinsulin-specific tolerance is broken, HLA-DR4 Tg mice develop autoinflammatory responses, including proinsulin-specific T cell proliferation, interferon (IFN)-γ and autoantibody production. These are preventable and quenchable by pre- and post-induction treatment, respectively, using intradermal proinsulin-PIT injections. Intradermal proinsulin-PIT enhances proliferation of regulatory [forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+))CD25(high) ] CD4 T cells, including those capable of proinsulin-specific regulation, suggesting this as its main mode of action. In contrast, peptide delivered intradermally on the surface of vitamin D3-modulated (tolerogenic) dendritic cells, controls autoimmunity in association with proinsulin-specific IL-10 production, but no change in regulatory CD4 T cells. These studies define a humanized, translational model for in vivo optimization of PIT to control autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes and indicate that dominant mechanisms of action differ according to mode of peptide delivery. PMID:26206289

  11. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  12. The Role of Autophagy in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linlin; Law, Helen Ka Wai

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by the generation of immune responses to self-antigens. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and severe complications in SLE patients. Though the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis has been studied extensively, unresolved questions are still left and new therapeutic methods are needed for disease control. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process through which cytoplasmic constituents can be degraded in lysosome and reused. Autophagy plays vital roles in maintaining cell homeostasis and is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In particular, autophagy can affect almost all parts of the immune system and is involved in autoimmune diseases. Based on genetic analysis, cell biology, and mechanism studies of the classic and innovative therapeutic drugs, there are growing lines of evidence suggesting the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis. In the present review, we summarize the recent publications investigating the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis and provide a new perspective towards the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. PMID:26506346

  13. The Role of Autophagy in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linlin; Law, Helen Ka Wai

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by the generation of immune responses to self-antigens. Lupus nephritis is one of the most common and severe complications in SLE patients. Though the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis has been studied extensively, unresolved questions are still left and new therapeutic methods are needed for disease control. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process through which cytoplasmic constituents can be degraded in lysosome and reused. Autophagy plays vital roles in maintaining cell homeostasis and is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In particular, autophagy can affect almost all parts of the immune system and is involved in autoimmune diseases. Based on genetic analysis, cell biology, and mechanism studies of the classic and innovative therapeutic drugs, there are growing lines of evidence suggesting the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis. In the present review, we summarize the recent publications investigating the relationship between autophagy and lupus nephritis and provide a new perspective towards the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. PMID:26506346

  14. Lupus a Tough Disease to Spot, Treat

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159098.html Lupus a Tough Disease to Spot, Treat But experts say scientists are working to unearth genetic causes of autoimmune ...

  15. Thyroid disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, K L; Wang, F

    1986-01-01

    Of 319 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), nine had thyrotoxicosis, three had hypothyroidism, and two had thyroiditis. This prevalence seems greater than that of similar thyroid disorders seen in the general population. It is suggested that patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders may develop SLE or vice versa. This association requires confirmation by prospective study. PMID:3740982

  16. Cytokine Gene Polymorphisms and Human Autoimmune Disease in the Era of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cytokine (receptor) genes have traditionally attracted great interest as plausible genetic risk factors for autoimmune disease. Since 2007, the implementation of genome-wide association studies has facilitated the robust identification of allelic variants in more than 35 cytokine loci as susceptibility factors for a wide variety of over 15 autoimmune disorders. In this review, we catalog the gene loci of interleukin, chemokine, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and ligands that have emerged as autoimmune risk factors. We examine recent progress made in the clarification of the functional mechanisms by which polymorphisms in the genes coding for interleukin-2 receptor alpha (IL2RA), IL7R, and IL23R may alter risk for autoimmune disease, and discuss opposite autoimmune risk alleles found, among others, at the IL10 locus. PMID:22191464

  17. Use of Humanized Mice to Study the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Koboziev, Iurii; Jones-Hall, Yava; Valentine, John F.; Webb, Cynthia Reinoso; Furr, Kathryn L.; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of disease have been used extensively by the research community for the past several decades to better understand the pathogenesis of different diseases as well as assess the efficacy and toxicity of different therapeutic agents. Retrospective analyses of numerous preclinical intervention studies using mouse models of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases reveal a generalized failure to translate promising interventions or therapeutics into clinically-effective treatments in patients. Although several possible reasons have been suggested to account for this generalized failure to translate therapeutic efficacy from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the mouse immune system may not adequately recapitulate the immuno-pathological mechanisms observed in human diseases. Indeed, it is well-known that >80 major differences exist between mouse and human immunology; all of which contribute to significant differences in immune system development, activation and responses to challenges in innate and adaptive immunity. This inconvenient reality has prompted investigators to attempt to humanize the mouse immune system in order to address important, human-specific questions that are impossible to study in patients. The successful long-term engraftment of human hemato-lymphoid cells in mice would provide investigators with a relatively inexpensive, small animal model to study clinically-relevant mechanisms as well as facilitate the evaluation of human-specific therapies in vivo. The discovery that targeted mutation of the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain in lymphopenic mice allows for the long-term engraftment of functional human immune cells has advanced greatly our ability to humanize the mouse immune system. The objective of this review is to present a brief overview of the recent advances that have been made in the development and use of humanized mice with special emphasis on autoimmune and chronic

  18. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Elshikha, Ahmed S.; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A.; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  19. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Elshikha, Ahmed S; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  20. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  1. MicroRNAs Implicated in the Immunopathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Chafin, Cristen B.; Reilly, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the deposition of immune complexes due to widespread loss of immune tolerance to nuclear self-antigens. Deposition in the renal glomeruli results in the development of lupus nephritis (LN), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE. In addition to the well-recognized genetic susceptibility to SLE, disease pathogenesis is influenced by epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that bind to the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs resulting in posttranscriptional gene modulation. miRNAs play an important and dynamic role in the activation of innate immune cells and are critical in regulating the adaptive immune response. Immune stimulation and the resulting cytokine milieu alter miRNA expression while miRNAs themselves modify cellular responses to stimulation. Here we examine dysregulated miRNAs implicated in LN pathogenesis from human SLE patients and murine lupus models. The effects of LN-associated miRNAs in the kidney, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, mesangial cells, dendritic cells, and splenocytes are discussed. As the role of miRNAs in immunopathogenesis becomes delineated, it is likely that specific miRNAs may serve as targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of LN and other pathologies. PMID:23983769

  2. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  3. Role of neutrophils in systemic autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have emerged as important regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent evidence indicates that neutrophils display marked abnormalities in phenotype and function in various systemic autoimmune diseases, and may play a central role in initiation and perpetuation of aberrant immune responses and organ damage in these conditions. This review discusses the putative roles that neutrophils and aberrant neutrophil cell death play in the pathogenesis of various systemic autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, small vessel vasculitis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24286137

  4. Nonbilayer Phospholipid Arrangements Are Toll-Like Receptor-2/6 and TLR-4 Agonists and Trigger Inflammation in a Mouse Model Resembling Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Tescucano, Alonso; Astudillo, Horacio; Reséndiz, Albany; Landa, Carla; España, Luis; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by dysregulated activation of T and B cells and autoantibodies to nuclear antigens and, in some cases, lipid antigens. Liposomes with nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements induce a disease resembling human lupus in mice, including IgM and IgG antibodies against nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements. As the effect of these liposomes on the innate immune response is unknown and innate immune system activation is necessary for efficient antibody formation, we evaluated the effect of these liposomes on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, cytokine production, proinflammatory gene expression, and T, NKT, dendritic, and B cells. Liposomes induce TLR-4- and, to a lesser extent, TLR-2/TLR-6-dependent signaling in TLR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Mice with the lupus-like disease had increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, C3a and C5a; they also had more TLR-4-expressing splenocytes, a higher expression of genes associated with TRIF-dependent TLR-4-signaling and complement activation, and a lower expression of apoptosis-related genes, compared to healthy mice. The percentage of NKT and the percentage and activation of dendritic and B2 cells were also increased. Thus, TLR-4 and TLR-2/TLR-6 activation by nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements triggers an inflammatory response that could contribute to autoantibody production and the generation of a lupus-like disease in mice. PMID:26568960

  5. Initial clinical trial of epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22 antibody) for immunotherapy of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Dörner, Thomas; Kaufmann, Joerg; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Goldenberg, David M; Burmester, Gerd R

    2006-01-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), so the safety and activity of anti-B cell immunotherapy with the humanized anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab was evaluated in SLE patients. An open-label, single-center study of 14 patients with moderately active SLE (total British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) score 6 to 12) was conducted. Patients received 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab intravenously every 2 weeks for 4 doses with analgesic/antihistamine premedication (but no steroids) prior to each dose. Evaluations at 6, 10, 18 and 32 weeks (6 months post-treatment) follow-up included safety, SLE activity (BILAG score), blood levels of epratuzumab, B and T cells, immunoglobulins, and human anti-epratuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Total BILAG scores decreased by > or = 50% in all 14 patients at some point during the study (including 77% with a > or = 50% decrease at 6 weeks), with 92% having decreases of various amounts continuing to at least 18 weeks (where 38% showed a >/= 50% decrease). Almost all patients (93%) experienced improvements in at least one BILAG B- or C-level disease activity at 6, 10 and 18 weeks. Additionally, 3 patients with multiple BILAG B involvement at baseline had completely resolved all B-level disease activities by 18 weeks. Epratuzumab was well tolerated, with a median infusion time of 32 minutes. Drug serum levels were measurable for at least 4 weeks post-treatment and detectable in most samples at 18 weeks. B cell levels decreased by an average of 35% at 18 weeks and remained depressed at 6 months post-treatment. Changes in routine safety laboratory tests were infrequent and without any consistent pattern, and there was no evidence of immunogenicity or significant changes in T cells, immunoglobulins, or autoantibody levels. In patients with mild to moderate active lupus, 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab was well tolerated, with evidence of clinical improvement after the first infusion and durable clinical

  6. Ranking the impact of human health disorders on gut metabolism: systemic lupus erythematosus and obesity as study cases.

    PubMed

    Rojo, David; Hevia, Arancha; Bargiela, Rafael; López, Patricia; Cuervo, Adriana; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés; Suárez, Antonio; Margolles, Abelardo; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Multiple factors have been shown to alter intestinal microbial diversity. It remains to be seen, however, how multiple collective pressures impact the activity in the gut environment and which, if any, is positioned as a dominant driving factor determining the final metabolic outcomes. Here, we describe the results of a metabolome-wide scan of gut microbiota in 18 subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 17 healthy control subjects and demonstrate a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the two groups. Healthy controls could be categorized (p < 0.05) based on their body mass index (BMI), whereas individuals with SLE could not. We discuss the prevalence of SLE compared with BMI as the dominant factor that regulates gastrointestinal microbial metabolism and provide plausible explanatory causes. Our results uncover novel perspectives with clinical relevance for human biology. In particular, we rank the importance of various pathophysiologies for gut homeostasis. PMID:25655524

  7. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications. PMID:26861824

  8. Effective Arrestin–Specific Immunotherapy of Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis with RTL: A Prospect for Treatment of Human Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kyger, Madison; Worley, Aneta; Huan, Jianya; McDowell, Hugh; Smith, W. Clay; Burrows, Gregory G.; Mattapallil, Mary J.; Caspi, Rachel R.; Adamus, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the immunotherapeutic efficacy of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs) specific for arrestin immunity in treatment of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in humanized leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR3) transgenic (Tg) mice. Methods: We generated de novo recombinant human DR3-derived RTLs bearing covalently tethered arrestin peptides 291–310 (RTL351) or 305–324 (RTL352). EAU was induced by immunization of HLA-DR3 mice with arrestin or arrestin peptide and treated with RTLs by subcutaneous delivery. T cell proliferation and cytokine expression was measured in RTL-treated and control mice. Results: RTL351 prevented the migration of cells outside of the spleen and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the eye, and provided full protection against inflammation from EAU induced with arrestin or arrestin peptides. RTL351 significantly inhibited T cell proliferation and secretion of inflammatory cytokines interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon γ (IFN-γ), IL-6, and IL-17 and chemokines (macrophage inflammatory proteins [MIP-1a] and regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]), which is in agreement with the suppression of intraocular inflammation. RTL350 (“empty,” no peptide) and RTL352 were not effective. Conclusions: Immunotherapy with a single RTL351 successfully prevented and treated arrestin-induced EAU in HLA-DR3 mice and provided proof of concept for therapy of autoimmune uveitis in human patients. The beneficial effects of RTL351 should be attributed to a significant decrease in Th1/Th17 mediated inflammation. Translational Relevance: Successful therapies for autoimmune uveitis must specifically inhibit pathogenic inflammation without inducing generalized immunosuppression. RTLs can offer such an option. The single retina-specific RTLs may have a value as potential immunotherapeutic drug for human autoimmune uveitis because they effectively prevent disease induced by multiple T cell specificities. PMID:24049712

  9. Genetic basis of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Marson, Alexander; Housley, William J.; Hafler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect up to approximately 10% of the population. While rare Mendelian autoimmunity syndromes can result from monogenic mutations disrupting essential mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance, more common human autoimmune diseases are complex disorders that arise from the interaction between polygenic risk factors and environmental factors. Although the risk attributable to most individual nucleotide variants is modest, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to provide an unbiased view of biological pathways that drive human autoimmune diseases. Interpretation of GWAS requires integration of multiple genomic datasets including dense genotyping, cis-regulatory maps of primary immune cells, and genotyped studies of gene expression in relevant cell types and cellular conditions. Improved understanding of the genetic basis of autoimmunity may lead to a more sophisticated understanding of underlying cellular phenotypes and, eventually, novel diagnostics and targeted therapies. PMID:26030227

  10. [Hydroxychloroquine for autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Danza, Álvaro; Graña, Diego; Goñi, Mabel; Vargas, Andrea; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is by far the most frequently used antimalarial for the management of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. It has immunomodulatory, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antithrombotic properties and it diminishes the risk of malignancies. The most important mechanisms to explain the immunomodulatory actions are its ability to reduce inflammatory pathways and Toll-like receptors activation. The safety profile is favorable. In spite of its low frequency, retinal toxicity is potentially severe. In systemic lupus erythematous HCQ therapy reduces activity, the accrual of organ damage, risk of infections and thrombosis and improves the cardiometabolic profile. It contributes to induce lupus nephritis remission, spares steroid use and increases survival rates. In rheumatoid arthritis, it improves cardiometabolic risk and has a favorable effect in joint inflammation. In Sjögren's syndrome, an increased lacrimal quality as well as an improvement in objective and subjective inflammatory markers has been demonstrated with HCQ. In Antiphospholipid Syndrome, HCQ is effective in primary and secondary thrombosis prevention. The effectiveness of the drug in other systemic autoimmune diseases is less established. HCQ therapy may improve dermatological manifestations in Dermatomyositis and may have a positive effects in the treatment of Sarcoidosis and Still disease. PMID:27092678

  11. Metals and kidney autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P E

    1999-01-01

    The causes of autoimmune responses leading to human kidney pathology remain unknown. However, environmental agents such as microorganisms and/or xenobiotics are good candidates for that role. Metals, either present in the environment or administered for therapeutic reasons, are prototypical xenobiotics that cause decreases or enhancements of immune responses. In particular, exposure to gold and mercury may result in autoimmune responses to various self-antigens as well as autoimmune disease of the kidney and other tissues. Gold compounds, currently used in the treatment of patients with progressive polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis, can cause a nephrotic syndrome. Similarly, an immune-mediated membranous nephropathy frequently occurred when drugs containing mercury were commonly used. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that occupational exposure to mercury does not usually result in autoimmunity. However, mercury induces antinuclear antibodies, sclerodermalike disease, lichen planus, or membranous nephropathy in some individuals. Laboratory investigations have confirmed that the administration of gold or mercury to experimental animals leads to autoimmune disease quite similar to that observed in human subjects exposed to these metals. In addition, studies of inbred mice and rats have revealed that a few strains are susceptible to the autoimmune effects of gold and mercury, whereas the majority of inbred strains are resistant. These findings have emphasized the importance of genetic (immunogenetic and pharmacogenetic) factors in the induction of metal-associated autoimmunity. (italic)In vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) research of autoimmune disease caused by mercury and gold has already yielded valuable information and answered a number of important questions. At the same time it has raised new issues about possible immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive mechanisms of xenobiotic activity. Thus it is evident that investigations of metal

  12. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies. PMID:27511737

  13. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P.W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune-disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  14. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  15. IL-10 regulates murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhinan; Bahtiyar, Gul; Zhang, Na; Liu, Lanzhen; Zhu, Ping; Robert, Marie E; McNiff, Jennifer; Madaio, Michael P; Craft, Joe

    2002-08-15

    MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr); MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome closely resembling human systemic lupus erythematosus. To define the role of IL-10 in the regulation of murine lupus, IL-10 gene-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) MRL-Fas(lpr) (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-)) mice were generated and their disease phenotype was compared with littermates with one or two copies of an intact IL-10 locus (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/-) and MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/+) mice, respectively). MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice developed severe lupus, with earlier appearance of skin lesions, increased lymphadenopathy, more severe glomerulonephritis, and higher mortality than their IL-10-intact littermate controls. The increased severity of lupus in MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice was closely associated with enhanced IFN-gamma production by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and increased serum concentration of IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. The protective effect of IL-10 in this lupus model was further supported by the observation that administration of rIL-10 reduced IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibody production in wild-type MRL-Fas(lpr) animals. In summary, our results provide evidence that IL-10 can down-modulate murine lupus through inhibition of pathogenic Th1 cytokine responses. Modulation of the level of IL-10 may be of potential therapeutic benefit for human lupus. PMID:12165544

  16. Fatigue in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Grace E; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease often characterized by fatigue, with significant effects on physical functioning and wellbeing. The definition, prevalence and factors associated with fatigue, including physical activity, obesity, sleep, depression, anxiety, mood, cognitive dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, pain, effects of medications and comorbidities, as well as potential therapeutic options of fatigue in the systemic lupus erythematosus population are reviewed. Due to variability in the reliability and validity of various fatigue measures used in clinical studies, clinical trial data have been challenging to interpret. Further investigation into the relationships between these risk factors and fatigue, and improved measures of fatigue, may lead to an improvement in the management of this chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:22737181

  17. IL-17 promotes murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Amarilyo, Gil; Lourenço, Elaine V; Shi, Fu-Dong; La Cava, Antonio

    2014-07-15

    The proinflammatory activity of IL-17-producing Th17 cells has been associated with the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases. In this article, we provide direct evidence for a role of IL-17 in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The induction of SLE by pristane in IL-17-sufficient wild-type mice did not occur in IL-17-deficient mice, which were protected from development of lupus autoantibodies and glomerulonephritis. The protection from SLE in IL-17-deficient mice was associated with a reduced frequency of CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) double-negative T cells and an expansion of CD4(+) regulatory T cells, and did not depend on Stat-1 signaling. These data affirm the key role of IL-17 in the pathogenesis of SLE and strengthen the support for IL-17 blockade in the therapy of SLE. PMID:24920843

  18. Recent Advances and Opportunities in Research on Lupus: Environmental Influences and Mechanisms of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Glinda S.; Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Greidinger, Eric L.; James, Judith A.; Pfau, Jean C.; Reinlib, Leslie; Richardson, Bruce C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives In this review we summarize research on mechanisms through which environmental agents may affect the pathogenesis of lupus, discuss three exposures that have been the focus of research in this area, and propose recommendations for new research initiatives. Data sources and synthesis We examined studies pertaining to key mechanistic events and specific exposures. Apoptosis leading to increased production or decreased clearance of immunogenic intracellular self-antigens and defective apoptosis of autoreactive immune cells both have been implicated in the loss of self-tolerance. The adjuvant or bystander effect is also needed to produce a sustained autoimmune response. Activation of toll-like receptors is one mechanism through which these effects may occur. Abnormal DNA methylation may also contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus. Each of the specific exposures we examined—Epstein-Barr virus, silica, and trichloroethylene—has been shown, in humans or in mice, to act upon one or more of these pathogenic steps. Specific recommendations for the continued advancement of our understanding of environmental influences on lupus and other autoimmune diseases include the development and use of mouse models with varying degrees of penetrance and manifestations of disease, identification of molecular or physiologic targets of specific exposures, development and use of improved exposure assessment methodologies, and multisite collaborations designed to examine understudied environmental exposures in humans. Conclusions The advances made in the past decade concerning our understanding of mechanisms involved in the development of lupus and the influence of environmental agents on this process provide a strong foundation for further developments in this field. PMID:18560522

  19. Systemic autoimmune disease induced by dendritic cells that have captured necrotic but not apoptotic cells in susceptible mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Trendell-Smith, Nigel J; Wu, Adrian; Tian, Lina; Lam, Audrey C; Chan, Albert K; Lo, Chi-Kin; Chik, Stanley; Ko, King-Hung; To, Christina K W; Kam, Siu-Kee; Li, Xiao-Song; Yang, Cui-Hong; Leung, Suet Yi; Ng, Mun-Hon; Stott, David I; MacPherson, G Gordon; Huang, Fang-Ping

    2005-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder of a largely unknown etiology. Anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA antibodies are a classic hallmark of the disease, although the mechanism underlying their induction remains unclear. We demonstrate here that, in both lupus-prone and normal mouse strains, strong anti-dsDNA antibody responses can be induced by dendritic cells (DC) that have ingested syngeneic necrotic (DC/nec), but not apoptotic (DC/apo), cells. Clinical manifestations of lupus were evident, however, only in susceptible mouse strains, which correlate with the ability of DC/nec to release IFN-gamma and to induce the pathogenic IgG2a anti-dsDNA antibodies. Injection of DC/nec not only accelerated disease progression in the MRL/MpJ-lpr/lpr lupus-prone mice but also induced a lupus-like disease in the MRL/MpJ-+/+ wild-type control strain. Immune complex deposition was readily detectable in the kidneys, and the mice developed proteinuria. Strikingly, female MRL/MpJ-+/+ mice that had received DC/nec, but not DC/apo, developed a 'butterfly' facial lesion resembling a cardinal feature of human SLE. Our study therefore demonstrates that DC/nec inducing a Th1 type of responses, which are otherwise tightly regulated in a normal immune system, may play a pivotal role in SLE pathogenesis. PMID:16224814

  20. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia gravis Pernicious anemia Reactive arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Sjögren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Type I diabetes Symptoms Symptoms will vary based on the type ...

  1. Comparative Effects of Human Neural Stem Cells and Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells on the Neurobehavioral Disorders of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Dae-Kwon; Park, Dongsun; Lee, Sun Hee; Yang, Goeun; Kyung, Jangbeen; Kim, Dajeong; Shin, Kyungha; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Kim, Gonhyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Seung U.

    2016-01-01

    Since multiple sclerosis (MS) is featured with widespread demyelination caused by autoimmune response, we investigated the recovery effects of F3.olig2 progenitors, established by transducing human neural stem cells (F3 NSCs) with Olig2 transcription factor, in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein- (MOG-) induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model mice. Six days after EAE induction, F3 or F3.olig2 cells (1 × 106/mouse) were intravenously transplanted. MOG-injected mice displayed severe neurobehavioral deficits which were remarkably attenuated and restored by cell transplantation, in which F3.olig2 cells were superior to its parental F3 cells. Transplanted cells migrated to the injured spinal cord, matured to oligodendrocytes, and produced myelin basic proteins (MBP). The F3.olig2 cells expressed growth and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). In addition, the transplanted cells markedly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced cytokine levels in the spinal cord and lymph nodes, and protected host myelins. The results indicate that F3.olig2 cells restore neurobehavioral symptoms of EAE mice by regulating autoimmune inflammatory responses as well as by stimulating remyelination and that F3.olig2 progenitors could be a candidate for the cell therapy of demyelinating diseases including MS. PMID:27429621

  2. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5f/f). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26120731

  3. Belimumab in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Andreia; Morais, Sandra A; Isenberg, David A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is one of the most challenging autoimmune disorders with a complex pathophysiology and diverse clinical presentation. Many drugs have been used to treat SLE with suboptimal results, especially in patients with moderate-to-severe disease. Belimumab is the first biological drug to be approved for the treatment of SLE in more than 50 years. This monoclonal antibody blocks B-cell activating factor, a cytokine important for B-cell differentiation and survival. In this review we focus on the activity of belimumab in patients with SLE and discuss the controversies of its use. PMID:26509047

  4. Contribution of Defective PS Recognition and Efferocytosis to Chronic Inflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kimani, Stanley Gititu; Geng, Ke; Kasikara, Canan; Kumar, Sushil; Sriram, Ganapathy; Wu, Yi; Birge, Raymond B.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid and efficient clearance of apoptotic cells results in the elimination of auto-antigens and provides a strong anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive signal to prevent autoimmunity. While professional and non-professional phagocytes utilize a wide array of surface receptors to recognize apoptotic cells, the recognition of phosphatidylserine (PS) on apoptotic cells by PS receptors on phagocytes is the emblematic signal for efferocytosis in metazoans. PS-dependent efferocytosis is associated with the production of anti-inflammatory factors such as IL-10 and TGF-β that function, in part, to maintain tolerance to auto-antigens. In contrast, when apoptotic cells fail to be recognized and processed for degradation, auto-antigens persist, such as self-nucleic acids, which can trigger immune activation leading to autoantibody production and autoimmunity. Despite the fact that genetic mouse models clearly demonstrate that loss of PS receptors can lead to age-dependent auto-immune diseases reminiscent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the link between PS and defective clearance in chronic inflammation and human autoimmunity is not well delineated. In this perspective, we review emerging questions developing in the field that may be of relevance to SLE and human autoimmunity. PMID:25426118

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1: resurgence as new drug target for human autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Yadhu; Bashir, Samina; Bhardwaj, Puja; Ahmad, Altaf; Khan, Farah

    2016-08-01

    Recognition of self-antigen and its destruction by the immune system is the hallmark of autoimmune diseases. During the developmental stages, immune cells are introduced to the self-antigen, for which tolerance develops. The inflammatory insults that break the immune tolerance provoke immune system against self-antigen, progressively leading to autoimmune diseases. SH2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP), SHP-1, was identified as hematopoietic cell-specific PTP that regulates immune function from developing immune tolerance to mediating cell signaling post-immunoreceptor activation. The extensive research on SHP-1-deficient mice elucidated the diversified role of SHP-1 in immune regulation, and inflammatory process and related disorders such as cancer, autoimmunity, and neurodegenerative diseases. The present review focalizes upon the implication of SHP-1 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders, such as allergic asthma, neutrophilic dermatosis, atopic dermatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, so as to lay the background in pursuance of developing therapeutic strategies targeting SHP-1. Also, new SHP-1 molecular targets have been suggested like SIRP-α, PIPKIγ, and RIP-1 that may prove to be the focal point for the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27216862

  6. Neuroimmunopathology in a murine model of neuropsychiatric lupus

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Animal models are extremely useful tools in defining pathogenesis and treatment of human disease. For many years researchers believed that structural damage to the brain of neuropsychiatric (NP) patients lead to abnormal mental function, but this possibility was not extensively explored until recently. Imaging studies of NP-systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) support the notion that brain cell death accounts for the emergence of neurologic and psychiatric symptoms, and evidence suggests that it is an autoimmunity-induced brain disorder characterized by profound metabolic alterations and progressive neuronal loss. While there are a number of murine models of SLE, this article reviews recent literature on the immunological connections to neurodegeneration and behavioral dysfunction in the Fas-deficient MRL model of NP-SLE. Probable links between spontaneous peripheral immune activation, the subsequent central autoimmune/inflammatory responses in MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6lpr (MRL–lpr) mice and the sequential mode of events leading to Fas-independent neurodegenerative autoimmune-induced encephalitis will be reviewed. The role of hormones, alternative mechanisms of cell death, the impact of central dopaminergic degeneration on behavior, and germinal layer lesions on developmental/regenerative capacity of MRL–lpr brains will also be explored. This model can provide direction for future therapeutic interventions in patients with this complex neuroimmunological syndrome. PMID:17223198

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and autoimmune hepatitis during highly active anti-retroviral treatment: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The emergence of hepatic injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection during highly active therapy presents a diagnostic dilemma. It may represent treatment side effects or autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hepatitis, emerging during immune restoration. Case presentation We present the case of a 42-year-old African-American woman with human immunodeficiency virus infection who presented to our emergency department with severe abdominal pain and was found to have autoimmune hepatitis. A review of the literature revealed 12 reported cases of autoimmune hepatitis in adults with human immunodeficiency virus infection, only three of whom were diagnosed after highly active anti-retroviral treatment was initiated. All four cases (including our patient) were women, and one had a history of other autoimmune disorders. In our patient (the one patient case we are reporting), a liver biopsy revealed interface hepatitis, necrosis with lymphocytes and plasma cell infiltrates and variable degrees of fibrosis. All four cases required treatment with corticosteroids and/or other immune modulating agents and responded well. Conclusion Our review suggests that autoimmune hepatitis is a rare disorder which usually develops in women about six to eight months after commencing highly active anti-retroviral treatment during the recovery of CD4 lymphocytes. It represents either re-emergence of a pre-existing condition that was unrecognized or a de novo manifestation during immune reconstitution. PMID:21702972

  8. Meta-analysis of relationships between human offtake, total mortality and population dynamics of gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Creel, Scott; Rotella, Jay J

    2010-01-01

    Following the growth and geographic expansion of wolf (Canis lupus) populations reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995-1996, Rocky Mountain wolves were removed from the endangered species list in May 2009. Idaho and Montana immediately established hunting seasons with quotas equaling 20% of the regional wolf population. Combining hunting with predator control, 37.1% of Montana and Idaho wolves were killed in the year of delisting. Hunting and predator control are well-established methods to broaden societal acceptance of large carnivores, but it is unprecedented for a species to move so rapidly from protection under the Endangered Species Act to heavy direct harvest, and it is important to use all available data to assess the likely consequences of these changes in policy. For wolves, it is widely argued that human offtake has little effect on total mortality rates, so that a harvest of 28-50% per year can be sustained. Using previously published data from 21 North American wolf populations, we related total annual mortality and population growth to annual human offtake. Contrary to current conventional wisdom, there was a strong association between human offtake and total mortality rates across North American wolf populations. Human offtake was associated with a strongly additive or super-additive increase in total mortality. Population growth declined as human offtake increased, even at low rates of offtake. Finally, wolf populations declined with harvests substantially lower than the thresholds identified in current state and federal policies. These results should help to inform management of Rocky Mountain wolves. PMID:20927363

  9. Meta-Analysis of Relationships between Human Offtake, Total Mortality and Population Dynamics of Gray Wolves (Canis lupus)

    PubMed Central

    Creel, Scott; Rotella, Jay J.

    2010-01-01

    Following the growth and geographic expansion of wolf (Canis lupus) populations reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995–1996, Rocky Mountain wolves were removed from the endangered species list in May 2009. Idaho and Montana immediately established hunting seasons with quotas equaling 20% of the regional wolf population. Combining hunting with predator control, 37.1% of Montana and Idaho wolves were killed in the year of delisting. Hunting and predator control are well-established methods to broaden societal acceptance of large carnivores, but it is unprecedented for a species to move so rapidly from protection under the Endangered Species Act to heavy direct harvest, and it is important to use all available data to assess the likely consequences of these changes in policy. For wolves, it is widely argued that human offtake has little effect on total mortality rates, so that a harvest of 28–50% per year can be sustained. Using previously published data from 21 North American wolf populations, we related total annual mortality and population growth to annual human offtake. Contrary to current conventional wisdom, there was a strong association between human offtake and total mortality rates across North American wolf populations. Human offtake was associated with a strongly additive or super-additive increase in total mortality. Population growth declined as human offtake increased, even at low rates of offtake. Finally, wolf populations declined with harvests substantially lower than the thresholds identified in current state and federal policies. These results should help to inform management of Rocky Mountain wolves. PMID:20927363

  10. Ultrastructural localization of DNA in immune deposits of human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Malide, D.; Londoño, I.; Russo, P.; Bendayan, M.

    1993-01-01

    DNA molecules were revealed in the glomerular wall of lupus nephritis patients by applying two specific colloidal gold cytochemical approaches at the electron microscope level: immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody in conjunction with protein A-gold and enzyme-gold cytochemistry using DNAse-gold complexes. Application of both techniques has demonstrated that DNA molecules are preferentially located over the electron-dense deposits found in the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix of SLE patients, as well as over the nuclei. Their distribution within the glomerular wall was correlated with electron-dense immune deposits revealed by anti-light chain antibodies. In normal control kidney, DNA labeling was restricted to the cell nuclei. Several control experiments have demonstrated the high specificity of the results. These data thus suggest a possible role for DNA as an antigenic component in the formation of immune complexes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 and 3 Figure 4 and 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8317553

  11. Persistent scarring, atrophy, and dyspigmentation in a preteen girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    High, Whitney A; Costner, Melissa I

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is an uncommon autoimmune disease with distinctive cutaneous findings. Descriptions of chronic cutaneous sequelae are rare. We describe a 12-year-old girl with persistent dyspigmentation, scarring, and atrophy as a result of neonatal lupus occurring during infancy. PMID:12664034

  12. The Autoimmunity-Associated Gene CLEC16A Modulates Thymic Epithelial Cell Autophagy and Alters T Cell Selection.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Cornelia; Gerold, Kay D; Schober, Kilian; Probst, Lilli; Boerner, Kevin; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Ruckdeschel, Anna; Serwold, Thomas; Kissler, Stephan

    2015-05-19

    CLEC16A variation has been associated with multiple immune-mediated diseases, including type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, Addison's disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and alopecia areata. Despite strong genetic evidence implicating CLEC16A in autoimmunity, this gene's broad association with disease remains unexplained. We generated Clec16a knock-down (KD) mice in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) model for type 1 diabetes and found that Clec16a silencing protected against autoimmunity. Disease protection was attributable to T cell hyporeactivity, which was secondary to changes in thymic epithelial cell (TEC) stimuli that drive thymocyte selection. Our data indicate that T cell selection and reactivity were impacted by Clec16a variation in thymic epithelium owing to Clec16a's role in TEC autophagy. These findings provide a functional link between human CLEC16A variation and the immune dysregulation that underlies the risk of autoimmunity. PMID:25979422

  13. Lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffanelli, D.L.

    1981-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a multisystem disease. Genetic predisposition, altered immunity, hormones, drugs, viruses, and ultraviolet light all may play a role in etiology. A wide range of cutaneous lesions occur, and variants such as subacute cutaneous LE, complement-deficient LE, and neonatal LE have recently been emphasized. Management of the LE patient, including appropriate diagnostic studies and therapy relevant to the dermatologist, is discussed in the review.

  14. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Activation and IFN-α Production Are Prominent Features of Murine Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Human IgG4-Related Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Kouhei; Kuriyama, Katsutoshi; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Uchida, Kazushige; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Strober, Warren; Chiba, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The abnormal immune response accompanying IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is presently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) activation and IFN-α production in this disease as well as in a murine model of AIP (MRL/Mp mice treated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid). We found that the development of AIP in treated MRL/Mp mice occurred in parallel with pancreatic accumulation of pDCs producing IFN-α, and with pDC depletion and IFN-α-blocking studies, we showed that such accumulation was necessary for AIP induction. In addition, we found that the pancreas of treated MRL/Mp mice contained neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) shown previously to stimulate pDCs to produce IFN-α. Consistent with these findings, we found that patients with IgG4-related AIP also exhibited pancreatic tissue localization of IFN-α-expressing pDCs and had significantly higher serum IFN-α levels than healthy controls. In addition, the inflamed pancreas of these patients but not controls also contained NETs that were shown to be capable of pDC activation. More importantly, patient pDCs cultured in the presence of NETs produced greatly increased levels of IFN-α and induced control B cells to produce IgG4 (but not IgG1) as compared with control pDCs. These data suggest that pDC activation and production of IFN-α is a major cause of murine AIP; in addition, the increased pDC production of IFN-α and its relation to IgG4 production observed in IgG4-related AIP suggest that this mechanism also plays a role in the human disease. PMID:26297761

  15. Effective combination of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and minocycline in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Minocycline ameliorates the clinical severity of MS and exhibits antiinflammatory, neuroprotective activities, and good tolerance for long-term use, whereas it is toxic to the CNS. Recently, the immunomodulation and neuroprotection capabilities of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were shown in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this study, we evaluated whether the combination of hBM-MSCs and a low-dose minocycline could produce beneficial effects in EAE mice. Methods The sensitivity of hBM-MSCs to minocycline was determined by an established cell-viability assay. Minocycline-treated hBM-MSCs were also characterized with flow cytometry by using MSC surface markers and analyzed for their multiple differentiation capacities. EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by using immunization with MOG35-55. Immunopathology assays were used to detect the inflammatory cells, demyelination, and neuroprotection. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ)/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4)/interleukin-10 (IL-10), the hallmark cytokines that direct Th1 and Th2 development, were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to elucidate the cell apoptosis in the spinal cords of EAE mice. Results Minocycline did not affect the viability, surface phenotypes, or differentiation capacity of hBM-MSCs, while minocycline affected the viability of astrocytes at a high dose. In vivo efficacy experiments showed that combined treatment, compared to the use of minocycline or hBM-MSCs alone, resulted in a significant reduction in clinical scores, along with attenuation of inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration. Moreover, the combined treatment with hBM-MSCs and minocycline enhanced the immunomodulatory effects, which suppressed proinflammatory

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare triggered by a spider bite.

    PubMed

    Martín Nares, Eduardo; López Iñiguez, Alvaro; Ontiveros Mercado, Heriberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with a relapsing and remitting course characterized by disease flares. Flares are a major cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Some triggers for these exacerbations have been identified, including infections, vaccines, pregnancy, environmental factors such as weather, stress and drugs. We report a patient who presented with a lupus flare with predominantly mucocutaneous, serosal and cardiac involvement after being bitten by a spider and we present the possible mechanisms by which the venom elicited such a reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature. PMID:26494589

  17. Extracellular Vesicles as Biomarkers of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Hernandez, Javier; Cortes, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and typically manifests in multiple organs. The damage caused by this disorder is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microvesicles (also known as microparticles), apoptotic bodies, and exosomes, are recognized vehicles of intercellular communication, carrying autoantigens, cytokines, and surface receptors. Therefore, the evidence of EVs and their cargo as biomarkers of autoimmune disease is rapidly expanding. This review will focus on biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, their pathophysiological roles, and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in inflammatory disease, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26435565

  18. Cell-mediated Immunity to Human Tamm-Horsfall Glycoprotein in Autoimmune Liver Disease with Renal Tubular Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsantoulas, D. C.; McFarlane, I. G.; Portmann, B.; Eddleston, A. L. W. F.; Williams, Roger

    1974-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein isolated from human urine were investigated using the leucocyte migration test. Abnormal responses were found in 91% of patients with active chronic hepatitis or primary biliary cirrhosis with an associated renal tubular acidosis (R.T.A.) but in only 19% of those without R.T.A. In nearly all of a group of patients without autoimmune liver disease and in a control group of normal subjects results were within normal limits. In addition, using an immunofluorescent technique with rabbit antibody to human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, it was possible to show the presence in human liver cell membrane of material reacting immunologically as Tamm-Horsfall. These findings suggest that the development of an immune response to this glycoprotein, initiated by release of cross-reacting antigens from damaged hepatocytes, could be the mechanism underlying the occurrence of R.T.A. in some patients with autoimmune liver disease. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:4611578

  19. Antagonist-mediated down-regulation of toll-like receptors increases the prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prevalence of an abnormal Papanicolaou smear was significantly increased in lupus patients in cross-sectional studies, associated with a higher prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. The nucleic acid-specific Toll-like receptors (TLRs) locate at the endolysosomal compartments and trigger the induction of cytokines for the innate immune response. This study evaluated whether abnormal host innate immune response in lupus patients may enhance HPV persistence. Methods Protein levels of TLRs 3, 7, 8 and 9 in cervical epithelial cells of lupus patients and controls with or without HPV infection were assessed using flow cytometry. Characteristics associated with the differential expression of TLRs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were elucidated. The effect and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) (ISG15 and Mx-1) gene expressions were then measured in oncogenic HeLa (HPV18), CaSki (HPV) and C33A (HPV negative) cell lines using flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo productions of cytokines and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) upon TLR ligands stimulations were subsequently measured using cytometric bead array and ELISA. Results For subjects with HPV infection, levels of TLR3 and TLR7 were significantly lower in lupus patients compared with controls. Significantly decreased TLRs 7, 8 and 9 levels were observed in HPV-negative SLE compared to healthy controls. For SLE with and without HPV infection, TLR7 and 9 levels were significantly lower in infected SLE than those in HPV-negative patients. Independent explanatory variables associated with down-regulation of TLR7 level included HPV infection and a higher cumulative dose of prednisolone; while a higher cumulative dose of hydroxychloroquine and HPV infection were associated with down-regulation of TLR9 level. In cervical cell lines, TLRs 3, 7, 8, 9 protein levels and antiviral ISG15 and Mx-1 gene expressions were inhibited in two oncogenic HPV types. Functional data showed

  20. The Lupus Autoantigen La Prevents Mis-channeling of tRNA Fragments into the Human MicroRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Daniele; Lehmann, Gerhard; Murakawa, Yasuhiro; Klironomos, Filippos; Jakob, Leonhard; Grässer, Friedrich A; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Landthaler, Markus; Meister, Gunter

    2016-07-01

    The Lupus autoantigen La is an RNA-binding protein that stabilizes RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcripts and supports RNA folding and has in addition been implicated in the mammalian microRNA (miRNA) pathway. Here, we have analyzed effects of La depletion on Argonaute (Ago)-bound small RNAs in human cells. We find that in the absence of La, distinct tRNA fragments are loaded into Ago proteins. Thus, La functions as gatekeeper ensuring correct tRNA maturation and protecting the miRNA pathway from potentially functional tRNA fragments. However, one specific isoleucin pre-tRNA produces both a functional tRNA and a miRNA even when La is present. We demonstrate that the fully complementary 5' leader and 3' trailer of the pre-tRNA-Ile form a double-stranded RNA molecule that has low affinity to La. Instead, Exportin-5 (Xpo5) recognizes it as miRNA precursor and transports it into the cytoplasm for Dicer processing and Ago loading. PMID:27345152

  1. Three functional variants of IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) define risk and protective haplotypes for human lupus

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Robert R.; Kyogoku, Chieko; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Vlasova, Irina A.; Davies, Leela R. L.; Baechler, Emily C.; Plenge, Robert M.; Koeuth, Thearith; Ortmann, Ward A.; Hom, Geoffrey; Bauer, Jason W.; Gillett, Clarence; Burtt, Noel; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Onofrio, Robert; Petri, Michelle; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gregersen, Peter K.; Moser, Kathy; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Daly, Mark J.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Altshuler, David

    2007-01-01

    Systematic genome-wide studies to map genomic regions associated with human diseases are becoming more practical. Increasingly, efforts will be focused on the identification of the specific functional variants responsible for the disease. The challenges of identifying causal variants include the need for complete ascertainment of genetic variants and the need to consider the possibility of multiple causal alleles. We recently reported that risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is strongly associated with a common SNP in IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and that this variant altered spicing in a way that might provide a functional explanation for the reproducible association to SLE risk. Here, by resequencing and genotyping in patients with SLE, we find evidence for three functional alleles of IRF5: the previously described exon 1B splice site variant, a 30-bp in-frame insertion/deletion variant of exon 6 that alters a proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain region, and a variant in a conserved polyA+ signal sequence that alters the length of the 3′ UTR and stability of IRF5 mRNAs. Haplotypes of these three variants define at least three distinct levels of risk to SLE. Understanding how combinations of variants influence IRF5 function may offer etiological and therapeutic insights in SLE; more generally, IRF5 and SLE illustrates how multiple common variants of the same gene can together influence risk of common disease. PMID:17412832

  2. Induction of excessive B cell proliferation and differentiation by an in vitro stimulus in culture in human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Sakane, T

    1989-01-01

    B cell hyperactivity present in the body in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be detectable via almost any measure of B cell function. Nonetheless, the basis for the B cell hyperactivity is difficult to study in vitro. In this study, we have obtained the resting B cells from patients with entirely inactive SLE by collecting them sedimenting in a high density fraction on a Percoll density gradient. These resting SLE B cells proliferated in vitro at a higher rate than normal B cells when exposed to Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC). In addition, significant proliferation was observed earlier in the course of culture in SLE patients than in normal controls. Moreover, the SLE resting B cells, once triggered by SAC produced abnormally high numbers of immunoglobulin-secreting cells in response to T cell-derived soluble factors. There was less frequency of circulating Leu 1+ B cells in the SLE patients than in normal controls. Moreover, not only Leu 1+ B cells but also Leu 1- B cells of SLE patients were more responsive to SAC than those of normal controls. The results indicate that the B cell hyperactivity in human SLE can be induced by in vitro stimuli, and may not be limited to the Leu 1+ B cell subset. PMID:2646322

  3. 10% liquid human immunoglobulin (KIOVIG(®)) for immunomodulation in autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Nikolai; Reisinger, Jürgen; Schwarz, Hans P

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins have been used to treat autoimmune disorders (ADs) for over 50 years. The etiologies of various ADs are not fully understood and although intravenous immunoglobulin treatment has proved its immunomodulatory properties, the roles of proposed mechanisms of action also remain a matter of speculation. A systemic search of the literature regarding KIOVIG(®) (Baxalta US, Inc., MA, USA) use in clinical trials on patients with ADs and a detailed review of retrieved articles revealed eight relevant publications. These articles reported KIOVIG use in multifocal motor neuropathy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, Kawasaki disease, Guillain-Barré syndrome and other autoimmune and neurologic disorders and showed that KIOVIG is an effective, safe and well-tolerated treatment in the studied populations. Nevertheless, further studies on larger patient cohorts are needed. PMID:27126341

  4. Human T lymphotropic virus type I in arthropathy and autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, K; Sumida, T; Hasunuma, T

    1996-08-01

    The progressive nature of the disease and the persistent inflammation affecting various organs are common features of idiopathic autoimmune disorders of unknown etiology. Therefore, the HTLV-I-associated disorders described in the present review are outstandingly important models for our understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of organ-specific immune disorders. HTLV-I arthropathy is characterized by chronic inflammatory and proliferative synovitis with lymphoid follicles and pannus formation in the affected joints, indistinguishable from the findings in idiopathic RA. The presence of the tax gene in HTLV-I-negative SS patients suggests that it is responsible for the exocrine gland abnormality, characterized by extensive lymphoproliferative epithelial lesions. Furthermore, the pulmonary lesions of HTLV-I bronchopneumonopathy are similar to those of idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. Based on these observations, the clinical findings associated with the immunologic abnormalities in HTLV-I-infected patients provide us with valuable information for understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic inflammatory conditions associated with immune regulatory disorders. Although the clinical and pathologic features of the 2 common HTLV-I-associated disorders, ATL and HAM/TSP, have been well characterized and are clearly distinguishable from those of the idiopathic forms of these disorders, other HTLV-I-related autoimmune diseases, e.g., arthropathy, SS, or bronchopneumonopathy, are clinically indistinguishable from the idiopathic forms of the diseases. Such similarity may serve as a clue to the pathogenetic mechanisms of idiopathic autoimmune disorders. PMID:8702452

  5. Targeting FcγRs to treat antibody-dependent autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojie; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-06-01

    Self-reactive antibodies represent a significant force in autoimmune disease induction. In antibody-dependent autoimmune syndromes such as immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), myasthenia gravis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), autoantibodies exert their inflammatory effect through FcγRs, a well-established class of cell surface receptors that interact with the Fc domain of IgG. Down-regulating FcγR functionality presents an attractive strategy to treat antibody-dependent autoimmune diseases. Various approaches, including nonspecific blocking of the IgG binding site as well as specific targeting using antagonistic monoclonal antibodies, have been explored to modulate the interaction between the Fc portion of IgG and FcγRs. The exquisite specificity and favorable pharmacokinetics of IgG make monoclonal antibodies a preferred choice. Indeed, the first antagonistic monoclonal antibody against the human FcγRIIIA had shown efficacy in refractory ITP patients; however, the practicality of using anti-FcγRIII antibody as a therapeutic was hindered by its associated adverse events, a phenomenon recapitulated in animal models. In this review, we discuss the role of FcγRs in autoimmune diseases, and focus on a novel monovalent approach to target FcγRs to resolve antibody-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:26854400

  6. Prevention of autoimmune demyelination in non-human primates by a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Genain, C P; Roberts, T; Davis, R L; Nguyen, M H; Uccelli, A; Faulds, D; Li, Y; Hedgpeth, J; Hauser, S L

    1995-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that serves as a model for the human disease multiple sclerosis. We evaluated rolipram, a type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor, for its efficacy in preventing EAE in the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus. In a blinded experimental design, clinical signs of EAE developed within 17 days of immunization with human white matter in two placebo-treated animals but in none of three monkeys that received rolipram (10 mg/kg s.c. every other day) beginning 1 week after immunization. In controls, signs of EAE were associated with development of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and cerebral MRI abnormalities. In the treatment group, there was sustained protection from clinical EAE, transient cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in only one of three animals, no MRI abnormality, and marked reduction in histopathologic findings. Rolipram-treated and control animals equally developed circulating antibodies to myelin basic protein. Thus, inhibition of type IV phosphodiesterase, initiated after sensitization to central nervous system antigens, protected against autoimmune demyelinating disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7536938

  7. Autoimmune myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eoin P

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated spinal cord disorders with a broad differential diagnosis. They encompass myelopathies with an immune attack on the spinal cord (e.g., aquaporin-4-IgG (AQP4-IgG) seropositive neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and its spectrum disorders (NMOSD)), myelopathies occurring with systemic autoimmune disorders (which may also be due to coexisting NMO/NMOSD), paraneoplastic autoimmune myelopathies, postinfectious autoimmune myelopathies (e.g., acute disseminated encephalomyelitis), and myelopathies thought to be immune-related (e.g., multiple sclerosis and spinal cord sarcoidosis). Spine magnetic resonance imaging is extremely useful in the evaluation of autoimmune myelopathies as the location of signal change, length of the lesion, gadolinium enhancement pattern, and evolution over time narrow the differential diagnosis considerably. The recent discovery of multiple novel neural-specific autoantibodies accompanying autoimmune myelopathies has improved their classification. These autoantibodies may be pathogenic (e.g., AQP4-IgG) or nonpathogenic and more reflective of a cytotoxic T-cell-mediated autoimmune response (collapsin response mediator protein-5(CRMP5)-IgG). The presence of an autoantibody may help guide cancer search, assist treatment decisions, and predict outcome/relapse. With paraneoplastic myelopathies the initial goal is detection and treatment of the underlying cancer. The aim of immunotherapy in all autoimmune myelopathies is to maximize reversibility, maintain benefits (while preventing relapse), and minimize side effects. PMID:27112686

  8. Induced murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Zeumer, Leilani; Reeves, Westley H; Morel, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Induced mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been developed to complement the spontaneous models. This chapter describes the methods used in the pristane-induced model and the chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) model, both of which have been extensively used. We will also outline the specific mechanisms of systemic autoimmunity that can be best characterized using each of these models. PMID:24497358

  9. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Deborah M.; Kamphuis, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can involve any organ system with a wide range of disease manifestations, and can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. This article reviews the epidemiology, common clinical features, complications of disease, and briefly discusses the available treatment options. In addition, important medical and psychosocial issues relevant to the pediatrician caring for children and adolescents with SLE are discussed. PMID:22560574

  10. Somatic mutations in the variable regions of a human IgG anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody suggest a role for antigen in the induction of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    van Es, J H; Gmelig Meyling, F H; van de Akker, W R; Aanstoot, H; Derksen, R H; Logtenberg, T

    1991-02-01

    The processes that govern the generation of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies in human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are largely unknown. Autoantibodies may arise as a consequence of polyclonal B cell activation and/or antigen-driven B cell activation and selection. The role of these processes in humoral autoimmunity may be studied by molecular genetic analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) regions of antibodies that are characteristic of SLE. We have analyzed the gene elements that encode a high affinity, IgG anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody secreted by a monoclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cell line derived from a patient with active SLE. In addition, we have identified, cloned, and sequenced the germline counterparts of the VH and VL genes expressed in this autoantibody. The comparison of both sets of gene elements shows that the autoantibody VH and VL regions harbor numerous somatic mutations characteristic of an antigen-driven immune response. The light chain expressed in this autoantibody is a somatically mutated variant of the kv325 germline gene that is frequently associated with paraproteins having autoantibody activity and with Ig molecules produced by malignant B cells that express the CD5 antigen. Furthermore, the utilized DH segment has been repeatedly found in multireactive, low affinity IgM anti-DNA autoantibodies from SLE patients and healthy individuals. These results suggest that pathogenic IgG anti-DNA autoantibodies in human SLE may arise through antigen-driven selection of somatic mutations in the gene elements that frequently encode multireactive IgM autoantibodies. PMID:1899104

  11. Environmental Factors, Toxicants and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm; Tay, Sen Hee

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an immune-complex-mediated multi-systemic autoimmune condition of multifactorial etiology, which mainly affects young women. It is currently believed that the onset of SLE and lupus flares are triggered by various environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Various environmental agents and toxicants, such as cigarette smoke, alcohol, occupationally- and non-occupationally-related chemicals, ultraviolet light, infections, sex hormones and certain medications and vaccines, have been implicated to induce SLE onset or flares in a number case series, case-control and population-based cohort studies and very few randomized controlled trials. Here, we will describe some of these recognized environmental lupus triggering and perpetuating factors and explain how these factors potentially bias the immune system towards autoimmunity through their interactions with genetic and epigenetic alterations. Further in-depth exploration of how potentially important environmental factors mechanistically interact with the immune system and the genome, which trigger the onset of SLE and lupus flares, will certainly be one of the plausible steps to prevent the onset and to decelerate the progress of the disease. PMID:25216337

  12. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  13. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  14. Human and animal spongiform encephalopathies are the result of chronic autoimmune attack in the CNS: a novel medical theory supported by overwhelming experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B T

    2005-04-01

    Spongiform encephalopathies, also called "prion diseases", are fatal degenerative diseases of the central nervous system which can occur in animals (such as the "mad cow disease" in cattle) and also in humans. This paper presents a novel medical theory concerning the pathogenic mechanisms for various human and animal spongiform encephalopathies. It is hypothesized that various forms of prion diseases are essentially autoimmune diseases, resulting from chronic autoimmune attack of the central nervous system. A key step in the pathogenic process leading towards the development of spongiform encephalopathies involves the production of specific autoimmune antibodies against the disease-causing prion protein (PrPsc) and possibly other immunogenic macromolecules present in the brain. As precisely explained in this paper, the autoimmune antibodies produced against PrPsc are responsible for the conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) to PrPsc, for the accumulation of PrPsc in the brain and other peripheral tissues, and also for the initiation of an antibody-mediated chronic autoimmune attack of the central nervous system neurons, which would contribute to the development of characteristic pathological changes and clinical symptoms associated with spongiform encephalopathies. The validity and correctness of the proposed theory is supported by an overwhelming body of experimental observations that are scattered in the biomedical literature. In addition, the theory also offers practical new strategies for early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of various human and animal prion diseases. PMID:15736062

  15. cDNA immunization of mice with human thyroglobulin generates both humoral and T cell responses: a novel model of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; Ho, Kenneth; Kopp, Peter; Vono Toniolo, Jussara; Tomer, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) represents one of the largest known self-antigens involved in autoimmunity. Numerous studies have implicated it in triggering and perpetuating the autoimmune response in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Indeed, traditional models of autoimmune thyroid disease, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), are generated by immunizing mice with thyroglobulin protein in conjunction with an adjuvant, or by high repeated doses of Tg alone, without adjuvant. These extant models are limited in their experimental flexibility, i.e. the ability to make modifications to the Tg used in immunizations. In this study, we have immunized mice with a plasmid cDNA encoding the full-length human Tg (hTG) protein, in order to generate a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is closer to the human disease and does not require adjuvants to breakdown tolerance. Human thyroglobulin cDNA was injected and subsequently electroporated into skeletal muscle using a square wave generator. Following hTg cDNA immunizations, the mice developed both B and T cell responses to Tg, albeit with no evidence of lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid. This novel model will afford investigators the means to test various hypotheses which were unavailable with the previous EAT models, specifically the effects of hTg sequence variations on the induction of thyroiditis. PMID:21559421

  16. Linkage proof for PTPN22, a rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility gene and a human autoimmunity gene

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Laëtitia; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Rat, Anne-Christine; Migliorini, Paola; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Alves, Helena; Pierlot, Céline; Glikmans, Elodie; Garnier, Sophie; Dausset, Jean; Vaz, Carlos; Fernandes, Manuela; Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Lemaire, Isabelle; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Bombardieri, Stefano; Dequeker, Jan; Radstake, Timothy R.; Van Riel, Piet; van de Putte, Leo; Lopes-Vaz, Antonio; Prum, Bernard; Bardin, Thomas; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François

    2007-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 allele 1858T has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases. RA is the most frequent of those multifactorial diseases. The RA association was usually restricted to serum rheumatoid factor positive disease (RF+). No interaction was shown with HLA-DRB1, the first RA gene. Many case-control studies replicated the RA association, showing an allele frequency increase of ≈5% on average and large variations of population allele frequencies (2.1–15.5%). In multifactorial diseases, the final proof for a new susceptibility allele is provided by departure from Mendel's law (50% transmission from heterozygous parents). For PTPN22–1858T allele, convincing linkage proof was available only for type 1 diabetes. We aimed at providing this proof for RA. We analyzed 1,395 West European Caucasian individuals from 465 “trio” families. We replicated evidence for linkage, demonstrating departure from Mendel's law in this subset of early RA onset patients. We estimated the overtransmission of the 1858T allele in RF+ families: T = 63%, P < 0.0007. The 1858T allele frequency increased from 11.0% in controls to 17.4% in RF+ RA for the French Caucasian population and the susceptibility genotype (1858T/T or T/C) from 20.2% to 31.6% [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8 (1.2–2.8)]. In conclusion, we provided the linkage proof for the PTPN22–1858T allele and RF+ RA. With diabetes and RA, PTPN22 is therefore a “linkage-proven” autoimmunity gene. PTPN22 accounting for ≈1% of the RA familial aggregation, many new genes could be expected that are as many leads to definitive therapy for autoimmune diseases. PMID:17237219

  17. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... a notice published in the Federal Register of June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35492), FDA announced the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Withdrawal of Guidance AGENCY: Food...

  18. The paracrine effect of mesenchymal human stem cells restored hearing in β-tubulin induced autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yoo, T J; Du, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the activities of hASCs (Human Adipose tissue Derived Stem Cells) on experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) and how human stem cells regenerated mouse cochlea cells. We have restored hearing in 19 years old white female with autoimmune hearing loss with autologous adipose tissue derived stem cells and we wish to understand the mechanism of restoration of hearing in animal model. BALB/c mice underwent to develop EAHL; mice with EAHL were given hASCs intraperitoneally once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. ABR were examined over time. The helper type 1 autoreactive responses and T-reg cells were examined. H&E staining or immunostaining with APC conjugated anti-HLA-ABC antibody were conducted. The organ of Corti, stria vascularis, spira ligament and spiral ganglion in stem cell group are normal. In control group, without receiving stem cells, the organ of Corti is replaced by a single layer of cells, atrophy of stria vascularis. Systemic infusion of hASCs significantly improved hearing function and protected hair cells in established EAHL. The hASCs decreased the proliferation of antigen specific Th1/Th17 cells and induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin10 in splenocytes. They also induced the generation of antigen specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T-reg cells. The experiment showed the restoration is due to the paracrine activities of human stem cells, since there are newly regenerated mice spiral ganglion cells, not human mesenchymal stem cells derived tissue given by intraperitoneally. PMID:26235980

  19. Interleukin 35-Producing B Cells (i35-Breg): A New Mediator of Regulatory B-Cell Functions in CNS Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Egwuagu, Charles E; Yu, Cheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to neuronal deficits in neurodegenerative CNS (central nervous system) autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and uveitis. The major goal of most treatment modalities for CNS autoimmune diseases is to limit inflammatory responses in the CNS; immune-suppressive drugs are the therapy of choice. However, lifelong immunosuppression increases the occurrence of infections, nephrotoxicity, malignancies, cataractogenesis, and glaucoma, which can greatly impair quality of life for the patient. Biologics that target pathogenic T cells is an alternative approach that is gaining wide acceptance as indicated by the popularity of a variety of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anti-inflammatory compounds and humanized antibodies such as Zenapax, Etanercept, Remicade, anti-ICAM, rapamycin, or tacrolimus. B cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they provide costimulatory signals that activate pathogenic T cells and secrete cytokines that promote autoimmune pathology. B cells also produce autoreactive antibodies implicated in several organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases including lupus erythematosus, Graves' disease, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. On the other hand, recent studies have led to the discovery of several regulatory B-cell (Breg) populations that suppress immune responses and autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present a brief overview of Breg phenotypes and in particular, the newly discovered IL35-producing regulatory B cell (i35-Breg). We discuss the critical roles played by i35-Bregs in regulating autoimmune diseases and the potential use of adoptive Breg therapy in CNS autoimmune diseases. PMID:25746047

  20. Autoimmunity and auto-immune syndromes associated with and preceding the development of lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Polliack, A; Lugassy, G

    1992-11-01

    In this report the association of autoimmunity and autoimmune syndromes with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) is described in 15 patients. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) developed in 10 patients, Hodgkin's disease (HD) in 3 and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in two. In most instances clinical and laboratory phenomena preceded the development/diagnosis of these disorders. Manifestations ranged from the presence of autoantibodies in the serum to the presence of both ill defined or incomplete autoimmune syndromes including cold urticaria, Raynaud's phenomenon, cold agglutinin disease, thyroiditis, nephrotic syndrome and vasculitis to typical systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and even one of scleroderma. It is suggested that in some patients (in)complete clinical manifestations of autoimmunity may precede the development of lymphoid neoplasias. The link between autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders is briefly discussed. PMID:1434818

  1. Beneficial Effect of Bupleurum Polysaccharides on Autoimmune-Prone MRL-lpr Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi-Wen; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Li, Wen; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Ou, Ying-Ye; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease leading to inflammatory tissue damage in multiple organs. The crude polysaccharides (BPs) isolated from the roots of Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium have anticomplementary activity and immunomodulatory functions on macrophages. To study its potential benefit on SLE, we examined effects of BPs on MRL-lpr mice, which have similar disease features to human SLE. MRL-lpr mice were treated orally with BPs 15, 30, or 60 mg kg−1 day−1 for 12 weeks and their SLE characteristics were evaluated. The results revealed that BPs elongated life span, improved kidney function, delayed lymphadenopathy, and reduced autoantibodies. It seemed to be mediated by inhibition of complement and macrophages activation and suppression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression in the kidney. These results implicate that BPs may be an immunomodulator for the treatment of autoimmune diseases like SLE. PMID:22701502

  2. Preclinical efficacy and mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells in animal models of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kyung; Lim, Sang Hee; Chung, In Sung; Park, Yunsoo; Park, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Yong Guk; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2014-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are present in diverse tissues and organs, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, adipose tissue, and placenta. MSCs can expand easily in vitro and have regenerative stem cell properties and potent immunoregulatory activity. They inhibit the functions of dendritic cells, B cells, and T cells, but enhance those of regulatory T cells by producing immunoregulatory molecules such as transforming growth factor-β, hepatic growth factors, prostaglandin E2, interleukin-10, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase, nitric oxide, heme oxygenase-1, and human leukocyte antigen-G. These properties make MSCs promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the preclinical studies of MSCs in animal models for systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and summarize the underlying immunoregulatory mechanisms. PMID:24851097

  3. Endothelial-binding, proinflammatory T cells identified by MCAM (CD146) expression: Characterization and role in human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Dagur, Pradeep K; McCoy, J Philip

    2015-05-01

    A subset of T cells defined by the cell surface expression of MCAM (CD146) has been identified in the peripheral circulation of healthy individuals. These cells comprise approximately 3% of the pool of circulating T cells, have an effector memory phenotype, and are capable of producing several cytokines. Notably, the MCAM positive cells are enhanced for IL-17 production compared to MCAM negative effector memory T cells. These cells are committed to IL-17 production and do not require in vitro polarization with exogenous cytokines. MCAM positive T cells also demonstrate an increased ability to bind to endothelial monolayers. In numerous autoimmune diseases these cells are found at increased proportions in the peripheral circulation, and at the sites of active inflammation in patients with autoimmune disease, these cells appear in large numbers and are major contributors to IL-17 production. Studies to date have been performed with human subjects and it is uncertain if appropriate mouse models exist for this cell type. These cells could represent early components of the adaptive immune response and serve as targets of therapy in these diseases, although much work remains to be performed in order to discern the exact nature and function of these cells. PMID:25595133

  4. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells engineered to secrete IL-10 inhibit APC function and limit CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Payne, Natalie L; Sun, Guizhi; McDonald, Courtney; Moussa, Leon; Emerson-Webber, Ashley; Loisel-Meyer, Séverine; Medin, Jeffrey A; Siatskas, Christopher; Bernard, Claude C A

    2013-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine shown to impact inflammatory processes as manifested in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and in its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Several lines of evidence indicate that the effectiveness of IL-10-based therapies may be dependent on the timing and mode of delivery. In the present study we engineered the expression of IL-10 in human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Adi-IL-10-MSCs) and transplanted these cells early in the disease course to mice with EAE. Adi-IL-10-MSCs transplanted via the intraperitoneal route prevented or delayed the development of EAE. This protective effect was associated with several anti-inflammatory response mechanisms, including a reduction in peripheral T-cell proliferative responses, a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion as well as a preferential inhibition of Th17-mediated neuroinflammation. In vitro analyses revealed that Adi-IL-10-MSCs inhibited the phenotypic maturation, cytokine production and antigen presenting capacity of bone marrow-derived myeloid dendritic cells, suggesting that the mechanism of action may involve an indirect effect on pathogenic T-cells via the modulation of antigen presenting cell function. Collectively, these results suggest that early intervention with gene modified Adi-MSCs may be beneficial for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as MS. PMID:23369732

  5. Human IL2RA null mutation mediates immunodeficiency with lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Goudy, Kevin; Aydin, Didem; Barzaghi, Federica; Gambineri, Eleonora; Vignoli, Marina; Mannurita, Sara Ciullini; Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Assanelli, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto; Brigida, Immacolata; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Martino, Silvana; Olek, Sven; Aiuti, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Cell-surface CD25 expression is critical for maintaining immune function and homeostasis. As in few reported cases, CD25 deficiency manifests with severe autoimmune enteritis and viral infections. To dissect the underlying immunological mechanisms driving these symptoms, we analyzed the regulatory and effector T cell functions in a CD25 deficient patient harboring a novel IL2RA mutation. Pronounced lymphoproliferation, mainly of the CD8+ T cells, was detected together with an increase in T cell activation markers and elevated serum cytokines. However, Ag-specific responses were impaired in vivo and in vitro. Activated CD8+STAT5+ T cells with lytic potential infiltrated the skin, even though FOXP3+ Tregs were present and maintained a higher capacity to respond to IL-2 compared to other T-cell subsets. Thus, the complex pathogenesis of CD25 deficiency provides invaluable insight into the role of IL2/IL-2RA-dependent regulation in autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. PMID:23416241

  6. A Case of Mania in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Lindsay; Chopra, Kokil

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory condition caused by an autoimmune disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus has been described as inducing neuropsychiatric symptoms, including mania and psychosis, in approximately 14 to 80 percent of systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We present and discuss the differential diagnoses in a patient with mania and systemic lupus erythematosus being treated with immunosuppresants and also with a history of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Finally, we review the potential pathogenesis of mania due to an inflammatory-mediated etiology and how this may be used to partly explain the pathogenesis of primary mood disorders. PMID:20508806

  7. Genetic polymorphism in milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus in human.

    PubMed

    Hu, C Y; Wu, C S; Tsai, H F; Chang, S K; Tsai, W I; Hsu, P N

    2009-07-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a molecule implicated in phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells by bridging between macrophages and apoptotic cells. Defects in MFG-E8 cause lupus-like disease in murine models. The aim of our study is to determine whether genetic variation in MFG-E8 predisposes human to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A case-control study of MFG-E8 genetic polymorphism was performed on 147 SLE patients and 146 non-lupus control subjects. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding sequence of human MFG-E8 gene were investigated. SNPs on MFG-E8 residues 3 (3(Arg or Ser)) and 76 (76(Leu or Met)) did not show genetic linkage. Genetic polymorphism on MFG-E8 residue 76 correlated significantly to SLE. The MFG-E8-76(Met) allele predisposed subjects to SLE in a recessive mode (odds ratio: 2.1, P = 0.020), while carriage of MFG-E8-76(Leu) were negatively associated with SLE. The MFG-E8 genotypic combinations with 3(Ser) and 76(Leu) showed the most pronounced protective effect on SLE when compared to the most predisposing genotype 3(Arg/Arg)-76(Met/Met) (OR: 0.29, P = 0.007). According to our result, MFG-E8 is associated with SLE predisposition in Taiwanese. Our study implicates that the impairment of phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells through phosphotidylserine-dependent MFG-E8 system may lead to the development of human SLE. PMID:19502262

  8. Shaping the spectrum - From autoinflammation to autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Christian M

    2016-04-01

    Historically, autoimmune-inflammatory disorders were subdivided into autoinflammatory vs. autoimmune diseases. About a decade ago, an immunological continuum was proposed, placing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders, characterized by systemic inflammation in the absence of high-titer autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes, at the one end, and autoimmune disorders at the other end. We provide an overview of recent developments and observations, filling in some of the gaps and showing strong interconnections between innate and adaptive immune mechanisms, indicating that disorders from both ends of the immunological spectrum indeed share key pathomechanisms. We focus on three exemplary disorders: i) systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis representing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders; ii) psoriasis, a mixed pattern disease; and iii) systemic lupus erythematosus, a prototypical autoimmune disease. We summarize scientific observations suggesting that, depending on disease stages and/or duration, individualized treatment targeting innate or adaptive immune mechanisms in disorders from either end of the immunological spectrum may control disease activity. PMID:26948930

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  10. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... exact cause of autoimmune disorders is unknown. One theory is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or viruses) or drugs may trigger changes that confuse the immune system. This may happen ...

  11. T-cell exhaustion, co-stimulation and clinical outcome in autoimmunity and infection.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Eoin F; Lee, James C; Jayne, David R W; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2015-07-30

    The clinical course of autoimmune and infectious disease varies greatly, even between individuals with the same condition. An understanding of the molecular basis for this heterogeneity could lead to significant improvements in both monitoring and treatment. During chronic infection the process of T-cell exhaustion inhibits the immune response, facilitating viral persistence. Here we show that a transcriptional signature reflecting CD8 T-cell exhaustion is associated with poor clearance of chronic viral infection, but conversely predicts better prognosis in multiple autoimmune diseases. The development of CD8 T-cell exhaustion during chronic infection is driven both by persistence of antigen and by a lack of accessory 'help' signals. In autoimmunity, we find that where evidence of CD4 T-cell co-stimulation is pronounced, that of CD8 T-cell exhaustion is reduced. We can reproduce the exhaustion signature by modifying the balance of persistent stimulation of T-cell antigen receptors and specific CD2-induced co-stimulation provided to human CD8 T cells in vitro, suggesting that each process plays a role in dictating outcome in autoimmune disease. The 'non-exhausted' T-cell state driven by CD2-induced co-stimulation is reduced by signals through the exhaustion-associated inhibitory receptor PD-1, suggesting that induction of exhaustion may be a therapeutic strategy in autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Using expression of optimal surrogate markers of co-stimulation/exhaustion signatures in independent data sets, we confirm an association with good clinical outcome or response to therapy in infection (hepatitis C virus) and vaccination (yellow fever, malaria, influenza), but poor outcome in autoimmune and inflammatory disease (type 1 diabetes, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and dengue haemorrhagic fever). Thus, T-cell exhaustion plays a central role in determining outcome in

  12. Intestinal Dysbiosis Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Milani, Christian; López, Patricia; Cuervo, Adriana; Arboleya, Silvia; Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypical systemic autoimmune disease in humans and is characterized by the presence of hyperactive immune cells and aberrant antibody responses to nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens, including characteristic anti–double-stranded DNA antibodies. We performed a cross-sectional study in order to determine if an SLE-associated gut dysbiosis exists in patients without active disease. A group of 20 SLE patients in remission, for which there was strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, was recruited, and we used an optimized Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based analysis protocol to decipher the fecal microbial profiles of these patients and compare them with those of 20 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. We found diversity to be comparable based on Shannon’s index. However, we saw a significantly lower Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in SLE individuals (median ratio, 1.97) than in healthy subjects (median ratio, 4.86; P < 0.002). A lower Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in SLE individuals was corroborated by quantitative PCR analysis. Notably, a decrease of some Firmicutes families was also detected. This dysbiosis is reflected, based on in silico functional inference, in an overrepresentation of oxidative phosphorylation and glycan utilization pathways in SLE patient microbiota. PMID:25271284

  13. The Role of Decay Accelerating Factor in Environmentally Induced and Idiopathic Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Christopher B.; Pollard, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF) plays a complex role in the immune system through complement-dependent and -independent regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Over the past five years there has been accumulating evidence for a significant role of DAF in negatively regulating adaptive T-cell responses and autoimmunity in both humans and experimental models. This review discusses the relationship between DAF and the complement system and highlights major advances in our understanding of the biology of DAF in human disease, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus. The role of DAF in regulation of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity is discussed including studies showing that reduction or absence of DAF is associated with autoimmunity. In contrast, DAF-mediated T cell activation leads to cytokine expression consistent with T regulatory cells. This is supported by studies showing that interaction between DAF and its molecular partner, CD97, modifies expression of autoimmunity promoting cytokines. These observations are used to develop a hypothetical model to explain how DAF expression may impact T cell differentiation via interaction with CD97 leading to T regulatory cells, increased production of IL-10, and immune tolerance. PMID:24592327

  14. Lupus Nephritis: The Evolving Role of Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rovin, Brad H.; Parikh, Samir V.

    2014-01-01

    Immune complex accumulation in the kidney is the hallmark of lupus nephritis and triggers a series of events that result in kidney inflammation and injury. Cytotoxic agents and corticosteroids are standard of care for lupus nephritis treatment, but are associated with considerable morbidity and suboptimal outcomes. Recently, there has been interest in using novel biologic agents and small molecules to treat lupus nephritis. These therapies can be broadly categorized as anti-inflammatory (laquinamod, anti–tumor necrosis factor–like weak inducer of apotosis, anti-C5, and retinoids), antiautoimmunity (anti-CD20, anti–interferon α, and costimulatory blockers), or both (anti–interleukin 6 and proteasome inhibitors). Recent lupus nephritis clinical trials applied biologics or small molecules of any category to induction treatment, seeking short-term end points of complete renal response. These trials in general have not succeeded. When lupus nephritis comes to clinical attention during the inflammatory stage of the disease, the autoimmune stage leading to kidney inflammation will have been active for some time. The optimal approach for using novel therapies may be to initially target kidney inflammation to preserve renal parenchyma, followed by suppression of autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss novel lupus nephritis therapies and how they fit into a combinatorial treatment strategy based on the pathogenic stage. PMID:24411715

  15. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Davydovskaya, M V; Boyko, A N; Beliaeva, I A; Martynov, M Yu; Gusev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The authors consider the issues related to pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis. It has been demonstrated that the development of autoimmune encephalitis can be associated with the oncologic process or be of idiopathic character. The pathogenesis of autoimmune encephalitis is caused by the production of antibodies that directly or indirectly (via T-cell mechanism) damage exo-and/or endocellular structures of the nerve cells. The presence of antobodies to endocellular structures of neurons in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with autoimmune encephalitis in the vast majority of cases (> 95%) indicates the concomitant oncologic process, the presence of antibodies to membranes or neuronal synapses can be not associated with the oncologic process. Along with complex examination, including neuroimaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid and antibodies, the diagnostic algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis should include the search for the nidus of cancer. The treatment algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis included the combined immunosupressive therapy, plasmapheresis, immunoglobulines, cytostatics as well as treatment of the oncologic process. PMID:26322363

  16. cDNA cloning and sequencing of human fibrillarin, a conserved nucleolar protein recognized by autoimmune antisera

    SciTech Connect

    Aris, J.P.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated a 1.1-kilobase cDNA clone that encodes human fibrillarin by screening a hepatoma library in parallel with DNA probes derived from the fibrillarin genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NOP1) and Xenopus laevis. RNA blot analysis indicates that the corresponding mRNA is {approximately}1,300 nucleotides in length. Human fibrillarin expressed in vitro migrates on SDS gels as a 36-kDa protein that is specifically immunoprecipitated by antisera from humans with scleroderma autoimmune disease. Human fibrillarin contains an amino-terminal repetitive domain {approximately}75-80 amino acids in length that is rich in glycine and arginine residues and is similar to amino-terminal domains in the yeast and Xenopus fibrillarins. The occurrence of a putative RNA-binding domain and an RNP consensus sequence within the protein is consistent with the association of fibrillarin with small nucleolar RNAs. Protein sequence alignments show that 67% of amino acids from human fibrillarin are identical to those in yeast fibrillarin and that 81% are identical to those in Xenopus fibrillarin. This identity suggests the evolutionary conservation of an important function early in the pathway for ribosome biosynthesis.

  17. Pharmacologic Therapies for Rheumatologic and Autoimmune Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bays, Alison M; Gardner, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are commonly prescribed by rheumatologists to reduce disease activity and induce remission in autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Steroids are sometimes used in combination with DMARD therapy and should be used at the lowest effective dose for the least amount of time. There are many biologic agents available for use for inflammatory arthritis and other autoimmune conditions. Care should be taken when prescribing and managing DMARDS, steroids and biologic agents medications with a careful eye towards screening for infectious disease, vaccination, bone heath and lab monitoring. PMID:27235612

  18. Assessment of the translational value of mouse lupus models using clinically relevant biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrew T; Wu, Yin; Cao, Qiongfang; Ding, Yueyun; Oestreicher, Judith; Genest, Melinda; Akare, Sandeep; Ishizaka, Sally T; Mackey, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    Lupus is an autoimmune disease with a poorly understood etiology that manifests with a diverse pathology. This heterogeneity has been a challenge to clinical drug development efforts. A related difficulty is the uncertain translational power of animal models used for evaluating potential drug targets and candidate therapeutics, because it is unlikely that any 1 preclinical model will recapitulate the spectrum of human disease. Therefore, multiple models, along with an understanding of the immune mechanisms that drive them, are necessary if we are to use them to identify valid drug targets and evaluate candidate therapies successfully. To this end, we have characterized several different mouse lupus models and report their differences with respect to biomarkers and symptoms that are representative of the human disease. We compared the pristane-induced mouse lupus disease model using 3 different strains (DBA/1, SJL, BALB/c), and the spontaneous NZB x NZW F1(NZB/W) mouse model. We show that the models differ significantly in their autoantibody profiles, disease manifestations such as nephritis and arthritis, and expression of type I interferon-regulated genes. Similar to the NZB/W model, pristane-induced disease in SJL mice manifests with nephritis and proteinuria, whereas the pristane-treated DBA/1 mice develop arthritis and an interferon-driven gene signature that closely resembles that in human patients. The elucidation of each model's strengths and the identification of translatable biomarkers yields insight for basic lupus research and drug development, and should assist in the proper selection of models for evaluating candidate targets and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24462761

  19. Targeting Syk in Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guo-Min; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, which associates directly with surface receptors, including B-cell receptor and Fcγ receptor, and is involved in a variety of signal transduction pathways. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus are autoimmune diseases in which autoantibodies, immune complexes, and autoreactive T cells account for the expression of tissue inflammation and damage. Syk inhibitors efficiently suppress RA in patients albeit in the expression of unwanted side effects, including gastrointestinal effects, hypertension, and neutropenia. Syk inhibitors also inhibit clinical manifestations in lupus-prone mice. Here, we review the evidence that supports the use of Syk inhibitors to treat rheumatic and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27014261

  20. Parasitic helminth infections and the control of human allergic and autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Maizels, R M

    2016-06-01

    The profile of global health today presents a striking reciprocal distribution between parasitic diseases in many of the world's lower-income countries, and ever-increasing levels of inflammatory disorders such as allergy, autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel diseases in the more affluent societies. Attention is particularly focused on helminth worm parasites, which are associated with protection from allergy and inflammation in both epidemiologic and laboratory settings. One mechanistic explanation of this is that helminths drive the regulatory arm of the immune system, abrogating the ability of the host to expel the parasites, while also dampening reactivity to many bystander specificities. Interest has therefore heightened into whether helminth parasites, or their products, hold therapeutic potential for immunologic disorders of the developed world. In this narrative review, progress across a range of trials is discussed, together with prospects for isolating individual molecular mediators from helminths that may offer defined new therapies for inflammatory conditions. PMID:27172808

  1. Analysis of Associations of Human BAFF Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiunn-Diann; Yang, Shun-Fa; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Fang, Wen-Fang; Lin, Ying-Chin; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Tang, Kam-Tsun; Wu, Mei-Yi; Cheng, Chao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background The B-lymphocyte-activating factor (BAFF) is associated with B-cell functions, and gene polymorphisms of the BAFF have been linked to autoimmune diseases (AIDs). In this study, we explored possible associations of two BAFF single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1041569 and rs2893321, with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) in an ethnic Chinese population. Material and Methods In total, 319 Graves’ disease (GD), 83 Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) patients, and 369 healthy controls were enrolled. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and direct sequencing were used to genotype rs2893321 and rs1041569. Results There was a significant difference in frequencies of the G allele and AG+GG genotype of rs2893321 between the GD and control groups (p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 0.76, and p = 0.017, OR = 0.68, respectively) and between the AITD and control groups (p = 0.009, OR = 0.76, and, p = 0.014, OR = 0.69, respectively). The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with low titers of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TSHRAb) (p = 0.015) in males but not in females. The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with the presence of two different types of thyroid autoantibody (TAb) (TSHRAb and Hashimoto’s autoantibody (anti-thyroglobulin or anti-microsomal antibody)) in females and with that of one type in males. Conclusions rs2893321 may be a susceptible genetic variant for the development of GD and AITDs. Associations of rs2893321 with susceptibility to GD and AITDs and the correlation between rs2893321 and TAb exhibit a dimorphic pattern. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to confirm our findings. PMID:27136204

  2. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Triggered by Infection with Human Parvovirus B19 after Total Abdominal Colectomy for Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Satoh, Shuji; Nakagaki, Suguru; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for an adhesive ileus 14 years after total abdominal colectomy for ulcerative colitis (UC). The ileus decreased with conservative treatment, however, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed due to worsening anemia, a positive direct Coombs test, low haptoglobin, high lactase dehydrogenase, reticulocytosis, and an increase in the erythroblastic series in a bone-marrow examination. Human parvovirus B19 (PV-B19) IgM and PV-B19 DNA were present, indicating the development of AIHA triggered by an infection with PV-B19. The patient is currently being monitored after spontaneous remission. This is the first report of UC after total abdominal colectomy complicated by AIHA triggered by PV-B19 infection. PMID:26984090

  3. Glomerular expression of myxovirus resistance protein 1 in human mesangial cells: possible activation of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa, Tomomi; Ito, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Yoshida, Hidemi; Joh, Kensuke; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Since viral infections activate type I interferon (IFN) pathways and cause subsequent release of IFN-dependent proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, the innate immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). It has been reported that human myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1), a type I IFN-dependent transcript, acts against a wide range of RNA viruses. Although the expression of Mx1 in biopsy specimens obtained from patients with dermatomyositis and cutaneous lupus has been described, the expression of Mx1 in human mesangial cells (MCs) has remained largely unknown. We treated normal human MCs in culture with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC), an authentic double-stranded RNA, and analyzed the expression of Mx1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. To elucidate the poly IC-signalling pathway, we subjected the cells to RNA interference against IFN-β. We also conducted an immunofluorescence study to examine mesangial Mx1 expression in biopsy specimens from patients with LN. Poly IC-induced Mx1 expression in MCs are shown both time- and dose-dependently, and RNA interference against IFN-β inhibited poly IC-induced Mx1 expression. Intense glomerular Mx1 expression was observed in biopsy specimens from patients with LN, whereas negative staining occurred in specimens from patients with IgA nephropathy or purpura nephritis. These preliminary observations support, at least in part, the theory of innate immune system activation in the pathogenesis of LN. PMID:24674141

  4. Phagocytosis Is the Main CR3-Mediated Function Affected by the Lupus-Associated Variant of CD11b in Human Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cortini, Andrea; Szajna, Marta; Malik, Talat H.; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Cook, H. Terence; Taylor, Philip R.; Botto, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The CD11b/CD18 integrin (complement receptor 3, CR3) is a surface receptor on monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells that plays a crucial role in several immunological processes including leukocyte extravasation and phagocytosis. The minor allele of a non-synonymous CR3 polymorphism (rs1143679, conversation of arginine to histidine at position 77: R77H) represents one of the strongest genetic risk factor in human systemic lupus erythematosus, with heterozygosity (77R/H) being the most common disease associated genotype. Homozygosity for the 77H allele has been reported to reduce adhesion and phagocytosis in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages, respectively, without affecting surface expression of CD11b. Herein we comprehensively assessed the influence of R77H on different CR3-mediated activities in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells. R77H did not alter surface expression of CD11b including its active form in any of these cell types. Using two different iC3b-coated targets we found that the uptake by heterozygous 77R/H macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils was significantly reduced compared to 77R/R cells. Allele-specific transduced immortalized macrophage cell lines demonstrated that the minor allele, 77H, was responsible for the impaired phagocytosis. R77H did not affect neutrophil adhesion, neutrophil transmigration in vivo or Toll-like receptor 7/8-mediated cytokine release by monocytes or dendritic cells with or without CR3 pre-engagement by iC3b-coated targets. Our findings demonstrate that the reduction in CR3-mediated phagocytosis associated with the 77H CD11b variant is not macrophage-restricted but demonstrable in other CR3-expressing professional phagocytic cells. The association between 77H and susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus most likely relates to impaired waste disposal, a key component of lupus pathogenesis. PMID:23451151

  5. Increased expression of human T-cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with system lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peiqing; Xu, Liyun; Wang, Piming; Liang, Xiaohong; Qi, Jianni; Liu, Peng; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Ma, Chunhong; Gao, Lifen

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease. Innate and adaptive immunity cooperatively contribute to the development of SLE. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) have been suggested to link innate and adaptive immunity. T-cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-4 (Tim-4; also known as Timd4), expressed primarily on the surface of APCs, is a member of the TIM family, a recently described group of molecules that have received much attention as potential regulators of the immune system. In this study, we used quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to examine the mRNA expression of Tim-4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from SLE patients and further analyzed the correlation between the expression of Tim-4 and Tim-1 (a potential ligand for Tim-4) in PBMCs and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. The results showed that Tim-4 mRNA expression in PBMCs was significantly higher in SLE patients than in healthy controls, especially those patients in the active phase of disease. Moreover, Tim-4 mRNA levels were closely correlated with Tim-1 mRNA levels in PBMCs and with serum TNF-α levels in SLE patients but not in the control group. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Tim-4 may be involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:20140011

  6. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... health problems and have a normal lifespan with periodic doctor visits and treatments with various drugs. What ...

  7. Living Well with Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Investigator Grants, Fellowships and Career Development Awards & Prizes Peer-Reviewed Grant Program LIFELINE Grant Program 2015 ... following a specific diet or nutrition plan for my lupus? How do I explain lupus to others? ...

  8. What Is Lupus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... better about themselves Remain more active. Pregnancy and Contraception for Women With Lupus Women with lupus can ... harmful to an unborn baby may want reliable birth control. Recent studies have shown that oral contraceptives (birth ...

  9. Target Awareness: Lupus

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... 15 Questions - Spotlight on Clinical Trials 15 Questions - Kidney Issues and Lupus 15 Questions – Pulmonary Issues and ... 15 Questions - Strategies for Restful Sleep 15 Questions - Kidney Issues with Lupus 15 Questions - Cardiovascular Issues with ...

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Arvind; Gordon, Caroline; Crow, Mary K; Touma, Zahi; Urowitz, Murray B; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Hughes, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect many organs, including the skin, joints, the central nervous system and the kidneys. Women of childbearing age and certain racial groups are typically predisposed to developing the condition. Rare, inherited, single-gene complement deficiencies are strongly associated with SLE, but the disease is inherited in a polygenic manner in most patients. Genetic interactions with environmental factors, particularly UV light exposure, Epstein-Barr virus infection and hormonal factors, might initiate the disease, resulting in immune dysregulation at the level of cytokines, T cells, B cells and macrophages. Diagnosis is primarily clinical and remains challenging because of the heterogeneity of SLE. Classification criteria have aided clinical trials, but, despite this, only one drug (that is, belimumab) has been approved for use in SLE in the past 60 years. The 10-year mortality has improved and toxic adverse effects of older medications such as cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids have been partially offset by newer drugs such as mycophenolate mofetil and glucocorticoid-sparing regimes. However, further improvements have been hampered by the adverse effects of renal and neuropsychiatric involvement and late diagnosis. Adding to this burden is the increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease in SLE together with the risk of infection made worse by immunosuppressive therapy. Challenges remain with treatment-resistant disease and symptoms such as fatigue. Newer therapies may bring hope of better outcomes, and the refinement to stem cell and genetic techniques might offer a cure in the future. PMID:27306639

  11. CCR1 inhibition ameliorates the progression of lupus nephritis in NZB/W mice.

    PubMed

    Bignon, Alexandre; Gaudin, Françoise; Hémon, Patrice; Tharinger, Hugo; Mayol, Katia; Walzer, Thierry; Loetscher, Pius; Peuchmaur, Michel; Berrebi, Dominique; Balabanian, Karl

    2014-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, the development of which is characterized by a progressive loss of renal function. Such dysfunction is associated with leukocyte infiltration in the glomerular and tubulointerstitial compartments in both human and experimental lupus nephritis. In this study, we investigated the role of the Ccr1 chemokine receptor in this infiltration process during the progression of nephritis in the lupus-prone New Zealand Black/New Zealand White (NZB/W) mouse model. We found that peripheral T cells, mononuclear phagocytes, and neutrophils, but not B cells, from nephritic NZB/W mice were more responsive to Ccr1 ligands than the leukocytes from younger prenephritic NZB/W mice. Short-term treatment of nephritic NZB/W mice with the orally available Ccr1 antagonist BL5923 decreased renal infiltration by T cells and macrophages. Longer Ccr1 blockade decreased kidney accumulation of effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, Ly6C(+) monocytes, and both M1 and M2 macrophages; reduced tubulointerstitial and glomerular injuries; delayed fatal proteinuria; and prolonged animal lifespan. In contrast, renal humoral immunity was unaffected in BL5923-treated mice, which reflected the unchanged numbers of infiltrated B cells in the kidneys. Altogether, these findings define a pivotal role for Ccr1 in the recruitment of T and mononuclear phagocyte cells to inflamed kidneys of NZB/W mice, which in turn contribute to the progression of renal injury. PMID:24367031

  12. Mercury in Hair Is Inversely Related to Disease Associated Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, William; Doherty, Leanne; Watson, Gene; Armstrong, David; Ball, Elisabeth; Magee, Pamela; Allsopp, Philip; Bell, Aubrey; Strain, J. J.; McSorley, Emeir

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease, and environmental factors are proposed to exacerbate existing symptoms. One such environmental factor is mercury. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to mercury (Hg) and disease activity and disease associated damage in Total Hg concentrations in hair and urine were measured in 52 SLE patients. Dental amalgams were quantified. Disease activity was assessed using three indexes including the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG). Disease associated damage was measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology SLICC/ACR Damage Index. Pearson’s correlation identified a significant negative correlation between hair Hg and BILAG (r = −0.323, p = 0.029) and SLICC/ACR (r = −0.377, p = 0.038). Multiple regression analysis identified hair Hg as a significant predictor of disease associated damage as determined by SLICC/ACR (β = −0.366, 95% confidence interval (CI): −1.769, −0.155 p = 0.019). Urinary Hg was not related to disease activity or damage. Fish consumption is the primary route of MeHg exposure in humans and the inverse association of hair Hg with disease activity observed here might be explained by the anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids also found in fish. PMID:26703710

  13. Cell therapy for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dazzi, Francesco; van Laar, Jacob M; Cope, Andrew; Tyndall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Cell therapy, pioneered for the treatment of malignancies in the form of bone marrow transplantation, has subsequently been tested and successfully employed in autoimmune diseases. Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become a curative option for conditions with very poor prognosis such as severe forms of scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and lupus, in which targeted therapies have little or no effect. The refinement of the conditioning regimens has virtually eliminated transplant-related mortality, thus making HSCT a relatively safe choice. Although HSCT remains a nonspecific approach, the knowledge gained in this field has led to the identification of new avenues. In fact, it has become evident that the therapeutic efficacy of HSCT cannot merely be the consequence of a high-dose immuno-suppression, but rather the result of a resetting of the abnormal immune regulation underlying autoimmune conditions. The identification of professional and nonprofessional immunosuppressive cells and their biological properties is generating a huge interest for their clinical exploitation. Regulatory T cells, found abnormal in several autoimmune diseases, have been proposed as central to achieve long-term remissions. Mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow origin have more recently been shown not only to be able to differentiate into multiple tissues, but also to exert a potent antiproliferative effect that results in the inhibition of immune responses and prolonged survival of haemopoietic stem cells. All of these potential resources clearly need to be investigated at the preclinical level but support a great deal of enthusiasm for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:17367542

  14. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  15. Do dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) make counterproductive choices because they are sensitive to human ostensive cues?

    PubMed

    Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Passalacqua, Chiara; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Valsecchi, Paola; Prato-Previde, Emanuela

    2012-01-01

    Dogs appear to be sensitive to human ostensive communicative cues in a variety of situations, however there is still a measure of controversy as to the way in which these cues influence human-dog interactions. There is evidence for instance that dogs can be led into making evaluation errors in a quantity discrimination task, for example losing their preference for a larger food quantity if a human shows a preference for a smaller one, yet there is, so far, no explanation for this phenomenon. Using a modified version of this task, in the current study we investigated whether non-social, social or communicative cues (alone or in combination) cause dogs to go against their preference for the larger food quantity. Results show that dogs' evaluation errors are indeed caused by a social bias, but, somewhat contrary to previous studies, they highlight the potent effect of stimulus enhancement (handling the target) in influencing the dogs' response. A mild influence on the dog's behaviour was found only when different ostensive cues (and no handling of the target) were used in combination, suggesting their cumulative effect. The discussion addresses possible motives for discrepancies with previous studies suggesting that both the intentionality and the directionality of the action may be important in causing dogs' social biases. PMID:22558150

  16. The Dopaminergic System in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Rodrigo; Contreras, Francisco; Zouali, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional interactions between the immune and the nervous systems are of considerable interest both for deciphering their functioning and for designing novel therapeutic strategies. The past decade has brought a burst of insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroimmune communications mediated by dopamine. Studies of dendritic cells (DCs) revealed that they express the whole machinery to synthesize and store dopamine, which may act in an autocrine manner to stimulate dopamine receptors (DARs). Depending on specific DARs stimulated on DCs and T cells, dopamine may differentially favor CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th1 or Th17 inflammatory cells. Regulatory T cells can also release high amounts of dopamine that acts in an autocrine DAR-mediated manner to inhibit their suppressive activity. These dopaminergic regulations could represent a driving force during autoimmunity. Indeed, dopamine levels are altered in the brain of mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and lupus, and in inflamed tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The distorted expression of DARs in peripheral lymphocytes of lupus and MS patients also supports the importance of dopaminergic regulations in autoimmunity. Moreover, dopamine analogs had beneficial therapeutic effects in animal models, and in patients with lupus or RA. We propose models that may underlie key roles of dopamine and its receptors in autoimmune diseases. PMID:24711809

  17. Smoke and autoimmunity: The fire behind the disease.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Versini, Mathilde; Ben-Ami, Dana; Gertel, Smadar; Watad, Abdulla; Segel, Michael J; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Conti, Fabrizio; Cantarini, Luca; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Antonelli, Alessandro; Amital, Howard; Valesini, Guido; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    The association between smoke habit and autoimmunity has been hypothesized a long time ago. Smoke has been found to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune disease as it may trigger the development of autoantibodies and act on pathogenic mechanism possibly related with an imbalance of the immune system. Indeed, both epidemiological studies and animal models have showed the potential deleterious effect caused by smoke. For instance, smoke, by provoking oxidative stress, may contribute to lupus disease by dysregulating DNA demethylation, upregulating immune genes, thereby leading to autoreactivity. Moreover, it can alter the lung microenvironment, facilitating infections, which, in turn, may trigger the development of an autoimmune condition. This, in turn, may result in a dysregulation of immune system leading to autoimmune phenomena. Not only cigarette smoke but also air pollution has been reported as being responsible for the development of autoimmunity. Large epidemiological studies are needed to further explore the accountability of smoking effect in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26772647

  18. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  19. Immunoglobulin E plays an immunoregulatory role in lupus.

    PubMed

    Dema, Barbara; Charles, Nicolas; Pellefigues, Christophe; Ricks, Tiffany K; Suzuki, Ryo; Jiang, Chao; Scheffel, Jorg; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Hoffman, Victoria; Jablonski, Mathieu; Sacré, Karim; Gobert, Delphine; Papo, Thomas; Daugas, Eric; Crampton, Steve; Bolland, Silvia; Rivera, Juan

    2014-10-20

    The (patho)physiological role of IgE in nonallergic inflammatory diseases is not well understood. Here, we explored the effect of IgE deficiency on the inflammatory response in FcγRIIB-deficient mice as well as in mice carrying both a deletion of FcγRIIB and the chromosomal translocation of Y-linked autoimmune acceleration (Yaa) that hastens and results in a more aggressive lupuslike disease in these mice. The findings show that deficiency of IgE delays disease development and severity as demonstrated by reduced autoantibody production and amelioration of organ pathologies. This was associated with decreased numbers of plasma cells and reduced levels of IgG2b and IgG3. Unexpectedly, the loss of IgE also caused a striking decrease of immune cell infiltration in secondary lymphoid organs with a marked effect on the presence of dendritic cells, monocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils in these organs and decreased activation of basophils. The presence of autoreactive IgE in human systemic lupus erythematosus subjects was also associated with increased basophil activation and enhanced disease activity. These findings argue that IgE facilitates the amplification of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:25267791

  20. Autoimmunity as a result of escape from RNA surveillance.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Michael P; Bartsch, Holger; Gross, Joanne K; Maier, Shannon M; Gross, Timothy F; Workman, Jennifer L; James, Judith A; Farris, A Darise; Jung, Bettina; Franke, Claudia; Conrad, Karsten; Schmitz, Marc; Büttner, Cordula; Buyon, Jill P; Semsei, Imre; Harley, John B; Rieber, E Peter

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies, we detected a frame shift mutation in the gene encoding the autoantigen La of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. The mutant La mRNA contains a premature termination codon. mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation should be eliminated by RNA quality control mechanisms. As we find Abs specific for the mutant La form in approximately 30% of sera from anti-La-positive patients, we expected that mutant La mRNAs circumvent RNA control and the expression of mutant La protein could become harmful. Indeed, real-time PCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting data of mice transgenic for the mutant La form show that mutant La mRNAs are not repressed in these animals and are translated to mutant La protein. In addition to the mutant La protein, we detected a minor portion of native human La in the mutant La-transgenic mice. Therefore, ribosomal frame shifting may allow the mutant La mRNA to escape from RNA control. Interestingly, expression of the mutant La mRNA results in a lupus-like disease in the experimental mice. Consequently, escape of mutant La mRNA from RNA control can have two effects: it 1) results in the expression of an immunogenic (neo)epitope, and 2) predisposes to autoimmunity. PMID:16849479

  1. Autoimmunity as a Result of Escape from RNA Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Michael P.; Bartsch, Holger; Gross, Joanne K.; Maier, Shannon M.; Gross, Timothy F.; Workman, Jennifer L.; James, Judith A.; Farris, A. Darise; Jung, Bettina; Franke, Claudia; Conrad, Karsten; Schmitz, Marc; Büttner, Cordula; Buyon, Jill P.; Semsei, Imre; Harley, John B.; Rieber, E. Peter

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies we detected a frame shift mutation in the gene encoding the autoantigen La of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. The mutant La mRNA contains a premature termination codon. mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation should be eliminated by RNA quality control mechanisms. As we find Abs specific for the mutant La form in about 30% of sera from anti-La positive patients we expected that mutant La mRNAs circumvent RNA control and the expression of mutant La protein could become harmful. Indeed, realtime PCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting data of mice transgenic for the mutant La form show that mutant La mRNAs are not repressed in these animals and are translated to mutant La protein. In addition to the mutant La protein, we detected a minor portion of native human La in the mutant La transgenic mice. Therefore, ribosomal frame shifting may allow the mutant La mRNA to escape from RNA control. Interestingly, expression of the mutant La mRNA results in a lupus like disease in the experimental mice. Consequently, escape of mutant La mRNA from RNA control can have two effects: It (i) results in the expression of an immunogenic (neo)epitope, and (ii) predisposes to autoimmunity. PMID:16849479

  2. Epidemiology of environmental exposures and human autoimmune diseases: findings from a National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop.

    PubMed

    Miller, Frederick W; Alfredsson, Lars; Costenbader, Karen H; Kamen, Diane L; Nelson, Lorene M; Norris, Jill M; De Roos, Anneclaire J

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) are a collection of many complex disorders of unknown etiology resulting in immune responses to self-antigens and are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Here we review the epidemiologic evidence for the role of environmental factors in the development of human AID, the conclusions that can be drawn from the existing data, critical knowledge gaps, and research needed to fill these gaps and to resolve uncertainties. We specifically summarize the state of knowledge and our levels of confidence in the role of specific agents in the development of autoimmune diseases, and we define the areas of greatest impact for future investigations. Among our consensus findings we are confident that: 1) crystalline silica exposure can contribute to the development of several AID; 2) solvent exposure can contribute to the development of systemic sclerosis; 3) smoking can contribute to the development of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis; and 4) an inverse association exists between ultraviolet radiation exposure and the risk of development of multiple sclerosis. We suggest that more studies of phenotypes, genotypes, and multiple exposures are needed. Additional knowledge gaps needing investigation include: defining important windows in the timing of exposures and latencies relating to age, developmental state, and hormonal changes; understanding dose-response relationships; and elucidating mechanisms for disease development. Addressing these essential issues will require more resources to support research, particularly of rare AID, but knowledge of the risks conferred by environmental factors in specific genetic contexts could pave the way for prevention of AID in the future. PMID:22739348

  3. Epidemiology of Environmental Exposures and Human Autoimmune Diseases: Findings from a National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Alfredsson, Lars; Costenbader, Karen H.; Kamen, Diane L.; Nelson, Lorene; Norris, Jill M.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) are a collection of many complex disorders of unknown etiology resulting in immune responses to self-antigens and are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Here we review the epidemiologic evidence for the role of environmental factors in the development of human AID, the conclusions that can be drawn from the existing data, critical knowledge gaps, and research needed to fill these gaps and to resolve uncertainties. We specifically summarize the state of knowledge and our levels of confidence in the role of specific agents in the development of autoimmune diseases, and we define the areas of greatest impact for future investigations. Among our consensus findings we are confident that: 1) crystalline silica exposure can contribute to the development of several AID; 2) solvent exposure can contribute to the development of systemic sclerosis; 3) smoking can contribute to the development of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis; and 4) an inverse association exists between ultraviolet radiation exposure and the risk of development of multiple sclerosis. We suggest that more studies of phenotypes, genotypes, and multiple exposures are needed. Additional knowledge gaps needing investigation include: defining important windows in the timing of exposures and latencies relating to age, developmental state, and hormonal changes; understanding dose-response relationships; and elucidating mechanisms for disease development. Addressing these essential issues will require more resources to support research, particularly of rare AID, but knowledge of the risks conferred by environmental factors in specific genetic contexts could pave the way for prevention of AID in the future. PMID:22739348

  4. Select phytochemicals suppress human T-lymphocytes and mouse splenocytes suggesting their use in autoimmunity and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hushmendy, Shazaan; Jayakumar, Lalithapriya; Hahn, Amy B.; Bhoiwala, Devang; Bhoiwala, Dipti L.; Crawford, Dana R.

    2009-01-01

    We have considered a novel “rational” gene targeting approach for treating pathologies whose genetic bases are defined using select phytochemicals. We reason that one such potential application of this approach would be conditions requiring immunosuppression such as autoimmune disease and transplantation, where the genetic target is clearly defined; i.e., interleukin-2 and associated T-cell activation. Therefore, we hypothesized that select phytochemicals can suppress T-lymphocyte proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The immunosuppressive effects of berry extract, curcumin, quercetin, sulforaphane, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), resveratrol, α-tocopherol, vitamin C and sucrose were tested on anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28-activated primary human T-lymphocytes in culture. Curcumin, sulforaphane, quercetin, berry extract and EGCG all significantly inhibited T-cell proliferation, and this effect was not due to toxicity. IL-2 production was also reduced by these agents, implicating this important T-cell cytokine in proliferation suppression. Except for berry extract, these same agents also inhibited mouse splenic T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. Subsequent in vivo studies revealed that quercetin (but not sulforaphane) modestly suppressed mouse splenocyte proliferation following supplementation of BALB/c mice diets. This effect was especially prominent if corrected for the loss of supplement “recall” as observed in cultured T-cells. These results suggest the potential use of these select phytochemicals for treating autoimmune and transplant patients, and support our strategy of using select phytochemicals to treat genetically-defined pathologies, an approach that we believe is simple, healthy, and cost-effective. PMID:19761891

  5. A disease-associated PTPN22 variant promotes systemic autoimmunity in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xuezhi; James, Richard G.; Habib, Tania; Singh, Swati; Jackson, Shaun; Khim, Socheath; Moon, Randall T.; Liggitt, Denny; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Buckner, Jane H.; Rawlings, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Graves disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with an allelic variant of protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22), which encodes the protein LYP. To model the human disease-linked variant LYP-R620W, we generated knockin mice expressing the analogous mutation, R619W, in the murine ortholog PEST domain phosphatase (PEP). In contrast with a previous report, we found that this variant exhibits normal protein stability, but significantly alters lymphocyte function. Aged knockin mice exhibited effector T cell expansion and transitional, germinal center, and age-related B cell expansion as well as the development of autoantibodies and systemic autoimmunity. Further, PEP-R619W affected B cell selection and B lineage–restricted variant expression and was sufficient to promote autoimmunity. Consistent with these features, PEP-R619W lymphocytes were hyperresponsive to antigen-receptor engagement with a distinct profile of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates. Thus, PEP-R619W uniquely modulates T and B cell homeostasis, leading to a loss in tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:23619366

  6. Autoimmune synaptopathies.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Sarah J; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Vincent, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that autoantibodies account for myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune disorders of the CNS by disrupting the functional or structural integrity of synapses. Studying neurological and psychiatric diseases of autoimmune origin may provide new insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying a broad range of CNS disorders. PMID:26806629

  7. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  8. Gene expression in human lupus: bone marrow differentiates active from inactive patients and displays apoptosis and granulopoiesis signatures

    PubMed Central

    Nakou, Magdalene; Knowlton, Nicholas; Frank, Mark B.; Bertsias, George; Osban, Jeanette; Sandel, Clayton E.; Papadaki, Eleni; Raptopoulou, Amalia; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Kritikos, Heraklis; Tassiulas, Ioannis; Centola, Michael; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The cells of the immune system originate from the bone marrow (BM), where many of them also mature. To better understand the aberrant immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we examined the BM in lupus patients using DNA microarrays and compared it to the peripheral blood (PB). Patients and Methods Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) from 20 SLE patients (11 with active disease and 9 with inactive disease) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 27 patients (16 active/ 11 inactive); BMMCs and PBMCs from 7 healthy individuals and 3 osteoarthritis patients served as controls. Samples were analyzed on genome-scale microarrays with 21,329 genes represented. Results We found 102 differentially expressed genes between patients’ and controls’ BMMCs (unpaired student t-test), involved in various biologic processes; 53 of them are involved in major networks including cell death, growth, signaling and proliferation. Comparative analysis between BM and PB of patients identified 88 genes differentially expressed; 61 out of 88 participate in cell growth and differentiation, cellular movement and morphology, immune response and other hematopoietic cell functions. Unsupervised clustering of highly expressed genes revealed two major SLE patient clusters (active and inactive) in BM, but not in PB. The upregulated genes in the bone marrow of active patients included genes involved in cell death and granulopoiesis. Conclusion Microarray analysis of the bone marrow differentiates active from inactive lupus patients and provides further evidence for the role of apoptosis and granulocytes in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:18975309

  9. Anti-tubulin antibodies in autoimmune thyroid disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Rousset, B; Bernier-Valentin, F; Poncet, C; Orgiazzi, J; Madec, A M; Monier, J C; Mornex, R

    1983-01-01

    The presence of circulating antibodies directed against a cytoskeletal element, microtubules, in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders, has been studied using pure brain tubulin as antigen. Immune complexes were immunoprecipitated using a goat anti-human immunoglobulin antibody. Twenty sera among 48 (41%) from patients with Graves' disease and nine sera among 16 (56%) from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis had increased levels of anti-tubulin antibodies as compared to that of 26 sera from control subjects. Only one serum among 11 from patients with toxic adenoma was positive. Very similar results were obtained using protein A adsorbent to collect immune complexes. Specificity of the tubulin binding activity was ascertained by dilution of the sera and displacement of tracer tubulin by unlabelled pure tubulin from rat or human brain. Anti-tubulin antibody titres were variable; one serum was positive at dilution higher than 1:15,000, a titre similar to those obtained in animals experimentally immunized against tubulin. Binding of labelled and unlabelled tubulin to immunoglobulins from positive sera was strictly competitive. The apparent affinity constant for the binding of tubulin to human anti-tubulin autoantibodies determined on four sera was 0.2-0.6 X 10(9)/M. There was no significant association between anti-tubulin antibodies and anti-microsomal antibodies or anti-thyroglobulin antibodies or thyroid stimulating antibodies. In contrast, only five to six per cent of sera from patients with other autoimmune diseases: lupus erythematosis or pernicious anaemia, had increased levels of anti-tubulin antibodies. In conclusion, tubulin represents a new autoantigen which is expressed rather specifically in autoimmune thyroid disorders and probably independently from the classical thyroid antigens. PMID:6688044

  10. Are there environmental forms of systemic autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Hess, E V

    1999-01-01

    A large number of drugs and an increasing number of environmental agents reportedly result in the appearance of a number of autoantibodies and in many instances in the appearance of a range of autoimmune clinical syndromes. The major disorders so recognized have marked resemblances to the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. The commonly used term is drug-induced lupus; a better term is drug-related lupus. There is considerable interest at the present time in an increasing number of environmental agents. There have been two epidemics in recent years--one in Spain to a contaminant of rapeseed oil and one in the United States to a contaminant of l-tryptophan that caused an eosinophilic myositis. It is important for physicians and others involved in health care to recognize the potential associations of these diseases of unknown cause or causes. PMID:10502535

  11. Reducing progression of experimental lupus nephritis via inhibition of the B7/CD28 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Kong, Yong; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Shi, Qin; Qiu, Yu-Hua

    2015-09-01

    therapeutic use of blocking the B7‑1/CD28 signaling pathway in human lupus nephritis and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:26096149

  12. Reducing progression of experimental lupus nephritis via inhibition of the B7/CD28 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, LI; KONG, YONG; WANG, JING; SUN, JIE; SHI, QIN; QIU, YU-HUA

    2015-01-01

    -1/CD28 signaling pathway in human lupus nephritis and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:26096149

  13. Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal cells preserve kidney function and extend lifespan in NZB/W F1 mouse model of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Austin; Yavanian, Gregory; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Morales, Peter; Kouris, Nicholas A; Kimbrel, Erin A; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are showing promise in clinical trials for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the inability to manufacture large quantities of functional cells from a single donor as well as donor-dependent variability in quality limits their clinical utility. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived MSCs are an alternative to adult MSCs that can circumvent issues regarding scalability and consistent quality due to their derivation from a renewable starting material. Here, we show that hESC-MSCs prevent the progression of fatal lupus nephritis (LN) in NZB/W F1 (BWF1) mice. Treatment led to statistically significant reductions in proteinuria and serum creatinine and preserved renal architecture. Specifically, hESC-MSC treatment prevented disease-associated interstitial inflammation, protein cast deposition, and infiltration of CD3(+) lymphocytes in the kidneys. This therapy also led to significant reductions in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two inflammatory cytokines associated with SLE. Mechanistically, in vitro data support these findings, as co-culture of hESC-MSCs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BWF1 lymphocytes decreased lymphocyte secretion of TNFα and IL-6, and enhanced the percentage of putative regulatory T cells. This study represents an important step in the development of a commercially scalable and efficacious cell therapy for SLE/LN. PMID:26628350

  14. Carabin deficiency in B cells increases BCR-TLR9 costimulation-induced autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soley, Anne; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Decossas, Marion; Kern, Aurélie; Fauny, Jean-Daniel; Marcellin, Luc; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms behind flares of human autoimmune diseases in general, and of systemic lupus in particular, are poorly understood. The present scenario proposes that predisposing gene defects favour clinical flares under the influence of external stimuli. Here, we show that Carabin is low in B cells of (NZB × NZW) F1 mice (murine SLE model) long before the disease onset, and is low in B cells of lupus patients during the inactive phases of the disease. Using knock-out and B-cell-conditional knock-out murine models, we identify Carabin as a new negative regulator of B-cell function, whose deficiency in B cells speeds up early B-cell responses and makes the mice more susceptible to anti-dsDNA production and renal lupus flare after stimulation with a Toll-like Receptor 9 agonist, CpG-DNA. Finally, in vitro analysis of NFκB activation and Erk phosphorylation in TLR9- and B-cell receptor (BCR)-stimulated Carabin-deficient B cells strongly suggests how the internal defect synergizes with the external stimulus and proposes Carabin as a natural inhibitor of the potentially dangerous crosstalk between BCR and TLR9 pathways in self-reactive B cells. PMID:23109291

  15. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Günther, Albrecht; Schubert, Julia; Brämer, Dirk; Witte, Otto Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis, an inflammatory disease of the brain, is usually attributed to antibody-mediated damage and dysfunction of neuronal structures. A distinction is made between onconeuronal antibodies (directed against intracellular neuronal antigens with resulting paraneoplastic neurological syndromes) and antibodies directed against neuronal cell surface proteins (with resulting synaptic encephalopathies). Anti-NMDA-Receptor-Encephalitis, the most common form of autoimmune encephalopathy, is characterized by a phased course of disease. Early disease phase involves nonspecific prodromes (fatigue, fever, headache) which lead to family doctor or emergency department consultation. Subsequently, neuropsychiatric behavioural problems, seizures, disturbance of memory and finally coma, dysautonomia and respiratory insufficiency often result in major complications (e.g. status epilepticus) necessitating intensive care treatment. The diagnosis is secured by detection of auto-antibodies in serum or cerebrospinal fluid. An intensive search for tumors is also recommended. The treatment of autoimmune encephalitis comprises of immunomodulatory and immunosuppessive strategies. Tumor therapy is the most important treatment of autoimmune encephalitis by onconeuronal antibodies. PMID:27557073

  16. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will closely monitor and manage any side effects that may occur, as high doses of prednisone are often prescribed to treat autoimmune hepatitis. Immune system suppressors. Medications that suppress the immune system prevent the body from making autoantibodies and block the immune reaction ...

  17. Brain, Craniofacial, and Dental Lesions of a Free-ranging Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Implicated in a Human Attack in Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Schwabenlander, Marc; Stepaniuk, Kevin; Carstensen, Michelle; Armién, Aníbal G

    2016-01-01

    We describe significant brain, craniofacial, and dental lesions in a free-ranging wolf (Canis lupus) involved in a human attack. On postmortem examination, the wolf presented asymmetric atrophy and bone remodeling affecting the mandible, incisive, maxilla, lacrimal, palatine, frontal, and ethmoid bones. There was an asymmetrical skeletal malocclusion and dental abnormalities including rotated, malpositioned, partially erupted teeth, and an odontogenic cyst associated with an unerupted canine tooth. Brain changes were bilateral loss and atrophy of extensive cortex regions including olfactory bulb, peduncles, and tract, and the frontal lobe. We highlight the relevance of a thorough postmortem examination of wildlife to elucidate disease-based abnormal behavior as the reason for human-animal conflict. PMID:26540333

  18. Fatal autoimmunity in mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells encoding defective FOXP3

    PubMed Central

    Goettel, Jeremy A.; Biswas, Subhabrata; Lexmond, Willem S.; Yeste, Ada; Passerini, Laura; Patel, Bonny; Yang, Siyoung; Sun, Jiusong; Ouahed, Jodie; Shouval, Dror S.; McCann, Katelyn J.; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Mathis, Diane; Milford, Edgar L.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Fiebiger, Edda; Marasco, Wayne A.; Bacchetta, Rosa; Quintana, Francisco J.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice reconstituted with a human immune system provide a tractable in vivo model to assess human immune cell function. To date, reconstitution of murine strains with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from patients with monogenic immune disorders have not been reported. One obstacle precluding the development of immune-disease specific “humanized” mice is that optimal adaptive immune responses in current strains have required implantation of autologous human thymic tissue. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain that lacks murine major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and instead expresses human leukocyte antigen DR1 (HLA-DR1). These mice displayed improved adaptive immune responses when reconstituted with human HSCs including enhanced T-cell reconstitution, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and class-switch recombination. Following immune reconstitution of this novel strain with HSCs from a patient with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, associated with aberrant FOXP3 function, mice developed a lethal inflammatory disorder with multiorgan involvement and autoantibody production mimicking the pathology seen in affected humans. This humanized mouse model permits in vivo evaluation of immune responses associated with genetically altered HSCs, including primary immunodeficiencies, and should facilitate the study of human immune pathobiology and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:25833964

  19. Epigenetics and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Unmet Needs.

    PubMed

    Meroni, Pier Luigi; Penatti, Alessandra Emiliana

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic relapsing-remitting autoimmune disease affecting several organs. Although the management of lupus patients has improved in the last years, several aspects still remain challenging. More sensitive and specific biomarkers for an early diagnosis as well as for monitoring disease activity and tissue damage are needed. Genome-wide association and gene mapping studies have supported the genetic background for SLE susceptibility. However, the relatively modest risk association and the studies in twins have suggested a role for environmental and epigenetic factors, as well as genetic-epigenetic interaction. Accordingly, there is evidence that differences in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNA profiling can be found in lupus patients versus normal subjects. Moreover, impaired DNA methylation on the inactive X-chromosome was suggested to explain, at least in part, the female prevalence of the disease. Epigenetic markers may be help in fulfilling the unmet needs for SLE by offering new diagnostic tools, new biomarkers for monitoring disease activity, or to better characterize patients with a silent clinical disease but with an active serology. Anti-DNA, anti-phospholipid, and anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies are thought to be pathogenic for glomerulonephritis, recurrent thrombosis and miscarriages, and neonatal lupus, respectively. However, tissue damage occurs occasionally or, in some patients, only in spite of the persistent presence of the antibodies. Preliminary studies suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may explain why the damage takes place in some patients only or at a given time. PMID:26206675

  20. Autoimmunity due to molecular mimicry as a cause of neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael C.; Lee, Sang Min; Kalume, Franck; Morcos, Yvette; Dohan, F. Curtis; Hasty, Karen A.; Callaway, Joseph C.; Zunt, Joseph; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Stuart, John M.

    2009-01-01

    One hypothesis that couples infection with autoimmune disease is molecular mimicry. Molecular mimicry is characterized by an immune response to an environmental agent that cross-reacts with a host antigen, resulting in disease1,2. This hypothesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, lupus and multiple sclerosis (MS)1–4. There is limited direct evidence linking causative agents with pathogenic immune reactions in these diseases. Our study establishes a clear link between viral infection, autoimmunity and neurological disease in humans. As a model for molecular mimicry, we studied patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a disease that can be indistinguishable from MS (refs. 5–7). HAM/TSP patients develop antibodies to neurons8. We hypothesized these antibodies would identify a central nervous system (CNS) autoantigen. Immunoglobulin G isolated from HAM/TSP patients identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein-A1 (hnRNP-A1) as the autoantigen. Antibodies to hnRNP-A1 cross-reacted with HTLV-1-tax, the immune response to which is associated with HAM/TSP (refs. 5,9). Immunoglobulin G specifically stained human Betz cells, whose axons are preferentially damaged7. Infusion of autoantibodies in brain sections inhibited neuronal firing, indicative of their pathogenic nature. These data demonstrate the importance of molecular mimicry between an infecting agent and hnRNP-A1 in autoimmune disease of the CNS. PMID:11984596

  1. Analysis of the New Zealand Black contribution to lupus-like renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, C.G.; Rozzo, S.J.; Hirschfeld, H.F.; Smarnworawong, N.P.; Palmer, E.; Kotzin, B.L. |

    1995-03-01

    F{sub 1} progeny of New Zealand Black (NZB) and New Zealand White (NZW) mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune process remarkably similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus. Previous studies have implicated major genetic contributions from the NZW MHC and from a dominant NZB gene on chromosome 4. To identify additional NZB contributions to lupus-like disease, (NZB x SM/J)F{sub 1} x NZW backcross mice were followed for the development of severe renal disease and were comprehensively genotyped. Despite a 50% incidence of disease significant associations between the presence of the NZB genotype and disease were noted on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, and 19. The data indicated that multiple NZB genes, in different combinations, contribute to severe renal disease, and that no single gene is required. To further investigate this NZB contribution, NZB x SM/J (NXSM) recombinant inbred (RI) strains were crossed with NZW mice, and F{sub 1} progeny were analyzed for the presence of lupus-like renal disease. Interestingly, nearly all of the (RI x NZW)F{sub 1} cohorts studies expressed some level of disease. Five RI strains generated a high incidence of disease, similar to (NZB x NZW)F{sub 1} mice, and nearly one-half of the cohorts developed disease at intermediate levels. Only two cohorts demonstrated very little disease, supporting the conclusion that multiple genes are capable of disease induction. Experiments correlating the genotypes of these RI strains with their ability to generate disease revealed that none of the disease-associated loci defined by the backcross analysis were present in all five RI strains that generated disease at high levels. Overall, both the backcross data and RI analysis provide additional support for the genetic complexity of lupus nephritis and uphold the conclusion that heterogeneous combinations of contributing NZB genes seem to operate in a threshold manner to generate the disease phenotype. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Environmental Triggers of Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Burek, C. Lynne; Talor, Monica V.

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger or autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2h4 mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  3. Environmental triggers of autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Burek, C Lynne; Talor, Monica V

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger for autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2(h4) mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  4. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  5. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  6. Commensal microbiota influence systemic autoimmune responses

    PubMed Central

    Van Praet, Jens T; Donovan, Erin; Vanassche, Inge; Drennan, Michael B; Windels, Fien; Dendooven, Amélie; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A; van de Loo, Fons; Norris, Paula S; Kruglov, Andrey A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Rabot, Sylvie; Tito, Raul; Raes, Jeroen; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eberl, Gérard; Ware, Carl F; Elewaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are a hallmark feature of generalized autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. However, the processes underlying the loss of tolerance against nuclear self-constituents remain largely unresolved. Using mice deficient in lymphotoxin and Hox11, we report that approximately 25% of mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs spontaneously develop specific antinuclear antibodies. Interestingly, we find this phenotype is not caused by a defect in central tolerance. Rather, cell-specific deletion and in vivo lymphotoxin blockade link these systemic autoimmune responses to the formation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the neonatal period of life. We further demonstrate antinuclear antibody production is influenced by the presence of commensal gut flora, in particular increased colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria, and IL-17 receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that neonatal colonization of gut microbiota influences generalized autoimmunity in adult life. PMID:25599993

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Manson, Jessica J; Rahman, Anisur

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease, which is autoimmune in origin and is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies directed against nuclear antigens. It is a multi-system disease, and patients can present in vastly different ways. Prevalence varies with ethnicity, but is estimated to be about 1 per 1000 overall with a female to male ratio of 10:1. The clinical heterogeneity of this disease mirrors its complex aetiopathogenesis, which highlights the importance of genetic factors and individual susceptibility to environmental factors. SLE can affect every organ in the body. The most common manifestations include rash, arthritis and fatigue. At the more severe end of the spectrum, SLE can cause nephritis, neurological problems, anaemia and thrombocytopaenia. Over 90% of patients with SLE have positive anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). Significant titres are accepted to be of 1:80 or greater. SLE is a relapsing and remitting disease, and treatment aims are threefold: managing acute periods of potentially life-threatening ill health, minimizing the risk of flares during periods of relative stability, and controlling the less life-threatening, but often incapacitating day to day symptoms. Hydroxychloroquine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used for milder disease; corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies are generally reserved for major organ involvement; anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody is now used in patients with severe disease who has not responded to conventional treatments. Despite enormous improvements in prognosis since the introduction of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs, SLE continues to have a significant impact on the mortality and morbidity of those affected. PMID:16722594

  8. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Clustering in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Charlon, Thomas; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Carmona, F. David; Di Cara, Alessandro; Wojcik, Jérôme; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, a group of chronic inflammatory conditions, have variable symptoms and difficult diagnosis. In order to reclassify them based on genetic markers rather than clinical criteria, we performed clustering of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. However naive approaches tend to group patients primarily by their geographic origin. To reduce this “ancestry signal”, we developed SNPClust, a method to select large sources of ancestry-independent genetic variations from all variations detected by Principal Component Analysis. Applied to a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus case control dataset, SNPClust successfully reduced the ancestry signal. Results were compared with association studies between the cases and controls without or with reference population stratification correction methods. SNPClust amplified the disease discriminating signal and the ratio of significant associations outside the HLA locus was greater compared to population stratification correction methods. SNPClust will enable the use of ancestry-independent genetic information in the reclassification of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. SNPClust is available as an R package and demonstrated on the public Human Genome Diversity Project dataset at https://github.com/ThomasChln/snpclust. PMID:27490238

  10. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Clustering in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Charlon, Thomas; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Carmona, F David; Di Cara, Alessandro; Wojcik, Jérôme; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav; Martín, Javier; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, a group of chronic inflammatory conditions, have variable symptoms and difficult diagnosis. In order to reclassify them based on genetic markers rather than clinical criteria, we performed clustering of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. However naive approaches tend to group patients primarily by their geographic origin. To reduce this "ancestry signal", we developed SNPClust, a method to select large sources of ancestry-independent genetic variations from all variations detected by Principal Component Analysis. Applied to a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus case control dataset, SNPClust successfully reduced the ancestry signal. Results were compared with association studies between the cases and controls without or with reference population stratification correction methods. SNPClust amplified the disease discriminating signal and the ratio of significant associations outside the HLA locus was greater compared to population stratification correction methods. SNPClust will enable the use of ancestry-independent genetic information in the reclassification of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. SNPClust is available as an R package and demonstrated on the public Human Genome Diversity Project dataset at https://github.com/ThomasChln/snpclust. PMID:27490238

  11. Primary autoimmune myelofibrosis: definition of a distinct clinicopathologic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Bass, Randall D; Gong, Jerald Z; Feinstein, Donald I; Brynes, Russell K

    2003-01-01

    Myelofibrosis is characterized by reticulin fibrosis of the bone marrow with resulting features of myelophthisis. Besides hematopoietic malignancies and other neoplasms involving the bone marrow, myelofibrosis has been described in association with autoimmune disorders, especially systemic lupus erythematosus. We describe the clinicopathologic features of a primary form of autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) in patients who do not have systemic lupus erythematosus or another well-defined autoimmune syndrome. Absence of marked splenomegaly, peripheral blood cytopenias with mild teardrop poikilocytosis and leukoerythroblastosis, bone marrow lymphoid aggregates, and presence of autoantibodies are some of the salient features of primary AIMF. AIMF should especially be differentiated from chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis, a neoplastic myeloproliferative disease. Primary AIMF appears to have an excellent prognosis, with all patients reported in this series responding to a short course of corticosteroid therapy. PMID:12508261

  12. Smell and autoimmunity: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Netta; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; de Carolis, Caterina; Perricone, Roberto; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-08-01

    The sense of smell is an ancient sensory modality vital for sampling and perceiving the chemical composition of surrounding environments. Olfaction involves a pathway of biochemical and electrophysiological processes, which allows the conversion of molecular information into sensations. Disturbances in the olfactory function have been investigated mainly in neurological/neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases; impaired sense of smell has been associated with depressed mood. Only recently, smell capability was tested in other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Shoenfeld and colleagues opened this chapter showing that patients affected with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have disturbances in their olfactory functions and revealed its association with neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disease. This evidence was confirmed in experimental models and replicated in other SLE populations. The connection between autoimmunity and the sense of smell was lately emphasized by studies on patients with Sjögren's syndrome and in patients with other autoimmune/immune-mediated diseases, such as polydermatomyositis, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and hereditary angioedema. Genetic susceptibility and hormonal and environmental factors may play a role in these conditions. Olfactory receptor gene clusters are located in proximity to key locus of susceptibility for autoimmune diseases such as the major histocompatibility complex, suggesting not only a physic linkage, but a functional association. Nonetheless, gender- and hormone-mediated effects are fundamental in the development of autoimmune diseases. The different connections between smell and autoimmunity, genes and hormones may suggest that this is another tessera of a mosaic which is waiting the answer of Oedipus. PMID:23233263

  13. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  14. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Pirapakaran, Tharshikha; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  15. Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Baenas, Diego F; Diehl, Fernando A; Haye Salinas, María J; Riva, Verónica; Diller, Ana; Lemos, Pablo A

    2016-01-01

    Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease, or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is an infrequent idiopathic disorder. It has been associated with autoimmune disorders, of which systemic lupus erythematosus is the most outstanding. The basis of its diagnosis relies on the histological examination of lymph nodes, which typically reveals necrosis surrounded by histiocytes with crescentic nucleus, immunoblasts and plasma cells, and absence of neutrophils. We report the case of a 27-year-old Argentinian female patient without any relevant past medical history to demonstrate the correlation between Kikuchi–Fujimoto disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27418858

  16. Infection in systemic lupus erythematosus: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Lisa; Perl, Andras

    2010-01-01

    Infectious agents have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Common viruses, such as the Epstein-Barr virus, transfusion transmitted virus, parvovirus and cytomegalovirus, have an increased prevalence in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. They may contribute to disease pathogenesis through triggering autoimmunity via structural or functional molecular mimicry, encoding proteins that induce cross-reactive immune responses to self antigens or modulate antigen processing, activation, or apoptosis of B and T cells, macrophages or dendritic cells. Alternatively, some infectious agents, such as malaria, Toxoplasma gondii and Helicobacter pylori, may have a protective effect. Vaccinations may play dual roles by protecting against friend and foe alike. PMID:20209114

  17. Thrombin Cleavage of Osteopontin Modulates Its Activities in Human Cells In Vitro and Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Boggio, Elena; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Clemente, Nausicaa; Toth, Erika; Raineri, Davide; Ferrara, Benedetta; Chiocchetti, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin is a proinflammatory cytokine and plays a pathogenetic role in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), by recruiting autoreactive T cells into the central nervous system. Osteopontin functions are modulated by thrombin cleavage generating N- and C-terminal fragment, whose individual roles are only partly known. Published data are difficult to compare since they have been obtained with heterogeneous approaches. Interestingly, thrombin cleavage of osteopontin unmasks a cryptic domain of interaction with α4β1 integrin that is the main adhesion molecule involved in lymphocyte transmigration to the brain and is the target for natalizumab, the most potent drug preventing relapses. We produced recombinant osteopontin and its N- and C-terminal fragments in an eukaryotic system in order to allow their posttranslational modifications. We investigated, in vitro, their effect on human cells and in vivo in EAE. We found that the osteopontin cleavage plays a key role in the function of this cytokine and that the two fragments exert distinct effects both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that drugs targeting each fragment may be used to fine-tune the pathological effects of osteopontin in several diseases. PMID:27478856

  18. Thrombin Cleavage of Osteopontin Modulates Its Activities in Human Cells In Vitro and Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Boggio, Elena; Dianzani, Chiara; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Clemente, Nausicaa; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Toth, Erika; Raineri, Davide; Ferrara, Benedetta; Comi, Cristoforo; Dianzani, Umberto; Chiocchetti, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin is a proinflammatory cytokine and plays a pathogenetic role in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), by recruiting autoreactive T cells into the central nervous system. Osteopontin functions are modulated by thrombin cleavage generating N- and C-terminal fragment, whose individual roles are only partly known. Published data are difficult to compare since they have been obtained with heterogeneous approaches. Interestingly, thrombin cleavage of osteopontin unmasks a cryptic domain of interaction with α 4 β 1 integrin that is the main adhesion molecule involved in lymphocyte transmigration to the brain and is the target for natalizumab, the most potent drug preventing relapses. We produced recombinant osteopontin and its N- and C-terminal fragments in an eukaryotic system in order to allow their posttranslational modifications. We investigated, in vitro, their effect on human cells and in vivo in EAE. We found that the osteopontin cleavage plays a key role in the function of this cytokine and that the two fragments exert distinct effects both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that drugs targeting each fragment may be used to fine-tune the pathological effects of osteopontin in several diseases. PMID:27478856

  19. Autoimmune and inflammatory epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Nabbout, Rima

    2012-09-01

    The role of immunity and inflammation in epilepsy have long been suggested by the anticonvulsant activity of steroids in some infancy and childhood epilepsies. The role of fever and infection in exacerbating seizures due to possible proinflammatory molecules, the increased frequency of seizures in systemic autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous, and, recently, the detection of autoantibodies in some unexplained epilepsies reinforced the causal place of immunity and inflammation in epilepsies with unknown etiology. In this article, we summarize epilepsies where clinical and biologic data strongly support the pathogenic role of autoantibodies (e.g., limbic encephalitides, N-methyl-d-aspartate [NMDA] encephalitis) and epilepsies where immune-mediated inflammation occurs, but the full pathogenic cascade is either not clear (e.g., Rasmussen's encephalitis) or only strongly hypothesized (idiopathic hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome [IHHS] and fever-induced refractory epilepsy in school-aged children [FIRES]). We emphasize the electroclinical features that would help to diagnose these conditions, allowing early immunomodulating therapy. Finally, we raise some questions that remain unclear regarding diagnosis, mechanisms, and future therapies. PMID:22946722

  20. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  1. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions' pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding. PMID:27267530

  2. Nucleic acid recognizing Toll-like receptors and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    von Landenberg, Philipp; Bauer, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    The understanding of autoimmune diseases experienced an impressive boost since the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been identified as possible key players in autoimmune pathophysiology. Although these receptors recognize a variety of structures derived from viruses, bacteria, and fungi leading to subsequent initiation of the relevant immune responses, recent data support the idea that TLRs are crucial in the induction and perpetuation of certain autoimmune diseases, especially the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this review, we will summarize recent data on involvement of TLRs in the development of autoimmune diseases. We will focus on TLRs 7, 8, and 9 that were originally identified as receptors specific for bacterial and viral RNA/DNA, but more recent in vitro and in vivo studies have linked these receptors to the detection of host RNA, DNA, and RNA-associated or DNA-associated proteins in the context of autoimmunity. PMID:18060756

  3. IRF5 deficiency ameliorates lupus but promotes atherosclerosis and metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of lupus-associated atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Amanda A.; Yasuda, Kei; Wilson, Gabriella E.; Aprahamian, Tamar; Xie, Yao; Maganto-Garcia, Elena; Shukla, Prachi; Oberlander, Lillian; Laskow, Bari; Menn-Josephy, Hanni; Wu, Yuanyuan; Duffau, Pierre; Fried, Susan K.; Lichtman, Andrew H.; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Premature atherosclerosis is a severe complication of lupus and other systemic autoimmune disorders. Gain-of-function polymorphisms in interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) are associated with an increased risk of developing lupus and IRF5 deficiency in lupus mouse models ameliorates disease. However, whether IRF5 deficiency also protects against atherosclerosis development in lupus is not known. Here we addressed this question using the gld.apoE−/− mouse model. IRF5 deficiency markedly reduced lupus disease severity. Unexpectedly, despite the reduction in systemic immune activation, IRF5-deficient mice developed increased atherosclerosis and also exhibited metabolic dysregulation characterized by hyperlipidemia, increased adiposity and insulin resistance. Levels of the atheroprotective cytokine IL-10 were reduced in aortae of IRF5-deficient mice and in vitro studies demonstrated that IRF5 is required for IL-10 production downstream of TLR7 and TLR9 signaling in multiple immune cell types. Chimera studies showed that IRF5 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells prevents lupus development and contributes in part to the increased atherosclerosis. Notably, IRF5 deficiency in non-bone marrow-derived cells also contributes to the increased atherosclerosis through the generation of hyperlipidemia and increased adiposity. Together, our results reveal a protective role for IRF5 in lupus-associated atherosclerosis that is mediated through the effects of IRF5 in both immune and non-immune cells. These findings have implications for the proposed targeting of IRF5 in the treatment of autoimmune disease as global IRF5 inhibition may exacerbate cardiovascular disease in these patients. PMID:25595782

  4. Bone health, vitamin D and lupus.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is high. This is likely due to photoprotection measures in addition to intrinsic factors of the disease. Low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of low bone mineral density and fracture. Vitamin D deficiency could also have undesirable effects on patients' immune response, enhancing mechanisms of loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Vitamin D levels should be periodically monitored and patients should be treated with the objective of reaching vitamin D levels higher than 30-40 ng/ml. PMID:25488287

  5. Lupus as a paraneoplastic manifestation of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    González Amores, Yolanda; Hernando Rebollar, Sofía; Casado Bernabeu, Aida

    2016-05-01

    Tumors originating in the digestive system, like those in other areas, whether solid or otherwise, may present with extradigestive manifestations in the setting of a paraneoplastic syndrome. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune condition most commonly involving women of childbearing age. On occasion it represents a paraneoplastic manifestation heralding a primary tumor. Cancer suspicion is therefore a key element for newly diagnosed SLE cases with nonstandard epidemiology even in the absence of suggestive symptoms, and digestive tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26925842

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Drugs for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kamenarska, Zornitsa G; Hristova, Maria H; Vinkov, Anton I; Dourmishev, Lyubomir A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease which engages most of the immune cells in its development. Various studies concerning the application of antibodies against TNF-α, BlyS, CD20, CD22, IL-6R and complement factors in treatment of SLE have been recently conducted and in spite of the good results reported by some of them, no definite conclusion on their risk-benefit profile can be drawn. The current review summarizes the results obtained in the field and reveals the perspectives for the development of new and more effective strategies for SLE treatment in combination with other immunomodulating drugs. PMID:26933777

  7. Dendritic Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Heather M.; Matsushima, Glenn K.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) persists as a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease and is characterized by the production of autoantibodies and immune complexes that affects multiple organs. The underlying mechanism that triggers and sustain disease are complex and involves certain susceptibility genes and environmental factors. There have been several immune mediators linked to SLE including cytokines and chemokines that have been reviewed elsewhere(1–3). A number of articles have reviewed the role of B cells and T cells in SLE(4–10). Here, we focus on role of dendritic cells (DC) and innate immune factors that may regulate autoreactive B cells. PMID:20367140

  8. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  9. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Primary Care Approach to Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nguyet-Cam Vu; Ghetu, Maria V; Bieniek, Marzena L

    2016-08-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that affects many systems, including the skin, musculoskeletal, renal, neuropsychiatric, hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and reproductive systems. Family physicians should be familiar with the manifestations of lupus to aid in early diagnosis, monitoring patients with mild disease, recognizing warning signs that require referral to a rheumatologist, and helping to monitor disease activity and treatment in patients with moderate to severe disease. The American College of Rheumatology has 11 classification criteria for lupus. If a patient meets at least four criteria, lupus can be diagnosed with 95% specificity and 85% sensitivity. All patients with lupus should receive education, counseling, and support. Hydroxychloroquine is the cornerstone of treatment because it reduces disease flares and other constitutional symptoms. Low-dose glucocorticoids can be used to treat most manifestations of lupus. The use of immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents depends on the body systems affected. Patients with mild disease that does not involve major organ systems can be monitored by their family physician. Patients with increased disease activity, complications, or adverse effects from treatment should be referred to a rheumatologist. To optimize treatment, it is important that a rheumatologist coordinate closely with the patient's family physician to improve chronic care as well as preventive health services. PMID:27548593

  10. An acquired defect in IgG-dependent phagocytosis explains the impairment in antibody-mediated cellular depletion in Lupus.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Anupama; Teichmann, Lino L; Wang, Haowei; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn R; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2011-10-01

    B cells play important roles in autoimmune diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis to rheumatoid arthritis. B cells have also long been considered central players in systemic lupus erythematosus. However, anti-CD20-mediated B cell depletion was not effective in two clinical lupus studies, whereas anti-B lymphocyte stimulator, which inhibits B cell survival, was effective. Others and we previously found that anti-CD20-based depletion was surprisingly ineffective in tissues of lupus-prone mice, but that persistent high doses eventually led to depletion and ameliorated lupus. Lupus patients might also have incomplete depletion, as suggested in several studies, and which could have led to therapeutic failure. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of resistance to Ab-mediated cellular depletion in murine lupus. B cells from lupus-prone mice were easily depleted when transferred into normal environments or in lupus-prone mice that lacked serum Ig. Serum from lupus-prone mice transferred depletion resistance, with the active component being IgG. Because depletion is FcγR-dependent, we assayed macrophages and neutrophils exposed to lupus mouse serum, showing that they are impaired in IgG-mediated phagocytosis. We conclude that depletion resistance is an acquired, reversible phagocytic defect depending on exposure to lupus serum IgG. These results have implications for optimizing and monitoring cellular depletion therapy. PMID:21873531

  11. Treating activated CD4+ T cells with either of two distinct DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, 5-azacytidine or procainamide, is sufficient to cause a lupus-like disease in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Quddus, J; Johnson, K J; Gavalchin, J; Amento, E P; Chrisp, C E; Yung, R L; Richardson, B C

    1993-01-01

    Human antigen-specific CD4+ T cells become autoreactive after treatment with various DNA methylation inhibitors, including 5-azacytidine, procainamide, and hydralazine. This suggests a mechanism that could contribute to the development of some forms of autoimmunity. In this report we have asked whether T cells treated with DNA methylation inhibitors can induce autoimmunity. Murine CD4+ T cells were treated with 5-azacytidine or procainamide and were shown to respond to syngeneic antigen-presenting cells, similar to CD4+ human T cell clones treated with these drugs. Functional characterization demonstrated that cells treated with either drug spontaneously lysed syngeneic macrophages and secreted IL-4, IL-6, and IFN-gamma. Adoptive transfer of 5-azacytidine- or procainamide-treated cells into unirradiated syngeneic recipients induced an immune complex glomerulonephritis and IgG anti-DNA and antihistone antibodies. These experiments demonstrate that T cells treated with either of two distinct DNA methyltransferase inhibitors are sufficient to induce a lupus-like disease. It is possible that the lysis of macrophages, together with the release of cytokines promoting B cell differentiation, contributes to the autoantibody production and immune complex deposition. These results suggest that environmental agents that inhibit DNA methylation could interact with T cells in vivo to produce a lupus-like illness, a mechanism that could have relevance to drug-induced and idiopathic lupus. Images PMID:7686923

  12. MIF: Implications in the Pathoetiology of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Tali; Foote, Andrew; Lee, Jacinta P. W.; Morand, Eric F.; Harris, James

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage migration Inhibitory factor (MIF) was one of the earliest pro-inflammatory cytokines to be identified. Increasing interest in this cytokine in recent decades has followed the cloning of human MIF and the generation of Mif−/− mice. Deepening understanding of signaling pathways utilized by MIF and putative receptor mechanisms have followed. MIF is distinct from all other cytokines by virtue of its unique induction by and counter regulation of glucocorticoids (GCs). MIF is further differentiated from other cytokines by its structural homology to specific tautomerase and isomerase enzymes and correlative in vitro enzymatic functions. The role of MIF in immune and inflammatory states, including a range of human autoimmune diseases, is now well established, as are the relationships between MIF polymorphisms and a number of inflammatory diseases. Here, we review the known pleiotropic activities of MIF, in addition to novel functions of MIF in processes including autophagy and autophagic cell death. In addition, recent developments in the understanding of the role of MIF in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the potential application of anti-MIF strategies to treat human diseases such as SLE, which will require a comprehensive understanding of the unique and complex activities of this ubiquitously expressed cytokine. PMID:26617609

  13. Crossreactivity of a human autoimmune TCR is dominated by a single TCR loop.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Dhruv K; Gordo, Susana; Schubert, David A; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2013-01-01

    Self-reactive CD4 T cells are thought to have a central role in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory human diseases. Microbial peptides can activate self-reactive T cells, but the structural basis for such crossreactivity is not well understood. The Hy.1B11 T cell receptor (TCR) originates from a patient with multiple sclerosis and recognizes the self-antigen myelin basic protein. Here we report the structural mechanism of TCR crossreactivity with two distinct peptides from human pathogens. The structures show that a single TCR residue (CDR3α F95) makes the majority of contacts with the self-peptide and both microbial peptides (66.7-80.6%) due to a highly tilted TCR-binding topology on the peptide-MHC surface. Further, a neighbouring residue located on the same TCR loop (CDR3α E98) forms an energetically critical interaction with the MHC molecule. These data show how binding by a self-reactive TCR favors crossreactivity between self and microbial antigens. PMID:24136005

  14. Leukocyte Beta-Catenin Expression Is Disturbed in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Orme, Jacob J; Du, Yong; Vanarsa, Kamala; Wu, Tianfu; Satterthwaite, Anne B; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is relatively understudied in immunity and autoimmunity. β-catenin blocks inflammatory mediators and favors tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) phenotypes. We show here that leukocytes from lupus-prone mice and SLE patients express diminished β-catenin transcriptional activity, particularly in myeloid cells, although other leukocytes revealed similar trends. Serum levels of DKK-1, an inhibitor under transcriptional control of Wnt/β-catenin, were also decreased in lupus-prone mice. Surprisingly, however, preemptive deletion of β-catenin from macrophages appears to have no effect on lupus development, even in mice with varying genetic loads for lupus. Although myeloid-specific loss of β-catenin does not seem to be important for lupus development, the potential role of this transcription factor in other leukocytes and renal cells remain to be elucidated. PMID:27548498

  15. Leukocyte Beta-Catenin Expression Is Disturbed in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Jacob J.; Du, Yong; Vanarsa, Kamala; Wu, Tianfu; Satterthwaite, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is relatively understudied in immunity and autoimmunity. β-catenin blocks inflammatory mediators and favors tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) phenotypes. We show here that leukocytes from lupus-prone mice and SLE patients express diminished β-catenin transcriptional activity, particularly in myeloid cells, although other leukocytes revealed similar trends. Serum levels of DKK-1, an inhibitor under transcriptional control of Wnt/β-catenin, were also decreased in lupus-prone mice. Surprisingly, however, preemptive deletion of β-catenin from macrophages appears to have no effect on lupus development, even in mice with varying genetic loads for lupus. Although myeloid-specific loss of β-catenin does not seem to be important for lupus development, the potential role of this transcription factor in other leukocytes and renal cells remain to be elucidated. PMID:27548498

  16. Hydrogen peroxide-induced production of a 40 kDa immunoreactive thyroglobulin fragment in human thyroid cells: the onset of thyroid autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Duthoit, C; Estienne, V; Giraud, A; Durand-Gorde, J M; Rasmussen, A K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Carayon, P; Ruf, J

    2001-01-01

    We recently reported that, during in vitro thyroid-hormone synthesis, H(2)O(2) stress cleaved thyroglobulin (Tg) into C-terminal peptides. These peptides were found to contain the immunodominant region of Tg recognized by Tg autoantibodies from patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. To test the hypothesis that Tg fragmentation is an early upstream initiating event involved in Tg autoimmune response and the consequence of oxidative injuries, we studied the effect of H(2)O(2) stress on human thyroid cells. In culture conditions allowing Tg synthesis and iodine organification by the cells, we found that bolus addition of increasing millimolar doses of H(2)O(2) induced a dose-response appearance of floating cells in the culture medium. These cells apparently resulted from a necrotic process, and they bore iodinated Tg fragments. These fragments were found to be similar to those previously obtained in vitro from purified Tg. In both cases, Tg peptides were recognized by a well-defined monoclonal antibody directed to the immunodominant region of Tg. The smallest immunoreactive Tg peptide had a molecular mass of 40 kDa and entered human thyrocytes more efficiently than the entire Tg. These data suggest that thyrocytes exposed to locally increased H(2)O(2) doses accumulate fragmented Tg for further delivery into surrounding living thyrocytes in the course of an autoimmune response. PMID:11736644

  17. Clearing the complexity: immune complexes and their treatment in lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Toong, Catherine; Adelstein, Stephen; Phan, Tri Giang

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a classic antibody-mediated systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the development of autoantibodies to ubiquitous self-antigens (such as antinuclear antibodies and antidouble-stranded DNA antibodies) and widespread deposition of immune complexes in affected tissues. Deposition of immune complexes in the kidney results in glomerular damage and occurs in all forms of lupus nephritis. The development of nephritis carries a poor prognosis and high risk of developing end-stage renal failure despite recent therapeutic advances. Here we review the role of DNA-anti-DNA immune complexes in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis and possible new treatment strategies aimed at their control. PMID:21694945

  18. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H; Guns, Emma S; McNagny, Kelly M; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%- 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  19. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R.; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H.; Guns, Emma S.; McNagny, Kelly M.; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%– 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  20. Induction of lupus-related specific autoantibodies by non-specific inflammation caused by an intraperitoneal injection of n-hexadecane in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yoshiki; Ono, Nobutaka; Akaogi, Jun; Nacionales, Dina C; Yamasaki, Yoshioki; Barker, Tolga T; Reeves, Westley H; Satoh, Minoru

    2006-02-01

    A single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of pristane, incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), or the adjuvant oil squalene, but not high molecular weight medicinal mineral oils, induces lupus-related autoantibodies to nRNP/Sm and -Su in non-autoimmune strains of mice. This ability appears to be associated with the low molecular weight and adjuvanticity of hydrocarbon. n-Hexadecane (C(16)H(34)), which is present in petroleum, has adjuvant activity and induces arthritis in rodents like other lupus-inducing oils. In addition to dietary exposure to n-hexadecane in mineral oils, exposure also occurs via inhalation of oil mist, jet fuel, or diesel exhaust or by absorption through the skin. Since n-hexadecane is a low molecular weight adjuvant hydrocarbon oil similar to other lupus-inducing hydrocarbons, the present study examined whether it can also induce lupus-related autoantibodies in mice. Female BALB/cJ mice received a single i.p. injection of 0.5 ml of n-hexadecane, pristane, or saline (control). Pathology and serology (immunoglobulin levels, autoantibodies by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and ELISA) were examined 3 months later. Unexpectedly, all n-hexadecane-treated mice, but none in the other groups, developed inflammatory ascites within 2.5 months. n-Hexadecane induced hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG1, IgG2a), antinuclear (titer>1:160, 67%) and -cytoplasmic antibodies (58%) and autoantibodies to nRNP/Sm (25%), Su (33%), ssDNA (83%), and chromatin (100%). Therefore, non-specific inflammation caused by n-hexadecane resulted in the production of a limited set of specific autoantibodies. These previously unrecognized immunological effects of n-hexadecane may have implications in monitoring human exposure to hydrocarbons and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:16309812

  1. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider diagnose ...

  2. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected. PMID:27446537

  3. Phenotypic associations of genetic susceptibility loci in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Elena; Nadig, Ajay; Richardson, Bruce C; Freedman, Barry I; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Niewold, Timothy B; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Ziegler, Julie T; Langefeld, Carl D; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Brown, Elizabeth E; Kimberly, Robert P; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Merrill, Joan T; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Martin, Javier; Park, So-Yeon; Bang, So-Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Moser, Kathy L; Vyse, Timothy J; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gaffney, Patrick M; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Harley, John B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sawalha, Amr H

    2011-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease. A number of genetic loci that increase lupus susceptibility have been established. This study examines if these genetic loci also contribute to the clinical heterogeneity in lupus. Materials and methods 4001 European-derived, 1547 Hispanic, 1590 African-American and 1191 Asian lupus patients were genotyped for 16 confirmed lupus susceptibility loci. Ancestry informative markers were genotyped to calculate and adjust for admixture. The association between the risk allele in each locus was determined and compared in patients with and without the various clinical manifestations included in the ACR criteria. Results Renal disorder was significantly correlated with the lupus risk allele in ITGAM (p=5.0×10−6, OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.35) and in TNFSF4 (p=0.0013, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.25). Other significant findings include the association between risk alleles in FCGR2A and malar rash (p=0.0031, OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.33), ITGAM and discoid rash (p=0.0020, OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.33), STAT4 and protection from oral ulcers (p=0.0027, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) and IL21 and haematological disorder (p=0.0027, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.22). All these associations are significant with a false discovery rate of <0.05 and pass the significance threshold using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Significant associations were found between lupus clinical manifestations and the FCGR2A, ITGAM, STAT4, TNSF4 and IL21 genes. The findings suggest that genetic profiling might be a useful tool to predict disease manifestations in lupus patients in the future. PMID:21719445

  4. A case of mistaken identity: When lupus masquerades as primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasrouni, Edy; Rogers, Heesun J; Tabarroki, Ali; Visconte, Valeria; Traina, Fabiola; Afable, Manuel; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Autoimmune myelofibrosis is an uncommon hematologic disease characterized by anemia, bone marrow myelofibrosis, and an autoimmune feature. Myelofibrosis is often associated with other conditions, including infections, nutritional/endocrine dysfunction, toxin/drug exposure, and connective tissue diseases, including scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. Absence of clonal markers (JAK2) and heterogeneity of the symptoms often complicate the diagnosis. Case presentation: Here, we present two cases of systemic lupus erythematosus–induced autoimmune myelofibrosis. The first case is of a 36-year-old African American female with diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus at the age of 12 years. The second patient is a 44-year-old African American male with family history of systemic lupus erythematosus who developed anemia and constitutional symptoms later on. Both patients showed hypercellularity and fibrotic changes of the bone marrow. Moreover, mutational analysis showed that both patients were wild type for JAK2 (V617F and exon 12) and MPL (exon 10). Conclusions: These two cases illustrate that anemic patients with fibrotic changes in the bone marrow without other clinicopathologic features associated with primary myelofibrosis in the presence of clinical manifestations and history of an autoimmune disease should suggest an autoimmune myelofibrosis. These cases demonstrate that a good clinical history combined with molecular technologies and pathomorphologic criteria are helpful in distinguishing between primary myelofibrosis and a nonclonal myelofibrosis from an associated condition. PMID:27489629

  5. A review of the current use of rituximab in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gürcan, Hakan M; Keskin, Derin B; Stern, Joel N H; Nitzberg, Matthew A; Shekhani, Haris; Ahmed, A Razzaque

    2009-01-01

    Rituximab is a human/murine chimeric monoclonal antibody primarily used for treating non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. Recently it has also been used in the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. A literature review was conducted to determine the efficacy of rituximab in the treatment of some of these autoimmune diseases. Multiple mechanisms proposed for the rituximab mediated B cell depletion are also discussed. The efficacy of rituximab is well-established and it is FDA approved for treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, data on the use of rituximab is presented from 92 studies involving 1197 patients with the following diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, pemphigus vulgaris, hemophilia A, cold agglutinin disease, Sjogren's syndrome, graft vs. host disease, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, cryoglobulinemia, IgM mediated neuropathy, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, idiopathic membranous nephropathy, dermatomyositis, and opsoclonus myoclonus. The efficacy varies among different autoimmune diseases. The cumulative data would suggest that in the vast majority of studies in this review, RTX has a beneficial role in their treatment. While rituximab is very effective in the depletion of B cells, current research suggests it may also influence other cells of the immune system by re-establishing immune homeostasis and tolerance. The safety profile of RTX reveals that most reactions are infusion related. In patients with autoimmune diseases the incidence of serious and severe side effects is low. Systemic infection still remains a major concern and may result in death. PMID:19000786

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  8. Emerging role of adipokines in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Miao; Zhang, Tian-Ping; Leng, Rui-Xue; Li, Xiang-Pei; Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Hai-Rong; Ye, Dong-Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by multisystem organ involvement and unclear pathogenesis. Several adipokines synthesized in the adipose tissue, including leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and chemerin, have been explored in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, especially SLE, and results suggest that these mediators may be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE. However, the current results are controversial. In this review, we will briefly discuss the expression and possible pathogenic role of several important adipokines, including leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and chemerin in SLE. PMID:27314594

  9. Open questions in autoimmunity: discussions from the 2013 Controversies in Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Meeting.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    The recent CORA (Controversies in Rheumatology and Autoimmunity) meeting held in 2013 represented a unique opportunity for rheumatologists to address several topics. Among these, four topics include: (i) the role of epigenetic changes in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as shown by studies in monozygotic twins; (ii) the cardiovascular and atherosclerotic risk in patients with RA treated with biologics; (iii) the use of new biomarkers for the diagnosis and follow-up of RA and other autoimmune diseases, as represented by the new automatic machines for anti-nuclear antibodies detection, or ultrasound imaging to follow RA progression; and (iv) the latest guidelines on how to use and manage biologic therapies in RA and other autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. In summary, we will herein present these topics of discussion and underline the conclusions obtained by rheumatologists during the 2013 CORA Meeting. PMID:24642104

  10. The microRNA miR-148a functions as a critical regulator of B cell tolerance and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martin, Alicia; Adams, Brian D; Lai, Maoyi; Shepherd, Jovan; Salvador-Bernaldez, Maria; Salvador, Jesus M; Lu, Jun; Nemazee, David; Xiao, Changchun

    2016-04-01

    Autoreactive B cells have critical roles in a large diversity of autoimmune diseases, but the molecular pathways that control these cells remain poorly understood. We performed an in vivo functional screen of a lymphocyte-expressed microRNA library and identified miR-148a as a potent regulator of B cell tolerance. Elevated miR-148a expression impaired B cell tolerance by promoting the survival of immature B cells after engagement of the B cell antigen receptor by suppressing the expression of the autoimmune suppressor Gadd45α, the tumor suppressor PTEN and the pro-apoptotic protein Bim. Furthermore, increased expression of miR-148a, which occurs frequently in patients with lupus and lupus-prone mice, facilitated the development of lethal autoimmune disease in a mouse model of lupus. Our studies demonstrate a function for miR-148a as a regulator of B cell tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:26901150

  11. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. ); Olsen, N.J. ); Siminovitch, K.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  12. Bilaterally symmetrical alopecia with reticulated hyperpigmentation: a manifestation of cutaneous lupus erythematosus in a dog with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Olivry, T; Linder, K E

    2013-07-01

    An adult castrated male Doberman Pinscher was presented with a 6-month history of well-demarcated alopecic patches with reticulated hyperpigmentation and fine peripheral scaling on the axillae, thorax, abdomen, inguinal region, and thighs. The dog later developed hyperthermia, lethargy, apparent joint pain, peripheral lymphadenomegaly, vomiting, and diarrhea. Relevant laboratory tests results included anemia, thrombocytopenia, proteinuria, and an elevated antinuclear antibodies serum titer. Histologically, skin biopsy specimens had a lymphocyte-rich interface dermatitis and interface mural folliculitis ending in follicular destruction. Altogether, these signs were consistent with a unique alopecic variant of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, eventually associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. This rare form of chronic cutaneous lupus needs to be added to the expanding list of lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune alopecias in dogs. PMID:23051917

  13. 77 FR 41792 - Prospective Grant of Co-Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... hematological malignancies such as hairy cell leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and autoimmune disease such as lupus and Sjogren's syndrome. The specific...

  14. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the recognition of these disorders is of utmost importance. In general, there are no brain-imaging modalities or biomarkers specific of these disorders other than the demonstration of the neuronal antibodies. A disease classification based on these antibodies provides information on prognosis and paraneoplastic aetiology. This article focuses on recent clinical advances, newly characterised antibodies and treatment approaches to these disorders. PMID:27330568

  15. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  16. Role of IgE in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan, Miguel A; Sagar, Divya; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest that IgE plays a significant role in autoimmunity. The presence of circulating self-reactive IgE in patients with autoimmune disorders has been long known but, at the same time, largely understudied. However, studies have shown that the increased IgE concentration is not associated with higher prevalence for atopy and allergy in patients with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. IgE-mediated mechanisms are conventionally known to facilitate degranulation of mast cells and basophils and promote TH2 immunity, mechanisms that are not only central to mounting an appropriate defense against parasitic worms, noxious substances, toxins, venoms, and environmental irritants but that also trigger exuberant allergic reactions in patients with allergies. More recently, IgE autoantibodies have been recognized to participate in the self-inflicted damaging immune responses that characterize autoimmunity. Such autoimmune responses include direct damage on tissue-containing autoantigens, activation and migration of basophils to lymph nodes, and, as observed most recently, induction of type 1 interferon responses from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The importance of IgE as a central pathogenic mechanism in autoimmunity has now been clinically validated by the approval of omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and for the clinical benefit of patients with bullous pemphigoid. In this review we summarize recent reports describing the prevalence of self-reactive IgE and discuss novel findings that incriminate IgE as central in the pathogenesis of inflammatory autoimmune disorders. PMID:27264000

  17. Toward the Development of a Lupus Interactive Navigator to Facilitate Patients and Their Health Care Providers in the Management of Lupus: Results of Web-Based Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Carolyn; DaCosta, Deborah; Rochon, Murray; Eng, Davy

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus is an inflammatory autoimmune disease associated with high morbidity and unacceptable mortality. Information and management tools are needed to help persons with lupus cope with their illness and facilitate health care providers in the delivery of care. Objective The objective of the study was to assess the needs and find solutions to support persons with lupus and their health care providers. Methods Web-based surveys were distributed across Canada to persons with lupus and their relatives (n=3119), rheumatologists (n=517), and arthritis health professionals (AHPs) (n=226) by Lupus Canada, the Canadian Rheumatology Association, and the Arthritis Health Professions Association, respectively. Results The survey sample comprised 665 (21.3%) persons with lupus, 98 (19.0%) rheumatologists, and 74 (32.7%) AHPs. Among the participants with lupus, 92.4% were female, the average age was 46.8 (SD 12.7) years, 79.2% were Caucasian, and 58.8% were employed. All Canadian provinces and territories were represented. The majority (43.3%) of respondents were from Ontario. Mean disease duration was 10.2 (SD 9.5) years, and 41.9% rated their global assessment as fair or poor. There was high agreement between lupus participants and health care providers regarding disease-specific information topics. All groups rated topics related to lupus, fatigue, medications, and stress as most important. Ratings differed among lupus participants and their health care providers regarding perceived helpfulness of some of the patient tools, such as the option to view test results. Needs differed for persons with lupus based on age, sex, depression, stress, and disease activity. Differences in health care provider needs were based on amount of experience in treating lupus. Conclusions Information and support tools needed for persons with lupus and their health care providers were identified. These results will help guide us in the development of a Web

  18. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  19. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells induce both polyclonal expansion and differentiation of B cells isolated from healthy donors and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Traggiai, Elisabetta; Volpi, Stefano; Schena, Francesca; Gattorno, Marco; Ferlito, Francesca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Martini, Alberto

    2008-02-01

    Human bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are progenitor cells that can be expanded in vitro and differentiate into various cells of mesodermal origin. They contribute to the bone marrow reticular niche, where mature B cells and long-lived plasma cells are maintained. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells were recently shown to modulate T- and B-cell proliferation and differentiation, dendritic cell maturation, and natural killer activity. These immunoregulatory properties encouraged a possible use of these cells to modulate autoimmune responses in humans. We studied the influence of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on highly purified B-cell subsets isolated from healthy donors and total B cells from pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promoted proliferation and differentiation into immunoglobulin-secreting cells of transitional and naive B cells stimulated with an agonist of Toll-like receptor 9, in the absence of B cell receptor triggering. They strongly enhanced proliferation and differentiation into plasma cells of memory B-cell populations. A similar effect was observed in response to polyclonal stimulation of B cells isolated from pediatric patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. This study casts important questions on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic tool in autoimmune diseases in which B-cell activation is crucially implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:18024418

  20. Introducing Polyautoimmunity: Secondary Autoimmune Diseases No Longer Exist

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS). We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4%). Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006–September 2011). There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases. PMID:22454759

  1. DNA methylation perspectives in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Luo, Zhi-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation is now widely recognized as being critical to maintain the function of immune cells. Recent studies suggest that aberrant DNA methylation levels not only can result in immune cells autoreactivity in vitro, but also are related to autoimmunity in vivo. Environmental factors and genetic polymorphisms cause abnormal methylation, which affects the expression of certain immune-related genes, being becoming hot spot of explaining the mechanism of autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews the importance of abnormal methylation during the development of common autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, aiming at a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and providing new ideas for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26821302

  2. A Difficult and Rare Diagnosis of Autoimmune Enteropathy in a Patient Affected by Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Depince-Berger, Anne; Cremilieux, Clara; Rinaudo-Gaujous, Melanie; Genin, Christian; de Freminville, Benedicte; Lambert, Claude; Bruneau, J; Paul, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    Patients with Down syndrome are more susceptible to autoimmune pathologies, in particular endocrine or digestive diseases such as celiac disease. Autoimmune enteropathy is another form of digestive autoimmune disease, non-gluten-dependant, more often diagnosed in male neonates with immunodysregulation and polyendocrinopathy such as the Immunodysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked syndrome. It also exists in the adult, but this pathology is less known and therefore frequently under-diagnosed. Clinical manifestations are similar to celiac disease, but not improved after a gluten-free diet. Autoimmune enteropathy is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, lupus or immune deficiencies, as Common Variable Immunodeficiency. Pathological analysis of intestinal biopsies can frequently distinguish autoimmune enteropathy and celiac disease. Autoimmune enteropathy usually has an important lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the mucosa and a lack of intraepithelial lymphocytes in the gastrointestinal mucosal surface, while celiac disease usually has a polymorph infiltration of the mucosa and an important intraepithelial lymphocytes infiltration. Nevertheless, the two pathological patterns may overlap. Here we report the first case of a patient with Down syndrome associated to autoimmune enteropathy (initially diagnosed as celiac disease), chronic pancreatitis and cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Even if autoimmune pathologies are much more common in patients with Down syndrome, we would like to report on this rare and original association found in our patient. PMID:27072857

  3. Treatment targets in systemic lupus erythematosus: biology and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Marian, Valentin; Anolik, Jennifer H

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease characterized by numerous autoantibodies and clinical involvement in multiple organ systems. The immunological events triggering the onset and progression of clinical manifestations are also complex and multi-step, including breach of tolerance in the adaptive immune system, amplification of autoimmunity through innate and adaptive immune system dysregulation, and end-organ damage. Studies of murine genetic manipulations and human risk variants have provided important clues to the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of SLE, operating at multiple of these steps. The breakdown of B-cell tolerance is probably a defining and early event in the disease process and may occur by multiple pathways, including alterations in factors that affect B-cell activation thresholds, B-cell longevity, and apoptotic cell processing. Examples of amplification of autoimmunity on the adaptive immune system side include disturbances in B-cell/T-cell collaboration. B cells can also amplify innate immune cell activation via antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms. Indeed, one of the key amplification loops in SLE is the activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells via autoantibodies and RNA-containing and DNA-containing immune complexes, which act as Toll-like receptor ligands, stimulating the secretion of large quantities of IFNα. A more recent link between the innate and adaptive immune system in SLE includes the neutrophil, which can be primed by interferon and autoantibodies to release neutrophil extracellular traps as an additional source of immunogenic DNA, histones, and neutrophil proteins. The innate immune system activation then feeds back, driving autoreactive B-cell and T-cell survival and maturation. This self-perpetuating disease cycle creates the opportunity for targeted treatment inventions at multiple steps. PMID:23281796

  4. Two case reports indicating the dilemma in diagnosing lupus cerebritis.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dharitri; Chatterjee, Shuddhosatta; Ahmad, Bashar Imam; Das, Shantanu

    2013-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a connective-tissue disorder commonly affecting females of reproductive age group. Lupus Cerebritis is a serious neurological complication encountered in a good percentage of SLE cases. In this report, we discuss two Lupus Cerebritis patients, who were successfully diagnosed and treated. The first case, presented with generalized seizure, severe metabolic acidosis, and shock, with a history of fever of one-month duration. The second case manifested with an attack of generalized seizure after suffering from low-grade intermittent fever and joint pains for a duration of one-and-a-half months. Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement in SLE is caused by an inflammatory response of the autoimmune system, precipitated by an increased concentration of cytokines. Prompt identification of Lupus Cerebritis is extremely difficult, mainly because there is no single laboratory or radiological confirmatory test. Assessment of the clinical features and neurological signs, along with detection of antibodies in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid are necessary to arrive at a diagnosis. Lupus Cerebritis should be included in the provisional diagnosis of a female patient of reproductive age group, who presents with complicated neurological manifestations and with no clear-cut clinical, pathological, or image finding. PMID:24479062

  5. Evaluating the role of nucleic acid antigens in murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Amanda A; Bonegio, Ramon G B; Rifkin, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    Impaired apoptotic cell clearance is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disease, in particular systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Endogenous RNA- and DNA-containing autoantigens released from dying cells can engage Toll-like receptors (TLR) 7/8 and TLR9, respectively in a number of immune cell types, thereby promoting innate and adaptive immune responses. Mouse models of lupus reliably phenocopy many of the characteristic features of SLE in humans and these models have proved invaluable in defining disease mechanisms. TLR7 signaling is essential for the development of autoantibodies to RNA and RNA-associated proteins like Sm and RNP, while TLR9 signaling is important for the development of antibodies to DNA and chromatin. TLR7 deficiency ameliorates end-organ disease, but, surprisingly, TLR9 deficiency exacerbates disease, possibly as a result of TLR7 overactivity in TLR9-deficient mice. Deficiency of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) inhibits autoantibody production and ameliorates disease likely due to its role in both TLR7 and TLR9 signaling. In this report we describe methods to analyze two commonly used mouse models of SLE in which TLRs and/or IRF5 have been shown to play a role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:24957237

  6. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    PubMed

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  7. Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Miziara, Ivan Dieb; Mahmoud, Ali; Chagury, Azis Arruda; Alves, Ricardo Dourado

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE) is an autoantibody-mediated disease with subepidermal blisters. It is a rare form of presentation of SLE that occurs in less than 5% of cases of lupus. Case Report: A 27-year-old, female, FRS patient reported the appearance of painful bullous lesions in the left nasal wing and left buccal mucosa that displayed sudden and rapid growth. She sought advice from emergency dermatology staff 15 days after onset and was hospitalized with suspected bullous disease. Intravenous antibiotics and steroids were administered initially, but the patient showed no improvement during hospitalization. She displayed further extensive injuries to the trunk, axillae, and vulva as well as disruption of the bullous lesions, which remained as hyperemic scars. Incisional biopsy of a lesion in the left buccal mucosa was performed, and pathological results indicated mucositis with extensive erosion and the presence of a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate with degeneration of basal cells and apoptotic keratinocytes. Under direct immunofluorescence, the skin showed anti-IgA, anti-IgM, and anti-IgG linear fluorescence on the continuous dermal side of the cleavage. Indirect immunofluorescence of the skin showed conjugated anti-IgA, was anti-IgM negative, and displayed pemphigus in conjunction with anti-IgG fluorescence in the nucleus of keratinocytes, consistent with a diagnosis of bullous lupus erythematosus. Discussion: BSLE is an acquired autoimmune bullous disease caused by autoantibodies against type VII collagen or other components of the junctional zone, epidermis, and dermis. It must be differentiated from the secondary bubbles and vacuolar degeneration of the basement membrane that may occur in acute and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. PMID:25992032

  8. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  9. Self-reactive IgE exacerbates interferon responses associated with autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Henault, Jill; Riggs, Jeffrey M.; Karnell, Jodi L.; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Li, Jianqing; Shirinian, Lena; Xu, Linda; Casey, Kerry A.; Smith, Michael A.; Khatry, Deepak B.; Izhak, Liat; Clarke, Lorraine; Herbst, Ronald; Ettinger, Rachel; Petri, Michelle; Clark, Marcus R.; Mustelin, Tomas; Kolbeck, Roland; Sanjuan, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Canonically, IgE mediates allergic immune responses by triggering mast cells and basophils to release histamine and Type 2 helper cytokines. Here, we report that in human systemic lupus erythematosus, IgE antibodies specific for double-stranded DNA activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), an immune cell type linked to viral defense, leading to the secretion of substantial amounts of interferon-α. The concentrations of dsDNA-specific IgE found in patient serum correlated with disease severity and greatly potentiated pDC functions by triggering phagocytosis via FcεRI followed by Toll-like receptor 9-mediated DNA sensing in phagosomes. These findings expand the known pathogenic mechanisms of IgE-mediated inflammation beyond those found in allergy and demonstrate that IgE can trigger interferon responses capable of exacerbating self-destructive autoimmune responses. PMID:26692173

  10. Lupus and Your Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recipients 2014 LIFELINE Grant Program™ Recipients Lupus Insight Prize Evelyn V. Hess, MD, MACP, MACR, Award About ... V. Hess Mary Betty Stevens, MD, Young Investigator Prize About Dr. Mary Betty Stevens Career Development Award ...

  11. Lupus Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lupus Q&A with Sheri R. Abrams - Social Security and Disability Q&A with Dr. Betsy Blazek- ... Life Insurance Employment, Disability and Legal Issues Social Security Disability Applying for Social Security Disability Work Related ...

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, S J; Friedlander, A H; Swerdloff, M

    1980-04-01

    A case of osteomyelitis of the mandible in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus is described. Both the disease process and the treatment modalities must be understood for correct management. PMID:6928895

  13. P-glycoprotein in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Macias Díaz, S; Vera-Recabarren, M; Vázquez de Lara, L; Méndez Martínez, S; Soto-Santillán, P; González-Ramírez, R; Ruiz-Arguelles, A

    2015-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a transmembrane protein of 170 kD encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1) gene, localized on chromosome 7. More than 50 polymorphisms of the MDR-1 gene have been described; a subset of these has been shown to play a pathophysiological role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease, femoral head osteonecrosis induced by steroids, lung cancer and renal epithelial tumors. Polymorphisms that have a protective effect on the development of conditions such as Parkinson disease have also been identified. P-glycoprotein belongs to the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter superfamily and its structure comprises a chain of approximately 1280 aminoacid residues with an N-C terminal structure, arranged as 2 homologous halves, each of which has 6 transmembrane segments, with a total of 12 segments with 2 cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains. Many cytokines like interleukin 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha increase Pgp expression and activity. Pgp functions as an efflux pump for a variety of toxins in order to protect particular organs and tissues as the central nervous system. Pgp transports a variety of substrates including glucocorticoids while other drugs such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A act as modulators of this protein. The most widely used method to measure Pgp activity is flow cytometry using naturally fluorescent substrates such as anthracyclines or rhodamine 123. The study of drug resistance and its association to Pgp began with the study of resistance to chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer and antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus; however, the role of Pgp in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis has been a focus of study lately and has emerged as an important mechanism by which treatment failure occurs. The present review analyzes the role of Pgp in these autoimmune diseases. PMID:25712147

  14. Characterization of the in vitro expressed autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of human titin encoded by TTN exons 248-249

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinka, L.; McCann, S.; Budde, J.; Sethi, S.; Guidos, M.; Giles, R.; Walker, G.R.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Affinity purification of the autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of titin. {yields} Partial sequence analysis confirms that the peptides is in the I band region of titin. {yields} This region of the human titin shows high degree of homology to mouse titin N2-A. -- Abstract: Autoimmune rippling muscle disease (ARMD) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Past studies in our laboratory recognized a very high molecular weight skeletal muscle protein antigen identified by ARMD patient antisera as the titin isoform. These past studies used antisera from ARMD and MG patients as probes to screen a human skeletal muscle cDNA library and several pBluescript clones revealed supporting expression of immunoreactive peptides. This study characterizes the products of subcloning the titin immunoreactive domain into pGEX-3X and the subsequent fusion protein. Sequence analysis of the fusion gene indicates the cloned titin domain (GenBank ID: (EU428784)) is in frame and is derived from a sequence of N2-A spanning the exons 248-250 an area that encodes the fibronectin III domain. PCR and EcoR1 restriction mapping studies have demonstrated that the inserted cDNA is of a size that is predicted by bioinformatics analysis of the subclone. Expression of the fusion protein result in the isolation of a polypeptide of 52 kDa consistent with the predicted inferred amino acid sequence. Immunoblot experiments of the fusion protein, using rippling muscle/myasthenia gravis antisera, demonstrate that only the titin domain is immunoreactive.

  15. T-cell receptor Vbeta gene expression in experimental lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Sutmuller, M; Baelde, H J; Ouellette, S; De Heer, E; Bruijn, J A

    1998-01-01

    A limited T-cell receptor (TCR) Vbeta repertoire employed by autoreactive T cells may be related to the development and course of autoimmune diseases. Vbeta repertoire skewing has been observed not only in man, but also in animal models of several human autoimmune diseases, such as MRL-lpr mice, which spontaneously develop a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like disease. Murine chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an inducible model for SLE, involving direct interaction between donor T cells and recipient B cells. It is not known whether Vbeta-specific T-cell subsets are pathogenically involved in this model. Retroviral superantigens such as Mls-1 are known to have a profound impact on the TCR Vbeta repertoire in mice. Restriction of the peripheral TCR repertoire may result from intrathymic expression of Mls-1, which causes deletion of T cells expressing Vbeta6, -7, -8.1, or -9. Mls-1 incompatibility between donor and recipient can be used to determine the involvement of these TCR Vbeta families in GVHD. In the present study we induced GVHD in several strain combinations to investigate TCR Vbeta gene expression during GVHD, and the effect of Mls-1 incompatibility on the TCR Vbeta repertoire. TCR Vbeta gene expression was determined using an RNase protection assay. Our results indicate that T cells expressing the Vbeta2 or Vbeta16 chain play an important pathogenetic role, while T cells bearing the Vbeta1 or Vbeta6 chain may be related to self-limitation of the lupus-like disease in this model. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9767452

  16. Autoantibodies to glutathione S-transferase theta 1 in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and other autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ardesjö, Brita; Hansson, Caisa M; Bruder, Carl E G; Rorsman, Fredrik; Betterle, Corrado; Dumanski, Jan P; Kämpe, Olle; Ekwall, Olov

    2008-06-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an enigmatic disorder with a suggested autoimmune basis. A variety of autoantigens have been suggested but no specific or highly directed epitope has been identified. To address this issue, we constructed a cDNA library from normal human choledochus and screened expressing clones with serum from a patient with PSC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Based on this screening, glutathione S-transferase theta 1 (GSTT1) was identified as a potential autoantigenic target. To study the specificity of GSTT1, we determined immunoreactivity using a panel of 58 patients with PSC, with and without IBD, 57 patients with IBD, 31 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 30 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), 20 patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, 22 patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I, 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 20 patients with Sjögren's syndrome, 12 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, 28 patients with Addison's disease, 27 patients with Grave's disease, 17 with myasthenia gravis, and 118 healthy controls. Reactivity against GSTT1 was found with PSC and IBD as well as some patients with other autoimmune pathology, indicating that this population of antibodies is neither specific nor a sensitive serologic marker for PSC, but the frequency was clearly higher in autoimmune patients than controls. GSTT1-antibodies have been described in persons with GSTT1-null genotype and are suggested to develop as an alloimmune response to blood transfusions from GSTT1-positive donors or pregnancies with GSTT1-positive children. Therefore, two IBD patients with and 15 PSC patients without GSTT1-antibodies were genotyped for GSTT1 to investigate if the presence of GSTT1-antibodies was associated with the GSTT1-null genotype and possibly caused by an alloimmune response. Both IBD patients and three of the PSC patients were of the GSTT1-null genotype. We note that the frequency of GSTT1

  17. Evidence from Human and Animal Studies: Pathological Roles of CD8+ T Cells in Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mu; Peyret, Corentin; Shi, Xiang Qun; Siron, Nicolas; Jang, Jeong Ho; Wu, Sonia; Fournier, Sylvie; Zhang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) affect millions of people worldwide. Despite significant advances in understanding the pathology, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune-mediated neuropathies remain elusive. T lymphocytes definitely play an important role in disease pathogenesis and CD4+ T cells have been the main area of research for decades. This is partly due to the fact that the most frequent animal model to study autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is experimental allergic neuritis (EAN). As it is induced commonly by immunization with peripheral nerve proteins, EAN is driven mainly by CD4+ T cells. However, similarly to what has been reported for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, a significant body of evidence indicates that CD8+ T cells may play a pathogenic role in GBS and CIDP disease development and/or progression. Here, we summarize clinical studies pertaining to the presence and potential role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. We also discuss the findings from our most recent studies using a transgenic mouse line (L31 mice) in which the T cell co-stimulator molecule B7.2 (CD86) is constitutively expressed in antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues. L31 mice spontaneously develop peripheral neuropathy, and CD8+ T cells are found accumulating in peripheral nerves of symptomatic animals. Interestingly, depletion of CD4+ T cells accelerates disease onset and increases disease prevalence. Finally, we point out some unanswered questions for future research to dissect the critical roles of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26528293

  18. Obstetric nephrology: lupus and lupus nephritis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Todd J; White, Wendy M; Moder, Kevin G; Smyth, Andrew; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    SLE is a multi-organ autoimmune disease that affects women of childbearing age. Renal involvement in the form of either active lupus nephritis (LN) at the time of conception, or a LN new onset or flare during pregnancy increases the risks of preterm delivery, pre-eclampsia, maternal mortality, fetal/neonatal demise, and intrauterine growth restriction. Consequently, current recommendations advise that the affected woman achieve a stable remission of her renal disease for at least 6 months before conception. Hormonal and immune system changes in pregnancy may affect disease activity and progression, and published evidence suggests that there is an increased risk for a LN flare during pregnancy. The major goal of immunosuppressive therapy in pregnancy is control of disease activity with medications that are relatively safe for a growing fetus. Therefore, the use of mycophenolate mofetil, due to increasing evidence supporting its teratogenicity, is contraindicated during pregnancy. Worsening proteinuria, which commonly occurs in proteinuric renal diseases toward the end of pregnancy, should be differentiated from a LN flare and/or pre-eclampsia, a pregnancy-specific condition clinically characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. These considerations present challenges that underscore the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach when caring for these patients, including a nephrologist, rheumatologist, and obstetrician who have experience with these pregnancy-related complications. This review discusses the pathogenesis, maternal and fetal risks, and management pertinent to SLE patients with new onset or a history of LN predating pregnancy. PMID:22879437

  19. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Focus on Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi; Katsarogiannis, Evangelos; Lourenço, Filipa; Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) caused by reactivation of the JC virus (JCV), a human polyomavirus, occurs in autoimmune disorders, most frequently in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We describe a HIV-negative 34-year-old female with SLE who had been treated with immunosuppressant therapy (IST; steroids and azathioprine) since 2004. In 2011, she developed decreased sensation and weakness of the right hand, followed by vertigo and gait instability. The diagnosis of PML was made on the basis of brain MRI findings (posterior fossa lesions) and JCV isolation from the cerebrospinal fluid (700 copies/ml). IST was immediately discontinued. Cidofovir, mirtazapine, mefloquine and cycles of cytarabine were sequentially added, but there was progressive deterioration with a fatal outcome 1 year after disease onset. This report discusses current therapeutic choices for PML and the importance of early infection screening when SLE patients present with neurological symptoms. In the light of recent reports of PML in SLE patients treated with rituximab or belimumab, we highlight that other IST may just as well be implicated. We conclude that severe lymphopenia was most likely responsible for JCV reactivation in this patient and discuss how effective management of lymphopenia in SLE and PML therapy remains an unmet need. PMID:27065427

  20. [Ocular fundus lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus model mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Yokoyama, T; Kodera, S; Zhang, D; Hirose, S

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate spontaneous development of the ocular fundus abnormalities associated with collagen disease, we investigated the ocular fundus lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) models. (NZW x BXSB) F1 mice were employed as SLE models with antiphospholipid syndrome. The abnormal findings in the ocular fundus were recorded with a fundus camera for small animals (KOWA Co., Ltd.), and the chorioretinal lesions were studied histopathologically. As in the systemic symptoms of SLE, the incidence of ocular fundus abnormalities in these (NZW x BXSB) F1 mice was significantly higher in males than in females, suggesting the influence of the Yaa (Y chromosome-linked autoimmune acceleration) gene. Lesions in the fundus appeared in the form of white spots, which increased in number along with the course of the disease. The lesion developed into retinal detachment in some animals. Dilatation of veins and narrowing of arteries were marked. These lesions were very similar to multifocal posterior pigment epitheliopathy (MPPE) in humans in that white spots appear first and then develop into exudative retinal detachment caused by retinal pigment epithelial disorder. Histopathological findings included 1. structural destruction of the photoreceptor cell layer, 2. degeneration and loss of the retinal pigment epithelium, and 3. narrowing and occlusion of the choriocapillaris associated with thrombus formation, cellular infiltration into the surrounding tissues, and wall thickening of the choroidal arterioles. The study of these SLE mouse may contribute to the elucidation of abnormalities in the fundus associated with collagen diseases, including the relationship between thrombus formation and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:9489364

  1. Immune Response Modulation by Vitamin D: Role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu; Hirigoyen, Daniela; Naves, Rodrigo; Burgos, Paula Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays key roles as a natural immune modulator and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This review presents a summary and analysis of the recent literature regarding immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D as well as its importance in SLE development, clinical severity, and possible effects of supplementation in disease treatment. PMID:26528285

  2. Delayed diagnosis of porphyria based on manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2006-01-01

    In this case report, a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis is presented, who was diagnosed with hereditary coproporphyria after 5 years of follow-up. Diagnostic difficulties and possible role of genetic background in the autoimmune response in patients with porphyria are briefly discussed. PMID:17048215

  3. The role of tyrosine kinases in systemic lupus erythematosus and their potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wen-Hai; Cohen, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    The autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by loss of tolerance to nuclear antigens. Breakdown of tolerance is associated with alterations in T-cell and B-cell receptor signal transduction, including increased protein phosphorylation that may underlie pathogenesis and explain the characteristic hyperactivity of T and B cells and other immune cells in active disease. Tyrosine kinases play a central role in signaling processes in cells known to be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the function of tyrosine kinases in immune cell signaling pathways. In this review, we will summarize the function of tyrosine kinases and their novel inhibitors from studies made in animal lupus models and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. PMID:24678775

  4. Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy Targets Aldose Reductase and SOD2

    PubMed Central

    Prunotto, Marco; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Candiano, Giovanni; Murtas, Corrado; Bruschi, Maurizio; Corradini, Emilia; Trivelli, Antonella; Magnasco, Alberto; Petretto, Andrea; Santucci, Laura; Mattei, Silvia; Gatti, Rita; Scolari, Francesco; Kador, Peter; Allegri, Landino

    2010-01-01

    Glomerular targets of autoimmunity in human membranous nephropathy are poorly understood. Here, we used a combined proteomic approach to identify specific antibodies against podocyte proteins in both serum and glomeruli of patients with membranous nephropathy (MN). We detected specific anti–aldose reductase (AR) and anti–manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) IgG4 in sera of patients with MN. We also eluted high titers of anti-AR and anti-SOD2 IgG4 from microdissected glomeruli of three biopsies of MN kidneys but not from biopsies of other glomerulonephritides characterized by IgG deposition (five lupus nephritis and two membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis). We identified both antigens in MN biopsies but not in other renal pathologies or normal kidney. Confocal and immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) showed co-localization of anti-AR and anti-SOD2 with IgG4 and C5b-9 in electron-dense podocyte immune deposits. Preliminary in vitro experiments showed an increase of SOD2 expression on podocyte plasma membrane after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. In conclusion, our data support AR and SOD2 as renal antigens of human MN and suggest that oxidative stress may drive glomerular SOD2 expression. PMID:20150532

  5. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  6. Progress toward production of immunologic tolerance with no or minimal toxic immunosuppression for prevention of immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Good, R A

    2000-07-01

    With donor and recipient matched at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, peripheral lymphoid tissue transplantation can be carried out without producing a graft-versus-host reaction or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), thus correcting profound T cell immunodeficiencies of neonatally thymectomized mice. This analysis set the stage for clinical application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to provide for the first time cure of a human disease. With successful BMT, we cured immunologic deficiencies of a patient with XL severe combined immunodeficiency; thereafter we were the first to employ BMT to cure aplastic anemia. BMT regularly corrects immune and hematologic deficiencies caused by fatal irradiation without producing GVHD if the bone marrow (BM) used for the transplants has been purged of postthymic T cells. Over two decades in conjunction with Ikehara et al., we have shown that lethal total body irradiation (TBI) plus allogeneic BMT prevents or cures many organ-specific and systemic experimental autoimmune diseases. Animal models successfully treated by BMT include type I diabetes in nonobese diabetes (NOD) mice, type II diabetes in insulin-insensitive, glucose intolerant, diabetes mellitus (KK/Ay) mice, and autoimmune lupus erythematosus (LE) and glomerulonephritis in New Zealand Black x New Zealand White first generation hybrid (NZB x NZW)F1 females. El-Badri extended Ildstad's original research showing a high frequency of survival with a normal functioning immune system after stable mixed chimerism is produced by mixed BMT in C57BL/6 (normal long-lived black strain) mice transplanted with T cell-depleted marrow (TCDM) from BALB/c ("normal" long-lived strain) allogeneic donors and C57BL/6 syngeneic donors. We showed that osteoblasts act as facilitator cells for allogeneic BMT and promote engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells. Wang et al. then showed that the autoimmunities and fulminating renal disease of BXSB (C57BL x SB cross and

  7. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  8. Lupus Therapies Continue to Evolve

    MedlinePlus

    ... common form, called systemic lupus erythematosus, commonly causes mouth sores, rash, fatigue, joint pain and swelling, as well ... symptoms such as fatigue, rashes, joint pain or mouth sores. Part of what makes lupus research such a ...

  9. B Cells with Regulatory Function in Animal Models of Autoimmune and Non-Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Wang, Zuomin; Han, Xiaozhe

    2015-01-01

    Although the identification of B cell subsets with negative regulatory functions and the definition of their mechanisms of action are recent events, the important negative regulatory roles of B cells in immune responses are now broadly recognized. There is an emerging appreciation for the pivotal role played by B cells in several areas of human diseases including autoimmune diseases and non-autoimmune diseases such as parasite infections and cancer. The recent research advancement of regulatory B cells in human disease coincides with the vastly accelerated pace of research on the bridging of innate and adaptive immune system. Current study and our continued research may provide better understanding of the mechanisms that promote regulatory B10 cell function to counteract exaggerated immune activation in autoimmune as well as non-autoimmune conditions. This review is focused on the current knowledge of BREG functions studied in animal models of autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases. PMID:26236565

  10. Anti-CD22/CD20 Bispecific Antibody with Enhanced Trogocytosis for Treatment of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Edmund A.; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The humanized anti-CD22 antibody, epratuzumab, has demonstrated therapeutic activity in clinical trials of lymphoma, leukemia and autoimmune diseases, treating currently over 1500 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemias, Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia, Sjögren’s syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Because epratuzumab reduces on average only 35% of circulating B cells in patients, and has minimal antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and negligible complement-dependent cytotoxicity when evaluated in vitro, its therapeutic activity may not result completely from B-cell depletion. We reported recently that epratuzumab mediates Fc/FcR-dependent membrane transfer from B cells to effector cells via trogocytosis, resulting in a substantial reduction of multiple BCR modulators, including CD22, CD19, CD21, and CD79b, as well as key cell adhesion molecules, including CD44, CD62L, and β7 integrin, on the surface of B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from normal donors or SLE patients. Rituximab has clinical activity in lupus, but failed to achieve primary endpoints in a Phase III trial. This is the first study of trogocytosis mediated by bispecific antibodies targeting neighboring cell-surface proteins, CD22, CD20, and CD19, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. We show that, compared to epratuzumab, a bispecific hexavalent antibody comprising epratuzumab and veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 mAb) exhibits enhanced trogocytosis resulting in major reductions in B-cell surface levels of CD19, CD20, CD21, CD22, CD79b, CD44, CD62L and β7-integrin, and with considerably less immunocompromising B-cell depletion that would result with anti-CD20 mAbs such as veltuzumab or rituximab, given either alone or in combination with epratuzumab. A CD22/CD19 bispecific hexavalent antibody, which exhibited enhanced trogocytosis of some antigens and minimal B-cell depletion, may also be therapeutically

  11. Anti-CD22/CD20 Bispecific antibody with enhanced trogocytosis for treatment of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Edmund A; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M

    2014-01-01

    The humanized anti-CD22 antibody, epratuzumab, has demonstrated therapeutic activity in clinical trials of lymphoma, leukemia and autoimmune diseases, treating currently over 1500 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemias, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Because epratuzumab reduces on average only 35% of circulating B cells in patients, and has minimal antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and negligible complement-dependent cytotoxicity when evaluated in vitro, its therapeutic activity may not result completely from B-cell depletion. We reported recently that epratuzumab mediates Fc/FcR-dependent membrane transfer from B cells to effector cells via trogocytosis, resulting in a substantial reduction of multiple BCR modulators, including CD22, CD19, CD21, and CD79b, as well as key cell adhesion molecules, including CD44, CD62L, and β7 integrin, on the surface of B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from normal donors or SLE patients. Rituximab has clinical activity in lupus, but failed to achieve primary endpoints in a Phase III trial. This is the first study of trogocytosis mediated by bispecific antibodies targeting neighboring cell-surface proteins, CD22, CD20, and CD19, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. We show that, compared to epratuzumab, a bispecific hexavalent antibody comprising epratuzumab and veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 mAb) exhibits enhanced trogocytosis resulting in major reductions in B-cell surface levels of CD19, CD20, CD21, CD22, CD79b, CD44, CD62L and β7-integrin, and with considerably less immunocompromising B-cell depletion that would result with anti-CD20 mAbs such as veltuzumab or rituximab, given either alone or in combination with epratuzumab. A CD22/CD19 bispecific hexavalent antibody, which exhibited enhanced trogocytosis of some antigens and minimal B-cell depletion, may also be therapeutically useful

  12. Identification of a lupus-susceptibility locus leading to impaired clearance of apoptotic debris on New Zealand Black chromosome 13

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Evelyn; Loh, Christina; Minty, Gillian E.S.; Chang, Nan-Hua; Wither, Joan E.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic multi-organ autoimmune disease marked mainly by the production of anti-nuclear antibodies. Nuclear antigens become accessible to the immune system following apoptosis and defective clearance of apoptotic debris has been shown in several knockout mouse models to promote lupus. However, genetic loci associated with defective clearance are not well defined in spontaneously arising lupus models. We previously showed that introgression of the chromosome 13 interval from lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice onto a non-autoimmune B6 genetic background (B6.NZBc13) recapitulated many of the NZB autoimmune phenotypes. Here, we show that B6.NZBc13 mice have impaired clearance of apoptotic debris by peritoneal and tingible-body macrophages and have narrowed down the chromosomal interval of this defect using subcongenic mice with truncated NZB chromosome 13 intervals. This chromosomal region (81–94 Mb) is sufficient to produce polyclonal B and T cell activation, and expansion of dendritic cells. To fully recapitulate the autoimmune phenotypes seen in B6.NZBc13 mice, at least one additional locus located in the centromeric portion of the interval is required. Thus, we have identified a novel lupus susceptibility locus on NZB chromosome 13 that is associated with impaired clearance of apoptotic debris. PMID:23328841

  13. Amplification of autoimmune disease by infection

    PubMed Central

    Posnett, David N; Yarilin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    Reports of infection with certain chronic persistent microbes (herpesviruses or Chlamydiae) in human autoimmune diseases are consistent with the hypothesis that these microbes are reactivated in the setting of immunodeficiency and often target the site of autoimmune inflammation. New experimental animal models demonstrate the principle. A herpesvirus or Chlamydia species can be used to infect mice with induced transient autoimmune diseases. This results in increased disease severity and even relapse. The evidence suggests that the organisms are specifically imported to the inflammatory sites and cause further tissue destruction, especially when the host is immunosuppressed. We review the evidence for the amplification of autoimmune inflammatory disease by microbial infection, which may be a general mechanism applicable to many human diseases. We suggest that patients with autoimmune disorders receiving immunosuppressing drugs should benefit from preventive antiviral therapy. PMID:15743493

  14. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    PubMed

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT. PMID:26744435

  15. A Rare Presentation of Lupus Nephritis Flare up with Posterior Reversible Leucoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mani, S Hima; Shivaprasad, S M; Umesh, L

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with various neurologic or psychiatric abnormalities and Posterior Reversible Leuco Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is very rare neurological manifestation in SLE. PRES is associated with various clinical manifestations, like, seizures, visual loss, headaches, vomiting altered mental status and rarely focal neurological deficits. Other predisposing condition associated with PRES is eclampsia, accelerated hypertension, uraemia, transplantation, autoimmune diseases and/or use of immunosuppressive drugs. It is important to recognise PRES since it is a potentially reversible. We describe an unusual case of PRES caused by uraemia during lupus flare up in a patient with biopsy proven class IV lupus nephritis who presented with features of asymmetrical quadriparesis which completely reversed after haemodialysis sessions and treating lupus flare up. In our case she presented with quadriparesis which is a rare presentation and hypertensive encephalopathy was not present. PMID:26894110

  16. Non-invasive imaging to monitor lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect multiple different organs, including the kidneys and central nervous system (CNS). Conventional radiological examinations in SLE patients include volumetric/ anatomical computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US). The utility of these modalities is limited, however, due to the complexity of the disease. Furthermore, standard CT and MRI contrast agents are contraindicated in patients with renal impairment. Various radiologic methods are currently being developed to improve disease characterization in patients with SLE beyond simple anatomical endpoints. Physiological non-contrast MRI protocols have been developed to assess tissue oxygenation, glomerular filtration, renal perfusion, interstitial diffusion, and inflammation-driven fibrosis in lupus nephritis (LN) patients. For neurological symptoms, vessel size imaging (VSI, an MRI approach utilizing T2-relaxing iron oxide nanoparticles) has shown promise as a diagnostic tool. Molecular imaging probes (mostly for MRI and nuclear medicine imaging) have also been developed for diagnosing SLE with high sensitivity, and for monitoring disease activity. This paper reviews the challenges in evaluating disease activity in patients with LN and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). We describe novel MRI and positron-emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging protocols using targeted iron oxide nanoparticles and radioactive ligands, respectively, for detection of SLE-associated inflammation. PMID:26309728

  17. Infections and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Binding or Sparring Partners?

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Donato; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Extensive work on experimental animal models clearly demonstrates that infectious agents can break immunological tolerance to self-antigens and induce autoimmune disorders, mainly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The establishment of a causative link between infections and autoimmunity has been largely studied in a host of clinical studies, proving the role of infectious agents in the induction, as well as in the progression or exacerbation of SLE. However, we are far from a plain understanding of microbial-host interactions in the pathogenesis of SLE. Much serological, molecular and geoepidemiological evidence supports the relationship of different environmental infectious triggers in the inception of SLE-related autoimmune phenomena with adjuvant effects. The promotion of autoimmune responses through bystander activation or epitope spreading via multiple inflammatory pathways has been confirmed in animal models. Different viruses have been implicated in SLE pathogenesis, particularly Epstein-Barr virus, but also parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus and retroviruses. SLE patients usually have an impaired immune response towards Epstein-Barr virus and dysregulation of the viral latency period. Furthermore, the accumulation of endogenous retroviral products might trigger the production of interferon and anti-DNA antibodies. In addition, protozoan infections might even protect from autoimmune processes and rescind an ongoing B cell activation. Herein, we discuss which type of infections induce, exacerbate or inhibit autoimmune disorders and analyze the principal infection-induced immunological mechanisms influencing the development of SLE. PMID:26230690

  18. Preventing and curing citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis in a humanized mouse model using a Th2-polarizing iNKT cell agonist.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kyle M; Rytelewski, Mateusz; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Meilleur, Shannon A; Mannik, Lisa A; Yue, David; Brintnell, William C; Welch, Ian; Cairns, Ewa; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2012-07-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate lymphocytes with unique reactivity to glycolipid antigens bound to non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. They are capable of rapidly releasing pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines and constitute attractive targets for immunotherapy of a wide range of diseases including autoimmune disorders. In this study, we have explored the beneficial effects of OCH, a Th2-polarizing glycolipid agonist of iNKT cells, in a humanized mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in which citrullinated human proteins are targeted by autoaggressive immune responses in mice expressing an RA susceptibility human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4 molecule. We found for the first time that treatment with OCH both prevents and cures citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis as evidenced by resolved ankle swelling and reversed histopathological changes associated with arthritis. Also importantly, OCH treatment blocked the arthritogenic capacity of citrullinated antigen-experienced splenocytes without compromising their global responsiveness or altering the proportion of splenic naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Interestingly, administering the Th1-promoting iNKT cell glycolipid ligand α-C-galactosylceramide into HLA-DR4 transgenic mice increased the incidence of arthritis in these animals and exacerbated their clinical symptoms, strongly suggesting a role for Th1 responses in the pathogenesis of citrulline-induced arthritis. Therefore, our findings indicate a role for Th1-mediated immunopathology in citrulline-induced arthritis and provide the first evidence that iNKT cell manipulation by Th2-skewing glycolipids may be of therapeutic value in this clinically relevant model, a finding that is potentially translatable to human RA. PMID:21912419

  19. HLA-E–restricted regulatory CD8+ T cells are involved in development and control of human autoimmune type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Canfield, Steve M.; Gallagher, Mary P.; Jiang, Hong H.; Jiang, Yihua; Zheng, Zongyu; Chess, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    A key feature of the immune system is its ability to discriminate self from nonself. Breakdown in any of the mechanisms that maintain unresponsiveness to self (a state known as self-tolerance) contributes to the development of autoimmune conditions. Recent studies in mice show that CD8+ T cells specific for the unconventional MHC class I molecule Qa-1 bound to peptides derived from the signal sequence of Hsp60 (Hsp60sp) contribute to self/nonself discrimination. However, it is unclear whether they exist in humans and play a role in human autoimmune diseases. Here we have shown that CD8+ T cells specific for Hsp60sp bound to HLA-E (the human homolog of Qa-1) exist and play an important role in maintaining peripheral self-tolerance by discriminating self from nonself in humans. Furthermore, in the majority of type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients tested, there was a specific defect in CD8+ T cell recognition of HLA-E/Hsp60sp, which was associated with failure of self/nonself discrimination. However, the defect in the CD8+ T cells from most of the T1D patients tested could be corrected in vitro by exposure to autologous immature DCs loaded with the Hsp60sp peptide. These data suggest that HLA-E–restricted CD8+ T cells may play an important role in keeping self-reactive T cells in check. Thus, correction of this defect could be a potentially effective and safe approach in the therapy of T1D. PMID:20877010

  20. RNA sensing by conventional dendritic cells is central to the development of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Celhar, Teja; Hopkins, Richard; Thornhill, Susannah I; De Magalhaes, Raquel; Hwang, Sun-Hee; Lee, Hui-Yin; Yasuga, Hiroko; Jones, Leigh A; Casco, Jose; Lee, Bernett; Thamboo, Thomas P; Zhou, Xin J; Poidinger, Michael; Connolly, John E; Wakeland, Edward K; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie

    2015-11-10

    Glomerulonephritis is a common and debilitating feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The precise immune mechanisms that drive the progression from benign autoimmunity to glomerulonephritis are largely unknown. Previous investigations have shown that a moderate increase of the innate Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is sufficient for the development of nephritis. In these systems normalization of B-cell TLR7 expression or temporal depletion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) slow progression; however, the critical cell that is responsible for driving full immunopathology remains unidentified. In this investigation we have shown that conventional DC expression of TLR7 is essential for severe autoimmunity in the Sle1Tg7 model of SLE. We show that a novel expanding CD11b(+) conventional DC subpopulation dominates the infiltrating renal inflammatory milieu, localizing to the glomeruli. Moreover, exposure of human myeloid DCs to IFN-α or Flu increases TLR7 expression, suggesting they may have a role in self-RNA recognition pathways in clinical disease. To our knowledge, this study is the first to highlight the importance of conventional DC-TLR7 expression for kidney pathogenesis in a murine model of SLE. PMID:26512111

  1. RNA sensing by conventional dendritic cells is central to the development of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Celhar, Teja; Hopkins, Richard; Thornhill, Susannah I.; De Magalhaes, Raquel; Hwang, Sun-Hee; Lee, Hui-Yin; Yasuga, Hiroko; Jones, Leigh A.; Casco, Jose; Lee, Bernett; Thamboo, Thomas P.; Zhou, Xin J.; Poidinger, Michael; Connolly, John E.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis is a common and debilitating feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The precise immune mechanisms that drive the progression from benign autoimmunity to glomerulonephritis are largely unknown. Previous investigations have shown that a moderate increase of the innate Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is sufficient for the development of nephritis. In these systems normalization of B-cell TLR7 expression or temporal depletion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) slow progression; however, the critical cell that is responsible for driving full immunopathology remains unidentified. In this investigation we have shown that conventional DC expression of TLR7 is essential for severe autoimmunity in the Sle1Tg7 model of SLE. We show that a novel expanding CD11b+ conventional DC subpopulation dominates the infiltrating renal inflammatory milieu, localizing to the glomeruli. Moreover, exposure of human myeloid DCs to IFN-α or Flu increases TLR7 expression, suggesting they may have a role in self-RNA recognition pathways in clinical disease. To our knowledge, this study is the first to highlight the importance of conventional DC-TLR7 expression for kidney pathogenesis in a murine model of SLE. PMID:26512111

  2. The microRNA miR-148a functions as a critical regulator of B cell tolerance and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Martin, Alicia; Adams, Brian D; Lai, Maoyi; Shepherd, Jovan; Salvador-Bernaldez, Maria; Salvador, Jesus M; Lu, Jun; Nemazee, David; Xiao, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Autoreactive B cells play critical roles in a large diversity of autoimmune diseases, but the molecular pathways controlling these cells remain poorly understood. We performed an in vivo functional screen of a lymphocyte-expressed miRNA library and identified the microRNA miR-148a as a potent regulator of B cell tolerance. Elevated miR-148a expression impaired B cell tolerance by promoting the survival of immature B cells upon B cell receptor engagement via suppressing the expression of Gadd45a, Pten and Bcl2l11, which encodes the pro-apoptotic factor Bim. Furthermore, increased expression of miR-148a, which occurs frequently in lupus patients and lupus-prone mice, facilitated the development of lethal autoimmune disease in a lupus mouse model. These studies demonstrate that miR-148a functions as an important regulator of B cell tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:26901150

  3. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  4. Autoimmunity: from black water fever to regulatory function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity is a field that has only been around for a little over a century. Initially, it was thought that autoimmunity could not happen, that the body would never turn on itself (i.e. "horror autotoxicus"). It was only around the First World War that autoimmunity was recognized as the pathogenesis of various diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of Compound E led to successful treatment of patients with autoimmune diseases, but it was not till later that the adverse effects of this class of drugs were elucidated. The "modern" age of autoimmunity began around 1945 with the description of blackwater fever, and most of the subsequent research on hemolytic anemia and the role of an autoantibody in its pathogenesis led to a description of the anti-globulin reaction. The lupus erythematous (LE) cell was recognized in the mid-1940s by Hargreaves. His research carried on into the 1960s. Rheumatoid factor was also first described in the 1940s as yet another serum factor with activity against globulin-coated sheep red blood cells. The concept of autoimmunity really gained a foothold in the 1950s, when autoimmune thyroid disease and idiopathic thrombocytopenia were first described. Much has happened since then, and our understanding of autoimmunity has evolved now to include mechanisms of apoptosis, signaling pathway derangements, and the discovery of subsets of T cells with regulatory activity. The modern day study of autoimmunity is a fascinating area of research, and full understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is far from being completely elucidated. PMID:24491820

  5. Networking in Europe for special centres of excellence for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, C; Cervera, R

    2009-09-01

    The studies developed by the European Working Party on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and the European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibodies stress the importance of the creation of international networks devoted to the study of autoimmune diseases and the need for centres of excellence in the management of these conditions. This article analyses the importance of such centres and networks in Europe. PMID:19671795

  6. Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Daisuke; Dainichi, Teruki; Hamada, Takahiro; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are the best-characterized autoimmune skin diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these diseases has become possible due to the identification of their target autoantigens over the past three decades. In this review, we summarize methodology for categorizing autoimmune bullous diseases by means of combinations of direct and indirect immunofluorescence techniques using normal human skin sections, rat bladder sections and COS7 cells transfected with desmocollins 1-3 encoded vectors, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting with normal human epidermal extracts, dermal extracts, purified proteins from cell cultures and recombinant proteins. PMID:23325635

  7. Autoimmune Hemolysis: A Journey through Time

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary The existence of autoimmune diseases in humans has been known for almost 100 years. Currently, autoimmune pathogenesis has been attributed to more than 40 human diseases; yet it is still not clear what immune abnormalities conclusively prove underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. Hence, although much has been learned, research is still needed for complete elucidation of the mechanisms of the immune dysregulation in AIHA. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s) may allow for development of more specific therapies of these not uncommon and often difficult-to-treat disorders. PMID:26696795

  8. Bone Loss Triggered by the Cytokine Network in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekara, Dulshara Sachini; Yu, Jiyeon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifelong process in vertebrates that relies on the correct balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Bone loss and fracture risk are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The network of inflammatory cytokines produced during chronic inflammation induces an uncoupling of bone formation and resorption, resulting in significant bone loss in patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Here, we review and discuss the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine network in the pathophysiological aspects and the therapeutic advances in inflammatory autoimmune diseases. PMID:26065006

  9. Immunofluorescence profile of discoid lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Shreekant; Dogra, Sunil; Saikia, Biman; Walker, Ranjana Minz; Chhabra, Seema; Saikia, Uma Nahar

    2015-01-01

    The direct immunofluorescence (DIF) of skin in conjunction with histopathology gives the best diagnostic yield. It is invaluable in confirming the diagnosis of small vessel vasculitides and bullous lesions of the skin and can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the diagnosis of systemic and localized autoimmune diseases involving the skin. This study was undertaken to analyze the strength of DIF vis-à -vis histopathology in the diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and at the same time to elaborate the specific immunofluorescence findings in the lesions of DLE. The clinical profile and cutaneous lesions of 75 patients with DLE are described. DIF was positive in 68% and histopathology in 60% of cases. The most common immunoreactant was IgG at the dermoepidermal junction, followed by IgM and IgA. A conclusive diagnosis of DLE could be achieved satisfactorily in 64 cases (85%) by a combination of the two techniques. PMID:26549071

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus in 50 year olds.

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, I.; Aydintug, O.; Cervera, R.; Khamashta, M.; Jedryka-Goral, A.; Vianna, J. L.; Hughes, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    We compared the clinical and serological characteristics of 15 patients with onset of systemic lupus erythematosus after the age of 50 with those of 232 younger patients. The sex distribution was similar in both groups. All 15 patients were Caucasian. Autoimmune thyroiditis was found in 20% of the elderly patients. Initial manifestations, which presented more frequently in the older group, included thrombocytopenia (P < 0.05), sicca syndrome (P < 0.01) and cardiomyopathy (P < 0.005), whereas butterfly rash (P < 0.05) presented more frequently in the younger group. Analysis of cumulative clinical symptoms showed that butterfly rash (P < 0.05) and livedo reticularis (P < 0.05) were less frequent in the elderly. However, this group presented a significantly increased incidence of sicca syndrome (P < 0.005) and cardiomyopathy (P < 0.005). Antibodies to double-stranded DNA tended to occur less frequently in older patients (P < 0.05). PMID:1437923

  11. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Diagnostic Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Vivek; Anil, Rahul; Aristy, Sary

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with complaints of rapid cognitive decline and new onset leukopenia. The patient had a 17-year history of refractory seizures. Detailed review of symptoms and investigations revealed the patient met American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient had high titer ANA with a strongly positive dsDNA. Immunosuppressive therapy with hydroxychloroquine and mycophenolate mofetil led to significant improvement in cognition and seizures. Neuropsychiatric SLE should be considered a potential differential diagnosis for patients presenting with seizures or cognitive decline. Moreover, neuropsychiatric manifestations especially seizures are an early event in the disease course of SLE. Hence, we believe that early diagnosis of SLE by neuropsychiatric manifestations will not only lead to better control of CNS symptoms but early immunosuppressive therapy could control the progression of the underlying autoimmune disease.

  12. At the Bedside: Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as targets for biomarkers and therapies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnado, April; Crofford, Leslie J; Oates, Jim C

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps are associated with a unique form of cell death distinct from apoptosis or necrosis, whereby invading microbes are trapped and killed. Neutrophil extracellular traps can contribute to autoimmunity by exposing autoantigens, inducing IFN-α production, and activating the complement system. The association of neutrophil extracellular traps with autoimmune diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus, will be reviewed. Increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation is seen in psoriasis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Neutrophil extracellular traps may promote thrombus formation in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. In systemic lupus erythematosus, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation is associated with increased disease activity and renal disease, suggesting that neutrophil extracellular traps could be a disease activity marker. Neutrophil extracellular traps can damage and kill endothelial cells and promote inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques, which may contribute to accelerated atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus. As neutrophil extracellular traps induce IFN-α production, measuring neutrophil extracellular traps may estimate IFN-α levels and identify which systemic lupus erythematosus patients have elevated levels and may be more likely to respond to emerging anti-IFN-α therapies. In addition to anti-IFN-α therapies, other novel agents, such as N-acetyl-cysteine, DNase I, and peptidylarginine deiminase inhibitor 4, target neutrophil extracellular traps. Neutrophil extracellular traps offer insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and provide promise in developing disease markers and novel therapeutic agents in systemic lupus erythematosus. Priority areas for basic research based on clinical research

  13. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  14. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  15. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  16. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  17. Cell mediated immune regulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Pusztai-Markos, Z

    1979-01-01

    Autoimmunity is the term for the immune conditions characterized by a specific humoral or cell mediated response to the body's own tissues. The termination of the natural state of self tolerance may lead to immunopathological manifestations with clinical consequences, i.e. autoimmune diseases. In a very general sense, one may classify autoimmune diseases into two groups with respect to the underlying mechanism: 1. There are autoimmune diseases which develop in the presence of a normal intact regulation mechanism. 2. Another group whose development must be understood on the basis of a cellular dysfunction. In the first case, dequestered or semi-sequestered autoantigens are liberated as a consequence of exogenic influences inducing the sensitization of immunocompetent cells. The immune system then reacts with these autoantigens in the same way as with foreign substances. This kind of autoimmune disease will, however, not be dealt with here. In the second case, autoantigens are normally, i.e. in healthy individuals, accessible to the immunocompetent cells. To understand the reason for the development of an autoimmune reaction one must first clarify the mechanism of self tolerance. Then one must examine the way in which a break of this physiological state takes place. One of the major unanswered questions is the relative importance of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the onset and further development of autoimmune diseases. Recently it has been suggested that a dysfunction at the cellular level might represent the basic cause which induces the termination of selftolerance. Most of the conceptions about the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases are triggered were gained through experiments with animals. It is, however, difficult to use these experimental results to explain human diseases; in humans many questions are still open. Undoubtedly, the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of self tolerance and also the ways in which autoimmune

  18. A model for lupus brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Betty; Volpe, Bruce T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease characterized by antibodies that bind target autoantigens in multiple organs in the body. In peripheral organs, immune complexes engage the complement cascade, recruiting blood-borne inflammatory cells and initiating tissue inflammation. Immune complex-mediated activation of Fc receptors on infiltrating blood-borne cells and tissue resident cells amplifies an inflammatory cascade with resulting damage to tissue function, ultimately leading to tissue destruction. This pathophysiology appears to explain tissue injury throughout the body, except in the central nervous system. This review addresses a paradigm we have developed for autoantibody-mediated brain damage. This paradigm suggests that antibody-mediated brain disease does not depend on immune complex formation but rather on antibody-mediated alterations in neuronal activation and survival. Moreover, antibodies only access brain tissue when blood-brain barrier integrity is impaired, leading to a lack of concurrence of brain disease and tissue injury in other organs. We discuss the implications of this model for lupus and for identifying other antibodies that may contribute to brain disease. PMID:22725954

  19. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  20. Clinical aspects of indirect immunofluorescence for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ghanadan, Alireza; Saghazadeh, Amene; Jahanzad, Issa; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-05-01

    Because the most common term used in conversations considering autoimmunity is autoantibodies, it is well-expected that the indirect immunofluorescence assay, which detects antibodies directed against various antigens, is one of our most impressive techniques for investigating autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Roughly speaking, the current literature corroborates that this immunopathologic investigation means that autoantibodies detection makes a considerable contribution to both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of AIDs in the clinical setting. However, it varies between different AIDs, autoantibodies, ethnicities or detection methodologies. Directly focusing on the indirect immunofluorescence assay, we present evidence to support this multidimensional variation regarding the subject via reviewing briefly the best-investigated autoantibodies in the well-documented AIDs, including vasculitis, inflammatory bowel disease, scleroderma, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:25786676

  1. Secondary autoimmune diseases occurring after HSCT for an autoimmune disease: a retrospective study of the EBMT Autoimmune Disease Working Party.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, Thomas; Labopin, Myriam; Di Gioia, Massimo; Abinun, Mario; Alexander, Tobias; Miniati, Irene; Gualandi, Francesca; Fassas, Athanasios; Martin, Thierry; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Wulffraat, Nico; Buch, Maya; Sampol, Antonia; Carreras, Enric; Dubois, Benedicte; Gruhn, Bernd; Güngör, Tayfun; Pohlreich, David; Schuerwegh, Annemie; Snarski, Emilian; Snowden, John; Veys, Paul; Fasth, Anders; Lenhoff, Stig; Messina, Chiara; Voswinkel, Jan; Badoglio, Manuela; Henes, Jörg; Launay, David; Tyndall, Alan; Gluckman, Eliane; Farge, Dominique

    2011-08-11

    To specify the incidence and risk factors for secondary autoimmune diseases (ADs) after HSCT for a primary AD, we retrospectively analyzed AD patients treated by HSCT reported to EBMT from 1995 to 2009 with at least 1 secondary AD (cases) and those without (controls). After autologous HSCT, 29 of 347 patients developed at least 1 secondary AD within 21.9 (0.6-49) months and after allogeneic HSCT, 3 of 16 patients. The observed secondary ADs included: autoimmune hemolytic anemia (n = 3), acquired hemophilia (n = 3), autoimmune thrombocytopenia (n = 3), antiphospholipid syndrome (n = 2), thyroiditis (n = 12), blocking thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (n = 1), Graves disease (n = 2), myasthenia gravis (n = 1), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), sarcoidosis (n = 2), vasculitis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 1). After autologous HSCT for primary AD, the cumulative incidence of secondary AD was 9.8% ± 2% at 5 years. Lupus erythematosus as primary AD, and antithymocyte globulin use plus CD34(+) graft selection were important risk factors for secondary AD by multivariate analysis. With a median follow-up of 6.2 (0.54-11) years after autologous HSCT, 26 of 29 patients with secondary AD were alive, 2 died during their secondary AD (antiphospholipid syndrome, hemophilia), and 1 death was HSCT-related. This European multicenter study underlines the need for careful management and follow-up for secondary AD after HSCT. PMID:21596847

  2. Genetics Home Reference: systemic lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions systemic lupus erythematosus systemic lupus erythematosus Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease that causes ...

  3. S.L.E. Lupus Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategies for Speaking with Your Lupus Doctor Traveling Smart with Lupus 21st Century Cures A Year’s Worth ... Kickoff 2009 Camp Sunshine 2009 ING New York City Marathon 2009 Life Without Lupus® Gala 2010 Camp ...

  4. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dhaou, Besma; Boussema, Fatma; Aydi, Zohra; Baili, Lilia; Rokbani, Lilia

    2012-01-01

    Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study. PMID:22924044

  5. No Evidence of Pathogenic Involvement of Cathelicidins in Patient Cohorts and Mouse Models of Lupus and Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kienhöfer, D.; Hahn, J.; Schubert, I.; Reinwald, C.; Ipseiz, N.; Lang, S. C.; Borràs, È. Bosch; Amann, K.; Sjöwall, C.; Barron, A. E.; Hueber, A. J.; Agerberth, B.; Schett, G.; Hoffmann, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from their role in the immune defence against pathogens evidence of a role of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in autoimmune diseases has accumulated in the past years. The aim of this project was to examine the functional impact of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and the mouse cathelicidin-related AMP (CRAMP) on the pathogenesis of lupus and arthritis. Serum LL-37 and anti-LL-37 levels were measured by ELISA in healthy donors and patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pristane-induced lupus was induced in female wild type (WT) and cathelicidin-deficient (CRAMP−/−) mice. Serum levels of anti-Sm/RNP, anti-dsDNA, and anti-histone were determined via ELISA, cytokines in sera and peritoneal lavages were measured via Multiplex. Expression of Interferon I stimulated genes (ISG) was determined by real-time PCR. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in male WT and CRAMP−/− mice and arthritis severity was visually scored and analysed histomorphometrically by OsteoMeasure software. Serum levels of anti-LL-37 were higher in SLE-patients compared to healthy donors or patients with RA. However, no correlation to markers of disease activity or organ involvement was observed. No significant differences of autoantibody or cytokine/chemokine levels, or of expression of ISGs were observed between WT and CRAMP−/− mice after pristane-injection. Furthermore, lung and kidney pathology did not differ in the absence of CRAMP. Incidence and severity of CIA and histological parameters (inflammation, cartilage degradation, and bone erosion) were not different in WT and CRAMP−/− mice. Although cathelicidins are upregulated in mouse models of lupus and arthritis, cathelicidin-deficiency did not persistently affect the diseases. Also in patients with SLE, autoantibodies against cathelicidins did not correlate with disease manifestation. Reactivity against cathelicidins in lupus and arthritis could thus be an epiphenomenon caused by

  6. No evidence of pathogenic involvement of cathelicidins in patient cohorts and mouse models of lupus and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kienhöfer, D; Hahn, J; Schubert, I; Reinwald, C; Ipseiz, N; Lang, S C; Borràs, È Bosch; Amann, K; Sjöwall, C; Barron, A E; Hueber, A J; Agerberth, B; Schett, G; Hoffmann, M H

    2014-01-01

    Apart from their role in the immune defence against pathogens evidence of a role of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in autoimmune diseases has accumulated in the past years. The aim of this project was to examine the functional impact of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and the mouse cathelicidin-related AMP (CRAMP) on the pathogenesis of lupus and arthritis. Serum LL-37 and anti-LL-37 levels were measured by ELISA in healthy donors and patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pristane-induced lupus was induced in female wild type (WT) and cathelicidin-deficient (CRAMP-/-) mice. Serum levels of anti-Sm/RNP, anti-dsDNA, and anti-histone were determined via ELISA, cytokines in sera and peritoneal lavages were measured via Multiplex. Expression of Interferon I stimulated genes (ISG) was determined by real-time PCR. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in male WT and CRAMP-/- mice and arthritis severity was visually scored and analysed histomorphometrically by OsteoMeasure software. Serum levels of anti-LL-37 were higher in SLE-patients compared to healthy donors or patients with RA. However, no correlation to markers of disease activity or organ involvement was observed. No significant differences of autoantibody or cytokine/chemokine levels, or of expression of ISGs were observed between WT and CRAMP-/- mice after pristane-injection. Furthermore, lung and kidney pathology did not differ in the absence of CRAMP. Incidence and severity of CIA and histological parameters (inflammation, cartilage degradation, and bone erosion) were not different in WT and CRAMP-/- mice. Although cathelicidins are upregulated in mouse models of lupus and arthritis, cathelicidin-deficiency did not persistently affect the diseases. Also in patients with SLE, autoantibodies against cathelicidins did not correlate with disease manifestation. Reactivity against cathelicidins in lupus and arthritis could thus be an epiphenomenon caused by extensive

  7. Lupus nephritis: an update.

    PubMed

    Imran, Tasnim F; Yick, Frederick; Verma, Suneet; Estiverne, Christopher; Ogbonnaya-Odor, Chinonye; Thiruvarudsothy, Srikanth; Reddi, Alluru S; Kothari, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is an inflammatory condition of the kidneys that encompasses various patterns of renal disease including glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. It is a major predictor of poor prognosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genetic factors, including several predisposing loci, and environmental factors, such as EBV and ultraviolet light, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. It carries a high morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Renal biopsy findings are utilized to guide treatment. Optimizing risk factors such as proteinuria and hypertension with renin-angiotensin receptor blockade is crucial. Immunosuppressive therapy is recommended for patients with focal or diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (Class III or IV) disease, and certain patients with membranous LN (Class V) disease. Over the past decade, immunosuppressive therapies have significantly improved long-term outcomes, but the optimal therapy for LN remains to be elucidated. Cyclophosphamide-based regimens, given concomitantly with corticosteroids, have improved survival significantly. Even though many patients achieve remission, the risk of relapse remains considerably high. Other treatments include hydroxychloroquine, mycofenolate mofetil, and biologic therapies such as Belimumab, Rituximab, and Abatacept. In this paper, we provide a review of LN, including pathogenesis, classification, and clinical manifestations. We will focus, though, on discussion of the established as well as emerging therapies for patients with proliferative and membranous lupus nephritis. PMID:26471017

  8. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells in autoimmunity, immune-mediated diseases and airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Timothy S C

    2016-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a novel class of innate-like T cells, expressing a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) and able to recognize small molecules presented on the non-polymorphic MHC-related protein 1. Their intrinsic effector-memory phenotype, enabling secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and their relative abundance in humans imply a significant potential to contribute to autoimmune processes. However, as MAIT cells were unknown until recently and specific immunological tools were unavailable, little is known of their roles in disease. Here I review observations from clinical studies and animal models of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases including the roles of MAIT cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and airways diseases. MAIT cell deficiencies are frequently observed in peripheral blood, and at sites of disease such as the airways in asthma. However, MAIT cells have a specific sensitivity to suppression by therapeutic corticosteroids that may confound many of these observations, as may the tendency of the surface marker CD161 to activation-induced down-regulation. Nonetheless, the dependence on bacteria for the development of MAIT cells suggests a potentially important protective role linking the influences of early life microbial exposures and subsequent development of autoimmunity. Conversely, MAIT cells could contribute to chronic inflammation either through TCR-independent activation, or potentially by TCR recognition of as yet undiscovered ligands. Future research will be greatly facilitated by the immunological tools that are now available, including murine genetic models and human and murine specific tetramers. PMID:26778581

  9. Susceptibility genes in the pathogenesis of murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Chapter summary Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the paradigm of a multisystem autoimmune disease in which genetic factors strongly influence susceptibility. Through genome scans and congenic dissection, numerous loci associated with lupus susceptibility have been defined and the complexity of the inheritance of this disease has been revealed. In this review, we provide a brief description of animal models of SLE, both spontaneous models and synthetic models, with an emphasis on the B6 congenic model derived from analyses of the NZM2410 strain. A hypothetical model of disease progression that organizes many of the identified SLE susceptibility loci in three distinct biological pathways that interact to mediate disease pathogenesis is also described. We finally discuss our recent fine mapping analysis, which revealed a cluster of loci that actually comprise the Sle1 locus. PMID:12110145

  10. The deleterious role of basophils in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pellefigues, Christophe; Charles, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease of multifactorial origins. All compartments of the immune system appear to be affected, at least in some way, and to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Because of an escape from negative selection autoreactive T and B cells accumulate in SLE patients leading to the production of autoantibodies mainly raised against nuclear components and their subsequent deposition into target organs. We recently showed that basophils, in an IgE and IL-4 dependent manner, contribute to SLE pathogenesis by amplifying autoantibody production. Here, we summarize what we have learned about the deleterious role of basophils in lupus both in a mouse model and in SLE patients. We discuss which possible pathways could be involved in basophil activation and recruitment to secondary lymphoid organs during SLE, and how basophils may amplify autoantibody production. PMID:24209595

  11. An Unusual Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hemophagocytic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharmeen, Saika; Hussain, Nazia

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HS) or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immune mediated phenomenon that can occur in the setting of an autoimmune disease, chronic immunosuppression, malignancy, or infection. It has been more commonly described in the pediatric population and less commonly in adults. We describe a case of a 52-year-old male who presented with a rash. He simultaneously met the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the diagnostic criteria of HS as described in the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) 2004 trial. The bone marrow on autopsy showed the presence of abundant hemosiderophages with focal hemophagocytosis. SLE-associated HS might be underdiagnosed due to the overlap in clinical findings. This case represents the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment of such a potentially fatal clinical syndrome. PMID:26981305

  12. Neonatal lupus with atypical cardiac and cutaneous manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sofia; Santos, Isabel Cristina; Pereira, Dolores Faria; Mimoso, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is a rare, passively acquired autoimmune disease, caused by maternal autoantibodies. The most common manifestations are skin rash and congenital heart block. Cutaneous manifestations may be present at birth, but often develop within a few weeks after delivery. Congenital heart block may present as bradycardia in utero or during physical examination at birth. Approximately 40–60% of mothers are asymptomatic when the infants are diagnosed. We present a case of a child, born with erythematosus lesions in the face, scalp, trunk, limbs and nodules/papules on the palmar and plantar surfaces. He also had hepatosplenomegaly and thrombocytopenia. Echocardiography showed hyperechoic lesions on the anterior papilar muscle of the left ventricle and on the lateral cusp of the tricuspid valve. The mother had unexplained fever and vasculitic lesions in her hands and feet. Antinuclear antibodies, anti-SSa/Ro and anti-SSb/La were positive in the mother and child, making the diagnosis of neonatal lupus. PMID:23839605

  13. DNA-damaging autoantibodies and cancer: the lupus butterfly theory.

    PubMed

    Noble, Philip W; Bernatsky, Sasha; Clarke, Ann E; Isenberg, David A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Hansen, James E

    2016-07-01

    Autoantibodies reactive against host DNA are detectable in the circulation of most people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The long-held view that antibodies cannot penetrate live cells has been disproved. A subset of lupus autoantibodies penetrate cells, translocate to nuclei, and inhibit DNA repair or directly damages DNA. The result of these effects depends on the microenvironment and genetic traits of the cell. Some DNA-damaging antibodies alone have little impact on normal cells, but in the presence of other conditions, such as pre-existing DNA-repair defects, can become highly toxic. These findings raise new questions about autoimmunity and DNA damage, and reveal opportunities for new targeted therapies against malignancies particularly vulnerable to DNA damage. In this Perspectives article, we review the known associations between SLE, DNA damage and cancer, and propose a theory for the effects of DNA-damaging autoantibodies on SLE pathophysiology and cancer risk. PMID:27009542

  14. Common variable immunodeficiency and autoimmunity--an inconvenient truth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Miao, Qi; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2014-08-01

    Coexisting morbidities in CVID include bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and malignancies. The incidence of autoimmune disease in CVID patients may approach 20% of cases. The most common autoimmune disease found in CVID patients is autoimmune cytopenia, but rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and now primary biliary cirrhosis have also been reported. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state. However, this paradox may not actually be all that implausible due to the complex nature of immune cells, signaling pathways and their interactions. The cellular alterations in combined variable immunodeficiency include a range of T and B cell abnormalities. Selective immune derangements found in CVID include a downregulation of regulatory T cells (Treg cells), accelerated T cell apoptosis, abnormal cytokine production secondary to cytokine gene polymorphisms and increased autoreactive B cell production. The impact of these abnormalities on T and B cell interaction may not only explain the immunodeficiency but also the development of autoimmunity in select groups of patients with CVID. The variability in the clinical manifestations of CVID as a result of this immune interaction suggests that CVID is not one disease but many. This is important because it follows that the treatment of CVID may not always be the same, but may need to be directed specifically towards each individual patient. PMID:24747700

  15. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, C G; Conrad, K; Cooper, G S

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to silica dust has been examined as a possible risk factor with respect to several systemic autoimmune diseases, including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and some of the small vessel vasculitidies with renal involvement (e.g., Wegener granulomatosis). Crystalline silica, or quartz, is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. High-level exposure to respirable silica dust can cause chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the lung and other organs. Studies of specific occupational groups with high-level silica exposure (e.g., miners) have shown increased rates of autoimmune diseases compared to the expected rates in the general population. However, some clinic- and population-based studies have not demonstrated an association between silica exposure and risk of autoimmune diseases. This lack of effect may be due to the limited statistical power of these studies to examine this association or because the lower- or moderate-level exposures that may be more common in the general population were not considered. Experimental studies demonstrate that silica can act as an adjuvant to nonspecifically enhance the immune response. This is one mechanism by which silica might be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. Given that several different autoimmune diseases may be associated with silica dust exposure, silica dust may act to promote or accelerate disease development, requiring some other factor to break immune tolerance or initiate autoimmunity. The specific manifestation of this effect may depend on underlying differences in genetic susceptibility or other environmental exposures. PMID:10970168

  16. The Autoimmune Disease Database: a dynamically compiled literature-derived database

    PubMed Central

    Karopka, Thomas; Fluck, Juliane; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Glass, Änne

    2006-01-01

    Background Autoimmune diseases are disorders caused by an immune response directed against the body's own organs, tissues and cells. In practice more than 80 clinically distinct diseases, among them systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, are classified as autoimmune diseases. Although their etiology is unclear these diseases share certain similarities at the molecular level i.e. susceptibility regions on the chromosomes or the involvement of common genes. To gain an overview of these related diseases it is not feasible to do a literary review but it requires methods of automated analyses of the more than 500,000 Medline documents related to autoimmune disorders. Results In this paper we present the first version of the Autoimmune Disease Database which to our knowledge is the first comprehensive literature-based database covering all known or suspected autoimmune diseases. This dynamically compiled database allows researchers to link autoimmune diseases to the candidate genes or proteins through the use of named entity recognition which identifies genes/proteins in the corresponding Medline abstracts. The Autoimmune Disease Database covers 103 autoimmune disease concepts. This list was expanded to include synonyms and spelling variants yielding a list of over 1,200 disease names. The current version of the database provides links to 541,690 abstracts and over 5,000 unique genes/proteins. Conclusion The Autoimmune Disease Database provides the researcher with a tool to navigate potential gene-disease relationships in Medline abstracts in the context of autoimmune diseases. PMID:16803617

  17. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  18. Caspase-Activated DNase is Required to Maintain Tolerance to Lupus Nuclear AutoAntigens

    PubMed Central

    Jog, Neelakshi R.; Frisoni, Lorenza; Shi, Qin; Monestier, Marc; Hernandez, Sairy; Craft, Joe; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Caricchio, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Objective Caspase Activated DNase (CAD) is an endonuclease that is activated by active caspase 3 during apoptosis and is responsible for degradation of chromatin into nucleosomal units. These nucleosomal units are then included in apoptotic bodies. The presence of apoptotic bodies is considered important for the generation of auto-antigens in autoimmune diseases such as lupus, which are characterized by the presence of anti-nuclear antibodies. Methods The present study was carried out to determine the role of CAD in Sle1, Sle123 and 3H9 spontaneous models of lupus, where autoimmunity is genetically pre-determined. We also determined the ability of lupus auto-antibodies to bind to CAD deficient or sufficient apoptotic cells. Results The deficiency of CAD resulted in higher anti-dsDNA antibody titers in lupus-prone mice. Surprisingly, the absence of CAD only exacerbated genetically pre-determined autoimmune responses. To further determine whether nuclear modifications are required to maintain tolerance to nuclear auto-antigens, we used the 3H9 mouse, an anti-DNA heavy chain knock-in. In this model, the autoreactive B cells are tolerized by anergy. In line with the Sle1 and Sle123 CAD mutant mice, CAD deficient 3H9 mice spontaneously generated anti-DNA antibodies. We finally show that auto-antibodies with specificities towards histone/DNA complexes bind more to CAD deficient apoptotic cells compared to CAD sufficient apoptotic cells. Conclusions We propose that in mice genetically predisposed to lupus, nuclear apoptotic modifications are required to maintain tolerance. In the absence of these modifications, apoptotic chromatin is abnormally exposed, facilitating the autoimmune response. PMID:22127758

  19. Successful use of interleukin 6 antagonist tocilizumab in a patient with refractory cutaneous lupus and urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Makol, Ashima; Gibson, Lawrence E; Michet, Clement J

    2012-03-01

    Tocilizumab (Actemra; Genentech, Inc) is the first biologic therapy targeting the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6). It is a humanized monoclonal immunoglobulin G1 antibody against the α-chain of the IL-6 receptor that prevents the binding of IL-6 to membrane-bound and -soluble IL-6 receptor. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in January 2010 for rheumatoid arthritis refractory to other approved therapies and in April 2011 for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It has been used as an off-label treatment in many autoimmune diseases, where IL-6 plays a major role in pathogenesis. We report a case of refractory systemic lupus erythematosus in a 22-year-old woman with recurrent high-grade fever, polyarthritis, diffuse rash with urticarial vasculitis, and tumid lupus who did not respond to topical corticosteroids, photoprotection, antimalarials, methotrexate, anakinra, mycophenolate mofetil, etanercept, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Symptoms recurred after corticosteroid tapers below 10 mg. She was noted to have an elevated IL-6 level, and tocilizumab was started. She responded favorably with remission of fever, arthritis, and skin manifestations and was able to taper corticosteroid therapy successfully. PMID:22334272

  20. [Thrombophilia, autoimmunity, and perioperative thromboprophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Jurado, Benjamín; Salazar-Páramo, Mario; Medrano-Múnoz, Fabiola; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Nava, Arnulfo

    2007-01-01

    Thrombosis is observed in several areas of medicine. Equilibrium between pro- and anticoagulant factors is required for maintaining blood flow. Tissue injury from multiple causes may induce coagulum formation mediated by coagulation pathway activation. Tissue factor (F III) + F VIIa interacts with both platelet and endothelial cell receptors. This coagulation model displays four stages: a) initiation, b) amplification, c) propagation and d) stabilization. Development of thrombosis is associated with either primary or hereditary and acquired factors. Primary thrombophilia is determined genetically by a hypercoagulative state shown by loss of natural anticoagulant activity, such as antithrombin III, C, S protein or procoagulant activity gaining resistance to activated C protein: factor V (Leiden), prothrombin and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations. Acquired thrombophilia mainly relates to an autoimmune condition such as the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies or lupus anticoagulant. Surgical procedures enhance mechanisms that predispose to thrombosis, e.g., acidosis, hypothermia, plasma expanders, extracorporeal circulation, duration of surgical procedure, and tissue manipulation. Adequate classification of the patient's thrombosis risk and adequate use of primary and secondary prophylactic recommendations in these groups of patients is necessary. PMID:18053365

  1. Expression in systemic lupus erythematosus of an idiotype common to DNA-binding and nonbinding monoclonal antibodies produced by normal human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, E; Massicotte, H; Bell, D A

    1989-01-01

    Rabbit antiserum raised against a normal-derived monoclonal anti-DNA antibody KIM 4.6.3 (IgM lambda) was used for idiotype analyses. This anti-serum (anti-4.6.3 ID) was rendered specific for KIM 4.6.3 idiotype (4.6.3 ID) by absorption with normal human IgM and IgG. The specificity of anti-4.6.3 was shown by its ability to bind to KIM 4.6.3 antibody but not to normal human IgM and IgG, by inhibition of anti-4.6.3 ID reactivity with KIM 4.6.3 antibody by the homologous monoclonal antibody and by the ability of anti-4.6.3 ID to inhibit the binding of single stranded DNA with KIM 4.6.3 antibody. The 4.6.3 ID was found to be commonly expressed since it was detected among 33% (10/30) DNA and 32% (23/72) non-DNA-reactive monoclonal antibodies that were obtained from five different unrelated normal individuals. The binding to ssDNA of the majority of idiotype positive anti-DNA antibodies however was not blocked by anti-4.6.3 ID suggesting that among these other monoclonal antibodies its expression is outside of the antigen binding site. The 4.6.3 ID, which was present among some normal-derived monoclonal IgM molecules was also found at a high frequency (90%) in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but only at a low frequency (24%) and concentration in normal sera. The level of 4.6.3 ID in SLE did not correlate with serum IgM and IgG nor with anti-DNA antibody concentrations. Idiotypic relatedness between SLE serum antibodies and monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies of normals implies the existence of a cross-reactive idiotype family and implies that a conserved common gene or closely related genes exist in the germ line encoding these 4.6.3 ID positive antibodies some of which are not exclusively associated with nucleic acid reactivity. The expression of these germ line genes in vivo thus distinguishes SLE from normals. PMID:2493481

  2. Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Stem Cells Display Immunomodulatory Properties and Transiently Improve Rat Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Donders, Raf; Vanheusden, Marjan; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Ravanidis, Stylianos; Thewissen, Kristof; Stinissen, Piet; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Hendriks, Jerome J A; Hellings, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical cord matrix or Wharton's jelly-derived stromal cells (WJ-MSCs) are an easily accessible source of mesenchymal-like stem cells. Recent studies describe a hypoimmunogenic phenotype, multipotent differentiation potential, and trophic support function for WJ-MSCs, with variable clinical benefit in degenerative disease models such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and Parkinson's disease. It remains unclear whether WJ-MSCs have therapeutic value for multiple sclerosis (MS), where autoimmune-mediated demyelination and neurodegeneration need to be halted. In this study, we investigated whether WJ-MSCs possess the required properties to effectively and durably reverse these pathological hallmarks and whether they survive in an inflammatory environment after transplantation. WJ-MSCs displayed a lowly immunogenic phenotype and showed intrinsic expression of neurotrophic factors and a variety of anti-inflammatory molecules. Furthermore, they dose-dependently suppressed proliferation of activated T cells using contact-dependent and paracrine mechanisms. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 was identified as one of the main effector molecules responsible for the observed T-cell suppression. The immune-modulatory phenotype of WJ-MSCs was further enhanced after proinflammatory cytokine treatment in vitro (licensing). In addition to their effect on adaptive immunity, WJ-MSCs interfered with dendritic cell differentiation and maturation, thus directly affecting antigen presentation and therefore T-cell priming. Systemically infused WJ-MSCs potently but transiently ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS, when injected at onset or during chronic disease. This protective effect was paralleled with a reduction in autoantigen-induced T-cell proliferation, confirming their immunomodulatory activity in vivo. Surprisingly, in vitro licensed WJ-MSCs did not ameliorate EAE, indicative of a fast rejection as a result of enhanced immunogenicity

  3. A loss-of-function variant of the antiviral molecule MAVS is associated with a subset of systemic lupus patients

    PubMed Central

    Pothlichet, Julien; Niewold, Timothy B; Vitour, Damien; Solhonne, Brigitte; Crow, Mary K; Si-Tahar, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of the antiviral immune response may contribute to autoimmune diseases. Here, we hypothesized that altered expression or function of MAVS, a key molecule downstream of the viral sensors RIG-I and MDA-5, may impair antiviral cell signalling and thereby influence the risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototype autoimmune disease. We used molecular techniques to screen non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MAVS gene for functional significance in human cell lines and identified one critical loss-of-function variant (C79F, rs11905552). This SNP substantially reduced expression of type I interferon (IFN) and other proinflammatory mediators and was found almost exclusively in the African-American population. Importantly, in African-American SLE patients, the C79F allele was associated with low type I IFN production and absence of anti-RNA-binding protein autoantibodies. These serologic associations were not related to a distinct, functionally neutral, MAVS SNP Q198K. Hence, this is the first demonstration that an uncommon genetic variant in the MAVS gene has a functional impact upon the anti-viral IFN pathway in vivo in humans and is associated with a novel sub-phenotype in SLE. This study demonstrates the utility of functional data in selecting rare variants for genetic association studies, allowing for fewer comparisons requiring statistical correction and for alternate lines of evidence implicating the particular variant in disease. PMID:21268286

  4. Why are kids with lupus at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Catherine; Marks, Stephen D; Tullus, Kjell

    2016-06-01

    Juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an aggressive multisystem autoimmune disease. Despite improvements in outcomes for adult patients, children with SLE continue to have a lower life expectancy than adults with SLE, with more aggressive disease, a higher incidence of lupus nephritis and there is an emerging awareness of their increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this review, we discuss the evidence for an increased risk of CVD in SLE, its pathogenesis, and the clinical approach to its management. PMID:26399239

  5. The effects of lupus and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome on foetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nalli, C; Iodice, A; Andreoli, L; Lojacono, A; Motta, M; Fazzi, E; Tincani, A

    2014-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-organ autoimmune disease that primarily affects women of childbearing-age. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disorder defined by the occurrence of venous and arterial thrombosis, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Recently, the long-term outcome of children born to patients with lupus and APS has become a major topic of interest both to patients and physicians. One of the major problems related to maternal disease is preterm delivery with all the consequences that this condition may bring. Prematurity may also be due to the presence of aPL; however, aPL do not generally display any thrombotic potential on neonates. Another complication may be neonatal lupus (NL), mediated by the presence of maternal antibodies (anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB). In addition, behaviour and neuropsychological outcomes have also been a matter of interest, but there are currently few data available. Beyond the biological influence of both maternal disease and autoimmune background, it is important to focus on the possible influence of maternal chronic illness on the neuropsychological development of her children. Whether aPL exposure could have a direct effect on brain development is still being debated. In children of mothers with APS, language delays have been noted and learning disabilities were described with a higher rate than the general age-school population. Several studies were performed on children born to lupus mothers: even if maternal lupus does not seem to impair intelligence levels, it may increase the occurrence of learning disabilities and particularly dyslexia in male children. To the best of our knowledge, no studies are available on the long-term outcome of children born to mothers with lupus or APS and particularly regarding the development of autoimmune diseases. Nevertheless, common experience of experts in the field is that these children do

  6. Dehydroepiandrosterone in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sawalha, Amr H; Kovats, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a weak androgen that exerts pleomorphic effects on the immune system. The hormone has no known receptor, and consequently, the mechanism of action of DHEA on immunocompetent cells remains poorly understood. Interestingly, serum levels of DHEA are decreased in patients with inflammatory disease including lupus, and these levels seem to inversely correlate with disease activity. Following encouraging studies demonstrating beneficial effects of DHEA supplementation in murine lupus models, a number of clinical studies have tested the effect of DHEA administration in lupus patients. DHEA treatment could improve patient’s overall quality of life assessment measures and glucocorticoid requirements in some lupus patients with mild to moderate disease, however, the effect of DHEA on disease activity in lupus patients remains controversial. Long term safety assessment studies are required in light of the reported effect of DHEA supplementation in lowering HDL cholesterol in lupus patients. PMID:18662508

  7. Multiple etiologies of equine recurrent uveitis--A natural model for human autoimmune uveitis: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Cywinska, Anna; Paschalis-Trela, Katarzyna; Crisman, Mark; Kita, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) has various etiologies, with Leptospira infection and genetic predisposition being the leading risk factors. Regardless of etiology, expression of ocular proteins associated with maintenance of the blood-ocular barrier is impaired in ERU. The recurring-remitting cycle of ERU repeatedly disrupts the blood-ocular barrier, allowing the previously immune-privileged ocular environment to become the site of a progressive local autoimmune pathology that ultimately results in tissue destruction and vision loss. The immune-mediated process involves humoral and cellular mechanisms. Intraocular antibodies either produced in the eye or that leak through the blood-ocular barrier, are often present at higher levels than in serum and react with antigens in ocular tissue of horses with ERU. Ocular infiltration of auto-aggressive lymphocytes occurs with each uveitis episode and is the most crucial contributor to inflammation and eye damage. Recurring uveitis episodes may be initiated when epitopes of an ocular antigen become visible to the immune system (intramolecular spreading) or another autoantigen (intermolecular spreading), resulting in a new inflammatory reaction. PMID:26851589

  8. Synthetic autoantigens of immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors: their recognition in aging, infection, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Marchalonis, J J; Schluter, S F; Wang, E; Dehghanpisheh, K; Lake, D; Yocum, D E; Edmundson, A B; Winfield, J B

    1994-11-01

    Immunoglobulins and their close relatives, the antigen-specific T-cell receptors, are recognition proteins that express structures which readily serve as self-immunogens. Healthy humans can produce antibodies against variable region-defined recognition structures termed idiotypes, as well as against constant region structures, and the levels of these can increase markedly in autoimmune disease; e.g., rheumatoid factors are autoantibodies directed against a conformational determinant of the gamma heavy chain. More recent analyses employing synthetic peptide technologies and construction of recombinant T-cell receptors document that autoantibodies directed against both variable and constant region markers of the alpha/beta T-cell receptor occur in healthy individuals. Alterations in levels of antibody, usage of IgM or IgG isotypes, and specificity for particular peptide-defined regions vary with natural physiological processes (aging, pregnancy), with artificial allografting, with retroviral infection, and with the inception and progression of autoimmune disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus). Two of the major autoimmunogeneic regions of the Tcr alpha/beta are "constitutive" markers inasmuch as all individuals tested produce antibodies against these regions. The most frequently observed autoantibodies are against Tcr V beta CDR1 and Fr3 markers. It is hypothesized that these are normally involved in immunoregulation. Autoantibodies usually are not detected against CDR2 region determinants, or the "private idiotypes" defined by the CDR3 region, or the highly conserved FR4 segment specified by the joining gene segment. However, autoantibodies against the CDR2 of the Tcr alpha chain occur in some SLE patients, and healthy pregnant women produce antibodies against the common peptide determinant expressed by the joining gene and the beginning of the C alpha or C beta domain. Although the precise role of the naturally occurring autoantibodies in

  9. A novel mutation in NCF2 associated with autoimmune disease and a solitary late-onset infection.

    PubMed

    Chou, Janet; Hsu, Joyce T; Bainter, Wayne; Al-Attiyah, Raja'a; Al-Herz, Waleed; Geha, Raif S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is typically characterized by recurrent infections, granulomatous disease, and an increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease. We report a novel homozygous mutation in NCF2 that permits residual expression of an alternatively spliced variant in a patient with duodenitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), followed by a late-onset, single pulmonary infection in the setting of immunosuppressive medications. This report highlights the importance of considering CGD in patients who present initially exclusively with autoimmune disease. PMID:26272171

  10. Bridging Mice to Men: Using HLA Transgenic Mice to Enhance the Future Prediction and Prevention of Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes in Humans.

    PubMed

    Serreze, David V; Niens, Marijke; Kulik, John; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the vast majority of cases in humans, the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the NOD mouse model is due to T-cell mediated autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β cells. Particular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes (designated HLA in humans; and H2 in mice) provide the primary genetic risk factor for T1D development. It has long been appreciated that within the MHC, particular unusual class II genes contribute to the development of T1D in both humans and NOD mice by allowing for the development and functional activation of β cell autoreactive CD4 T cells. However, studies in NOD mice have revealed that through interactions with other background susceptibility genes, the quite common class I variants (K(d), D(b)) characterizing this strain's H2 (g7) MHC haplotype aberrantly acquire an ability to support the development of β cell autoreactive CD8 T cell responses also essential to T1D development. Similarly, recent studies indicate that in the proper genetic context some quite common HLA class I variants also aberrantly contribute to T1D development in humans. This review focuses on how "humanized" HLA transgenic NOD mice can be created and used to identify class I dependent β cell autoreactive CD8 T cell populations of clinical relevance to T1D development. There is also discussion on how HLA transgenic NOD mice can be used to develop protocols that may ultimately be useful for the prevention of T1D in humans by attenuating autoreactive CD8 T cell responses against pancreatic β cells. PMID:27150089

  11. Frequency of neuro-psychiatric dysfunction in anti-SSA/SSB exposed children with and without neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Askanase, A D; Izmirly, P M; Katholi, M; Mumtaz, J; Buyon, J P

    2010-03-01

    Neonatal lupus is a model of passively acquired autoimmunity whereby anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies target the fetal heart and neonatal skin in a minority of cases. Since neuro-psychiatric impairment has been reported in humans and mice exposed prenatally to a variety of maternal autoantibodies including anti-Ro/La, this study was initiated to evaluate the potential neurotoxic effects of these specific autoantibodies and the overall frequency of autoimmune diseases, general health, and somatic growth of children with neonatal lupus and their unaffected siblings. In addition to the general health questionnaires maintained on family members enrolled in the Research Registry for Neonatal Lupus (RRNL), specific questionnaires related to neuro-psychiatric development were sent to all mothers whose children (both affected and unaffected) were older than 5 years of age. Controls consisted of healthy friends. Of 121 anti-Ro exposed children meeting the inclusion criteria, information was returned on 104 (33 cardiac manifestations of neonatal lupus, 20 rash, and 51 unaffected siblings) and 22 of the friend controls. The mean age of all of the children was 14.5 years (range 5-39). In total, 42 (40%) of the 104 anti-Ro exposed children were reported to have a neuro-psychiatric disorder, compared with 6 (27%) of the friend controls (p = 0.34). For 8 (24%) of the congenital heart block (CHB) children (6 boys, 2 girls) the mothers reported attention problems. Four, all boys, were on stimulants. Of the rash children, 4 (20%) (2 boys, 2 girls) had attention problems with one boy on Ritalin. Of the unaffected siblings, 9 (18%) (8 boys and 1 girl) had attention problems with 3 boys on stimulants. One (5%) of the control children (a girl) had attention problems, not requiring therapy. There was no statistical difference in attention problems between the groups (p = 0.120). Behavioral problems were present in all groups with no statistical differences noted. The prevalence of

  12. Environmental Basis of Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Floreani, Annarosa; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    The three common themes that underlie the induction and perpetuation of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immune regulation. Environmental factors have gained much attention for their role in triggering autoimmunity, with increasing evidence of their influence as demonstrated by epidemiological studies, laboratory research, and animal studies. Environmental factors known to trigger and perpetuate autoimmunity include infections, gut microbiota, as well as physical and environmental agents. To address these issues, we will review major potential mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading, bystander activation, polyclonal activation of B and T cells, infections, and autoinflammatory activation of innate immunity. The association of the gut microbiota on autoimmunity will be particularly highlighted by their interaction with pharmaceutical agents that may lead to organ-specific autoimmunity. Nonetheless, and we will emphasize this point, the precise mechanism of environmental influence on disease pathogenesis remains elusive. PMID:25998909

  13. Hepatic manifestations in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Farrag, Mona I

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by multisystem involvement and diverse clinical and serological manifestations. Clinically significant hepatic disease is generally regarded as unusual in JSLE, but many studies have showed that hepatic disease may be more common in SLE than was usually thought. Hepatic disease does not cause significant morbidity and mortality, but subclinical liver involvement is common. One of the hepatic disorders associated with JSLE is autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The precise etiology of AIH and JSLE remains unknown, however both AIH and JSLE are associated with antinuclear antibody (ANA) and multisystem disease manifestations. A shared immunologic response and genetic predisposition were suggested. Recently, new approaches for treatment of SLE and recent patents that could develop into novel therapeutic agents in clinical management of SLE have been proposed. An array of promising new therapies is currently emerging or being developed including B-cell depletion therapies, agents targeting B-cell survival factors, blockade of T-cell co-stimulation and present review, we will also report the case of a 12-year old girl who developed JSLE four years after her preliminary diagnosis with AIH. PMID:24383439

  14. Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus: Diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Lauren G.; Werth, Victoria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus encompasses a wide range of dermatologic manifestations, which may or may not be associated with the development of systemic disease. Cutaneous lupus is divided into several subtypes, including acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus includes discoid lupus erythematosus, lupus erythematosus profundus, chilblain cutaneous lupus, and lupus tumidus. Diagnosis of these diseases requires proper classification of the subtype, through a combination of physical exam, laboratory studies, histology, antibody serology, and occasionally direct immunofluorescence, while ensuring to exclude systemic disease. Treatment of cutaneous lupus consists of patient education on proper sun protection along with appropriate topical and systemic agents. Systemic agents are indicated in cases of widespread, scarring, or treatment-refractory disease. In this review, we discuss issues in classification and diagnosis of the various subtypes of CLE, as well as provide an update on therapeutic management. PMID:24238695

  15. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Simone; Fattori, Andre; Saad, Sarita T; Costallat, Lilian T L

    2008-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a prevalent genetic disorder that includes sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS), hemoglobin SC, and hemoglobin Sb-thalassemia. Patients with SCD present with a defective activation of the alternate pathway of the complement system that increases the risk of capsulate bacteria infection and failure to eliminate antigens, predisposing these patients to autoimmune diseases. The authors describe three patients with SCD that developed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In all patients, SLE diagnosis was delayed because symptoms were initially attributable to SCD. Physicians should be alerted to the possible development of SLE in patients with SCD to not delay the diagnosis and start appropriate treatment. PMID:18000698

  17. Mechanisms of Kidney Injury in Lupus Nephritis – the Role of Anti-dsDNA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a breakdown of self-tolerance, production of auto-antibodies and immune-mediated injury, resulting in damage accrual in multiple organs. Kidney involvement, termed lupus nephritis, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality that affects over half of the SLE population during the course of disease. The etiology of lupus nephritis is multifactorial and remains to be fully elucidated. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to forming immune complexes and triggering complement activation, anti-dsDNA antibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis through binding, either directly or indirectly, to cross-reactive antigens or chromatin materials, respectively, to resident renal cells and/or extracellular matrix components, thereby triggering downstream cellular activation and proliferation as well as inflammatory and fibrotic processes. Several cross-reactive antigens that mediate anti-dsDNA antibody binding have been identified, such as annexin II and alpha-actinin. This review discusses the mechanisms through which anti-dsDNA antibodies contribute to immunopathogenesis in lupus nephritis. Corticosteroids combined with either mycophenolic acid (MPA) or cyclophosphamide is the current standard of care immunosuppressive therapy for severe lupus nephritis. This review also discusses recent data showing distinct effects of MPA and cyclophosphamide on inflammatory and fibrotic processes in resident renal cells. PMID:26441980

  18. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  19. Serology of Lupus Erythematosus: Correlation between Immunopathological Features and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Drosera, Massimo; Gasparini, Giulia; Parodi, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the aberrant production of a broad and heterogenous group of autoantibodies. Even though the presence of autoantibodies in SLE has been known, for more than 60 years, still nowadays a great effort is being made to understand the pathogenetic, diagnostic, and prognostic meaning of such autoantibodies. Antibodies to ds-DNA are useful for the diagnosis of SLE, to monitor the disease activity, and correlate with renal and central nervous involvements. Anti-Sm antibodies are highly specific for SLE. Anti-nucleosome antibodies are an excellent marker for SLE and good predictors of flares in quiescent lupus. Anti-histone antibodies characterize drug-induced lupus, while anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies are associated with neonatal lupus erythematosus and photosensitivity. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies play a role in neuropsychiatric lupus, but their association with clinical manifestations is still unclear. Anti-phospholipid antibodies are associated with the anti-phospholipid syndrome, cerebral vascular disease, and neuropsychiatric lupus. Anti-C1q antibodies amplify glomerular injury, and the elevation of their titers may predict renal flares. Anti-RNP antibodies are a marker of Sharp's syndrome but can be found in SLE as well. Anti-PCNA antibodies are present in 5-10% of SLE patients especially those with arthritis and hypocomplementemia. PMID:24649358

  20. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients’ characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  1. Differential Expression of Glucocorticoid Receptor Noncoding RNA Repressor Gas5 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mayama, T; Marr, A K; Kino, T

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids have strong regulatory actions on the immune system and act as potent therapeutic compounds for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We previously reported that the long noncoding RNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which accumulates inside the cells in response to cellular starvation/growth arrest, functions as a potent repressor of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) through its RNA "glucocorticoid response element (GRE)". To evaluate potential roles of Gas5 in immune-related disorders, we examined Gas5 RNA levels in various autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases using the microarray data available in the Gene Expression Omnibus. We found that Gas5 levels were altered in whole blood or leukocytes of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and sarcoidosis. Gas5 levels were also altered in infectious diseases, such as by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 and influenza virus, and bacterial sepsis. In our experimental analysis using mice, Gas5 levels were kept at high basal levels and did not respond to fasting in immune organs, such as spleen and thymus, while its levels in metabolic organs, including liver, fat, and skeletal muscles, were low at baseline and were highly elevated upon this treatment, possibly through suppression of the mTOR pathway. These results suggest that Gas5 plays a role in the regulation of immune functions and pathogenesis/pathophysiology of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases in part through modulation of the GR transcriptional activity via its decoy RNA "GRE". Changes in the Gas5 levels may also influence disease response to immunosuppressive glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:27214311

  2. The 52 000 MW Ro/SS-A autoantigen in Sjögren's syndrome/systemic lupus erythematosus (Ro52) is an interferon-gamma inducible tripartite motif protein associated with membrane proximal structures.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Davd A; Ihrke, Gudrun; Reinicke, Anna T; Malcherek, Georg; Towey, Michael; Isenberg, David A; Trowsdale, John

    2002-06-01

    The 52 000 MW Ro/SS-A (Ro52) protein is a major target of autoantibodies in autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Recent genomic and bioinformatic studies have shown that Ro52 belongs to a large family of related RING/Bbox/coiled-coil (RBCC) tripartite motif proteins sharing overall domain structure and 40-50% identity at the amino acid level. Ro52 also has a B30.2 domain at the C-terminus. Using the human genome draft sequence, the genomic organization of the Ro52 gene on human chromosome 11p15.5 has been deduced and related to the protein domain structure. We show that the steady-state levels of Ro52 mRNA are normally very low but are induced by cell activation with interferon-gamma. In transient transfection of HeLa cells, epitope-tagged Ro52 protein was localized to unidentified membrane proximal rod-like structures. Using in vitro coupled transcription/translation followed by immunoprecipitation, the autoimmune response to Ro52 protein was investigated and two distinct interactions were resolved. The Ro52 C-terminal B30.2 domain interacts with human immunoglobulin independently of antibody specificities. Sera derived from patients with Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus, in addition, contained specific autoantibodies directed towards the rest of the Ro52 molecule. The majority of these autoimmune sera also immunoprecipitated the Ro52-related molecule RNF15. A possible role for Ro52 protein in alterations of plasma membranes during cellular activation or apoptosis is discussed. PMID:12047754

  3. General Approach for Tetramer Based Identification of Autoantigen Reactive B Cells: Characterization of La and snRNP Reactive B Cells in Autoimmune BXD2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jennie A.; Li, Jun; Wu, Qi; Yang, PingAr; Luo, Bao; Li, Hao; Bradley, John E.; Taylor, Justin J.; Randall, Troy D.; Mountz, John D.; Hsu, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive B cells are associated with the development of several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The low frequency of these cells represents a major barrier to their analysis. Antigen-tetramers prepared from linear epitopes represent a promising strategy for the identification of small subsets of antigen-reactive immune cells. This is challenging given the requirement for identification and validation of linear epitopes and the complexity of autoantibody responses, including the broad spectrum of autoantibody specificities and the contribution of isotype to pathogenicity. We therefore tested a two-tiered peptide microarray approach, coupled with epitope mapping of known autoantigens, to identify and characterize autoepitopes using the BXD2 autoimmune mouse model. Microarray results were verified through comparison with established age-associated profiles of autoantigen specificities and autoantibody class switching in BXD2 and control (B6) mice and high-throughput ELISA and ELISPOT analyses of synthetic peptides. Tetramers were prepared from two linear peptides derived from two ribonucleic acid binding proteins (RBP): lupus La and 70 kDa U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP). Flow cyotmetric analysis of tetramer-reactive B-cell subsets revealed a significantly higher frequency and greater numbers of RBP-reactive marginal zone precursor (MZ-P), transitional T3 and PDL-2+CD80+ memory B cells, with significantly elevated CD69 and CD86 observed in RBP+ MZ-P B cells in the spleens of BXD2 compared to B6 mice, suggesting a regulatory defect. This study establishes a feasible strategy for the characterization of autoantigen-specific B-cell subsets in different models of autoimmunity and, potentially, humans. PMID:25888644

  4. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  5. Apoptosis in chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, discoid lupus, and lupus profundus

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz-Corral, Claudia Ileana; Vega-Memíje, María Elisa; Martínez-Luna, Eduwiges; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; de la Rosa, Juan José Bollain-y-Goytia; del Muro, Felipe de Jesús Torres; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lupus erythematosus is a multisystemic disease that is characterized by autoantibody production and immune complex deposition in such tissues as the mucosa, joints, the central nervous system, and skin. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus is categorized as acute, subacute, and chronic. Chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus comprises discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and lupus profundus (LP). Aim: To analyze the expression of proapoptotic molecules in patients with lupus erythematosus discoid and lupus profundus. Material and methods: Descriptive study, the study groups comprised 10 cases of LP and 10 cases of DLE, and a control. Skin samples of cases and controls were processed for immunohistochemistry and by TUNEL technique. The database and statistical analysis was performed (statistical test X2) SPSS (Chicago, IL, USA). Results: Apoptotic features were broadly distributed along the skin biopsies in epidermal keratinocytes as well as at dermis. By immunohistochemistry the expression of Fas receptor and Fas-L was higher in the skin of lupus patients compared with controls. We also noted differences in Fas-L, -Fas, and -Bax proteins expression intensity in discoid lupus erythematosus patients in the epidermis, and hair follicles. Conclusions: Fas and Fas-L are expressed similarly in LP and DLE. PMID:26261624

  6. Personalized Immunomonitoring Uncovers Molecular Networks that Stratify Lupus Patients.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Romain; Hong, Seunghee; Cantarel, Brandi; Baldwin, Nicole; Baisch, Jeanine; Edens, Michelle; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Acs, Peter; Turner, Jacob; Anguiano, Esperanza; Vinod, Parvathi; Kahn, Shaheen; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Wakeland, Edward; Nassi, Lorien; Gotte, Alisa; Punaro, Marilynn; Liu, Yong-Jun; Banchereau, Jacques; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Wright, Tracey; Pascual, Virginia

    2016-04-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by loss of tolerance to nucleic acids and highly diverse clinical manifestations. To assess its molecular heterogeneity, we longitudinally profiled the blood transcriptome of 158 pediatric patients. Using mixed models accounting for repeated measurements, demographics, treatment, disease activity (DA), and nephritis class, we confirmed a prevalent IFN signature and identified a plasmablast signature as the most robust biomarker of DA. We detected gradual enrichment of neutrophil transcripts during progression to active nephritis and distinct signatures in response to treatment in different nephritis subclasses. Importantly, personalized immunomonitoring uncovered individual correlates of disease activity that enabled patient stratification into seven groups, supported by patient genotypes. Our study uncovers the molecular heterogeneity of SLE and provides an explanation for the failure of clinical trials. This approach may improve trial design and implementation of tailored therapies in genetically and clinically complex autoimmune diseases. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27040498

  7. Regulatory T-Cell-Associated Cytokines in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Akiko; Fujio, Keishi; Okamura, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody production, complement activation, and immune complex deposition, resulting in tissue and organ damage. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for homeostatic control of inflammation, which involve both innate and adoptive immune responses, will enable the development of novel therapies for SLE. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play critical roles in the induction of peripheral tolerance to self- and foreign antigens. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Treg, which characteristically express the transcription factor forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3), have been intensively studied because their deficiency abrogates self-tolerance and causes autoimmune disease. Moreover, regulatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) also play a central role in controlling inflammatory processes. This paper focuses on Tregs and Treg-associated cytokines which might regulate the pathogenesis of SLE and, hence, have clinical applications. PMID:22219657

  8. Eruptive anetoderma in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Nam-Ji; Park, Seung-Bae; Im, Myung; Seo, Young-Joon; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Lee, Young

    2014-10-01

    Anetoderma is a rare cutaneous disorder characterized by a loss of normal elastic tissue that presents clinically as atrophic patches located mainly on the upper trunk. Recent studies suggest immunological mechanisms may play a role in this process. Furthermore, a secondary form of macular atrophy occurs in the course of infectious diseases (e.g. syphilis and tuberculosis) and autoimmune disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE]). Here, we report the case of a 20-year-old woman previously diagnosed with SLE, who presented with numerous well-circumscribed atrophic macules on the face and upper trunk. Histopathological examination showed decreased elastic tissues in the reticular dermis and mononuclear cells adhering to elastic fibers, consistent with anetoderma. Thus, the eruptive anetoderma localized widely on the face and upper trunk may have been caused by an autoimmune response of SLE. PMID:25324656

  9. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune DIsease Awareness ... Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two important events ...

  10. Th17 Cells in Immunity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Simone Kennedy; Lam, Brandon; Lau, Kenneth; Larkin, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Th17 and IL-17 play important roles in the clearance of extracellular bacterial and fungal infections. However, strong evidence also implicates the Th17 lineage in several autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and asthma. The Th17 subset has also been connected with type I diabetes, although whether it plays a role in the pathogenicity of or protection from the disease remains a controversial issue. In this review we have provided a comprehensive overview of Th17 pathogenicity and function, including novel evidence for a protective role of Th17 cells in conjunction with the microbiota gut flora in T1D onset and progression. PMID:24454481

  11. New Insights into Disease-Specific Absence of Complement Factor H Related Protein C in Mouse Models of Spontaneous Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Banda, Nirmal K.

    2014-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2 ± 44.4, 54.5 ± 5.75 and 729 ± 252.9, 74.04 ± 22.76 respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9 ± 23.8, 58.8 ± 1.41 and 890.3 ± 135.2, 63.30 ± 9.2 respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development