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Sample records for human melanoma-bearing mouse

  1. Therapeutic Efficacy of a {sup 188}Re-Labeled {alpha}-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analog in Murine and Human Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Models

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Owen, Nellie K.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic efficacy of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH in the B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. Method: (Arg11)CCMSH was synthesized and labeled with {sup 188}Re to form {sup 188}Re-(Agr{sup 11})CCMSH. B16/F1 melanoma tumor bearing mice were administrated with 200 Ci, 600 Ci and 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH via the tail vein, respectively. TXM13 melanoma tumor hearing mice were separately injected with 600 Ci, 2x400 Ci and 1000 Ci of 100Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH through the tail vein. Two groups of 10 mice bearing either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors were injected with saline as untreated controls. Results: In contrast to the untreated control group, {sup 188}Re(Arg11)CCMSH yielded rapid and lasting therapeutic effects in the treatment groups with either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors. The tumor growth rate was reduced and the survival rate was prolonged in the treatment groups. Treatment with 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-Arg{sup 11}CCMSH significantly extended the mean life of B16/F1 tumor mice (p<0.05), while the mean life of TXm13 tumor mice was significantly prolonged after treatment with 600 Ci and 1000 Ci doses of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH (p<0.05 High-dose {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11}))CCMSH produced no observed normal-tissue toxicity. Conclusions: The therapy study results revealed that {sup 188}Re-Arg11 CCMSH yielded significant therapeutic effects in both B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH appears to be a promising radiolabeled peptide for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  2. Simvastatin increases the antineoplastic actions of paclitaxel carried in lipid nanoemulsions in melanoma-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Kretzer, Iara F; Maria, Durvanei A; Guido, Maria C; Contente, Thaís C; Maranhão, Raul C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipid nanoemulsions (LDEs) that bind to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors used as carriers of paclitaxel (PTX) can decrease toxicity and increase PTX antitumoral action. The administration of simvastatin (Simva), which lowers LDL-cholesterol, was tested as an adjuvant to commercial PTX and to PTX associated with LDE (LDE-PTX). Materials and methods B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice were treated with saline solution or LDE (controls), Simva, PTX, PTX and Simva, LDE-PTX, and LDE-PTX and Simva: PTX dose 17.5 μmol/kg (three intraperitoneal injections, 3 alternate days): Simva 50 mg/kg/day by gavage, 9 consecutive days. Results Compared with saline controls, 95% tumor-growth inhibition was achieved by LDE-PTX and Simva, 61% by LDE-PTX, 44% by PTX and Simva, and 43% by PTX. Simva alone had no effect. Metastasis developed in only 37% of the LDE-PTX and Simva, 60% in LDE-PTX, and 90% in PTX and Simva groups. Survival rates were higher in LDE-PTX and Simva and in LDE-PTX groups. The LDE-PTX and Simva group presented tumors with reduced cellular density and increased collagen fibers I and III. Tumors from all groups showed reduction in immunohistochemical expression of ICAM, MCP-1, and MMP-9; LDE-PTX and Simva presented the lowest MMP-9 expression. Expression of p21 was increased in the Simva, LDE-PTX, and LDE-PTX and Simva groups. In the Simva and LDE-PTX and Simva groups, expression of cyclin D1, a proliferation and survival promoter of tumor cells, was decreased. Therapy with LDE-PTX and Simva showed negligible toxicity compared with PTX and Simva, which resulted in weight loss and myelosuppression. Conclusion Simva increased the antitumor activity of PTX carried in LDE but not of PTX commercial presentation, possibly because statins increase the expression of LDL receptors that internalize LDE-PTX. PMID:27022257

  3. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  4. Human-mouse mixed lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Boylston, A W; Anderson, R L

    1978-01-01

    Conditions for stimulating human lymphocytes with mouse cells are established. The proliferative and cytotoxic responses generated are shown to be specific for antigens coded for in the major histocompatibility locus. PMID:151664

  5. Mouse Chromosome Engineering for Modeling Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Weyden, Louise; Bradley, Allan

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements occur frequently in humans and can be disease-associated or phenotypically neutral. Recent technological advances have led to the discovery of copy-number changes previously undetected by cytogenetic techniques. To understand the genetic consequences of such genomic changes, these mutations need to be modeled in experimentally tractable systems. The mouse is an excellent organism for this analysis because of its biological and genetic similarity to humans, and the ease with which its genome can be manipulated. Through chromosome engineering, defined rearrangements can be introduced into the mouse genome. The resulting mouse models are leading to a better understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of dosage alterations in human disease phenotypes, in turn opening new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:16824018

  6. The pluripotent state in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Kathryn C; Mason, Elizabeth A; Pera, Martin F

    2015-09-15

    In the mouse, naïve pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are thought to represent the cell culture equivalent of the late epiblast in the pre-implantation embryo, with which they share a unique defining set of features. Recent studies have focused on the identification and propagation of a similar cell state in human. Although the capture of an exact human equivalent of the mouse naïve PSC remains an elusive goal, comparative studies spurred on by this quest are lighting the path to a deeper understanding of pluripotent state regulation in early mammalian development. PMID:26395138

  7. Overcoming current limitations in humanized mouse research.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Michael A; Shultz, Leonard D; Luban, Jeremy; Greiner, Dale L

    2013-11-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human cells and tissues have provided an exciting alternative to in vitro studies with human tissues and nonhuman primates for the study of human immunobiology. A major breakthrough in the early 2000s was the introduction of a targeted mutation in the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor common gamma chain (IL2rg(null)) into mice that were already deficient in T and B cells. Among other immune defects, natural killer (NK) cells are disrupted in these mice, permitting efficient engraftment with human hematopoietic cells that generate a functional human immune system. These humanized mouse models are becoming increasingly important for preclinical studies of human immunity, hematopoiesis, tissue regeneration, cancer, and infectious diseases. In particular, humanized mice have enabled studies of the pathogenesis of human-specific pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, Epstein Barr virus, and Salmonella typhi. However, there are a number of limitations in the currently available humanized mouse models. Investigators are continuing to identify molecular mechanisms underlying the remaining defects in the engrafted human immune system and are generating "next generation" models to overcome these final deficiencies. This article provides an overview of some of the emerging models of humanized mice, their use in the study of infectious diseases, and some of the remaining limitations that are currently being addressed. PMID:24151318

  8. Overcoming Current Limitations in Humanized Mouse Research

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Michael A.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Luban, Jeremy; Greiner, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human cells and tissues have provided an exciting alternative to in vitro studies with human tissues and nonhuman primates for the study of human immunobiology. A major breakthrough in the early 2000s was the introduction of a targeted mutation in the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor common gamma chain (IL2rgnull) into mice that were already deficient in T and B cells. Among other immune defects, natural killer (NK) cells are disrupted in these mice, permitting efficient engraftment with human hematopoietic cells that generate a functional human immune system. These humanized mouse models are becoming increasingly important for preclinical studies of human immunity, hematopoiesis, tissue regeneration, cancer, and infectious diseases. In particular, humanized mice have enabled studies of the pathogenesis of human-specific pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, Epstein Barr virus, and Salmonella typhi. However, there are a number of limitations in the currently available humanized mouse models. Investigators are continuing to identify molecular mechanisms underlying the remaining defects in the engrafted human immune system and are generating “next generation” models to overcome these final deficiencies. This article provides an overview of some of the emerging models of humanized mice, their use in the study of infectious diseases, and some of the remaining limitations that are currently being addressed. PMID:24151318

  9. Mouse models of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  10. Chronic alcohol consumption enhances myeloid-derived suppressor cells in B16BL6 melanoma-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Meadows, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    We previously found that chronic alcohol consumption decreases the survival of mice bearing subcutaneous B16BL6 melanoma. The underlying mechanism is still not completely understood. Antitumor T cell immune responses are important to inhibiting tumor progression and extending survival. Therefore, we examined the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on the functionality and regulation of these cells in C57BL/6 mice that chronically consumed 20% (w/v) alcohol and subsequently were inoculated subcutaneously with B16BL6 melanoma cells. Chronic alcohol consumption inhibited melanoma-induced memory T cell expansion and accelerated the decay of interferon (IFN)-γ producing T cells in the tumor-bearing mice. Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were not affected; however, the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) was significantly increased in the peripheral blood and spleen. T cell proliferation as determined by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester labeling experiments in vitro was inhibited by alcohol consumption relative to control water-drinking melanoma-bearing mice. Collectively, these data show that chronic alcohol consumption inhibits proliferation of memory T cells, accelerates the decay of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells, and increases MDSC, all of which could be associated with melanoma progression and reduced survival. PMID:20229084

  11. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer. PMID:25572806

  12. Mouse models for understanding human developmental anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The mouse experimental system presents an opportunity for studying the nature of the underlying mutagenic damage and the molecular pathogenesis of this class of anomalies by virtue of the accessibility of the zygote and its descendant blastomeres. Such studies could contribute to the understanding of the etiology of certain sporadic but common human malformations. The vulnerability of the zygotes to mutagens as demonstrated in the studies described in this report should be a major consideration in chemical safety evaluation. It raises questions regarding the danger to human zygotes when the mother is exposed to drugs and environmental chemicals.

  13. Generation of improved humanized mouse models for human infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Michael A; Wiles, Michael V; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D

    2014-08-01

    The study of human-specific infectious agents has been hindered by the lack of optimal small animal models. More recently development of novel strains of immunodeficient mice has begun to provide the opportunity to utilize small animal models for the study of many human-specific infectious agents. The introduction of a targeted mutation in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain gene (IL2rg(null)) in mice already deficient in T and B cells led to a breakthrough in the ability to engraft hematopoietic stem cells, as well as functional human lymphoid cells and tissues, effectively creating human immune systems in immunodeficient mice. These humanized mice are becoming increasingly important as pre-clinical models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and other human-specific infectious agents. However, there remain a number of opportunities to further improve humanized mouse models for the study of human-specific infectious agents. This is being done by the implementation of innovative technologies, which collectively will accelerate the development of new models of genetically modified mice, including; i) modifications of the host to reduce innate immunity, which impedes human cell engraftment; ii) genetic modification to provide human-specific growth factors and cytokines required for optimal human cell growth and function; iii) and new cell and tissue engraftment protocols. The development of "next generation" humanized mouse models continues to provide exciting opportunities for the establishment of robust small animal models to study the pathogenesis of human-specific infectious agents, as well as for testing the efficacy of therapeutic agents and experimental vaccines. PMID:24607601

  14. Generation of improved humanized mouse models for human infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Michael A.; Wiles, Michael V.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    The study of human-specific infectious agents has been hindered by the lack of optimal small animal models. More recently development of novel strains of immunodeficient mice has begun to provide the opportunity to utilize small animal models for the study of many human-specific infectious agents. The introduction of a targeted mutation in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain gene (IL2rgnull) in mice already deficient in T and B cells led to a breakthrough in the ability to engraft hematopoietic stem cells, as well as functional human lymphoid cells and tissues, effectively creating human immune systems in immunodeficient mice. These humanized mice are becoming increasingly important as pre-clinical models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and other human-specific infectious agents. However, there remain a number of opportunities to further improve humanized mouse models for the study of human-specific infectious agents. This is being done by the implementation of innovative technologies, which collectively will accelerate the development of new models of genetically modified mice, including; i) modifications of the host to reduce innate immunity, which impedes human cell engraftment; ii) genetic modification to provide human-specific growth factors and cytokines required for optimal human cell growth and function; iii) and new cell and tissue engraftment protocols. The development of “next generation” humanized mouse models continues to provide exciting opportunities for the establishment of robust small animal models to study the pathogenesis of human-specific infectious agents, as well as for testing the efficacy of therapeutic agents and experimental vaccines. PMID:24607601

  15. Finding mouse models of human lymphomas and leukemia's using the Jackson laboratory mouse tumor biology database.

    PubMed

    Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Krupke, Debra M; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Morse, Herbert C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2015-12-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  16. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  17. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  18. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  19. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25348401

  20. Comparative anatomy of mouse and human nail units.

    PubMed

    Fleckman, Philip; Jaeger, Karin; Silva, Kathleen A; Sundberg, John P

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies of mice with hair defects have resulted in major contributions to the understanding of hair disorders. To use mouse models as a tool to study nail diseases, a basic understanding of the similarities and differences between the human and mouse nail unit is required. In this study we compare the human and mouse nail unit at the macroscopic and microscopic level and use immunohistochemistry to determine the keratin expression patterns in the mouse nail unit. Both species have a proximal nail fold, cuticle, nail matrix, nail bed, nail plate, and hyponychium. Distinguishing features are the shape of the nail and the presence of an extended hyponychium in the mouse. Expression patterns of most keratins are similar. These findings indicate that the mouse nail unit shares major characteristics with the human nail unit and overall represents a very similar structure, useful for the investigation of nail diseases and nail biology. PMID:23408541

  1. Comparative Anatomy of Mouse and Human Nail Units

    PubMed Central

    Fleckman, Philip; Jaeger, Karin; Silva, Kathleen A.; Sundberg, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of mice with hair defects have resulted in major contributions to the understanding of hair disorders. To use mouse models as a tool to study nail diseases, a basic understanding of the similarities and differences between the human and mouse nail unit is required. In this study we compare the human and mouse nail unit at the macroscopic and microscopic level and use immunohistochemistry to determine the keratin expression patterns in the mouse nail unit. Both species have a proximal nail fold, cuticle, nail matrix, nail bed, nail plate, and hyponychium. Distinguishing features are the shape of the nail and the presence of an extended hyponychium in the mouse. Expression patterns of most keratins are similar. These findings indicate that the mouse nail unit shares major characteristics with the human nail unit and overall represents a very similar structure, useful for the investigation of nail diseases and nail biology. PMID:23408541

  2. A Detailed Comparison of Mouse and Human Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Anita; Samtani, Rajeev; Dhanantwari, Preeta; Lee, Elaine; Yamada, Shigehito; Shiota, Kohei; Donofrio, Mary T.; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mouse mutants are used to model human congenital cardiovascular disease. Little is published comparing normal cardiovascular development in mice versus humans. We carried out a systematic comparative analysis of mouse and human fetal cardiovascular development. Methods Episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) was performed on 66 wild type mouse embryos from embryonic day (E) 9.5-birth; 2D and 3D datasets were compared with EFIC and magnetic resonance images (MRI) from a study of 52 human fetuses (Carnegie Stage (CS) 13–23). Results Time course of atrial, ventricular and outflow septation were outlined, and followed a similar sequence in both species. Bilateral vena cavae and prominent atrial appendages were seen in the mouse fetus; in human fetuses, atrial appendages were small, and a single right superior vena cava was present. In contrast to humans with separate pulmonary vein orifices, a pulmonary venous confluence with one orifice enters the left atrium in mice. Conclusions The cardiac developmental sequences observed in mouse and human fetuses are comparable, with minor differences in atrial and venous morphology. These comparisons of mouse and human cardiac development strongly support that mouse morphogenesis is a good model for human development. PMID:25167202

  3. Human-Mouse Chimerism Validates Human Stem Cell Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are defined by their capacity to differentiate into all three tissue layers that comprise the body. Chimera formation, generated by stem cell transplantation to the embryo, is a stringent assessment of stem cell pluripotency. However, the ability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to form embryonic chimeras remains in question. Here we show using a stage-matching approach that human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the capacity to participate in normal mouse development when transplanted into gastrula-stage embryos, providing in vivo functional validation of hPSC pluripotency. hiPSCs and hESCs form interspecies chimeras with high efficiency, colonize the embryo in a manner predicted from classical developmental fate mapping, and differentiate into each of the three primary tissue layers. This faithful recapitulation of tissue-specific fate post-transplantation underscores the functional potential of hPSCs and provides evidence that human-mouse interspecies developmental competency can occur. PMID:26712580

  4. Advanced molecular cytogenetics in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dorritie, Kathleen; Montagna, Cristina; Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Ried, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization, spectral karyotyping, multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization, comparative genomic hybridization, and more recently array comparative genomic hybridization, represent advancements in the field of molecular cytogenetics. The application of these techniques for the analysis of specimens from humans, or mouse models of human diseases, enables one to reliably identify and characterize complex chromosomal rearrangements resulting in alterations of the genome. As each of these techniques has advantages and limitations, a comprehensive analysis of cytogenetic aberrations can be accomplished through the utilization of a combination approach. As such, analyses of specific tumor types have proven invaluable in the identification of new tumor-specific chromosomal aberrations and imbalances (aneuploidy), as well as regions containing tumor-specific gene targets. Application of these techniques has already improved the classification of tumors into distinct categories, with the hope that this will lead to more tailored treatment strategies. These techniques, in particular the application of tumor-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization probes to interphase nuclei, are also powerful tools for the early identification of premalignant lesions. PMID:15347260

  5. Possible use of similar framework region amino acid sequences between human and mouse immunoglobulins for humanizing mouse antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wu, T T; Kabat, E A

    1992-09-01

    We have previously noted that a specific amino acid sequence could form the second framework region of human, mouse and rabbit immunoglobulin light chains, suggesting that this sequence has been preserved for 80 million years. Through divergent evolution, each species has acquired a different set of framework region sequences; however, these sets still share a few similar or identical amino acid sequences. In the present study, we have identified such sequences for all four framework regions between human and mouse immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. They may be useful in humanizing or reshaping mouse or rat antibodies for therapeutic applications in human patients. PMID:1495500

  6. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse–human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human–Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene–phenotype–disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25348401

  7. PPARγ in human and mouse physiology

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Sami; Auwerx, Johan; Argmann, Carmen A

    2007-01-01

    Summary The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member in the nuclear receptor superfamily which mediates part of the regulatory effects of dietary fatty acids on gene expression. As PPARγ also coordinates adipocyte differentiation, it is an important component in storing the excess nutritional energy as fat. Our genes have evolved into maximizing energy storage, and PPARγ has a central role in the mismatch between our genes and our affluent western society which results in a broad range of metabolic disturbances, collectively known as the metabolic syndrome. A flurry of human and mouse studies has shed new light on the mechanisms how the commonly used insulin sensitizer drugs and PPARγ activators, thiazolidinediones, act, and which of their physiological effects are dependent of PPARγ. It is now evident that the full activation of PPARγ is less advantageous than targeted modulation of it's activity. Furthermore, new roles for PPARγ signaling have been discovered in inflammation, bone morphogenesis, endothelial function, cancer, longevity, and atherosclerosis, to mention a few. Here we draw together and discuss these recent advances in the research into PPARγ biology. PMID:17475546

  8. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  9. Speriolin is a novel human and mouse sperm centrosome protein

    PubMed Central

    Goto, M.; O'Brien, D.A.; Eddy, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oocytes in humans, mice and other mammals lack identifiable centrioles. The proximal centriole brought in by the fertilizing sperm in humans and most other mammals appears to gives rise to the centrioles at the spindle poles in the zygote, and is believed to indicate that centrioles are inherited through the paternal lineage. However, both the proximal and distal sperm centrioles degenerate in mice and other rodents. A bipolar mitotic spindle nucleates from multiple centrosome-like structures in the mouse zygote and centrioles are not seen until the blastocyst stage, suggesting that centrioles are inherited through the maternal lineage in mice. We previously identified speriolin as a spermatogenic cell-specific binding partner of Cdc20 that co-localizes with pericentrin in mouse spermatocytes and is present in the centrosome in round spermatids. METHODS The nature and localization of speriolin in mouse and human sperm and the fate of speriolin following fertilization in the mouse were determined using immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy and western blotting. RESULTS Speriolin surrounds the intact proximal centriole in human sperm, but is localized at the periphery of the disordered distal centriole in mouse sperm. Human speriolin contains an internal 163-amino acid region not present in mouse that may contribute to localization differences. Speriolin is carried into the mouse oocyte during fertilization and remains associated with the decondensing sperm head in zygotes. The speriolin spot appears to undergo duplication or splitting during the first interphase and is detectable in 2-cell embryos. CONCLUSIONS Speriolin is a novel centrosomal protein present in the connecting piece region of mouse and human sperm that is transmitted to the mouse zygote and can be detected throughout the first mitotic division. PMID:20542897

  10. Transcriptional divergence and conservation of human and mouse erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pishesha, Novalia; Thiru, Prathapan; Shi, Jiahai; Eng, Jennifer C.; Sankaran, Vijay G.; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models have been used extensively for decades and have been instrumental in improving our understanding of mammalian erythropoiesis. Nonetheless, there are several examples of variation between human and mouse erythropoiesis. We performed a comparative global gene expression study using data from morphologically identical stage-matched sorted populations of human and mouse erythroid precursors from early to late erythroblasts. Induction and repression of major transcriptional regulators of erythropoiesis, as well as major erythroid-important proteins, are largely conserved between the species. In contrast, at a global level we identified a significant extent of divergence between the species, both at comparable stages and in the transitions between stages, especially for the 500 most highly expressed genes during development. This suggests that the response of multiple developmentally regulated genes to key erythroid transcriptional regulators represents an important modification that has occurred in the course of erythroid evolution. In developing a systematic framework to understand and study conservation and divergence between human and mouse erythropoiesis, we show how mouse models can fail to mimic specific human diseases and provide predictions for translating findings from mouse models to potential therapies for human disease. PMID:24591581

  11. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Krupke, Debra M.; Begley, Dale A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Sundberg, John P.; Eppig, Janan T.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers. PMID:25332399

  12. End Sequencing and Finger Printing of Human & Mouse BAC Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, C.

    2005-09-27

    This project provided for continued end sequencing of existing and new BAC libraries constructed to support human sequencing as well as to initiate BAC end sequencing from the mouse BAC libraries constructed to support mouse sequencing. The clones, the sequences, and the fingerprints are now an available resource for the community at large. Research and development of new metaodologies for BAC end sequencing have reduced costs and increase throughput.

  13. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn S.; Fields, Natasha R.; Chaudoin, Tammy R; Epstein, Adrian A.; Makarov, Edward; Akhter, Sidra P.; Gorantla, Santhi; Bonasera, Stephen J.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization. PMID:26353862

  14. Cohesin and human disease: lessons from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2015-12-01

    Cohesin is an evolutionarily conserved large ring-like multi-subunit protein structure that can encircle DNA. Cohesin affects many processes that occur on chromosomes such as segregation, DNA replication, double-strand break repair, condensation, chromosome organization, and gene expression. Mutations in the genes that encode cohesin and its regulators cause human developmental disorders and cancer. Several mouse models have been established with the aim of understanding the cohesin mediated processes that are disrupted in these diseases. Mouse models support the idea that cohesin is essential for cell division, but partial loss of function can alter gene expression, DNA replication and repair, gametogenesis, and nuclear organization. PMID:26343989

  15. STING activator c-di-GMP enhances the anti-tumor effects of peptide vaccines in melanoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zili; Celis, Esteban

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to induce anti-tumor CD8 T cells have been used in clinical trials for advanced melanoma patients, but the clinical response rate and overall survival time have not improved much. We believe that these dismal outcomes are caused by inadequate number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells generated by most vaccines. In contrast, huge CD8 T cell responses readily occur during acute viral infections. High levels of type-I interferon (IFN-I) are produced during these infections, and this cytokine not only exhibits anti-viral activity but also promotes CD8 T cell responses. The studies described here were performed to determine whether promoting the production of IFN-I could enhance the potency of a peptide vaccine. We report that cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which activates the stimulator of interferon genes, potentiated the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of a peptide vaccine against mouse B16 melanoma. The synergistic effects of c-di-GMP required co-administration of costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody, the adjuvant poly-IC, and were mediated in part by IFN-I. These findings demonstrate that peptides representing CD8 T cell epitopes can be effective inducers of large CD8 T cell responses in vaccination strategies that mimic acute viral infections. PMID:25986168

  16. Assignment of three human markers in chromosome 21q11 to mouse chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Shen, Y; Tong, S; Kao, F T

    1997-09-01

    Three unique sequence microclones from human chromosome region 21q11 were assigned to mouse chromosome 16 using a mouse/Chinese hamster cell hybrid 96Az2 containing a single mouse chromosome 16. This comparative mapping provides further homology between human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 to include the very proximal portion of the long arm of human chromosome 21. Since this part of human chromosome 21 is associated with mental retardation in Down syndrome individuals, its homologous mouse region should also be included in the construction of mouse models for studying Down syndrome phenotypes including mental retardation. PMID:9546078

  17. Humanized Mouse Model to Study Bacterial Infections Targeting the Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Melican, Keira; Aubey, Flore; Duménil, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes a severe, frequently fatal sepsis when it enters the human blood stream. Infection leads to extensive damage of the blood vessels resulting in vascular leak, the development of purpuric rashes and eventual tissue necrosis. Studying the pathogenesis of this infection was previously limited by the human specificity of the bacteria, which makes in vivo models difficult. In this protocol, we describe a humanized model for this infection in which human skin, containing dermal microvessels, is grafted onto immunocompromised mice. These vessels anastomose with the mouse circulation while maintaining their human characteristics. Once introduced into this model, N. meningitidis adhere exclusively to the human vessels, resulting in extensive vascular damage, inflammation and in some cases the development of purpuric rash. This protocol describes the grafting, infection and evaluation steps of this model in the context of N. meningitidis infection. The technique may be applied to numerous human specific pathogens that infect the blood stream. PMID:24747976

  18. Mouse and human FcR effector functions.

    PubMed

    Bruhns, Pierre; Jnsson, Friederike

    2015-11-01

    Mouse and human FcRs have been a major focus of attention not only of the scientific community, through the cloning and characterization of novel receptors, and of the medical community, through the identification of polymorphisms and linkage to disease but also of the pharmaceutical community, through the identification of FcRs as targets for therapy or engineering of Fc domains for the generation of enhanced therapeutic antibodies. The availability of knockout mouse lines for every single mouse FcR, of multiple or cell-specific--' la carte'--FcR knockouts and the increasing generation of hFcR transgenics enable powerful in vivo approaches for the study of mouse and human FcR biology. This review will present the landscape of the current FcR family, their effector functions and the in vivo models at hand to study them. These in vivo models were recently instrumental in re-defining the properties and effector functions of FcRs that had been overlooked or discarded from previous analyses. A particular focus will be made on the (mis)concepts on the role of high-affinity IgG receptors in vivo and on results from antibody engineering to enhance or abrogate antibody effector functions mediated by FcRs. PMID:26497511

  19. How informative is the mouse for human gut microbiota research?

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Loan Anh; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Liston, Adrian; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota of the human gut is gaining broad attention owing to its association with a wide range of diseases, ranging from metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity and type 2 diabetes) to autoimmune diseases (such as inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes), cancer and even neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). Having been increasingly used in biomedical research, mice have become the model of choice for most studies in this emerging field. Mouse models allow perturbations in gut microbiota to be studied in a controlled experimental setup, and thus help in assessing causality of the complex host-microbiota interactions and in developing mechanistic hypotheses. However, pitfalls should be considered when translating gut microbiome research results from mouse models to humans. In this Special Article, we discuss the intrinsic similarities and differences that exist between the two systems, and compare the human and murine core gut microbiota based on a meta-analysis of currently available datasets. Finally, we discuss the external factors that influence the capability of mouse models to recapitulate the gut microbiota shifts associated with human diseases, and investigate which alternative model systems exist for gut microbiota research. PMID:25561744

  20. A Mouse Model for Imprinting of the Human Retinoblastoma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tasiou, Vasiliki; Hiber, Michaela; Steenpass, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to integration of the PPP1R26P1 pseudogene into intron 2. PPP1R26P1 harbors the gametic differentially methylated region of the RB1 gene, CpG85, which is methylated in the female germ line. The paternally unmethylated CpG85 acts as promoter for the alternative transcript 2B of RB1, which interferes with expression of full-length RB1 in cis. In mice, PPP1R26P1 is not present in the Rb1 gene and Rb1 is not imprinted. Assuming that the mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting are conserved, we investigated if imprinting of mouse Rb1 can be induced by transferring human PPP1R26P1 into mouse Rb1. We generated humanized Rb1_PPP1R26P1 knock-in mice that pass human PPP1R26P1 through the mouse germ line. We found that the function of unmethylated CpG85 as promoter for an alternative Rb1 transcript and as cis-repressor of the main Rb1 transcript is maintained in mouse tissues. However, CpG85 is not recognized as a gametic differentially methylated region in the mouse germ line. DNA methylation at CpG85 is acquired only in tissues of neuroectodermal origin, independent of parental transmission of PPP1R26P1. Absence of CpG85 methylation in oocytes and sperm implies a failure of imprint methylation establishment in the germ line. Our results indicate that site-specific integration of a proven human gametic differentially methylated region is not sufficient for acquisition of DNA methylation in the mouse germ line, even if promoter function of the element is maintained. This suggests a considerable dependency of DNA methylation induction on the surrounding sequence. However, our model is suited to determine the cellular function of the alternative Rb1 transcript. PMID:26275142

  1. Genetically Engineered Humanized Mouse Models for Preclinical Antibody Studies

    PubMed Central

    Proetzel, Gabriele; Wiles, Michael V.; Roopenian, Derry C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetic engineering has vastly improved our capabilities to create animal models relevant in preclinical research. With the recent advances in gene-editing technologies, it is now possible to very rapidly create highly tunable mouse models as needs arise. Here, we provide an overview of genetic engineering methods, as well as the development of humanized neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) models and their use for monoclonal antibody in vivo studies. PMID:24150980

  2. Comprehensive comparative homeobox gene annotation in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Boychenko, Veronika; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of genes coding for transcription factors with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix structure called a homeodomain and which play a crucial role in pattern formation during embryogenesis. Many homeobox genes are located in clusters and some of these, most notably the HOX genes, are known to have antisense or opposite strand long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes that play a regulatory role. Because automated annotation of both gene clusters and non-coding genes is fraught with difficulty (over-prediction, under-prediction, inaccurate transcript structures), we set out to manually annotate all homeobox genes in the mouse and human genomes. This includes all supported splice variants, pseudogenes and both antisense and flanking lncRNAs. One of the areas where manual annotation has a significant advantage is the annotation of duplicated gene clusters. After comprehensive annotation of all homeobox genes and their antisense genes in human and in mouse, we found some discrepancies with the current gene set in RefSeq regarding exact gene structures and coding versus pseudogene locus biotype. We also identified previously un-annotated pseudogenes in the DUX, Rhox and Obox gene clusters, which helped us re-evaluate and update the gene nomenclature in these regions. We found that human homeobox genes are enriched in antisense lncRNA loci, some of which are known to play a role in gene or gene cluster regulation, compared to their mouse orthologues. Of the annotated set of 241 human protein-coding homeobox genes, 98 have an antisense locus (41%) while of the 277 orthologous mouse genes, only 62 protein coding gene have an antisense locus (22%), based on publicly available transcriptional evidence. PMID:26412852

  3. CARI III inhibits tumor growth in a melanoma-bearing mouse model through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute) III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox)-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88%) was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients. PMID:25221864

  4. A versatile new technique to clear mouse and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-07-01

    Large volumes imaging with microscopic resolution is limited by light scattering. In the last few years based on refractive index matching, different clearing approaches have been developed. Organic solvents and water-based optical clearing agents have been used for optical clearing of entire mouse brain. Although these methods guarantee high transparency and preservation of the fluorescence, though present other non-negligible limitations. Tissue transformation by CLARITY allows high transparency, whole brain immunolabelling and structural and molecular preservation. This method however requires a highly expensive refractive index matching solution limiting practical applicability. In this work we investigate the effectiveness of a water-soluble clearing agent, the 2,2'-thiodiethanol (TDE) to clear mouse and human brain. TDE does not quench the fluorescence signal, is compatible with immunostaining and does not introduce any deformation at sub-cellular level. The not viscous nature of the TDE make it a suitable agent to perform brain slicing during serial two-photon (STP) tomography. In fact, by improving penetration depth it reduces tissue slicing, decreasing the acquisition time and cutting artefacts. TDE can also be used as a refractive index medium for CLARITY. The potential of this method has been explored by imaging a whole transgenic mouse brain with the light sheet microscope. Moreover we apply this technique also on blocks of dysplastic human brain tissue transformed with CLARITY and labeled with different antibody. This clearing approach significantly expands the application of single and two-photon imaging, providing a new useful method for quantitative morphological analysis of structure in mouse and human brain.

  5. MOUSE SKIN TUMORS AND HUMAN LUNG CANCER: RELATIONSHIPS WITH COMPLEX ENVIRONMENTAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, mouse skin tumorigenesis has been used to evaluate the tumorigenic effects of complex mixtures including human respiratory carcinogens. his study examines the quantitative relationships between tumor induction in SENCAR mouse skin and the induction of respiratory ca...

  6. P2Y Receptors Sensitize Mouse and Human Colonic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hockley, James R. F.; Tranter, Michael M.; McGuire, Cian; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Thaha, Mohamed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Knowles, Charles H.; Winchester, Wendy J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of visceral nociceptors by inflammatory mediators contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain associated with many gastrointestinal disorders. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotides (e.g., ATP and UTP) are strongly implicated in this process following their release from epithelial cells during mechanical stimulation of the gut, and from immune cells during inflammation. Actions of ATP are mediated through both ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. P2X receptor activation causes excitation of visceral afferents; however, the impact of P2Y receptor activation on visceral afferents innervating the gut is unclear. Here we investigate the effects of stimulating P2Y receptors in isolated mouse colonic sensory neurons, and visceral nociceptor fibers in mouse and human nerve-gut preparations. Additionally, we investigate the role of Nav1.9 in mediating murine responses. The application of UTP (P2Y2 and P2Y4 agonist) sensitized colonic sensory neurons by increasing action potential firing to current injection and depolarizing the membrane potential. The application of ADP (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13 agonist) also increased action potential firing, an effect blocked by the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500. UTP or ADP stimulated afferents, including mouse and human visceral nociceptors, in nerve-gut preparations. P2Y1 and P2Y2 transcripts were detected in 80% and 56% of retrogradely labeled colonic neurons, respectively. Nav1.9 transcripts colocalized in 86% of P2Y1-positive and 100% of P2Y2-positive colonic neurons, consistent with reduced afferent fiber responses to UTP and ADP in Nav1.9−/− mice. These data demonstrate that P2Y receptor activation stimulates mouse and human visceral nociceptors, highlighting P2Y-dependent mechanisms in the generation of visceral pain during gastrointestinal disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic visceral pain is a debilitating symptom of many gastrointestinal disorders. The activation of pain-sensing nerves located in the bowel wall and their sensitization to physiological stimuli, including bowel movements, underpins the development of such pain, and is associated with mediators released during disease. This work addresses the unstudied role of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in modulating colonic nociceptors via P2Y receptors using a combination of electrophysiological recordings from human ex vivo samples and a detailed functional study in the mouse. This is the first report to identify colonic purinergic signaling as a function of P2Y receptor activation, in addition to established P2X receptor activity, and the results contribute to our understanding of the development of visceral pain during gastrointestinal disease. PMID:26911685

  7. The truth about mouse, human, worms and yeast

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Genome comparisons are behind the powerful new annotation methods being developed to find all human genes, as well as genes from other genomes. Genomes are now frequently being studied in pairs to provide cross-comparison datasets. This 'Noah's Ark' approach often reveals unsuspected genes and may support the deletion of false-positive predictions. Joining mouse and human as the cross-comparison dataset for the first two mammals are: two Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura; two sea squirts, Ciona intestinalis and Ciona savignyi; four yeast (Saccharomyces) species; two nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae; and two pufferfish (Takefugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis). Even genomes like yeast and C. elegans, which have been known for more than five years, are now being significantly improved. Methods developed for yeast or nematodes will now be applied to mouse and human, and soon to additional mammals such as rat and dog, to identify all the mammalian protein-coding genes. Current large disparities between human Unigene predictions (127,835 genes) and gene-scanning methods (45,000 genes) still need to be resolved. This will be the challenge during the next few years. PMID:15601543

  8. A novel antiangiogenic and vascular normalization therapy targeted against human CD160 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chabot, Sophie; Bigot, Karine; Tabiasco, Julie; Provost, Alexandra; Golzio, Muriel; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Giustiniani, Jérôme; Bellard, Elisabeth; Brayer, Stéphanie; Aguerre-Girr, Maryse; Meggetto, Fabienne; Giuriato, Sylvie; Malecaze, François; Galiacy, Stéphane; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Chose, Olivier; Kadouche, Jean; Chouaib, Salem; Teissié, Justin; Abitbol, Marc; Bensussan, Armand

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an essential role in several diseases of the eye and in the growth of solid tumors, but existing antiangiogenic therapies have limited benefits in several cases. We report the antiangiogenic effects of a monoclonal antibody, CL1-R2, in several animal models of neovascularization. CL1-R2 recognizes human CD160, a membrane receptor which is conserved in various mammal species. We show that CD160 is expressed on the endothelial cells of newly formed blood vessels in human colon carcinoma and mouse B16 melanoma but not in vessels of healthy tissues. CL1-R2 reduced fibroblast growth factor 2–induced neovascularization in the rabbit cornea, in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, and in a mouse Matrigel plug assay. Treatment of B16 melanoma-bearing mice with CL1-R2 combined with cyclophosphamide chemotherapy caused regression of the tumor vasculature and normalization of the remaining vessels as shown by Doppler ultrasonography, intravital microscopy, and histology. These studies validate CD160 as a potential new target in cases of human pathological ocular and tumor neoangiogenesis that do not respond or become resistant to existing antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:21482699

  9. Mouse liver repopulation with hepatocytes generated from human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Saiyong; Rezvani, Milad; Harbell, Jack; Mattis, Aras N.; Wolfe, Alan R.; Benet, Leslie Z.; Willenbring, Holger; Ding, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) promise to revolutionize research and therapy of liver diseases by providing a source of hepatocytes for autologous cell therapy and disease modeling. However, despite progress in advancing the differentiation of iPSCs into hepatocytes (iPSC-Heps) in vitro1–3, cells that replicate the ability of human primary adult hepatocytes (aHeps) to proliferate extensively in vivo have not been reported. This deficiency has hampered efforts to recreate human liver diseases in mice, and has cast doubt on the potential of iPSC-Heps for liver cell therapy. The reason is that extensive post-transplant expansion is needed to establish and sustain a therapeutically effective liver cell mass in patients, a lesson learned from clinical trials of aHep transplantation4. As a solution to this problem, we report generation of human fibroblast-derived hepatocytes that can repopulate mouse livers. Unlike current protocols for deriving hepatocytes from human fibroblasts, ours did not generate iPSCs, but shortcut reprogramming to pluripotency to generate an induced multipotent progenitor cell (iMPC) state from which endoderm progenitor cells (iMPC-EPCs) and subsequently hepatocytes (iMPC-Heps) could be efficiently differentiated. For this, we identified small molecules that aided endoderm and hepatocyte differentiation without compromising proliferation. After transplantation into an immune-deficient mouse model of human liver failure, iMPC-Heps proliferated extensively and acquired levels of hepatocyte function similar to aHeps. Unfractionated iMPC-Heps did not form tumors, most likely because they never entered a pluripotent state. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of significant liver repopulation of mice with human hepatocytes generated in vitro, which removes a long-standing roadblock on the path to autologous liver cell therapy. PMID:24572354

  10. Binding of licarbazepine enantiomers to mouse and human plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Falcão, Amílcar; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2010-07-01

    Racemic licarbazepine (Lic) is the active metabolite of oxcarbazepine (OXC) and eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), appearing in human plasma as S-licarbazepine (S-Lic) and R-licarbazepine (R-Lic). However, human metabolism of OXC and ESL to Lic differs in the S-Lic/R-Lic enantiomeric ratio observed in plasma. S-Lic appears in higher proportion after ESL administration than after OXC (95% versus 80%). Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of Lic enantiomers have been found in mice after their separate administration and in humans following OXC treatment. Since protein binding of drugs may be enantioselective and a determining factor of pharmacokinetics, the binding of S-Lic and R-Lic to mouse and human total plasma proteins and, specifically, to human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were herein investigated for the first time. Free and bound fractions of S-Lic and R-Lic were separated by ultrafiltration after previous in vitro incubation of spiked plasma samples and protein solutions with each enantiomer at 10, 25 and 50 microg/ml. The results revealed that the extent of binding of Lic enantiomers to total plasma proteins was 30% and independent of the drug concentration and species considered. The data also suggest that the binding of Lic enantiomers to HSA is greater than that to AGP. Moreover, absence of enantioselectivity in the binding of Lic enantiomers to mouse and human plasma proteins and to HSA and AGP is evident. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the enantioselectivity observed in vivo in the biodisposition of S-Lic and R-Lic is not dependent on their affinity to plasma proteins. PMID:20578208

  11. Structural features of mouse telomerase RNA are responsible for the lower activity of mouse telomerase versus human telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Garforth, Scott J.; Wu, Yan Yun; Prasad, Vinayaka R.

    2006-01-01

    Human and mouse telomerases show a high degree of similarity in both the protein and RNA components. Human telomerase is more active and more processive than the mouse telomerase. There are two key differences between hTR [human TR (telomerase RNA)] and mTR (mouse TR) structures. First, the mouse telomerase contains only 2 nt upstream of its template region, whereas the human telomerase contains 45 nt. Secondly, the template region of human telomerase contains a 5-nt alignment domain, whereas that of mouse has only 2 nt. We hypothesize that these differences are responsible for the differential telomerase activities. Mutations were made in both the hTR and mTR, changing the template length and the length of the RNA upstream of the template, and telomerase was reconstituted in vitro using mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase generated by in vitro translation. We show that the sequences upstream of the template region, with a potential to form a double-stranded helix (the P1 helix) as in hTR, increase telomerase activity. The longer alignment domain increases telomerase activity only in the context of the P1 helix. Thus the TR contributes to regulating the level of activity of mammalian telomerases. PMID:16669789

  12. An In Vivo Mouse Model of Metastatic Human Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa; Gaskins, Kelli; Yu, Zhiya; Xiong, Yin; Merino, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mouse models of metastatic human cancers are important tools in preclinical studies for testing new systematic therapies and studying effectors of cancer metastasis. The major drawbacks of current mouse models for metastatic thyroid cancer are that they have low metastasis rates and do not allow in vivo tumor detection. Here, we report and characterize an in vivo detectable metastasis mouse model of human thyroid cancer using multiple thyroid cancer cell lines. Methods: Human anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C, C-643, SW-1736, and THJ-16T; follicular thyroid cancer cell lines FTC-133, FTC-236, and FTC-238; and Hürthle cell carcinoma cell line XTC-1 were transfected with a linearized pGL4.51[luc2/CMV/Neo] vector or transduced with lentivirus containing Luc2-eGFP reporter genes. The stably transfected cells were injected intravenously into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice. Tumors were detected with an in vivo imaging system—Xenogen IVIS. Vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, was used to treat lung metastases generated from 8505C-Luc2 cells with a BRAFV600E mutation to test the accuracy of the model to evaluate response to therapy. Results: Intravenous injection of as few as 30,000 8505C-Luc2 cells produced lung metastases in 100% of the injected mice, and many of these mice also developed bone metastases at a later stage of the disease. Similarly, metastatic tumors also developed in all mice injected with C-643-Luc2, THJ-16T-Luc2, FTC-133-Luc2, FTC-236-Luc2, FTC-238-Luc2, and XTC-1-Luc2 cells. The metastases were easily detectable in vivo, and tumor progression could be dynamically and accurately followed and correlated with the actual tumor burden. Furthermore, disease progression could be easily controlled by adjusting the number of injected cells. The in vivo treatment of 8505C xenograft lung metastases with vemurafenib dramatically reduced the growth and signal intensity with good correlation with actual tumor burden. Conclusions: Herein we report an in vivo detectable mouse model of metastatic human thyroid cancer that is reliable and reproducible. It will serve as a useful tool in the preclinical testing of alternative systematic therapies for metastatic thyroid cancer, and for functional studies of thyroid cancer tumor biology in vivo. PMID:24262022

  13. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-05-15

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how 'human-like' can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1{sub C}YP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+){sub s}evere-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs.

  14. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W

    2009-05-15

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how "human-like" can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1_CYP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+)_severe-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs. PMID:19285097

  15. Glycine receptor mouse mutants: model systems for human hyperekplexia

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Natascha; Langlhofer, Georg; Kluck, Christoph J; Villmann, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Human hyperekplexia is a neuromotor disorder caused by disturbances in inhibitory glycine-mediated neurotransmission. Mutations in genes encoding for glycine receptor subunits or associated proteins, such as GLRA1, GLRB, GPHN and ARHGEF9, have been detected in patients suffering from hyperekplexia. Classical symptoms are exaggerated startle attacks upon unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli, massive tremor, loss of postural control during startle and apnoea. Usually patients are treated with clonazepam, this helps to dampen the severe symptoms most probably by up-regulating GABAergic responses. However, the mechanism is not completely understood. Similar neuromotor phenotypes have been observed in mouse models that carry glycine receptor mutations. These mouse models serve as excellent tools for analysing the underlying pathomechanisms. Yet, studies in mutant mice looking for postsynaptic compensation of glycinergic dysfunction via an up-regulation in GABAA receptor numbers have failed, as expression levels were similar to those in wild-type mice. However, presynaptic adaptation mechanisms with an unusual switch from mixed GABA/glycinergic to GABAergic presynaptic terminals have been observed. Whether this presynaptic adaptation explains the improvement in symptoms or other compensation mechanisms exist is still under investigation. With the help of spontaneous glycine receptor mouse mutants, knock-in and knock-out studies, it is possible to associate behavioural changes with pharmacological differences in glycinergic inhibition. This review focuses on the structural and functional characteristics of the various mouse models used to elucidate the underlying signal transduction pathways and adaptation processes and describes a novel route that uses gene-therapeutic modulation of mutated receptors to overcome loss of function mutations. PMID:23941355

  16. Alternative splicing of human and mouse NPFF2 receptor genes: Implications to receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Ankö, Minna-Liisa; Ostergård, Maria; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Panula, Pertti

    2006-12-22

    Alternative splicing has an important role in the tissue-specific regulation of gene expression. Here we report that similar to the human NPFF2 receptor, the mouse NPFF2 receptor is alternatively spliced. In human the presence of three alternatively spliced receptor variants were verified, whereas two NPFF2 receptor variants were identified in mouse. The alternative splicing affected the 5' untranslated region of the mouse receptor and the variants in mouse were differently distributed. The mouse NPFF system may also have species-specific features since the NPFF2 receptor mRNA expression differs from that reported for rat. PMID:17157836

  17. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  18. Mitochondrial viability in mouse and human postmortem brain.

    PubMed

    Barksdale, Keri A; Perez-Costas, Emma; Gandy, Johanna C; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Bijur, Gautam N

    2010-09-01

    Neuronal function in the brain requires energy in the form of ATP, and mitochondria are canonically associated with ATP production in neurons. The electrochemical gradient, which underlies the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(mem)), is harnessed for ATP generation. Here we show that DeltaPsi(mem) and ATP-production can be engaged in mitochondria isolated from human brains up to 8.5 h postmortem. Also, a time course of postmortem intervals from 0 to 24 h using mitochondria isolated from mouse cortex reveals that DeltaPsi(mem) in mitochondria can be reconstituted beyond 10 h postmortem. It was found that complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was affected adversely with increasing postmortem intervals. Mitochondria isolated from postmortem mouse brains maintain the ability to produce ATP, but rates of production decreased with longer postmortem intervals. Furthermore, we show that postmortem brain mitochondria retain their DeltaPsi(mem) and ATP-production capacities following cryopreservation. Our finding that DeltaPsi(mem) and ATP-generating capacity can be reinitiated in brain mitochondria hours after death indicates that human postmortem brains can be an abundant source of viable mitochondria to study metabolic processes in health and disease. It is also possible to archive these mitochondria for future studies. PMID:20466876

  19. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  20. Chromosomal localization of mouse bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2: Identification of a new region of homology between mouse and human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. ); Li, K.; Sawamura, D.; Chu, Monli; Uitto, J. ); Giudice, G.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Two bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2, have been recently cloned and mapped to human chromosomes 6p12-p11 and 10q24.3, respectively. In this study, we localized the corresponding mouse genes by interspecific backcross analysis. Bpag-1 mapped to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1, identifying a new region of homology between human chromosome 6 and mouse chromosome 1. Bpag-2 mapped to the distal end of mouse chromosome 19 in a region of homology to human chromosome 10q. These assignments confirm and extend the relationships between the human and the mouse chromosomes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Osama M; Hughes, Craig E; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P

    2015-09-24

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  2. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Osama M.; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K.; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  3. ALIGNING MOUSE MODELS OF ASTHMA TO HUMAN ENDOTYPES OF DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A; Hodgkins, Samantha R; Dixon, Anne E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2014-01-01

    Substantial gains in understanding the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying asthma have been made using preclinical mouse models. However, because asthma is a complex, heterogeneous syndrome that is rarely due to a single allergen and that often presents in the absence of atopy, few of the promising therapeutics that demonstrated effectiveness in mouse models have translated into new treatments for patients. This has resulted in an urgent need to characterize Th2-low, noneosinophilic subsets of asthma, to study models that are resistant to conventional treatments such as corticosteroids, and to develop therapies targeting patients with severe disease. Classifying asthma based on underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, known as endotyping, offers a stratified approach for the development of new therapies for asthma. In preclinical research, new models of asthma are being utilized that more closely resemble the clinical features of different asthma endotypes, including the presence of IL-17 and a Th17 response, a biomarker of severe disease. These models utilize more physiologically relevant sensitizing agents, exacerbating factors, and allergens, as well as incorporate time points that better reflect the natural history and chronicity of clinical asthma. Importantly, some models better represent nonclassical asthma endotypes that facilitate the study of non-Th2 driven pathology and resemble the complex nature of clinical asthma, including corticosteroid resistance. Placing mouse asthma models into the context of human asthma endotypes will afford a more relevant approach to the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of disease that will afford the development of new therapies for those asthmatics that remain difficult to treat. PMID:24811131

  4. COMPARISON OF SOLUBLE HUMAN AND MOUSE TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Dean L.; Nathenson, Stanley G.

    1969-01-01

    The molecular and chemical characteristics of membrane components bearing the major transplantation antigen systems in mouse (H-2) and man (HL-A) were compared and found to be strikingly similar. Kinetics of papain solubilization from cell membranes, gel filtration, and electrophoretic patterns of the alloantigenic components were found to be nearly identical. Comparable size heterogeneity of the solubilized materials was also demonstrated. Some differences in amino acid and carbohydrate content of the purified H-2 and HL-A alloantigenic materials were found. The general pattern of distribution of the amino acid residues, however, appears to be quite similar and indicate compositional relatedness in these materials. These physical and chemical similarities in the characteristics of molecules bearing the transplantation antigens are in accord with biologic studies indicating a comparable functional immunologic role for the mouse H-2 and human HL-A antigen systems. These studies support the view that the genes determining these major transplantation antigen systems may have evolved from a common precursor. Images PMID:5271759

  5. TGN1412 Induces Lymphopenia and Human Cytokine Release in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Weißmüller, Sabrina; Kronhart, Stefanie; Kreuz, Dorothea; Schnierle, Barbara; Kalinke, Ulrich; Kirberg, Jörg; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Waibler, Zoe

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as the superagonistic, CD28-specific antibody TGN1412, or OKT3, an anti-CD3 mAb, can cause severe adverse events including cytokine release syndrome. A predictive model for mAb-mediated adverse effects, for which no previous knowledge on severe adverse events to be expected or on molecular mechanisms underlying is prerequisite, is not available yet. We used a humanized mouse model of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-reconstituted NOD-RAG1-/-Aβ-/-HLADQ(tg+ or tg-)IL-2Rγc-/- mice to evaluate its predictive value for preclinical testing of mAbs. 2–6 hours after TGN1412 treatment, mice showed a loss of human CD45+ cells from the peripheral blood and loss of only human T cells after OKT3 injection, reminiscent of effects observed in mAb-treated humans. Moreover, upon OKT3 injection we detected selective CD3 downmodulation on T cells, a typical effect of OKT3. Importantly, we detected release of human cytokines in humanized mice upon both OKT3 and TGN1412 application. Finally, humanized mice showed severe signs of illness, a rapid drop of body temperature, and succumbed to antibody application 2–6 hours after administration. Hence, the humanized mouse model used here reproduces several effects and adverse events induced in humans upon application of the therapeutic mAbs OKT3 and TGN1412. PMID:26959227

  6. TGN1412 Induces Lymphopenia and Human Cytokine Release in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Weißmüller, Sabrina; Kronhart, Stefanie; Kreuz, Dorothea; Schnierle, Barbara; Kalinke, Ulrich; Kirberg, Jörg; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Waibler, Zoe

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as the superagonistic, CD28-specific antibody TGN1412, or OKT3, an anti-CD3 mAb, can cause severe adverse events including cytokine release syndrome. A predictive model for mAb-mediated adverse effects, for which no previous knowledge on severe adverse events to be expected or on molecular mechanisms underlying is prerequisite, is not available yet. We used a humanized mouse model of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-reconstituted NOD-RAG1-/-Aβ-/-HLADQ(tg+ or tg-)IL-2Rγc-/- mice to evaluate its predictive value for preclinical testing of mAbs. 2-6 hours after TGN1412 treatment, mice showed a loss of human CD45+ cells from the peripheral blood and loss of only human T cells after OKT3 injection, reminiscent of effects observed in mAb-treated humans. Moreover, upon OKT3 injection we detected selective CD3 downmodulation on T cells, a typical effect of OKT3. Importantly, we detected release of human cytokines in humanized mice upon both OKT3 and TGN1412 application. Finally, humanized mice showed severe signs of illness, a rapid drop of body temperature, and succumbed to antibody application 2-6 hours after administration. Hence, the humanized mouse model used here reproduces several effects and adverse events induced in humans upon application of the therapeutic mAbs OKT3 and TGN1412. PMID:26959227

  7. USE OF A HUMAN/MOUSE HYBRID CELL LINE TO DETECT ANEUPLOIDY INDUCED BY ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing a human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cell line R3-5, to detect chemically induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome seg...

  8. A possible human homologue for the mouse mutant disorganisation.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, R M; Donnai, D

    1989-01-01

    The mouse mutant disorganisation (Ds) is a semidominant gene with variable penetrance in heterozygotes and lethality in homozygotes; 67% of heterozygotes have multiple defects and the rest have single defects. Fifty-three percent have cranioschisis and execephaly, 40% have hamartomas represented by papillae of variable size and shape protruding from the body, sometimes containing cartilage, and 33% have limb abnormalities. A child is presented with defects similar to those seen in mice heterozygous for Ds. He had shortening of the upper and lower segments of the right leg with a popliteal web and nine toes on the same side. A finger-like structure arose from the abdomen and one kidney was absent. The homology between this infant and Ds mice is discussed and published reports of human cases with similar abnormalities are reviewed. Images PMID:2664177

  9. Transfected DNA is mutated in monkey, mouse, and human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lebkowski, A.S.; Du Bridge, R.B.; Antell, E.A.; Greisen, K.S.; Calos, M.P.

    1984-10-01

    Papovavirus-based shuttle vectors containing the bacterial lacI gene were used to show that a mutation frequency in the range of 1% occurs in lacI when such vectors are transfected into COS7 and CV-1 simian cells, NIH 3T3, 3T6, L, and C127 mouse cells, and human 293 and HeLa cells. This frequency is approximately four orders of magnitude higher than the spontaneous mutation frequency in either mammalian or bacterial cells. The mutations are predominantly base substitutions and deletions and also include insertions from the mammalian genome. Time course experiments argue that mutagenesis occurs soon after arrival of the DNA into the nucleus. However, replication of the vector is not required since mutations occur even when the vector lacks all viral sequences. The high mutation frequency appears to be the characteristic outcome of transfection of DNA into mammalian cells.

  10. Spectral karyotyping analysis of human and mouse chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical banding methods provide basic information about the identities and structures of chromosomes on the basis of their unique banding patterns. Spectral karyotyping (SKY), and the related multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), are chromosome-specific multicolor FISH techniques that augment cytogenetic evaluations of malignant disease by providing additional information and improved characterization of aberrant chromosomes that contain DNA sequences not identifiable using conventional banding methods. SKY is based on cohybridization of combinatorially labeled chromosome-painting probes with unique fluorochrome signatures onto human or mouse metaphase chromosome preparations. Image acquisition and analysis use a specialized imaging system, combining Sagnac interferometer and CCD camera images to reconstruct spectral information at each pixel. Here we present a protocol for SKY analysis using commercially available SkyPaint probes, including procedures for metaphase chromosome preparation, slide pretreatment and probe hybridization and detection. SKY analysis requires approximately 6 d. PMID:17406576

  11. Prediction of Human Disease Genes by Human-Mouse Conserved Coexpression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Elena; Damasco, Christian; Silengo, Lorenzo; Oti, Martin; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2008-01-01

    Background Even in the post-genomic era, the identification of candidate genes within loci associated with human genetic diseases is a very demanding task, because the critical region may typically contain hundreds of positional candidates. Since genes implicated in similar phenotypes tend to share very similar expression profiles, high throughput gene expression data may represent a very important resource to identify the best candidates for sequencing. However, so far, gene coexpression has not been used very successfully to prioritize positional candidates. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that it is possible to reliably identify disease-relevant relationships among genes from massive microarray datasets by concentrating only on genes sharing similar expression profiles in both human and mouse. Moreover, we show systematically that the integration of human-mouse conserved coexpression with a phenotype similarity map allows the efficient identification of disease genes in large genomic regions. Finally, using this approach on 850 OMIM loci characterized by an unknown molecular basis, we propose high-probability candidates for 81 genetic diseases. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that conserved coexpression, even at the human-mouse phylogenetic distance, represents a very strong criterion to predict disease-relevant relationships among human genes. PMID:18369433

  12. Comparative analysis of transposed element insertion within human and mouse genomes reveals Alu's unique role in shaping the human transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Noa; Mersch, Britta; Gal-Mark, Nurit; Lev-Maor, Galit; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Ast, Gil

    2007-01-01

    Background Transposed elements (TEs) have a substantial impact on mammalian evolution and are involved in numerous genetic diseases. We compared the impact of TEs on the human transcriptome and the mouse transcriptome. Results We compiled a dataset of all TEs in the human and mouse genomes, identifying 3,932,058 and 3,122,416 TEs, respectively. We than extracted TEs located within human and mouse genes and, surprisingly, we found that 60% of TEs in both human and mouse are located in intronic sequences, even though introns comprise only 24% of the human genome. All TE families in both human and mouse can exonize. TE families that are shared between human and mouse exhibit the same percentage of TE exonization in the two species, but the exonization level of Alu, a primate-specific retroelement, is significantly greater than that of other TEs within the human genome, leading to a higher level of TE exonization in human than in mouse (1,824 exons compared with 506 exons, respectively). We detected a primate-specific mechanism for intron gain, in which Alu insertion into an exon creates a new intron located in the 3' untranslated region (termed 'intronization'). Finally, the insertion of TEs into the first and last exons of a gene is more frequent in human than in mouse, leading to longer exons in human. Conclusion Our findings reveal many effects of TEs on these two transcriptomes. These effects are substantially greater in human than in mouse, which is due to the presence of Alu elements in human. PMID:17594509

  13. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  14. A Novel Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nucera, Carmelo; Nehs, Matthew A.; Mekel, Michal; Zhang, Xuefeng; Hodin, Richard; Lawler, Jack; Nose, Vânia

    2009-01-01

    Background Orthotopic mouse models of human cancer represent an important in vivo tool for drug testing and validation. Most of the human thyroid carcinoma cell lines used in orthotopic or subcutaneous models are likely of melanoma and colon cancer. Here, we report and characterize a novel orthotopic model of human thyroid carcinoma using a unique thyroid cancer cell line. Methods We used the cell line 8505c, originated from a thyroid tumor histologically characterized by anaplastic carcinoma cell features. We injected 8505c cells engineered using a green fluorescent protein–positive lentiviral vector orthotopically into the thyroid of severe combined immunodeficient mice. Results Orthotopic implantation with the 8505c cells produced thyroid tumors after 5 weeks, showing large neck masses, with histopathologic features of a high-grade neoplasm (anaplasia, necrosis, high mitotic and proliferative indexes, p53 positivity, extrathyroidal invasion, lymph node and distant metastases) and immunoprofile of follicular thyroid cell origin with positivity for thyroid transcription factor-1 and PAX8, and for cytokeratins. Conclusions Here we describe a novel orthotopic thyroid carcinoma model using 8505c cells. This model can prove to be a reliable and useful tool to investigate in vivo biological mechanisms determining thyroid cancer aggressiveness, and to test novel therapeutics for the treatment of refractory or advanced thyroid cancers. PMID:19772429

  15. A Humanized Mouse Model for the Reduced Folate Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, David; Graham, Christine; Cherian, Christina; Matherly, Larry H.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier (RFC) or SLC19A1 is recognized to be an essential transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. In addition to its generalized role as a folate transporter, RFC provides specialized tissue functions including absorption across intestinal/colonic epithelia, transport across the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubules, transplacental transport of folates, and folate transport across the blood-brain barrier. The human RFC (hRFC) gene is regulated by 5 major upstream non-coding regions (designated A1/A2, A, B, C, and D), each transcribed from a unique promoter. Altogether, at least 14 distinct hRFC transcripts can be envisaged in which different 5’ untranslated regions (UTRs) are fused to a common splice acceptor region (positions -1 to -49) within the first coding exon with a common 1776 bp coding sequence. The 5’ non-coding regions are characterized by alternate transcription start sites, multiple splice forms, and selective tissue distributions. Alternate 5’UTRs impact mRNA stabilities and translation efficiencies, and result in synthesis of modified hRFC proteins translated from upstream AUGs. In this report, we describe production and characterization of transgenic mice (TghRFC1) containing a functional hRFC gene and of humanized mice in which the mRFC gene is inactivated and an active hRFC gene has been introduced. The mice appear to be healthy and to breed well. Analysis of tissue specificity of expression in both the TghRFC1 and humanized hRFC mice by real-time RT-PCR demonstrates that the hRFC gene is expressed with a specificity closely resembling that seen in human tissues. For the humanized hRFC mice, levels of B and A1/A2 5’UTRs predominated in all mice/tissues, thus resembling results in normal human tissues. Lower levels of A and C 5’UTRs were also detected. The availability of humanized mouse models for hRFC will permit investigators to address critical unanswered questions pertinent to human health and disease. These include the ability to analyze the hRFC gene in vivo, to control dietary and other environmental conditions that may impact levels of gene expression, and to control the genetics of the mice in order to assess the effects of hRFC gene alterations on tissue folate uptake and distribution, none of which can be easily achieved in human populations. PMID:17983788

  16. A humanized mouse model for the reduced folate carrier.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David; Graham, Christine; Cherian, Christina; Matherly, Larry H

    2008-02-01

    The ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier (RFC) or SLC19A1 is recognized to be an essential transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. In addition to its generalized role as a folate transporter, RFC provides specialized tissue functions including absorption across intestinal/colonic epithelia, transport across the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubules, transplacental transport of folates, and folate transport across the blood-brain barrier. The human RFC (hRFC) gene is regulated by five major upstream non-coding regions (designated A1/A2, A, B, C, and D), each transcribed from a unique promoter. Altogether, at least 14 distinct hRFC transcripts can be envisaged in which different 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) are fused to a common splice acceptor region (positions -1 to -49) within the first coding exon with a common 1776bp coding sequence. The 5' non-coding regions are characterized by alternate transcription start sites, multiple splice forms, and selective tissue distributions. Alternate 5' UTRs impact mRNA stabilities and translation efficiencies, and result in synthesis of modified hRFC proteins translated from upstream AUGs. In this report, we describe production and characterization of transgenic mice (TghRFC1) containing a functional hRFC gene and of humanized mice in which the mRFC gene is inactivated and an active hRFC gene has been introduced. The mice appear to be healthy and to breed well. Analysis of tissue specificity of expression in both the TghRFC1 and humanized hRFC mice by real-time RT-PCR demonstrates that the hRFC gene is expressed with a specificity closely resembling that seen in human tissues. For the humanized hRFC mice, levels of B and A1/A2 5' UTRs predominated in all mice/tissues, thus resembling results in normal human tissues. Lower levels of A and C 5' UTRs were also detected. The availability of humanized mouse models for hRFC will permit investigators to address critical unanswered questions pertinent to human health and disease. These include the ability to analyze the hRFC gene in vivo, to control dietary and other environmental conditions that may impact levels of gene expression, and to control the genetics of the mice in order to assess the effects of hRFC gene alterations on tissue folate uptake and distribution, none of which can be easily achieved in human populations. PMID:17983788

  17. Diffusion of (2-/sup 14/C)diazepam across hairless mouse skin and human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.L.; Palicharla, P.; Groves, M.J.

    1987-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the absorption of diazepam applied topically to the hairless mouse in vivo and to determine the diffusion of diazepam across isolated hairless mouse skin and human skin. (/sup 14/C)Diazepam was readily absorbed after topical administration to the intact hairless mouse, a total of 75.8% of the /sup 14/C-label applied being recovered in urine and feces. Diazepam was found to diffuse across human and hairless mouse skin unchanged in experiments with twin-chambered diffusion cells. The variation in diffusion rate or the flux for both human and mouse tissues was greater among specimens than between duplicate or triplicate trials for a single specimen. Fluxes for mouse skin (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis) were greater than for human skin (stratum corneum and epidermis): 0.35-0.61 microgram/cm2/h for mouse skin vs 0.24-0.42 microgram/cm2/h for human skin. The permeability coefficients for mouse skin ranged from 1.4-2.4 X 10(-2)cm/h compared with 0.8-1.4 X 10(-2)cm/h for human skin. Although human stratum corneum is almost twice the thickness of that of the hairless mouse, the diffusion coefficients for human skin were 3-12 times greater (0.76-3.31 X 10(-6) cm2/h for human skin vs 0.12-0.27 X 10(-6) cm2/h for hairless mouse) because of a shorter lag time for diffusion across human skin. These differences between the diffusion coefficients and diffusion rates (or permeability coefficients) suggest that the presence of the dermis may present some barrier properties. In vitro the dermis may require complete saturation before the diazepam can be detected in the receiving chamber.

  18. Aup1, a novel gene on mouse Chromosome 6 and human Chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Wonhee; Weber, J.S.; Meisler, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse cDNA, Aup1, encoding a predicted protein of 410 amino acid residues. The 1.5-kb Aup1 transcript is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues. An evolutionary relationship to the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted protein F44b9.5 is indicated by the 35% identity and 53% conservation of the amino acid sequences. Nineteen related human ESTs spanning 80% of the protein have also been identified, with a predicted amino acid sequence identity of 86% between the human and the mouse proteins. The gene has been mapped to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 2p13 and mouse Chromosome 6. Aup1 was eliminated as a candidate gene for two closely linked disorders, human LGMD2B and mouse mnd2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Quantification of Histone Deacetylase Isoforms in Human Frontal Cortex, Human Retina, and Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kyle W.; Chen, Junjun; Wang, Meiyao; Mast, Natalia; Pikuleva, Irina A.; Turko, Illarion V.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition has promise as a therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, therapeutic HDAC inhibitors target many HDAC isoforms, a particularly detrimental approach when HDAC isoforms are known to have different and specialized functions. We have developed a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry assay using stable isotope-labeled QconCATs as internal standards to quantify HDAC isoforms. We further determined a quantitative pattern of specific HDACs expressed in various human and mouse neural tissues. In human AD frontal cortex, HDAC1,2 decreased 32%, HDAC5 increased 47%, and HDAC6 increased 31% in comparison to age-matched controls. Human neural retina concentrations of HDAC1, 2, HDAC5, HDAC6, and HDAC7 decreased in age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-affected donors and exhibited a greater decrease in AD-affected donors in comparison to age-matched control neural retinas. Additionally, HDAC concentrations were measured in whole hemisphere of brain of 5XFAD mice, a model of β-amyloid deposition, to assess similarity to AD in human frontal cortex. HDAC profiles of human frontal cortex and mouse hemisphere had noticeable differences and relatively high concentrations of HDAC3 and HDAC4 in mice, which were undetectable in humans. Our method for quantification of HDAC isoforms is a practical and efficient technique to quantify isoforms in various tissues and diseases. Changes in HDAC concentrations reported herein contribute to the understanding of the pathology of neurodegeneration. PMID:25962138

  20. Recommended nomenclature for five mammalian carboxylesterase gene families: human, mouse, and rat genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Roger S.; Wright, Matthew W.; Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; Cox, Laura A.; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko; Ishibashi, Shun; Lehner, Richard; Miyazaki, Masao; Perkins, Everett J.; Potter, Phillip M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Robert, Jacques; Satoh, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Yan, Bingfan; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Zechner, Rudolf; Maltais, Lois J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES or Ces) genes encode enzymes that participate in xenobiotic, drug, and lipid metabolism in the body and are members of at least five gene families. Tandem duplications have added more genes for some families, particularly for mouse and rat genomes, which has caused confusion in naming rodent Ces genes. This article describes a new nomenclature system for human, mouse, and rat carboxylesterase genes that identifies homolog gene families and allocates a unique name for each gene. The guidelines of human, mouse, and rat gene nomenclature committees were followed and “CES” (human) and “Ces” (mouse and rat) root symbols were used followed by the family number (e.g., human CES1). Where multiple genes were identified for a family or where a clash occurred with an existing gene name, a letter was added (e.g., human CES4A; mouse and rat Ces1a) that reflected gene relatedness among rodent species (e.g., mouse and rat Ces1a). Pseudogenes were named by adding “P” and a number to the human gene name (e.g., human CES1P1) or by using a new letter followed by ps for mouse and rat Ces pseudogenes (e.g., Ces2d-ps). Gene transcript isoforms were named by adding the GenBank accession ID to the gene symbol (e.g., human CES1_AB119995 or mouse Ces1e_BC019208). This nomenclature improves our understanding of human, mouse, and rat CES/Ces gene families and facilitates research into the structure, function, and evolution of these gene families. It also serves as a model for naming CES genes from other mammalian species. PMID:20931200

  1. Chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human DNA helicase RECQL and its mouse homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, K.L.; Kennington, E.; Blackshear, P.J.

    1995-04-10

    We have determined the chromosomal location of the human and mouse genes encoding the RECQL protein, a putative DNA helicase homologous to the bacterial DNA helicase, RecQ. RECQL was localized to human chromosome 12 by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid DNA, fine mapping of RECQL by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed its chromosomal location to be 12p11-p12. The corresponding mouse gene, Recql, was mapped to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 6 by analysis of DNA from an interspecific cross. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  2. The Mouse Genome Database: Genotypes, Phenotypes, and Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD’s catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations. PMID:23175610

  3. Different evolutionary processes shaped the mouse and human olfactory receptor gene families.

    PubMed

    Young, Janet M; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor M; Ross, Joseph A; Tonnes-Priddy, Lori; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-03-01

    We report a comprehensive comparative analysis of human and mouse olfactory receptor (OR) genes. The OR family is the largest mammalian gene family known. We identify approximately 93% of an estimated 1500 mouse ORs, exceeding previous estimates and the number of human ORs by 50%. Only 20% are pseudogenes, giving a functional OR repertoire in mice that is three times larger than that of human. The proteins encoded by intact human ORs are less highly conserved than those of mouse, in patterns that suggest that even some apparently intact human OR genes may encode non-functional proteins. Mouse ORs are clustered in 46 genomic locations, compared to a much more dispersed pattern in human. We find orthologous clusters at syntenic human locations for most mouse genes, indicating that most OR gene clusters predate primate-rodent divergence. However, many recent local OR duplications in both genomes obscure one-to-one orthologous relationships, thereby complicating cross-species inferences about OR-ligand interactions. Local duplications are the major force shaping the gene family. Recent interchromosomal duplications of ORs have also occurred, but much more frequently in human than in mouse. In addition to clarifying the evolutionary forces shaping this gene family, our study provides the basis for functional studies of the transcriptional regulation and ligand-binding capabilities of the OR gene family. PMID:11875048

  4. The mouse and human excitatory amino acid transporter gene (EAAT1) maps to mouse chromosome 15 and a region of syntenic homology on human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, M.A.; Arriza, J.L.; Amara, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for human excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosome spreads. Interspecific backcross analysis identified the mouse Eaat1 locus in a region of 5p13 homology on mouse chromosome 15. Markers that are linked with EAAT1 on both human and mouse chromosomes include the receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-7, and prolactin. The Eaat1 locus appears not be linked to the epilepsy mutant stg locus, which is also on chromosome 15. The EAAT1 locus is located in a region of 5p deletions that have been associated with mental retardation and microcephaly. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Epidermal surface antigen (MS17S1) is highly conserved between mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.J.; Chema, D.; Cho, M.

    1995-05-20

    A mouse monoclonal antibody ECS-1 raised to human keratinocytes detects a 35-kDa epidermal surface antigen (ESA) and causes keratinocyte dissociation in vitro. ECS-1 stains skin of 16-day mouse embryo and 8- to 9-week human fetus. Mouse Esa cDNA encodes a 379-amino-acid protein that is 99.2% identical to the human, differing at only 3 amino acids. The gene (M17S1) was mapped to mouse chromosome 11, highlighting the conserved linkage synteny existing between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11. Although the nude locus has been mapped to the same region of chromosome 11, no abnormalities in protein, mRNA, or cDNA or genomic sequences were detected in nude mice. However, both nude and control mice were found to have a second Esa mRNA transcript that conserves amino acid sequence and molecular weight. The mouse and human 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated sequences are conserved. Similar RNA folding patterns of the 5{prime} untranslated region are predicted despite a 91-bp insertion in the mouse. These data suggest that both the function and the regulation of ESA protein are of importance and that Esa (M17S1) is not the nude locus gene. 42 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. The utilization of humanized mouse models for the study of human retroviral infections

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Pedati, Caitlin; Guendel, Irene; Carpio, Lawrence; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    The development of novel techniques and systems to study human infectious diseases in both an in vitro and in vivo settings is always in high demand. Ideally, small animal models are the most efficient method of studying human afflictions. This is especially evident in the study of the human retroviruses, HIV-1 and HTLV-1, in that current simian animal models, though robust, are often expensive and difficult to maintain. Over the past two decades, the construction of humanized animal models through the transplantation and engraftment of human tissues or progenitor cells into immunocompromised mouse strains has allowed for the development of a reconstituted human tissue scaffold in a small animal system. The utilization of small animal models for retroviral studies required expansion of the early CB-17 scid/scid mouse resulting in animals demonstrating improved engraftment efficiency and infectivity. The implantation of uneducated human immune cells and associated tissue provided the basis for the SCID-hu Thy/Liv and hu-PBL-SCID models. Engraftment efficiency of these tissues was further improved through the integration of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mutation leading to the creation of NODSCID, NOD/Shi-scid IL2rγ-/-, and NOD/SCID β2-microglobulinnull animals. Further efforts at minimizing the response of the innate murine immune system produced the Rag2-/-γc-/- model which marked an important advancement in the use of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Together, these animal models have revolutionized the investigation of retroviral infections in vivo. PMID:19674458

  7. The effects of human skin fibroblast monolayers on human sperm motility and mouse zygote development.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, A M; Punt-Van der Zalm, A P; Bastiaans, B A; Janssen, B A; Goverde, H J; Rolland, R

    1992-07-01

    A new system for co-culture in human in-vitro fertilization (IVF), using human skin fibroblasts, is described and tested pre-clinically. The first test involved the development of 1-cell mouse embryos which exhibit the 2-cell developmental block in vitro. Passage through this block (pb1-ratio) was determined by the ratio of compacted morula stages on day 4 of incubation. For nine human skin cell lines tested (fetal, neonatal and adult), the pb1-ratio was approximately 0.45 (0.07 in culture medium alone; P less than 0.0005). At the compacted morula stage, a second developmental block was observed. The ratio of passing this block (pb2-ratio) was 0.70 +/- 0.09 on skin fibroblasts obtained from fetal or neonatal tissue. On fibroblasts from adult patients the pb2-ratio was 0.30 +/- 0.04 (P less than 0.0005). The second test examined the influence of skin fibroblasts from fetal or neonatal tissue on human sperm motility. After 24 h of incubation, all skin cell lines had a positive influence (P less than 0.01) on the percentage motility compared to culture medium alone. The curvilinear velocity was not significantly increased. From the results we conclude that (i) human skin fibroblasts (especially from fetal tissue) have a positive influence on the development of mouse embryos in vitro, (ii) there is a positive influence of human skin fibroblasts on the percentage motility of human spermatozoa, and (iii) a clinical trial of co-culture with human skin fibroblasts can be justified. PMID:1500485

  8. Analysis of tumor suppressor gene on human chromosome 9 in mouse x human somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Porterfield, B.W.; Olopade, O.I.; Rowley, J.D.; Diaz, M.O.

    1994-09-01

    Deletions of the short arm of human chromosome 9 (9p) are common in human leukemia and solid tumors. The minimum region of overlap of these deletions, located between the interferon genes and the methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene, is partially synthenic with a region of mouse chromosome 4 that has tumor suppressor activity. Somatic cell hybrids between tumorigenic, MTAP-deficient, mouse L cells, and MTAP-competent human cells containing either a normal copy of 9p or a 9p with a deletion involving band 9p21 were selected in culture conditions that require MTAP activity for continued growth. Somatic cell hybrids that contained a normal copy of 9p rarely formed tumors in nude mice. Cells from the rare tumors that grew had lost the normal 9p. Hybrid cells that contained a 9p with deletions formed tumors more frequently, and cells from these tumors retained the 9p deletion chromosome. These results provide evidence that a tumor suppressor gene (or genes) is located on human chromosome 9 within the region of deletion.

  9. Abundant alkali-sensitive sites in DNA of human and mouse sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.P.; Danner, D.B.; McCoy, M.T.; Collins, G.D.; Schneider, E.L. ); Tice, R.R. )

    1989-10-01

    The DNA of human and mouse sperm cells was analyzed by single-cell microgel electrophoresis, by agarose gel electrophoresis, and by alkaline elution-three techniques that can detect single-strand DNA breaks and/or labile sites. Under these conditions a surprisingly large number of single-strand DNA breaks, approximately 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} per genome, were detected in human and mouse sperm but not in human lymphocytes or in mouse bone marrow cells. These breaks were also present in chicken erythrocyte DNA, which is also highly condensed. These breaks were not observed under neutral pH conditions nor under denaturing conditions not involving alkali, suggesting that these sites are alkali-sensitive and do not represent preexisting single-strand breaks. The high frequency of such sites in sperm from healthy mouse and human donors suggest that they represent a functional characteristic of condensed chromatin rather than DNA damage.

  10. Pre-Clinical Mouse Models of Human Prostate Cancer and their Utility in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Serk In; Kim, Sun Jin; McCauley, Laurie K.; Gallick, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo animal experiments are essential to current prostate cancer research, and are particularly critical to studying interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment. Numerous pre-clinical animal models of prostate cancer are currently available, including transgenic mouse models and human prostate cancer xenograft mouse models. In contrast to transgenic mouse models producing more heterogeneous cohorts of tumors, xenograft mouse models provide more controlled approaches. This unit describes the detailed procedures necessary to establish several distinct pre-clinical mouse models of human prostate cancer, including an orthotopic prostate xenograft model, an orthotopic bone metastasis model, an experimental metastasis model of intra-cardiac injection, and a vossicle model of tumor-bone interaction. PMID:21483646

  11. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Monica J.; Dhillon, Paraminder

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings. PMID:26839397

  12. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  13. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  14. Striking differences of LDL receptor-related protein 1B expression in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; Bu, Guojun

    2005-08-01

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 1B (LRP1B) is a member of the expanding LDL receptor family, and is closely related to LRP. It was discovered as a putative tumor suppressor, and is frequently inactivated in human malignant tissues. However, the expression pattern of LRP1B in normal human tissues was unclear. In the present study, we analyzed LRP1B expression in normal mouse and human tissues. By using RT-PCR, we found that, while mouse LRP1B expression is mostly restricted to the brain, human LRP1B expression is more widespread with highest expression levels detected in the brain, adrenal gland, salivary gland, and testis. Although mouse LRP1B expresses in the forms of both full-length receptor tail and an alternatively spliced form lacking a 33-amino acid insert, human LRP1B is expressed exclusively in the form of full-length receptor tail. Finally, we found that, unlike mouse LRP1B, human LRP1B is cleaved by furin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that there are striking differences between LRP1B expression in mouse and human tissues. The broader expression pattern of LRP1B in human tissues suggests that this putative tumor suppressor may play roles in several types of human cancer. PMID:15963947

  15. Differential Divergence of Three Human Pseudoautosomal Genes and Their Mouse Homologs: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Sanges, Remo; Esposito, Teresa; Tempesta, Sergio; Rao, Ercole; Rappold, Gudrun; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Graves, Jennifer A.M.; Forabosco, Antonino; D'Urso, Michele

    2001-01-01

    The human pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) is essential for meiotic pairing and recombination, and its deletion causes male sterility. Comparative studies of human and mouse pseudoautosomal genes are valuable in charting the evolution of this interesting region, but have been limited by the paucity of genes conserved between the two species. We have cloned a novel human PAR1 gene, DHRSXY, encoding an oxidoreductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family, and isolated a mouse ortholog Dhrsxy. We also searched for mouse homologs of recently reported PGPL and TRAMP genes that flank it within PAR1. We recovered a highly conserved mouse ortholog of PGPL by cross-hybridization, but found no mouse homolog of TRAMP. Like Csf2ra and Il3ra, both mouse homologs are autosomal; Pgpl on chromosome 5, and Dhrsxy subtelomeric on chromosome 4. TRAMP, like the human genes within or near PAR1, is probably very divergent or absent in the mouse genome. We interpret the rapid divergence and loss of pseudoautosomal genes in terms of a model of selection for the concentration of repetitive recombinogenic sequences that predispose to high recombination and translocation. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL data library under accession nos. AJ293620, AJ296079, and AJ293619.] PMID:11731500

  16. High affinity mouse-human chimeric Fab against Hepatitis B surface antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Biplab; Khanna, Navin; Acharya, Subrat K; Sinha, Subrata

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Passive immunotherapy using antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has been advocated in certain cases of Hepatitis B infection. We had earlier reported on the cloning and expression of a high affinity scFv derived from a mouse monoclonal (5S) against HBsAg. However this mouse antibody cannot be used for therapeutic purposes as it may elicit anti-mouse immune responses. Chimerization by replacing mouse constant domains with human ones can reduce the immunogenicity of this antibody. METHODS: We cloned the VH and VL genes of this mouse antibody, and fused them with CH1 domain of human IgG1 and CL domain of human kappa chain respectively. These chimeric genes were cloned into a phagemid vector. After initial screening using the phage display system, the chimeric Fab was expressed in soluble form in E. coli. RESULTS: The chimeric Fab was purified from the bacterial periplasmic extract. We characterized the chimeric Fab using several in vitro techniques and it was observed that the chimeric molecule retained the high affinity and specificity of the original mouse monoclonal. This chimeric antibody fragment was further expressed in different strains of E. coli to increase the yield. CONCLUSION: We have generated a mouse-human chimeric Fab against HBsAg without any significant loss in binding and epitope specificity. This chimeric Fab fragment can be further modified to generate a full-length chimeric antibody for therapeutic uses. PMID:16437680

  17. Lactoferrin gene promoter in human and mouse. Analogous and dissimilar characteristics.

    PubMed

    Teng, C T

    1994-01-01

    Lactoferrin promoter and the 5'-flanking region of both human and mouse were isolated from a genomic library constructed with lambda phage. A 2.0 kbp Sac I fragment of the human clone (HLF031a.30) and a 3.0 kbp Eco R I/Hinc II fragment of the mouse clone (mL14p9E) containing the lactoferrin promoter, 5'-flanking region, first exon and partial intron were sequenced completely. There were many sequence homologies between human and mouse at the promoter/enhancer (1 to -363) region, yet substantial divergence was observed beyond this region. To determine the promoter activity, 5'-deletion mutants of the mouse lactoferrin gene were linked to a CAT-reporter plasmid and transfected into the human endometrium carcinoma cell line, RL95-2. We identified a number of positive and negative regulatory sequences as well as the estrogen-response element in the 5'-flanking region of the lactoferrin gene. The imperfect estrogen response elements of both human and mouse are functional as demonstrated by transfection experiments, band-shift assay and DNase I footprint analysis. The molecular mechanism that governs the estrogen-stimulated response, however, differs between human and mouse. PMID:7762430

  18. Assessing The Evolutionary Diversity Of Exon Skipping Events In Human, Mouse And Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Fang-Rong; Chen, Chao-Jung; Kuo, Min-Chieh; Chang, Hwan-You; Shia, Wei-Chung

    2008-01-01

    This study is to research on the cross-species comparative analysis of homologous genetic sequence among human, mouse and rat by bioinformatics method, hopefully assessing the evolutionary diversity through exon length, reading frame preservation and KA/KS ratio test of alternative splicing events. Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism in eukaryotic organism. We choose the "exon skipping events" from AS events for research. In the data of "conserved exon skipping events", we get 668 human-mouse conserved events, 179 human-rat conserved events and 266 conserved mouse-rat events. There are some extra data such as "non-conserved exon skipping events" and "species-specific events". We found out that the length of AS exon is shorter in conserved exon skipping event, but the ratio of reading frame preservation is higher. Among them, the minor form is the most special. We even got the same result in non-conserved exon skipping events. We calculated the KA/KS value by KA/KS ratio test and found out that the human-mouse KA/KS ratio is 0.158, the human-rat is 0.182 and the mouse-rat is 0.190. This represents that the human-mouse conserved events have the highest purifying selection pressure. In the end, we adopt KA/KS ratio test to do a further analysis between conserved and non-conserved exon skipping events and evaluate the evolutionary diversity of cross-species comparation.

  19. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  20. Differences in gene expression between mouse and human for dynamically regulated genes in early embryo.

    PubMed

    Madissoon, Elo; Töhönen, Virpi; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Katayama, Shintaro; Unneberg, Per; Inzunza, Jose; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide concern that can be treated with in vitro fertilization (IVF). Improvements in IVF and infertility treatment depend largely on better understanding of the molecular mechanisms for human preimplantation development. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to identify gene expression patterns for the first five days of human development, and many functional studies utilize mouse as a model system. We have identified genes of possible importance for this time period by analyzing human microarray data and available data from online databases. We selected 70 candidate genes for human preimplantation development and investigated their expression in the early mouse development from oocyte to the 8-cell stage. Maternally loaded genes expectedly decreased in expression during development both in human and mouse. We discovered that 25 significantly upregulated genes after fertilization in human included 13 genes whose orthologs in mouse behaved differently and mimicked the expression profile of maternally expressed genes. Our findings highlight many significant differences in gene expression patterns during mouse and human preimplantation development. We also describe four cancer-testis antigen families that are also highly expressed in human embryos: PRAME, SSX, GAGE and MAGEA. PMID:25089626

  1. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying Human Serum Albumin as a Biomarker of Carcinogenic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jonathan; Wang, Yi; Turesky, Robert J; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-05-16

    Albumin is a commonly used serum protein for studying human exposure to xenobiotic compounds, including therapeutics and environmental pollutants. Often, the reactivity of albumin with xenobiotic compounds is studied ex vivo with human albumin or plasma/serum samples. Some studies have characterized the reactivity of albumin with chemicals in rodent models; however, differences between the orthologous peptide sequences of human and rodent albumins can result in the formation of different types of chemical-protein adducts with different interaction sites or peptide sequences. Our goal is to generate a human albumin transgenic mouse model that can be used to establish human protein biomarkers of exposure to hazardous xenobiotics for human risk assessment via animal studies. We have developed a human albumin transgenic mouse model and characterized the genotype and phenotype of the transgenic mice. The presence of the human albumin gene in the genome of the model mouse was confirmed by genomic PCR analysis, whereas liver-specific expression of the transgenic human albumin mRNA was validated by RT-PCR analysis. Further immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the transgenic human albumin protein is a full-length, mature protein, which is less abundant than the endogenous mouse albumin that coexists in the serum of the transgenic mouse. The transgenic protein was able to form ex vivo adducts with a genotoxic metabolite of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, a procarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meat. This novel human albumin transgenic mouse model will facilitate the development and validation of albumin-carcinogen adducts as biomarkers of xenobiotic exposure and/or toxicity in humans. PMID:27028147

  2. Thalidomide-induced limb abnormalities in a humanized CYP3A mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Akita, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Satoh, Daisuke; Ohta, Ryo; Abe, Satoshi; Takehara, Shoko; Kazuki, Kanako; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogen in humans but not in rodents. It causes multiple birth defects including malformations of limbs, ears, and other organs. However, the species-specific mechanism of thalidomide teratogenicity is not completely understood. Reproduction of the human teratogenicity of thalidomide in rodents has previously failed because of the lack of a model reflecting human drug metabolism. In addition, because the maternal metabolic effect cannot be eliminated, the migration of unchanged thalidomide to embryos is suppressed, and the metabolic activation is insufficient to develop teratogenicity. Previously, we generated transchromosomic mice containing a human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A cluster in which the endogenous mouse Cyp3a genes were deleted. Here, we determined whether human CYP3A or mouse Cyp3a enzyme expression was related to the species difference in a whole embryo culture system using humanized CYP3A mouse embryos. Thalidomide-treated embryos with the human CYP3A gene cluster showed limb abnormalities, and human CYP3A was expressed in the placenta, suggesting that human CYP3A in the placenta may contribute to the teratogenicity of thalidomide. These data suggest that the humanized CYP3A mouse is a useful model to predict embryonic toxicity in humans. PMID:26903378

  3. Thalidomide-induced limb abnormalities in a humanized CYP3A mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Akita, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Satoh, Daisuke; Ohta, Ryo; Abe, Satoshi; Takehara, Shoko; Kazuki, Kanako; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogen in humans but not in rodents. It causes multiple birth defects including malformations of limbs, ears, and other organs. However, the species-specific mechanism of thalidomide teratogenicity is not completely understood. Reproduction of the human teratogenicity of thalidomide in rodents has previously failed because of the lack of a model reflecting human drug metabolism. In addition, because the maternal metabolic effect cannot be eliminated, the migration of unchanged thalidomide to embryos is suppressed, and the metabolic activation is insufficient to develop teratogenicity. Previously, we generated transchromosomic mice containing a human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A cluster in which the endogenous mouse Cyp3a genes were deleted. Here, we determined whether human CYP3A or mouse Cyp3a enzyme expression was related to the species difference in a whole embryo culture system using humanized CYP3A mouse embryos. Thalidomide-treated embryos with the human CYP3A gene cluster showed limb abnormalities, and human CYP3A was expressed in the placenta, suggesting that human CYP3A in the placenta may contribute to the teratogenicity of thalidomide. These data suggest that the humanized CYP3A mouse is a useful model to predict embryonic toxicity in humans. PMID:26903378

  4. Differential regulation of mouse and human nephron progenitors by the Six family of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lori L; Guo, Qiuyu; Lee, YoungJin; Tran, Tracy; Benazet, Jean-Denis; Whitney, Peter H; Valouev, Anton; McMahon, Andrew P

    2016-02-15

    Nephron endowment is determined by the self-renewal and induction of a nephron progenitor pool established at the onset of kidney development. In the mouse, the related transcriptional regulators Six1 and Six2 play non-overlapping roles in nephron progenitors. Transient Six1 activity prefigures, and is essential for, active nephrogenesis. By contrast, Six2 maintains later progenitor self-renewal from the onset of nephrogenesis. We compared the regulatory actions of Six2 in mouse and human nephron progenitors by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). Surprisingly, SIX1 was identified as a SIX2 target unique to the human nephron progenitors. Furthermore, RNA-seq and immunostaining revealed overlapping SIX1 and SIX2 activity in 16 week human fetal nephron progenitors. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of human SIX1 and SIX2 ChIP-seq showed each factor targeted a similar set of cis-regulatory modules binding an identical target recognition motif. In contrast to the mouse where Six2 binds its own enhancers but does not interact with DNA around Six1, both human SIX1 and SIX2 bind homologous SIX2 enhancers and putative enhancers positioned around SIX1. Transgenic analysis of a putative human SIX1 enhancer in the mouse revealed a transient, mouse-like, pre-nephrogenic, Six1 regulatory pattern. Together, these data demonstrate a divergence in SIX-factor regulation between mouse and human nephron progenitors. In the human, an auto/cross-regulatory loop drives continued SIX1 and SIX2 expression during active nephrogenesis. By contrast, the mouse establishes only an auto-regulatory Six2 loop. These data suggest differential SIX-factor regulation might have contributed to species differences in nephron progenitor programs such as the duration of nephrogenesis and the final nephron count. PMID:26884396

  5. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  6. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Translating human deficits into mouse behavior.

    PubMed

    Pasciuto, E; Borrie, S C; Kanellopoulos, A K; Santos, A R; Cappuyns, E; D'Andrea, L; Pacini, L; Bagni, C

    2015-10-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders, with rising incidence but little effective therapeutic intervention available. Currently two main clinical features are described to diagnose ASDs: impaired social interaction and communication, and repetitive behaviors. Much work has focused on understanding underlying causes of ASD by generating animal models of the disease, in the hope of discovering signaling pathways and cellular targets for drug intervention. Here we review how ASD behavioral phenotypes can be modeled in the mouse, the most common animal model currently in use in this field, and discuss examples of genetic mouse models of ASD with behavioral features that recapitulate various symptoms of ASD. PMID:26220900

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopic Examination of the Extracellular Matrix in the Decellularized Mouse and Human Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Santi, Peter A; Aldaya, Robair; Brown, Alec; Johnson, Shane; Stromback, Tyler; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-06-01

    Decellularized tissues have been used to investigate the extracellular matrix (ECM) in a number of different tissues and species. Santi and Johnson JARO 14:3-15 (2013) first described the decellularized inner ear in the mouse, rat, and human using scanning thin-sheet laser imaging microscopy (sTSLIM). The purpose of the present investigation is to examine decellularized cochleas in the mouse and human at higher resolution using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh cochleas were harvested and decellularized using detergent extraction methods. Following decellularization, the ECM of the bone, basilar membrane, spiral limbus, and ligament remained, and all of the cells were removed from the cochlea. A number of similarities and differences in the ECM of the mouse and human were observed. A novel, spirally directed structure was present on the basilar membrane and is located at the border between Hensen and Boettcher cells. These septa-like structures formed a single row in the mouse and multiple rows in the human. The basal lamina of the stria vascularis capillaries was present and appeared thicker in the human compared with the mouse. In the mouse, numerous openings beneath the spiral prominence that previously housed the root processes of the external sulcus cells were observed but in the human there was only a single row of openings. These and other anatomical differences in the ECM between the mouse and human may reflect functional differences and/or be due to aging; however, decellularized cochleas provide a new way to examine the cochlear ECM and reveal new observations. PMID:27029011

  8. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  9. Species-Specific Metastasis of Human Tumor Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Engrafted with Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Namikawa, Reiko

    1995-05-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to γ-irradiation or to interleukin 1α. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process.

  10. [Low expression of activin A in mouse and human embryonic teratocarcinoma cells].

    PubMed

    Gordeeva, O F

    2014-01-01

    TGFP3 family factors play an important role in regulating the balance of self-renewal and differentiation of mouse and human pluripotent stem and embryonic teratocarcinoma cells. The expression patterns of TGFbeta family signaling ligands and functional roles of these signaling pathways differ significantly in mouse and human embryonic stem cells, but the activity and functional role of these factors in mouse and human embryonic teratocarcinoma cells were not sufficiently investigated. Comparative quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the expression of TGF@[beta] family factors in mouse embryonic stem, embryonic germ, and embryonic teratocarcinoma cells showed that embryonic teratocarcinoma cells express lower ActivinA than pluripotent stem cells but similar levels of factors Nodal, Lefty 1, TGFbeta1, BMP4, and GDF3. In human nullipotent embryonic teratocarcinoma PA-1 cells, most factors of the TGFbeta family (ACTIVINA, NODAL, LEFTY 1, BMP4, and GDF3) are expressed at lower levels than in human embryonic stem cells: Thus, in mouse and human nullipotent teratocarcinoma cells, theexpression of ActivinA is significantly reduced com- pared ivith embryonic stem cells. Presumably, these differences may be associated with changes in the functional activity of the respective signaling pathways and deregulation of proliferative and antiproliferative mechanisms in embryonic teratocarcinoma cells. PMID:25735149

  11. Assignment of the human and mouse genes for muscle ecto mono (ADPribosyl)transferase to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 11p15 and mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Koch-Nolte, F.; Kuehl, M.; Haag, F.

    1996-08-15

    This report describes the localization of the human and mouse genes for muscle ecto mono (ADProbosyl)transferase to human chromosome 11p15 and mouse chromosome 7 using polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrids. Mono ADP-ribosylation is the mechanism by which bacterial toxins interfere with protein biosynthesis in human host cells. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Kinetic properties of mouse pancreatic lipase-related protein-2 suggest the mouse may not model human fat digestion

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xunjun; Ross, Leah E.; Miller, Rita A.; Lowe, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice have been employed to understand the role of lipases in dietary fat digestion with the expectation that the results can be extrapolated to humans. However, little is known about the properties of mouse pancreatic triglyceride lipase (mPTL) and pancreatic lipase-related protein-2 (mPLRP2). In this study, both lipases were expressed in Pichia Pastoris GS115, purified to near homogeneity, and their properties were characterized. Mouse PTL displayed the kinetics typical of PTL from other species. Like mPTL, mPLRP2 exhibited strong activity against various triglycerides. In contrast to mPTL, mPLRP2 was not inhibited by increasing bile salt concentration. Colipase stimulated mPLRP2 activity 2- to 4-fold. Additionally, mPTL absolutely required colipase for absorption to a lipid interface, whereas mPLRP2 absorbed fully without colipase. mPLRP2 had full activity in the presence of BSA, whereas BSA completely inhibited mPTL unless colipase was present. All of these properties of mPLRP2 differ from the properties of human PLRP2 (hPLRP2). Furthermore, mPLRP2 appears capable of compensating for mPTL deficiency. These findings suggest that the molecular mechanisms of dietary fat digestion may be different in humans and mice. Thus, extrapolation of dietary fat digestion in mice to humans should be done with care. PMID:21382969

  13. Mouse BMD Quantitative Trait Loci Show Improved Concordance With Human Genome-wide Association Loci When Recalculated on a New, Common Mouse Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Karasik, David; Li, Qian; Smith, Randy V; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly J; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern

    2010-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a heritable trait, and in mice, over 100 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been reported, but candidate genes have been identified for only a small percentage. Persistent errors in the mouse genetic map have negatively affected QTL localization, spurring the development of a new, corrected map. In this study, QTLs for BMD were remapped in 11 archival mouse data sets using this new genetic map. Since these QTLs all were mapped in a comparable way, direct comparisons of QTLs for concordance would be valid. We then compared human genome-wide association study (GWAS) BMD loci with the mouse QTLs. We found that 26 of the 28 human GWAS loci examined were located within the confidence interval of a mouse QTL. Furthermore, 14 of the GWAS loci mapped to within 3 cM of a mouse QTL peak. Lastly, we demonstrated that these newly remapped mouse QTLs can substantiate a candidate gene for a human GWAS locus, for which the peak single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) fell in an intergenic region. Specifically, we suggest that MEF2C (human chromosome 5, mouse chromosome 13) should be considered a candidate gene for the genetic regulation of BMD. In conclusion, use of the new mouse genetic map has improved the localization of mouse BMD QTLs, and these remapped QTLs show high concordance with human GWAS loci. We believe that this is an opportune time for a renewed effort by the genetics community to identify the causal variants regulating BMD using a synergistic mouse-human approach. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200990

  14. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pérès, Eléonore; Bagdassarian, Eugénie; This, Sébastien; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed. PMID:26690200

  15. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prs, Elonore; Bagdassarian, Eugnie; This, Sbastien; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed. PMID:26690200

  16. The mouse as a model for human biology: a resource guide for complex trait analysis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Luanne L; Robledo, Raymond F; Bult, Carol J; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly J; Svenson, Karen L

    2007-01-01

    The mouse has been a powerful force in elucidating the genetic basis of human physiology and pathophysiology. From its beginnings as the model organism for cancer research and transplantation biology to the present, when dissection of the genetic basis of complex disease is at the forefront of genomics research, an enormous and remarkable mouse resource infrastructure has accumulated. This review summarizes those resources and provides practical guidelines for their use, particularly in the analysis of quantitative traits. PMID:17173058

  17. The NEUROD gene maps to human chromosome 2q32 and mouse chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, R; Steingrimsson, E; Copeland, N G; Dyer-Montgomery, K; Lee, J E; Hernandez, R; Jenkins, N A; Tapscott, S J

    1996-06-15

    The Neurod gene is a basic-helix-loop-helix gene that regulates neurogenesis and is identical to the hamster beta2 gene that was cloned as a regulator of insulin transcription. Here we report the cloning of human NEUROD and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 2q32 and to mouse chromosome 2. PMID:8786144

  18. Activity of the human carcinogen MeCCNU in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay

    SciTech Connect

    Tinwell, H.; Ashby, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The nitrosourea mustard MeCCNU is the most recent organic chemical to be classified as a human carcinogen by IARC. MeCCNU gave a strong positive response when tested in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. Activity was evident using either ip injection or oral gavage of the test chemical. These results further support the correlation between human carcinogens and their genotoxicity.

  19. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human
    lymphocytes.

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  20. Human and Mouse Mononuclear Phagocyte Networks: A Tale of Two Species?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gary; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are a heterogeneous population of mononuclear phagocytes that are involved in antigen processing and presentation to initiate and regulate immune responses to pathogens, vaccines, tumor, and tolerance to self. In addition to their afferent sentinel function, DCs and macrophages are also critical as effectors and coordinators of inflammation and homeostasis in peripheral tissues. Harnessing DCs and macrophages for therapeutic purposes has major implications for infectious disease, vaccination, transplantation, tolerance induction, inflammation, and cancer immunotherapy. There has been a paradigm shift in our understanding of the developmental origin and function of the cellular constituents of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Significant progress has been made in tandem in both human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte biology. This progress has been accelerated by comparative biology analysis between mouse and human, which has proved to be an exceptionally fruitful strategy to harmonize findings across species. Such analyses have provided unexpected insights and facilitated productive reciprocal and iterative processes to inform our understanding of human and mouse mononuclear phagocytes. In this review, we discuss the strategies, power, and utility of comparative biology approaches to integrate recent advances in human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte biology and its potential to drive forward clinical translation of this knowledge. We also present a functional framework on the parallel organization of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte networks. PMID:26124761

  1. Mechanism of ethylbenzene-induced mouse-specific lung tumor: metabolism of ethylbenzene by rat, mouse, and human liver and lung microsomes.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Shakil A; Rick, David L; McClymont, E L; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Bus, James S

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine species differences in the metabolism of ethylbenzene (EB) in liver and lung. EB (0.22-7.0mM) was incubated with mouse, rat and human liver and lung microsomes and the formation of 1-phenylethanol (1PE), acetophenone (AcPh), 2-ethylphenol (2EP), 4-ethylphenol (4EP), 2,5-ethylquinone, and 3,4-ethylquinone were measured. Reactive metabolites (2,5-dihydroxyethylbenzene-GSH [2EP-GSH] and 3,4-dihydroxyethylbenzene-GSH [4EP-GSH]) were monitored via glutathione (GSH) trapping technique. None of the metabolites were formed at detectable levels in incubations with human lung microsomes. Percent conversion of EB to 1PE ranged from 1% (rat lung; 7.0mM EB) to 58% (mouse lung; 0.22 mM EB). More 1PE was formed in mouse lung than in mouse liver microsomes, although formation of 1PE by rat liver and lung microsomes was similar. Metabolism of EB to 1PE was in the order of mouse > rat > human. Formation of AcPh was roughly an order of magnitude lower than 1PE. Conversion of EB to ring-hydroxylated metabolites was much lower (0.0001% [4EP-GSH; rat lung] to 0.6% [2EP-GSH; mouse lung]); 2EP-GSH was typically 10-fold higher than 4EP-GSH. Formation of 2EP-GSH was higher by lung (highest by mouse lung) than liver microsomes and the formation of 2EP-GSH by mouse liver microsomes was higher than rat and human liver microsomes. Increasing concentrations of EB did lead to a decrease in amount of some formed metabolites. This may indicate some level of substrate- or metabolite-mediated inhibition. High concentrations of 2EP and 4EP were incubated with microsomes to further investigate their oxidation to ethylcatechol (ECat) and ethylhydroquinone (EHQ). Conversion of 2EP to EHQ ranged from 6% to 9% by liver (mouse > human > rat) and from 0.1% to 18% by lung microsomes (mouse > rat > human). Conversion of 4EP to ECat ranged from 2% to 4% by liver (mouse > human approximately rat) and from 0.3% to 7% by lung microsomes (mouse > rat > human). Although ring-oxidized metabolites accounted for a relatively small fraction of overall EB metabolism, its selective elevation in mouse lung microsomes is nonetheless consistent with the hypothesized mode of action for observed preferential toxicity of EB to the lung in this species. PMID:19075040

  2. Expression of human myeloid-associated surface antigens in human-mouse myeloid cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Geurts van Kessel, A H; Tetteroo, P A; von dem Borne, A E; Hagemeijer, A; Bootsma, D

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid cell lines were obtained after fusion of mouse myeloid cells (WEHI-TG) with leukocytes from two patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. A third fusion was carried out with leukocytes from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All three patients carried the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) in the leukemia cell population. Cytochemical analysis confirmed the myelo-monocytic nature of the hybrid cell lines. The presence of Ph1 translocation products could be established in most hybrids derived from the two chronic myeloid leukemic patients, which confirms that indeed human myeloid cells were fused. Several of these hybrid lines showed reactivity with monoclonal antibodies known to be specific for human myeloid cells, whereas interlineage Chinese hamster fibroblast-human chronic myeloid leukemia hybrids failed to react with these antibodies. Five independently obtained monoclonal antibodies--MI/NI, UJ-308, VIM-D5, FMC-10, and B4.3--showed very similar reactivity patterns when tested on the hybrid clones. This result substantiates the evidence obtained from other studies, that these five antibodies are directed against the same myeloid-associated antigen. The gene(s) for expression of the latter antigen could be assigned to human chromosome 11. Images PMID:6574514

  3. Cloning, analysis, and chromosomal localization of myoxin (MYH12), the human homologue to the mouse dilute gene

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, L.J.; Kennett, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    The mouse dilute gene encodes a novel type of non-muscle myosin that structurally combines elements from both nonmuscle myosin type I and nonmuscle myosin type II. Phenotypically, mutations in the mouse dilute gene result not only in the lightening of coat color, but also in the onset of severe neurological defects shortly after birth. This may indicate that the mouse dilute gene is important in maintaining the normal neuronal function in the mouse. The authors report the isolation and sequencing of [open quotes]myoxin[close quotes] (MYH12), the human homologue of the mouse dilute gene, and its assignment to human chromosome 15. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  4. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Mouse models of Down syndrome: how useful can they be? Comparison of the gene content of human chromosome 21 with orthologous mouse genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Fortna, Andrew; Bechtel, Lawrence; Davisson, Muriel T

    2003-10-30

    With an incidence of approximately 1 in 700 live births, Down syndrome (DS) remains the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. The phenotype is assumed to be due to overexpression of some number of the >300 genes encoded by human chromosome 21. Mouse models, in particular the chromosome 16 segmental trisomies, Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje, are indispensable for DS-related studies of gene-phenotype correlations. Here we compare the updated gene content of the finished sequence of human chromosome 21 (364 genes and putative genes) with the gene content of the homologous mouse genomic regions (291 genes and putative genes) obtained from annotation of the public sector C57Bl/6 draft sequence. Annotated genes fall into one of three classes. First, there are 170 highly conserved, human/mouse orthologues. Second, there are 83 minimally conserved, possible orthologues. Included among the conserved and minimally conserved genes are 31 antisense transcripts. Third, there are species-specific genes: 111 spliced human transcripts show no orthologues in the syntenic mouse regions although 13 have homologous sequences elsewhere in the mouse genomic sequence, and 38 spliced mouse transcripts show no identifiable human orthologues. While these species-specific genes are largely based solely on spliced EST data, a majority can be verified in RNA expression experiments. In addition, preliminary data suggest that many human-specific transcripts may represent a novel class of primate-specific genes. Lastly, updated functional annotation of orthologous genes indicates genes encoding components of several cellular pathways are dispersed throughout the orthologous mouse chromosomal regions and are not completely represented in the Down syndrome segmental mouse models. Together, these data point out the potential for existing mouse models to produce extraneous phenotypes and to fail to produce DS-relevant phenotypes. PMID:14585506

  6. Integration of Ecogpt and SV40 early region sequences into human chromosome 17: a dominant selection system in whole cell and microcell human-mouse hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Tunnacliffe, A; Parkar, M; Povey, S; Bengtsson, B O; Stanley, K; Solomon, E; Goodfellow, P

    1983-01-01

    The dominant selectable gene, Ecogpt, has been introduced, by the calcium phosphate precipitation technique, into normal human fibroblasts, along with the SV40 early region genes. In one transfectant clone, integration of these sequences into human chromosome 17 was demonstrated by the construction of human-mouse somatic cell hybrids, selected for by growth in medium containing mycophenolic acid and xanthine. A whole cell hybrid, made between the human transfectant and a mouse L cell, was used as donor of the Ecogpt-carrying human chromosome 17 to 'tribrids' growing in suspension, made by whole cell fusion between a mouse thymoma cell line, and to microcell hybrids made with a mouse teratocarcinoma cell line. Two tribrids contained karyotypically normal human chromosomes 17 and a small number of other human chromosomes, while a third tribrid had a portion of the long arm of chromosome 17 translocated to mouse as its only human genetic material. Two independent microcell hybrids contained a normal chromosome 17 and no other human chromosome on a mouse teratocarcinoma background. These experiments demonstrate the ability to construct human-mouse somatic cell hybrids using a dominant selection system. By applying this approach it should be possible to select for a wide range of different human chromosomes in whole cell and microcell hybrids. In particular, transfer of single human chromosomes to mouse teratocarcinoma cells will allow examination of developmentally regulated human gene sequences after differentiation of such hybrids. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:11892815

  7. Xenogeneic mouse fibroblasts persist in human cultured epidermal grafts: a possible mechanism of graft loss.

    PubMed

    Cairns, B A; deSerres, S; Brady, L A; Hultman, C S; Meyer, A A

    1995-07-01

    Recent reports suggest that long-term graft take of cultured epidermal autografts (CEAs) is less than 50% when late graft loss is considered. The characteristics of late CEA loss suggest that it may occur as a result of an immunologic reaction to persistent xenogeneic cells and/or proteins used to grow CEA. In this study we examined whether immunologically reactive, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts used as feeder layers can persist in primary, secondary, and tertiary human CEA. We cocultured keratinocytes from 11 separate burn patients with growth-arrested 3T3 fibroblasts. After removing visible 3T3 fibroblasts from CEA with trypsinization, we allowed CEA to reach confluence. We then harvested CEA either as primary, secondary, or tertiary cultures. We detected mouse fibroblasts using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) with a monoclonal antibody specific for mouse major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens. We detected mouse MHC class II antigens by performing Western immunoblotting with another mouse MHC-specific monoclonal antibody. By FACS we identified mouse fibroblasts in 100, 75, and 62.5% of primary, secondary, and tertiary passage CEAs, respectively. Similarly by immunoblotting we found mouse MHC class II antigen in 100, 80, and 66.7% of primary, secondary, and tertiary CEAs. These results demonstrate that xenogeneic fibroblast feeder layers capable of generating immunogenic transplantation antigens persist in CEAs. The persistence of these cells and their antigen expression may contribute to CEA loss. PMID:7636913

  8. Toxicity testing of human assisted reproduction devices using the mouse embryo assay.

    PubMed

    Punt-van der Zalm, J P E M; Hendriks, J C M; Westphal, J R; Kremer, J A M; Teerenstra, S; Wetzels, A M M

    2009-04-01

    Systems to assess the toxicity of materials used in human assisted reproduction currently lack efficiency and/or sufficient discriminatory power. The development of 1-cell CBA/B6 F1 hybrid mouse embryos to blastocysts, expressed as blastocyst rate (BR), is used to measure toxicity. The embryos were divided into control and test groups, and were exposed to either control medium or to a potentially toxic test medium. Inferences on toxicity were based on differences in BR between the two groups. The mouse embryo assay followed a stratified (mouse), randomized (embryo), and balanced (equal number of embryos per group and per mouse) design. The number of embryos needed was calculated using power analysis. The basal BR of the hybrid strain was determined in a historical population. Sixty-nine mouse embryos per group were required to detect toxic materials with sufficient sensitivity and to account for the considerable inter-mouse variation in blastocyst development. Fifty-two samples, divided over batches of seven different products were tested before use in the study IVF centre and five of these were found to be toxic. This test system, presented as the Nijmegen mouse embryo assay (NMEA), can be used to detect embryo-toxic materials in daily IVF practice, and this report may provide a starting point for standardization. PMID:19400995

  9. Experimental evaluation of the zoonotic infection potency of simian retrovirus type 4 using humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kei; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Misawa, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Takeuchi, Junko S.; Miura, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Munehiro; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao; Ito, Mamoru; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    During 2001-2002 and 2008-2011, two epidemic outbreaks of infectious hemorrhagic disease have been found in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in Kyoto University Primate Research Institute, Japan. Following investigations revealed that the causative agent was simian retrovirus type 4 (SRV-4). SRV-4 was isolated by using human cell lines, which indicates that human cells are potently susceptible to SRV-4 infection. These raise a possibility of zoonotic infection of pathogenic SRV-4 from Japanese macaques into humans. To explore the possibility of zoonotic infection of SRV-4 to humans, here we use a human hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model. Eight out of the twelve SRV-4-inoculated humanized mice were infected with SRV-4. Importantly, 3 out of the 8 infected mice exhibited anemia and hemophagocytosis, and an infected mouse died. To address the possibility that SRV-4 adapts humanized mouse and acquires higher pathogenicity, the virus was isolated from an infected mice exhibited severe anemia was further inoculated into another 6 humanized mice. However, no infected mice exhibited any illness. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the zoonotic SRV-4 infection from Japanese macaques to humans is technically possible under experimental condition. However, such zoonotic infection may not occur in the real society. PMID:26364986

  10. Experimental evaluation of the zoonotic infection potency of simian retrovirus type 4 using humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kei; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Misawa, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Takeuchi, Junko S; Miura, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Munehiro; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao; Ito, Mamoru; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    During 2001-2002 and 2008-2011, two epidemic outbreaks of infectious hemorrhagic disease have been found in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in Kyoto University Primate Research Institute, Japan. Following investigations revealed that the causative agent was simian retrovirus type 4 (SRV-4). SRV-4 was isolated by using human cell lines, which indicates that human cells are potently susceptible to SRV-4 infection. These raise a possibility of zoonotic infection of pathogenic SRV-4 from Japanese macaques into humans. To explore the possibility of zoonotic infection of SRV-4 to humans, here we use a human hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model. Eight out of the twelve SRV-4-inoculated humanized mice were infected with SRV-4. Importantly, 3 out of the 8 infected mice exhibited anemia and hemophagocytosis, and an infected mouse died. To address the possibility that SRV-4 adapts humanized mouse and acquires higher pathogenicity, the virus was isolated from an infected mice exhibited severe anemia was further inoculated into another 6 humanized mice. However, no infected mice exhibited any illness. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the zoonotic SRV-4 infection from Japanese macaques to humans is technically possible under experimental condition. However, such zoonotic infection may not occur in the real society. PMID:26364986

  11. Kit regulates HSC engraftment across the human-mouse species barrier.

    PubMed

    Cosgun, Kadriye Nehir; Rahmig, Susann; Mende, Nicole; Reinke, Sren; Hauber, Ilona; Schfer, Carola; Petzold, Anke; Weisbach, Henry; Heidkamp, Gordon; Purbojo, Ariawan; Cesnjevar, Robert; Platz, Alexander; Bornhuser, Martin; Schmitz, Marc; Dudziak, Diana; Hauber, Joachim; Kirberg, Jrg; Waskow, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    In-depth analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating human HSC function will require a surrogate host that supports robust maintenance of transplanted human HSCs in vivo, but the currently available options are problematic. Previously we showed that mutations in the Kit receptor enhance engraftment of transplanted HSCs in the mouse. To generate an improved model for human HSC transplantation and analysis, we developed immune-deficient mouse strains containing Kit mutations. We found that mutation of the Kit receptor enables robust, uniform, sustained, and serially transplantable engraftment of human HSCs in adult mice without a requirement for irradiation conditioning. Using this model, we also showed that differential KIT expression identifies two functionally distinct subpopulations of human HSCs. Thus, we have found that the capacity of this Kit mutation to open up stem cell niches across species barriers has significant potential and broad applicability in human HSC research. PMID:25017720

  12. Comparative diversity analysis of gut microbiota in two different human flora-associated mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Benhua; Liu, Zhiwei; Liao, Zhenlin; Li, Wenxai; Wei, Hong; Fang, Xiang

    2014-09-01

    The Kunming (KM) mouse is a closed colony mouse strain widely used in Chinese pharmacology, toxicology, and microbiology research laboratories. However, few studies have examined human flora-associated (HFA) microbial communities in KM mice. In this study, HFA models were built from germ-free KM and C57BL/6J mouse strains, and gut microbial diversity was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and DNA sequencing. We found that the two strains of HFA mice were significantly different based on the UPGMA dendrogram and the Richness index, but dice similarity coefficients of mouse replicates were not significantly different between HFA-KM and HFA-C57BL/6J. Most of the dominant phyla of human gut microflora could be transferred into the guts of the two mouse strains. However, the predominant genus that formed in HFA-KM was Clostridium sp. and that in HFA-C57BL/6J was Blautia sp. These results imply that genotypes difference between the two mice strains is a critical factor in shaping the intestinal microflora. However, genetic differences of individuals within KM mouse populations failed to lead to individual difference in microflora. Successful generation of HFA-KM mice will facilitate studies examining how diet affects gut microbial structure, and will enable comparative studies for uncovering genetic factors that shape gut microbial communities. PMID:24807625

  13. Pharmacokinetics in melanoma-bearing mice of 5-dihydroxyboryl-6-propyl-2-thiouracil (BPTU), a candidate compound for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Verrijk, R.; Smolders, I. J.; Huiskamp, R.; Gavin, P. R.; Philipp, K. H.; Begg, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    Blood pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of 5-dihydroxyboryl-6-propyl-2-thiouracil (BPTU), a boron carrier with postulated melanin-seeking properties for boron neutron capture therapy, were determined in C57/BL mice with subcutaneous pigmented or non-pigmented B16 melanomas. Borocaptate sodium (BSH) was used as a boron compound without melanin-seeking properties in a comparative biodistribution study in the same animal tumour models. Administration of single doses showed that BPTU was retained better in the pigmented B16 tumour than in the non-pigmented variant. BPTU was found in large concentrations in kidney and liver. Brain boron was approximately 10-fold lower than tumour boron. On a molar basis, BPTU demonstrated higher affinity for B16 tumours than BSH. Owing to solubility limits, tumour boron concentrations in this mouse study were too low for effective application of BNCT. However, the high tumour-to-blood and tumour-to-normal tissues ratios indicate that, with appropriate formulation, BPTU could be a promising candidate for clinical BNCT. PMID:8142252

  14. Effects of exopolysaccharide fraction (EPSF) from a cultivated Cordyceps sinensis fungus on c-Myc, c-Fos, and VEGF expression in B16 melanoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinyu; Zhang, Weiyun; Shi, Peihua; Chen, Jiaping; Han, Xiaodong; Wang, Yong

    2005-01-01

    The aqueous extract of Cordyceps sinensis (Cs), one of the traditional Chinese medicines, has been used for the treatment of a wide range of disorders for centuries. It is generally accepted that its cultivated Cs fungi possess the same functions as Cs natural herbs. Although polysaccharide from Cs is one of its bioactive compositions, its antitumor ability has not been confirmed. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the exopolysaccharide fraction (EPSF) of a cultivated Cs fungus on c-Myc, c-Fos, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression of tumor-bearing mice. The mice (C57BL/6) were administered three different doses of EPSF peritoneally every 2 days, starting from the day of implantation of B16 melanoma cells through their tail veins for 27 days (14 times). Sections from mouse paraffin-embedded liver and lung tissues were subjected to immunohistochemical analyses. The results of c-Myc, c-Fos, and VEGF expression were analyzed using SimplePCI image analysis software. The c-Myc, c-Fos, and VEGF levels in the lungs and livers of EPSF-treated mice were found to be significantly lower than those of untreated mice (p<0.05). This suggests that EPSF had inhibited tumor growth in the lungs and livers of mice, and that it might be a potential adjuvant in cancer therapy. PMID:16325517

  15. Independent specialization of the human and mouse X chromosomes for the male germline

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jacob L.; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G.; Zaghlul, Sara; Rock, Susan; Graves, Tina; Auger, Katherine; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Page, David C.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the human and mouse X chromosomes to systematically test Ohno’s law, which states that the gene content of X chromosomes is conserved across placental mammals1. First, we improved the accuracy of the human X-chromosome reference sequence through single-haplotype sequencing of ampliconic regions. This closed gaps in the reference sequence, corrected previously misassembled regions, and identified new palindromic amplicons. Our subsequent analysis led us to conclude that the evolution of human and mouse X chromosomes was bimodal. In accord with Ohno’s law, 94–95% of X-linked single-copy genes are shared between human and mouse; most are expressed in both sexes. Strikingly, most X-ampliconic genes are exceptions to Ohno’s law: only 31% of human and 22% of mouse X-ampliconic genes share orthologs. X-ampliconic genes are expressed predominantly in testicular germ cells, and many were independently acquired since the common ancestor of humans and mice, specializing portions of their X chromosomes for sperm production. PMID:23872635

  16. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  17. Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human

    SciTech Connect

    Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-07-04

    We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

  18. Generation and characterization of a novel multidrug resistance protein 2 humanized mouse line.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Nico; Balimane, Praveen; Hayward, Michael D; Buechel, Sandra; Kauselmann, Gunther; Wolf, C Roland

    2012-11-01

    The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2 is predominantly expressed in liver, intestine, and kidney, where it plays an important role in the excretion of a range of drugs and their metabolites or endogenous compounds into bile, feces, and urine. Mrp knockout [Mrp2(-/-)] mice have been used recently to study the role of MRP2 in drug disposition. Here, we describe the first generation and initial characterization of a mouse line humanized for MRP2 (huMRP2), which is nulled for the mouse Mrp2 gene and expresses the human transporter in the organs and cell types where MRP2 is normally expressed. Analysis of the mRNA expression for selected cytochrome P450 and transporter genes revealed no major changes in huMRP2 mice compared with wild-type controls. We show that human MRP2 is able to compensate functionally for the loss of the mouse transporter as demonstrated by comparable bilirubin levels in the humanized mice and wild-type controls, in contrast to the hyperbilirubinemia phenotype that is observed in MRP2(-/-) mice. The huMRP2 mouse provides a model to study the role of the human transporter in drug disposition and in assessing the in vivo consequences of inhibiting this transporter by compounds interacting with human MRP2. PMID:22917771

  19. Evaluation of a chimeric (uPA+/+)/SCID mouse model with a humanized liver for prediction of human metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Serres, Mark; Bowers, Gary; Boyle, Gary; Beaumont, Claire; Castellino, Steve; Sigafoos, James; Dave, Mehul; Roberts, Andrew; Shah, Vishal; Olson, Katie; Patel, Dipak; Wagner, David; Yeager, Russell; Serabjit-Singh, Cosette

    2011-06-01

    A model that predicts human metabolism and disposition of drug candidates would be of value in early drug development. In this study, a chimeric (uPA+/+)/SCID mouse model was evaluated with three structurally distinct compounds (GW695634, a benzophenone, SB-406725, a tetrahydroisoquinoline and GW823093, a fluoropyrrolidine) for which human metabolism and disposition was characterized. Human metabolite profiles in plasma and/or urine were compared to those of chimeric (uPA+/+)/SCID and control CD-1 or (uPA+/+)/SCID) mice. GW695634 and SB-406725 exhibited primarily hepatic metabolism and were chosen as probes to assess which human metabolites would likely circulate systemically. GW823093 exhibited a combination of hepatic and extrahepatic metabolism such that renal excretion of drug-related material was ~2-fold greater in humans than in mice, and thus chosen as a probe to assess if the chimeric (uPA+/+)/SCID mouse would predict the urinary excretion of human metabolites. We observed that human metabolism and disposition was well represented for GW695634, somewhat represented for GW823093 and minimally represented for SB-406725. Collectively, the results of this and other studies suggest that while limitations for prediction of human metabolism and disposition exist, humanized chimeric mouse models can potentially represent informative new tools in drug discovery and development. PMID:21370990

  20. Defining the molecular pathologies in cloaca malformation: similarities between mouse and human

    PubMed Central

    Runck, Laura A.; Method, Anna; Bischoff, Andrea; Levitt, Marc; Peña, Alberto; Collins, Margaret H.; Gupta, Anita; Shanmukhappa, Shiva; Wells, James M.; Guasch, Géraldine

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal malformations are congenital anomalies that form a spectrum of disorders, from the most benign type with excellent functional prognosis, to very complex, such as cloaca malformation in females in which the rectum, vagina and urethra fail to develop separately and instead drain via a single common channel into the perineum. The severity of this phenotype suggests that the defect occurs in the early stages of embryonic development of the organs derived from the cloaca. Owing to the inability to directly investigate human embryonic cloaca development, current research has relied on the use of mouse models of anorectal malformations. However, even studies of mouse embryos lack analysis of the earliest stages of cloaca patterning and morphogenesis. Here we compared human and mouse cloaca development and retrospectively identified that early mis-patterning of the embryonic cloaca might underlie the most severe forms of anorectal malformation in humans. In mouse, we identified that defective sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling results in early dorsal-ventral epithelial abnormalities prior to the reported defects in septation. This is manifested by the absence of Sox2 and aberrant expression of keratins in the embryonic cloaca of Shh knockout mice. Shh knockout embryos additionally develop a hypervascular stroma, which is defective in BMP signaling. These epithelial and stromal defects persist later, creating an indeterminate epithelium with molecular alterations in the common channel. We then used these animals to perform a broad comparison with patients with mild-to-severe forms of anorectal malformations including cloaca malformation. We found striking parallels with the Shh mouse model, including nearly identical defective molecular identity of the epithelium and surrounding stroma. Our work strongly suggests that early embryonic cloacal epithelial differentiation defects might be the underlying cause of severe forms of anorectal malformations in humans. Moreover, deranged Shh and BMP signaling is correlated with severe anorectal malformations in both mouse and humans. PMID:24524909

  1. Chimeric mouse-human IgG1 antibody that can mediate lysis of cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.Y.; Robinson, R.R.; Hellstroem, K.E.; Murray, E.D. Jr.; Chang, C.P.; Hellstroem, I.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric mouse-human antibody has been created that recognizes an antigen found on the surface of cells from many carcinomas. Immunoglobulin constant (C) domains of the mouse monoclonal antibody L6, C/sub ..gamma..2a/ and C/sub kappa/, were substituted by the human C/sub ..gamma..1/ and C/sub kappa/ by recombining cDNA modules encoding variable or C domains. The cDNA constructs were transfected into lymphoid cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibody and mouse L6 antibody bound to carcinoma cells with equal affinity and mediated complement-dependent cytolysis. In the presence of human effector cells, the chimeric antibody gave antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity at 100 times lower concentration than that needed for the mouse L6 antibody. The assay for lysis was carried out with /sup 51/Cr-labeled target calls. The chimeric antibody, but not the mouse L6 antibody, is effective against a melanoma line expressing small amounts of the L6 antigen. The findings point to the usefulness of the chimeric antibody approach for obtaining agents with strong antitumor activity for possible therapeutic use in man.

  2. Carbonic anhydrases and their functional differences in human and mouse sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    José, O; Torres-Rodríguez, P; Forero-Quintero, L S; Chávez, J C; De la Vega-Beltrán, J L; Carta, F; Supuran, C T; Deitmer, J W; Treviño, C L

    2015-12-25

    Fertilization is a key reproductive event in which sperm and egg fuse to generate a new individual. Proper regulation of certain parameters (such as intracellular pH) is crucial for this process. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are among the molecular entities that control intracellular pH dynamics in most cells. Unfortunately, little is known about the function of CAs in mammalian sperm physiology. For this reason, we re-explored the expression of CAI, II, IV and XIII in human and mouse sperm. We also measured the level of CA activity, determined by mass spectrometry, and found that it is similar in non-capacitated and capacitated mouse sperm. Importantly, we found that CAII activity accounts for half of the total CA activity in capacitated mouse sperm. Using the general CA inhibitor ethoxyzolamide, we studied how CAs participate in fundamental sperm physiological processes such as motility and acrosome reaction in both species. We found that capacitated human sperm depend strongly on CA activity to support normal motility, while capacitated mouse sperm do not. Finally, we found that CA inhibition increases the acrosome reaction in capacitated human sperm, but not in capacitated mouse sperm. PMID:26551457

  3. The expression of BST2 in human and experimental mouse brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) is a highly malignant brain tumor with poor treatment options and an average lifespan of 15 months after diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that BST2 (bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2; also known as PDCA-1, CD137 and HM1.24) is expressed by multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer and primary lung cancer cells. BST2 is expressed on the plasma membrane, which makes it an ideal target for immunotherapy. Accordingly, several groups have shown BST2 mAb to be effective for targeting tumor cells. In this report, we hypothesized that BST2 is expressed in human and mouse brain tumors and plays a critical role in brain tumor progression. We show that BST2 expression is upregulated at both the mRNA and protein level in high grade when compared to low grade human astrocytoma (p<0.05). To test the relevance of BST2, we utilized the intracranially (IC)-injected GL261 cell-based malignant brain tumor mouse model. We show that BST2 mRNA expression is increased in mouse brain IC-injected with GL261 cells, when compared to mouse brain IC-injected with saline at 3 weeks post-operative (p<0.05). Furthermore, BST2 immunofluorescence predominantly localized to mouse brain tumor cells. Finally, mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with shRNA for BST2preincubated with BST2 mAb show no difference in overall lifespan when compared to mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with a scrambled shRNApreincubated with BST2 mAb. Collectively, these data show that while BST2 expression increases during brain tumor progression in both human and mouse brain tumors, it has no apparent consequences to overall lifespan in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model. PMID:21565182

  4. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Genetic programs in human and mouse early embryos revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhigang; Huang, Kevin; Cai, Chaochao; Cai, Lingbo; Jiang, Chun-yan; Feng, Yun; Liu, Zhenshan; Zeng, Qiao; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E; Liu, Jia-yin; Horvath, Steve; Fan, Guoping

    2013-08-29

    Mammalian pre-implantation development is a complex process involving dramatic changes in the transcriptional architecture. We report here a comprehensive analysis of transcriptome dynamics from oocyte to morula in both human and mouse embryos, using single-cell RNA sequencing. Based on single-nucleotide variants in human blastomere messenger RNAs and paternal-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we identify novel stage-specific monoallelic expression patterns for a significant portion of polymorphic gene transcripts (25 to 53%). By weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we find that each developmental stage can be delineated concisely by a small number of functional modules of co-expressed genes. This result indicates a sequential order of transcriptional changes in pathways of cell cycle, gene regulation, translation and metabolism, acting in a step-wise fashion from cleavage to morula. Cross-species comparisons with mouse pre-implantation embryos reveal that the majority of human stage-specific modules (7 out of 9) are notably preserved, but developmental specificity and timing differ between human and mouse. Furthermore, we identify conserved key members (or hub genes) of the human and mouse networks. These genes represent novel candidates that are likely to be key in driving mammalian pre-implantation development. Together, the results provide a valuable resource to dissect gene regulatory mechanisms underlying progressive development of early mammalian embryos. PMID:23892778

  6. The Cinderella effect: searching for the best fit between mouse models and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Roopenian, Derry C; Liu, Edison T; Schofield, Paul N

    2013-11-01

    A recent publication questions the suitability of mice as a model for the human inflammatory response and has fueled the continuing debate about the suitability of mice as models for human disease. We discuss recent advances in disease modeling using mice, and the genetic factors that need to be considered when trying to recapitulate aspects of human disease. Failure to appreciate the important differences between human and mouse biology and genetics underlying attempts to generate faithful models frequently leads to poor outcomes. Closely coordinated human and model organism studies are essential to provide traction for translational research. PMID:23812235

  7. MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE ASSAY TO QUANTITATE CHEMICALLY INDUCED ANEUPLOIDY: USE OF A MONOCHROMOSOMAL HUMAN/MOUSE CELL HYBRID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing a human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cell line R3-5, to detect chemically induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome seg...

  8. Mouse models rarely mimic the transcriptome of human neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic bioinformatics-based critique of preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Burns, Terry C; Li, Matthew D; Mehta, Swapnil; Awad, Ahmed J; Morgan, Alexander A

    2015-07-15

    Translational research for neurodegenerative disease depends intimately upon animal models. Unfortunately, promising therapies developed using mouse models mostly fail in clinical trials, highlighting uncertainty about how well mouse models mimic human neurodegenerative disease at the molecular level. We compared the transcriptional signature of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), Parkinson׳s disease (PD), Huntington׳s disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to human disease. In contrast to aging, which demonstrated a conserved transcriptome between humans and mice, only 3 of 19 animal models showed significant enrichment for gene sets comprising the most dysregulated up- and down-regulated human genes. Spearman׳s correlation analysis revealed even healthy human aging to be more closely related to human neurodegeneration than any mouse model of AD, PD, ALS or HD. Remarkably, mouse models frequently upregulated stress response genes that were consistently downregulated in human diseases. Among potential alternate models of neurodegeneration, mouse prion disease outperformed all other disease-specific models. Even among the best available animal models, conserved differences between mouse and human transcriptomes were found across multiple animal model versus human disease comparisons, surprisingly, even including aging. Relative to mouse models, mouse disease signatures demonstrated consistent trends toward preserved mitochondrial function protein catabolism, DNA repair responses, and chromatin maintenance. These findings suggest a more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology in human neurodegeneration than is captured through standard animal models, and suggest that even among conserved physiological processes such as aging, mice are less prone to exhibit neurodegeneration-like changes. This work may help explain the poor track record of mouse-based translational therapies for neurodegeneration and provides a path forward to critically evaluate and improve animal models of human disease. PMID:25814260

  9. Differential Effects of Bisphenol A and Diethylstilbestrol on Human, Rat and Mouse Fetal Leydig Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    N’Tumba-Byn, Thierry; Moison, Delphine; Lacroix, Marlène; Lecureuil, Charlotte; Lesage, Laëtitia; Prud’homme, Sophie M.; Pozzi-Gaudin, Stéphanie; Frydman, René; Benachi, Alexandra; Livera, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (ED) have been incriminated in the current increase of male reproductive alterations. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used weak estrogenic environmental ED and it is debated whether BPA concentrations within the average internal exposure are toxic. In the present study we investigated the effects of 10−12 to 10−5 M BPA concentrations on fetal Leydig cell function, as fetal life is a critical period of sensitivity to ED effects on male reproductive function. To this aim, fetal testes from human at 6.5–10.5 gestational weeks (GW) or from rat and mouse at a comparable critical period of development (14.5 days post-coitum (dpc) for rat and 12.5 dpc for mouse) were explanted and cultured using our validated organotypic culture system in the presence or absence of BPA for 1–3 days. BPA concentrations as low as 10−8 M reduced testosterone secretion by human testes from day 1 of culture onwards, but not by mouse and rat testes where concentrations equal to 10−5 M BPA were required. Similarly, 10−8 M BPA reduced INSL3 mRNA levels only in human cultured testes. On the contrary, 10−5 and 10−6 M diethylstilbestrol (DES), a classical estrogenic compound, affected testosterone secretion only in rat and mouse testis cultures, but not in human testis cultures. Lastly, contrarily to the DES effect, the negative effect of BPA on testosterone produced by the mouse fetal testis was maintained after invalidation of estrogen receptor α (ERα). In conclusion, these results evidenced i) a deleterious effect of BPA on fetal Leydig cells function in human for concentrations from 10−8 M upwards, ii) species-specific differences raising concerns about extrapolation of data from rodent studies to human risk assessment, iii) a specific signaling pathway for BPA which differs from the DES one and which does not involve ERα. PMID:23284716

  10. Increased globotriaosylceramide levels in a transgenic mouse expressing human α1,4-galactosyltransferase and a mouse model for treating Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Shiozuka, Chikara; Taguchi, Atsumi; Matsuda, Junichiro; Noguchi, Yoko; Kunieda, Takanori; Uchio-Yamada, Kozue; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Yano, Shinji; Yokoyama, Shigeo; Mannen, Kazuaki; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Furukawa, Koichi; Ishii, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by an α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency and resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). A transgenic mouse expressing the human α-Gal A R301Q mutant in an α-Gal A-knockout background (TgM/KO) should be useful for studying active-site-specific chaperone (ASSC) therapy for Fabry disease. However, the Gb3 content in the heart tissue of this mouse was too low to detect an ASSC-induced effect. To increase the Gb3 levels in mouse organs, we created transgenic mice (TgG3S) expressing human α1,4-galactosyltransferase (Gb3 synthase). High levels of Gb3 were observed in all major organs of the TgG3S mouse. A TgG3S (+/−)M(+/−)/KO mouse was prepared by cross-breeding the TgG3S and TgM/KO mice and the Gb3 content in the heart of the TgG3S(+/−)M(+/−)/KO mouse was 1.4 µg/mg protein, higher than in the TgM(+/−)/KO (<0.1 µg/mg protein). Treatment with an ASSC, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, caused a marked induction of α-Gal A activity and a concomitant reduction of the Gb3 content in the TgG3S(+/−) M(+/−)/KO mouse organs. These data indicated that the TgG3S(+/−) M(+/−)/KO mouse was suitable for studying ASSC therapy for Fabry disease, and that the TgG3S mouse would be useful for studying the effect of high Gb3 levels in mouse organs. PMID:20961863

  11. Increased globotriaosylceramide levels in a transgenic mouse expressing human alpha1,4-galactosyltransferase and a mouse model for treating Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Shiozuka, Chikara; Taguchi, Atsumi; Matsuda, Junichiro; Noguchi, Yoko; Kunieda, Takanori; Uchio-Yamada, Kozue; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Yano, Shinji; Yokoyama, Shigeo; Mannen, Kazuaki; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Furukawa, Koichi; Ishii, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by an α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency and resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). A transgenic mouse expressing the human α-Gal A R301Q mutant in an α-Gal A-knockout background (TgM/KO) should be useful for studying active-site-specific chaperone (ASSC) therapy for Fabry disease. However, the Gb3 content in the heart tissue of this mouse was too low to detect an ASSC-induced effect. To increase the Gb3 levels in mouse organs, we created transgenic mice (TgG3S) expressing human α1,4-galactosyltransferase (Gb3 synthase). High levels of Gb3 were observed in all major organs of the TgG3S mouse. A TgG3S (+/-)M(+/-)/KO mouse was prepared by cross-breeding the TgG3S and TgM/KO mice and the Gb3 content in the heart of the TgG3S(+/-)M(+/-)/KO mouse was 1.4 µg/mg protein, higher than in the TgM(+/-)/KO (<0.1 µg/mg protein). Treatment with an ASSC, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, caused a marked induction of α-Gal A activity and a concomitant reduction of the Gb3 content in the TgG3S(+/-) M(+/-)/KO mouse organs. These data indicated that the TgG3S(+/-) M(+/-)/KO mouse was suitable for studying ASSC therapy for Fabry disease, and that the TgG3S mouse would be useful for studying the effect of high Gb3 levels in mouse organs. PMID:20961863

  12. MicroRNAs and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Human Disease Mouse Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Underbayev, Chingiz; Kasar, Siddha; Yuan, Yao; Raveche, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Human disease animal models are absolutely invaluable tools for our understanding of mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathological processes. By studying various genetic abnormalities in these organisms we can get a better insight into potential candidate genes responsible for human disease development. To this point a mouse represents one of the most used and convenient species for human disease modeling. Hundreds if not thousands of inbred, congenic, and transgenic mouse models have been created and are now extensively utilized in the research labs worldwide. Importantly, pluripotent stem cells play a significant role in developing new genetically engineered mice with the desired human disease-like phenotype. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells which represent reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells represent a significant advancement in research armament. The novel application of microRNA manipulation both in the generation of iPS cells and subsequent lineage-directed differentiation is discussed. Potential applications of induced pluripotent stem cell—a relatively new type of pluripotent stem cells—for human disease modeling by employing human iPS cells derived from normal and diseased somatic cells and iPS cells derived from mouse models of human disease may lead to uncovering of disease mechanisms and novel therapies. PMID:22619497

  13. Induction of micronuclei by x radiation in human, mouse, and rat peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Erexson, G.L.; Kligerman, A.D.; Bryant, M.F.; Sontag, M.R.; Halperin, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    The study compared the radiosensitivity of human, rat and mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) by analyzing micronuclei (MN) in cytochalasin B-induced binucleated (BN) cells. For each species and dose 4-ml aliquots of whole blood were X-irradiated to obtain doses of 38, 75, 150 or 300 cGy. Controls were sham-irradiated. After exposure to X-rays, mononuclear leukocytes were isolated using density gradients and cultured in RPMI 1640 medium containing phytohemagglutinin to stimulate mitogenesis. At 21 h cytochalasin B was added to produce BN PBLs, and all cultures were harvested at 52 h post-initiation using a cytocentrifuge. Significant dose-dependent increases in the percentage of micronucleated cells and the number of MN per BN cell were observed in all three species. The linear-quadratic regression curves for the total percentage of micronucleated cells for the three species were similar; however, the curve for the mouse PBLs had a larger quadratic component than either of the curves for the rat or human PBLs. Although the correlation between the percentage of cells with MN and those with chromosome aberrations was high (r squared > 0.95), the mouse and rat PBLs were over twice as efficient as human PBLs in forming MN from presumed acentric fragments. These data indicate that the induction of MN in BN cells following ionizing radiation is similar in human, rat and mouse PBLs, but care must be taken in using the MN results to predict frequencies of cells with chromosomal aberrations.

  14. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells. PMID:25573173

  15. Gene Entropy-Fractal Dimension Informatics with Application to Mouse-Human Translational Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Holden, T.; Cheung, E.; Dehipawala, S.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2013-01-01

    DNA informatics represented by Shannon entropy and fractal dimension have been used to form 2D maps of related genes in various mammals. The distance between points on these maps for corresponding mRNA sequences in different species is used to study evolution. By quantifying the similarity of genes between species, this distance might be indicated when studies on one species (mouse) would tend to be valid in the other (human). The hypothesis that a small distance from mouse to human could facilitate mouse to human translational medicine success is supported by the studied ESR-1, LMNA, Myc, and RNF4 sequences. ID1 and PLCZ1 have larger separation. The collinearity of displacement vectors is further analyzed with a regression model, and the ID1 result suggests a mouse-chimp-human translational medicine approach. Further inference was found in the tumor suppression gene, p53, with a new hypothesis of including the bovine PKM2 pathways for targeting the glycolysis preference in many types of cancerous cells, consistent with quantum metabolism models. The distance between mRNA and protein coding CDS is proposed as a measure of the pressure associated with noncoding processes. The Y-chromosome DYS14 in fetal micro chimerism that could offer protection from Alzheimer's disease is given as an example. PMID:23586047

  16. Number of CpG islands and genes in human and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Antequera, F; Bird, A

    1993-01-01

    Estimation of gene number in mammals is difficult due to the high proportion of noncoding DNA within the nucleus. In this study, we provide a direct measurement of the number of genes in human and mouse. We have taken advantage of the fact that many mammalian genes are associated with CpG islands whose distinctive properties allow their physical separation from bulk DNA. Our results suggest that there are approximately 45,000 CpG islands per haploid genome in humans and 37,000 in the mouse. Sequence comparison confirms that about 20% of the human CpG islands are absent from the homologous mouse genes. Analysis of a selection of genes suggests that both human and mouse are losing CpG islands over evolutionary time due to de novo methylation in the germ line followed by CpG loss through mutation. This process appears to be more rapid in rodents. Combining the number of CpG islands with the proportion of island-associated genes, we estimate that the total number of genes per haploid genome is approximately 80,000 in both organisms. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7505451

  17. INDUCTION OF MICRONUCLEI BY X-RADIATION IN HUMAN, MOUSE, AND RAT PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared the radiosensitivity of human, rat, and mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) by analyzing micronuclei (MN) in cytochalasin B-induced binucleated (BN) cells. or each species and dose, 4 ml aliquots of whole blood were X-irradiated to obtain doses of 38, 75, 150, o...

  18. Fate of non-virulent group A streptococci phagocytized by human and mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    WILSON, A T; WILEY, G G; BRUNO, P

    1957-12-01

    The fate of non-virulent group A streptococci phagocytized in vitro has been investigated by destroying the phagocyte with electric current and observing whether the liberated cocci multiply. Human and mouse peripheral blood neutrophils quickly injure ingested cocci, the time required to produce 50 per cent non-survival of chains being 8 and 6(3/4) minutes, respectively. PMID:13481244

  19. The expanding role of mouse genetics for understanding human biology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc; Xu, Tian

    2008-01-01

    It has taken about 100 years since the mouse first captured our imagination as an intriguing animal for it to become the premier genetic model organism. An expanding repertoire of genetic technology, together with sequencing of the genome and biological conservation, place the mouse at the foremost position as a model to decipher mechanisms underlying biological and disease processes. The combined approaches of embryonic stem cell-based technologies, chemical and insertional mutagenesis have enabled the systematic interrogation of the mouse genome with the aim of creating, for the first time, a library of mutants in which every gene is disrupted. The hope is that phenotyping the mutants will reveal novel and interesting phenotypes that correlate with genes, to define the first functional map of a mammalian genome. This new milestone will have a great impact on our understanding of mammalian biology, and could significantly change the future of medical diagnosis and therapeutic development, where databases can be queried in silico for potential drug targets or underlying genetic causes of illnesses. Emerging innovative genetic strategies, such as somatic genetics, modifier screens and humanized mice, in combination with whole-genome mutagenesis will dramatically broaden the utility of the mouse. More significantly, allowing genome-wide genetic interrogations in the laboratory, will liberate the creativity of individual investigators and transform the mouse as a model for making original discoveries and establishing novel paradigms for understanding human biology and disease. PMID:19048054

  20. The expanding role of mouse genetics for understanding human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Xu, Tian

    2008-01-01

    It has taken about 100 years since the mouse first captured our imagination as an intriguing animal for it to become the premier genetic model organism. An expanding repertoire of genetic technology, together with sequencing of the genome and biological conservation, place the mouse at the foremost position as a model to decipher mechanisms underlying biological and disease processes. The combined approaches of embryonic stem cell-based technologies, chemical and insertional mutagenesis have enabled the systematic interrogation of the mouse genome with the aim of creating, for the first time, a library of mutants in which every gene is disrupted. The hope is that phenotyping the mutants will reveal novel and interesting phenotypes that correlate with genes, to define the first functional map of a mammalian genome. This new milestone will have a great impact on our understanding of mammalian biology, and could significantly change the future of medical diagnosis and therapeutic development, where databases can be queried in silico for potential drug targets or underlying genetic causes of illnesses. Emerging innovative genetic strategies, such as somatic genetics, modifier screens and humanized mice, in combination with whole-genome mutagenesis will dramatically broaden the utility of the mouse. More significantly, allowing genome-wide genetic interrogations in the laboratory, will liberate the creativity of individual investigators and transform the mouse as a model for making original discoveries and establishing novel paradigms for understanding human biology and disease. PMID:19048054

  1. Mouse models of human disease: An evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  2. Discovery and bio-optimization of human antibody therapeutics using the XenoMouse(®) transgenic mouse platform.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Ian N; Gunasekaran, Kannan; King, Chadwick T

    2016-03-01

    Since the late 1990s, the use of transgenic animal platforms has transformed the discovery of fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. The first approved therapy derived from a transgenic platform - the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist panitumumab to treat advanced colorectal cancer - was developed using XenoMouse(®) technology. Since its approval in 2006, the science of discovering and developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies derived from the XenoMouse(®) platform has advanced considerably. The emerging array of antibody therapeutics developed using transgenic technologies is expected to include antibodies and antibody fragments with novel mechanisms of action and extreme potencies. In addition to these impressive functional properties, these antibodies will be designed to have superior biophysical properties that enable highly efficient large-scale manufacturing methods. Achieving these new heights in antibody drug discovery will ultimately bring better medicines to patients. Here, we review best practices for the discovery and bio-optimization of monoclonal antibodies that fit functional design goals and meet high manufacturing standards. PMID:26864104

  3. Reprogramming within hours following nuclear transfer into mouse but not human zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Dieter; Chen, Alice E.; Saphier, Genevieve; Ichida, Justin; Fitzgerald, Claire; Go, Kathryn J.; Acevedo, Nicole; Patel, Jay; Baetscher, Manfred; Kearns, William G.; Goland, Robin; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Melton, Douglas A.; Eggan, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Fertilized mouse zygotes can reprogram somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Human zygotes might therefore be useful for producing patient-derived pluripotent stem cells. However, logistical, legal and social considerations have limited the availability of human eggs for research. Here we show that a significant number of normal fertilized eggs (zygotes) can be obtained for reprogramming studies. Using these zygotes, we found that when the zygotic genome was replaced with that of a somatic cell, development progressed normally throughout the cleavage stages, but then arrested before the morula stage. This arrest was associated with a failure to activate transcription in the transferred somatic genome. In contrast to human zygotes, mouse zygotes reprogrammed the somatic cell genome to a pluripotent state within hours after transfer. Our results suggest that there is a previously unappreciated barrier to successful human nuclear transfer, and that future studies should focus on the requirements for genome activation. PMID:21971503

  4. Immune-deficient mouse models for analysis of human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meyerrose, Todd E; Herrbrich, Phillip; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2003-12-01

    The field of murine models of xenotransplantation has grown immensely over the past two decades. The explosive growth in this field is in part due to the fact that good in vitro methods do not exist yet to allow examination of human stem cell homing into the bone marrow compartment versus other tissues, long-term survival of human stem cells, or differentiation into tissues outside of the hematopoietic system. Since these important aspects of human stem cell biology can be examined in vivo using immune-deficient mice, the number of different strains and models is constantly increasing. The current review discusses the merits and drawbacks of each immune-deficient mouse xenograft system as it stands to date and reviews how each immune-deficient mouse model has been used to further our knowledge of human hematopoietic stem cell biology. PMID:14682062

  5. A human lung xenograft mouse model of Nipah virus infection.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Gustavo; Halliday, Hailey; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Goez, Yenny; Rockx, Barry

    2014-04-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae) that causes severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans with high mortality rates (up to 92%). NiV can cause Acute Lung Injury (ALI) in humans, and human-to-human transmission has been observed in recent outbreaks of NiV. While the exact route of transmission to humans is not known, we have previously shown that NiV can efficiently infect human respiratory epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms of NiV-associated ALI in the human respiratory tract are unknown. Thus, there is an urgent need for models of henipavirus infection of the human respiratory tract to study the pathogenesis and understand the host responses. Here, we describe a novel human lung xenograft model in mice to study the pathogenesis of NiV. Following transplantation, human fetal lung xenografts rapidly graft and develop mature structures of adult lungs including cartilage, vascular vessels, ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and primitive "air" spaces filled with mucus and lined by cuboidal to flat epithelium. Following infection, NiV grows to high titers (10(7) TCID50/gram lung tissue) as early as 3 days post infection (pi). NiV targets both the endothelium as well as respiratory epithelium in the human lung tissues, and results in syncytia formation. NiV infection in the human lung results in the production of several cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IP-10, eotaxin, G-CSF and GM-CSF on days 5 and 7 pi. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NiV can replicate to high titers in a novel in vivo model of the human respiratory tract, resulting in a robust inflammatory response, which is known to be associated with ALI. This model will facilitate progress in the fundamental understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis and virus-host interactions; it will also provide biologically relevant models for other respiratory viruses. PMID:24699832

  6. A TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODEL EXPRESSING EXCLUSIVELY HUMAN HEMOGLOBIN E: INDICATIONS OF A MILD OXIDATIVE STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuying; Fabry, Mary E.; Rybicki, Anne C.; Suzuka, Sandra M.; Balazs, Tatiana C.; Etzion, Zipora; de Jong, Kitty; Akoto, Edna K.; Canterino, Joseph E.; Kaul, Dhananjay K.; Kuypers, Frans A.; Lefer, David; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) E (β26 Glu→ Lys) is the most common abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) variant in the world. Homozygotes for HbE are mildly thalassemic as a result of the alternate splice mutation and present with a benign clinical picture (microcytic and mildly anemic) with rare clinical symptoms. Given that the human red blood cell (RBC) contains both HbE and excess α-chains along with minor hemoglobins, the consequence of HbE alone on RBC pathophysiology has not been elucidated. This becomes critical for the highly morbid βE-thalassemia disease. We have generated transgenic mice exclusively expressing human HbE (HbEKO) that exhibit the known aberrant splicing of βE globin mRNA, but are essentially non-thalassemic as demonstrated by RBC α/β (human) globin chain synthesis. These mice exhibit hematological characteristics similar to presentations in human EE individuals: microcytic RBC with low MCV and MCH but normal MCHC; target RBC; mild anemia with low Hb, HCT and mildly elevated reticulocyte levels and decreased osmotic fragility, indicating altered RBC surface area to volume ratio. These alterations are correlated with a mild RBC oxidative stress indicated by enhanced membrane lipid peroxidation, elevated zinc protoporphyrin levels, and by small but significant changes in cardiac function. The C57 (background) mouse and full KO mouse models expressing HbE with the presence of HbS or HbA are used as controls. In select cases, the HbA full KO mouse model is compared but found to be limited due to its RBC thalassemic characteristics. Since the HbEKO mouse RBC lacks an abundance of excess α-chains that would approximate a mouse thalassemia (or a human thalassemia), the results indicate that the observed in vivo RBC mild oxidative stress arises, at least in part, from the molecular consequences of the HbE mutation. PMID:22260787

  7. Plasmodium falciparum genetic crosses in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Ashley M; Pinapati, Richard S; Cheeseman, Ian H; Camargo, Nelly; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Checkley, Lisa A; Nair, Shalini; Hutyra, Carolyn A; Nosten, François H; Anderson, Timothy J C; Ferdig, Michael T; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2015-07-01

    Genetic crosses of phenotypically distinct strains of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are a powerful tool for identifying genes controlling drug resistance and other key phenotypes. Previous studies relied on the isolation of recombinant parasites from splenectomized chimpanzees, a research avenue that is no longer available. Here we demonstrate that human-liver chimeric mice support recovery of recombinant progeny for the identification of genetic determinants of parasite traits and adaptations. PMID:26030447

  8. Plasmodium falciparum genetic crosses in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Ashley M.; Pinapati, Richard S.; Cheeseman, Ian H.; Camargo, Nelly; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Checkley, Lisa A.; Nair, Shalini; Hutyra, Carolyn A.; Nosten, François H.; Anderson, Timothy J. C.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic crosses of phenotypically distinct strains of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are a powerful tool for identifying genes controlling drug resistance and other key phenotypes. Previous studies relied on the isolation of recombinant parasites from splenectomized chimpanzees, a research avenue that is no longer available. Here, we demonstrate that human-liver chimeric mice support recovery of recombinant progeny for the identification of genetic determinants of parasite traits and adaptations. PMID:26030447

  9. The mouse homologue of the tuberin gene (TSC2) maps to a conserved synteny group between mouse chromosome 17 and human 16p13.3

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.G.; Sutherland, H.F.; Nowicka, U.

    1995-01-01

    The tuberous sclerosis gene (TSC2) on human chromosome 16p13.3 has recently been identified. Several markers from this region have previously been shown to be members of a conserved synteny group, in the mouse located on chromosome 17. The mouse region includes markers D17Lon1, D17Lon2, D17Lon3, and D17Lon4, which are linked to the {alpha}-globin pseudogene Hba-ps4 on chromosome 17, while the corresponding human markers, NK12, NK92, sazD, and KM17, are linked to the functional {alpha}-globin locus near the tip of chromosome 16p. Since the human TSC2 maps in close proximity to NK12, we wanted to investigate whether a mouse gene, homologous to TSC2, was present on mouse chromosome 17 and thus included in the conserved synteny group. During the characterization of transcripts from the human PKD1 region on human chromosome 16p13.3, we isolated three short clones encoding fragments of TSC2 from a human fetal brain cDNA library enriched for transcripts from the PKD1 region. These TSC2 clones were used as probes to screen a mouse teratocarcinoma (PCC4) cDNA library (Stratagene), at a final stringency of 0.3 x SSC, 0.1% SDS at 65{degrees}C. One of the positive clones isolated, mTS-1, had a 2.8-kb insert. Two hundred bases from each end of the insert were sequenced, showing 88 and 83.5% identity to the human tuberin nucleotide sequence, with the 5{prime} end of the clone starting at position 2351 and the 3{prime} end ending at position 5265. The high degree of homology to the human tuberin sequence suggests that clone mTS-1 is indeed derived from the mouse homologue of TSC2. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Significance of Mouse Models in Dissecting the Mechanism of Human Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases (EGID)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that eosinophils play a significant role in promoting several gastrointestinal diseases, and animal models are the significant tools to understand the pathogenesis of eosinophil-associatd inflammatory disorders. The focus of this review is on the significance of mouse models that mimic the characteristics of human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases. Eosinophils are the important leukocytes with diverse functions in the gastrointestinal tract, such as excretion of intestinal parasites and promoting the pathogenesis of a numerous allergic gastrointestinal disorders like food allergy, parasitic infection, allergic gastroenteritis, allergic colitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Among these gastrointestinal diseases, the eosinophilic esophagitis is the most recently recognized disease and the mouse models are proven to be an effective tool to understand the pathophysiology of disease and to test novel treatment strategies. Based on patients allergic conditions and the gene overexpressed in human EGID, a number of gene overexpressed and allergen-challenged mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders were developed. These models were utilized to explore the mechanism(s) that promotes the eosinophil-mediated gastrointestinal diseases including the role of the eosinophil responsive cytokines and chemokines. Herein, we have provided a detailed overviews of the mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders that mimic the human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases and can be utilized as a tool for understanding the diseases pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25866707

  11. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  12. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM+ mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab′ fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production. PMID:26956543

  13. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM(+) mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab' fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production. PMID:26956543

  14. Comparative human and mouse antibody responses against tetanus toxin at clonal level.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Mehdi; Younesi, Vahid; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Abbasi, Ebrahim; Razavi, Alireza; Khosravi-Eghbal, Roya; Asgarin-Omran, Hossein; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-03-01

    Tetanus is a highly fatal disease caused by tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and remains a major threat to human and animal health, despite preventive strategies. TeNT is composed of heavy and light chain linked by a disulfide bond. The antibody response to TeNT is polyclonal and directed to multiple epitopes within both the light and heavy chains, leading to toxin neutralization. This study was undertaken to localize and compare neutralizing epitopes recognized by human and mouse TeNT-specific antibodies at a clonal level. In the present study, 22 murine hybridoma clones and 50 human lymphoblastoid cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were generated against TeNT. The specificity of these mAb was determined using different recombinant fragments of tetanus toxin. Moreover, this study investigated the in vitro toxin neutralizing activity of these mAb by a ganglioside GT1b assay. The results showed that tetanus toxoid immunization in humans and BALB/c mice induced a vigorous humoral immune response against different fragments of TeNT, particularly the carboxyl-terminal fragment of the heavy chain (known as fragment C). The fragment C-specific human and mouse mAb could largely neutralize TeNT. However, while all fragment C-specific human mAb reacted with the carboxyl-terminal part of this fragment (HCC), the majority of the mouse mAb failed to recognize this region. These results suggested that fragment C is the major target for the TeNT neutralizing antibodies, although different epitopes seem to be targeted by human and mouse antibodies. PMID:25990600

  15. CpG islands in human ZFX and ZFY and mouse Zfx genes: Sequence similarities and methylation differences

    SciTech Connect

    Luoh, S.W.; Jegalian, K.; Ridley, A.; Page, D.C.

    1995-09-20

    The human ZFX, human ZFY, and mouse Zfx genes have CpG islands near their 5` ends. These islands are typical in that they span about 1.5 kb, contain transcription initiation sites, and encompass some 5` untranslated exons and introns. However, comparative nucleotide sequencing of these humans and mouse islands provided evidence of evolutionary conservation to a degree unprecedented among mammalian 5` CpG islands. In one stretch of 165 nucleotides containing 19 CpGs, mouse Zfx and human ZFX are identical to each other and differ from human ZFY at only 9 nucleotides. In contrast, we found no evidence of homologous CpG islands in the mouse Zfy genes, whose transcription is more circumscribed than that of a human ZFX, human ZFY, and mouse Zfx. Using the isoschizomers HpaII and MspI to examine a highly conserved segment of the ZFX CpG island, we detected methylation on inactive mouse X-chromosomes. These observations parallel the previous findings that mouse Zfx undergoes X inactivation while human ZFX escapes it. 62 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Assignment of the gene for methylthioadenosine phosphorylase to human chromosome 9 by mouse-human somatic cell hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, C J; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Carson, D A

    1984-01-01

    The purine and polyamine metabolic enzyme methylthioadenosine (MeSAdo) phosphorylase is abundant in normal cells and tissues but is lacking from many human and murine malignant cell lines and from cells of some human leukemias in vivo. To explore the genetic control of MeSAdo phosphorylase expression, we measured levels of the enzyme in somatic cell hybrids prepared by fusing MeSAdo phosphorylase-deficient mouse L cell lines with human fibroblasts. In the hybrid clones, MeSAdo phosphorylase activity segregated concordantly with adenylate kinase 1, a marker for human chromosome 9, but not with enzyme markers for any other human chromosome. In hybrid clones derived from human fibroblasts with a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 17, MeSAdo phosphorylase activity was confined to cells containing the 9pter----9q12 region. In every case, the enzyme-positive hybrid clones displayed bands of MeSAdo phosphorylase activity with isoelectric points characteristic of both the human and murine enzymes. These results indicate that the structural gene for human MeSAdo phosphorylase, designated MTAP, can be assigned to the 9pter----9q12 region of human chromosome 9. Furthermore, these studies with interspecies somatic cell hybrids show that the MeSAdo phosphorylase-deficient state is recessive in mouse L cell lines. Images PMID:6425836

  17. Use of PC mouse components for continuous measuring of human heartbeat.

    PubMed

    Beiderman, Yevgeny; Talyosef, Roy; Yeori, Daniel; Garcia, Javier; Mico, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2012-06-01

    A new technology for remote measuring of vibration sources was recently developed for industrial, medical, and security-related applications [Int. Appl. Patent No: PCT/IL2008/001008]. It requires relatively expensive equipment, such as high-speed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensors and customized optics. In this paper, we demonstrate how the usage of a simple personal computer (PC) mouse as an optical system composed of a low-power laser and a CMOS circuitry on the same integrated circuit package, can be used to monitor heartbeat from the wrist. The method is based on modifying the mouse optical system in such a way that it will recognize temporal change in skin's vibration profile, generated due to the heart pulses, as mouse movement. The tests that were carried out show a very good correlation between the heartbeat rate measured from human skin and the reference values taken manually. PMID:22695566

  18. Rapamycin relieves lentiviral vector transduction resistance in human and mouse hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cathy X.; Sather, Blythe D.; Wang, Xuefeng; Adair, Jennifer; Khan, Iram; Singh, Swati; Lang, Shanshan; Adams, Amie; Curinga, Gabrielle; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Miao, Carol H.; Rawlings, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for genetic diseases, HIV, and cancer. However, a barrier for clinical HSC gene therapy is the limited efficiency of gene delivery via lentiviral vectors (LVs) into HSCs. We show here that rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin complexes, facilitates highly efficient lentiviral transduction of mouse and human HSCs and dramatically enhances marking frequency in long-term engrafting cells in mice. Mechanistically, rapamycin enhanced postbinding endocytic events, leading to increased levels of LV cytoplasmic entry, reverse transcription, and genomic integration. Despite increasing LV copy number, rapamycin did not significantly alter LV integration site profile or chromosomal distribution in mouse HSCs. Rapamycin also enhanced in situ transduction of mouse HSCs via direct intraosseous infusion. Collectively, rapamycin strongly augments LV transduction of HSCs in vitro and in vivo and may prove useful for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24914132

  19. Sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of human pseudoautosomal genes and their mouse homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Li, X.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is an area of sequence identity between the X and Y chromosomes and is important for mediating X-Y pairing during male meiosis. Of the seven genes assigned to the human PAR, none of the mouse homologs have been isolated by a cross-hybridization strategy. Two of these homologs, Csfgmra and II3ra, have been isolated using a functional assay for the gene products. These genes are quite different in sequence from their human homologs, showing only 60-70% sequence similarity. The Csfgmra gene has been found to further differ from its human homolog in being isolated not on the sex chromosomes, but on a mouse autosome (chromosome 19). Using a mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have mapped the II3ra gene to yet another mouse autosome, chromosome 14. Attempts to clone the mouse homolog of the ANT3 locus resulted in the isolation of two related genes, Ant1 and Ant2, but failed to yield the Ant3 gene. Southern blot analysis of the ANT/Ant genes showed the Ant1 and Ant2 sequences to be well-conserved among all of a dozen mammals tested. In contrast, the ANT3 gene only showed hybridization to non-rodent mammals, suggesting it is either greatly divergent or has been deleted in the rodent lineage. Similar experiments with other human pseudoautosomal probes likewise showed a lack of hybridization to rodent sequences. The results show a definite trend of extensive divergence of pseudoautosomal sequences in addition to chromosomal rearrangements involving X;autosome translocations and perhaps gene deletions. Such observations have interesting implications regarding the evolution of this important region of the sex chromosomes.

  20. Liraglutide Compromises Pancreatic ? Cell Function in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Abdulreda, Midhat H; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Caicedo, Alejandro; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2016-03-01

    Incretin mimetics are frequently used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes because they potentiate ? cell response to glucose. Clinical evidence showing short-term benefits of such therapeutics (e.g., liraglutide) is abundant; however, there have been several recent reports of unexpected complications in association with incretin mimetic therapy. Importantly, clinical evidence on the potential effects of such agents on the ? cell and islet function during long-term, multiyear use remains lacking. We now show that prolonged daily liraglutide treatment of >200days in humanized mice, transplanted with human pancreatic islets in the anterior chamber of the eye, is associated with compromised release of human insulin and deranged overall glucose homeostasis. These findings raise concern about the chronic potentiation of ? cell function through incretin mimetic therapy in diabetes. PMID:26876561

  1. Insights into synaptic function from mouse models of human cognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Banko, Jessica L; Trotter, Justin; Weeber, Edwin J

    2013-01-01

    Modern approaches to the investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying human cognitive disease often include multidisciplinary examination of animal models engineered with specific mutations that spatially and temporally restrict expression of a gene of interest. This approach not only makes possible the development of animal models that demonstrate phenotypic similarities to their respective human disorders, but has also allowed for significant progress towards understanding the processes that mediate synaptic function and memory formation in the nondiseased state. Examples of successful mouse models where genetic manipulation of the mouse resulted in recapitulation of the symptomatology of the human disorder and was used to significantly expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying normal synaptic plasticity and memory formation are discussed in this article. These studies have broadened our knowledge of several signal transduction cascades that function throughout life to mediate synaptic physiology. Defining these events is key for developing therapies to address disorders of cognitive ability. PMID:25083141

  2. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M.; Bassi, M.T.

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A novel Flt3-deficient HIS mouse model with selective enhancement of human DC development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Mention, Jean-Jacques; Court, Nathalie; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Toubert, Antoine; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas; Corcuff, Erwan; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Di Santo, James P

    2016-05-01

    Humanized mice harboring human immune systems (HIS) represent a platform to study immune responses against pathogens and to screen vaccine candidates and novel immunotherapeutics. Innate and adaptive immune responses are suboptimal in HIS mice, possibly due to poor reconstitution of human antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DC homeostasis is regulated by cytokine availability, and Flt3-ligand (Flt3L) is one factor that conditions this process. Mouse myelopoiesis is essentially normal in most current HIS models. As such, developing mouse myeloid cells may limit human DC reconstitution by reducing available Flt3L and by cellular competition for specific "niches." To address these issues, we created a novel HIS model that compromises host myeloid cell development via deficiency in the receptor tyrosine kinase Flk2/Flt3. In Balb/c Rag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) Flt3(-/-) (BRGF) recipients, human conventional DCs and plasmacytoid DCs develop from hCD34(+) precursors and can be specifically boosted with exogenous Flt3L. Human DCs that develop in this context normally respond to TLR stimulation, and improved human DC homeostasis is associated with increased numbers of human NK and T cells. This new HIS-DC model should provide a means to dissect human DC differentiation and represents a novel platform to screen immune adjuvants and DC targeting therapies. PMID:26865269

  4. Revisiting the case for genetically engineered mouse models in human myelodysplastic syndrome research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Kinney, Marsha C; Scott, Linda M; Zinkel, Sandra S; Rebel, Vivienne I

    2015-08-27

    Much-needed attention has been given of late to diseases specifically associated with an expanding elderly population. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a hematopoietic stem cell-based blood disease, is one of these. The lack of clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease has hampered the development of efficacious therapies, especially in the presence of comorbidities. Mouse models could potentially provide new insights into this disease, although primary human MDS cells grow poorly in xenografted mice. This makes genetically engineered murine models a more attractive proposition, although this approach is not without complications. In particular, it is unclear if or how myelodysplasia (abnormal blood cell morphology), a key MDS feature in humans, presents in murine cells. Here, we evaluate the histopathologic features of wild-type mice and 23 mouse models with verified myelodysplasia. We find that certain features indicative of myelodysplasia in humans, such as Howell-Jolly bodies and low neutrophilic granularity, are commonplace in healthy mice, whereas other features are similarly abnormal in humans and mice. Quantitative hematopoietic parameters, such as blood cell counts, are required to distinguish between MDS and related diseases. We provide data that mouse models of MDS can be genetically engineered and faithfully recapitulate human disease. PMID:26077396

  5. Sensory and autonomic deficits in a new humanized mouse model of familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Morini, Elisabetta; Dietrich, Paula; Salani, Monica; Downs, Heather M; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Alli, Shanta; Brenner, Anthony; Nilbratt, Mats; LeClair, John W; Oaklander, Anne Louise; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Dragatsis, Ioannis

    2016-03-15

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease that affects the development and survival of sensory and autonomic neurons. FD is caused by an mRNA splicing mutation in intron 20 of the IKBKAP gene that results in a tissue-specific skipping of exon 20 and a corresponding reduction of the inhibitor of kappaB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP), also known as Elongator complex protein 1. To date, several promising therapeutic candidates for FD have been identified that target the underlying mRNA splicing defect, and increase functional IKAP protein. Despite these remarkable advances in drug discovery for FD, we lacked a phenotypic mouse model in which we could manipulate IKBKAP mRNA splicing to evaluate potential efficacy. We have, therefore, engineered a new mouse model that, for the first time, will permit to evaluate the phenotypic effects of splicing modulators and provide a crucial platform for preclinical testing of new therapies. This new mouse model, TgFD9; Ikbkap(Δ20/flox) was created by introducing the complete human IKBKAP transgene with the major FD splice mutation (TgFD9) into a mouse that expresses extremely low levels of endogenous Ikbkap (Ikbkap(Δ20/flox)). The TgFD9; Ikbkap(Δ20/flox) mouse recapitulates many phenotypic features of the human disease, including reduced growth rate, reduced number of fungiform papillae, spinal abnormalities, and sensory and sympathetic impairments, and recreates the same tissue-specific mis-splicing defect seen in FD patients. This is the first mouse model that can be used to evaluate in vivo the therapeutic effect of increasing IKAP levels by correcting the underlying FD splicing defect. PMID:26769677

  6. The LKB1 Tumor Suppressor as a Biomarker in Mouse and Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Zhang, Song; Zhao, Ni; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Sharpless, Norman E.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hayes, D. Neil; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in the LKB1 gene (also known as STK11) cause the Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, and somatic loss of LKB1 has emerged as causal event in a wide range of human malignancies, including melanoma, lung cancer, and cervical cancer. The LKB1 protein is a serine-threonine kinase that phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other downstream targets. Conditional knockout studies in mouse models have consistently shown that LKB1 loss promotes a highly-metastatic phenotype in diverse tissues, and human studies have demonstrated a strong association between LKB1 inactivation and tumor recurrence. Furthermore, LKB1 deficiency confers sensitivity to distinct classes of anticancer drugs. The ability to reliably identify LKB1-deficient tumors is thus likely to have important prognostic and predictive implications. Previous research studies have employed polyclonal antibodies with limited success, and there is no widely-employed immunohistochemical assay for LKB1. Here we report an assay based on a rabbit monoclonal antibody that can reliably detect endogenous LKB1 protein (and its absence) in mouse and human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. LKB1 protein levels determined through this assay correlated strongly with AMPK phosphorylation both in mouse and human tumors, and with mRNA levels in human tumors. Our studies fully validate this immunohistochemical assay for LKB1 in paraffin-embedded formalin tissue sections. This assay should be broadly useful for research studies employing mouse models and also for the development of human tissue-based assays for LKB1 in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24086281

  7. Generation and Characterization of a Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Shannon; Salphati, Laurent; Gomez-Zepeda, David; Wanek, Thomas; Chen, Liangfu; Chu, Xiaoyan; Kunta, Jeevan; Mezler, Mario; Menet, Marie-Claude; Chasseigneaux, Stephanie; Declèves, Xavier; Langer, Oliver; Pierre, Esaie; DiLoreto, Karen; Hoft, Carolin; Laplanche, Loic; Pang, Jodie; Pereira, Tony; Andonian, Clara; Simic, Damir; Rode, Anja; Yabut, Jocelyn; Zhang, Xiaolin; Scheer, Nico

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is expressed in various tissues, such as the gut, liver, kidney and blood brain barrier (BBB), where it mediates the unidirectional transport of substrates to the apical/luminal side of polarized cells. Thereby BCRP acts as an efflux pump, mediating the elimination or restricting the entry of endogenous compounds or xenobiotics into tissues and it plays important roles in drug disposition, efficacy and safety. Bcrp knockout mice (Bcrp(-/-)) have been used widely to study the role of this transporter in limiting intestinal absorption and brain penetration of substrate compounds. Here we describe the first generation and characterization of a mouse line humanized for BCRP (hBCRP), in which the mouse coding sequence from the start to stop codon was replaced with the corresponding human genomic region, such that the human transporter is expressed under control of the murineBcrppromoter. We demonstrate robust human and loss of mouse BCRP/Bcrp mRNA and protein expression in the hBCRP mice and the absence of major compensatory changes in the expression of other genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition. Pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies with several BCRP probe substrates confirmed the functional activity of the human transporter in these mice. Furthermore, we provide practical examples for the use of hBCRP mice to study drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The hBCRP mouse is a promising model to study the in vivo role of human BCRP in limiting absorption and BBB penetration of substrate compounds and to investigate clinically relevant DDIs involving BCRP. PMID:26893303

  8. Metabolism of human cytochrome P450 marker substrates in mouse: a strain and gender comparison.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, S; Hagbjörk, A L; Ekman, S; Fransson-Steen, R; Terelius, Y

    2004-09-01

    The aim was to characterize mouse gender and strain differences in the metabolism of commonly used human cytochrome (CYP) P450 probe substrates. Thirteen human CYP probe substrates (phenacetin, coumarin, 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin, amiodarone, paclitaxel, diclofenac, S-mephenytoin, bufuralol, dextromethorphan, chlorzoxazone, p-nitrophenol, testosterone and lauric acid) were used in activity measurements. The metabolism of the probe substrates was compared in liver microsomes from male and female NMRI, CBA, C57bl/6, 129/SvJ and CD1 strains. The expression of proteins identified on Western blots with commonly available antibodies selective for specific human and rat CYP enzymes were compared in the different mouse strains. Males had higher metabolism than corresponding females for phenacetin O-deethylation (human marker for CYP1A2 activity), and a high correlation was found between phenacetin activity and immunoreactivity in Western blots produced with rat CYP1A2 antibodies. Protein detected by antibodies cross-reacting with human CYP2B6 and rat CYP2B1/2 antibodies was female specific except for the 129/SvJ strain, where it was absent in both genders. Females generally had a higher metabolism of bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation and dextromethorphan O-demethylation (human markers for CYP2D activity). Bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation correlated with a female-dominant mouse CYP, which was detected with antibodies against rat CYP2D4. p-Nitrophenol 2-hydroxylation correlated better than chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation with the protein detected with antibodies against rat CYP2E1, indicating that p-nitrophenol is a more specific substrate for mouse CYP2E1. PMID:15742976

  9. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease. PMID:20092628

  10. The Humanized NOD/SCID Mouse as a Preclinical Model to Study the Fate of Encapsulated Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Oberholzer, Jose; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Tuch, Bernard E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite encouraging results in animal models, the transplantation of microencapsulated islets into humans has not yet reached the therapeutic level. Recent clinical trials using microencapsulated human islets in barium alginate showed the presence of dense fibrotic overgrowth around the microcapsules with no viable islets. The major reason for this is limited understanding of what occurs when encapsulated human islets are allografted. This warrants the need for a suitable small animal model. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human PBMCs (called humanized NOD/SCID mice) as a preclinical model. In this model, human T cell engraftment could be achieved, and CD45+ cells were observed in the spleen and peripheral blood. Though the engrafted T cells caused a small fibrotic overgrowth around the microencapsulated human islets, this failed to stop the encapsulated islets from functioning in the diabetic recipient mice. The ability of encapsulated islets to survive in this mouse model might partly be attributed to the presence of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10, which are known to induce graft tolerance. In conclusion, this study showed that the hu-NOD/SCID mouse is not a suitable preclinical model to study the allograft rejection mechanisms of encapsulated human islets. As another result, the maintained viability of transplanted islets on the NOD/SCID background emphasized a critical role of protective mechanisms in autoimmune diabetes transplanted subjects due to specific immunoregulatory effects provided by IL-4 and IL-10. PMID:20703439

  11. Mouse Regenerating Myofibers Detected as False-Positive Donor Myofibers with Anti-Human Spectrin

    PubMed Central

    Rozkalne, Anete; Adkin, Carl; Meng, Jinhong; Lapan, Ariya; Morgan, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell transplantation is being tested as a potential therapy for a number of diseases. Stem cells isolated directly from tissue specimens or generated via reprogramming of differentiated cells require rigorous testing for both safety and efficacy in preclinical models. The availability of mice with immune-deficient background that carry additional mutations in specific genes facilitates testing the efficacy of cell transplantation in disease models. The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, of which Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most severe and common type. Cell-based therapy for muscular dystrophy has been under investigation for several decades, with a wide selection of cell types being studied, including tissue-specific stem cells and reprogrammed stem cells. Several immune-deficient mouse models of muscular dystrophy have been generated, in which human cells obtained from various sources are injected to assess their preclinical potential. After transplantation, the presence of engrafted human cells is detected via immunofluorescence staining, using antibodies that recognize human, but not mouse, proteins. Here we show that one antibody specific to human spectrin, which is commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of transplanted human cells in mouse muscle, detects myofibers in muscles of NOD/Rag1nullmdx5cv, NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγnull mice, or mdx nude mice, irrespective of whether they were injected with human cells. These “reactive” clusters are regenerating myofibers, which are normally present in dystrophic tissue and the spectrin antibody is likely recognizing utrophin, which contains spectrin-like repeats. Therefore, caution should be used in interpreting data based on detection of single human-specific proteins, and evaluation of human stem cell engraftment should be performed using multiple human-specific labeling strategies. PMID:24152287

  12. Mouse-human immunoglobulin G1 chimeric antibodies with activities against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Zebedee, S L; Koduri, R K; Mukherjee, J; Mukherjee, S; Lee, S; Sauer, D F; Scharff, M D; Casadevall, A

    1994-01-01

    Passive antibody administration is a potentially useful approach for the therapy of human Cryptococcus neoformans infections. To evaluate the efficacy of the human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) constant region against C. neoformans and to construct murine antibody derivatives with reduced immunogenicities and longer half-lives in humans, two mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibodies were generated from the protective murine monoclonal antibodies 2D10 (IgM) and 18B7 (IgG1). The 2D10 mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibody (ch2D10) had significantly lower binding affinity than its parent murine antibody (m2D10), presumably because of a loss of avidity contribution on switching from IgM to IgG. The 18B7 mouse-human IgG1 chimeric antibody (ch18B7) had higher affinity for cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen than its parent murine antibody (m18B7). ch18B7 and ch2D10 promoted phagocytosis of C. neoformans by primary human microglial cells and the murine J774.16 macrophage-like cell line. ch18B7 and m18B7 enhanced fungistatic or fungicidal activity of J774.16 cells and prolonged the survival of lethally infected mice. We conclude that the human IgG1 constant chain can be effective in mediating antifungal activity against C. neoformans. ch18B7 or similar antibodies are potential candidates for passive antibody therapy of human cryptococcosis. PMID:7979280

  13. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H.M.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G.J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation and exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy. PMID:25557080

  14. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. Methods We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. Results We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse–human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like “organ development” and “disorders related to neurological tissue”. However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch’s membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. Conclusion These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26517551

  15. Genetic Regulation of Pituitary Gland Development in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kelberman, Daniel; Rizzoti, Karine; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Robinson, Iain C. A. F.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2009-01-01

    Normal hypothalamopituitary development is closely related to that of the forebrain and is dependent upon a complex genetic cascade of transcription factors and signaling molecules that may be either intrinsic or extrinsic to the developing Rathke’s pouch. These factors dictate organ commitment, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation within the anterior pituitary. Abnormalities in these processes are associated with congenital hypopituitarism, a spectrum of disorders that includes syndromic disorders such as septo-optic dysplasia, combined pituitary hormone deficiencies, and isolated hormone deficiencies, of which the commonest is GH deficiency. The highly variable clinical phenotypes can now in part be explained due to research performed over the last 20 yr, based mainly on naturally occurring and transgenic animal models. Mutations in genes encoding both signaling molecules and transcription factors have been implicated in the etiology of hypopituitarism, with or without other syndromic features, in mice and humans. To date, mutations in known genes account for a small proportion of cases of hypopituitarism in humans. However, these mutations have led to a greater understanding of the genetic interactions that lead to normal pituitary development. This review attempts to describe the complexity of pituitary development in the rodent, with particular emphasis on those factors that, when mutated, are associated with hypopituitarism in humans. PMID:19837867

  16. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  17. The SCID mouse: relevance as an animal model system for studying human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    The simultaneous description some 5 years ago of two methods for the partial reconstitution of a human immune system in severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice (collectively, human:SCID mice) was met with great enthusiasm. At the time, it was hoped that human:SCID mice would provide experimental animal model systems for studying human disease and the human immune system. Many of these hopes have been borne out. Importantly, the experimental results obtained from these chimeric human/animal studies appear to be relevant to human disease and immune function. In spite of these glowing achievements, the SCID mouse may not represent the optimal experimental system with which to address these questions. The incomplete penetrance ("leakiness") of the scid mutation and the recent discovery that the mutation is not lymphoid specific, but rather affects a general DNA repair pathway, will only serve to complicate the interpretation of already complex biological interactions. Recently other immune-deficient mice have been described that appear to overcome one or both of these problems and thus these mice could represent improved hosts for the adaptive transfer of a human immune system. The current status of the SCID mouse in light of these new findings is discussed. PMID:8256843

  18. Mutations in orthologous genes in human spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and the brachymorphic mouse.

    PubMed

    Faiyaz ul Haque, M; King, L M; Krakow, D; Cantor, R M; Rusiniak, M E; Swank, R T; Superti-Furga, A; Haque, S; Abbas, H; Ahmad, W; Ahmad, M; Cohn, D H

    1998-10-01

    The osteochondrodysplasias are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting skeletal development, linear growth and the maintenance of cartilage and bone. We have studied a large inbred Pakistani family with a distinct form of recessively inherited spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) and mapped a gene associated with this dwarfing condition to chromosome 10q23-24, a region syntenic with the locus for the brachymorphic mutation on mouse chromosome 19. We identified two orthologous genes, ATPSK2 and Atpsk2, encoding novel ATP sulfurylase/APS kinase orthologues in the respective regions of the human and mouse genomes. We characterized a nonsense mutation in ATPSK2 in the SEMD family and a missense mutation in the region of Atpsk2 encoding the APS kinase activity in the brachymorphic mouse. ATP sulfurylase/APS kinase catalyses the metabolic activation of inorganic sulfate to PAPS, the universal donor for post-translational protein sulfation in all cell types. The cartilage-specificity of the human and mouse phenotypes provides further evidence of the critical role of sulfate activation in the maturation of cartilage extracellular matrix molecules and the effect of defects in this process on the architecture of cartilage and skeletogenesis. PMID:9771708

  19. High efficiency reconstitution of a human-mouse chimeric Fab of CAb-1 antibody specific to human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, X-M; Xing, J-L; Liao, C-G; Yao, X-Y; Li, Y; Chen, Z-N

    2008-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been widely applied in the treatment of human diseases, especially in malignant tumours. However, most antibodies produced in mouse by hybridoma technology might induce severe human anti-mouse reactions. We had reported a murine mAb CAb-1 of therapeutic interest for its specifically binding to a cell surface glycoprotein of human colon cancer. Here, we attempted to generate a reconstituted human-mouse chimeric Fab (cFab) of CAb-1 in vitro to reduce its antigenicity and increase its capacity of penetration. First, the genes of heavy and light chain variable region (VH, VL) of CAb-1 were cloned. Then, the chimeric light chain (cL) and Fd (cFd) were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. Finally, the reconstituted cFab was obtained by gradient dialysis of the mixture of cFd and cL. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis showed the reconstituted cFab with a recovery rate of 70.2% when the initial total concentration of cL and cFd proteins to be 100 microg/ml. The reconstituted cFab maintained the affinity and specificity to colon cancer cells compared with its parental antibody as determined by immunostaining analysis, FACS and ELISA. Our results established a foundation for further application of the cFab in diagnosis and treatment of colon cancer. PMID:18482205

  20. FXN Promoter Silencing in the Humanized Mouse Model of Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Chutake, Yogesh K.; Costello, Whitney N.; Lam, Christina C.; Parikh, Aniruddha C.; Hughes, Tamara T.; Michalopulos, Michael G.; Pook, Mark A.; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene that results in epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter. This silencing mechanism is seen in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells but it remains unknown if it is a widespread phenomenon affecting multiple cell types and tissues. Methodology / Principal Findings The humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia (YG8sR), which carries a single transgenic insert of the human FXN gene with an expanded GAA triplet-repeat in intron 1, is deficient for FXN transcript when compared to an isogenic transgenic mouse lacking the expanded repeat (Y47R). We found that in YG8sR the deficiency of FXN transcript extended both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat, suggestive of deficient transcriptional initiation. This pattern of deficiency was seen in all tissues tested, irrespective of whether they are known to be affected or spared in disease pathogenesis, in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and in cultured primary fibroblasts. FXN promoter function was directly measured via metabolic labeling of newly synthesized transcripts in fibroblasts, which revealed that the YG8sR mouse was significantly deficient in transcriptional initiation compared to the Y47R mouse. Conclusions / Significance Deficient transcriptional initiation accounts for FXN transcriptional deficiency in the humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia, similar to patient-derived cells, and the mechanism underlying promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is widespread across multiple cell types and tissues. PMID:26393353

  1. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  2. Development of a Mouse Model of Helicobacter pylori Infection that Mimics Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Marta; Arico, Beatrice; Burroni, Daniela; Figura, Natale; Rappuoli, Rino; Ghiara, Paolo

    1995-03-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. The pathogenesis of H. pylori infection in vivo was studied by adapting fresh clinical isolates of bacteria to colonize the stomachs of mice. A gastric pathology resembling human disease was observed in infections with cytotoxin-producing strains but not with noncytotoxic strains. Oral immunization with purified H. pylori antigens protected mice from bacterial infection. This mouse model will allow the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines against H. pylori infection in humans.

  3. Preconditioning allows engraftment of mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Chava; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Klionsky, Yael Zlotnikov; Yaakov, Yasmin; Assayag, Miri; Biton, Inbal Eti; Tal, Orna; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Shneider, David; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, Oscar; Evron, Shmuel; Freud, Enrique; Shoseyov, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Berkman, Neville; Fibbe, Willem E; Hagin, David; Hillel-Karniel, Carmit; Krentsis, Irit Milman; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2015-08-01

    Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche. PMID:26168294

  4. Obesity genetics in mouse and human: back and forth, and back again

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Fereshteh T.; Clee, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern. This condition results from a constant and complex interplay between predisposing genes and environmental stimuli. Current attempts to manage obesity have been moderately effective and a better understanding of the etiology of obesity is required for the development of more successful and personalized prevention and treatment options. To that effect, mouse models have been an essential tool in expanding our understanding of obesity, due to the availability of their complete genome sequence, genetically identified and defined strains, various tools for genetic manipulation and the accessibility of target tissues for obesity that are not easily attainable from humans. Our knowledge of monogenic obesity in humans greatly benefited from the mouse obesity genetics field. Genes underlying highly penetrant forms of monogenic obesity are part of the leptin-melanocortin pathway in the hypothalamus. Recently, hypothesis-generating genome-wide association studies for polygenic obesity traits in humans have led to the identification of 119 common gene variants with modest effect, most of them having an unknown function. These discoveries have led to novel animal models and have illuminated new biologic pathways. Integrated mouse-human genetic approaches have firmly established new obesity candidate genes. Innovative strategies recently developed by scientists are described in this review to accelerate the identification of causal genes and deepen our understanding of obesity etiology. An exhaustive dissection of the molecular roots of obesity may ultimately help to tackle the growing obesity epidemic worldwide. PMID:25825681

  5. Shared and unique proteins in human, mouse and rat saliva proteomes: Footprints of functional adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Robert C.; Chung, Amanda G.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of our study was to compare the proteins found in the saliva proteomes of three mammals: human, mouse and rat. Our first objective was to compare two human proteomes with very different analysis depths. The 89 shared proteins in this comparison apparently represent a core of highly-expressed human salivary proteins. Of the proteins unique to each proteome, one-half to 2/3 lack signal peptides and probably are contaminants instead of less highly-represented salivary proteins. We recently published the first rodent saliva proteomes with salivas collected from the genome mouse (C57BL/6) and the genome rat (BN/SsNHsd/Mcwi). Our second objective was to compare the proteins in the human proteome with those we identified in the genome mouse and rat to determine those common to all three mammals as well as the specialized rodent subset. We also identified proteins unique to each of the three mammals because differences in the secreted protein constitutions can provide clues to differences in the evolutionary adaptation of the secretions in the three different mammals. PMID:24926433

  6. Enhancer Turnover Is Associated with a Divergent Transcriptional Response to Glucocorticoid in Mouse and Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jubb, Alasdair W; Young, Robert S; Hume, David A; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-01-15

    Phenotypic differences between individuals and species are controlled in part through differences in expression of a relatively conserved set of genes. Genes expressed in the immune system are subject to especially powerful selection. We have investigated the evolution of both gene expression and candidate enhancers in human and mouse macrophages exposed to glucocorticoid (GC), a regulator of innate immunity and an important therapeutic agent. Our analyses revealed a very limited overlap in the repertoire of genes responsive to GC in human and mouse macrophages. Peaks of inducible binding of the GC receptor (GR) detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq correlated with induction, but not repression, of target genes in both species, occurred at distal regulatory sites not promoters, and were strongly enriched for the consensus GR-binding motif. Turnover of GR binding between mice and humans was associated with gain and loss of the motif. There was no detectable signal of positive selection at species-specific GR binding sites, but clear evidence of purifying selection at the small number of conserved sites. We conclude that enhancer divergence underlies the difference in transcriptional activation after GC treatment between mouse and human macrophages. Only the shared inducible loci show evidence of selection, and therefore these loci may be important for the subset of responses to GC that is shared between species. PMID:26663721

  7. Novel human and mouse homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J P; Rapić-Otrin, V; Epstein, J A; Broughton, B C; Wang, X; Lehmann, A R; Wolgemuth, D J; Woodgate, R

    1999-08-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD30 gene encodes a novel eukaryotic DNA polymerase, pol eta that is able to replicate across cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers both accurately and efficiently. Very recently, a human homolog of RAD30 was identified, mutations in which result in the sunlight-sensitive, cancer-prone, Xeroderma pigmentosum variant group phenotype. We report here the cloning and localization of a second human homolog of RAD30. Interestingly, RAD30B is localized on chromosome 18q21.1 in a region that is often implicated in the etiology of many human cancers. The mouse homolog (Rad30b) is located on chromosome 18E2. The human RAD30B and mouse Rad30b mRNA transcripts, like many repair proteins, are highly expressed in the testis. In situ hybridization analysis indicates that expression of mouse Rad30b occurs predominantly in postmeiotic round spermatids. Database searches revealed genomic and EST sequences from other eukaryotes such as Aspergillus nidulans, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Brugia malayi, Caenorhabditis elegans, Trypanosoma cruzi, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Drosophila melanogaster that also encode putative homologs of RAD30, thereby suggesting that Rad30-dependent translesion DNA synthesis is conserved within the eukaryotic kingdom. PMID:10458907

  8. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martnez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  9. The fibulin-1 gene (FBLN1) is located on human chromosome 22 and on mouse chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, M.G.; Pan, T.C.; Zhang, R.Z.

    1994-07-15

    Fibulin-1 is a calcium-binding glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in the serum. The gene coding for fibulin-1 (FBLN1) was located by in situ hybridization of {sup 3}H-labeled cDNA probes to human and mouse metaphase chromosomes. The gene was assigned to the q13.2-q13.3 region of human chromosome 22 and to the E-F band of mouse chromosome 15. The finding extends the evolutionary conservation between human chromosome 22 and mouse chromosome 15. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  10. The Ah receptor nuclear translocator gene (ARNT) is located on q21 of human chromosome 1 and on mouse chromosome 3 near Cf-3

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.; Brooks, B.A.; Heinzmann, C. ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors have mapped the Ah (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) gene to a conserved linkage group located on mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1. EcoRi-digested DNA from a panel of 17 human x mouse somatic cell hybrids was probed with a cDNA fragment of the human ARNT gene. Six of the 17 independent mouse x human hybrids were positive for human bands. Human chromosome 1 showed complete cosegregation with the gene, whereas discordant segregation was observed for all other human chromosomes. The human gene was localized to 1q21 by using DNA from mouse x human hybrid clones that retain translocations involving human chromosome 1, by segregation analysis in nine informative CEPH families, and by in situ hybridization. The mouse homologue was mapped to mouse chromosome 3 using a panel of 16 hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids. Six of 16 mouse x hamster hybrids were positive for mouse bands, showing complete concordance with mouse chromosome 3. The mouse Arnt gene was regionally mapped on chromosome 3, using linkage analysis in an interspecific backcross. The results indicate that the mouse gene resides about 40 cM from the centromere and about 10 cM proximal to Cf-3, the gene for tissue factor. 41 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Neovascular Niche for Human Myeloma Cells in Immunodeficient Mouse Bone

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Yoshitaka; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Miyauchi, Yoshiteru; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Miyamoto, Kana; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Ikeda, Eiji; Kizaki, Masahiro; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Suda, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The interaction with bone marrow (BM) plays a crucial role in pathophysiological features of multiple myeloma (MM), including cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and bone lesion progression. To characterize the MM-BM interactions, we utilized an in vivo experimental model for human MM in which a GFP-expressing human MM cell line is transplanted into NOG mice (the NOG-hMM model). Transplanted MM cells preferentially engrafted at the metaphyseal region of the BM endosteum and formed a complex with osteoblasts and osteoclasts. A subpopulation of MM cells expressed VE-cadherin after transplantation and formed endothelial-like structures in the BM. CD138+ myeloma cells in the BM were reduced by p53-dependent apoptosis following administration of the nitrogen mustard derivative bendamustine to mice in the NOG-hMM model. Bendamustine maintained the osteoblast lining on the bone surface and protected extracellular matrix structures. Furthermore, bendamustine suppressed the growth of osteoclasts and mesenchymal cells in the NOG-hMM model. Since VE-cadherin+ MM cells were chemoresistant, hypoxic, and HIF-2α-positive compared to the VE-cadherin− population, VE-cadherin induction might depend on the oxygenation status. The NOG-hMM model described here is a useful system to analyze the dynamics of MM pathophysiology, interactions of MM cells with other cellular compartments, and the utility of novel anti-MM therapies. PMID:22347385

  12. Functional Integration of Human Neural Precursor Cells in Mouse Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fu-Wen; Fortin, Jeff M.; Chen, Huan-Xin; Martinez-Diaz, Hildabelis; Chang, Lung-Ji; Reynolds, Brent A.; Roper, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the electrophysiological properties and functional integration of different phenotypes of transplanted human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) in immunodeficient NSG mice. Postnatal day 2 mice received unilateral injections of 100,000 GFP+ hNPCs into the right parietal cortex. Eight weeks after transplantation, 1.21% of transplanted hNPCs survived. In these hNPCs, parvalbumin (PV)-, calretinin (CR)-, somatostatin (SS)-positive inhibitory interneurons and excitatory pyramidal neurons were confirmed electrophysiologically and histologically. All GFP+ hNPCs were immunoreactive with anti-human specific nuclear protein. The proportions of PV-, CR-, and SS-positive cells among GFP+ cells were 35.5%, 15.7%, and 17.1%, respectively; around 15% of GFP+ cells were identified as pyramidal neurons. Those electrophysiologically and histological identified GFP+ hNPCs were shown to fire action potentials with the appropriate firing patterns for different classes of neurons and to display spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs). The amplitude, frequency and kinetic properties of sEPSCs and sIPSCs in different types of hNPCs were comparable to host cells of the same type. In conclusion, GFP+ hNPCs produce neurons that are competent to integrate functionally into host neocortical neuronal networks. This provides promising data on the potential for hNPCs to serve as therapeutic agents in neurological diseases with abnormal neuronal circuitry such as epilepsy. PMID:25763840

  13. Pyramidal neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells integrate efficiently into mouse brain circuits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Espuny-Camacho, Ira; Michelsen, Kimmo A; Gall, David; Linaro, Daniele; Hasche, Anja; Bonnefont, Jérôme; Bali, Camilia; Orduz, David; Bilheu, Angéline; Herpoel, Adèle; Lambert, Nelle; Gaspard, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Schiffmann, Serge N; Giugliano, Michele; Gaillard, Afsaneh; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The study of human cortical development has major implications for brain evolution and diseases but has remained elusive due to paucity of experimental models. Here we found that human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), cultured without added morphogens, recapitulate corticogenesis leading to the sequential generation of functional pyramidal neurons of all six layer identities. After transplantation into mouse neonatal brain, human ESC-derived cortical neurons integrated robustly and established specific axonal projections and dendritic patterns corresponding to native cortical neurons. The differentiation and connectivity of the transplanted human cortical neurons complexified progressively over several months in vivo, culminating in the establishment of functional synapses with the host circuitry. Our data demonstrate that human cortical neurons generated in vitro from ESC/iPSC can develop complex hodological properties characteristic of the cerebral cortex in vivo, thereby offering unprecedented opportunities for the modeling of human cortex diseases and brain repair. PMID:23395372

  14. Metabolism of the anti-tuberculosis drug ethionamide by mouse and human FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3 and mouse and human lung microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Morre, Jeffrey T.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2008-12-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) results from infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and remains endemic throughout the world with one-third of the world's population infected. The prevalence of multi-drug resistant strains necessitates the use of more toxic second-line drugs such as ethionamide (ETA), a pro-drug requiring bioactivation to exert toxicity. M. tuberculosis possesses a flavin monooxygenase (EtaA) that oxygenates ETA first to the sulfoxide and then to 2-ethyl-4-amidopyridine, presumably through a second oxygenation involving sulfinic acid. ETA is also a substrate for mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). We examined activity of expressed human and mouse FMOs toward ETA, as well as liver and lung microsomes. All FMOs converted ETA to the S-oxide (ETASO), the first step in bioactivation. Compared to M. tuberculosis, the second S-oxygenation to the sulfinic acid is slow. Mouse liver and lung microsomes, as well as human lung microsomes from an individual expressing active FMO, oxygenated ETA in the same manner as expressed FMOs, confirming this reaction functions in the major target organs for therapeutics (lung) and toxicity (liver). Inhibition by thiourea, and lack of inhibition by SKF-525A, confirm ETASO formation is primarily via FMO, particularly in lung. ETASO production was attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by glutathione. FMO3 in human liver may contribute to the toxicity and/or affect efficacy of ETA administration. Additionally, there may be therapeutic implications of efficacy and toxicity in human lung based on the FMO2 genetic polymorphism, though further studies are needed to confirm that suggestion.

  15. In Vivo Ultra-Fast Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry of Circulating Human Melanoma Cells Using Near-Ingrared High-Pulse Rate Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Ye, John; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear to be a marker of metastasis development, especially, for highly aggressive and epidemically growing melanoma malignancy that is often metastatic at early stages. Recently, we introduced in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for label-free detection of mouse B16F10 CTCs in melanoma-bearing mice using melanin as an intrinsic marker. Here, we significantly improve the speed of PAFC by using a high pulse repetition rate laser operating at 820 and 1064 nm wavelengths. This platform was used in preclinical studies for label-free PA detection of low pigmented human CTCs. Demonstrated label-free PAFC detection, low level of background signals, and favorable safety standards for near infrared irradiation suggest that a fiber laser operating at 1064 nm at pulse repetition rates up to 0.5 MHz could be a promising source for portable clinical PAFC devices. The possible applications can include early diagnosis of melanoma at the parallel progression of primary tumor and CTCs, detection of cancer recurrence, residual disease, and real-time monitoring of therapy efficiency by counting CTCs before, during and after therapeutic intervention. Herewith, we also address sensitivity of label-free PAFC melanoma CTCs detection and introduce in vivo CTCs targeting by magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with specific antibody and magnetic cells enrichment. PMID:21786417

  16. Generation of L-cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina; Farin, Henner F.; Ringnalda, Femke C.; Vries, Robert G. J.; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; Gribble, Fiona M.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L-cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate functional L-cells from 3D cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) selectively increase the number of L-cells resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by up-regulation of transcription factors, associated with the endocrine lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L-cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24130334

  17. A 6000 kb segment of chromosome 1 is conserved in human and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Kingsmore, S F; Watson, M L; Howard, T A; Seldin, M F

    1989-01-01

    A murine linkage map generated from analyses of 428 meiotic events in an interspecific cross and pulsed field gel electrophoresis allowed examination of the genomic organization of a 6000 kb segment of mouse and human chromosome 1. Analysis of five genes within this syntenic segment of both species revealed striking conservation of gene order, intergenic distance and, to a lesser extent, CpG dinucleotides. In the mouse, meiotic crossover events were not evenly distributed; a hot spot for meiotic recombination was coincident with a CpG-island. These studies provide a practical approach to aid physical mapping of the human genome and a model for determining the molecular principles that govern meiotic recombination. In addition, these findings demonstrate profound conservation of genomic organization over mammalian evolution. Images PMID:2591369

  18. Genome Integrity in Aging: Human Syndromes, Mouse Models, and Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Human syndromes and mouse mutants that exhibit accelerated but bona fide aging in multiple organs and tissues have been invaluable for the identification of nine denominators of aging: telomere attrition, genome instability, epigenetic alterations, mitochondrial dysfunction, deregulated nutrient sensing, altered intercellular communication, loss of proteostasis, cellular senescence and adult stem cell exhaustion. However, whether and how these instigators of aging interrelate or whether they have one root cause is currently largely unknown. Rare human progeroid syndromes and corresponding mouse mutants with resolved genetic defects highlight the dominant importance of genome maintenance for aging. A second class of aging-related disorders reveals a cross connection with metabolism. As genome maintenance and metabolism are closely interconnected, they may constitute the main underlying biology of aging. This review focuses on the role of genome stability in aging, its crosstalk with metabolism, and options for nutritional and/or pharmaceutical interventions that delay age-related pathology. PMID:26514200

  19. Yeast artificial chromosome libraries containing large inserts from mouse and human DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, Z.; Monaco, A.P.; Lehrach, H. )

    1991-05-15

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries have been difficult to construct with average insert sizes >400 kilobase pairs when DNA is size-fractionated in low-melting-point agarose. By using yeast chromosomes in mock cloning experiments, the authors found that polyamines should be present whenever agarose containing high molecular weight DNA is melted to protect DNA from degradation. By incorporating polyamines during the cloning procedure, they constructed YAC libraries from mouse and human DNA with average insert sizes of 700 and 620 kilobase pairs, respectively. Several genome equivalents of these YAC libraries were replicated onto the surface of many duplicate agar plates using a 40,000 multipin transfer device. High-density filter replicas were screened by hybridization, and 70 mouse YAC clones from 31 loci and 132 human YAC clones from 49 loci were isolated.

  20. Visualization of plasmid delivery to keratinocytes in mouse and human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    González-González, Emilio; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Speaker, Tycho J.; Hickerson, Robyn P.; Spitler, Ryan; Birchall, James C.; Lara, Maria Fernanda; Hu, Rong-hua; Liang, Yanhua; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Milstone, Leonard M.; Contag, Christopher H.; Kaspar, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    The accessibility of skin makes it an ideal target organ for nucleic acid-based therapeutics; however, effective patient-friendly delivery remains a major obstacle to clinical utility. A variety of limited and inefficient methods of delivering nucleic acids to keratinocytes have been demonstrated; further advances will require well-characterized reagents, rapid noninvasive assays of delivery, and well-developed skin model systems. Using intravital fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging and a standard set of reporter plasmids we demonstrate transfection of cells in mouse and human xenograft skin using intradermal injection and two microneedle array delivery systems. Reporter gene expression could be detected in individual keratinocytes, in real-time, in both mouse skin as well as human skin xenografts. These studies revealed that non-invasive intravital imaging can be used as a guide for developing gene delivery tools, establishing a benchmark for comparative testing of nucleic acid skin delivery technologies. PMID:22355673

  1. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Michael J.; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an impact to the cranium of an unrestrained subject allowing rapid acceleration of the free-moving head and torso, an essential characteristic known to be important for concussive injury in humans, and a factor that is missing from existing animal models of TBI. Our method does not require scalp incision, emplacement of protective skull helmets or surgery and the procedure can be completed in 1-2 minutes. Mice spontaneously recover the righting reflex and show no evidence of seizures, paralysis or impaired behavior. Skull fractures and intracranial bleeding are very rare. Minor deficits in motor coordination and locomotor hyperactivity recover over time. Histological analyses reveal mild astrocytic reactivity (increased expression of GFAP) and increased phospho-tau but a lack of blood-brain-barrier disruption, edema and microglial activation. This new animal model is simple and cost-effective and will facilitate characterization of the neurobiological and behavioral consequences of rmTBI. It is also ideal for high throughput screening of potential new therapies for mild concussive injuries as experienced by athletes and military personnel. PMID:21930157

  2. Effect of sodium salicylate on human and mouse granulopoiesis in vitro.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Gabourel JD; Moore MA; Bagby GC Jr; Davies GH

    1977-01-01

    Sodium salicylate inhibited generation of granulocyte and macrophage colonies when added to soft agar cultures of mouse or human bone marrow cells (CFUc) containing colony-stimulating factor (CSF). This effect was dose-dependent with over 90% inhibition at 48 mg%. The salicylate effect was not decreased with increasing concentrations of CSF, but inhibition was reversed when salicylate-treated CFUc were washed with drug-free medium before plating. CSF production was not inhibited by salicylate.

  3. Effect of sodium salicylate on human and mouse granulopoiesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gabourel, J D; Moore, M A; Bagby, G C; Davies, G H

    1977-01-01

    Sodium salicylate inhibited generation of granulocyte and macrophage colonies when added to soft agar cultures of mouse or human bone marrow cells (CFUc) containing colony-stimulating factor (CSF). This effect was dose-dependent with over 90% inhibition at 48 mg%. The salicylate effect was not decreased with increasing concentrations of CSF, but inhibition was reversed when salicylate-treated CFUc were washed with drug-free medium before plating. CSF production was not inhibited by salicylate. PMID:300023

  4. Inhibition of PAD4 activity is sufficient to disrupt mouse and human NET formation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Huw D.; Liddle, John; Coote, Jim E.; Atkinson, Stephen J.; Barker, Michael D.; Bax, Benjamin, D.; Bicker, Kevin L.; Bingham, Ryan P.; Campbell, Matthew; Chen, Yu Hua; Chung, Chun-wa; Craggs, Peter D.; Davis, Rob P.; Eberhard, Dirk; Joberty, Gerard; Lind, Kenneth E.; Locke, Kelly; Maller, Claire; Martinod, Kimberly; Patten, Chris; Polyakova, Oxana; Rise, Cecil E.; Rüdiger, Martin; Sheppard, Robert J.; Slade, Daniel J.; Thomas, Pamela; Thorpe, Jim; Yao, Gang; Drewes, Gerard; Wagner, Denisa D.; Thompson, Paul R.; Prinjha, Rab K.; Wilson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    PAD4 has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune, cardiovascular and oncological diseases, through clinical genetics and gene disruption in mice. Novel, selective PAD4 inhibitors binding to a calcium-deficient form of the PAD4 enzyme have, for the first time, validated the critical enzymatic role of human and mouse PAD4 in both histone citrullination and neutrophil extracellular trap formation. The therapeutic potential of PAD4 inhibitors can now be explored. PMID:25622091

  5. Mapping of myeloperoxidase epitopes recognized by MPO-ANCA using human-mouse MPO chimers.

    PubMed

    Erdbrügger, U; Hellmark, T; Bunch, D O; Alcorta, D A; Jennette, J C; Falk, R J; Nachman, P H

    2006-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is one of the major target antigens of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) found in patients with small-vessel vasculitis and pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis. To date, the target epitopes of MPO-ANCA remain poorly defined. Human MPO-ANCA do not typically bind mouse MPO. We utilized the differences between human and mouse MPO to identify the target regions of MPO-ANCA. We generated five chimeric MPO molecules in which we replaced different segments of the human or mouse molecules with their homologous counterpart from the other species. Of serum samples from 28 patients screened for this study, 43 samples from 14 patients with MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis were tested against recombinant human and mouse MPO and the panel of chimeric molecules. Sera from 64 and 71% of patients bound to the carboxy-terminus of the heavy chain, in the regions of amino acids 517-667 or 668-745, respectively. No patient serum bound the MPO light chain or the amino-terminus of the heavy chain. All sera bound to only one or two regions of MPO. Although the pattern of MPO-ANCA binding changed over time (4-27 months) in 6 of 10 patients with several serum samples, such changes were infrequent. Other target regions of MPO-ANCA may not have been detected due to conformational differences between the native and recombinant forms of MPO. MPO-ANCA do not target a single epitope, but rather a small number of regions of MPO, primarily in the carboxy-terminus of the heavy chain. PMID:16557221

  6. Joint mouse-human phenome-wide association to test gene function and disease risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xusheng; Pandey, Ashutosh K; Mulligan, Megan K; Williams, Evan G; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Li, Zhengsheng; Jovaisaite, Virginija; Quarles, L Darryl; Xiao, Zhousheng; Huang, Jinsong; Capra, John A; Chen, Zugen; Taylor, William L; Bastarache, Lisa; Niu, Xinnan; Pollard, Katherine S; Ciobanu, Daniel C; Reznik, Alexander O; Tishkov, Artem V; Zhulin, Igor B; Peng, Junmin; Nelson, Stanley F; Denny, Joshua C; Auwerx, Johan; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Phenome-wide association is a novel reverse genetic strategy to analyze genome-to-phenome relations in human clinical cohorts. Here we test this approach using a large murine population segregating for ∼5 million sequence variants, and we compare our results to those extracted from a matched analysis of gene variants in a large human cohort. For the mouse cohort, we amassed a deep and broad open-access phenome consisting of ∼4,500 metabolic, physiological, pharmacological and behavioural traits, and more than 90 independent expression quantitative trait locus (QTL), transcriptome, proteome, metagenome and metabolome data sets-by far the largest coherent phenome for any experimental cohort (www.genenetwork.org). We tested downstream effects of subsets of variants and discovered several novel associations, including a missense mutation in fumarate hydratase that controls variation in the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in both mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans, and missense mutations in Col6a5 that underlies variation in bone mineral density in both mouse and human. PMID:26833085

  7. Integrative genetic analysis of mouse and human AML identifies cooperating disease alleles.

    PubMed

    Hatlen, Megan A; Arora, Kanika; Vacic, Vladimir; Grabowska, Ewa A; Liao, Willey; Riley-Gillis, Bridget; Oschwald, Dayna M; Wang, Lan; Joergens, Jacob E; Shih, Alan H; Rapaport, Franck; Gu, Shengqing; Voza, Francesca; Asai, Takashi; Neel, Benjamin G; Kharas, Michael G; Gonen, Mithat; Levine, Ross L; Nimer, Stephen D

    2016-01-11

    t(8;21) is one of the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, expression of AML1-ETO is not sufficient to induce transformation in vivo. Consistent with this observation, patients with this translocation harbor additional genetic abnormalities, suggesting a requirement for cooperating mutations. To better define the genetic landscape in AML and distinguish driver from passenger mutations, we compared the mutational profiles of AML1-ETO-driven mouse models of leukemia with the mutational profiles of human AML patients. We identified TET2 and PTPN11 mutations in both mouse and human AML and then demonstrated the ability of Tet2 loss and PTPN11 D61Y to initiate leukemogenesis in concert with expression of AML1-ETO in vivo. This integrative genetic profiling approach allowed us to accurately predict cooperating events in t(8;21)(+) AML in a robust and unbiased manner, while also revealing functional convergence in mouse and human AML. PMID:26666262

  8. Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, David C.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes surface reconstructions and associated flat maps that represent the highly convoluted shape of cerebellar cortex in three species: human, macaque, and mouse. The reconstructions were based on high-resolution structural MRI data obtained from other laboratories. The surface areas determined for the fiducial reconstructions are about 600 cm(2) for the human, 60 cm(2) for the macaque, and 0.8 cm(2) for the mouse. As expected from the ribbon-like pattern of cerebellar folding, the cerebellar flat maps are elongated along the axis parallel to the midline. However, the degree of elongation varies markedly across species. The macaque flat map is many times longer than its mean width, whereas the mouse flat map is only slightly elongated and the human map is intermediate in its aspect ratio. These cerebellar atlases, along with associated software for visualization and for mapping experimental data onto the atlas, are freely available to the neuroscience community (see http:/brainmap.wustl.edu).

  9. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human

    PubMed Central

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Hartley, Catherine A.; Johnson, David C.; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C.; Ra, Stephen; Gray, Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Glatt, Charles E.; Hill, Matthew N.; Casey, B. J.; Lee, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry, and behavior. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest a gain-of-function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  10. Organization, evolution and functions of the human and mouse Ly6/uPAR family genes.

    PubMed

    Loughner, Chelsea L; Bruford, Elspeth A; McAndrews, Monica S; Delp, Emili E; Swamynathan, Sudha; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K

    2016-01-01

    Members of the lymphocyte antigen-6 (Ly6)/urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) superfamily of proteins are cysteine-rich proteins characterized by a distinct disulfide bridge pattern that creates the three-finger Ly6/uPAR (LU) domain. Although the Ly6/uPAR family proteins share a common structure, their expression patterns and functions vary. To date, 35 human and 61 mouse Ly6/uPAR family members have been identified. Based on their subcellular localization, these proteins are further classified as GPI-anchored on the cell membrane, or secreted. The genes encoding Ly6/uPAR family proteins are conserved across different species and are clustered in syntenic regions on human chromosomes 8, 19, 6 and 11, and mouse Chromosomes 15, 7, 17, and 9, respectively. Here, we review the human and mouse Ly6/uPAR family gene and protein structure and genomic organization, expression, functions, and evolution, and introduce new names for novel family members. PMID:27098205

  11. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T; Hartley, Catherine A; Johnson, David C; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C; Ra, Stephen; Gray, J Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Glatt, Charles E; Hill, Matthew N; Casey, B J; Lee, Francis S

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry and behaviour. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviours. These results suggest a gain of function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  12. DRD4 genotype predicts longevity in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Grady, Deborah L; Thanos, Panayotis K; Corrada, Maria M; Barnett, Jeffrey C; Ciobanu, Valentina; Shustarovich, Diana; Napoli, Anthony; Moyzis, Alexandra G; Grandy, David; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kawas, Claudia H; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Wang, Eric; Volkow, Nora D; Moyzis, Robert K

    2013-01-01

    Longevity is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The brain's dopamine system may be particularly relevant, since it modulates traits (e.g., sensitivity to reward, incentive motivation, sustained effort) that impact behavioral responses to the environment. In particular, the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) has been shown to moderate the impact of environments on behavior and health. We tested the hypothesis that the DRD4 gene influences longevity and that its impact is mediated through environmental effects. Surviving participants of a 30-year-old population-based health survey (N = 310; age range, 90-109 years; the 90+ Study) were genotyped/resequenced at the DRD4 gene and compared with a European ancestry-matched younger population (N = 2902; age range, 7-45 years). We found that the oldest-old population had a 66% increase in individuals carrying the DRD4 7R allele relative to the younger sample (p = 3.5 × 10(-9)), and that this genotype was strongly correlated with increased levels of physical activity. Consistent with these results, DRD4 knock-out mice, when compared with wild-type and heterozygous mice, displayed a 7-9.7% decrease in lifespan, reduced spontaneous locomotor activity, and no lifespan increase when reared in an enriched environment. These results support the hypothesis that DRD4 gene variants contribute to longevity in humans and in mice, and suggest that this effect is mediated by shaping behavioral responses to the environment. PMID:23283341

  13. Analysis of Human Innate Immune Responses to PRINT Fabricated Nanoparticles with Cross Validation Using a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, GR; Roberts, RA; Guo, H; Reuter, K; Shen, T; Sempowski, GD; McKinnon, Karen P.; Su, L; DeSimone, JM; Ting, JP

    2015-01-01

    Ideal nanoparticle (NP)-based drug and vaccine delivery vectors should be free of inherent cytotoxic or immunostimulatory properties. Therefore, determining baseline immune responses to nanomaterials is of utmost importance when designing human therapeutics. We characterized the response of human immune cells to hydrogel NPs fabricated using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) technology. We found preferential NP uptake by primary CD14+ monocytes, which was significantly reduced upon PEGylation of the NP surface. Multiplex cytokine analysis of NP treated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMC) suggests that PRINT based hydrogel NPs do not evoke significant inflammatory responses nor do they induce cytotoxicity or complement activation. We furthered these studies using an in vivo humanized mouse model and similarly found preferential NP uptake by human CD14+ monocytes without systemic inflammatory cytokine responses. These studies suggest that PRINT hydrogel particles form a desirable platform for vaccine and drug delivery as they neither induce inflammation nor toxicity. PMID:25596079

  14. Mouse model recapitulating human Fcγ receptor structural and functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Patrick; DiLillo, David J.; Bournazos, Stylianos; Li, Fubin; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2012-01-01

    The in vivo biological activities of IgG antibodies result from their bifunctional nature, in which antigen recognition by the Fab is coupled to the effector and immunomodulatory diversity found in the Fc domain. This diversity, resulting from both amino acid and glycan heterogeneity, is translated into cellular responses through Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), a structurally and functionally diverse family of cell surface receptors found throughout the immune system. Although many of the overall features of this system are maintained throughout mammalian evolution, species diversity has precluded direct analysis of human antibodies in animal species, and, thus, detailed investigations into the unique features of the human IgG antibodies and their FcγRs have been limited. We now report the development of a mouse model in which all murine FcγRs have been deleted and human FcγRs, encoded as transgenes, have been inserted into the mouse genome resulting in recapitulation of the unique profile of human FcγR expression. These human FcγRs are shown to function to mediate the immunomodulatory, inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities of human IgG antibodies and Fc engineered variants and provide a platform for the detailed mechanistic analysis of therapeutic and pathogenic IgG antibodies. PMID:22474370

  15. Activated Notch counteracts Ikaros tumor suppression in mouse and human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, MT; Cimmino, L; Hu, Y; Trimarchi, T; Tagoh, H; McKenzie, MD; Best, SA; Tuohey, L; Willson, TA; Nutt, SL; Busslinger, M; Aifantis, I; Smyth, GK; Dickins, RA

    2016-01-01

    Activating NOTCH1 mutations occur in ~ 60% of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs), and mutations disrupting the transcription factor IKZF1 (IKAROS) occur in ~5% of cases. To investigate the regulatory interplay between these driver genes, we have used a novel transgenic RNA interference mouse model to produce primary T-ALLs driven by reversible Ikaros knockdown. Restoring endogenous Ikaros expression in established T-ALL in vivo acutely represses Notch1 and its oncogenic target genes including Myc, and in multiple primary leukemias causes disease regression. In contrast, leukemias expressing high levels of endogenous or engineered forms of activated intracellular Notch1 (ICN1) resembling those found in human T-ALL rapidly relapse following Ikaros restoration, indicating that ICN1 functionally antagonizes Ikaros in established disease. Furthermore, we find that IKAROS mRNA expression is significantly reduced in a cohort of primary human T-ALL patient samples with activating NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations, but is upregulated upon acute inhibition of aberrant NOTCH signaling across a panel of human T-ALL cell lines. These results demonstrate for the first time that aberrant NOTCH activity compromises IKAROS function in mouse and human T-ALL, and provide a potential explanation for the relative infrequency of IKAROS gene mutations in human T-ALL. PMID:25655195

  16. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  17. Host genetics of severe influenza: from mouse Mx1 to human IRF7.

    PubMed

    Ciancanelli, Michael J; Abel, Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Influenza viruses cause mild to moderate respiratory illness in most people, and only rarely devastating or fatal infections. The virulence factors encoded by viral genes can explain seasonal or geographic differences at the population level but are unlikely to account for inter-individual clinical variability. Inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies may thus underlie severe cases of influenza. The crucial role of host genes was first demonstrated by forward genetics in inbred mice, with the identification of interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible Mx1 as a canonical influenza susceptibility gene. Reverse genetics has subsequently characterized the in vivo role of other mouse genes involved in IFN-α/β and -λ immunity. A series of in vitro studies with mouse and human cells have also refined the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of protection against influenza viruses. Population-based human genetic studies have not yet uncovered variants with a significant impact. Interestingly, human primary immunodeficiencies affecting T and B cells were also not found to predispose to severe influenza. Recently however, human IRF7 was shown to be essential for IFN-α/β- and IFN-λ-dependent protective immunity against primary influenza in vivo, as inferred from a patient with life-threatening influenza revealed to be IRF7-deficient by whole exome sequencing. Next generation sequencing of human exomes and genomes will facilitate the analysis of the human genetic determinism of severe influenza. PMID:26761402

  18. Allergic Contact Dermatitis: A Model of Inflammatory Itch and Pain in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    LaMotte, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of published observations from our laboratory on the psychophysics and neurobiology of the persistent itch and pain of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). ACD is a clinically significant problem with many features characteristic of other pruritic disorders. Our approach was to produce ACD experimentally in humans and in the mouse. The goal was to use the mouse as an animal model for investigating the peripheral neural mechanisms of itch and pain of ACD in humans. Humans and mice were each sensitized by cutaneous topical application of squaric acid dibutyl ester, a hapten not encountered in the environment. Subsequent challenge at another cutaneous site produced local inflammation ("ACD") with humans reporting persistent itch (lasting up to a week) and mice exhibiting persistent itch- and pain-like behaviors directed toward the ACD site. Enhanced mechanically evoked itch and pain in surrounding skin in humans were reversibly blocked by numbing the ACD site with cold, suggesting dependence on ongoing activity from the site. In mice, in vivo recordings revealed spontaneous activity in a subset of pruriceptive, mechanoheat-sensitive nociceptors with unmyelinated axons innervating the ACD site. These and a larger subpopulation of acutely dissociated small-diameter neurons innervating the ACD site exhibited an upregulation of the receptor CXCR3 and excitatory responses to one of its ligands, the chemokine CXCL10 (IP-10) that contributes to the pathogenesis of ACD. Preliminary findings point to possible therapeutic targets that could be investigated in inflammatory itch disorders in humans. PMID:26900060

  19. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach using drugs that have been approved for PD: 10 approved PD drugs were ranked within top 10% among 1197 candidates. In predicting novel PD drugs, our approach achieved a mean average precision of 0.24, which is significantly higher (pmouse phenotype data. Comparison of gene expression profiles between PD and top-ranked drug candidates indicates that quetiapine has the potential to treat PD. PMID:26958284

  20. Secretion of Human Protein C in Mouse Milk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chae-Won; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2015-01-01

    To determine the production of recombinant human protein C (rec-hPC) in milk, we created two homozygous mice lines for the goat β-casein/hPC transgene. Females and males of both lines (#10 and #11) displayed normal growth, fertility, and lactated normally. The copy number of the transgene was about fivefold higher in #10 line as compared to #11 line. mRNA expression of the transgene was only detected in the mammary glands of both lines. Furthermore, mRNA expression was fourfold higher on day 7 than on day 1 during lactation. Northern blot analysis of mRNA expression in the #10 line of transgenic (Tg) mice indicated a strong expression of the transgene in the mammary glands after seven days of lactation. Comparison of rec-hPC protein level with that of mRNA in the mammary glands showed a very similar pattern. A 52-kDa band corresponding to the hPC protein was strongly detected in mammary glands of the #10 line during lactation. We also detected two bands of heavy chain and one weak band of light chain in the milk of the #10 and #11 lines. One single band at 52 kDa was detected from CHO cells transfected with hPC cDNA. hPC was mainly localized in the alveolar epithelial cell of the mammary glands. The protein is strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of the cultured mammary gland tissue. hPC protein produced in milk ranged from 2 to 28 ng/mL. These experiments indicated that rec-hPC can be produced at high levels in mice mammary glands. PMID:25749471

  1. Translational Analysis of Mouse and Human Placental Protein and mRNA Reveals Distinct Molecular Pathologies in Human Preeclampsia*

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian; Sharma, Parveen; Evangelou, Andreas I.; Whiteley, Kathie; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Ignatchenko, Alex; Baczyk, Dora; Czikk, Marie; Kingdom, John; Rossant, Janet; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Adamson, S. Lee; Kislinger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) adversely impacts ?5% of pregnancies. Despite extensive research, no consistent biomarkers or cures have emerged, suggesting that different molecular mechanisms may cause clinically similar disease. To address this, we undertook a proteomics study with three main goals: (1) to identify a panel of cell surface markers that distinguish the trophoblast and endothelial cells of the placenta in the mouse; (2) to translate this marker set to human via the Human Protein Atlas database; and (3) to utilize the validated human trophoblast markers to identify subgroups of human preeclampsia. To achieve these goals, plasma membrane proteins at the blood tissue interfaces were extracted from placentas using intravascular silica-bead perfusion, and then identified using shotgun proteomics. We identified 1181 plasma membrane proteins, of which 171 were enriched at the maternal blood-trophoblast interface and 192 at the fetal endothelial interface with a 70% conservation of expression in humans. Three distinct molecular subgroups of human preeclampsia were identified in existing human microarray data by using expression patterns of trophoblast-enriched proteins. Analysis of all misexpressed genes revealed divergent dysfunctions including angiogenesis (subgroup 1), MAPK signaling (subgroup 2), and hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (subgroup 3). Subgroup 2 lacked expected changes in known preeclampsia markers (sFLT1, sENG) and uniquely overexpressed GNA12. In an independent set of 40 banked placental specimens, GNA12 was overexpressed during preeclampsia when co-incident with chronic hypertension. In the current study we used a novel translational analysis to integrate mouse and human trophoblast protein expression with human microarray data. This strategy identified distinct molecular pathologies in human preeclampsia. We conclude that clinically similar preeclampsia patients exhibit divergent placental gene expression profiles thus implicating divergent molecular mechanisms in the origins of this disease. PMID:21986993

  2. Physiology of SLC12 transporters: lessons from inherited human genetic mutations and genetically engineered mouse knockouts

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Among the over 300 members of the solute carrier (SLC) group of integral plasma membrane transport proteins are the nine electroneutral cation-chloride cotransporters belonging to the SLC12 gene family. Seven of these transporters have been functionally described as coupling the electrically silent movement of chloride with sodium and/or potassium. Although in silico analysis has identified two additional SLC12 family members, no physiological role has been ascribed to the proteins encoded by either the SLC12A8 or the SLC12A9 genes. Evolutionary conservation of this gene family from protists to humans confirms their importance. A wealth of physiological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical studies have revealed a great deal of information regarding the importance of this gene family to human health and disease. The sequencing of the human genome has provided investigators with the capability to link several human diseases with mutations in the genes encoding these plasma membrane proteins. The availability of bacterial artificial chromosomes, recombination engineering techniques, and the mouse genome sequence has simplified the creation of targeting constructs to manipulate the expression/function of these cation-chloride cotransporters in the mouse in an attempt to recapitulate some of these human pathologies. This review will summarize the three human disorders that have been linked to the mutation/dysfunction of the Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl, and K-Cl cotransporters (i.e., Bartter's, Gitleman's, and Andermann's syndromes), examine some additional pathologies arising from genetically modified mouse models of these cotransporters including deafness, blood pressure, hyperexcitability, and epithelial transport deficit phenotypes. PMID:23325410

  3. Expression of human and mouse adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) isoform genes in adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gavaldà-Navarro, Aleix; Domingo, Pere; Viñas, Octavi; Mampel, Teresa

    2015-07-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) are mitochondrial proteins encoded by nuclear DNA that catalyze the exchange of ATP generated in the mitochondria for ADP produced in cytosol. There are four ANT isoforms in humans (hANT1-4) and three in mice (mANT1, mANT2 and mANT4), all encoded by distinct genes. The aim of this study was to quantify expression of ANT isoform genes during the adipogenesis of mouse 3T3-L1 and human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS)-derived preadipocytes. We also studied the effects of the adipogenesis regulators, insulin and rosiglitazone, on ANT isoform expression in differentiated adipocytes and examined the expression of ANT isoforms in subcutaneous and visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) from mice and humans. We found that adipogenesis was associated with an increase in the expression of ANT isoforms, specifically mANT2 in mouse 3T3-L1 cells and hANT3 in human SGBS cells. These changes could be involved in the increases in oxidative metabolism and decreases in lactate production observed during differentiation. Insulin and rosiglitazone induced mANT2 gene expression in mature 3T3-L1 cells and hANT2 and hANT3 gene expression in SGBS adipocytes. Furthermore, human WAT expressed greater amounts of hANT3 than hANT2, and the expression of both of these isoforms was greater in subcutaneous WAT than in visceral WAT. Finally, inhibition of ANT activity by atractyloside or bongkrekic acid impaired proper adipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that changes in the expression of ANT isoforms may be involved in adipogenesis in both human and mouse WAT. PMID:25817039

  4. Specificity of the ecto-ATPase inhibitor ARL 67156 on human and mouse ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, S A; Lavoie, É G; Lecka, J; Bigonnesse, F; Sévigny, J

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: ARL 67156, 6-N,N-Diethyl-D-β-γ-dibromomethylene adenosine triphosphate, originally named FPL 67156, is the only commercially available inhibitor of ecto-ATPases. Since the first report on this molecule, various ectonucleotidases responsible for the hydrolysis of ATP at the cell surface have been cloned and characterized. In this work, we identified the ectonucleotidases inhibited by ARL 67156. Experimental approach: The effect of ARL 67156 on recombinant NTPDase1, 2, 3 & 8 (mouse and human), NPP1, NPP3 and ecto-5′-nucleotidase (human) have been evaluated. The inhibition of the activity of NTPDases (using the following substrates: ATP, ADP, UTP), NPPs (pnp-TMP, Ap3A) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase (AMP) was measured by colorimetric or HPLC assays. Key results: ARL 67156 was a weak competitive inhibitor of human NTPDase1, NTPDase3 and NPP1 with Ki of 11±3, 18±4 and 12±3 μM, respectively. At concentrations used in the literature (50–100 μM), ARL 67156 partially but significantly inhibited the mouse and human forms of these enzymes. NTPDase2, NTPDase8, NPP3 and ecto-5′-nucleotidase activities were less affected. Importantly, ARL 67156 was not hydrolysed by either human NTPDase1, 2, 3, 8, NPP1 or NPP3. Conclusions and implications: In cell environments where NTPDase1, NTPDase3, NPP1 or mouse NTPDase8 are present, ARL 67156 would prolong the effect of endogenously released ATP on P2 receptors. However, it does not block any ectonucleotidases efficiently when high concentrations of substrates are present, such as in biochemical, pharmacological or P2X7 assays. In addition, ARL 67156 is not an effective inhibitor of NTPDase2, human NTPDase8, NPP3 and ecto-5′-nucleotidase. PMID:17603550

  5. Mouse mammary tumor virus uses mouse but not human transferrin receptor 1 to reach a low pH compartment and infect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Enxiu; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ying Qihua; Davey, Robert A.; Ross, Susan R.

    2008-11-25

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a pH-dependent virus that uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry into cells. Previous studies demonstrated that MMTV could induce pH 5-dependent fusion-from-with of mouse cells. Here we show that the MMTV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion requires both the entry receptor and low pH (pH 5). Although expression of the MMTV envelope and TfR1 was sufficient to mediate low pH-dependent syncytia formation, virus infection required trafficking to a low pH compartment; infection was independent of cathepsin-mediated proteolysis. Human TfR1 did not support virus infection, although envelope-mediated syncytia formation occurred with human cells after pH 5 treatment and this fusion depended on TfR1 expression. However, although the MMTV envelope bound human TfR1, virus was only internalized and trafficked to a low pH compartment in cells expressing mouse TfR1. Thus, while human TfR1 supported cell-cell fusion, because it was not internalized when bound to MMTV, it did not function as an entry receptor. Our data suggest that MMTV uses TfR1 for all steps of entry: cell attachment, induction of the conformational changes in Env required for membrane fusion and internalization to an appropriate acidic compartment.

  6. Synchrony in human, mouse and bacterial cell cultures--a comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen; Romero, Ana; Eward, K. Leigh

    2003-01-01

    Growth characteristics of synchronous human MOLT-4, human U-937 and mouse L1210 cultures produced with a new minimally-disturbing technology were compared to each other and to synchronous Escherichia coli B/r. Based on measurements of cell concentrations during synchronous growth, synchrony persisted in similar fashion for all cells. Cell size and DNA distributions in the mammalian cultures also progressed synchronously and reproducibly for multiple cell cycles. The results demonstrate that unambiguous multi-cycle synchrony, critical for verifying the absence of significant growth imbalances induced by the synchronization procedure, is feasible with these cell lines, and possibly others.

  7. Allele-specific imbalance mapping at human orthologs of mouse susceptibility to colon cancer (Scc) loci.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Madelyn M; Hampel, Heather; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; Schulz, Nathan P; Suhy, Adam; Deveci, Mehmet; Çatalyürek, Ümit V; Ewart Toland, Amanda

    2015-11-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) can be classified into different types. Chromosomal instable (CIN) colon cancers are thought to be the most common type of colon cancer. The risk of developing a CIN-related CRC is due in part to inherited risk factors. Genome-wide association studies have yielded over 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRC risk, but these only account for a subset of risk alleles. Some of this missing heritability may be due to gene-gene interactions. We developed a strategy to identify interacting candidate genes/loci for CRC risk that utilizes both linkage and RNA-seq data from mouse models in combination with allele-specific imbalance (ASI) studies in human tumors. We applied our strategy to three previously identified CRC susceptibility loci in the mouse that show evidence of genetic interaction: Scc4, Scc5 and Scc13. 525 SNPs from genes showing differential expression in the mouse and/or a previous role in cancer from the literature were evaluated for allele-specific imbalance in 194 paired human normal/tumor DNAs from CIN-related CRCs. One hundred three SNPs showing suggestive evidence of ASI (31 variants with uncorrected p values < 0.05) were genotyped in a validation set of 296 paired DNAs. Two variants in SNX10 (SCC13) showed significant evidence of allelic selection after multiple comparisons testing. Future studies will evaluate the role of these variants in combination with interacting genetic partners in colon cancer risk in mouse and humans. PMID:25973956

  8. Defining Human Pathways of Drug Metabolism In Vivo through the Development of a Multiple Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Nico; Kapelyukh, Yury; Rode, Anja; Oswald, Stefan; Busch, Diana; McLaughlin, Lesley A; Lin, De; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland

    2015-11-01

    Variability in drug pharmacokinetics is a major factor in defining drug efficacy and side effects. There remains an urgent need, particularly with the growing use of polypharmacy, to obtain more informative experimental data predicting clinical outcomes. Major species differences in multiplicity, substrate specificity, and regulation of enzymes from the cytochrome P450-dependent mono-oxygenase system play a critical role in drug metabolism. To develop an in vivo model for predicting human responses to drugs, we generated a mouse, where 31 P450 genes from the Cyp2c, Cyp2d, and Cyp3a gene families were exchanged for their relevant human counterparts. The model has been improved through additional humanization for the nuclear receptors constitutive androgen receptor and pregnane X receptor that control the expression of key drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. In this most complex humanized mouse model reported to date, the cytochromes P450 function as predicted and we illustrate how these mice can be applied to predict drug-drug interactions in humans. PMID:26265742

  9. Mapping of the NEP receptor tyrosine kinase gene to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Sweetser, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The mouse receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) NEP, also called Ptk-3, is widely expressed, with high levels in proliferating neuroepithelia of mouse embryos. The recently described human discoidin domain receptor (DDR) has a predicted amino acid sequence 93% identical to that of murine NEP and may be its human homologue. We have mapped the gene encoding NEP in human and mouse by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a mouse cDNA probe. The NEP/Nep gene maps to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C, respectively. This places the NEP/Nep gene at, or near, the major histocompatibility (MHC) locus-HLA in human and H2 in mouse, respectively. Based on its pattern of expression during development, NEP and Nep represent candidate genes for several MHC-linked developmental abnormalities in human and mouse. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Activation status of the Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) influences Vemurafenib availability in humanized mouse models

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, A. Kenneth; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Wolf, C. Roland

    2015-01-01

    Vemurafenib is a revolutionary treatment for melanoma, but the magnitude of therapeutic response is highly variable and the rapid acquisition of resistance is frequent. Here, we examined how vemurafenib disposition, particularly through cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation pathways, could potentially influence these outcomes using a panel of knockout and transgenic humanized mouse models. We identified CYP3A4 as the major enzyme involved in the metabolism of vemurafenib in in vitro assays with human liver microsomes. However, mice expressing human CYP3A4 did not process vemurafenib to a greater extent than CYP3A4 null animals, suggesting that other pregnane X receptor (PXR)-regulated pathways may contribute more significantly to vemurafenib metabolism in vivo. Activation of PXR, but not of the closely related constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), profoundly reduced circulating levels of vemurafenib in humanized mice. This effect was independent of CYP3A4 and was negated by co-treatment with the drug efflux transporter inhibitor, elacridar. Finally, vemurafenib strongly induced PXR activity in vitro, but only weakly induced PXR in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that vemurafenib is unlikely to exhibit a clinically significant interaction with CYP3A4, but that modulation of bioavailability through PXR-mediated regulation of drug transporters (for example by other drugs) has the potential to markedly influence systemic exposure and thereby therapeutic outcomes. Activation status of the Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) influences Vemurafenib availability in humanized mouse models. PMID:26363009

  11. A Simple Mouse Model for the Study of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Chang; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Chang; Park, Ki Hoon; Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Young Keol; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Sung Soon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-02-01

    Humanized mouse models derived from immune-deficient mice have been the primary tool for studies of human infectious viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the current protocol for constructing humanized mice requires elaborate procedures and complicated techniques, limiting the supply of such mice for viral studies. Here, we report a convenient method for constructing a simple HIV-1 mouse model. Without prior irradiation, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ-null (NSG) mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 × 10(7) adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMCs). Four weeks after PBMC inoculation, human CD45(+) cells, and CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were detected in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver, whereas human CD19(+) cells were observed in lymph nodes and spleen. To examine the usefulness of hu-PBMC-inoculated NSG (hu-PBMC-NSG) mice as an HIV-1 infection model, we intravenously injected these mice with dual-tropic HIV-1DH12 and X4-tropic HIV-1NL4-3 strains. HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice showed significantly lower human CD4(+) T cell counts and high HIV viral loads in the peripheral blood compared with noninfected hu-PBMC-NSG mice. Following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and neutralizing antibody treatment, HIV-1 replication was significantly suppressed in HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice without detectable viremia or CD4(+) T cell depletion. Moreover, the numbers of human T cells were maintained in hu-PBMC-NSG mice for at least 10 weeks. Taken together, our results suggest that hu-PBMC-NSG mice may serve as a relevant HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis model that could facilitate in vivo studies of HIV-1 infection and candidate HIV-1 protective drugs. PMID:26564392

  12. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  13. Topographies and isoforms of the progesterone receptor in female human, rat and mouse bladder.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Thomas; Rietjens, Roma; Voets, Thomas; Everaerts, Wouter; De Ridder, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Steroid hormones such as progesterone are known to influence bladder function. Progesterone effects are mediated by the progesterone receptor (PR) but no detailed studies of PR in bladder exist. We have investigated the presence, topography and subtypes of PR in mouse, rat and human bladder. Fresh tissue samples were obtained from cystectomies in female humans, rats and mice (n = 7 per group). Tissue samples were processed for immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF) and western blot (WB) and, for each species, a panel of specific PR antibody clones was used. Interpretation of IHC/IF was carried out by light/fluorescent microscopy and of WB via standard WB software. IHC/IF in female human bladder showed PR on the interstitial cells in the lamina propria and between detrusor smooth muscle cells, whereas in female rat and mouse bladder, PR was only found on the urothelium. WB in human bladder showed a 78-kD and a 60-kDa band, respectively, corresponding to a modified PR isoform A and PR isoform C. WB in rat and mice bladder showed a 60 kDa band and a 37 kDa band, respectively corresponding with PR isoform C and an unknown isoform. This is the first detailed investigation of the precise location and presence of several isoforms of PR in bladder, together with a comparison of these data between human, rat and mouse. Our study has revealed complex PR families in bladders from the various species studied and demonstrates obvious inter-species differences in PR topography and isoforms. PMID:26650465

  14. Enzyme replacement therapy of a novel humanized mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Frank; Andersson, Claes; Stein, Axel; Eistrup, Carl; Fogh, Jens; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Wenger, David A; Matzner, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    An inherited deficiency of β-galactosylceramidase (GALC) causes the lysosomal storage disease globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD). The disease is characterized by the accumulation of the cytotoxic metabolite psychosine (galactosylsphingosine), causing rapid degeneration of myelinating cells. Most patients suffer from the infantile form of GLD with onset of disease between 3 and 6 months after birth and death by 2 years of age. The most widely used animal model of GLD, the twitcher mouse, presents with an even more rapid course of disease and death around 40 days of age. We have generated a novel "humanized" mouse model of GLD by inserting a human GALC cDNA containing an adult-onset patient mutation into the murine GALC gene. Humanized GALC mice exhibit pathological hallmarks of GLD including psychosine accumulation, neuroinflammation, CNS infiltration of macrophages, astrogliosis and demyelination. Residual GALC activities in mouse tissues are low and the mice display a median lifespan of 46 days. Due to the expression of the human transgene, the mice do not develop an immune response against rhGALC, rendering the animal model suitable for therapies based on human enzyme. Intravenously injected rhGALC was able to surmount the blood-brain barrier and was targeted to lysosomes of brain macrophages, astrocytes and neurons. High-dose enzyme replacement therapy started at postnatal day 21 reduced the elevated psychosine levels in the peripheral and central nervous system by 14-16%, but did not ameliorate neuroinflammation, demyelination and lifespan. These results may indicate that treatment must be started earlier before pathology occurs. PMID:25956830

  15. Cryptic Translocation Identification in Human and Mouse using Several Telomeric Multiplex FISH (TM-FISH) Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Henegariu, O; Artan, S; Greally, J M; Chen, X-N; Korenberg, J R; Vance, G H; Stubbs, L; Bray-Ward, P; Ward, D C

    2003-08-19

    Experimental data published in recent years showed that up to 10% of all cases with mild to severe idiopathic mental retardation may result from small rearrangements of the subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes. To detect such cryptic translocations, we developed a ''telomeric'' multiplex FISH assay, using a set of previously published and commercially available subtelomeric probes. This set of probes includes 41 cosmid/PAC/P1 clones located from less than 100kb to about 1 Mb from the end of the chromosomes. Similarly, a published mouse probe set, comprised of BACs hybridizing to the closest known marker toward the centromere and telomere of each mouse chromosome, was used to develop a mouse-specific ''telomeric'' M-FISH. Three different combinatorial labeling strategies were used to simultaneously detect all human sub-telomeric regions on one slide. The simplest approach uses only three fluors, and can be performed in laboratories lacking sophisticated imaging equipment or personnel highly trained in cytogenetics. A standard fluorescence microscope equipped with only three filters is sufficient. Fluor-dUTPs and labeled probes can be custom-made, thus dramatically reducing costs. Images can be prepared using generic imaging software (Adobe Photoshop), and analysis performed by simple visual inspection.

  16. Comparative mapping of 50 human chromosome 9 loci in the laboratory mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Pilz, A.; Woodward, K.; Povey, S.

    1995-01-01

    We have set out to produce a comprehensive comparative map between human chromosome 9 (HSA9) and the laboratory mouse. The mouse homologues of 50 loci that were known to map to HSA9 were mapped by interspecific backcross linkage analysis. Ten loci from the short arm of HSA9 were mapped, and 40 from HSA9q, with 24 markers coming from the HSA9q33-q34 region - a part of the chromosome known to be very gene rich. Fifteen new assignments have been made - Ak3, Ctsl, Cntfr, C8g, D2H9S46E, Eng, Gcnt1, Irebp, Pappa, Ptgds, Snt212, Tal2, Tmod, Vav2, and Vldlr, the human homologues of which all map to HSA9. In addition, the assignment of Snf212 and Vldlr to MMU19 has defined a new region of synteny between the proximal portion of the short arm of HSA9 and the mouse. 54 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse immunoglobulin epsilon gene: comparison with the human epsilon gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, N; Ueda, S; Hayashida, H; Miyata, T; Honjo, T

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the immunoglobulin epsilon gene cloned from newborn mouse DNA. The epsilon gene sequence allows prediction of the amino acid sequence of the constant region of the epsilon chain and comparison of it with sequences of the human epsilon and other mouse immunoglobulin genes. The epsilon gene was shown to be under the weakest selection pressure at the protein level among the immunoglobulin genes although the divergence at the synonymous position is similar. Our results suggest that the epsilon gene may be dispensable, which is in accord with the fact that IgE has only obscure roles in the immune defense system but has an undesirable role as a mediator of hypersensitivity. The sequence data suggest that the human and murine epsilon genes were derived from different ancestors duplicated a long time ago. The amino acid sequence of the epsilon chain is more homologous to those of the gamma chains than the other mouse heavy chains. Two membrane exons, separated by an 80-base intron, were identified 1.7 kb 3' to the CH4 domain of the epsilon gene and shown to conserve a hydrophobic portion similar to those of other heavy chain genes. RNA blot hybridization showed that the epsilon membrane exons are transcribed into two species of mRNA in an IgE hybridoma. Images Fig. 4. PMID:6329728

  18. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 is a rapid turnover biomarker in mouse and human acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, You-Jin; Fontana, Robert J.; Omary, M. Bishr

    2014-01-01

    Several serum markers are used to assess hepatocyte damage, but they have limitations related to etiology specificity and prognostication. Identification of novel hepatocyte-specific biomarkers could provide important prognostic information and better pathogenesis classification. We tested the hypothesis that hepatocyte-selective biomarkers are released after subjecting isolated mouse hepatocytes to Fas-ligand-mediated apoptosis. Proteomic analysis of hepatocyte culture medium identified the mitochondrial matrix protein carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 (CPS1) among the most readily detected proteins that are released by apoptotic hepatocytes. CPS1 was also detected in mouse serum upon acute challenge with Fas-ligand or acetaminophen and in hepatocytes upon hypoosmotic stress, independent of hepatocyte caspase activation. Furthermore, CPS1 was observed in sera of mice chronically fed the hepatotoxin 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine. Mouse CPS1 detectability was similar in serum and plasma, and its half-life was 126 ± 9 min. Immune staining showed that CPS1 localized to mouse hepatocytes but not ductal cells. Analysis of a few serum samples from patients with acute liver failure (ALF) due to acetaminophen, Wilson disease, or ischemia showed readily detectable CPS1 that was not observed in several patients with chronic viral hepatitis or in control donors. Notably, CPS1 rapidly decreased to undetectable levels in sera of patients with acetaminophen-related ALF who ultimately recovered, while alanine aminotransferase levels remained elevated. Therefore, CPS1 becomes readily detectable upon hepatocyte apoptotic and necrotic death in culture or in vivo. Its abundance and short serum half-life, compared with alanine aminotransferase, suggest that it may be a useful prognostic biomarker in human and mouse liver injury. PMID:24924744

  19. Comparative mapping of the actin-binding protein 280 genes in human and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.; Manenti, G.; De Gregorio, L. ); Maestrini, E.; Rivella, S. ); Chatterjee, A.; Herman, G.E. ); Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R. )

    1994-05-15

    Two genes encode actin-binding protein 280 isoforms. ABP-280 or filamin (FLN1) is present in the cytoskeleton of many cell types, whereas expression of FLN2 is limited to skeletal muscle and heart. FLN1 maps to human chromosome Xq28, and, by physical mapping in YAC clones, the authors have mapped the homologous murine locus (Fln1) to mouse chromosome X, in a region of syntenic homology with human chromosome X. They mapped FLN2 to human chromosome 7q32-q35 by analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 7, and, by using a mapping panel from an interspecific murine cross, they mapped the corresponding murine locus (Fln2) to murine chromosome 6 in a region homologous to human chromosome 7. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Immune Response to Human Metapneumovirus Infection: What We Have Learned from the Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Cheemarla, Nagarjuna R; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta

    2015-01-01

    Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading respiratory viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma exacerbation in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The development of a potential vaccine against hMPV requires detailed understanding of the host immune system, which plays a significant role in hMPV pathogenesis, susceptibility and vaccine efficacy. As a result, animal models have been developed to better understand the mechanisms by which hMPV causes disease. Several animal models have been evaluated and established so far to study the host immune responses and pathophysiology of hMPV infection. However, inbred laboratory mouse strains have been one of the most used animal species for experimental modeling and therefore used for the studies of immunity and immunopathogenesis to hMPV. This review summarizes the contributions of the mouse model to our understanding of the immune response against hMPV infection. PMID:26393657

  1. Immune Response to Human Metapneumovirus Infection: What We Have Learned from the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheemarla, Nagarjuna R.; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta

    2015-01-01

    Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading respiratory viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma exacerbation in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The development of a potential vaccine against hMPV requires detailed understanding of the host immune system, which plays a significant role in hMPV pathogenesis, susceptibility and vaccine efficacy. As a result, animal models have been developed to better understand the mechanisms by which hMPV causes disease. Several animal models have been evaluated and established so far to study the host immune responses and pathophysiology of hMPV infection. However, inbred laboratory mouse strains have been one of the most used animal species for experimental modeling and therefore used for the studies of immunity and immunopathogenesis to hMPV. This review summarizes the contributions of the mouse model to our understanding of the immune response against hMPV infection. PMID:26393657

  2. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Mouse and Human Fcγ Receptors.

    PubMed

    Tutt, Alison L; James, Sonya; Laversin, Stéphanie A; Tipton, Thomas R W; Ashton-Key, Margaret; French, Ruth R; Hussain, Khiyam; Vaughan, Andrew T; Dou, Lang; Earley, Alexander; Dahal, Lekh N; Lu, Chen; Dunscombe, Melanie; Chan, H T Claude; Penfold, Christine A; Kim, Jinny H; Potter, Elizabeth A; Mockridge, C Ian; Roghanian, Ali; Oldham, Robert J; Cox, Kerry L; Lim, Sean H; Teige, Ingrid; Frendéus, Bjorn; Glennie, Martin J; Beers, Stephen A; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    FcγRs are key regulators of the immune response, capable of binding to the Fc portion of IgG Abs and manipulating the behavior of numerous cell types. Through a variety of receptors, isoforms, and cellular expression patterns, they are able to fine-tune and direct appropriate responses. Furthermore, they are key determinants of mAb immunotherapy, with mAb isotype and FcγR interaction governing therapeutic efficacy. Critical to understanding the biology of this complex family of receptors are reagents that are robust and highly specific for each receptor. In this study, we describe the development and characterization of mAb panels specific for both mouse and human FcγR for use in flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and immunocytochemistry. We highlight key differences in expression between the two species and also patterns of expression that will likely impact on immunotherapeutic efficacy and translation of therapeutic agents from mouse to clinic. PMID:26512139

  3. ATM kinase is required for telomere elongation in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stella Suyong; Bohrson, Craig; Pike, Alexandra Mims; Wheelan, Sarah Jo; Greider, Carol Widney

    2015-01-01

    Summary Short telomeres induce a DNA damage response, senescence and apoptosis; thus, maintaining telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell viability. Telomerase addition of telomere repeats is tightly regulated in cells. To probe pathways that regulate telomere addition, we developed the ADDIT assay to measure new telomere addition at a single telomere in vivo. Sequence analysis showed telomerase specific addition of repeats onto a new telomere occurred in just 48 hr. Using the ADDIT assay, we found that ATM is required for addition of new repeats onto telomeres in mouse cells. Evaluation of bulk telomeres, in both human and mouse cells, showed that blocking ATM inhibited telomere elongation. Finally, the activation of ATM through the inhibition of PARP1 resulted in increased telomere elongation, supporting the central role of the ATM pathway in regulating telomere addition. Understanding this role of ATM may yield new areas for possible therapeutic intervention in telomere-mediated disease. PMID:26586427

  4. Mapping TNNC1, the gene that encodes cardiac troponin I in the human and the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, N.; Hernandez, D.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1995-12-10

    We have mapped the TNNC1 gene, whose protein product is the cardiac TnI protein. TnI is one of the proteins that makes up the troponin complex, which mediates the response of muscle to calcium ions. The human TNNC1 locus had been assigned to a large region of chromosome 19, and we have refined the mapping position to the distal end of the chromosome by amplification of DNAs from a chromosome 19 mapping panel. We have also mapped the mouse Tnnc1 locus, by following the segregation of an intron sequence through DNAs from the European Interspecific Backcross. Tnnc1 maps close to the centromere on mouse chromosome 7. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The PanK2 Genes of Mouse and Human Specify Proteins with DistinctSubcellular Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Lydikis, Athanasios; Stevens,Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Wenner, Brett R.; Bain, James R.; Newgard,Christopher B.; Rock, Charles O.; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2007-05-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis is initiated by pantothenatekinase (PanK) and CoA levels are controlled through differentialexpression and feedback regulation of PanK isoforms. PanK2 is amitochondrial protein in humans, but comparative genomics revealed thatacquisition of a mitochondrial targeting signal was limited to primates.Human and mouse PanK2 possessed similar biochemical properties, withinhibition by acetylCoA and activation by palmitoylcarnitine. Mouse PanK2localized in the cytosol, and the expression of PanK2 was higher in humanbrain compared to mouse brain. Differences in expression and subcellularlocalization should be considered in developing a mouse model for humanPanK2 deficiency. (c) 2007 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Human nerve xenografting in nude mouse: Experimental study of graft revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, K.; Bour, C.; Merle, M.; Duprez, A. )

    1991-01-01

    In the nude mouse, the congenital absence of T lymphocytes makes it possible to implant human nerve grafts without rejection or iatrogenic modifications (by immunosuppression) of human and murine tissues. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves were harvested from human cadavers 1-18 hours after death. These nerve grafts were implanted using different techniques in nude mice. All the grafts were macroscopically and microscopically revascularized 3 days after implantation. The modifications in time of this vascularization could be studied with precision through the use of repeated biopsies. The absence of human blood group antigens on the neovessel endothelium suggested a murine origin for angiogenesis. In situ DNA hybridizations with human and mouse DNA confirmed this origin. The topography of the revascularization (maximal in the perineurium and endoneurium) and the almost complete absence of human cells other than Schwann cells in the grafts at the peak of angiogenesis (26 days after grafting) suggested that Schwann cells had a determining role in graft vascularization. The irradiation of the nerve grafts with a dose of 30 grays before implantation did not modify significantly their histologic appearance compared to the control group, whereas an irradiation of 60 grays led to massive lesions. The neurotization of murine axons led to chimerical structures of normal histologic appearance, with vascularization similar to that observed in nonneurotized nerves. Through chimerism (human Schwann cells, murine vessels and axons) this model makes it possible to dissociate the respective role of the host and of the nerve graft in angiogenesis and suggests the existence of growth factors produced by the human Schwann cells.

  7. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiugong Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to 0.25 mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. - Highlights: • Studied genomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells upon thalidomide exposure • Identified gene expression changes that may represent thalidomide embryotoxicity • The toxicogenomic changes coincide well with known thalidomide clinical outcomes. • The mouse embryonic stem cell model is suitable for developmental toxicity testing. • The model has the potential for high-throughput screening of a multitude of compounds.

  8. Germ-line mutations at a mouse ESTR (Pc-3) locus and human microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Haruko; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nomura, Taisei

    2006-01-01

    We examined the use of the mouse Pc-3 ESTR (expanded simple tandem repeat) locus and 72 human microsatellite loci as potentially sensitive biomarkers for mutagenic exposures to germ cells in mice and humans respectively. In the mouse work, we treated male mice with TCDD (2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; a chemical known to induce congenital anomalies in humans and mice) and, analysed the F(1) fetuses for Pc-3 mutations. Although the incidence of anomalies was higher in the TCDD group, there were no induced mutations. However, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) was observed in 3 of 7 fetuses born to male mice which were treated with TCDD and which showed abnormal length of Pc-3 allele. In the human studies, the children of Chernobyl liquidators were examined for mutations at a total of 72 (31 autosomal, 1 X-linked and 40 Y-linked) microsatellite loci. This study was prompted by earlier findings of increases in microsatellite mutations in barn swallows and wheat in the highly contaminated areas after the Chernobyl accident. We examined 64 liquidator families (70 children) and 66 control families (70 children). However, no increases in mutation rates were found. The estimated mean dose to the liquidators was about 39 mSv and this might be one possible reason why no increases of mutations could be found. PMID:17019050

  9. Endogenous Opioid-Masked Latent Pain Sensitization: Studies from Mouse to Human

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jørgen B.; Werner, Marianne; Taylor, Bradley K.; Werner, Mads U.

    2015-01-01

    Following the resolution of a severe inflammatory injury in rodents, administration of mu-opioid receptor inverse agonists leads to reinstatement of pain hypersensitivity. The mechanisms underlying this form of latent pain sensitization (LS) likely contribute to the development of chronic pain, but LS has not yet been demonstrated in humans. Using a C57BL/6 mouse model of cutaneous mild heat injury (MHI) we demonstrated a dose-dependent reinstatement of pain sensitization, assessed as primary (P < 0.001) and secondary hyperalgesia (P < 0.001) by naloxone (0.3–10 mg/kg), 168 hrs after the induction of MHI. Forward-translating the dose data to a human MHI model (n = 12) we could show that LS does indeed occur after naloxone 2 mg/kg, 168 hrs after a MHI. Our previous unsuccessful efforts to demonstrate unmasking of LS in humans are thus likely explained by an insufficient naloxone dose (0.021 mg/kg). However, while LS was consistently demonstrated in 21/24 mice, LS was only seen in 4/12 subjects. This difference is likely due to selection bias since the C57BL/6 mouse strain exhibits markedly enhanced pain sensitivity in assays of acute thermal nociception. Future exploratory studies in humans should prioritize inclusion of “high-sensitizers” prone to develop LS and use post-surgical models to elucidate markers of vulnerability to chronic postsurgical pain. Trial Registration EudraCT 2012-005663-27 PMID:26305798

  10. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  11. Mechanisms of activation of mouse and human enteroendocrine cells by nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, Erin L; Peiris, Madusha; Page, Amanda J; Chia, Bridgette; Dogra, Harween; Masding, Abigail; Galanakis, Vasileios; Atiba, Michael; Bulmer, David; Young, Richard L; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inhibition of food intake and glucose homeostasis are both promoted when nutrients stimulate enteroendocrine cells (EEC) to release gut hormones. Several specific nutrient receptors may be located on EEC that respond to dietary sugars, amino acids and fatty acids. Bypass surgery for obesity and type II diabetes works by shunting nutrients to the distal gut, where it increases activation of nutrient receptors and mediator release, but cellular mechanisms of activation are largely unknown. We determined which nutrient receptors are expressed in which gut regions and in which cells in mouse and human, how they are associated with different types of EEC, how they are activated leading to hormone and 5-HT release. Design and results mRNA expression of 17 nutrient receptors and EEC mediators was assessed by quantitative PCR and found throughout mouse and human gut epithelium. Many species similarities emerged, in particular the dense expression of several receptors in the distal gut. Immunolabelling showed specific colocalisation of receptors with EEC mediators PYY and GLP-1 (L-cells) or 5-HT (enterochromaffin cells). We exposed isolated proximal colonic mucosa to specific nutrients, which recruited signalling pathways within specific EEC extracellular receptor-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and calmodulin kinase II (pCAMKII), as shown by subsequent immunolabelling, and activated release of these mediators. Aromatic amino acids activated both pathways in mouse, but in humans they induced only pCAMKII, which was colocalised mainly with 5-HT expression. Activation was pertussis toxin-sensitive. Fatty acid (C12) potently activated p-ERK in human in all EEC types and evoked potent release of all three mediators. Conclusions Specific nutrient receptors associate with distinct activation pathways within EEC. These may provide discrete, complementary pharmacological targets for intervention in obesity and type II diabetes. PMID:25015642

  12. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  13. Cytotoxic effects of propiconazole and its metabolites in mouse and human hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Propiconazole is a triazole-containing fungicide that is used agriculturally on grasses, fruits, grains, seeds, hardwoods, and conifers. Propiconazole is a mouse liver hepatotoxicant and a hepatocarcinogen and has adverse reproductive and developmental toxicities in exp...

  14. Shannon information theoretic computation of synonymous codon usage biases in coding regions of human and mouse genomes.

    PubMed

    Zeeberg, Barry

    2002-06-01

    Exonic GC of human mRNA reference sequences (RefSeqs), as well as A, C, G, and T in codon position 3 are linearly correlated with genomic GC. These observations utilize information from the completed human genome sequence and a large, high-quality set of human and mouse coding sequences, and are in accord with similar determinations published by others. A Shannon Information Theoretic measure of bias in synonymous codon usage was developed. When applied to either human or mouse RefSeqs, this measure is nonlinearly correlated with genomic, exonic, and third codon position A, C, G, and T. Information values between orthologous mouse and human RefSeqs are linearly correlated: mouse = 0.092 + 0.55 human. Mouse genes were consistently placed in genomic regions whose GC content was closer to 50% than was the GC content of the human ortholog. Since the (nonlinear) information versus percent GC curve has a minimum at 50% GC and monotonically increases with increasing distance from 50% GC, this phenomenon directly results in the low slope of 0.55. This appears to be a manifestation of an evolutionary strategy for placement of genes in regions of the genome with a GC content that relates synonymous codon bias and protein folding. PMID:12045147

  15. Epstein-Barr-based episomal chromosomes shuttle 100 kb of self-replicating circular human DNA in mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Z.T.; Fu, H.; Livanos, E.; Wendelburg, B.; Gulino, S.; Vos, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    The authors describe the microcell fusion transfer of 100--200 kb self-replicating circular human minichromosomes from human into mouse cells. This experimental approach is illustrated through the shuttling of the latent 170 kb double-stranded DNA genome from the human herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, into nonpermissive rodent cells. Using this interspecies transfer strategy, circular episomes carrying 95--105 kb of human DNA were successfully established at low copy number in mouse A9 cells. Selected episomes were stably maintained for 6 months, and unselected episomes were characterized by a 95% episomal retention per cell division. The establishment of a mouse artificial episomal chromosome system should facilitate evolutionary and therapeutic studies of large human DNA in rodent genetic backgrounds.

  16. Comparison of gene expression of the oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway components in the mouse and human epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Li, Ning; Yeung, Ching-Hei; Cooper, Trevor G; Liu, Xue-Xia; Liu, Juan; Wang, Wen-Ting; Li, Yan; Shi, Hui; Liu, Fu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    β-catenin is an integral part of the Wnt signaling pathway and has been linked to tumorigenesis and multiple developmental processes. The high β-catenin expression with low tumor incidence in the human epididymis is thus intriguing. In the present study, the β-catenin gene and protein was found to be highly expressed in the murine caput epididymidis, and the protein mainly localized along the lateral plasma membranes of adjacent epithelial cells throughout both human and mouse epididymides. Furthermore, the adult mouse epididymis was found to express almost all the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway genes that were determined previously by our group in the human organ. Despite the differences in epididymal structure, the similar location of β-catenin and the high concordance of this pathway's components’ gene expression in both the adult human and mouse epididymides make the mouse a suitable animal model for studying the anti-tumor mechanism of the epididymis. In addition, both the mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin shared a similar spatial expression as the mRNA of Ros1, a proto-oncogene and a key developmental regulator of the initial segment of the mouse epididymis. The observations on the parallel temporal expression of β-catenin and Ros1 during postnatal development raise the possibility that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway has an additional role in the postnatal development of mouse epididymis. PMID:26228040

  17. Induction of cell cycle entry eliminates human leukemia stem cells in a mouse model of AML.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoriko; Uchida, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Tomizawa-Murasawa, Mariko; Sone, Akiko; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Aoki, Yuki; Wake, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Shultz, Leonard D; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Cancer stem cells have been proposed to be important for initiation, maintenance and recurrence of various malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We have previously reported that CD34+CD38- human primary AML stem cells residing in the endosteal region of the bone marrow are relatively chemotherapy resistant. Using a NOD/SCID/IL2rgamma(null) mouse model of human AML, we now show that the AML stem cells in the endosteal region are cell cycle quiescent and that these stem cells can be induced to enter the cell cycle by treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In combination with cell cycle-dependent chemotherapy, G-CSF treatment significantly enhances induction of apoptosis and elimination of human primary AML stem cells in vivo. The combination therapy leads to significantly increased survival of secondary recipients after transplantation of leukemia cells compared with chemotherapy alone. PMID:20160717

  18. Direct conversion of mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes by defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Ling; Liu, Shujing; Burrows, Michelle; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Cui, Rutao; Guo, Wei; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Direct reprogramming provides a fundamentally new approach for the generation of patient-specific cells. Here, by screening a pool of candidate transcription factors, we identify that a combination of three factors, MITF, SOX10 and PAX3, directly converts mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes. Induced melanocytes (iMels) activate melanocyte-specific networks, express components of pigment production and delivery system, and produce melanosomes. Human iMels properly integrate into the dermal-epidermal junction, and produce and deliver melanin pigment to surrounding keratinocytes in a 3D organotypic skin reconstruct. Human iMels generate pigmented epidermis and hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays in vivo. The generation of iMels has important implications for studies of melanocyte lineage commitment, pigmentation disorders and cell replacement therapies. PMID:25510211

  19. Direct conversion of mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes by defined factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Ling; Liu, Shujing; Burrows, Michelle; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Cui, Rutao; Guo, Wei; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming provides a fundamentally new approach for the generation of patient-specific cells. Here, by screening a pool of candidate transcription factors, we identify that a combination of the three factors, MITF, SOX10 and PAX3, directly converts mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes. Induced melanocytes (iMels) activate melanocyte-specific networks, express components of pigment production and delivery system and produce melanosomes. Human iMels properly integrate into the dermal-epidermal junction and produce and deliver melanin pigment to surrounding keratinocytes in a 3D organotypic skin reconstruct. Human iMels generate pigmented epidermis and hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays in vivo. The generation of iMels has important implications for studies of melanocyte lineage commitment, pigmentation disorders and cell replacement therapies. PMID:25510211

  20. Cell-mediated neuroprotection in a mouse model of human tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hampton, David W; Webber, Daniel J; Bilican, Bilada; Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2010-07-28

    Tau protein in a hyperphosphorylated state makes up the intracellular inclusions of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and cases of frontotemporal dementia. Mutations in Tau cause familial forms of frontotemporal dementia, establishing that dysfunction of tau protein is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration and dementia. Transgenic mice expressing human mutant tau in neurons exhibit the essential features of tauopathies, including neurodegeneration and abundant filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we show that a previously described mouse line transgenic for human P301S tau exhibits an age-related, layer-specific loss of superficial cortical neurons, similar to what has been observed in human frontotemporal dementias. We also show that focal neural precursor cell implantation, resulting in glial cell differentiation, leads to the sustained rescue of cortical neurons. Together with evidence indicating that astrocyte transplantation may be neuroprotective, our findings suggest a beneficial role for glial cell-based repair in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20668182

  1. New tools for studying microglia in the mouse and human CNS

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, F. Chris; Liddelow, Shane A.; Ajami, Bahareh; Zamanian, Jennifer L.; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B.; Mulinyawe, Sara B.; Bohlen, Christopher J.; Adil, Aykezar; Tucker, Andrew; Weissman, Irving L.; Chang, Edward F.; Li, Gordon; Grant, Gerald A.; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G.; Barres, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    The specific function of microglia, the tissue resident macrophages of the brain and spinal cord, has been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of tools to distinguish microglia from other immune cells, thereby limiting specific immunostaining, purification, and manipulation. Because of their unique developmental origins and predicted functions, the distinction of microglia from other myeloid cells is critically important for understanding brain development and disease; better tools would greatly facilitate studies of microglia function in the developing, adult, and injured CNS. Here, we identify transmembrane protein 119 (Tmem119), a cell-surface protein of unknown function, as a highly expressed microglia-specific marker in both mouse and human. We developed monoclonal antibodies to its intracellular and extracellular domains that enable the immunostaining of microglia in histological sections in healthy and diseased brains, as well as isolation of pure nonactivated microglia by FACS. Using our antibodies, we provide, to our knowledge, the first RNAseq profiles of highly pure mouse microglia during development and after an immune challenge. We used these to demonstrate that mouse microglia mature by the second postnatal week and to predict novel microglial functions. Together, we anticipate these resources will be valuable for the future study and understanding of microglia in health and disease. PMID:26884166

  2. New tools for studying microglia in the mouse and human CNS.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Mariko L; Bennett, F Chris; Liddelow, Shane A; Ajami, Bahareh; Zamanian, Jennifer L; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B; Mulinyawe, Sara B; Bohlen, Christopher J; Adil, Aykezar; Tucker, Andrew; Weissman, Irving L; Chang, Edward F; Li, Gordon; Grant, Gerald A; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G; Barres, Ben A

    2016-03-22

    The specific function of microglia, the tissue resident macrophages of the brain and spinal cord, has been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of tools to distinguish microglia from other immune cells, thereby limiting specific immunostaining, purification, and manipulation. Because of their unique developmental origins and predicted functions, the distinction of microglia from other myeloid cells is critically important for understanding brain development and disease; better tools would greatly facilitate studies of microglia function in the developing, adult, and injured CNS. Here, we identify transmembrane protein 119 (Tmem119), a cell-surface protein of unknown function, as a highly expressed microglia-specific marker in both mouse and human. We developed monoclonal antibodies to its intracellular and extracellular domains that enable the immunostaining of microglia in histological sections in healthy and diseased brains, as well as isolation of pure nonactivated microglia by FACS. Using our antibodies, we provide, to our knowledge, the first RNAseq profiles of highly pure mouse microglia during development and after an immune challenge. We used these to demonstrate that mouse microglia mature by the second postnatal week and to predict novel microglial functions. Together, we anticipate these resources will be valuable for the future study and understanding of microglia in health and disease. PMID:26884166

  3. Differences in the Early Development of Human and Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gabdoulline, R.; Kaisers, W.; Gaspar, A.; Meganathan, K.; Doss, M. X.; Jagtap, S.; Hescheler, J.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a systematic analysis of gene expression features in early (10–21 days) development of human vs mouse embryonic cells (hESCs vs mESCs). Many development features were found to be conserved, and a majority of differentially regulated genes have similar expression change in both organisms. The similarity is especially evident, when gene expression profiles are clustered together and properties of clustered groups of genes are compared. First 10 days of mESC development match the features of hESC development within 21 days, in accordance with the differences in population doubling time in human and mouse ESCs. At the same time, several important differences are seen. There is a clear difference in initial expression change of transcription factors and stimulus responsive genes, which may be caused by the difference in experimental procedures. However, we also found that some biological processes develop differently; this can clearly be shown, for example, for neuron and sensory organ development. Some groups of genes show peaks of the expression levels during the development and these peaks cannot be claimed to happen at the same time points in the two organisms, as well as for the same groups of (orthologous) genes. We also detected a larger number of upregulated genes during development of mESCs as compared to hESCs. The differences were quantified by comparing promoters of related genes. Most of gene groups behave similarly and have similar transcription factor (TF) binding sites on their promoters. A few groups of genes have similar promoters, but are expressed differently in two species. Interestingly, there are groups of genes expressed similarly, although they have different promoters, which can be shown by comparing their TF binding sites. Namely, a large group of similarly expressed cell cycle-related genes is found to have discrepant TF binding properties in mouse vs human. PMID:26473594

  4. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M.

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Modular expression analysis reveals functional conservation between human Langerhans cells and mouse cross-priming dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Artyomov, Maxim N.; Munk, Adiel; Gorvel, Laurent; Korenfeld, Daniel; Cella, Marina; Tung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of functionally distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets in mice has fueled interest in whether analogous counterparts exist in humans. Transcriptional modules of coordinately expressed genes were used for defining shared functions between the species. Comparing modules derived from four human skin DC subsets and modules derived from the Immunological Genome Project database for all mouse DC subsets revealed that human Langerhans cells (LCs) and the mouse XCR1+CD8α+CD103+ DCs shared the class I–mediated antigen processing and cross-presentation transcriptional modules that were not seen in mouse LCs. Furthermore, human LCs were enriched in a transcriptional signature specific to the blood cross-presenting CD141/BDCA-3+ DCs, the proposed equivalent to mouse CD8α+ DCs. Consistent with our analysis, LCs were highly adept at inducing primary CTL responses. Thus, our study suggests that the function of LCs may not be conserved between mouse and human and supports human LCs as an especially relevant therapeutic target. PMID:25918340

  6. Comparative analysis of dioxin response elements in human, mouse and rat genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y. V.; Boverhof, D. R.; Burgoon, L. D.; Fielden, M. R.; Zacharewski, T. R.

    2004-01-01

    Comparative approaches were used to identify human, mouse and rat dioxin response elements (DREs) in genomic sequences unambiguously assigned to a nucleotide RefSeq accession number. A total of 13 bona fide DREs, all including the substitution intolerant core sequence (GCGTG) and adjacent variable sequences, were used to establish a position weight matrix and a matrix similarity (MS) score threshold to rank identified DREs. DREs with MS scores above the threshold were disproportionately distributed in close proximity to the transcription start site in all three species. Gene expression assays in hepatic mouse tissue confirmed the responsiveness of 192 genes possessing a putative DRE. Previously identified functional DREs in well-characterized AhR-regulated genes including Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 were corroborated. Putative DREs were identified in 48 out of 2437 human–mouse–rat orthologous genes between −1500 and the transcriptional start site, of which 19 of these genes possessed positionally conserved DREs as determined by multiple sequence alignment. Seven of these nineteen genes exhibited 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated regulation, although there were significant discrepancies between in vivo and in vitro results. Interestingly, of the mouse–rat orthologous genes with a DRE between −1500 and +1500, only 37% had an equivalent human ortholog. These results suggest that AhR-mediated gene expression may not be well conserved across species, which could have significant implications in human risk assessment. PMID:15328365

  7. Toxicometabolomics of urinary biomarkers for human gastric cancer in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Bong; Yang, Ji-Young; Kwack, Seung Jun; Park, Kui Lea; Kim, Hyung Sik; Ryu, Do Hyun; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Lee, Byung Mu

    2010-01-01

    Toxicometabolomics of urinary biomarkers for human gastric cancer in a mouse model was investigated using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (1 × 10(7) cells/ml) was grafted onto the skin of the back of intact male BALB/c-nu/nu mice. After the xenografted tumors developed, urine was collected and analyzed for endogenous metabolites. Global profiling combined with principal components analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal projections to latent squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) showed distinct separation of clusters between control and tumor-bearing mice. Targeted profiling revealed significant changes in trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), 3-indoxylsulfate, hippurate, and citrate levels in mice carrying human gastric cancer cells compared to normal mice. The levels of TMAO (0.41-fold) and hippurate (0.26-fold) in tumor-bearing mice were significantly decreased, whereas the levels of 3-indoxylsulfate (3.39-fold), 2-oxoglutarate (2.32-fold), and citrate (1.9-fold) were significantly increased in urine samples of tumor-bearing mice. Data suggest that TMAO, hippurate, 3-indoxylsulfate, 2-oxoglutarate, and citrate may serve as useful urinary biomarkers for gastric tumorigenesis in a mouse model. PMID:20954069

  8. Expression, purification and characterization of a mouse-human chimeric antibody and chimeric Fab' fragment.

    PubMed

    King, D J; Adair, J R; Angal, S; Low, D C; Proudfoot, K A; Lloyd, J C; Bodmer, M W; Yarranton, G T

    1992-01-15

    B72.3 is a mouse monoclonal antibody against a tumour-associated antigen, TAG72, which recognizes breast, ovarian and colorectal tumour tissue. A mouse-human chimeric version of B72.3 has been expressed in Chinese-hamster ovary cells. This molecule has the binding specificity of B72.3 and constant regions from human IgG4. The chimeric B72.3 assembles to intact IgG and recognizes TAG72 as well as B72.3 in competitive binding assays. A proportion of the chimeric B72.3 (approx. 10%) does not form inter-heavy-chain disulphide bonds but still assembles into the IgG tetramer. This appears to be a general property of human IgG4 molecules. Co-expression of the chimeric light chain with a chimeric Fd' gene resulted in the expression of functional Fab'. Very little F(ab')2 is produced, although the Fab' can be oxidized to the dimeric F(ab')2 in vitro. The production of Fab' and F(ab')2 by this method is an attractive alternative to proteolytic digestion of IgG. The ability to produce these molecules in large quantities will allow the production and testing of a range of anti-tumour antibody and antibody fragment conjugates. PMID:1736881

  9. Remarkable intron and exon sequence conservation in human and mouse homeobox Hox 1. 3 genes

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Odenwald, W.F.; Garbern, J.; Trojanowski, J.; Lazzarini, R.A.

    1989-05-01

    A high degree of conservation exists between the Hox 1.3 homeobox genes of mice and humans. The two genes occupy the same relative positions in their respective Hox 1 gene clusters, they show extensive sequence similarities in their coding and noncoding portions, and both are transcribed into multiple transcripts of similar sizes. The predicted human Hox 1.3 protein differs from its murine counterpart in only 7 of 270 amino acids. The sequence similarity in the 250 base pairs upstream of the initiation codon is 98%, the similarity between the two introns, both 960 base pairs long, is 72%, and the similarity in the 3' noncoding region from termination codon to polyadenylation signal is 90%. Both mouse and human Hox 1.3 introns contain a sequence with homology to a mating-type-controlled cis element of the yeast Ty1 transposon. DNA-binding studies with a recombinant mouse Hox 1.3 protein identified two binding sites in the intron, both of which were within the region of shared homology with this Ty1 cis element.

  10. Improvements and Limitations of Humanized Mouse Models for HIV Research: NIH/NIAID "Meet the Experts" 2015 Workshop Summary.

    PubMed

    Akkina, Ramesh; Allam, Atef; Balazs, Alejandro B; Blankson, Joel N; Burnett, John C; Casares, Sofia; Garcia, J Victor; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Kashanchi, Fatah; Kitchen, Scott G; Klein, Florian; Kumar, Priti; Luster, Andrew D; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Rao, Mangala; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Shultz, Leonard D; Zack, Jerome A

    2016-02-01

    The number of humanized mouse models for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other infectious diseases has expanded rapidly over the past 8 years. Highly immunodeficient mouse strains, such as NOD/SCID/gamma chain(null) (NSG, NOG), support better human hematopoietic cell engraftment. Another improvement is the derivation of highly immunodeficient mice, transgenic with human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and cytokines that supported development of HLA-restricted human T cells and heightened human myeloid cell engraftment. Humanized mice are also used to study the HIV reservoir using new imaging techniques. Despite these advances, there are still limitations in HIV immune responses and deficits in lymphoid structures in these models in addition to xenogeneic graft-versus-host responses. To understand and disseminate the improvements and limitations of humanized mouse models to the scientific community, the NIH sponsored and convened a meeting on April 15, 2015 to discuss the state of knowledge concerning these questions and best practices for selecting a humanized mouse model for a particular scientific investigation. This report summarizes the findings of the NIH meeting. PMID:26670361

  11. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Gutman, Jonathan A; Kohrt, Wendy M; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L; Miller, Heidi L; Sullivan, Timothy M; Erickson, Paul F; Helm, Karen M; Acosta, Alistaire S; Childs, Christine R; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M; Klemm, Dwight J

    2016-03-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans.-Gavin, K. M., Gutman, J. A., Kohrt, W. M., Wei, Q., Shea, K. L., Miller, H. L., Sullivan, T. M., Erickson, P. F., Helm, K. M., Acosta, A. S., Childs, C. R., Musselwhite, E., Varella-Garcia, M., Kelly, K., Majka, S. M., Klemm, D. J. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue. PMID:26581599

  12. A Mouse to Human Search for Plasma Proteome Changes Associated with Pancreatic Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Faca, Vitor M; Song, Kenneth S; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L; Newcomb, Lisa F; Plentz, Ruben R; Gurumurthy, Sushma; Redston, Mark S; Pitteri, Sharon J; Pereira-Faca, Sandra R; Ireton, Renee C; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Glukhova, Veronika; Phanstiel, Douglas; Brenner, Dean E; Anderson, Michelle A; Misek, David; Scholler, Nathalie; Urban, Nicole D; Barnett, Matt J; Edelstein, Cim; Goodman, Gary E; Thornquist, Mark D; McIntosh, Martin W; DePinho, Ronald A; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Hanash, Samir M

    2008-01-01

    Background The complexity and heterogeneity of the human plasma proteome have presented significant challenges in the identification of protein changes associated with tumor development. Refined genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of human cancer have been shown to faithfully recapitulate the molecular, biological, and clinical features of human disease. Here, we sought to exploit the merits of a well-characterized GEM model of pancreatic cancer to determine whether proteomics technologies allow identification of protein changes associated with tumor development and whether such changes are relevant to human pancreatic cancer. Methods and Findings Plasma was sampled from mice at early and advanced stages of tumor development and from matched controls. Using a proteomic approach based on extensive protein fractionation, we confidently identified 1,442 proteins that were distributed across seven orders of magnitude of abundance in plasma. Analysis of proteins chosen on the basis of increased levels in plasma from tumor-bearing mice and corroborating protein or RNA expression in tissue documented concordance in the blood from 30 newly diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer relative to 30 control specimens. A panel of five proteins selected on the basis of their increased level at an early stage of tumor development in the mouse was tested in a blinded study in 26 humans from the CARET (Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial) cohort. The panel discriminated pancreatic cancer cases from matched controls in blood specimens obtained between 7 and 13 mo prior to the development of symptoms and clinical diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Conclusions Our findings indicate that GEM models of cancer, in combination with in-depth proteomic analysis, provide a useful strategy to identify candidate markers applicable to human cancer with potential utility for early detection. PMID:18547137

  13. Preclinical evaluation of human secretoglobin 3A2 in mouse models of lung development and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Winn, Melissa E.; Zehmer, John K.; Gillette, William K.; Lubkowski, Jacek T.; Pilon, Aprile L.

    2013-01-01

    Secretoglobin (SCGB) 3A2 is a member of the SCGB gene superfamily of small secreted proteins, predominantly expressed in lung airways. We hypothesize that human SCGB3A2 may exhibit anti-inflammatory, growth factor, and antifibrotic activities and be of clinical utility. Recombinant human SCGB3A2 was expressed, purified, and biochemically characterized as a first step to its development as a therapeutic agent in clinical settings. Human SCGB3A2, as well as mouse SCGB3A2, readily formed a dimer in solution and exhibited novel phospholipase A2 inhibitory activity. This is the first demonstration of any quantitative biochemical measurement for the evaluation of SCGB3A2 protein. In the mouse as an experimental animal, human SCGB3A2 exhibited growth factor activity by promoting embryonic lung development in both ex vivo and in vivo systems and antifibrotic activity in the bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model. The results suggested that human SCGB3A2 can function as a growth factor and an antifibrotic agent in humans. When SCGB3A2 was administered to pregnant female mice through the tail vein, the protein was detected in the dam's serum and lung, as well as the placenta, amniotic fluids, and embryonic lungs at 10 min postadministration, suggesting that SCGB3A2 readily crosses the placenta. The results warrant further development of recombinant SCGB3A2 as a therapeutic agent in treating patients suffering from lung diseases or preterm infants with respiratory distress. PMID:24213919

  14. A method for mutagenesis of mouse mtDNA and a resource of mouse mtDNA mutations for modeling human pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fayzulin, Rafik Z.; Perez, Michael; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Spadafora, Domenico; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease and have been associated with neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, diabetes and aging. Yet our progress toward delineating the precise contributions of mtDNA mutations to these conditions is impeded by the limited availability of faithful transmitochondrial animal models. Here, we report a method for the isolation of mutations in mouse mtDNA and its implementation for the generation of a collection of over 150 cell lines suitable for the production of transmitochondrial mice. This method is based on the limited mutagenesis of mtDNA by proofreading-deficient DNA-polymerase γ followed by segregation of the resulting highly heteroplasmic mtDNA population by means of intracellular cloning. Among generated cell lines, we identify nine which carry mutations affecting the same amino acid or nucleotide positions as in human disease, including a mutation in the ND4 gene responsible for 70% of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathies (LHON). Similar to their human counterparts, cybrids carrying the homoplasmic mouse LHON mutation demonstrated reduced respiration, reduced ATP content and elevated production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). The generated resource of mouse mtDNA mutants will be useful both in modeling human mitochondrial disease and in understanding the mechanisms of ROS production mediated by mutations in mtDNA. PMID:25820427

  15. The role of human and mouse Y chromosome genes in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Affara, N A; Mitchell, M J

    2000-11-01

    It was suggested by Ronald Fisher in 1931 that genes involved in benefit to the male (including spermatogenesis genes) would accumulate on the Y chromosome. The analysis of mouse Y chromosome deletions and the discovery of microdeletions of the human Y chromosome associated with diverse defective spermatogenic phenotypes has revealed the presence of intervals containing one or more genes controlling male germ cell differentiation. These intervals have been mapped, cloned and examined in detail for functional genes. This review discusses the genes mapping to critical spermatogenesis intervals and the evidence indicating which are the most likely candidates underlying Y-linked male infertility. PMID:11097427

  16. High-Throughput Humanized Mouse Models for Evaluation of HIV-1 Therapeutics and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tynisha; Seay, Kieran; Zheng, Jian Hua; Zhang, Cong; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Goldstein, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Mice cannot be used as a model to evaluate HIV-1 therapeutics because they do not become infected by HIV-1 due to structural differences between several human and mouse proteins required for HIV-1 replication. This has limited their use for in vivo assessment of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics and the mechanism by which cofactors, such as illicit drug use accelerate HIV-1 replication and disease course in substance abusers. Here, we describe the development and application of two in vivo humanized mouse models that are highly sensitive and useful models for the in vivo evaluation of candidate anti-HIV therapeutics. The first model, hu-spl-PBMC-NSG mice, uses NOD-SCID IL2rγ(-/-) (NSG) mice intrasplenically injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) which develop productive splenic HIV-1 infection after intrasplenic inoculation with a replication-competent HIV-1 expressing Renilla reniformis luciferase (HIV-LucR) and enables investigators to use bioluminescence to visualize and quantitate the temporal effects of therapeutics on HIV-1 infection. The second model, hCD4/R5/cT1 mice, consists of transgenic mice carrying human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 genes, which enables murine CD4-expressing cells to support HIV-1 entry, Tat-mediated LTR transcription and consequently develop productive infection. The hCD4/R5/cT1 mice develop disseminated infection of tissues including the spleen, small intestine, lymph nodes and lungs after intravenous injection with HIV-1-LucR. Because these mice can be infected with HIV-LucR expressing transmitted/founder and clade A/E and C Envs, these mouse models can also be used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of broadly neutralizing antibodies and antibodies induced by candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Furthermore, because hCD4/R5/cT1 mice can be infected by vaginal inoculation with replication-competent HIV-1 expressing NanoLuc (HIV-nLucR)-, this mouse model can be used to evaluate the mechanisms by which substance abuse and other factors enhance mucosal transmission of HIV-1. PMID:26714715

  17. Ultrasound fails to induce proliferation of human brain and mouse endothelial cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemer, Claus; Jenne, Jürgen; Fatar, Marc; Hennerici, Michael G.; Meairs, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that ultrasound (US) is capable of inducing angiogenesis. There is no information, however, on whether ultrasound can induce proliferation of brain endothelial cells. We therefore explored the angiogenic potential of ultrasound on a novel immortalised human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) and on mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEND3). Ultrasound failed to enhance cell proliferation in both cell lines at all acoustic pressures studied. Endothelial cell damage occurred at 0.24 MPa with significantly slower proliferation. Cells growing in Opticell{trade mark, serif} dishes did not show damage or reduced proliferation at these pressures.

  18. A detailed analysis of the erythropoietic control system in the human, squirrel, monkey, rat and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordheim, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The erythropoiesis modeling performed in support of the Body Fluid and Blood Volume Regulation tasks is described. The mathematical formulation of the species independent model, the solutions to the steady state and dynamic versions of the model, and the individual species specific models for the human, squirrel monkey, rat and mouse are outlined. A detailed sensitivity analysis of the species independent model response to parameter changes and how those responses change from species to species is presented. The species to species response to a series of simulated stresses directly related to blood volume regulation during space flight is analyzed.

  19. The mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar) maps to chromosome 2 in a region homologous to human 9q33-q34

    SciTech Connect

    Brunialti, A.L.B.; Guenet, J.L.; Harding, C.O.; Wolff, J.A.

    1996-08-15

    The autosomal recessive mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar), which was discovered segregating in the progeny of a male whose premeiotic germ cells had been treated with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea, is characterized by a deficiency in sarcosine dehydrogenase activity. Using an intersubspecific cross, we mapped the sar locus to mouse chromosome 2, approximately 15-18 cM from the centromere. The genetic localization of this locus in the mouse allows the identification of a candidate region in human (9q33-q34) where the homologous disease should map. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Conditional Expression of Human 15-Lipoxygenase-1 in Mouse Prostate Induces Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: The FLiMP Mouse Model1

    PubMed Central

    Kelavkar, Uddhav P; Parwani, Anil V; Shappell, Scott B; Martin, W David

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The incidence and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa) vary greatly in different geographic regions, for which lifestyle factors, such as dietary fat intake, have been implicated. Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LO-1), which metabolizes polyunsaturated fatty acids, is a highly regulated, tissue-specific, lipid-peroxidating enzyme that functions in physiological membrane remodeling and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. We have shown that aberrant overexpression of 15-LO-1 occurs in human PCa, particularly high-grade PCa, and in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and that the murine orthologue is increased in SV40-based genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of PCa, such as LADY and TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate. To further define the role of 15-LO-1 in prostate carcinogenesis, we established a novel GEM model with targeted overexpression of h15-LO-1 in the prostate [human fifteen lipoxygenase-1 in mouse prostate (FLiMP)]. We used a Cre- mediated and a loxP-mediated recombination strategy to target h15-LO-1 specifically to the prostate of C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type (wt), FLiMP+/-, and FLiMP+/+ mice aged 7 to 21, 24 to 28, and 35 weeks were characterized by histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and DNA/RNA and enzyme analyses. Compared to wt mice, h15-LO-1 enzyme activity was increased similarly in both homozygous FLiMP+/+ and hemizygous FLiMP+/- prostates. Dorsolateral and ventral prostates of FLiMP mice showed focal and progressive epithelial hyperplasia with nuclear atypia, indicative of the definition of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN) according to the National Cancer Institute. These foci showed increased proliferation by Ki-67 IHC. No progression to invasive PCa was noted up to 35 weeks. By IHC, h15-LO-1 expression was limited to luminal epithelial cells, with increased expression in mPIN foci (similar to human HGPIN). In summary, targeted overexpression of h15-LO-1 (a gene overexpressed in human PCa and HGPIN) to mouse prostate is sufficient to promote epithelial proliferation and mPIN development. These results support 15-LO-1 as having a role in prostate tumor initiation and as an early target for dietary or other prevention strategies. The FLiMP mouse model should also be useful in crosses with other GEM models to further define the combinations of molecular alterations necessary for PCa progression. PMID:16820097

  1. Transcriptional recapitulation and subversion of embryonic colon development by mouse colon tumor models and human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Sergio; Park, Young-Kyu; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Halberg, Richard B; Yu, Ming; Jessen, Walter J; Freudenberg, Johannes; Chen, Xiaodi; Haigis, Kevin; Jegga, Anil G; Kong, Sue; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Xu, Huan; Reichling, Timothy; Azhar, Mohammad; Boivin, Gregory P; Roberts, Reade B; Bissahoyo, Anika C; Gonzales, Fausto; Bloom, Greg C; Eschrich, Steven; Carter, Scott L; Aronow, Jeremy E; Kleimeyer, John; Kleimeyer, Michael; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Settle, Stephen H; Boone, Braden; Levy, Shawn; Graff, Jonathan M; Doetschman, Thomas; Groden, Joanna; Dove, William F; Threadgill, David W; Yeatman, Timothy J; Coffey, Robert J; Aronow, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    Background The expression of carcino-embryonic antigen by colorectal cancer is an example of oncogenic activation of embryonic gene expression. Hypothesizing that oncogenesis-recapitulating-ontogenesis may represent a broad programmatic commitment, we compared gene expression patterns of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) and mouse colon tumor models to those of mouse colon development embryonic days 13.5-18.5. Results We report here that 39 colon tumors from four independent mouse models and 100 human CRCs encompassing all clinical stages shared a striking recapitulation of embryonic colon gene expression. Compared to normal adult colon, all mouse and human tumors over-expressed a large cluster of genes highly enriched for functional association to the control of cell cycle progression, proliferation, and migration, including those encoding MYC, AKT2, PLK1 and SPARC. Mouse tumors positive for nuclear β-catenin shifted the shared embryonic pattern to that of early development. Human and mouse tumors differed from normal embryonic colon by their loss of expression modules enriched for tumor suppressors (EDNRB, HSPE, KIT and LSP1). Human CRC adenocarcinomas lost an additional suppressor module (IGFBP4, MAP4K1, PDGFRA, STAB1 and WNT4). Many human tumor samples also gained expression of a coordinately regulated module associated with advanced malignancy (ABCC1, FOXO3A, LIF, PIK3R1, PRNP, TNC, TIMP3 and VEGF). Conclusion Cross-species, developmental, and multi-model gene expression patterning comparisons provide an integrated and versatile framework for definition of transcriptional programs associated with oncogenesis. This approach also provides a general method for identifying pattern-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets. This delineation and categorization of developmental and non-developmental activator and suppressor gene modules can thus facilitate the formulation of sophisticated hypotheses to evaluate potential synergistic effects of targeting within- and between-modules for next-generation combinatorial therapeutics and improved mouse models. PMID:17615082

  2. GENETIC ASSAY FOR ANEUPLOIDY: QUANTITATION OF CHROMOSOME LOSS USING A MOUSE/HUMAN MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL LINE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A genetic assay is described in which a mouse/human hybrid cell line R3-5 containing a single human chromosome (a monochromosomal hybrid) is used to detect chemically induced aneuploidy. The hybrid cells are deficient in hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and ...

  3. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2p25 and mouse chromosome 12C

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Yuichi; Onogi, Satoshi; Fujita, Teizo

    1995-02-10

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) plays a central role in thyroid gland function. The enzyme catalyzes two important reactions of thyroid hormone synthesis, i.e., the iodination of tyrosine residues in thyroglobulin and phenoxy-ester formation between pairs of iodinated tyrosines to generate the thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Previously, we isolated the cDNAs encoding human and mouse TPOs and assigned the human TPO gene to the short arm of chromosome 2 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. By a similar analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids, the human TPO gene was mapped to 2pter-p12. The mouse TPO gene was localized to chromosome 12 using a rat TPO cDNA as a probe to hybridize with mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrids. In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to confirm the localization of human and mouse TPO genes to human chromosome 2 and mouse chromosome 12 and to assign them regionally to 2p25 and 12C, respectively. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Brain homogenates from human tauopathies induce tau inclusions in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Clavaguera, Florence; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Fraser, Graham; Crowther, R Anthony; Frank, Stephan; Hench, Jürgen; Probst, Alphonse; Winkler, David T; Reichwald, Julia; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Ghetti, Bernardino; Goedert, Michel; Tolnay, Markus

    2013-06-01

    Filamentous inclusions made of hyperphosphorylated tau are characteristic of numerous human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease (AGD), progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. In Alzheimer's disease and AGD, it has been shown that filamentous tau appears to spread in a stereotypic manner as the disease progresses. We previously demonstrated that the injection of brain extracts from human mutant P301S tau-expressing transgenic mice into the brains of mice transgenic for wild-type human tau (line ALZ17) resulted in the assembly of wild-type human tau into filaments and the spreading of tau inclusions from the injection sites to anatomically connected brain regions. Here we injected brain extracts from humans who had died with various tauopathies into the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of ALZ17 mice. Argyrophilic tau inclusions formed in all cases and following the injection of the corresponding brain extracts, we recapitulated the hallmark lesions of AGD, PSP and CBD. Similar inclusions also formed after intracerebral injection of brain homogenates from human tauopathies into nontransgenic mice. Moreover, the induced formation of tau aggregates could be propagated between mouse brains. These findings suggest that once tau aggregates have formed in discrete brain areas, they become self-propagating and spread in a prion-like manner. PMID:23690619

  5. Mutations in Eml1 lead to ectopic progenitors and neuronal heterotopia in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Kielar, Michel; Tuy, Françoise Phan Dinh; Bizzotto, Sara; Lebrand, Cécile; de Juan Romero, Camino; Poirier, Karine; Oegema, Renske; Mancini, Grazia Maria; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Olaso, Robert; Le Moing, Anne-Gaëlle; Boutourlinsky, Katia; Boucher, Dominique; Carpentier, Wassila; Berquin, Patrick; Deleuze, Jean-François; Belvindrah, Richard; Borrell, Victor; Welker, Egbert; Chelly, Jamel; Croquelois, Alexandre; Francis, Fiona

    2014-07-01

    Neuronal migration disorders such as lissencephaly and subcortical band heterotopia are associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. DCX, PAFAH1B1 and TUBA1A are mutated in these disorders; however, corresponding mouse mutants do not show heterotopic neurons in the neocortex. In contrast, spontaneously arisen HeCo mice display this phenotype, and our study revealed that misplaced apical progenitors contribute to heterotopia formation. While HeCo neurons migrated at the same speed as wild type, abnormally distributed dividing progenitors were found throughout the cortical wall from embryonic day 13. We identified Eml1, encoding a microtubule-associated protein, as the gene mutated in HeCo mice. Full-length transcripts were lacking as a result of a retrotransposon insertion in an intron. Eml1 knockdown mimicked the HeCo progenitor phenotype and reexpression rescued it. We further found EML1 to be mutated in ribbon-like heterotopia in humans. Our data link abnormal spindle orientations, ectopic progenitors and severe heterotopia in mouse and human. PMID:24859200

  6. Identification and monitoring of metabolite markers of dry bean consumption in parallel human and mouse studies

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Thushanthi; Young, Matthew R.; Zhang, Zhiying; Murphy, Gwen; Colburn, Nancy H.; Lanza, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl J.; Cross, Amanda J.; Bobe, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Scope Aim of the study was to identify and monitor metabolite markers of dry bean consumption in parallel human and mouse studies that each had shown chemopreventive effects of dry bean consumption on colorectal neoplasia risk. Methods and Results Using liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy +/− electrospray ionization and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, serum metabolites of dry beans were measured in 46 men before and after a four-week dry bean-enriched diet (250 g/d) and 12 mice that received a standardized diet containing either 0 or 10% navy bean ethanol extract for 6 weeks; we also investigated fecal metabolites in the mice. The serum metabolites identified in these controlled feeding studies were then investigated in 212 polyp-free participants from the Polyp Prevention Trial who self-reported either increased (≥+31 g/d from baseline), high dry bean intake of ≥42 g/d in year 3 or low, unchanged dry bean consumption of <8 g/d; serum was analyzed from baseline and year 3. Serum pipecolic acid and S-methyl-cysteine were elevated after dry bean consumption in human and mouse studies and reflected dry bean consumption in the Polyp Prevention Trial. Conclusions Serum levels of pipecolic acid and S-methyl-cysteine are useful biomarkers of dry bean consumption. PMID:25641932

  7. CD24 tracks divergent pluripotent states in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Nika; White, Carl A.; Lipsitz, Yonatan Y.; Yachie-Kinoshita, Ayako; Tonge, Peter D; Hussein, Samer M. I.; Puri, Mira C.; Elbaz, Judith; Morrissey-Scoot, James; Li, Mira; Munoz, Javier; Benevento, Marco; Rogers, Ian M.; Hanna, Jacob H.; Heck, Albert J. R.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nagy, Andras; Zandstra, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming is a dynamic process that can result in multiple pluripotent cell types emerging from divergent paths. Cell surface protein expression is a particularly desirable tool to categorize reprogramming and pluripotency as it enables robust quantification and enrichment of live cells. Here we use cell surface proteomics to interrogate mouse cell reprogramming dynamics and discover CD24 as a marker that tracks the emergence of reprogramming-responsive cells, while enabling the analysis and enrichment of transgene-dependent (F-class) and -independent (traditional) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at later stages. Furthermore, CD24 can be used to delineate epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in mouse pluripotent culture. Importantly, regulated CD24 expression is conserved in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), tracking the conversion of human ESCs to more naive-like PSC states. Thus, CD24 is a conserved marker for tracking divergent states in both reprogramming and standard pluripotent culture. PMID:26076835

  8. CD24 tracks divergent pluripotent states in mouse and human cells.

    PubMed

    Shakiba, Nika; White, Carl A; Lipsitz, Yonatan Y; Yachie-Kinoshita, Ayako; Tonge, Peter D; Hussein, Samer M I; Puri, Mira C; Elbaz, Judith; Morrissey-Scoot, James; Li, Mira; Munoz, Javier; Benevento, Marco; Rogers, Ian M; Hanna, Jacob H; Heck, Albert J R; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nagy, Andras; Zandstra, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming is a dynamic process that can result in multiple pluripotent cell types emerging from divergent paths. Cell surface protein expression is a particularly desirable tool to categorize reprogramming and pluripotency as it enables robust quantification and enrichment of live cells. Here we use cell surface proteomics to interrogate mouse cell reprogramming dynamics and discover CD24 as a marker that tracks the emergence of reprogramming-responsive cells, while enabling the analysis and enrichment of transgene-dependent (F-class) and -independent (traditional) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at later stages. Furthermore, CD24 can be used to delineate epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in mouse pluripotent culture. Importantly, regulated CD24 expression is conserved in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), tracking the conversion of human ESCs to more naive-like PSC states. Thus, CD24 is a conserved marker for tracking divergent states in both reprogramming and standard pluripotent culture. PMID:26076835

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of phosphohistidine phosphatase PHPT1 in mouse and human tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiau-Qun; Sundh, Ulla Beckman; Jansson, Leif; Zetterqvist, Orjan; Ek, Pia

    2009-01-01

    Protein histidine phosphorylation accounts for about 6% of the total protein phosphorylation in eukaryotic cells; still details concerning histidine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are limited. A mammalian 14-kDa phosphohistidine phosphatase, also denominated PHPT1, was found 6 years ago that provided a new tool in the study of phosphohistidine phosphorylation. The localization of PHPT1 mRNA by Northern blot analysis revealed high expression in heart and skeletal muscle. The main object of the present study was to determine the PHPT1 expression on protein level in mouse tissues in order to get further information on the physiological role of the enzyme. Tissue samples from adult mice and 14.5-day-old mouse embryos were processed for immunostaining using a PHPT1-specific polyclonal antibody. The same antibody was also provided to the Swedish human protein atlas project (HPR) (http://www.proteinatlas.org/index.php). The results from both studies were essentially consistent with the previously reported expression of mRNA of a few human tissues. In addition, several other tissues, including testis, displayed a high protein expression. A salient result of the present investigation was the ubiquitous expression of the PHPT1 protein and its high expression in continuously dividing epithelial cells. PMID:19396692

  10. Radioimmunoassay of metallothionein in rabbit, rat, mouse, Chinese hamster, and human cells.

    PubMed

    Leibrandt, M E; Koropatnick, J; Harris, J F; Cherian, M G

    1991-09-01

    We describe a competitive, solid-phase radioimmunoassay for metallothionein, which employs a rabbit antiserum directed against rat MT-2 to detect metallothionein (MT) from several different species (rabbit, mouse, rat, Chinese hamster, and human). The lower limit of detection of the assay for rat MT-2 was 0.7 ng; for rabbit MT-2 it was 2 ng. The method is capable of measuring both isoforms of MT (MT-1 and MT-2). When MT levels in rat and mouse tissues were estimated with this RIA and the silver-saturation method, both assays gave the same pattern of MT induction in control and cadmium-treated animals. Both methods measured high levels of MT in human liver samples. Chinese hamster ovary cells induced with cadmium also showed elevated MT expression. The detectability of MTs from a broad range of species is facilitated by the use of solid-phase MT, which has an avidity for the antiserum similar to that of the MT in the tested sample. PMID:1720645

  11. Chemokine-Targeted Mouse Models of Human Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J.; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D.; Gm?, Zeynep H.; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired sub-cutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening. PMID:26006007

  12. Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived From Mouse and Human White Mature Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abdmaulen, Raushan; Ly, Albert; Cubberly, Mark R.; Shahmirian, Laurine J.; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Dumesic, Daniel A.; Yao, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    White mature adipocytes give rise to so-called dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that spontaneously undergo multilineage differentiation. In this study, we defined stem cell characteristics of DFAT cells as they are generated from adipocytes and the relationship between these characteristics and lineage differentiation. Both mouse and human DFAT cells, prepared from adipose tissue and lipoaspirate, respectively, showed evidence of pluripotency, with a maximum 5–7 days after adipocyte isolation. The DFAT cells spontaneously formed clusters in culture, which transiently expressed multiple stem cell markers, including stage-specific embryonic antigens, and Sca-1 (mouse) and CD105 (human), as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and immunostaining. As the stem cell markers decreased, markers characteristic of the three germ layers and specific lineage differentiation, such as α-fetoprotein (endoderm, hepatic), Neurofilament-66 (ectoderm, neurogenic), and Troponin I (mesoderm, cardiomyogenic), increased. However, no teratoma formation was detected after injection in immunodeficient mice. A novel modification of the adipocyte isolation aimed at ensuring the initial purity of the adipocytes and avoiding ceiling culture allowed isolation of DFAT cells with pluripotent characteristics. Thus, the adipocyte-derived DFAT cells represent a plastic stem cell population that is highly responsive to changes in culture conditions and may benefit cell-based therapies. PMID:24396033

  13. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L; Yourick, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72h after exposure to 0.25mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. PMID:26006729

  14. Conservation of uORF repressiveness and sequence features in mouse, human and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chew, Guo-Liang; Pauli, Andrea; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    Upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are ubiquitous repressive genetic elements in vertebrate mRNAs. While much is known about the regulation of individual genes by their uORFs, the range of uORF-mediated translational repression in vertebrate genomes is largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear whether the repressive effects of uORFs are conserved across species. To address these questions, we analyse transcript sequences and ribosome profiling data from human, mouse and zebrafish. We find that uORFs are depleted near coding sequences (CDSes) and have initiation contexts that diminish their translation. Linear modelling reveals that sequence features at both uORFs and CDSes modulate the translation of CDSes. Moreover, the ratio of translation over 5' leaders and CDSes is conserved between human and mouse, and correlates with the number of uORFs. These observations suggest that the prevalence of vertebrate uORFs may be explained by their conserved role in repressing CDS translation. PMID:27216465

  15. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancerthe overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  16. Genetic conflict reflected in tissue-specific maps of genomic imprinting in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Babak, Tomas; DeVeale, Brian; Tsang, Emily K.; Zhou, Yiqi; Li, Xin; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Li, Jin Billy; van der Kooy, Derek; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic process that restricts gene expression to either the maternally or paternally inherited allele1,2. Many theories have been proposed to explain its evolutionary origin3,4, but our understanding has been limited by a paucity of data mapping the breadth and dynamics of imprinting within any organism. We generated an atlas of imprinting spanning 33 mouse and 45 human developmental stages and tissues. Nearly all imprinted genes were imprinted in early development and either retained their parent-of-origin expression in adults, or lost it completely. Consistent with an evolutionary signature of parental conflict, imprinted genes were enriched for co-expressed pairs of maternally/paternally expressed genes, showed accelerated expression divergence between human and mouse, and were more highly expressed than their non-imprinted orthologs in other species. Our approach demonstrates a general framework for imprinting discovery in any species, and sheds light on the causes and consequences of genomic imprinting in mammals. PMID:25848752

  17. Inactivation of the human fragile histidine triad gene at 3p14.2 in monochromosomal human/mouse microcell hybrid-derived severe combined immunodeficient mouse tumors.

    PubMed

    Kholodnyuk, I D; Szeles, A; Yang, Y; Klein, G; Imreh, S

    2000-12-15

    We have previously shown that inoculation of human chromosome 3 (chr3)/A9 mouse fibrosarcoma microcell hybrids (MCHs) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice was followed by the regular elimination of some 3p regions whereas a 3q region was retained even after prolonged mouse passage. Using this approach, referred to as the elimination test (Et), we have defined a common eliminated region (CER) of approximately 7 cM at 3p21.3 that was absent in all of the 27 tumors generated from five MCHs. Later, CER was reduced to a 1-Mb region, designated as CER1. Another eliminated region (ER2) at 3p21.1-p14.2 was absent in 21 of the 27 tumors. ER2 borders at but does not include the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene, considered as a putative tumor suppressor gene. In the present work, two new and two previously studied MCHs, and 13 derived SCID mouse tumors were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting and by PCR, using 72 chr3p-specific and 11 chr3q-specific markers. Nine tumors generated from three MCHs that carried cytogenetically normal chr3, remained PCR-positive for all of the chr3 markers tested. Designated as "PCR+" tumors, they were examined by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, together with four of six previously studied tumors derived from MCH910.7, which carried a del(3)(pter-p21.1), for the expression of 14 human genes: 5 genes within CER1 (LIMD1, CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR5), 5 genes located within regions that were homozygously deleted in a variety of carcinomas (ITGA4L, LUCA1, PTPRG, FHIT, DUTT1), and 4 other genes in chr3p (VHL, MLH1, TGM4, UBE1L). We found that VHL, MLH1, ITGA4L, LIMD1, UBE1L, LUCA1, PTPRG, and DUTT1 were expressed in the MCH lines in vitro and also in the derived SCID tumors. No transcripts that originated from the four CCR genes or from TGM4 could be detected in any of the MCH lines. Alone among the 14 genes examined, FHIT showed a tumor growth-associated change. It was expressed in vitro in five of seven MCH lines. Nine of 13 derived tumors had no FHIT transcript. The remaining 4 expressed a truncated mRNA and a reduced amount of the full-length mRNA. We have previously found that FHIT was deleted at the DNA level in 17 of 21 tumors derived from four MCHs. The remaining 4 of 21 had no FHIT transcript. Our compiled data show that FHIT was either physically or functionally impaired in all 34 of the 34 analyzed tumors. Variants with deleted or down-regulated FHIT have a selective growth advantage. PMID:11156420

  18. Characterization of copy number alterations in a mouse model of fibrosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma reveals concordance with human disease.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Grace; Silva, Grace O; Uehara, Takeki; Pogribny, Igor P; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a prevalent human cancer with rising incidence worldwide. Human HCC is frequently associated with chronic liver inflammation and cirrhosis, pathophysiological processes that are a consequence of chronic viral infection, disturbances in metabolism, or exposure to chemical toxicants. To better characterize the pathogenesis of HCC, we used a human disease-relevant mouse model of fibrosis-associated hepatocarcinogenesis. In this model, marked liver tumor response caused by the promutagenic chemical N-nitrosodiethylamine in the presence of liver fibrosis was associated with epigenetic events indicative of genomic instability. Therefore, we hypothesized that DNA copy number alterations (CNAs), a feature of genomic instability and a common characteristic of cancer, are concordant between human HCC and mouse models of fibrosis-associated hepatocarcinogenesis. We evaluated DNA CNAs and changes in gene expression in the mouse liver (normal, tumor, and nontumor fibrotic tissues). Additionally, we compared our findings to DNA CNAs in human HCC cases (tumor and nontumor cirrhotic/fibrotic tissues) using publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We observed that while fibrotic liver tissue is largely devoid of DNA CNAs, highly frequently occurring DNA CNAs are found in mouse tumors, which is indicative of a profound increase in chromosomal instability in HCC. The cross-species gene-level comparison of CNAs identified shared regions of CNAs between human fibrosis- and cirrhosis-associated liver tumors and mouse fibrosis-associated HCC. Our results suggest that CNAs most commonly arise in neoplastic tissue rather than in fibrotic or cirrhotic liver, and demonstrate the utility of this mouse model in replicating the molecular features of human HCC. PMID:26778414

  19. ZP2 peptide beads select human sperm in vitro, decoy mouse sperm in vivo, and provide reversible contraception.

    PubMed

    Avella, Matteo A; Baibakov, Boris A; Jimenez-Movilla, Maria; Sadusky, Anna Burkart; Dean, Jurrien

    2016-04-27

    Gamete recognition in the female reproductive tract occurs at the surface of the zona pellucida surrounding ovulated eggs. The acellular zona matrix is composed of three (mouse) or four (human) proteins (ZP1 to ZP4), and the amino terminus of ZP2 is the primary sperm-binding ligand. Mouse and human sperm bind, respectively, to recombinant moZP2(35-149) and huZP2(39-154) peptides attached to agarose beads. Mouse ZP2 peptide beads markedly inhibited fertilization of ovulated mouse eggs inseminated in vitro and incubated overnight. Similarly, human ZP2 peptide beads prevented sperm binding and penetration of transgenic ZP2(Rescue) zonae pellucidae, in which human ZP2 replaced mouse ZP2. When mouse ZP2 peptide beads were transcervically deposited into the uterus, there was no change in mating behavior and copulatory plugs were present, but bound sperm did not progress into the oviduct and female mice were infertile. On average, contraception lasted >10 estrus cycles but was reversible with no detectable pathology in the reproductive tract. Despite the long-term contraceptive effect, initial sperm binding to the peptide beads was reversible in vitro. We exploited this observation to select human sperm that were better able to penetrate the zonae of human ZP2(Rescue) eggs, and the approach holds promise for identifying superior sperm for human assisted reproductive technologies (ART). We conclude that the amino-terminal ZP2 peptide supports sperm binding, which is initially reversible but, with time, becomes irreversible. Short-term, reversible binding may be useful in selecting sperm for ART, and long-term binding decoys sperm and results in effective contraception in mice. PMID:27122613

  20. Neurodegeneration with tau accumulation in a transgenic mouse expressing V337M human tau.

    PubMed

    Tanemura, Kentaro; Murayama, Miyuki; Akagi, Takumi; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Tominaga, Takashi; Ichikawa, Michinori; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Takashima, Akihiko

    2002-01-01

    Formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) is a common neuropathological feature found in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a transgenic (Tg) mouse expressing mutant human tau (V337M), derived from frontotemporal dementia parkinsonism-17. V337M Tg mice revealed tau aggregations in the hippocampus, which fulfills the histological criteria for NFTs in human neurodegenerative diseases. Concurrent with the accumulation of RNA and phosphorylated tau, neurons exhibited morphological characteristics of degenerating neurons, which include a loss of microtubules, accumulation of ribosomes, plasma and nuclear membrane ruffling, and swelling of the Golgi network. Thus, mutant tau induces neuronal degeneration associated with the accumulation of RNA and phosphorylated tau. The functional consequences of this neuronal degeneration was evidenced by the reduction of hippocampal neural activity and behavioral abnormality in Tg mice. PMID:11756496

  1. The G protein-coupled receptor repertoires of human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vassilatis, Demetrios K.; Hohmann, John G.; Zeng, Hongkui; Li, Fusheng; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Mortrud, Marty T.; Brown, Analisa; Rodriguez, Stephanie S.; Weller, John R.; Wright, Abbie C.; Bergmann, John E.; Gaitanaris, George A.

    2003-01-01

    Diverse members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily participate in a variety of physiological functions and are major targets of pharmaceutical drugs. Here we report that the repertoire of GPCRs for endogenous ligands consists of 367 receptors in humans and 392 in mice. Included here are 26 human and 83 mouse GPCRs not previously identified. A direct comparison of GPCRs in the two species reveals an unexpected level of orthology. The evolutionary preservation of these molecules argues against functional redundancy among highly related receptors. Phylogenetic analyses cluster 60% of GPCRs according to ligand preference, allowing prediction of ligand types for dozens of orphan receptors. Expression profiling of 100 GPCRs demonstrates that most are expressed in multiple tissues and that individual tissues express multiple GPCRs. Over 90% of GPCRs are expressed in the brain. Strikingly, however, the profiles of most GPCRs are unique, yielding thousands of tissue- and cell-specific receptor combinations for the modulation of physiological processes. PMID:12679517

  2. Telomerase inhibition effectively targets mouse and human AML stem cells and delays relapse following chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bruedigam, Claudia; Bagger, Frederik O; Heidel, Florian H; Paine Kuhn, Catherine; Guignes, Solene; Song, Axia; Austin, Rebecca; Vu, Therese; Lee, Erwin; Riyat, Sarbjit; Moore, Andrew S; Lock, Richard B; Bullinger, Lars; Hill, Geoffrey R; Armstrong, Scott A; Williams, David A; Lane, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and lethal blood cancer maintained by rare populations of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Selective targeting of LSCs is a promising approach for treating AML and preventing relapse following chemotherapy, and developing such therapeutic modalities is a key priority. Here, we show that targeting telomerase activity eradicates AML LSCs. Genetic deletion of the telomerase subunit Terc in a retroviral mouse AML model induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of LSCs, and depletion of telomerase-deficient LSCs is partially rescued by p53 knockdown. Murine Terc(-/-) LSCs express a specific gene expression signature that can be identified in human AML patient cohorts and is positively correlated with patient survival following chemotherapy. In xenografts of primary human AML, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of telomerase targets LSCs, impairs leukemia progression, and delays relapse following chemotherapy. Altogether, these results establish telomerase inhibition as an effective strategy for eliminating AML LSCs. PMID:25479751

  3. Telomerase Inhibition Effectively Targets Mouse and Human AML Stem Cells and Delays Relapse Following Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bruedigam, Claudia; Bagger, Frederik O.; Heidel, Florian H.; Kuhn, Catherine Paine; Guignes, Solene; Song, Axia; Austin, Rebecca; Vu, Therese; Lee, Erwin; Riyat, Sarbjit; Moore, Andrew S.; Lock, Richard B.; Bullinger, Lars; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Williams, David A.; Lane, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and lethal blood cancer maintained by rare populations of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Selective targeting of LSCs is a promising approach for treating AML and preventing relapse following chemotherapy, and developing such therapeutic modalities is a key priority. Here, we show that targeting telomerase activity eradicates AML LSCs. Genetic deletion of the telomerase subunit Terc in a retroviral mouse AML model induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of LSCs, and depletion of telomerase-deficient LSCs is partially rescued by p53 knockdown. Murine Terc−/− LSCs express a specific gene expression signature that can be identified in human AML patient cohorts and is positively correlated with patient survival following chemotherapy. In xenografts of primary human AML, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of telomerase targets LSCs, impairs leukemia progression, and delays relapse following chemotherapy. Together, these results establish telomerase inhibition as an effective strategy for eliminating AML LSCs. PMID:25479751

  4. The mouse pale ear (ep) mutation is the homologue of human HermanskyPudlak?syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, John M.; Wildenberg, Scott C.; Keiper, Natalie M.; Novak, Edward K.; Rusiniak, Michael E.; Swank, Richard T.; Puri, Neelu; Finger, Joshua N.; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Lehman, Anne L.; Gales, Tracy L.; Bayer, Manfred E.; King, Richard A.; Brilliant, Murray H.

    1997-01-01

    The recessive mutation at the pale ear (ep) locus on mouse chromosome 19 was found to be the homologue of human HermanskyPudlak syndrome (HPS). A positional cloning strategy using yeast artificial chromosomes spanning the HPS locus was used to identify the HPS gene and its murine counterpart. These genes and their predicted proteins are highly conserved at the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Sequence analysis of the mutant ep gene revealed the insertion of an intracisternal A particle element in a protein-coding 3? exon. Here we demonstrate that mice with the ep mutation exhibit abnormalities similar to human HPS patients in melanosomes and platelet-dense granules. These results establish an animal model of HPS and will facilitate biochemical and molecular analyses of the functions of this protein in the membranes of specialized intracellular organelles. PMID:9256466

  5. Structural similarities and differences between the human and the mouse pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Mice remain the most studied animal model in pancreas research. Since the findings of this research are typically extrapolated to humans, it is important to understand both similarities and differences between the 2 species. Beside the apparent difference in size and macroscopic organization of the organ in the 2 species, there are a number of less evident and only recently described differences in organization of the acinar and ductal exocrine tissue, as well as in the distribution, composition, and architecture of the endocrine islets of Langerhans. Furthermore, the differences in arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels, as well as innervation are potentially important. In this article, the structure of the human and the mouse pancreas, together with the similarities and differences between them are reviewed in detail in the light of conceivable repercussions for basic research and clinical application. PMID:26030186

  6. Large-scale objective association of mouse phenotypes with human symptoms through structural variation identified in patients with developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Boulding, Hannah; Webber, Caleb

    2012-05-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are thought to underlie many human developmental abnormalities. However, it is unclear how many of these CNVs exert their pathogenic effects or, in particular, how distinct CNVs at dispersed loci can give rise to the same abnormality. We hypothesize that the mouse orthologs of genes whose copy number change gives rise to the same human abnormality might also yield a similar phenotype when disrupted in mice. Thus, by bringing together a large number of disparate CNVs, we may be able to identify an unusually overrepresented phenotype among the affected genes' mouse orthologs. We obtained 1,624 de novo CNVs identified in patients with developmental abnormalities from Database of Chromosomal Imbalance and Phenotype in Humans Using Ensembl Resources and European Cytogeneticists Association Register of Unbalanced Chromosome Aberrations database. Forming CNV sets for each of 1,088 distinct human abnormalities, we were able to associate a total of 143 (13%) human abnormalities with mouse model phenotypes. Although many mouse phenotypes are readily comparable to their associated human abnormality, others are less so, generating novel biological hypotheses. Of the 2,086 candidate genes that contribute to these associations, 65% have not been previously associated with human disease in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, and their distribution suggests both extensive pleiotropy and epistasis while also proposing a small number of simple additive consequences. PMID:22396327

  7. Characterization of multidrug transporter-mediated efflux of avermectins in human and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Abigail M; Mistry, Pratibha; Wright, Jayne; Williams, Faith M; Brown, Colin D A

    2015-06-15

    ABC transporters play an important role in the disposition of avermectins in several animal species. In this study the interactions of three key avermectins, abamectin, emamectin and ivermectin, with human and mouse homologues of MDR1 (ABCB1/Abcb1a) and MRP (ABCC/Abcc), transporters endogenously expressed by human SH-SY5Y and mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells were investigated. In both cell lines, retention of the fluorescent dye H33342 was found to be significantly increased in the presence of avermectins and cyclosporin A. These effects were shown to be unresponsive to the BCRP inhibitor Ko-143 and therefore MDR1/Mdr1-dependent. Avermectins inhibited MDR1/Mdr1a-mediated H33342 dye efflux, with apparent Ki values of 0.24±0.08 and 0.18±0.02μM (ivermectin); 0.60±0.07 and 0.56±0.02μM (emamectin) and 0.95±0.08 and 0.77±0.25μM (abamectin) in SH-SY5Y and N2a cells, respectively. There were some apparent affinity differences for MDR1 and Mdr1a within each cell line (affinity for ivermectin>emamectin≥abamectin, P<0.05 by One-Way ANOVA), but importantly, the Ki values for individual avermectins for human MDR1 or mouse Mdr1a were not significantly different. MK571-sensitive retention of GSMF confirmed the expression of MRP/Mrp efflux transporters in both cell lines. Avermectins inhibited MRP/Mrp-mediated dye efflux with IC50 values of 1.58±0.51 and 1.94±0.72μM (ivermectin); 1.87±0.57 and 2.74±1.01μM (emamectin) and 2.25±0.01 and 1.68±0.63μM (abamectin) in SH-SY5Y and N2a cells, respectively. There were no significant differences in IC50 values between individual avermectins or between human MRP and mouse Mrp. Kinetic data for endogenous human MDR1/MRP isoforms in SH-SY5Y cells and mouse Mdr1a/b/Mrp isoforms in N2a cells are comparable for the selected avermectins. All are effluxed at concentrations well above 0.05-0.1μM ivermectin detected in plasma (Ottesen and Campbell, 1994; Ottesen and Campbell, 1994) This is an important finding in the light of toxicity seen in the Mdr1-deficient animal models CF-1 mice, Mdr1ab (-/-) double knockout mice and Collie dogs. We also confirm MRP/Mrp-mediated avermectin transport in both N2a and SH-SY5Y cell lines. PMID:25865432

  8. A nude mouse model of hypertrophic scar shows morphologic and histologic characteristics of human hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Momtazi, Moein; Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Anderson, Colin C; Honardoust, Dariush; Goekjian, Serge; Tredget, Edward E

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) is a fibroproliferative disorder that occurs following deep dermal injury. Lack of a relevant animal model is one barrier toward better understanding its pathophysiology. Our objective is to demonstrate that grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in survival of engrafted human skin and murine scars that are morphologically, histologically, and immunohistochemically consistent with human HSc. Twenty nude mice were xenografted with split-thickness human skin. Animals were euthanized at 30, 60, 120, and 180 days postoperatively. Eighteen controls were autografted with full-thickness nude mouse skin and euthanized at 30 and 60 days postoperatively. Scar biopsies were harvested at each time point. Blinded scar assessment was performed using a modified Manchester Scar Scale. Histologic analysis included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue, and picrosirius red staining. Immunohistochemistry included anti-human human leukocyte antigen-ABC, ?-smooth muscle actin, decorin, and biglycan staining. Xenografted mice developed red, shiny, elevated scars similar to human HSc and supported by blinded scar assessment. Autograft controls appeared morphologically and histologically similar to normal skin. Xenografts survived up to 180 days and showed increased thickness, loss of hair follicles, adnexal structures and rete pegs, hypercellularity, whorled collagen fibers parallel to the surface, myofibroblasts, decreased decorin and increased biglycan expression, and increased mast cell density. Grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in persistent scars that show morphologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical consistency with human HSc. Therefore, this model provides a promising technique to study HSc formation and to test novel treatment options. PMID:23126488

  9. Expression and In Vivo Rescue of Human ABCC6 Disease-Causing Mutants in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Olivier; Fülöp, Krisztina; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Iliás, Attila; Szabó, Zalán; Brampton, Christopher N.; Pomozi, Viola; Huszár, Krisztina; Arányi, Tamás; Váradi, András

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in ABCC6 can cause chronic or acute forms of dystrophic mineralization described in disease models such as pseudoxanthoma elasticum (OMIM 26480) in human and dystrophic cardiac calcification in mice. The ABCC6 protein is a large membrane-embedded organic anion transporter primarily found in the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. We have established a complex experimental strategy to determine the structural and functional consequences of disease-causing mutations in the human ABCC6. The major aim of our study was to identify mutants with preserved transport activity but failure in intracellular targeting. Five missense mutations were investigated: R1138Q, V1298F, R1314W, G1321S and R1339C. Using in vitro assays, we have identified two variants; R1138Q and R1314W that retained significant transport activity. All mutants were transiently expressed in vivo, in mouse liver via hydrodynamic tail vein injections. The inactive V1298F was the only mutant that showed normal cellular localization in liver hepatocytes while the other mutants showed mostly intracellular accumulation indicating abnormal trafficking. As both R1138Q and R1314W displayed endoplasmic reticulum localization, we tested whether 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a drug approved for clinical use, could restore their intracellular trafficking to the plasma membrane in MDCKII and mouse liver. The cellular localization of R1314W was significantly improved by 4-PBA treatment, thus potentially rescuing its physiological function. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of the in vivo rescue of cellular maturation of some ABCC6 mutants in physiological conditions very similar to the biology of the fully differentiated human liver and could have future human therapeutic application. PMID:21935449

  10. The Annotation of Both Human and Mouse Kinomes in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot

    PubMed Central

    Quintaje, Silvia Braconi; Orchard, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Biomolecule phosphorylation by protein kinases is a fundamental cell signaling process in all living cells. Following the comprehensive cataloguing of the protein kinase complement of the human genome (Manning, G., Whyte, D. B., Martinez, R., Hunter, T., and Sudarsanam, S. (2002) The protein kinase complement of the human genome. Science 298, 1912–1934), this review will detail the state-of-the-art human and mouse kinase proteomes as provided in the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot protein knowledgebase. The sequences of the 480 classical and up to 24 atypical protein kinases now believed to exist in the human genome and 484 classical and up to 24 atypical kinases within the mouse genome have been reviewed and, where necessary, revised. Extensive annotation has been added to each entry. In an era when a wealth of new databases is emerging on the Internet, UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot makes available to the scientific community the most up-to-date and in-depth annotation of these proteins with access to additional external resources linked from within each entry. Incorrect sequence annotations resulting from errors and artifacts have been eliminated. Each entry will be constantly reviewed and updated as new information becomes available with the orthologous enzymes in related species being annotated in a parallel effort and complete kinomes being completed as sequences become available. This ensures that the mammalian kinomes available from UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot are of a consistently high standard with each separate entry acting both as a valuable information resource and a central portal to a wealth of further detail via extensive cross-referencing. PMID:18436524

  11. A novel mouse model for stable engraftment of a human immune system and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Strick-Marchand, Helene; Dusséaux, Mathilde; Darche, Sylvie; Huntington, Nicholas D; Legrand, Nicolas; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Corcuff, Erwan; Ahodantin, James; Weijer, Kees; Spits, Hergen; Kremsdorf, Dina; Di Santo, James P

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic infections by hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Plasmodium parasites leading to acute or chronic diseases constitute a global health challenge. The species tropism of these hepatotropic pathogens is restricted to chimpanzees and humans, thus model systems to study their pathological mechanisms are severely limited. Although these pathogens infect hepatocytes, disease pathology is intimately related to the degree and quality of the immune response. As a first step to decipher the immune response to infected hepatocytes, we developed an animal model harboring both a human immune system (HIS) and human hepatocytes (HUHEP) in BALB/c Rag2-/- IL-2Rγc-/- NOD.sirpa uPAtg/tg mice. The extent and kinetics of human hepatocyte engraftment were similar between HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. Transplanted human hepatocytes were polarized and mature in vivo, resulting in 20-50% liver chimerism in these models. Human myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages developed at similar frequencies in HIS and HIS-HUHEP mice, and splenic and hepatic compartments were humanized with mature B cells, NK cells and naïve T cells, as well as monocytes and dendritic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HIS-HUHEP mice can be stably (> 5 months) and robustly engrafted with a humanized immune system and chimeric human liver. This novel HIS-HUHEP model provides a platform to investigate human immune responses against hepatotropic pathogens and to test novel drug strategies or vaccine candidates. PMID:25782010

  12. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing ‘humanized’ mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how “human-like” can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1_CYP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+)_severe-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs. PMID:19285097

  13. Structure of the chromosomal gene for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: comparison of the mouse and human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, S; Otsuka, T; Yokota, T; Lee, F; Arai, K

    1985-01-01

    A cDNA clone that expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in COS-7 cells has been isolated from a pcD library prepared from mRNA derived from concanavalin A-activated mouse helper T cell clones. Based on homology with the mouse GM-CSF cDNA sequence, the mouse GM-CSF gene was isolated. The human GM-CSF gene was also isolated based on homology with the human GM-CSF cDNA sequence. The nucleotide sequences determined for the genes and their flanking regions revealed that both the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are composed of three introns and four exons. The organization of the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are highly homologous and strong sequence homology between the two genes is found both in the coding and non-coding regions. A 'TATA'-like sequence was found 20-25 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. In the 5'-flanking region, there is a highly homologous region extending 330 bp upstream of the putative TATA box. This sequence may play a role in regulation of expression of the GM-CSF gene. These structures are compared with those of different lymphokine genes and their regulatory regions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3876930

  14. Chromosomal localization of the gastric and brain receptors for cholecystokinin (CCKAR and CCKBR) in human and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Huppi, K.; Siwarski, D.; Pisegna, J.R.

    1995-02-10

    Receptors for cholcystokinin (CCK) can be pharmacologically classified into at least two distinct subtypes, CCK{sub A}R and CCK{sub B}R. In an effort to determine whether the CCK{sub A} and CCK{sub B} receptors may be associated with certain CNS or gastrointestinal diseases, we have localized and compared the human and mouse chromosomal loci encoded by the CCKAR and CCKBR genes. The gene encoding the CCK{sub A} receptor maps to a syntenic region of human chromosome 4 and mouse chromosome 5. The CCKB receptor gene, on the other hand, resides on a syntenic region of human chromosome 11 and distal mouse chromosome 7. Localization of the CCK receptors with two dopamine receptors, DRD5 (4p15.1-p15.3) and DRD4 (11p15) provides the interesting possibility of coinvolvement in neuropsychiatric or CNS illnesses. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Reactivation of silent rRNA genes by simian virus 40 in human-mouse hybrid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soprano, K J; Dev, V G; Croce, C M; Baserga, R

    1979-01-01

    Mouse-human hybrid cells were used to study the ability of simian virus 40 to regulate the expression of rRNA genes in vivo. In these hybrid cells, only the rRNA genes of the dominant species are expressed; the genes for the rRNA of the recessive species are silent. Simian virus 40 infection of these hybrids led to the production of two distinct 28S rRNA species as analyzed by agarose/2.4% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These species were identified as human and mouse rRNAs. This result was confirmed by histochemical studies which indicated that the nucleolus organizer regions of both mouse and human chromosomes were actively synthesizing rRNA in the virus-infected hybrid cells. These results indicate that simian virus 40 infection can induce the expression of otherwise silent rRNA genes. Images PMID:226986

  16. Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) Program is a multiinstitutional effort to identify and sequence a cDNA clone containing a complete ORF for each human and mouse gene. ESTs were generated from libraries enriched for full-length cDNAs and analyzed to identify candidate full-ORF clones, which then were sequenced to high accuracy. The MGC has currently sequenced and verified the full ORF for a nonredundant set of >9,000 human and >6,000 mouse genes. Candidate full-ORF clones for an additional 7,800 human and 3,500 mouse genes also have been identified. All MGC sequences and clones are available without restriction through public databases and clone distribution networks (see http://mgc.nci.nih.gov). PMID:12477932

  17. Homologs of Drosophila fushi-tarazu factor 1 map to mouse chromosome 2 and human chromosome 9q33

    SciTech Connect

    Taketo, Makoto; Parker, K.L.; Howard, T.A.

    1995-01-20

    SF-1, a nuclear receptor that regulates gene expression of the cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases, and ELP, an embryonal protein that suppresses expression of the Moloney murine leukemia virus LTR, are isoforms transcribed from the same gene by alternative promoter usage and splicing. This gene is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fushi-tarazu factor 1 (FTZ-Fl) gene. We have mapped the mouse gene Ftzf1 to the proximal quarter of Chr 2 by a linkage analysis using interspecific backcross mice, and its human homolog FTZ1 to Chr 9q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The mouse and human genes are located in the homologous regions of mouse Chr 2 and human Chr 9, respectively. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  19. Distinct Human and Mouse Membrane Trafficking Systems for Sweet Taste Receptors T1r2 and T1r3

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  20. Molecular cloning of a highly conserved mouse and human integral membrane protein (Itm1) and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Guizhu; Tylzanowski, P.; Deleersnijder, W.

    1996-02-01

    We have isolated and characterized a novel cDNA coding for a highly hydrophobic protein (B5) from a fetal mouse mandibular condyle cDNA library. The full-length mouse B5 cDNA is 3095 nucleotides long and contains a potential open reading frame coding for a protein of 705 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 80.5 kDa. The B5 mRNA is differentially polyadenylated, with the most abundant transcript having a length of 2.7 kb. The human homolog of B5 was isolated from a cDNA testis library. The predicted amino acid sequence of the human B5 is 98.5% identical to that of mouse. The most striking feature of the B5 protein is the presence of numerous (10-14) potential transmembrane domains, characteristic of an integral membrane protein. Similarity searches in public databanks reveal that B5 is 58% similar to the T12A2.2 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans and 60% similar to the STT3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Futhermore, the report of an EST sequence (Accession No. Z13858) related to the human B5, but identical to the STT3 gene, indicates that B5 belongs to a larger gene family coding for novel putative transmembrane proteins. This family exhibits a remarkable degree of conservation in different species. The gene for B5, designated Itm1 (Integral membrane protein 1), is located on mouse chromosome 9. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Specificity and rate of human and mouse liver and plasma phosphatidylcholine synthesis analyzed in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pynn, Christopher J; Henderson, Neil G; Clark, Howard; Koster, Grielof; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Postle, Anthony D

    2011-02-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis by the direct cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) pathway in rat liver generates predominantly mono- and di-unsaturated molecular species, while polyunsaturated PC species are synthesized largely by the phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway. Although altered PC synthesis has been suggested to contribute to development of hepatocarcinoma and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, analysis of the specificity of hepatic PC metabolism in human patients has been limited by the lack of sensitive and safe methodologies. Here we incorporated a deuterated methyl-D(9)-labled choline chloride, to quantify biosynthesis fluxes through both of the PC synthetic pathways in vivo in human volunteers and compared these fluxes with those in mice. Rates and molecular specificities of label incorporated into mouse liver and plasma PC were very similar and strongly suggest that label incorporation into human plasma PC can provide a direct measure of hepatic PC synthesis in human subjects. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that the PEMT pathway in human liver is selective for polyunsaturated PC species, especially those containing docosahexaenoic acid. Finally, we present a multiple isotopomer distribution analysis approach, based on transfer of deuterated methyl groups to S-adenosylmethionine and subsequent sequential methylations of PE, to quantify absolute flux rates through the PEMT pathway that are applicable to studies of liver dysfunction in clinical studies. PMID:21068006

  2. Regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: from mouse models to clinical research.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Fujimoto, Manabu; Sato, Shinichi

    2015-10-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and in clinical research using human samples. PMID:25957264

  3. Development and rescue of human familial hypercholesterolaemia in a xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Wang, Lili; Legras, Xavier; Saha, Pradip K.; Chen, Leon; Bell, Peter; Pankowicz, Francis P.; Hill, Matthew C.; Barzi, Mercedes; Leyton, Claudia Kettlun; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Kruse, Robert L.; Himes, Ryan W.; Goss, John A.; Wilson, James M.; Chan, Lawrence; Lagor, William R.; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of lipid metabolism are a major cause of human morbidity, but no animal model entirely recapitulates human lipoprotein metabolism. Here we develop a xenograft mouse model using hepatocytes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia caused by loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Like familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, our familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice develop hypercholesterolaemia and a 'humanized‘ serum profile, including expression of the emerging drug targets cholesteryl ester transfer protein and apolipoprotein (a), for which no genes exist in mice. We go on to replace the missing LDLR in familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice using an adeno-associated virus 9-based gene therapy and restore normal lipoprotein profiles after administration of a single dose. Our study marks the first time a human metabolic disease is induced in an experimental animal model by human hepatocyte transplantation and treated by gene therapy. Such xenograft platforms offer the ability to validate human experimental therapies and may foster their rapid translation into the clinic. PMID:26081744

  4. Comparison of chemical-induced changes in proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse neuroprogenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Culbreth, Megan E; Harrill, Joshua A; Freudenrich, Theresa M; Mundy, William R; Shafer, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    There is a need to develop rapid and efficient models to screen chemicals for their potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity. Use of in vitro neuronal models, including human cells, is one approach that allows for timely, cost-effective toxicity screening. The present study compares the sensitivity of human (ReN CX) and mouse (mCNS) neuroprogenitor cell lines to chemicals using a multiplex assay for proliferation and apoptosis, endpoints that are critical for neural development. Cells were exposed to 0.001-100 μM concentrations of 11 chemicals (cadmium, chlorpyrifos oxon, dexamethasone, dieldrin, ketamine, lead, maneb, methylmercury, nicotine, trans-retinoic acid, and trimethyltin) reported in the literature to affect proliferation and/or apoptosis, and 5 chemicals (dimethyl pthalate, glyphosate, omeprazole, saccharin, and d-sorbitol) with no reports of effects on either endpoint. High-content screening of markers for proliferation (BrdU incorporation) and apoptosis (activated caspase 3 and p53) was used to assess the effect of chemicals in both cell lines. Of the chemicals tested, methylmercury, cadmium, dieldrin, chlorpyrifos oxon, trans-retinoic acid, and trimethyltin decreased proliferation by at least 50% of control in either the ReN CX or mCNS cells. None of the chemicals tested activated caspase 3 or p53 in the ReN CX cells, while methylmercury, cadmium, dieldrin, chlorpyrifos oxon, trimethyltin, and glyphosate all induced at least a doubling in these apoptotic markers in the mCNS cells. Compared to control, cadmium, trans-retinoic acid, and trimethyltin decreased cell viability (ATP levels) by at least 50% in the ReN CX cells, while cadmium, dieldrin, and methylmercury decreased viability by at least 50% in the mCNS cells. Based on these results, BrdU is an appropriate marker for assessing chemical effects on proliferation, and human cells are more sensitive than mouse cells for this endpoint. By contrast, caspase 3 and p53 were altered by environmental chemicals in mouse, but not in human cells. Therefore, these markers are not appropriate to assess the ability of environmental chemicals to induce apoptosis in the ReN CX cells. PMID:22634143

  5. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Mulley, J.C.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  6. Mouse models of human TB pathology: roles in the analysis of necrosis and the development of host-directed therapies.

    PubMed

    Kramnik, Igor; Beamer, Gillian

    2016-03-01

    A key aspect of TB pathogenesis that maintains Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the human population is the ability to cause necrosis in pulmonary lesions. As co-evolution shaped M . tuberculosis (M.tb) and human responses, the complete TB disease profile and lesion manifestation are not fully reproduced by any animal model. However, animal models are absolutely critical to understand how infection with virulent M.tb generates outcomes necessary for the pathogen transmission and evolutionary success. In humans, a wide spectrum of TB outcomes has been recognized based on clinical and epidemiological data. In mice, there is clear genetic basis for susceptibility. Although the spectra of human and mouse TB do not completely overlap, comparison of human TB with mouse lesions across genetically diverse strains firmly establishes points of convergence. By embracing the genetic heterogeneity of the mouse population, we gain tremendous advantage in the quest for suitable in vivo models. Below, we review genetically defined mouse models that recapitulate a key element of M.tb pathogenesis-induction of necrotic TB lesions in the lungs-and discuss how these models may reflect TB stratification and pathogenesis in humans. The approach ensures that roles that mouse models play in basic and translational TB research will continue to increase allowing researchers to address fundamental questions of TB pathogenesis and bacterial physiology in vivo using this well-defined, reproducible, and cost-efficient system. Combination of the new generation mouse models with advanced imaging technologies will also allow rapid and inexpensive assessment of experimental vaccines and therapies prior to testing in larger animals and clinical trials. PMID:26542392

  7. Aldose reductases influence prostaglandin F2α levels and adipocyte differentiation in male mouse and human species.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Loubeau, Gaëlle; Dani, Christian; Slim, Karem; Martin, Gwenaëlle; Volat, Fanny; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Aldose reductases (AKR1B) are widely expressed oxidoreductases whose physiological function remains elusive. Some isoforms are genuine prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) synthases, suggesting they might influence adipose homeostasis because PGF2α inhibits adipogenesis. This was shown by Akr1b7 gene ablation in the mouse, which resulted in increased adiposity related to a lower PGF2α content in fat. Yet humans have no ortholog gene for Akr1b7, so the role of aldose reductases in human adipose homeostasis remains to be explored. We analyzed expression of genes encoding human and mouse aldose reductase isoforms in adipose tissues and differentiating adipocytes to assess conserved mechanisms regulating PGF2α synthesis and adipogenesis. The Akr1b3 gene encoded the most abundant isoform in mouse adipose tissue, whereas Akr1b7 encoded the only isoform enriched in the stromal vascular fraction. Most mouse aldose reductase gene expression peaked in early adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells and diminished with differentiation. In contrast with its mouse ortholog Akr1b3, AKR1B1 expression increased throughout differentiation of human multipotent adipose-derived stem cells, paralleling PGF2α release, whereas PGF2α receptor (FP) levels collapsed in early differentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of aldose reductase using Statil altered PGF2α production and enhanced human multipotent adipose-derived stem adipocyte differentiation. As expected, the adipogenic effects of Statil were counteracted by an FP agonist (cloprostenol). Thus, in both species aldose reductase-dependent PGF2α production could be important in early differentiation to restrict adipogenesis. PGF2α antiadipogenic signaling could then be toned down through the FP receptor or aldose reductases down-regulation in human and mouse cells, respectively. Our data suggest that aldose reductase inhibitors could have obesogenic potential. PMID:25730106

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, homologous to Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-08-01

    WNT signaling molecules play key roles in carcinogenesis and embryogenesis. Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin) is essential for Wnt/Wingless-dependent patterning in dorsal epidermis and also for hindgut development. With Wnt signaling, Lin accumulates in the nucleus to modulate transcription of Wnt target genes through association with beta-catenin/Armadillo and TCF/Pangolin. Here, human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, encoding proteins with Drosophila Lin homologous domain, were isolated using bioinformatics and cDNA-PCR. Human WINS1 encoded 757-amino-acid protein, and mouse Wins2 encoded 498-amino-acid protein. Human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 showed 60.0% total-amino-acid identity. Lin homologous domain of WINS1 and Wins2 showed 29.4% and 27.2% amino-acid identity with that of Drosphila Lin, respectively. In the human chromosome 15q26 region, WINS1 gene was clustered with ASB7 gene encoding ankyrin repeat and SOCS box-containing protein 7. Human WINS1 mRNA of 2.8-kb in size was expressed in adult testis, prostate, spleen, thymus, skeletal muscle, fetal kidney and brain. This is the first report on molecular cloning and initial characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 PMID:12119551

  9. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening. PMID:26582961

  10. Sox10 Expressing Cells in the Lateral Wall of the Aged Mouse and Human Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xinping; Xing, Yazhi; Moore, Michael W.; Zhang, Jianning; Han, Demin; Schulte, Bradley A.; Dubno, Judy R.; Lang, Hainan

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is a common human disorder, affecting one in three Americans aged 60 and over. Previous studies have shown that presbyacusis is associated with a loss of non-sensory cells in the cochlear lateral wall. Sox10 is a transcription factor crucial to the development and maintenance of neural crest-derived cells including some non-sensory cell types in the cochlea. Mutations of the Sox10 gene are known to cause various combinations of hearing loss and pigmentation defects in humans. This study investigated the potential relationship between Sox10 gene expression and pathological changes in the cochlear lateral wall of aged CBA/CaJ mice and human temporal bones from older donors. Cochlear tissues prepared from young adult (1–3 month-old) and aged (2–2.5 year-old) mice, and human temporal bone donors were examined using quantitative immunohistochemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Cells expressing Sox10 were present in the stria vascularis, outer sulcus and spiral prominence in mouse and human cochleas. The Sox10+ cell types included marginal and intermediate cells and outer sulcus cells, including those that border the scala media and those extending into root processes (root cells) in the spiral ligament. Quantitative analysis of immunostaining revealed a significant decrease in the number of Sox10+ marginal cells and outer sulcus cells in aged mice. Electron microscopic evaluation revealed degenerative alterations in the surviving Sox10+ cells in aged mice. Strial marginal cells in human cochleas from donors aged 87 and older showed only weak immunostaining for Sox10. Decreases in Sox10 expression levels and a loss of Sox10+ cells in both mouse and human aged ears suggests an important role of Sox10 in the maintenance of structural and functional integrity of the lateral wall. A loss of Sox10+ cells may also be associated with a decline in the repair capabilities of non-sensory cells in the aged ear. PMID:24887110

  11. Reactivity of mouse T-cell hybridomas expressing human Vbeta gene segments with staphylococcal and streptococcal superantigens.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, B; Necker, A; Leget, C; Malissen, B; Romagne, F

    1996-01-01

    A panel of 15 mouse T-cell hybridomas, each expressing a different human Vbeta gene segment (hVbeta) in an otherwise mouse T-cell receptor (i.e., mouse alpha chain and CD3 complex), was constructed by transfection of hVbeta/mouse Cbeta chimeric T-cell receptor (TCR)-beta genes into a mouse T-cell hybridoma recipient lacking the endogenous TCR-beta chain. Several qualities that are conferred by the hVbeta chain of the TCR are retained in the chimeric human-mouse TCR complex: a large panel of hVbeta-specific antibodies specifically stained the hVbeta expressed by the mouse T-cell hybridomas. Moreover, hVbeta-transfected mouse cells could readily produce interleukin 2 when stimulated by superantigens presented by antigen-presenting cells. These characteristics made it possible to refine the reactivity of 17 superantigen preparations with the available transfected Vbetas. Each superantigen gave a characteristic pattern of reactivity on the transfectants. Positive reactivities with some of these transfectants, which differ only by the expressed hVbeta, demonstrate unambiguously the superantigenic character of a protein or fraction and its potential to react with the corresponding Vbetas. Therefore, these hVbeta-transfected cells constituted a valuable tool for determining "specificity fingerprints" of known or putative superantigens. First, commonly used, commercially available superantigens such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) showed additional Vbeta reactivities, compared with those of their recombinant counterparts. This stresses the importance of using defined preparations of superantigens for the definition of Vbeta specificities. Second, the stimulatory pattern of a strain of Streptococcus pyogenes demonstrated that this strain, unlike others, produces a potent Vbeta 8-specific superantigen that is an yet undefined at the molecular level. PMID:8641811

  12. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  13. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A R; Harkness, John H; Neve, Kim A; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K; Eshleman, Amy J; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  14. Analysis of PRICKLE1 in human cleft palate and mouse development demonstrates rare and common variants involved in human malformations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Jia, Zhonglin; Bryant-Pike, Whitney; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Murray, Jeffrey C; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bassuk, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Palate development is shaped by multiple molecular signaling pathways, including the Wnt pathway. In mice and humans, mutations in both the canonical and noncanonical arms of the Wnt pathway manifest as cleft palate, one of the most common human birth defects. Like the palate, numerous studies also link different Wnt signaling perturbations to varying degrees of limb malformation; for example, shortened limbs form in mutations of Ror2,Vangl2looptail and, in particular, Wnt5a. We recently showed the noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling molecule Prickle1 (Prickle like 1) also stunts limb growth in mice. We now expanded these studies to the palate and show that Prickle1 is also required for palate development, like Wnt5a and Ror2. Unlike in the limb, the Vangl2looptail mutation only aggravates palate defects caused by other mutations. We screened Filipino cleft palate patients and found PRICKLE1 variants, both common and rare, at an elevated frequency. Our results reveal that in mice and humans PRICKLE1 directs palate morphogenesis; our results also uncouple Prickle1 function from Vangl2 function. Together, these findings suggest mouse and human palate development is guided by PCP-Prickle1 signaling that is probably not downstream of Vangl2. PMID:24689077

  15. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  16. In vitro drug metabolism of green tea catechins in human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy W; Qin, Geng-Yao; Zhang, Ting; Feng, Wan-Yong

    2012-06-01

    The metabolic fate of green tea catechins [(-)-epicatechin ((-)-EC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) (-)- epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)] in cryopreserved human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes was studied. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation and isomerization pathways of (-)-EC in all five species were found. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation, hydrolysis, isomerization and glucosidation pathways of ECG were found. Species differences in metabolism of (-)-EC or ECG were observed. Surprisingly, no metabolites of EGC or EGCG were detected, but chemical oxidation and polymerization were observed under these experimental conditions. It appeared that enzymatic reactions and chemical reactions were differentiated by an additional hydroxyl group on the B-ring between (-)-EC/ECG and EGC/EGCG. For (-)-EC, thirty-five metabolites including isomerized (M6. M10 and M25), glucuronidated (M3, M5 and M11), sulfated (M7, M15, M16, M18, M20, M23, M26), methylated (M2, M9, M12, M17, M19, M21, M27, M30, M32), glucuronated/methylated (M4, M8, M13, M14), sulfated/methylated (M22, M24, M28, M29, M31, M33, M34, M35) and diglucuronidate (M1), were detected and characterized. M11, M18, M19 and M23 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M10, M20, M22, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M5, M6 and M10 were major metabolites in rat hepatocytes; and M5, M6 and M13 were major metabolites in mouse hepatocytes. For ECG, twelve metabolites including isomerized (M1), hydrolyzed (M3), glucosidated (M2), glucuronidated (M4 and M6), sulfated (M9, M11 and M12), methylated (M7), sulfated/glucuronidated/methylated (M8 and M10) and diglucuronidated (M5), were detected and characterized. M4, M11 and M12 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11 and M12 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M3 and M11 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M4, M6 and M11 were major metabolites in rat hepatocytes, and M3 was a major metabolite in mouse hepatocytes. The experimental results have demonstrated that fate of catechins in in vitro hepatocytes depends on metabolism and chemical stability. In certain experimental conditions, the chemical reaction may become a dominant pathway. PMID:22594564

  17. Cloning, characterization, and mapping of human homolog of mouse T-cell death-associated gene.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, H; Zeng, Z; Su, K; Fan, P; Shell, B K; Carter, K C; Li, Y

    1998-06-01

    To establish immunologic autotolerance, self-reactive immature thymocytes are eliminated by negative selection during T-cell development in the thymus. Self-reactive clones undergo apoptosis after stimulation via the T-cell receptor (TCR). The process of cell selection is determined by the dedication of the TCR for tolerogenic antigen/major histocompatibility complex. We have cloned a novel human gene that is highly homologous in the transmembrane and G protein-coupling domains to mouse T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8). The gene, human TDAG8 (hTDAG8), which belongs to the G protein-couple receptor superfamily, encodes a protein of 337 amino acids. An expressed sequence tag (EST) corresponding to hTDAG8 was identified from a human thyroid cDNA library and subsequently used to isolate a full-length genomic clone. Northern blot analysis revealed that the hTDAG8 gene is expressed predominantly in lymphoid tissues, including peripheral blood leukocytes, spleen, lymph nodes, and thymus. Stably transfected mammalian CHO cells were generated, and heterologous expression of hTDAG8 was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that hTDAG8 maps to human chromosome 14q31-32.1, a region in which abnormalities associated with human T-cell lymphoma or leukemia are found. Taken together, these data implicate the hTDAG8 gene in T-cell-associated diseases in humans, but its actual physiological and pathological role in the human immune system needs further investigation. PMID:9655242

  18. A mouse model for a partially inactive obesity-associated human MC3R variant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonggi; Koo, Jashin; Yun Jun, Joo; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lee, Yongjun; Seo, Arnold Y.; Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C.; Adler-Wailes, Diane C.; Chen, Faye; Gardner, Ryan; Koutzoumis, Dimitri; Sherafat Kazemzadeh, Roya; Roberson, Robin B.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported children homozygous for two MC3R sequence variants (C17A+G241A) have greater fat mass than controls. Here we show, using homozygous knock-in mouse models in which we replace murine Mc3r with wild-type human (MC3RhWT/hWT) and double-mutant (C17A+G241A) human (MC3RhDM/hDM) MC3R, that MC3RhDM/hDM have greater weight and fat mass, increased energy intake and feeding efficiency, but reduced length and fat-free mass compared with MC3RhWT/hWT. MC3RhDM/hDM mice do not have increased adipose tissue inflammatory cell infiltration or greater expression of inflammatory markers despite their greater fat mass. Serum adiponectin levels are increased in MC3RhDM/hDM mice and MC3RhDM/hDM human subjects. MC3RhDM/hDM bone- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that accumulate more triglyceride than MC3RhWT/hWT MSCs. MC3RhDM/hDM impacts nutrient partitioning to generate increased adipose tissue that appears metabolically healthy. These data confirm the importance of MC3R signalling in human metabolism and suggest a previously-unrecognized role for the MC3R in adipose tissue development. PMID:26818770

  19. Immortalization of human lymphocytes by transfection with DNA from mouse L929 cytoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Abken, H.; Buetzler, C.; Willecke, K.

    1988-01-01

    Transfection of human peripheral blood lymphocytes with DNA from mouse L929 cytoplasts induced proliferation of lymphocytes and the formation of B and T cell-derived cell lines with apparently unlimited growth potential. The cell lines could be grown in serum-containing media as well as in chemically defined serum-free media, have a nearly normal human karyotype, did not form colonies in soft-agar medium, and were not tumorigenic after injection into nude mice. For immortalization of human lymphocytes DNA from L929 cytoplasts was 100-fold more efficient than L929 nuclear DNA. The ability of cytoplast DNA to immortalize lymphocytes could be consecutively transferred by using total cellular DNA from primary or secondary transfectants. Circular or linear mitochondrial DNA of L929 cells did not lead to immortilization of human lymphocytes. Since DNA with immortalizing activity could be isolated from cytoplasts, the Hirt supernatant, and a mitochondria-depleted cytoplasmic fraction of L929 cells. The authors conclude that the immortalizing DNA is located extramitochondrially in the cytoplasm of L929 cells.

  20. Maternally transmitted milk containing recombinant human catalase provides protection against oxidation for mouse offspring during lactation.

    PubMed

    He, Zuyong; Yu, Shengli; Mei, Gui; Zheng, Min; Wang, Meili; Dai, Yunping; Tang, Bo; Li, Ning

    2008-10-15

    Catalase plays an important role in protecting organisms against oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by degrading surplus hydrogen peroxide. Addition of exogenous catalase can alleviate injuries caused by ROS. Thus, production of human catalase through genetic engineering will meet the increasing therapeutic demand for this enzyme. In this study, we successfully expressed the recombinant gene in mouse mammary gland, and biologically active human catalase was secreted into the milk of the transgenic mice. The peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS) within the catalase gene had no significant negative effect on the secretion of the recombinant protein. Intake of the transgenic milk by the pups was found to decrease lipid peroxidation, increase the total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity in the brain, and enhance the total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) of brain, liver, and serum. To our knowledge, this is the first example of efficient production of biologically active human catalase in the milk of transgenic animals. Our study suggests that scaled-up production in transgenic farm animals would yield sufficient human catalase for biomedical research and clinical therapies. PMID:18722522

  1. Comparative Characterization of the Human and Mouse Third Ventricle Germinal Zones

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Sonika; Lee, Da Yong; Gutmann, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates differences in neural stem cell (NSC) biology in different brain regions. For example, we demonstrated that neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) tumor suppressor gene inactivation leads to increased NSC proliferation and gliogenesis in the optic chiasm and brainstem, but not in the cerebral cortex. The differential effect of Nf1 inactivation in the optic nerve and brainstem (in which gliomas commonly form in children with NF1) vs. the cortex (in which gliomas rarely develop) suggests the existence of distinct ventricular zones for gliomagenesis in children and adults. Here, we characterized the third ventricle subventricular zone (tv-SVZ) in young and adult mice and human brains. In children but not adult humans the tv-SVZ contains nestin-positive, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive, brain fatty acid binding protein-positive and sox2-positive cells with radial processes and prominent cilia. In contrast, the tv-SVZ in young mice contains sox2-positive progenitor cells and ciliated ependymal lining cells, but lacks GFAP-positive, nestin-positive radial glia. As in the lateral ventricle SVZ (lv-SVZ), proliferation in the human and murine tv-SVZ decreases with age. The tv-SVZ in adult mice lacks the hypocellular subventricular zone observed in adult human specimens. Collectively, these data indicate the existence of a subventricular zone relevant to our understanding of glioma formation in children and will assist interpretation of genetically engineered mouse glioma models. PMID:21666496

  2. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation. PMID:25557326

  3. Null mutations in human and mouse orthologs frequently result in different phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ben-Yang; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2008-01-01

    One-to-one orthologous genes of relatively closely related species are widely assumed to have similar functions and cause similar phenotypes when deleted from the genome. Although this assumption is the foundation of comparative genomics and the basis for the use of model organisms to study human biology and disease, its validity is known only from anecdotes rather than from systematic examination. Comparing documented phenotypes of null mutations in humans and mice, we find that >20% of human essential genes have nonessential mouse orthologs. These changes of gene essentiality appear to be associated with adaptive evolution at the protein-sequence, but not gene-expression, level. Proteins localized to the vacuole, a cellular compartment for waste management, are highly enriched among essentiality-changing genes. It is probable that the evolution of the prolonged life history in humans required enhanced waste management for proper cellular function until the time of reproduction, which rendered these vacuole proteins essential and generated selective pressures for their improvement. If our gene sample represents the entire genome, our results would mean frequent changes of phenotypic effects of one-to-one orthologous genes even between relatively closely related species, a possibility that should be considered in comparative genomic studies and in making cross-species inferences of gene function and phenotypic effect. PMID:18458337

  4. Characterization of hematopoietic GATA transcription factor expression in mouse and human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, Maaike R; Salunkhe, Vishal; De Cuyper, Iris M; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Li, Eveline; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key initiators and regulators of the immune response. The development of the DC lineage and their subsets requires an orchestrated regulation of their transcriptional program. Gata1, a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic cell lineages, has been recently reported to be required for mouse DC development and function. In humans, GATA1 is involved in the lineage separation between monocyte-derived DCs and Langerhans cells (LC) and loss of GATA1 results in differentiation arrest at the monocyte stage. The hematopoietic GATA factors (i.e. Gata1, Gata2, Gata3) are known to regulate each other's expression and to function consecutively throughout lineage commitment (so-called GATA switch). In humans, mutations in GATA2 are causative of MonoMAC disease, a human immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by loss of DCs, monocytes, B and NK cells. However, additional data on the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in the DC lineage is missing. In this study, we have characterized the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in murine and human DCs and their expression dynamics upon TLR stimulation. We found that all hematopoietic GATA factors are expressed in DCs, but identified species-specific differences in the relative expression of each GATA factor, and how their expression fluctuates upon stimulation. PMID:26460250

  5. The Human Splice Variant ?16HER2 Induces Rapid Tumor Onset in a Reporter Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Iezzi, Manuela; Zenobi, Santa; Montani, Maura; Pietrella, Lucia; Kalogris, Cristina; Rossini, Anna; Ciravolo, Valentina; Castagnoli, Lorenzo; Tagliabue, Elda; Pupa, Serenella M.; Musiani, Piero; Monaci, Paolo; Menard, Sylvie; Amici, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Several transgenic mice models solidly support the hypothesis that HER2 (ERBB2) overexpression or mutation promotes tumorigenesis. Recently, a HER2 splice variant lacking exon-16 (?16HER2) has been detected in human breast carcinomas. This alternative protein, a normal byproduct of HER2, has an increased transforming potency compared to wild-type (wt) HER2 receptors. To examine the ability of ?16HER2 to transform mammary epithelium in vivo and to monitor ?16HER2-driven tumorigenesis in live mice, we generated and characterized a mouse line that transgenically expresses both human ?16HER2 and firefly luciferase under the transcriptional control of the MMTV promoter. All the transgenic females developed multifocal mammary tumors with a rapid onset and an average latency of 15.11 weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the concurrent expression of luciferase and the human ?16HER2 oncogene only in the mammary gland and in strict correlation with tumor development. Transgenic ?16HER2 expressed on the tumor cell plasma membrane from spontaneous mammary adenocarcinomas formed constitutively active homodimers able to activate the oncogenic signal transduction pathway mediated through Src kinase. These new transgenic animals demonstrate the ability of the human ?16HER2 isoform to transform per se mammary epithelium in vivo. The high tumor incidence as well as the short latency strongly suggests that the ?16HER2 splice variant represents the transforming form of the HER2 oncoprotein. PMID:21559085

  6. The human splice variant ?16HER2 induces rapid tumor onset in a reporter transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Cristina; Gabrielli, Federico; Iezzi, Manuela; Zenobi, Santa; Montani, Maura; Pietrella, Lucia; Kalogris, Cristina; Rossini, Anna; Ciravolo, Valentina; Castagnoli, Lorenzo; Tagliabue, Elda; Pupa, Serenella M; Musiani, Piero; Monaci, Paolo; Menard, Sylvie; Amici, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Several transgenic mice models solidly support the hypothesis that HER2 (ERBB2) overexpression or mutation promotes tumorigenesis. Recently, a HER2 splice variant lacking exon-16 (?16HER2) has been detected in human breast carcinomas. This alternative protein, a normal byproduct of HER2, has an increased transforming potency compared to wild-type (wt) HER2 receptors. To examine the ability of ?16HER2 to transform mammary epithelium in vivo and to monitor ?16HER2-driven tumorigenesis in live mice, we generated and characterized a mouse line that transgenically expresses both human ?16HER2 and firefly luciferase under the transcriptional control of the MMTV promoter. All the transgenic females developed multifocal mammary tumors with a rapid onset and an average latency of 15.11 weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the concurrent expression of luciferase and the human ?16HER2 oncogene only in the mammary gland and in strict correlation with tumor development. Transgenic ?16HER2 expressed on the tumor cell plasma membrane from spontaneous mammary adenocarcinomas formed constitutively active homodimers able to activate the oncogenic signal transduction pathway mediated through Src kinase. These new transgenic animals demonstrate the ability of the human ?16HER2 isoform to transform "per se" mammary epithelium in vivo. The high tumor incidence as well as the short latency strongly suggests that the ?16HER2 splice variant represents the transforming form of the HER2 oncoprotein. PMID:21559085

  7. Pathway-Specific Engineered Mouse Allograft Models Functionally Recapitulate Human Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabova, Ludmila; Bupp, Sujata; Kamal, Muhaymin; Householder, Deborah B.; Hernandez, Lidia; Schlomer, Jerome J.; Baran, Maureen L.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Martin, Philip L.; Van Dyke, Terry A.

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate from ovarian cancers can be attributed to late-stage diagnosis and lack of effective treatment. Despite enormous effort to develop better targeted therapies, platinum-based chemotherapy still remains the standard of care for ovarian cancer patients, and resistance occurs at a high rate. One of the rate limiting factors for translation of new drug discoveries into clinical treatments has been the lack of suitable preclinical cancer models with high predictive value. We previously generated genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models based on perturbation of Tp53 and Rb with or without Brca1 or Brca2 that develop serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) closely resembling the human disease on histologic and molecular levels. Here, we describe an adaptation of these GEM models to orthotopic allografts that uniformly develop tumors with short latency and are ideally suited for routine preclinical studies. Ovarian tumors deficient in Brca1 respond to treatment with cisplatin and olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, whereas Brca1-wild type tumors are non-responsive to treatment, recapitulating the relative sensitivities observed in patients. These mouse models provide the opportunity for evaluation of effective therapeutics, including prediction of differential responses in Brca1-wild type and Brca1–deficient tumors and development of relevant biomarkers. PMID:24748377

  8. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  9. Regulation of homocysteine metabolism and methylation in human and mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Natalie C; Yang, Fan; Capecci, Louis M; Gu, Ziyu; Schafer, Andrew I; Durante, William; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2010-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism involves multiple enzymes; however, tissue Hcy metabolism and its relevance to methylation remain unknown. Here, we established gene expression profiles of 8 Hcy metabolic and 12 methylation enzymes in 20 human and 19 mouse tissues through bioinformatic analysis using expression sequence tag clone counts in tissue cDNA libraries. We analyzed correlations between gene expression, Hcy, S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) levels, and SAM/SAH ratios in mouse tissues. Hcy metabolic and methylation enzymes were classified into two types. The expression of Type 1 enzymes positively correlated with tissue Hcy and SAH levels. These include cystathionine beta-synthase, cystathionine-gamma-lyase, paraxonase 1, 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferases and glycine N-methyltransferase. Type 2 enzyme expressions correlate with neither tissue Hcy nor SAH levels. These include SAH hydrolase, methionyl-tRNA synthase, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate:Hcy methyltransferase, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, DNA methyltransferase 1/3a, isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferases, and histone-lysine N-methyltransferase. SAH is the only Hcy metabolite significantly correlated with Hcy levels and methylation enzyme expression. We established equations expressing combined effects of methylation enzymes on tissue SAH, SAM, and SAM/SAH ratios. Our study is the first to provide panoramic tissue gene expression profiles and mathematical models of tissue methylation regulation. PMID:20305127

  10. Sex and gonadal hormones in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease: what is relevant to the human condition?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Biologic sex and gonadal hormones matter in human aging and diseases of aging such as Alzheimer’s – and the importance of studying their influences relates directly to human health. The goal of this article is to review the literature to date on sex and hormones in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with an exclusive focus on interpreting the relevance of findings to the human condition. To this end, we highlight advances in AD and in sex and hormone biology, discuss what these advances mean for merging the two fields, review the current mouse model literature, raise major unresolved questions, and offer a research framework that incorporates human reproductive aging for future studies aimed at translational discoveries in this important area. Unraveling human relevant pathways in sex and hormone-based biology may ultimately pave the way to novel and urgently needed treatments for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23126652

  11. Comprehensive RNAi-based screening of human and mouse TLR pathways identifies species-specific preferences in signaling protein use.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Dutta, Bhaskar; Vayttaden, Sharat J; Lin, Bin; Ebert, Thomas S; De Nardo, Dominic; Davis, Joie; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Lounsbury, Nicolas W; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Latz, Eicke; Hornung, Veit; Fraser, Iain D C

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a major class of pattern recognition receptors, which mediate the responses of innate immune cells to microbial stimuli. To systematically determine the roles of proteins in canonical TLR signaling pathways, we conducted an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen in human and mouse macrophages. We observed a pattern of conserved signaling module dependencies across species, but found notable species-specific requirements at the level of individual proteins. Among these, we identified unexpected differences in the involvement of members of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family between the human and mouse TLR pathways. Whereas TLR signaling in mouse macrophages depended primarily on IRAK4 and IRAK2, with little or no role for IRAK1, TLR signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production in human macrophages depended on IRAK1, with knockdown of IRAK4 or IRAK2 having less of an effect. Consistent with species-specific roles for these kinases, IRAK4 orthologs failed to rescue signaling in IRAK4-deficient macrophages from the other species, and only mouse macrophages required the kinase activity of IRAK4 to mediate TLR responses. The identification of a critical role for IRAK1 in TLR signaling in humans could potentially explain the association of IRAK1 with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, this study demonstrated how systematic screening can be used to identify important characteristics of innate immune responses across species, which could optimize therapeutic targeting to manipulate human TLR-dependent outputs. PMID:26732763

  12. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  13. Inositol trisphosphate 3-kinase B is increased in human Alzheimer brain and exacerbates mouse Alzheimer pathology.

    PubMed

    Stygelbout, Virginie; Leroy, Karelle; Pouillon, Valérie; Ando, Kunie; D'Amico, Eva; Jia, Yonghui; Luo, H Robert; Duyckaerts, Charles; Erneux, Christophe; Schurmans, Stéphane; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2014-02-01

    ITPKB phosphorylates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate into inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and controls signal transduction in various hematopoietic cells. Surprisingly, it has been reported that the ITPKB messenger RNA level is significantly increased in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease, compared with control subjects. As extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 activation is increased in the Alzheimer brain and as ITPKB is a regulator of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 activation in some hematopoietic cells, we tested whether this increased activation in Alzheimer's disease might be related to an increased activity of ITPKB. We show here that ITPKB protein level was increased 3-fold in the cerebral cortex of most patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with control subjects, and accumulated in dystrophic neurites associated to amyloid plaques. In mouse Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, Itpkb overexpression was associated with increased cell apoptosis and increased β-secretase 1 activity leading to overproduction of amyloid-β peptides. In this cellular model, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated kinase kinases 1/2 completely prevented overproduction of amyloid-β peptides. Transgenic overexpression of ITPKB in mouse forebrain neurons was not sufficient to induce amyloid plaque formation or tau hyperphosphorylation. However, in the 5X familial Alzheimer's disease mouse model, neuronal ITPKB overexpression significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 activation and β-secretase 1 activity, resulting in exacerbated Alzheimer's disease pathology as shown by increased astrogliosis, amyloid-β40 peptide production and tau hyperphosphorylation. No impact on pathology was observed in the 5X familial Alzheimer's disease mouse model when a catalytically inactive ITPKB protein was overexpressed. Together, our results point to the ITPKB/inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate/extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 signalling pathway as an important regulator of neuronal cell apoptosis, APP processing and tau phosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease, and suggest that ITPKB could represent a new target for reducing pathology in human patients with Alzheimer's disease with ITPKB expression. PMID:24401760

  14. Pre- and postexposure efficacy of fully human antibodies against Spike protein in a novel humanized mouse model of MERS-CoV infection

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Kristen E.; Coleman, Christopher M.; Mujica, Alejandro O.; Kamat, Vishal; Badithe, Ashok; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Hunt, Charleen; Strein, John; Berrebi, Alexander; Sisk, Jeanne M.; Matthews, Krystal L.; Babb, Robert; Chen, Gang; Lai, Ka-Man V.; Huang, Tammy T.; Olson, William; Yancopoulos, George D.; Stahl, Neil; Frieman, Matthew B.; Kyratsous, Christos A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches to antimicrobial drug development are poorly suited to combatting the emergence of novel pathogens. Additionally, the lack of small animal models for these infections hinders the in vivo testing of potential therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the use of the VelocImmune technology (a mouse that expresses human antibody-variable heavy chains and κ light chains) alongside the VelociGene technology (which allows for rapid engineering of the mouse genome) to quickly develop and evaluate antibodies against an emerging viral disease. Specifically, we show the rapid generation of fully human neutralizing antibodies against the recently emerged Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and development of a humanized mouse model for MERS-CoV infection, which was used to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of the isolated antibodies. The VelocImmune and VelociGene technologies are powerful platforms that can be used to rapidly respond to emerging epidemics. PMID:26124093

  15. Significant expansion of the REST/NRSF cistrome in human versus mouse embryonic stem cells: potential implications for neural development

    PubMed Central

    Rockowitz, Shira; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have employed cross-species comparisons of transcription factor binding, reporting significant regulatory network ‘rewiring’ between species. Here, we address how a transcriptional repressor targets and regulates neural genes differentially between human and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We find that the transcription factor, Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST; also called neuron restrictive silencer factor) binds to a core group of ∼1200 syntenic genomic regions in both species, with these conserved sites highly enriched with co-factors, selective histone modifications and DNA hypomethylation. Genes with conserved REST binding are enriched with neural functions and more likely to be upregulated upon REST depletion. Interestingly, we identified twice as many REST peaks in human ESCs compared to mouse ESCs. Human REST cistrome expansion involves additional peaks in genes targeted by REST in both species and human-specific gene targets. Genes with expanded REST occupancy in humans are enriched for learning or memory functions. Analysis of neurological disorder associated genes reveals that Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and oxidative stress genes are particularly enriched with human-specific REST binding. Overall, our results demonstrate that there is substantial rewiring of human and mouse REST cistromes, and that REST may have human-specific roles in brain development and functions. PMID:25990720

  16. Human and mouse monoclonal antibodies to blood group A substance, which are nearly identical immunochemically, use radically different primary sequences.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, K G; Tao, M H; Chen, H T; Larrick, J; Kabat, E A

    1995-05-26

    A human monoclonal antibody (HuA) specific for blood group A substance with two fucose groups was found to be immunochemically almost identical with that of a previously characterized mouse monoclonal anti-A, AC-1001. The VH and VL chain cDNAs of HuA were sequenced and compared with those of AC-1001. The human and mouse antibodies used VH and Vk genes that came from different families and shared minimal nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity. Thus, two antibodies from two different species can use evolutionarily unrelated sequences to bind the same carbohydrate epitope. The cloned HuA VH and VL genes were then transfected into a mouse myeloma cell line and re-expressed, together, and each separately with an irrelevant VH or VL. Only the original HuA VH and Vk had anti-A activity, demonstrating that both the heavy and light chains contributed to specificity. PMID:7759488

  17. Dataset from proteomic analysis of rat, mouse, and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions

    PubMed Central

    Golizeh, Makan; Schneider, Christina; Ohlund, Leanne B.; Sleno, Lekha

    2015-01-01

    Rat, mouse and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions were analyzed using an optimized method combining ion exchange fractionation of digested peptides, and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HR-MS/MS). The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaíno et al., 2013 [1]) with the dataset identifiers PXD000717, PXD000720, PXD000721, PXD000731, PXD000733 and PXD000734. Data related to the peptides (trypsin digests only) were also uploaded to Peptide Atlas (Farrah et al., 2013 [2]) and are available with the dataset identifiers PASS00407, PASS00409, PASS00411, PASS00412, PASS00413 and PASS00414. The present dataset is associated with a research article published in EuPA Open Proteomics [3]. PMID:26217725

  18. Mouse model systems to study sex chromosome genes and behavior: relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kimberly H; Bonthuis, Paul J; Rissman, Emilie F

    2014-10-01

    Sex chromosome genes directly influence sex differences in behavior. The discovery of the Sry gene on the Y chromosome (Gubbay et al., 1990; Koopman et al., 1990) substantiated the sex chromosome mechanistic link to sex differences. Moreover, the pronounced connection between X chromosome gene mutations and mental illness produces a strong sex bias in these diseases. Yet, the dominant explanation for sex differences continues to be the gonadal hormones. Here we review progress made on behavioral differences in mouse models that uncouple sex chromosome complement from gonadal sex. We conclude that many social and cognitive behaviors are modified by sex chromosome complement, and discuss the implications for human research. Future directions need to include identification of the genes involved and interactions with these genes and gonadal hormones. PMID:24388960

  19. Human and Mouse Macrophages Collaborate with Neutrophils To Kill Larval Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Bonne-Anne, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A.; Hess, Jessica A.; O'Connell, Amy E.; Lok, James B.; Nolan, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are multifunctional cells that are active in TH1- and TH2-mediated responses. In this study, we demonstrate that human and mouse macrophages collaborate with neutrophils and complement to kill the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis in vitro. Infection of mice with worms resulted in the induction of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM?) within the peritoneal cavity. These cells killed the worms in vivo and collaborated with neutrophils and complement during the in vitro killing process. AAM? generated in vitro killed larvae more rapidly than naive macrophages, which killed larvae after a longer time period. In contrast, classically activated macrophages were unable to kill larvae either in vitro or in vivo. This study adds macrophages to the armamentarium of immune components that function in elimination of parasitic helminths and demonstrate a novel function by which AAM? control large extracellular parasites. PMID:23798541

  20. HLA reduces KIR expression level and frequency in a humanized mouse model1

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Thompson, Allan; Retière, Christelle; van Pel, Melissa; Salvatori, Daniela; Lemonnier, François; Raulet, David; Trowsdale, John; Koning, Frits

    2014-01-01

    Many human Natural Killer (NK) cells are prevented from killing autologous cells by virtue of inhibitory Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) binding `self' HLA class I molecules. Individual NK cells stably express a selected set of KIR, but it is currently disputed whether the fraction of NK cells expressing a particular inhibitory KIR is influenced by the presence of the corresponding HLA ligand. This issue has been particularly hard to tackle in a statistically meaningful way due to the extreme polymorphism of the KIR and HLA loci, with widely varying affinities for individual KIR and HLA allele combinations. Here, we use a transgenic mouse model to investigate the effect of HLA on KIR repertoire and function. In this model system, a functional interaction between HLA-Cw3 and KIR2DL2 reduced both the surface expression of KIR2DL2 as well as the frequency of KIR2DL2+ cells. PMID:23390293

  1. Mouse model systems to study sex chromosome genes and behavior: relevance to humans

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kimberly H.; Bonthuis, Paul J.; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosome genes directly influence sex differences in behavior. The discovery of the Sry gene on the Y chromosome (Gubbay et al., 1990; Koopman et al., 1990) substantiated the sex chromosome mechanistic link to sex differences. Moreover, the pronounced connection between X chromosome gene mutations and mental illness produces a strong sex bias in these diseases. Yet, the dominant explanation for sex differences continues to be the gonadal hormones. Here we review progress made on behavioral differences in mouse models that uncouple sex chromosome complement from gonadal sex. We conclude that many social and cognitive behaviors are modified by sex chromosome complement, and discuss the implications for human research. Future directions need to include identification of the genes involved and interactions with these genes and gonadal hormones. PMID:24388960

  2. microRNA Control of Mouse and Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blelloch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding both microRNA function and cellular pluripotency. Here we review the intersection of these two exciting fields. While microRNAs are not required for the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency in early development and cell culture, respectively, they are critically important in the regulation of the cell cycle structure of pluripotent stem cells as well as the silencing of the pluripotency program upon differentiation. Pluripotent cells, both in vivo and in vitro, dominantly express a single family of microRNAs, which can promote the reprogramming of a somatic cell back to a pluripotent state. Here, we review the known mechanisms by which these and other microRNAs regulate the different aspects of the pluripotent stem cell program in both mouse and human. PMID:23875649

  3. Biophysical Properties of γC-Crystallin in Human and Mouse Eye Lens: The Role of Molecular Dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Purkiss, Andrew G.; Bateman, Orval A.; Wyatt, Keith; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Wistow, Graeme J.; Slingsby, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Summary The eye lens is packed with soluble crystallin proteins, providing a lifetime of transparency and light refraction. γ-crystallins are major components of the dense, high refractive index central regions of the lens and generally have high solubility, high stability and high levels of cysteines. Human γC belongs to a group of γ-crystallins with a pair of cysteines at positions 78 and 79. Unlike other γ-crystallins it has relatively low solubility, whereas mouse γC, which has the exposed C79 replaced with arginine, and a novel mouse splice variant, γCins, are both highly soluble. Furthermore, human γC is extremely stable, while the mouse orthologs are less stable. Evolutionary pressure may have favoured stability over solubility for human γC and the reverse for the orthologs in the mouse. Mutation of C79 to R79, in human γC, greatly increased solubility, however neither form produced crystals. Remarkably, when the human γD R36S crystallization cataract mutation was mimicked in human γC-crystallin, the solubility of γC was dramatically increased, although it still did not crystallize. The highly soluble mouse γC-crystallin did crystallize. Its X-ray structure was solved and used in homology modelling of human γC, and its mutants C79R and R36S. The human γD R36S mutant was also modelled from human γD coordinates. Molecular dynamics simulation of the six molecules in the solution state showed that the human γCs differed from γDs in domain pairing, behaviour that correlates with interface sequence changes. When the fluctuations of the calculated molecular dipoles, for the six structures, over time were analysed, characteristic patterns for soluble γC and γD proteins were observed. Individual sequence changes that increase or decrease solubility correlated well with changes in the magnitude and direction of these dipoles. It is suggested that changes in surface residues have allowed adaptation for the differing needs of human and mouse lenses. PMID:17659303

  4. A genetically engineered ovarian cancer mouse model based on fallopian tube transformation mimics human high-grade serous carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Sherman-Baust, Cheryl A; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Valle, Blanca L; Shih, Ie-Ming; Kurman, Robert J; Wang, Tian-Li; Amano, Tomokazu; Ko, Minoru S H; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Araki, Yoshihiko; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Morin, Patrice J

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) originates from the epithelium of the fallopian tube. However, most mouse models are based on the previous prevailing view that ovarian cancer develops from the transformation of the ovarian surface epithelium. Here, we report the extensive histological and molecular characterization of the mogp-TAg transgenic mouse, which expresses the SV40 large T-antigen (TAg) under the control of the mouse müllerian-specific Ovgp-1 promoter. Histological analysis of the fallopian tubes of mogp-TAg mice identified a variety of neoplastic lesions analogous to those described as precursors to ovarian HGSC. We identified areas of normal-appearing p53-positive epithelium that are similar to 'p53 signatures' in the human fallopian tube. More advanced proliferative lesions with nuclear atypia and epithelial stratification were also identified that were morphologically and immunohistochemically reminiscent of human serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), a potential precursor of ovarian HGSC. Beside these non-invasive precursor lesions, we also identified invasive adenocarcinoma in the ovaries of 56% of the mice. Microarray analysis revealed several genes differentially expressed between the fallopian tube of mogp-TAg and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6. One of these genes, Top2a, which encodes topoisomerase IIα, was shown by immunohistochemistry to be concurrently expressed with elevated p53 and was specifically elevated in mouse STICs but not in the surrounding tissues. TOP2A protein was also found elevated in human STICs, low-grade and high-grade serous carcinoma. The mouse model reported here displays a progression from normal tubal epithelium to invasive HGSC in the ovary, and therefore closely simulates the current emerging model of human ovarian HGSC pathogenesis. This mouse therefore has the potential to be a very useful new model for elucidating the mechanisms of serous ovarian tumourigenesis, as well as for developing novel approaches for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of this disease. PMID:24652535

  5. Tariquidar Is an Inhibitor and Not a Substrate of Human and Mouse P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Lora D.; Fung, King Leung; Kannan, Pavitra; Moen, Janna K.; Kumar, Jeyan S.; Mulder, Jan; Innis, Robert B.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Since its development, tariquidar (TQR; XR9576; N-[2-[[4-[2-(6,7-Dimethoxy-3,4-dihydro-1H-isoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl]phenyl]carbamoyl]-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl]quinoline-3-carboxamide) has been widely regarded as one of the more potent inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. A third-generation inhibitor, TQR exhibits high affinity for P-gp, although it is also a substrate of another ABC transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Recently, several studies have questioned the mechanism by which TQR interfaces with P-gp, suggesting that TQR is a substrate for P-gp instead of a noncompetitive inhibitor. We investigated TQR and its interaction with human and mouse P-gp to determine if TQR is a substrate of P-gp in vitro. To address these questions, we used multiple in vitro transporter assays, including cytotoxicity, flow cytometry, accumulation, ATPase, and transwell assays. A newly generated BCRP cell line was used as a positive control that demonstrates TQR-mediated transport. Based on our results, we conclude that TQR is a potent inhibitor of both human and mouse P-gp and shows no signs of being a substrate at the concentrations tested. These in vitro data further support our position that the in vivo uptake of [11C]TQR into the brain can be explained by its high-affinity binding to P-gp and by it being a substrate of BCRP, followed by amplification of the brain signal by ionic trapping in acidic lysosomes. PMID:26658428

  6. Generation and characterization of a protective mouse monoclonal antibody against human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yong-Qiang; Ma, Jie; Xu, Li-Juan; Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhao, Hui; Han, Jian-Feng; Tao, Jiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection has emerged as a major threat to children; however, no effective antiviral treatment or vaccine is currently available. Antibody-based treatment shows promises to control this growing public health problem of EV71 infection, and a few potent monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting viral capsid protein have been well described. Here, we generated an EV71-specific mouse mAb 2G8 that conferred full protection against lethal EV71 challenge in a suckling mouse model. 2G8 belonged to IgM isotype and neutralized EV71 at the attachment stage. Biochemical assays mapped the binding epitope of 2G8 to the SP70 peptide, which spanning amino acid residues 208-222 on the VP1 protein. Alanine scanning mutagenesis defined the essential roles of multiple residues, including Y208, T210, G212, K215, K218, L220, E221, and Y222, for 2G8 binding. Then, a panel of single mutation was individually introduced into the EV71 infectious clone by reverse genetics, and three mutant viruses, K215A, K218A, and L220A, were successfully recovered and characterized. Biochemical and neutralization assays revealed that K218A mutant partially escaped 2G8 neutralization, while L220A completely abolished 2G8 binding and neutralization. In particular, neutralization assays with human sera demonstrated that K218A and L220A substitutions are also critical for antibody neutralization in natural infection population. These findings not only generate a protective mAb candidate with therapeutic potential but also provide insights into antibody-mediated EV71 neutralization mechanism. PMID:25967656

  7. Bacterial and human cell mutagenicity and mouse lung tumorigenicity of the oxygenated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon phenalenone.

    PubMed

    Wang, J S; Busby, W F

    1996-10-01

    Phenalenone (perinaphthenone) is a major oxygenated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (oxy-PAH) atmospheric pollutant formed from the combustion of fossil fuels. Mutagenicity of phenalenone was measured in quantitative forward mutation assays with Salmonella typhimurium TM677 and metabolically competent human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (MCL-5 and h1A1v2 cells), and its tumorigenicity was also assessed in a newborn mouse assay. Phenalenone was mutagenic in Salmonella in the presence of rat liver postmitochondrial supernatant (PMS) at a minimum detectable mutagen concentration (MDMC) of 12 micrograms/ml, but was not mutagenic in the absence of PMS at concentrations up to 100 micrograms/ ml. Phenalenone was not significantly mutagenic in either human cell line after 28 hr treatment, although mutant fractions were increased by nearly fivefold in h1A1v2 cells (at the tk locus) exposed at 30 micrograms/ml. However, after 72 hr treatment, phenalenone was mutagenic at the hprt locus in h1A1v2 cells with an MDMC of 3 micrograms/ml. Phenalenone was also tumorigenic in male BLU:Ha mice with a lung tumor incidence of 33% 6 months after injection with 4.2 mg phenalenone, the highest dose tested. Lung tumor multiplicity in this treatment group was 0.5 tumor/mouse. No increase in lung tumors in female mice was observed. Indices of lung tumor incidence (ED50) and multiplicity (TM1.0) for male mice were 29.3 and 34.9 mumol, respectively. These data suggest that phenalenone does not contribute significantly to the mutagenicity or carcinogenicity of combustion emission extracts. PMID:8921339

  8. Development and Characterization of a Novel Mouse Line Humanized for the Intestinal Peptide Transporter PEPT1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) is abundantly expressed in the small intestine, but not colon, of mammals and found to mediate the uptake of di/tripeptides and peptide-like drugs from the intestinal lumen. However, species differences have been observed in both the expression (and localization) of PEPT1 and its substrate affinity. With this in mind, the objectives of this study were to develop a humanized PEPT1 mouse model (huPEPT1) and to characterize hPEPT1 expression and functional activity in the intestines. Thus, after generating huPEPT1 mice in animals previously nulled for mouse Pept1, phenotypic, PCR, and immunoblot analyses were performed, along with in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion and in vivo oral pharmacokinetic studies with a model dipeptide, glycylsarcosine (GlySar). Overall, the huPEPT1 mice had normal survival rates, fertility, litter size, gender distribution, and body weight. There was no obvious behavioral or pathological phenotype. The mRNA and protein profiles indicated that huPEPT1 mice had substantial PEPT1 expression in all regions of the small intestine (i.e., duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) along with low but measurable expression in both proximal and distal segments of the colon. In agreement with PEPT1 expression, the in situ permeability of GlySar in huPEPT1 mice was similar to but lower than wildtype animals in small intestine, and greater than wildtype mice in colon. However, a species difference existed in the in situ transport kinetics of jejunal PEPT1, in which the maximal flux and Michaelis constant of GlySar were reduced 7-fold and 2- to 4-fold, respectively, in huPEPT1 compared to wildtype mice. Still, the in vivo function of intestinal PEPT1 appeared fully restored (compared to Pept1 knockout mice) as indicated by the nearly identical pharmacokinetics and plasma concentration–time profiles following a 5.0 nmol/g oral dose of GlySar to huPEPT1 and wildtype mice. This study reports, for the first time, the development and characterization of mice humanized for PEPT1. This novel transgenic huPEPT1 mouse model should prove useful in examining the role, relevance, and regulation of PEPT1 in diet and disease, and in the drug discovery process. PMID:25148225

  9. Development and characterization of a novel mouse line humanized for the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjun; Xie, Yehua; Wang, Yuqing; Chen, Xiaomei; Smith, David E

    2014-10-01

    The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) is abundantly expressed in the small intestine, but not colon, of mammals and found to mediate the uptake of di/tripeptides and peptide-like drugs from the intestinal lumen. However, species differences have been observed in both the expression (and localization) of PEPT1 and its substrate affinity. With this in mind, the objectives of this study were to develop a humanized PEPT1 mouse model (huPEPT1) and to characterize hPEPT1 expression and functional activity in the intestines. Thus, after generating huPEPT1 mice in animals previously nulled for mouse Pept1, phenotypic, PCR, and immunoblot analyses were performed, along with in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion and in vivo oral pharmacokinetic studies with a model dipeptide, glycylsarcosine (GlySar). Overall, the huPEPT1 mice had normal survival rates, fertility, litter size, gender distribution, and body weight. There was no obvious behavioral or pathological phenotype. The mRNA and protein profiles indicated that huPEPT1 mice had substantial PEPT1 expression in all regions of the small intestine (i.e., duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) along with low but measurable expression in both proximal and distal segments of the colon. In agreement with PEPT1 expression, the in situ permeability of GlySar in huPEPT1 mice was similar to but lower than wildtype animals in small intestine, and greater than wildtype mice in colon. However, a species difference existed in the in situ transport kinetics of jejunal PEPT1, in which the maximal flux and Michaelis constant of GlySar were reduced 7-fold and 2- to 4-fold, respectively, in huPEPT1 compared to wildtype mice. Still, the in vivo function of intestinal PEPT1 appeared fully restored (compared to Pept1 knockout mice) as indicated by the nearly identical pharmacokinetics and plasma concentration-time profiles following a 5.0 nmol/g oral dose of GlySar to huPEPT1 and wildtype mice. This study reports, for the first time, the development and characterization of mice humanized for PEPT1. This novel transgenic huPEPT1 mouse model should prove useful in examining the role, relevance, and regulation of PEPT1 in diet and disease, and in the drug discovery process. PMID:25148225

  10. Novel Insights into Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal Revealed Through Comparative Human and Mouse Systems Biology Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Karen G.; Simons, Allen K.; Bai, Hao; Kell, Braden; Wang, Zack Z.; Yun, Kyuson; Hibbs, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), characterized by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are a powerful model for biomedical research and developmental biology. Human and mouse ESCs share many features, yet have distinctive aspects, including fundamental differences in the signaling pathways and cell cycle controls that support self-renewal. Here, we explore the molecular basis of human ESC self-renewal using Bayesian network machine learning to integrate cell-type-specific, high-throughput data for gene function discovery. We integrated high-throughput ESC data from 83 human studies (~1.8 million data points collected under 1100 conditions) and 62 mouse studies (~2.4 million data points collected under 1085 conditions) into separate human and mouse predictive networks focused on ESC self-renewal to analyze shared and distinct functional relationships among protein-coding gene orthologs. Computational evaluations show that these networks are highly accurate, literature validation confirms their biological relevance, and RT-PCR validation supports our predictions. Our results reflect the importance of key regulatory genes known to be strongly associated with self-renewal and pluripotency in both species (e.g. POU5F1, SOX2, and NANOG), identify metabolic differences between species (e.g. threonine metabolism), clarify differences between human and mouse ESC developmental signaling pathways (e.g. LIF-activated JAK/STAT in mouse; NODAL/ACTIVIN-A-activated FGF in human), and reveal many novel genes and pathways predicted to be functionally associated with self-renewal in each species. These interactive networks are available online at www.StemSight.org for stem cell researchers to develop new hypotheses, discover potential mechanisms involving sparsely annotated genes, and prioritize genes of interest for experimental validation. PMID:24307629

  11. Production of proinflammatory mediators by indoor air bacteria and fungal spores in mouse and human cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Kati; Hyvärinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino; Komulainen, Hannu; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2003-01-01

    We compared the inflammatory and cytotoxic responses caused by household mold and bacteria in human and mouse cell lines. We studied the fungi Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium spinulosum, and Stachybotrys chartarum and the bacteria Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Streptomyces californicus for their cytotoxicity and ability to stimulate the production of inflammatory mediators in mouse RAW264.7 and human 28SC macrophage cell lines and in the human A549 lung epithelial cell line in 24-hr exposure to 10(5), 10(6), and 10(7) microbes/mL. We studied time dependency by terminating the exposure to 10(6) microbes/mL after 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hr. We analyzed production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukins 6 and 1ss (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1ss, respectively) and measured nitric oxide production using the Griess method, expression of inducible NO-synthase with Western Blot analysis, and cytotoxicity with the MTT-test. All bacteria strongly induced the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and, to a lesser extent, the formation of IL-1ss in mouse macrophages. Only the spores of Str. californicus induced the production of NO and IL-6 in both human and mouse cells. In contrast, exposure to fungal strains did not markedly increase the production of NO or any cytokine in the studied cell lines except for Sta. chartarum, which increased IL-6 production somewhat in human lung epithelial cells. These microbes were less cytotoxic to human cells than to mouse cells. On the basis of equivalent numbers of bacteria and spores of fungi added to cell cultures, the overall potency to stimulate the production of proinflammatory mediators decreased in the order Ps. fluorescens > Str. californicus > B. cereus > Sta. chartarum > A. versicolor > P. spinulosum. These data suggest that bacteria in water-damaged buildings should also be considered as causative agents of adverse inflammatory effects. PMID:12515684

  12. Human vs. Mouse Eosinophils: “That which we call an eosinophil, by any other name would stain as red”

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Ochkur, Sergei I; McGarry, Michael P.; Condjella, Rachel M.; Doyle, Alfred D.; Luo, Huijun; Zellner, Katie R.; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Willetts, Lian; LeSuer, William E.; Colbert, Dana C.; Helmers, Richard A.; Lacy, Paige; Moqbel, Redwan; Lee, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The respective life histories of humans and mice are well defined and describe a unique story of evolutionary conservation extending from sequence identity within the genome to the underpinnings of biochemical, cellular, and physiological pathways. As a consequence, the hematopoietic lineages of both species are invariantly maintained, each with identifiable eosinophils. This canonical presence nonetheless does not preclude disparities between human and mouse eosinophils and/or their effector functions. Indeed, many books and reviews dogmatically highlight differences, providing a rationale to discount the use of mouse models of human eosinophilic diseases. We suggest that this perspective is parochial and ignores the wealth of available studies and the consensus of the literature that overwhelming similarities (and not differences) exist between human and mouse eosinophils. The goal of this review is to summarize this literature and in some cases provide the experimental details, comparing and contrasting eosinophils and eosinophil effector functions in humans vs. mice. In particular, our review will provide a summation and an easy to use reference guide to important studies demonstrating that while differences exist, more often than not their consequences are unknown and do not necessarily reflect inherent disparities in eosinophil function, but instead, species-specific variations. The conclusion from this overview is that despite nominal differences, the vast similarities between human and mouse eosinophils provide important insights as to their roles in health and disease and, in turn, demonstrate the unique utility of mouse-based studies with an expectation of valid extrapolation to the understanding and treatment of patients. PMID:22935586

  13. Novel insights into embryonic stem cell self-renewal revealed through comparative human and mouse systems biology networks.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Karen G; Simons, Allen K; Bai, Hao; Kell, Braden; Wang, Zack Z; Yun, Kyuson; Hibbs, Matthew A

    2014-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), characterized by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are a powerful model for biomedical research and developmental biology. Human and mouse ESCs share many features, yet have distinctive aspects, including fundamental differences in the signaling pathways and cell cycle controls that support self-renewal. Here, we explore the molecular basis of human ESC self-renewal using Bayesian network machine learning to integrate cell-type-specific, high-throughput data for gene function discovery. We integrated high-throughput ESC data from 83 human studies (~1.8 million data points collected under 1,100 conditions) and 62 mouse studies (~2.4 million data points collected under 1,085 conditions) into separate human and mouse predictive networks focused on ESC self-renewal to analyze shared and distinct functional relationships among protein-coding gene orthologs. Computational evaluations show that these networks are highly accurate, literature validation confirms their biological relevance, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation supports our predictions. Our results reflect the importance of key regulatory genes known to be strongly associated with self-renewal and pluripotency in both species (e.g., POU5F1, SOX2, and NANOG), identify metabolic differences between species (e.g., threonine metabolism), clarify differences between human and mouse ESC developmental signaling pathways (e.g., leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-activated JAK/STAT in mouse; NODAL/ACTIVIN-A-activated fibroblast growth factor in human), and reveal many novel genes and pathways predicted to be functionally associated with self-renewal in each species. These interactive networks are available online at www.StemSight.org for stem cell researchers to develop new hypotheses, discover potential mechanisms involving sparsely annotated genes, and prioritize genes of interest for experimental validation. PMID:24307629

  14. CCDC88A mutations cause PEHO-like syndrome in humans and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Michael S.; Asai, Masato; Wakeling, Emma; Parker, Alasdair; Asai, Naoya; Canham, Natalie; Holder, Susan E.; Chen, Ya-Chun; Dyer, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hypsarrhythmia and optic atrophy (PEHO) syndrome is a rare Mendelian phenotype comprising severe retardation, early onset epileptic seizures, optic nerve/cerebellar atrophy, pedal oedema, and early death. Atypical cases are often known as PEHO-like, and there is an overlap with ‘early infantile epileptic encephalopathy’. PEHO is considered to be recessive, but surprisingly since initial description in 1991, no causative recessive gene(s) have been described. Hence, we report a multiplex consanguineous family with the PEHO phenotype where affected individuals had a homozygous frame-shift deletion in CCDC88A (c.2313delT, p.Leu772*ter). Analysis of cDNA extracted from patient lymphocytes unexpectedly failed to show non-sense mediated decay, and we demonstrate that the mutation produces a truncated protein lacking the crucial C-terminal half of CCDC88A (girdin). To further investigate the possible role of CCDC88A in human neurodevelopment we re-examined the behaviour and neuroanatomy of Ccdc88a knockout pups. These mice had mesial-temporal lobe epilepsy, microcephaly and corpus callosum deficiency, and by postnatal Day 21, microcephaly; the mice died at an early age. As the mouse knockout phenotype mimics the human PEHO phenotype this suggests that loss of CCDC88A is a cause of the PEHO phenotype, and that CCDC88A is essential for multiple aspects of normal human neurodevelopment. PMID:26917597

  15. Reducing social stress elicits emotional contagion of pain in mouse and human strangers.

    PubMed

    Martin, Loren J; Hathaway, Georgia; Isbester, Kelsey; Mirali, Sara; Acland, Erinn L; Niederstrasser, Nils; Slepian, Peter M; Trost, Zina; Bartz, Jennifer A; Sapolsky, Robert M; Sternberg, Wendy F; Levitin, Daniel J; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2015-02-01

    Empathy for another's physical pain has been demonstrated in humans [1] and mice [2]; in both species, empathy is stronger between familiars. Stress levels in stranger dyads are higher than in cagemate dyads or isolated mice [2, 3], suggesting that stress might be responsible for the absence of empathy for the pain of strangers. We show here that blockade of glucocorticoid synthesis or receptors for adrenal stress hormones elicits the expression of emotional contagion (a form of empathy) in strangers of both species. Mice and undergraduates were tested for sensitivity to noxious stimulation alone and/or together (dyads). In familiar, but not stranger, pairs, dyadic testing was associated with increased pain behaviors or ratings compared to isolated testing. Pharmacological blockade of glucocorticoid synthesis or glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors enabled the expression of emotional contagion of pain in mouse and human stranger dyads, as did a shared gaming experience (the video game Rock Band) in human strangers. Our results demonstrate that emotional contagion is prevented, in an evolutionarily conserved manner, by the stress of a social interaction with an unfamiliar conspecific and can be evoked by blocking the endocrine stress response. PMID:25601547

  16. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Genovesi, Laura A.; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J.; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D.; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Ban, Kenneth H.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1lacZ/+), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1lacZ/+ controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  17. Understanding the Basis of Auriculocondylar Syndrome: Insights From Human and Mouse Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Clouthier, David E.; Passos Bueno, Maria Rita; Tavares, Andre L.P.; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Gordon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    Among human birth defect syndromes, malformations affecting the face are perhaps the most striking due to cultural and psychological expectations of facial shape. One such syndrome is auriculocondylar syndrome (ACS), in which patients present with defects in ear and mandible development. Affected structures arise from cranial neural crest cells, a population of cells in the embryo that reside in the pharyngeal arches and give rise to most of the bone, cartilage and connective tissue of the face. Recent studies have found that most cases of ACS arise from defects in signaling molecules associated with the endothelin signaling pathway. Disruption of this signaling pathway in both mouse and zebrafish results in loss of identity of neural crest cells of the mandibular portion of the first pharyngeal arch and the subsequent repatterning of these cells, leading to homeosis of lower jaw structures into more maxillary-like structures. These findings illustrate the importance of endothelin signaling in normal human craniofacial development and illustrate how clinical and basic science approaches can coalesce to improve our understanding of the genetic basis of human birth syndromes. Further, understanding the genetic basis for ACS that lies outside of known endothelin signaling components may help elucidate unknown aspects critical to the establishment of neural crest cell patterning during facial morphogenesis. PMID:24123988

  18. CCDC88A mutations cause PEHO-like syndrome in humans and mouse.

    PubMed

    Nahorski, Michael S; Asai, Masato; Wakeling, Emma; Parker, Alasdair; Asai, Naoya; Canham, Natalie; Holder, Susan E; Chen, Ya-Chun; Dyer, Joshua; Brady, Angela F; Takahashi, Masahide; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hypsarrhythmia and optic atrophy (PEHO) syndrome is a rare Mendelian phenotype comprising severe retardation, early onset epileptic seizures, optic nerve/cerebellar atrophy, pedal oedema, and early death. Atypical cases are often known as PEHO-like, and there is an overlap with 'early infantile epileptic encephalopathy'. PEHO is considered to be recessive, but surprisingly since initial description in 1991, no causative recessive gene(s) have been described. Hence, we report a multiplex consanguineous family with the PEHO phenotype where affected individuals had a homozygous frame-shift deletion inCCDC88A(c.2313delT, p.Leu772*ter). Analysis of cDNA extracted from patient lymphocytes unexpectedly failed to show non-sense mediated decay, and we demonstrate that the mutation produces a truncated protein lacking the crucial C-terminal half of CCDC88A (girdin). To further investigate the possible role ofCCDC88Ain human neurodevelopment we re-examined the behaviour and neuroanatomy ofCcdc88aknockout pups. These mice had mesial-temporal lobe epilepsy, microcephaly and corpus callosum deficiency, and by postnatal Day 21, microcephaly; the mice died at an early age. As the mouse knockout phenotype mimics the human PEHO phenotype this suggests that loss of CCDC88A is a cause of the PEHO phenotype, and that CCDC88A is essential for multiple aspects of normal human neurodevelopment. PMID:26917597

  19. CD11b immunophenotyping identifies inflammatory profiles in the mouse and human lungs.

    PubMed

    Duan, M; Steinfort, D P; Smallwood, D; Hew, M; Chen, W; Ernst, M; Irving, L B; Anderson, G P; Hibbs, M L

    2016-03-01

    The development of easily accessible tools for human immunophenotyping to classify patients into discrete disease endotypes is advancing personalized therapy. However, no systematic approach has been developed for the study of inflammatory lung diseases with often complex and highly heterogeneous disease etiologies. We have devised an internally standardized flow cytometry approach that can identify parallel inflammatory alveolar macrophage phenotypes in both the mouse and human lungs. In mice, lung innate immune cell alterations during endotoxin challenge, influenza virus infection, and in two genetic models of chronic obstructive lung disease could be segregated based on the presence or absence of CD11b alveolar macrophage upregulation and lung eosinophilia. Additionally, heightened alveolar macrophage CD11b expression was a novel feature of acute lung exacerbations in the SHIP-1(-/-) model of chronic obstructive lung disease, and anti-CD11b antibody administration selectively blocked inflammatory CD11b(pos) but not homeostatic CD11b(neg) alveolar macrophages in vivo. The identification of analogous profiles in respiratory disease patients highlights this approach as a translational avenue for lung disease endotyping and suggests that heterogeneous innate immune cell phenotypes are an underappreciated component of the human lung disease microenvironment. PMID:26422753

  20. Isolation of high-purity myenteric plexus from adult human and mouse gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Grundmann, David; Klotz, Markus; Rabe, Holger; Glanemann, Matthias; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2015-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) orchestrates a broad range of important gastrointestinal functions such as intestinal motility and gastric secretion. The ENS can be affected by environmental factors, diet and disease. Changes due to these alterations are often hard to evaluate in detail when whole gut samples are used. Analyses based on pure ENS tissue can more effectively reflect the ongoing changes during pathological processes. Here, we present an optimized approach for the isolation of pure myenteric plexus (MP) from adult mouse and human. To do so, muscle tissue was individually digested with a purified collagenase. After incubation and a gentle mechanical disruption step, MP networks could be collected with anatomical integrity. These tissues could be stored and used either for immediate genomic, proteomic or in vitro approaches, and enteric neurospheres could be generated and differentiated. In a pilot experiment, the influence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on human MP was analyzed using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The method also allows investigation of factors that are secreted by myenteric tissue in vitro. The isolation of pure MP in large amounts allows new analytical approaches that can provide a new perspective in evaluating changes of the ENS in experimental models, human disease and aging. PMID:25791532

  1. Humanized mouse models for type 1 diabetes including pancreatic islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rahmig, S; Bornstein, S R; Chavakis, T; Jaeckel, E; Waskow, C

    2015-01-01

    We comment here on the suitability of available mouse models for type 1 diabetes research including research on therapeutic pancreatic islet transplantation. The major emphasis will be laid on models that require minimal invasive procedures. Most biological processes are too complex for a complete recapitulation in a test tube. The study of innate or even adaptive immune responses involves a number of different cell types and organs making in vitro studies unreliable but also providing extreme challenges for the use of surrogate model organisms. Studying these processes directly in humans is impossible due to ethical and technical constraints. To resolve this problem small animal models such as mice or rats are frequently used to study mechanisms of complex diseases. This has brought much insight into hematopoiesis and immune cell function including type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, 65 million years of evolution introduced striking differences between mice and humans 1. In fact, none of the many suggested therapies arising from studies using mice 2 3 that have promised prevention or even reversion of T1D made it into the clinic yet 4 5 6. The reason for this are major species-specific differences between rodents and humans regarding the immune system and beta cells. PMID:25369071

  2. Comparative genomics as a tool to reveal functional equivalences between human and mouse dendritic cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Crozat, Karine; Guiton, Rachel; Guilliams, Martin; Henri, Sandrine; Baranek, Thomas; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Malissen, Bernard; Dalod, Marc

    2010-03-01

    During evolution, vertebrates have developed an adaptive immune system able to cope with a variety of pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central to this process. DCs integrate information derived from pathogens or endogenous danger signals and convey them to T lymphocytes. Most of the present knowledge on DCs was generated in mice or by using human DCs differentiated in vitro from monocytes. In both species, several DC subsets have been identified in vivo based on differences in their phenotypes, anatomical locations or functions. In mice, protective immunity against intracellular pathogens or tumors can be induced most efficiently by targeting antigens to the CD8 alpha(+) DCs, a subset of DCs which resides in lymphoid tissues and is especially efficient at cross-presenting exogenous antigens to CD8(+) T lymphocytes. In contrary, harnessing human DC subsets for medical purposes is currently hampered by insufficient knowledge about these cells. To overcome this cognitive gap, we are using comparative genomics as a tool for designing hypotheses and experiments to further characterize DC subset functions and their molecular control, including the investigation of the functional equivalences that might exist between human and mouse DC subsets. PMID:20193019

  3. Human neural crest cells contribute to coat pigmentation in interspecies chimeras after in utero injection into mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Malkiel A; Wert, Katherine J; Goldmann, Johanna; Markoulaki, Styliani; Buganim, Yosef; Fu, Dongdong; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-02-01

    The neural crest (NC) represents multipotent cells that arise at the interphase between ectoderm and prospective epidermis of the neurulating embryo. The NC has major clinical relevance because it is involved in both inherited and acquired developmental abnormalities. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental platform that would allow for the integration of human NC cells (hNCCs) into the gastrulating mouse embryo. NCCs were derived from pluripotent mouse, rat, and human cells and microinjected into embryonic-day-8.5 embryos. To facilitate integration of the NCCs, we used recipient embryos that carried a c-Kit mutation (W(sh)/W(sh)), which leads to a loss of melanoblasts and thus eliminates competition from the endogenous host cells. The donor NCCs migrated along the dorsolateral migration routes in the recipient embryos. Postnatal mice derived from injected embryos displayed pigmented hair, demonstrating differentiation of the NCCs into functional melanocytes. Although the contribution of human cells to pigmentation in the host was lower than that of mouse or rat donor cells, our results indicate that hNCCs, injected in utero, can integrate into the embryo and form mature functional cells in the animal. This mouse-human chimeric platform allows for a new approach to study NC development and diseases. PMID:26811475

  4. CYTOGENETIC COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSES OF MOUSE AND HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES TO 60CO GAMMA RADIATION (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of (60)Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a (60)Co unit to yield exposures ...

  5. Cytogenetic comparison of the responses of mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to /sup 60/Co gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kligerman, A.D.; Halperin, E.C.; Erexson, G.L.; Honore, G.; Westbrook-Collins, B.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a /sup 60/Co unit to yield exposures of 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy. In addition, mice were whole-body irradiated in vivo with the same doses so that an in vitro-in vivo comparison could be made. The results indicate that mouse PBLs irradiated in whole blood, whether in vivo or in vitro, respond similarly to /sup 60/Co gamma rays as measured by dicentric chromosome formation. In addition, mouse and human PBLs showed a similar radiosensitivity, but because the mouse PBL data were best fitted to an exponential function and the human PBL data to a quadratic function, direct comparisons were difficult to make. Pelleted MNLs from mice were much less sensitive to the clastogenic effects of gamma radiation than whole blood. This is believed to be due to hypoxic conditions that developed during irradiation and transport. Human PBLs did not show a marked difference whether irradiated in whole blood or as pelleted MNLs in tissue culture medium.

  6. Mouse p53-Deficient Cancer Models as Platforms for Obtaining Genomic Predictors of Human Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, Marta; Santos, Mirentxu; Aranda, Juan F.; Bielza, Concha; Martínez-Cruz, Ana B.; Lorz, Corina; Taron, Miquel; Ciruelos, Eva M.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Martín, Miguel; Larrañaga, Pedro; Dahabreh, Jubrail; Stathopoulos, George P.; Rosell, Rafael; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene are very common in human cancers, and are associated with poor clinical outcome. Transgenic mouse models lacking the Trp53 gene or that express mutant Trp53 transgenes produce tumours with malignant features in many organs. We previously showed the transcriptome of a p53-deficient mouse skin carcinoma model to be similar to those of human cancers with TP53 mutations and associated with poor clinical outcomes. This report shows that much of the 682-gene signature of this murine skin carcinoma transcriptome is also present in breast and lung cancer mouse models in which p53 is inhibited. Further, we report validated gene-expression-based tests for predicting the clinical outcome of human breast and lung adenocarcinoma. It was found that human patients with cancer could be stratified based on the similarity of their transcriptome with the mouse skin carcinoma 682-gene signature. The results also provide new targets for the treatment of p53-defective tumours. PMID:22880004

  7. Fibulin-2 (FBLN2): Human cDNA sequence, mRNA expression, and mapping of the gene on human and mouse chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.Z.; Pan, T.C.; Zhang, Z.Y.

    1994-07-15

    Fibulin-2 is a new extracellular matrix protein recently identified by characterizing mouse cDNA clones. Fibulin-2 mRNA is prominently expressed in mouse heart tissue and is present in low amounts in other tissues. In this study, the authors isolated and sequenced a 4.1-kb human fibulin-2 cDNA, which encoded a mature protein of 1157 amino acids preceded by a 27-residue signal sequence. The predicted polypeptide contains three consecutive anaphylatoxin-related segments (domain I) in its central region followed by 10 EGF-like repeats (domain II), 9 of which have a consensus sequence for calcium binding. The 408-residue N-terminal region consists of two separate subdomains, a cysteine-rich segment of 150 residues (Na subdomain) and a cysteine-free segment with a stretch of acidic amino acids (Nb subdomain). The 115-residue C-terminal segment (domain III) is similar to the C variant of fibulin-1. The amino acid sequences of the human and mouse fibulin-2 share {approximately}90% identity in domains Na, I, II, and III but only 62% identity in domain Nb. The human cDNA lacks an EGF-like repeat, which is alternatively spliced in the mouse cDNA clones, and a potential cell-binding Arg-Gly-Asp sequence found in the Nb domain of the mouse counterpart. Northern blot analysis of mRNA from various human tissues reveals an abundant 4.5-kb transcript in heart, placenta, and ovary tissue. The expression pattern differs from that of fibulin-1. The fibulin-2 gene was localized by in situ hybridization to the p24-p25 region of human chromosome 3 and to the band D-E of mouse chromosome 6. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Mapping of the taurine transporter gene to mouse chromosome 6 and to the short arm of human chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Uhl, G.R.; Gregor, P.

    1995-01-01

    Transport proteins have essential functions in the uptake of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. We have mapped the gene encoding the taurine transporter, Taut, to the central region of mouse chromosome 6. Analysis of a cross segregating the neurological mutant mnd2 excluded Taut as a candidate gene for this closely linked mutation. To map the human taurine transporter gene, TAUT, a sequence-tagged site (STS) corresponding to the 3{prime} untranslated region of the human cDNA was developed. TAUT was assigned to human chromosome 3 by typing this STS on a panel of somatic cell hybrids. Further analysis of a hybrid panel containing defined deletions of chromosome 3 suggested that TAUT maps to 3p21-p25. These data extend a conserved linkage group on mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 3p. Deletion of TAUT might contribute to some phenotypic features of the 3p{sup -} syndrome. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Human and mouse eLOX3 have distinct substrate specificities: implications for their linkage with lipoxygenases in skin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zheyong; Schneider, Claus; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggests a functional link between human 12R-lipoxygenase (12R-LOX) and epidermal lipoxygenase-3 (eLOX3) in normal differentiation of the epidermis; LOX-derived fatty acid hydroperoxide is isomerized by the atypical eLOX3 into a specific epoxyalcohol that is a potential mediator in the pathway. Mouse epidermis expresses a different complement of LOX enzymes, and therefore this metabolic linkage could differ. To test this concept, we compared the substrate specificities of recombinant mouse and human eLOX3 toward sixteen hydroperoxy stereoisomers of arachidonic and linoleic acids. Both enzymes metabolized R-hydroperoxides 2–3 times faster than the corresponding S enantiomers. Whereas 12R-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12R-HPETE) is the best substrate for human eLOX3 (2.4 sec−1; at 30 µM substrate), mouse eLOX3 shows the highest turnover with 8R-HPETE (2.9 sec−1) followed by 8S-HPETE (1.3 sec−1). Novel product structures were characterized from reactions of mouse eLOX3 with 5S-, 8R-, and 8S-HPETEs. 8S-HPETE is converted specifically to a single epoxyalcohol, identified as 10R-hydroxy-8S,9S-epoxyeicosa-5Z,11Z,14Z-trienoic acid. The substrate preference of mouse eLOX3 and the unique occurrence of an 8S-LOX enzyme in mouse skin point to a potential LOX pathway for the production of epoxyalcohol in murine epidermal differentiation. PMID:17045234

  10. Effects of some antibiotics on paraoxonase from human serum in vitro and from mouse serum and liver in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sinan, Selma; Kockar, Feray; Gencer, Nahit; Yildirim, Hatice; Arslan, Oktay

    2006-08-01

    Paraoxonase (PON1, EC 3.1.8.1) is an esterase protein which plays multifunctional role in metabolism. Therefore, in this study the effects of commonly used antibiotics, namely sodium ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, rifamycin SV and clindamycin phosphate, on human PON1 were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human serum paraoxonase (PON1) was separately purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The in vitro effects of the antibiotics in purifying human serum paraoxonase was determined using paraoxon as a substrate, and the IC50 values of these drugs exhibiting inhibition effects were found from graphs of hydratase activity % by plotting the concentration of the drugs. It was determined that sodium ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, and clindamycin phosphate were effective inhibitors on human serum PON1, and the inhibition kinetics of interaction of sodium ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, and clindamycin phosphate with the human serum PON1 was also determined, with the Ki of sodium ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, and clindamycin phosphate being 0.00714+/-0.00068, 6.5x10(-6)+/-4.59x10(-7), 0.0291+/-0.0077 mM, respectively. The in vivo effects of the antibiotics on paraoxonase enzyme activity in mouse serum and liver PON1 were also investigated. Mouse liver PON1 activity showed a statistically significant change at 2, 4 and 6 h of drug application in vivo. Sodium ampicillin and clindamycin phosphate exhibited about 80% mouse liver PON1 at 2 or 4 h (p: 0.034, 0.003 and 0.021, respectively). In addition, ciprofloxacin and rifamycin SV only showed inhibition at 4 h incubation. Sodium ampicillin (17.12 mg/kg) lead to a significant decrease in mouse serum PON1 after 4 h drug administration. Ciprofloxacin (3.2 mg/kg), rifamycin SV (3.56 mg/kg) and clindamycin phosphate (2.143 mg/kg) did not exhibit any inhibition effect for the mouse serum PON1, in vivo. PMID:16880604

  11. Characterization of human DNGR-1+ BDCA3+ leukocytes as putative equivalents of mouse CD8alpha+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Lionel Franz; Salio, Mariolina; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Craciun, Ligia; Chen, Ji-Li; Keller, Anna M; Joffre, Olivier; Zelenay, Santiago; Nye, Emma; Le Moine, Alain; Faure, Florence; Donckier, Vincent; Sancho, David; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Bonnet, Dominique; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2010-06-01

    In mouse, a subset of dendritic cells (DCs) known as CD8alpha+ DCs has emerged as an important player in the regulation of T cell responses and a promising target in vaccination strategies. However, translation into clinical protocols has been hampered by the failure to identify CD8alpha+ DCs in humans. Here, we characterize a population of human DCs that expresses DNGR-1 (CLEC9A) and high levels of BDCA3 and resembles mouse CD8alpha+ DCs in phenotype and function. We describe the presence of such cells in the spleens of humans and humanized mice and report on a protocol to generate them in vitro. Like mouse CD8alpha+ DCs, human DNGR-1+ BDCA3hi DCs express Necl2, CD207, BATF3, IRF8, and TLR3, but not CD11b, IRF4, TLR7, or (unlike CD8alpha+ DCs) TLR9. DNGR-1+ BDCA3hi DCs respond to poly I:C and agonists of TLR8, but not of TLR7, and produce interleukin (IL)-12 when given innate and T cell-derived signals. Notably, DNGR-1+ BDCA3+ DCs from in vitro cultures efficiently internalize material from dead cells and can cross-present exogenous antigens to CD8+ T cells upon treatment with poly I:C. The characterization of human DNGR-1+ BDCA3hi DCs and the ability to grow them in vitro opens the door for exploiting this subset in immunotherapy. PMID:20479117

  12. Potential Limitations of the NSG Humanized Mouse as a Model System to Optimize Engineered Human T cell Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcantar-Orozco, Erik M.; Gornall, Hannah; Baldan, Vania; Hawkins, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genetic modification of peripheral blood lymphocytes using retroviral vectors to redirect T cells against tumor cells has been recently used as a means to generate large numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive cell therapy protocols. However, commonly used retroviral vector-based genetic modification requires T cells to be driven into cell division; this potent mitogenic stimulus is associated with the development of an effector phenotype that may adversely impact upon the long-term engraftment potential and subsequent antitumor effects of T cells. To investigate whether the cytokines used during culture impact upon the engraftment potential of gene-modified T cells, a humanized model employing T cells engrafted with a MART-1-specific T cell receptor adoptively transferred into NOD/Shi-scid IL-2rγ−/− (NSG) immune-deficient mice bearing established melanoma tumors was used to compare the effects of the common γ chain cytokines IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15 upon gene-modified T cell activity. MART-1-specific T cells cultured in IL-7 and IL-15 demonstrated greater relative in vitro proliferation and viability of T cells compared with the extensively used IL-2. Moreover, the IL-15 culture prolonged the survival of animals bearing melanoma tumors after adoptive transfer. However, the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 produced T cells with improved engraftment potential compared with IL-15 alone; however, a high rate of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease prevented the identification of a clear improvement in antitumor effect of these T cells. These results clearly demonstrate modulation of gene-modified T cell engraftment in the NSG mouse, which supports the future testing of the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 in adoptive cell therapy protocols; however, this improved engraftment is also associated with the long-term maintenance of xenoreactive T cells, which limits the ultimate usefulness of the NSG mouse model in this situation. PMID:23931270

  13. Human Cripto-1 overexpression in the mouse mammary gland results in the development of hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wechselberger, Christian; Strizzi, Luigi; Kenney, Nicholas; Hirota, Morihisa; Sun, Youping; Ebert, Andreas; Orozco, Olivia; Bianco, Caterina; Khan, Nadia I; Wallace-Jones, Brenda; Normanno, Nicola; Adkins, Heather; Sanicola, Michele; Salomon, David S

    2005-06-01

    Human Cripto-1 (CR-1) is overexpressed in approximately 80% of human breast, colon and lung carcinomas. Mouse Cr-1 upregulation is also observed in a number of transgenic (Tg) mouse mammary tumors. To determine whether CR-1 can alter mammary gland development and/or may contribute to tumorigenesis in vivo, we have generated Tg mouse lines that express human CR-1 under the transcriptional control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). Stable Tg MMTV/CR-1 FVB/N lines expressing different levels of CR-1 were analysed. Virgin female MMTV/CR-1 Tg mice exhibited enhanced ductal branching, dilated ducts, intraductal hyperplasia, hyperplastic alveolar nodules and condensation of the mammary stroma. Virgin aged MMTV/CR-1 Tg mice also possessed persistent end buds. In aged multiparous MMTV/CR-1 mice, the hyperplastic phenotype was most pronounced with multifocal hyperplasias. In the highest CR-1-expressing subline, G4, 38% (12/31) of the multiparous animals aged 12-20 months developed hyperplasias and approximately 33% (11/31) developed papillary adenocarcinomas. The long latency period suggests that additional genetic alterations are required to facilitate mammary tumor formation in conjunction with CR-1. This is the first in vivo study that shows hyperplasia and tumor growth in CR-1-overexpressing animals. PMID:15897912

  14. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies. PMID:23000787

  15. Mouse primed embryonic stem cells could be maintained and reprogrammed on human amnion epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fei; Dong, Zhangli; Jiang, Lizheng; Lai, Dongmei; Guo, Lihe

    2013-01-15

    Naïve and primed embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent 2 pluripotent states of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), corresponding to the pre- and postimplantation cells, respectively, in vivo. Primed ESCs are distinct from naïve cells in biological characteristics, genetic features, developing potentials, and antagonistic signal pathway dependences to support undifferentiated growth. In vitro, naïve mESCs are readily converted to primed cells upon transferring to primed pluripotency signaling. ESC-derived epiblast stem cells (ESD-EpiSCs) are stabilized primed cells derived from naïve mESCs in vitro, and cannot be maintained with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signaling with or without mouse embryonic fibroblasts as the feeder layer. Here, we show that the undifferentiated growth of ESD-EpiSCs could be maintained with the basic fibroblast growth factor employing human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) as the feeder layer. Upon exposure to LIF, ESD-EpiSCs could undergo a reprogramming process on hAECs and be converted to naïve-like cells converted ESCs (cESCs), in which naïve pluripotency markers were activated, and primed markers were suppressed. DNA methylation analysis also validated the epigenetic conversion from primed to naïve-like pluripotent status. The bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is an important signaling factor in pluripotency controlling, germ cell development, and neural commitment. It showed that ESD-EpiSCs and cESCs exhibited different features toward BMP4. Our results prove that hAECs are ideal feeder cells for both naïve and primed ESCs. More importantly, the primed ESCs are allowed to be reprogrammed to naïve-like pluripotent cells on hAECs. These findings suggest that under suitable conditions primed ESCs have the potency of converting to naïve-like ESCs. PMID:22985337

  16. Polymorphic Expression of a Human Superficial Bladder Tumor Antigen Defined by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradet, Yves; Islam, Nazrul; Boucher, Lucie; Parent-Vaugeois, Carmen; Tardif, Marc

    1987-10-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up.

  17. Genetically engineered mouse models of human B-cell precursor leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, Julia; Borkhardt, Arndt; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias (pB-ALLs) are the most frequent type of malignancies of the childhood, and also affect an important proportion of adult patients. In spite of their apparent homogeneity, pB-ALL comprises a group of diseases very different both clinically and pathologically, and with very diverse outcomes as a consequence of their biology, and underlying molecular alterations. Their understanding (as a prerequisite for their cure) will require a sustained multidisciplinary effort from professionals coming from many different fields. Among all the available tools for pB-ALL research, the use of animal models stands, as of today, as the most powerful approach, not only for the understanding of the origin and evolution of the disease, but also for the development of new therapies. In this review we go over the most relevant (historically, technically or biologically) genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of human pB-ALLs that have been generated over the last 20 years. Our final aim is to outline the most relevant guidelines that should be followed to generate an “ideal” animal model that could become a standard for the study of human pB-ALL leukemia, and which could be shared among research groups and drug development companies in order to unify criteria for studies like drug testing, analysis of the influence of environmental risk factors, or studying the role of both low-penetrance mutations and cancer susceptibility alterations. PMID:25486471

  18. Brucella β 1,2 Cyclic Glucan Is an Activator of Human and Mouse Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Pinto Salcedo, Suzana; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23166489

  19. The Gne M712T Mouse as a Model for Human Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kakani, Sravan; Yardeni, Tal; Poling, Justin; Ciccone, Carla; Niethamer, Terren; Klootwijk, Enriko D.; Manoli, Irini; Darvish, Daniel; Hoogstraten-Miller, Shelley; Zerfas, Patricia; Tian, E.; Ten Hagen, Kelly G.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Gahl, William A.; Huizing, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Pathological glomerular hyposialylation has been implicated in certain unexplained glomerulopathies, including minimal change nephrosis, membranous glomerulonephritis, and IgA nephropathy. We studied our previously established mouse model carrying a homozygous mutation in the key enzyme of sialic acid biosynthesis, N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase. Mutant mice died before postnatal day 3 (P3) from severe glomerulopathy with podocyte effacement and segmental glomerular basement membrane splitting due to hyposialylation. Administration of the sialic acid precursor N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) led to improved sialylation and survival of mutant pups beyond P3. We determined the onset of the glomerulopathy in the embryonic stage. A lectin panel, distinguishing normally sialylated from hyposialylated glycans, used WGA, SNA, PNA, Jacalin, HPA, and VVA, indicating glomerular hyposialylation of predominantly O-linked glycoproteins in mutant mice. The glomerular glycoproteins nephrin and podocalyxin were hyposialylated in this unique murine model. ManNAc treatment appeared to ameliorate the hyposialylation status of mutant mice, indicated by a lectin histochemistry pattern similar to that of wild-type mice, with improved sialylation of both nephrin and podocalyxin, as well as reduced albuminuria compared with untreated mutant mice. These findings suggest application of our lectin panel for categorizing human kidney specimens based on glomerular sialylation status. Moreover, the partial restoration of glomerular architecture in ManNAc-treated mice highlights ManNAc as a potential treatment for humans affected with disorders of glomerular hyposialylation. PMID:22322304

  20. Comparative metabolism of honokiol in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kong, Tae Yeon; Choi, Won Gu; Lee, Hye Suk

    2016-04-01

    Honokiol has antitumor, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. Here we aimed to identify the metabolic profile of honokiol in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human hepatocytes and to characterize the enzymes responsible for the glucuronidation and sulfation of honokiol. Honokiol had a high hepatic extraction ratio in all five species, indicating that it was extensively metabolized. A total of 32 metabolites, including 17 common and 15 different metabolites, produced via glucuronidation, sulfation, and oxidation of honokiol allyl groups were tentatively identified using liquid chromatography-high resolution quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Glucuronidation of honokiol to M8 (honokiol-4-glucuronide) and M9 (honokiol-2'-glucuronide) was the predominant metabolic pathway in hepatocytes of all five species; however, interspecies differences between 4- and 2'-glucuronidation of honokiol were observed. UGT1A1, 1A8, 1A9, 2B15, and 2B17 played major roles in M8 formation, whereas UGT1A7 and 1A9 played major roles in M9 formation. Human cDNA-expressed SULT1C4 played a major role in M10 formation (honokiol-2'-sulfate), whereas SULT1A1*1, 1A1*2, and 1A2 played major roles in M11 formation (honokiol-4-sulfate). In conclusion, honokiol metabolism showed interspecies differences. PMID:26983827

  1. Rescue of hearing and vestibular function in a mouse model of human deafness

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Jennifer J.; Jodelka, Francine M.; Hinrich, Anthony J.; McCaffrey, Kate E.; Farris, Hamilton E.; Spalitta, Mathew J.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Duelli, Dominik M.; Rigo, Frank; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory disorder, with congenital hearing impairment present in ~1 in 1000 newborns1, and yet there is no cellular cure for deafness. Hereditary deafness is often mediated by the developmental failure or degeneration of cochlear hair cells2. Until now, it was not known whether such congenital failures could be mitigated by therapeutic intervention3-5. Here we show that hearing and vestibular function can be rescued in a mouse model of human hereditary deafness. An antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was used to correct defective pre–mRNA splicing of transcripts from the mutated USH1C.216G>A gene, which causes human Usher syndrome (Usher), the leading genetic cause of combined deafness and blindness6,7. Treatment of neonatal mice with a single systemic dose of ASO partially corrects USH1C.216G>A splicing, increases protein expression, improves stereocilia organization in the cochlea, and rescues cochlear hair cells, vestibular function and hearing in mice. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of ASOs in the treatment of deafness and provide evidence that congenital deafness can be effectively overcome by treatment early in development to correct gene expression. PMID:23380860

  2. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R; Prescher, Jennifer A; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F

    2010-10-19

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44(+) cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  3. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  4. Data for identification of porcine X-chromosome inactivation center, XIC, by genomic comparison with human and mouse XIC

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Choi, Kwang-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    The data included in this article shows homologies of genes in porcine X-chromosome inactivation center, XIC, to each orthologue in human and mouse XIC. Open sequences of XIC-linked genes in human and mouse were compared to porcine genome and sequence homology of each orthologue to porcine genome was calculated. Sequence information of porcine genes encoded in the genomic regions having sequence homology with the human XIC-linked genes and their 2 Kb upstream regions were downloaded. Obtained information was used to design primer pairs for expression and methylation pattern analyses of XIC-linked genes in pigs. The data represented in here is related and applied to the research article entitled “Dosage compensation of X-chromosome inactivation center, XIC,-linked genes in porcine preimplantation embryos: Non-chromosome wide initiation of X-chromosome inactivation in blastocysts”, published in Mechanisms of Development Hwang et al., 2015 [1]. PMID:26793753

  5. Data for identification of porcine X-chromosome inactivation center, XIC, by genomic comparison with human and mouse XIC.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Choi, Kwang-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    The data included in this article shows homologies of genes in porcine X-chromosome inactivation center, XIC, to each orthologue in human and mouse XIC. Open sequences of XIC-linked genes in human and mouse were compared to porcine genome and sequence homology of each orthologue to porcine genome was calculated. Sequence information of porcine genes encoded in the genomic regions having sequence homology with the human XIC-linked genes and their 2 Kb upstream regions were downloaded. Obtained information was used to design primer pairs for expression and methylation pattern analyses of XIC-linked genes in pigs. The data represented in here is related and applied to the research article entitled "Dosage compensation of X-chromosome inactivation center, XIC,-linked genes in porcine preimplantation embryos: Non-chromosome wide initiation of X-chromosome inactivation in blastocysts", published in Mechanisms of Development Hwang et al., 2015 [1]. PMID:26793753

  6. Mucosal tissue pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir in a humanized mouse model: Implications for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Veselinovic, Milena; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Sykes, Craig; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Kashuba, Angela D M; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    Orally administered anti-retroviral drugs show considerable promise for HIV/AIDS pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). For the success of these strategies, pharmacokinetic (PK) data defining the optimal concentration of the drug needed for protection in relevant mucosal exposure sites is essential. Here we employed a humanized mouse model to derive comprehensive PK data on the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL), a leading PrEP drug candidate. Under steady state conditions following oral dosing, plasma and multiple mucosal tissues were sampled simultaneously. RAL exhibited higher drug exposure in mucosal tissues relative to that in plasma with one log higher exposure in vaginal and rectal tissue and two logs higher exposure in intestinal mucosa reflecting the trends seen in the human studies. These data demonstrate the suitability of RAL for HIV PrEP and validate the utility of humanized mouse models for deriving important preclinical PK-PD data. PMID:26771889

  7. Biology of human skin transplanted to the nude mouse: I. Response to agents which modify epidermal proliferation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, G G; Shelby, J

    1981-06-01

    To accept human skin transplanted to the congenitally athymic (nude) mouse as a system to study human skin and its physiologic and pathologic states, it must be demonstrated that skin so maintained retains its function as a biologic unit. We have found that responses of grafted human skin and nude mouse skin to various agents differ. This difference in response has been utilized to assess barrier function and proliferative capacity of human skin grafts. Human skin grafts undergo a proliferative response when 10 ng of the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) is applied. Nudes do not respond to this dose. Increasing the dose to 100 ng of TPA evokes a response in both. However, only in the human skin grafts can this response be blocked with betamethasone valerate (BV). In that human skin grafts do not take on their hosts' responsiveness, and the response of domestic pig skin to these agents before and after grafting is identical, the conclusion is reached that human skin appears to retain its inherent biologic unit function. The data also demonstrate some of the potential of this system to study kinetics of the epidermis of human skin. PMID:7017014

  8. Heterogeneity of human Ro ribonucleoproteins (RNPS): nuclear retention of Ro RNPS containing the human hY5 RNA in human and mouse cells

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, M; Roberge, D; Boire, G

    2001-01-01

    Ro ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) are autoantigens that result from the association of a 60-kDa protein (Ro60) with a small RNA (hY1, hY3, hY4 or hY5 in humans, mY1 or mY3 in mice). Previous studies localized Ro RNPs to the cytoplasm. Because Ro RNPs containing hY5 RNA (RohY5 RNPs) have unique biochemical and immunological properties, their intracellular localization was reassessed. Subcellular distribution of mouse and human Ro RNPs in intact and hY-RNA transfected cells was assessed by immunoprecipitation and Northern hybridization. Human RohY14 RNPs as well as murine RomY1, mY3 RNPs are exclusively cytoplasmic. Ro RNPs containing an intact hY5 RNA, but not those containing a mutated form of hY5 RNA, are found in the nuclear fractions of human and mouse cells. RohY5 RNPs are stably associated with transcriptionally active La protein and are known to associate with RoBPI, a nuclear autoantigen. Our results demonstrate that RohY5 RNPs are specifically present in the nucleus of cultured human and murine cells. The signal for nuclear localization of RohY5 RNPs appears to reside within the hY5 sequence itself. In conclusion, we suggest that the unique localization and interactions of primate-specific RohY5 RNPs reflect functions that are distinct from the predicted cytoplasmic function(s) of more conserved Ro RNPs. PMID:11472440

  9. Molecular Determinants of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Pathogenesis and Virulence in Young and Aged Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Boyd; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Page, Carly; Donaldson, Eric; Roberts, Anjeanette; Vogel, Leatrice; Woodruff, Becky; Scorpio, Diana; Subbarao, Kanta; Baric, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes severe acute respiratory tract disease characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and hyaline membrane formation. This pathology often progresses to acute respiratory distress (such as acute respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS]) and atypical pneumonia in humans, with characteristic age-related mortality rates approaching 50% or more in immunosenescent populations. The molecular basis for the extreme virulence of SARS-CoV remains elusive. Since young and aged (1-year-old) mice do not develop severe clinical disease following infection with wild-type SARS-CoV, a mouse-adapted strain of SARS-CoV (called MA15) was developed and was shown to cause lethal infection in these animals. To understand the genetic contributions to the increased pathogenesis of MA15 in rodents, we used reverse genetics and evaluated the virulence of panels of derivative viruses encoding various combinations of mouse-adapted mutations. We found that mutations in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein and, to a much less rigorous extent, in the nsp9 nonstructural protein, were primarily associated with the acquisition of virulence in young animals. The mutations in S likely increase recognition of the mouse angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor not only in MA15 but also in two additional, independently isolated mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs. In contrast to the findings for young animals, mutations to revert to the wild-type sequence in nsp9 and the S glycoprotein were not sufficient to significantly attenuate the virus compared to other combinations of mouse-adapted mutations in 12-month-old mice. This panel of SARS-CoVs provides novel reagents that we have used to further our understanding of differential, age-related pathogenic mechanisms in mouse models of human disease. PMID:22072787

  10. Translational Initiation at a Non-AUG Start Codon for Human and Mouse Negative Elongation Factor-B.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haihui; Zhao, Xiayan; Zhang, Xiaowen; Abouelsoud, Mohamed; Sun, Jianlong; April, Craig; Amleh, Asma; Fan, Jian-Bing; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Negative elongation factor (NELF), a four-subunit protein complex in metazoan, plays an important role in regulating promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Genetic studies demonstrate that the B subunit of mouse NELF (NELF-B) is critical for embryonic development and homeostasis in adult tissue. We report here that both human and mouse NELF-B proteins are translated from a non-AUG codon upstream of the annotated AUG. This non-AUG codon sequence is conserved in mammalian NELF-B but not NELF-B orthologs of lower metazoan. The full-length and a truncated NELF-B that starts at the first AUG codon both interact with the other three NELF subunits. Furthermore, these two forms of NELF-B have a similar impact on the transcriptomics and proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These results strongly suggest that additional amino acid sequence upstream of the annotated AUG is dispensable for the essential NELF function in supporting cell growth in vitro. The majority of mouse adult tissues surveyed express the full-length NELF-B protein, and some contain a truncated NELF-B protein with the same apparent size as the AUG-initiated version. This result raises the distinct possibility that translational initiation of mouse NELF-B is regulated in a tissue-dependent manner. PMID:26010750

  11. Expression of endothelin receptors in frog, chicken, mouse and human pigment cells.

    PubMed

    Scarparo, Ana Cristina; Isoldi, Mauro César; de Lima, Leonardo Henrique Ribeiro Graciani; Visconti, Maria Aparecida; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2007-07-01

    Several reports have shown the participation of vasoactive endothelins (ETs) in the regulation of vertebrate pigment cells. In the present study, we identified ET receptors in pigment cells of vertebrate species by RT-PCR assays, and compared the differential expression of the various subtypes in each species by quantitative PCR. RT-PCR was performed with specific primers for ETC, ETA(X) or ETA in Xenopus laevis melanophores, ETA or ETB(2) in chicken melanocytes, ETA or ETB in murine (B-16, S-91 or Melan-A) or human (SK-Mel 23 or SK-Mel 28) melanoma cells, and the products obtained were confirmed by cloning and sequencing. The results showed the presence of ETA(X), but not ETA mRNA, and confirmed the expression of ETC in X. laevis melanophores. ETA and ETB(2) mRNAs were also demonstrated in chicken melanocytes. ETA and ETB receptor were identified in S-91, B16 and Melan-A murine cells. In human melanoma cells, SK-Mel 23 and SK-Mel 28, we confirmed the presence of ETB mRNA, and also found ETA mRNA. The comparison between the two subtypes present in the pigment cell of each species and among species demonstrated that the expression of ETAs in chicken, mouse, and human melanocytes is negligible, as is the expression of ETA(X) in Xenopus melanophores. The relative expression, as determined by quantitative PCR, was as follows: chicken ETB>SK-Mel 23 ETB>S91 ETB>Xenopus ETC, suggesting that the endothelin system plays a major role in avian and mammalian pigment cell regulation, as compared to lower vertebrates. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that subtype A receptors were probably the most primitive ET receptors, directly deriving from the ancestral type; all the other receptors, B subtypes and C, originated from diverse derivative molecules. PMID:16962346

  12. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  13. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  14. Novel domains of expression for orphan receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 in the human and mouse reproductive system

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ripla; Altman, Eran; Tran, Nam D; Laird, Diana J

    2014-01-01

    Background The non-canonical Wnt receptor and tyrosine kinase Ror2 has been associated with Recessive Robinow syndrome (RRS) and dominant Brachydactyly type B1. The phenotypes of mouse mutants implicate Ror2 in the development of the heart, lungs, bone and craniofacial structures, which are affected in RRS. Following a recently identified role of Ror2 in the migration of mouse primordial germ cells, we extensively characterized its expression throughout the fetal internal reproductive system and the postnatal ductal system. Results We show that Ror2 gene products are present in the germ cells and somatic cells of the testis and the ovary of both the mouse and human fetus. In reproductive tract structures, we find that Ror2 is expressed in the mesonephros, developing Wolffian and Mllerian ducts and later in their derivatives, the epididymal epithelium and uterine epithelium. Conclusion This study sets the stage to explore function for this tyrosine kinase receptor in novel regions of expression in the developing reproductive system in both mouse and human. PMID:24753105

  15. Nop2 is expressed during proliferation of neural stem cells and in adult mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Kosi, Nina; Alić, Ivan; Kolačević, Matea; Vrsaljko, Nina; Jovanov Milošević, Nataša; Sobol, Margarita; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland; Mitrečić, Dinko

    2015-02-01

    The nucleolar protein 2 gene encodes a protein specific for the nucleolus. It is assumed that it plays a role in the synthesis of ribosomes and regulation of the cell cycle. Due to its link to cell proliferation, higher expression of Nop2 indicates a worse tumor prognosis. In this work we used Nop2(gt1gaj) gene trap mouse strain. While lethality of homozygous animals suggested a vital role of this gene, heterozygous animals allowed the detection of expression of Nop2 in various tissues, including mouse brain. Histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy techniques, applied to a mature mouse brain, human brain and on mouse neural stem cells revealed expression of Nop2 in differentiating cells, including astrocytes, as well as in mature neurons. Nop2 was detected in various regions of mouse and human brain, mostly in large pyramidal neurons. In the human, Nop2 was strongly expressed in supragranular and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex and in layer III of the cingulate cortex. Also, Nop2 was detected in CA1 and the subiculum of the hippocampus. Subcellular analyses revealed predominant location of Nop2 within the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus. To test if Nop2 expression correlates to cell proliferation occurring during tissue regeneration, we induced strokes in mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Two weeks after stroke, the number of Nop2/nestin double positive cells in the region affected by ischemia and the periventricular zone substantially increased. Our findings suggest a newly discovered role of Nop2 in both mature neurons and in cells possibly involved in the regeneration of nervous tissue. PMID:25481415

  16. Differential effects of immunosuppressants and antibiotics on human monoclonal antibody production in SCID mouse ascites by five heterohybridomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, K; Arai, K

    1998-02-01

    SCID mice were inoculated with five human-mouse heterohybridomas derived by fusion of human lymph node lymphocytes from lung cancer patients with murine myeloma cells or human-mouse heteromyeloma cells, and the production of their human monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the mouse ascites was investigated. In a comparison of the effects of pretreatment by i.p. (intraperitoneal) injection of pristane and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the antibody production of three of the hybridomas, pristane pretreatment resulted in substantial antibody production by all three, and pretreatment with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in similar or slightly lower levels of antibody production by two of the hybridomas but none by the third. In a second series of experiments using four of the hybridomas with pristane pretreatment, the co-injection of either penicillin G and streptomycin or kanamycin together with the hybridoma at the time of i.p. inoculation resulted in enhanced MAb production by the two heterohybridomas that had been propagated in medium containing hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine (HAT) but not by the two that had been propagated in HAT-free medium. PMID:9523236

  17. Uranyl nitrate inhibits lactate gluconeogenesis in isolated human and mouse renal proximal tubules: A {sup 13}C-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, Sophie; Faiz, Hassan; Gadet, Rudy; Ferrier, Bernard; Martin, Guy; Baverel, Gabriel; Conjard-Duplany, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study on uranium nephrotoxicity, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate in isolated human and mouse kidney cortex tubules metabolizing the physiological substrate lactate. In the millimolar range, uranyl nitrate reduced lactate removal and gluconeogenesis and the cellular ATP level in a dose-dependent fashion. After incubation in phosphate-free Krebs-Henseleit medium with 5 mM L-[1-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[2-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[3-{sup 13}C]lactate, substrate utilization and product formation were measured by enzymatic and NMR spectroscopic methods. In the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate, glucose production and the intracellular ATP content were significantly reduced in both human and mouse tubules. Combination of enzymatic and NMR measurements with a mathematical model of lactate metabolism revealed an inhibition of fluxes through lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzymes in the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate; in human and mouse tubules, fluxes were lowered by 20% and 14% (lactate dehydrogenase), 27% and 32% (pyruvate carboxylase), 35% and 36% (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and 39% and 45% (glucose-6-phosphatase), respectively. These results indicate that natural uranium is an inhibitor of renal lactate gluconeogenesis in both humans and mice.

  18. Human and Mouse α-Synuclein Genes: Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis and Identification of a Novel Gene Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Touchman, Jeffrey W.; Dehejia, Anindya; Chiba-Falek, Ornit; Cabin, Deborah E.; Schwartz, Jody R.; Orrison, Bonnie M.; Polymeropoulos, Mihael H.; Nussbaum, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    The human α-synuclein gene (SNCA) encodes a presynaptic nerve terminal protein that was originally identified as a precursor of the non-β-amyloid component of Alzheimer's disease plaques. More recently, mutations in SNCA have been identified in some cases of familial Parkinson's disease, presenting numerous new areas of investigation for this important disease. Molecular studies would benefit from detailed information about the long-range sequence context of SNCA. To that end, we have established the complete genomic sequence of the chromosomal regions containing the human and mouse α-synuclein genes, with the objective of using the resulting sequence information to identify conserved regions of biological importance through comparative sequence analysis. These efforts have yielded ∼146 and ∼119 kb of high-accuracy human and mouse genomic sequence, respectively, revealing the precise genetic architecture of the α-synuclein gene in both species. A simple repeat element upstream of SNCA/Snca has been identified and shown to be necessary for normal expression in transient transfection assays using a luciferase reporter construct. Together, these studies provide valuable data that should facilitate more detailed analysis of this medically important gene. [The genomic DNA sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AF163864 (human) and AF163865 (mouse).] PMID:11156617

  19. Defined Conditions for the Isolation and Expansion of Basal Prostate Progenitor Cells of Mouse and Human Origin

    PubMed Central

    Höfner, Thomas; Eisen, Christian; Klein, Corinna; Rigo-Watermeier, Teresa; Goeppinger, Stephan M.; Jauch, Anna; Schoell, Brigitte; Vogel, Vanessa; Noll, Elisa; Weichert, Wilko; Baccelli, Irène; Schillert, Anja; Wagner, Steve; Pahernik, Sascha; Sprick, Martin R.; Trumpp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Methods to isolate and culture primary prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cells (PESCs) have proven difficult and ineffective. Here, we present a method to grow and expand both murine and human basal PESCs long term in serum- and feeder-free conditions. The method enriches for adherent mouse basal PESCs with a Lin−SCA-1+CD49f+TROP2high phenotype. Progesterone and sodium selenite are additionally required for the growth of human Lin−CD49f+TROP2high PESCs. The gene-expression profiles of expanded basal PESCs show similarities to ESCs, and NF-kB function is critical for epithelial differentiation of sphere-cultured PESCs. When transplanted in combination with urogenital sinus mesenchyme, expanded mouse and human PESCs generate ectopic prostatic tubules, demonstrating their stem cell activity in vivo. This novel method will facilitate the molecular, genomic, and functional characterization of normal and pathologic prostate glands of mouse and human origin. PMID:25702639

  20. Contrast-enhanced microCT (EPIC-µCT) ex vivo applied to the mouse and human jaw joint

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, L; Lin, A S; Langenbach, G E J; Koolstra, J H; Guldberg, R E; Everts, V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is susceptive to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). More detailed knowledge of its development is essential to improve our insight into TMJ-OA. It is imperative to have a standardized reliable three-dimensional (3D) imaging method that allows for detailed assessment of both bone and cartilage in healthy and diseased joints. We aimed to determine the applicability of a contrast-enhanced microCT (µCT) technique for ex vivo research of mouse and human TMJs. Methods: Equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via µCT (EPIC-µCT) was previously applied for cartilage assessment in the knee joint. The method was ex vivo, applied to the mouse TMJ and adapted for the human TMJ. Results: EPIC-µCT (30-min immersion time) was applied to mouse mandibular condyles, and 3D imaging revealed an average cartilage thickness of 110 ± 16 µm. These measurements via EPIC-µCT were similar to the histomorphometric measures (113 ± 19 µm). For human healthy OA-affected TMJ samples, the protocol was adjusted to an immersion time of 1 h. 3D imaging revealed a significant thicker cartilage layer in joints with early signs of OA compared with healthy joints (414.2 ± 122.6 and 239.7 ± 50.5 µm, respectively). A subsequent significant thinner layer was found in human joints with late signs of OA (197.4 ± 159.7 µm). Conclusions: The EPIC-µCT technique is effective for the ex vivo assessment of 3D cartilage morphology in the mouse as well as human TMJ and allows bone–cartilage interaction research in TMJ-OA. PMID:24353248

  1. Localization of a novel natural killer triggering receptor locus to human chromosome 3p23-p21 and mouse chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Young, H.A.; Jenkins, N.A.; Copeland, N.G.; Simek, S.; Lerman, M.I.; Zbar, B.; Glenn, G.; Ortaldo, J.R.; Anderson, S.K.

    1993-05-01

    A novel gene (NKTR) that is involved in the recognition of tumor cells by large granular lymphocytes (LGLs) has been assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 3 in the region 3p23-p21 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. Interspecific backcross analysis revealed that the murine homologue maps to the distal end of mouse chromosome 9 and is closely linked to the locus coding for cholecystokinin (Cck). This region of mouse 9 shares a region of homology with human 3p. Thus, the placement of NKTR in these regions confirms and extends the relationship between these human and mouse chromosomes. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Integration of Mouse and Human Genome-Wide Association Data Identifies KCNIP4 as an Asthma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Himes, Blanca E.; Sheppard, Keith; Berndt, Annerose; Leme, Adriana S.; Myers, Rachel A.; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Levin, Albert M.; Gauderman, W. James; Yang, James J.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Romieu, Isabelle; Torgerson, Dara G.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Klanderman, Barbara; Ziniti, John; Senter-Sylvia, Jody; Szefler, Stanley J.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Zeiger, Robert S.; Strunk, Robert C.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Boushey, Homer; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Israel, Elliot; Mauger, David; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A. E.; Vonk, Judith M.; Lima, John J.; Irvin, Charles G.; Peters, Stephen P.; Kubo, Michiaki; Tamari, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Meyers, Deborah A.; London, Stephanie J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Williams, L. Keoki; Burchard, Esteban G.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Paigen, Beverly; Churchill, Gary; Shapiro, Steve D.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic respiratory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The genetics of asthma have been widely studied in mouse and human, and homologous genomic regions have been associated with mouse AHR and human asthma-related phenotypes. Our goal was to identify asthma-related genes by integrating AHR associations in mouse with human genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. We used Efficient Mixed Model Association (EMMA) analysis to conduct a GWAS of baseline AHR measures from males and females of 31 mouse strains. Genes near or containing SNPs with EMMA p-values <0.001 were selected for further study in human GWAS. The results of the previously reported EVE consortium asthma GWAS meta-analysis consisting of 12,958 diverse North American subjects from 9 study centers were used to select a subset of homologous genes with evidence of association with asthma in humans. Following validation attempts in three human asthma GWAS (i.e., Sepracor/LOCCS/LODO/Illumina, GABRIEL, DAG) and two human AHR GWAS (i.e., SHARP, DAG), the Kv channel interacting protein 4 (KCNIP4) gene was identified as nominally associated with both asthma and AHR at a gene- and SNP-level. In EVE, the smallest KCNIP4 association was at rs6833065 (P-value 2.9e-04), while the strongest associations for Sepracor/LOCCS/LODO/Illumina, GABRIEL, DAG were 1.5e-03, 1.0e-03, 3.1e-03 at rs7664617, rs4697177, rs4696975, respectively. At a SNP level, the strongest association across all asthma GWAS was at rs4697177 (P-value 1.1e-04). The smallest P-values for association with AHR were 2.3e-03 at rs11947661 in SHARP and 2.1e-03 at rs402802 in DAG. Functional studies are required to validate the potential involvement of KCNIP4 in modulating asthma susceptibility and/or AHR. Our results suggest that a useful approach to identify genes associated with human asthma is to leverage mouse AHR association data. PMID:23457522

  3. Cloning and characterization of the mouse homolog (D12H14S564E) of a novel human cochlear gene (D14S564E)

    SciTech Connect

    Kovatch, K.A.; Robertson, N.G.; Brody, T.H.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated mouse cDNA clones homologous to a novel human cochlear cDNA (D14S564E) identified by subtractive hybridization of a human fetal cochlear cDNA library with human fetal brain RNA. The human gene is preferentially expressed in cochlea, with low level expression in brain and eye, and has three transcripts of 2.0, 2.3, and 2.9 kb. To investigate the structure and function of the human cochlear gene and its role in the biology of hearing and deafness, we have cloned the mouse homolog (D12H14S564E). Mouse cDNAs, ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 kb, were identified with a mouse brain cDNA library screened by hybridization with the human cDNA. Analysis of mouse clones by DNA sequencing revealed significant homology with the human cochlear gene; in one region analyzed, the mouse clone possessed 88% homology over 525 bases with the human clone. In the area of homology, there is an open reading frame of approximately 125 amino acids. Comparison of the homologous sequence with those entered in GenBank identifies similarity with a von Willebrand factor type A-like domain in the area of sequence conservation, a feature consistent with the human clone. Known proteins containing the von Willebrand type A-like domain have diverse functions including extracellular matrix assembly, hemostasis, cellular adhesion and defense mechanisms. Further homology of mouse and human clones is supported by hybridization of the mouse clone to a Northern blot of human fetal cochlea and brain RNA; results show that the mouse clone hybridizes with the same three messages in the human cochlea RNA as does the novel human cochlear gene. D12H14S564E maps to mouse chromosome 12 in a region to which asp-1 (audiogenic seizure prone) is assigned. Further sequencing and expression studies are in progress to fully characterize the mouse gene and its homology with the novel human cochlear gene.

  4. Complexity and multifractality of neuronal noise in mouse and human hippocampal epileptiform dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serletis, Demitre; Bardakjian, Berj L.; Valiante, Taufik A.; Carlen, Peter L.

    2012-10-01

    Fractal methods offer an invaluable means of investigating turbulent nonlinearity in non-stationary biomedical recordings from the brain. Here, we investigate properties of complexity (i.e. the correlation dimension, maximum Lyapunov exponent, 1/fγ noise and approximate entropy) and multifractality in background neuronal noise-like activity underlying epileptiform transitions recorded at the intracellular and local network scales from two in vitro models: the whole-intact mouse hippocampus and lesional human hippocampal slices. Our results show evidence for reduced dynamical complexity and multifractal signal features following transition to the ictal epileptiform state. These findings suggest that pathological breakdown in multifractal complexity coincides with loss of signal variability or heterogeneity, consistent with an unhealthy ictal state that is far from the equilibrium of turbulent yet healthy fractal dynamics in the brain. Thus, it appears that background noise-like activity successfully captures complex and multifractal signal features that may, at least in part, be used to classify and identify brain state transitions in the healthy and epileptic brain, offering potential promise for therapeutic neuromodulatory strategies for afflicted patients suffering from epilepsy and other related neurological disorders. This paper is based on chapter 5 of Serletis (2010 PhD Dissertation Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto).

  5. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Palma, Giuseppe; Luciano, Antonio; Arra, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-?B and NF-?B-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-?B pathway. PMID:24324975

  6. Functional recovery with recombinant human IGF1 treatment in a mouse model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Jorge; Garcia, Rodrigo I.; Kwok, Showming; Banerjee, Abhishek; Petravicz, Jeremy; Woodson, Jonathan; Mellios, Nikolaos; Tropea, Daniela; Sur, Mriganka

    2014-01-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that arises from mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). MeCP2 has a large number of targets and a wide range of functions, suggesting the hypothesis that functional signaling mechanisms upstream of synaptic and circuit maturation may contribute to our understanding of the disorder and provide insight into potential treatment. Here, we show that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) levels are reduced in young male Mecp2-null (Mecp2−/y) mice, and systemic treatment with recombinant human IGF1 (rhIGF1) improves lifespan, locomotor activity, heart rate, respiration patterns, and social and anxiety behavior. Furthermore, Mecp2-null mice treated with rhIGF1 show increased synaptic and activated signaling pathway proteins, enhanced cortical excitatory synaptic transmission, and restored dendritic spine densities. IGF1 levels are also reduced in older, fully symptomatic heterozygous (Mecp2−/+) female mice, and short-term treatment with rhIGF1 in these animals improves respiratory patterns, reduces anxiety levels, and increases exploratory behavior. In addition, rhIGF1 treatment normalizes abnormally prolonged plasticity in visual cortex circuits of adult Mecp2−/+ female mice. Our results provide characterization of the phenotypic development of Rett Syndrome in a mouse model at the molecular, circuit, and organismal levels and demonstrate a mechanism-based therapeutic role for rhIGF1 in treating Rett Syndrome. PMID:24958891

  7. Tissue-Specific Evolution of Protein Coding Genes in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kryuchkova-Mostacci, Nadezda; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding genes evolve at different rates, and the influence of different parameters, from gene size to expression level, has been extensively studied. While in yeast gene expression level is the major causal factor of gene evolutionary rate, the situation is more complex in animals. Here we investigate these relations further, especially taking in account gene expression in different organs as well as indirect correlations between parameters. We used RNA-seq data from two large datasets, covering 22 mouse tissues and 27 human tissues. Over all tissues, evolutionary rate only correlates weakly with levels and breadth of expression. The strongest explanatory factors of purifying selection are GC content, expression in many developmental stages, and expression in brain tissues. While the main component of evolutionary rate is purifying selection, we also find tissue-specific patterns for sites under neutral evolution and for positive selection. We observe fast evolution of genes expressed in testis, but also in other tissues, notably liver, which are explained by weak purifying selection rather than by positive selection. PMID:26121354

  8. Reprogramming of Mouse, Rat, Pig, and Human Fibroblasts into iPS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    The induction of pluripotency in somatic cells by transcription factor overexpression has been widely regarded as one of the major breakthroughs in stem cell biology within this decade. The generation of these induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has enabled investigators to develop in vitro disease models for biological discovery and drug screening, and in the future, patient-specific therapy for tissue or organ regeneration. While new technologies for reprogramming are continually being discovered, the availability of iPSCs from different species is also increasing rapidly. Comparison of iPSCs across species may provide new insights into key aspects of pluripotency and early embryonic development. iPSCs from large animals may enable the generation of genetically-modified large animal models or potentially transplantable donor tissues or organs. In this unit, we describe the procedure for the generation of iPSCs from mouse, rat, pig and human fibroblasts. We focus on lenti- and retroviral infection as the main platform for pluripotent transcription factor overexpression since these reagents are widely-available and remain the most efficient way to generate iPSC colonies. We hope to illustrate the basic process for iPSC generation in these four species in such a way that would enable the lowering of the entry barrier into iPSC biology by new investigators. PMID:22237859

  9. Mouse and human islets survive and function after coating by biosilicification

    PubMed Central

    Jaroch, David B.; Lu, Jing; Madangopal, Rajtarun; Stull, Natalie D.; Stensberg, Matthew; Shi, Jin; Kahn, Jennifer L.; Herrera-Perez, Ruth; Zeitchek, Michael; Sturgis, Jennifer; Robinson, J. Paul; Yoder, Mervin C.; Porterfield, D. Marshall; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic materials have properties that can be advantageous in bioencapsulation for cell transplantation. Our aim was to engineer a hybrid inorganic/soft tissue construct by inducing pancreatic islets to grow an inorganic shell. We created pancreatic islets surrounded by porous silica, which has potential application in the immunoprotection of islets in transplantation therapies for type 1 diabetes. The new method takes advantage of the islet capsule surface as a template for silica formation. Mouse and human islets were exposed to medium containing saturating silicic acid levels for 9–15 min. The resulting tissue constructs were then cultured for up to 4 wk under normal conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to monitor the morphology and elemental composition of the material at the islet surface. A cytokine assay was used to assess biocompatibility with macrophages. Islet survival and function were assessed by confocal microscopy, glucose-stimulated insulin release assays, oxygen flux at the islet surface, expression of key genes by RT-PCR, and syngeneic transplant into diabetic mice. PMID:24002572

  10. Type I IFN-mediated synergistic activation of mouse and human DC subsets by TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Martin; Bakdash, Ghaith; Dolen, Yusuf; Sköld, Annette E; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Figdor, Carl G

    2015-10-01

    Novel approaches of dendritic cell (DC) based cancer immunotherapy aim at harnessing the unique attributes of different DC subsets. Classical monocyte-derived DC vaccines are currently being replaced by either applying primary DCs or specifically targeting antigens and adjuvants to these subsets in vivo. Appropriate DC activation in both strategies is essential for optimal effect. For this purpose TLR agonists are favorable adjuvant choices, with TLR7 triggering being essential for inducing strong Th1 responses. However, mouse CD8α(+) DCs, considered to be the major cross-presenting subset, lack TLR7 expression. Interestingly, this DC subset can respond to TLR7 ligand upon concurrent TLR3 triggering. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying this synergy remains obscure. We now show that TLR3 ligation results in the production of IFN-α, which rapidly induces the expression of TLR7, resulting in synergistic activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that this mechanism conversely holds for plasmacytoid DCs that respond to TLR3 ligation when TLR7 pathway is mobilized. We further demonstrate that this mechanism of sharpening DC senses is also conserved in human BDCA1(+) DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. These findings have important implications for future clinical trials as it suggests that combinations of TLR ligands should be applied irrespective of initial TLR expression profiles on natural DC subsets for optimal stimulation. PMID:26255864

  11. Two novel human and mouse DNA polymerases of the polX family

    PubMed Central

    Aoufouchi, Said; Flatter, Eric; Dahan, Auriel; Faili, Ahmad; Bertocci, Barbara; Storck, Sebastien; Delbos, Frédéric; Cocea, Laurentiu; Gupta, Neetu; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2000-01-01

    We describe here two novel mouse and human DNA polymerases: one (pol λ) has homology with DNA polymerase β while the other one (pol µ) is closer to terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase. However both have DNA polymerase activity in vitro and share similar structural organization, including a BRCT domain, helix–loop–helix DNA-binding motifs and polymerase X domain. mRNA expression of pol λ is highest in testis and fetal liver, while expression of pol µ is more lymphoid, with highest expression both in thymus and tonsillar B cells. An unusually large number of splice variants is observed for the pol µ gene, most of which affect the polymerase domain. Expression of mRNA of both polymerases is down-regulated upon treatment by DNA damaging agents (UV light, γ-rays or H2O2). This suggests that their biological function may differ from DNA translesion synthesis, for which several DNA polymerase activities have been recently described. Possible functions are discussed. PMID:10982892

  12. Missense mutation in mouse GALC mimics human gene defect and offers new insights into Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Gregory B.; Santos, Marta; Davisson, Muriel T.; Rowitch, David H.; Marks, Dan L.; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Petryniak, Magdalena A.

    2013-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a devastating pediatric leukodystrophy caused by mutations in the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) gene. A significant subset of the infantile form of the disease is due to missense mutations that result in aberrant protein production. The currently used mouse model, twitcher, has a nonsense mutation not found in Krabbe patients, although it is similar to the human 30 kb deletion in abrogating GALC expression. Here, we identify a spontaneous mutation in GALC, GALCtwi-5J, that precisely matches the E130K missense mutation in patients with infantile Krabbe disease. GALCtwi-5J homozygotes show loss of enzymatic activity despite normal levels of precursor protein, and manifest a more severe phenotype than twitcher, with half the life span. Although neuropathological hallmarks such as gliosis, globoid cells and psychosine accumulation are present throughout the nervous system, the CNS does not manifest significant demyelination. In contrast, the PNS is severely hypomyelinated and lacks large diameter axons, suggesting primary dysmyelination, rather than a demyelinating process. Our data indicate that early demise is due to mechanisms other than myelin loss and support an important role for neuroinflammation in Krabbe disease progression. Furthermore, our results argue against a causative relationship between psychosine accumulation, white matter loss and gliosis. PMID:23620143

  13. A practical guide to culturing mouse and human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, K; Mayer, B; Sworder, B J; Kuznetsov, S A; Mezey, E

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, frequently also called MSCs) represent a cell population within the bone marrow, a subset of which contains multipotent stem cells. Their primary role is to produce and maintain both bone tissue and bone marrow microenvironment necessary for hematopoiesis. The latter is achieved by secreting a wide variety of different cytokines and growth factors, many of which also have a regulatory role in immune processes. BMSCs have recently been introduced into the field of immunobiology after their successful clinical use in GVHD was reported in 2004. Since then, numerous studies confirmed and expanded the knowledge on the immunosuppressive potential of BMSCs in various in vitro and in vivo models. Although the immunomodulatory capacity of BMSCs is well established, there are still many unanswered questions regarding the cytokines, chemokines, receptors, and molecular pathways that play a role in this effect. To study these cells and answer many of the questions, researchers must be able to reliably and reproducibly isolate, culture, and use these cells. Below a practical guide on how to culture and characterize mouse and human BMSCs, which can then be applied in various in vitro and in vivo assays, is provided. PMID:24510517