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Sample records for human mutant sod1

  1. A novel SOD1-ALS mutation separates central and peripheral effects of mutant SOD1 toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Peter I.; Mcgoldrick, Philip; Saccon, Rachele A.; Weber, William; Fratta, Pietro; West, Steven J.; Zhu, Ning; Carter, Sarah; Phatak, Vinaya; Stewart, Michelle; Simon, Michelle; Kumar, Saumya; Heise, Ines; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Dick, James; Corrochano, Silvia; Stanford, Macdonnell J.; Luong, Tu Vinh; Nolan, Patrick M.; Meyer, Timothy; Brandner, Sebastian; Bennett, David L.H.; Ozdinler, P. Hande; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) have been critical in furthering our understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, such models generally overexpress the mutant protein, which may give rise to phenotypes not directly relevant to the disorder. Here, we have analysed a novel mouse model that has a point mutation in the endogenous mouse Sod1 gene; this mutation is identical to a pathological change in human familial ALS (fALS) which results in a D83G change in SOD1 protein. Homozgous Sod1D83G/D83G mice develop progressive degeneration of lower (LMN) and upper motor neurons, likely due to the same unknown toxic gain of function as occurs in human fALS cases, but intriguingly LMN cell death appears to stop in early adulthood and the mice do not become paralyzed. The D83 residue coordinates zinc binding, and the D83G mutation results in loss of dismutase activity and SOD1 protein instability. As a result, Sod1D83G/D83G mice also phenocopy the distal axonopathy and hepatocellular carcinoma found in Sod1 null mice (Sod1−/−). These unique mice allow us to further our understanding of ALS by separating the central motor neuron body degeneration and the peripheral effects from a fALS mutation expressed at endogenous levels. PMID:25468678

  2. ALS-linked mutant SOD1 damages mitochondria by promoting conformational changes in Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Steve; Sau, Daniela; Guareschi, Stefania; Bogush, Marina; Brown, Robert H.; Naniche, Nicole; Kia, Azadeh; Trotti, Davide; Pasinelli, Piera

    2010-01-01

    In mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1)-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accumulation of misfolded mutant SOD1 in spinal cord mitochondria is thought to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. Whether mutant SOD1 is toxic per se or whether it damages the mitochondria through interactions with other mitochondrial proteins is not known. We previously identified Bcl-2 as an interacting partner of mutant SOD1 specifically in spinal cord, but not in liver, mitochondria of SOD1 mice and patients. We now show that mutant SOD1 toxicity relies on this interaction. Mutant SOD1 induces mitochondrial morphological changes and compromises mitochondrial membrane integrity leading to release of Cytochrome C only in the presence of Bcl-2. In cells, mouse and human spinal cord with SOD1 mutations, the binding to mutant SOD1 triggers a conformational change in Bcl-2 that results in the uncovering of its toxic BH3 domain and conversion of Bcl-2 into a toxic protein. Bcl-2 carrying a mutagenized, non-toxic BH3 domain fails to support mutant SOD1 mitochondrial toxicity. The identification of Bcl-2 as a specific target and active partner in mutant SOD1 mitochondrial toxicity suggests new therapeutic strategies to inhibit the formation of the toxic mutant SOD1/Bcl-2 complex and to prevent mitochondrial damage in ALS. PMID:20460269

  3. Extracellular Mutant SOD1 Induces Microglial-Mediated Motoneuron Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weihua; Beers, David R.; Henkel, Jenny S.; Zhang, Wei; Urushitani, Makoto; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Appel, Stanley H.

    2009-01-01

    Through undefined mechanisms, dominant mutations in (Cu/Zn) superoxide dismutase-1 (mSOD1) cause the non-cell-autonomous death of motoneurons in inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Microgliosis at sites of motoneuron injury is a neuropathological hallmark of ALS. Extracellular mSOD1 causes motoneuron injury and triggers microgliosis in spinal cord cultures, but it is unclear whether the injury results from extracellular mSOD1 directly interacting with motoneurons or is mediated through mSOD1-activated microglia. To dissociate these potential mSOD1-mediated neurotoxic mechanisms, the effects of extracellular human mSOD1G93A or mSOD1G85R were assayed using primary cultures of motoneurons and microglia. The data demonstrate that exogenous mSOD1G93A did not cause detectable direct killing of motoneurons. In contrast, mSOD1G93A or mSOD1G85R did induce the morphological and functional activation of microglia, increasing their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and free radicals. Furthermore, only when microglia were co-cultured with motoneurons did extracellular mSOD1G93A injure motoneurons. The microglial activation mediated by mSOD1G93A was attenuated using toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, TLR4 and CD14 blocking antibodies, or when microglia lacked CD14 expression. These data suggest that extracellular mSOD1G93A is not directly toxic to motoneurons but requires microglial activation for toxicity, utilizing CD14 and TLR pathways. This link between mSOD1 and innate immunity may offer novel therapeutic targets in ALS. PMID:19672969

  4. Direct and indirect mechanisms for wild-type SOD1 to enhance the toxicity of mutant SOD1 in bigenic transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guilian; Ayers, Jacob I.; Roberts, Brittany L.; Brown, Hilda; Fromholt, Susan; Green, Cameron; Borchelt, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Co-expression of wild-type human superoxide dismutase 1 (WT-hSOD1) with ALS mutant hSOD1 accelerates disease onset relative to mice expressing only mutant protein. Here, we analyzed the effect of co-expressed WT-hSOD1 in two established mutant mouse models (L126Z and G37R), and a new model that expresses the first 102 amino acids of SOD1 with mutations at histidines 46, 48 and 63 to eliminate Cu binding (Cu-V103Z). A subset of Cu-V103Z mice developed paralysis between 500 and 730 days. Similar to mice expressing L126Z-SOD1, the spinal cords of this new model showed SOD1 immunoreactive fibrillar inclusions. Co-expression of WT-hSOD1 with Cu-V103Z SOD1 moderately accelerated the age to paralysis, similar in magnitude to WT/L126Z mice. In either combination of these bigenic mice, the severity of fibrillar inclusion pathology was diminished and unreactive to antibodies specific for the C terminus of WT protein. Co-expression of WT-hSOD1 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (WT-hSOD1:YFP) with G37R-hSOD1 produced earlier disease, and spinal cords of paralyzed bigenic mice showed YFP fluorescent inclusion-like structures. In bigenic L126Z/WT-hSOD1:YFP mice, disease was not accelerated and WT-hSOD1:YFP remained diffusely distributed. A combination of split luciferase complementation assays and affinity capture-binding assays demonstrated that soluble G37R-hSOD1 efficiently and tightly bound soluble WT-hSOD1, whereas soluble forms of the Cu-V103Z and L126Z variants demonstrated low affinity. These data indicate that WT-hSOD1 may indirectly augment the toxicity of mutant protein by competing for protective factors, but disease onset seems to be most accelerated when WT-hSOD1 interacts with mutant SOD1 and becomes misfolded. PMID:25305079

  5. Direct and indirect mechanisms for wild-type SOD1 to enhance the toxicity of mutant SOD1 in bigenic transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guilian; Ayers, Jacob I; Roberts, Brittany L; Brown, Hilda; Fromholt, Susan; Green, Cameron; Borchelt, David R

    2015-02-15

    Co-expression of wild-type human superoxide dismutase 1 (WT-hSOD1) with ALS mutant hSOD1 accelerates disease onset relative to mice expressing only mutant protein. Here, we analyzed the effect of co-expressed WT-hSOD1 in two established mutant mouse models (L126Z and G37R), and a new model that expresses the first 102 amino acids of SOD1 with mutations at histidines 46, 48 and 63 to eliminate Cu binding (Cu-V103Z). A subset of Cu-V103Z mice developed paralysis between 500 and 730 days. Similar to mice expressing L126Z-SOD1, the spinal cords of this new model showed SOD1 immunoreactive fibrillar inclusions. Co-expression of WT-hSOD1 with Cu-V103Z SOD1 moderately accelerated the age to paralysis, similar in magnitude to WT/L126Z mice. In either combination of these bigenic mice, the severity of fibrillar inclusion pathology was diminished and unreactive to antibodies specific for the C terminus of WT protein. Co-expression of WT-hSOD1 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (WT-hSOD1:YFP) with G37R-hSOD1 produced earlier disease, and spinal cords of paralyzed bigenic mice showed YFP fluorescent inclusion-like structures. In bigenic L126Z/WT-hSOD1:YFP mice, disease was not accelerated and WT-hSOD1:YFP remained diffusely distributed. A combination of split luciferase complementation assays and affinity capture-binding assays demonstrated that soluble G37R-hSOD1 efficiently and tightly bound soluble WT-hSOD1, whereas soluble forms of the Cu-V103Z and L126Z variants demonstrated low affinity. These data indicate that WT-hSOD1 may indirectly augment the toxicity of mutant protein by competing for protective factors, but disease onset seems to be most accelerated when WT-hSOD1 interacts with mutant SOD1 and becomes misfolded. PMID:25305079

  6. Mutant SOD1 Forms Ion Channel: Implications for ALS Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michael J.; Lacroix, Jérome J.; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Capone, Ricardo; Whitlock, Jenny L.; Ghadge, Ghanashyam D.; Arnsdorf, Morton F.; Roos, Raymond P.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Point mutations in the gene encoding copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) impart a gain-of-function to this protein that underlies 20-25% of all familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) cases. However, the specific mechanism of mutant SOD1 toxicity has remained elusive. Using the complementary techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrophysiology, and cell and molecular biology, here we examine the structure and activity of A4VSOD1, a mutant SOD1. AFM of A4VSOD1 reconstituted in lipid membrane shows discrete tetrameric pore-like structure with outer and inner diameters 12.2 and 3.0 nm respectively. Electrophysiological recordings show distinct ionic conductances across bilayer for A4VSOD1 and none for wild-type SOD1. Mouse neuroblastoma cells exposed to A4VSOD1 undergo membrane depolarization and increases in intracellular calcium. These results provide compelling new evidence that a mutant SOD1 is capable of disrupting cellular homeostasis via an unregulated ion channel mechanism. Such a “toxic channel” mechanism presents a new therapeutic direction for ALS research. PMID:21930207

  7. In vivo pathogenic role of mutant SOD1 localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Igoudjil, Anissa; Magrané, Jordi; Fischer, Lindsey R; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Hervias, Isabel; Dumont, Magali; Cortez, Czrina; Glass, Jonathan D; Starkov, Anatoly A; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-11-01

    Mutations in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutant SOD1 causes a complex array of pathological events, through toxic gain of function mechanisms, leading to selective motor neuron degeneration. Mitochondrial dysfunction is among the well established toxic effects of mutant SOD1, but its mechanisms are just starting to be elucidated. A portion of mutant SOD1 is localized in mitochondria, where it accumulates mostly on the outer membrane and inside the intermembrane space (IMS). Evidence in cultured cells suggests that mutant SOD1 in the IMS causes mitochondrial dysfunction and compromises cell viability. Therefore, to test its pathogenic role in vivo we generated transgenic mice expressing G93A mutant or wild-type (WT) human SOD1 targeted selectively to the mitochondrial IMS (mito-SOD1). We show that mito-SOD1 is correctly localized in the IMS, where it oligomerizes and acquires enzymatic activity. Mito-G93ASOD1 mice, but not mito-WTSOD1 mice, develop a progressive disease characterized by body weight loss, muscle weakness, brain atrophy, and motor impairment, which is more severe in females. These symptoms are associated with reduced spinal motor neuron counts and impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, characterized by decreased cytochrome oxidase activity and defective calcium handling. However, there is no evidence of muscle denervation, a cardinal pathological feature of ALS. Together, our findings indicate that mutant SOD1 in the mitochondrial IMS causes mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, but per se it is not sufficient to cause a full-fledged ALS phenotype, which requires the participation of mutant SOD1 localized in other cellular compartments. PMID:22049426

  8. Modifications of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Kyle C.; Zhou, Li; Jordon, Joshua K.; Huang, Yi; Yu, Yanbao; Redler, Rachel L.; Chen, Xian; Caplow, Michael; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2009-01-01

    Over 100 mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) result in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Dimer dissociation is the first step in SOD1 aggregation, and studies suggest nearly every amino acid residue in SOD1 is dynamically connected to the dimer interface. Post-translational modifications of SOD1 residues might be expected to have similar effects to mutations, but few modifications have been identified. Here we show, using SOD1 isolated from human erythrocytes, that human SOD1 is phosphorylated at threonine 2 and glutathionylated at cysteine 111. A second SOD1 phosphorylation was observed and mapped to either Thr-58 or Ser-59. Cysteine 111 glutathionylation promotes SOD1 monomer formation, a necessary initiating step in SOD1 aggregation, by causing a 2-fold increase in the Kd. This change in the dimer stability is expected to result in a 67% increase in monomer concentration, 315 nm rather than 212 nm at physiological SOD1 concentrations. Because protein glutathionylation is associated with redox regulation, our finding that glutathionylation promotes SOD1 monomer formation supports a model in which increased oxidative stress promotes SOD1 aggregation. PMID:19299510

  9. HDAC6 Regulates Mutant SOD1 Aggregation through Two SMIR Motifs and Tubulin Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Barnett, Kelly R.; Yang, Liuqing; Brumley, Erin; Zhu, Haining

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a tubulin deacetylase that regulates protein aggregation and turnover. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) make the mutant protein prone to aggregation. However, the role of HDAC6 in mutant SOD1 aggregation and the ALS etiology is unclear. Here we report that HDAC6 knockdown increased mutant SOD1 aggregation in cultured cells. Different from its known role in mediating the degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, HDAC6 selectively interacted with mutant SOD1 via two motifs similar to the SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR) that we identified previously in p62/sequestosome 1. Expression of the aggregation-prone mutant SOD1 increased α-tubulin acetylation, and the acetylation-mimicking K40Q α-tubulin mutant promoted mutant SOD1 aggregation. Our results suggest that ALS-linked mutant SOD1 can modulate HDAC6 activity and increase tubulin acetylation, which, in turn, facilitates the microtubule- and retrograde transport-dependent mutant SOD1 aggregation. HDAC6 impairment might be a common feature in various subtypes of ALS. PMID:23580651

  10. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H; Madrid, Rodolfo; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PC(Na)), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Na(v)) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1(G93A). These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1(G93A) on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  11. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R.; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H.; Madrid, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1G93A) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PCNa), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Nav) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1G93A. These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1G93A on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  12. Mutant SOD1 accumulation in sensory neurons does not associate with endoplasmic reticulum stress features: Implications for differential vulnerability of sensory and motor neurons to SOD1 toxicity.

    PubMed

    Taiana, Michela; Sassone, Jenny; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previous papers showed that mutant SOD1 accumulates and undergoes misfolding in motor neurons and that the specific interaction of mutant SOD1 with derlin-1 leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Because evidence shows that mutant SOD1 expression also damages sensory neurons, we hypothesized that, similarly to motor neurons, the sensory neurons of ALS mouse model SOD1(G93A) accumulate mutant/misfolded SOD1 and suffer from ER stress and UPR activation. Our results reveal that SOD1(G93A) sensory neurons accumulate mutant/misfolded SOD1 but, surprisingly, do not suffer from ER stress and UPR activation. Moreover, the sensory neurons do not express detectable levels of the SOD1 interactor derlin-1. These results suggest a potential molecular mechanism underlying the differential vulnerability of motor and sensory neurons to mutant SOD1 toxicity. PMID:27241719

  13. Mutant SOD1 mediated pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran J; McKeown, Stephanie R; Rashid, Shazia

    2016-02-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neural disorder that causes death of the motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord; this affects the voluntary muscles and gradually leads to paralysis of the whole body. Most ALS cases are sporadic, though about 5-10% are familial. ALS is caused by multiple factors including mutation in any one of a number of specific genes, one of the most frequently affected is superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1. Alterations in SOD 1 have been linked with several variants of familial ALS. SOD 1 is a powerful antioxidant enzyme that protects cells from the damaging effects of superoxide radicals. The enzyme binds both copper and zinc ions that are directly involved in the deactivation of toxic superoxide radicals. Mutated SOD1 gene can acquire both gain and loss of function mutations. The most commonly identified mutations in SOD1 that affect protein activity are D90A, A4V and G93A. Deleterious mutations have been shown to modify SOD1 activity, which leads to the accumulation of highly toxic hydroxyl radicals. Accumulation of these free radicals causes degradation of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA and protein misfolding, features which can be used as pathological indicators associated with ALS. Numerous clinical trials have been carried out over last few years with limited success. In some patients advanced techniques like gene and stem cell therapy have been trialed. However no definitive treatment option can provide a cure and currently ALS is managed by drugs and other supportive therapies. Consequently there is a need to identify new approaches for treatment of this ultimately fatal disease. PMID:26657039

  14. Lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Is a Target for Mutant SOD1 Toxicity in Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Magrané, Jordi; Kunst, Catherine; King, Michael P.; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease affecting the motor neurons. The majority of familial forms of ALS are caused by mutations in the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1). In mutant SOD1 spinal cord motor neurons, mitochondria develop abnormal morphology, bioenergetic defects, and degeneration. However, the mechanisms of mitochondrial toxicity are still unclear. One possibility is that mutant SOD1 establishes aberrant interactions with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which can interfere with their normal trafficking from the cytosol to mitochondria. Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (KARS), an enzyme required for protein translation that was shown to interact with mutant SOD1 in yeast, is a good candidate as a target for interaction with mutant SOD1 at the mitochondrion in mammals because of its dual cytosolic and mitochondrial localization. Here, we show that in mammalian cells mutant SOD1 interacts preferentially with the mitochondrial form of KARS (mitoKARS). KARS-SOD1 interactions occur also in the mitochondria of the nervous system in transgenic mice. In the presence of mutant SOD1, mitoKARS displays a high propensity to misfold and aggregate prior to its import into mitochondria, becoming a target for proteasome degradation. Impaired mitoKARS import correlates with decreased mitochondrial protein synthesis. Ultimately, the abnormal interactions between mutant SOD1 and mitoKARS result in mitochondrial morphological abnormalities and cell toxicity. mitoKARS is the first described member of a group of mitochondrial proteins whose interaction with mutant SOD1 contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in ALS. PMID:18715867

  15. Drosophila expressing human SOD1 successfully recapitulates mitochondrial phenotypic features of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gallart-Palau, Xavier; Ng, Chee-Hoe; Ribera, Joan; Sze, Siu Kwan; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2016-06-15

    Mitochondrial pathology is a seminal pathogenic hallmark of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) which is extensively manifested by human patients and mutant SOD1(G93A) mammalian models. Rodents expressing human FALS-associated mutations successfully mimic several human disease features; although they are not as amenable to genetic and therapeutic compound screenings as non-mammalian models. In this study, we report a newly generated and characterized Drosophila model that expresses human SOD1(G93A) in muscle fibers. Presence of SOD1(G93A) in thoracic muscles causes mitochondrial pathology and impairs normal motor behavior in these flies. Use of this new FALS-24B-SOD1(G93A) fly model holds promise for better understanding of the mitochondrial affectation process in FALS and for the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds able to reverse mitochondrial dysfunction in this fatal disease. PMID:27163198

  16. Modeling ALS with iPSCs Reveals that Mutant SOD1 Misregulates Neurofilament Balance in Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Qian, Kun; Du, Zhongwei; Cao, Jingyuan; Petersen, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Blackbourn, Lisle W.; Huang, CindyTzu-Ling; Errigo, Anthony; Yin, Yingnan; Lu, Jianfeng; Ayala, Melvin; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) presents motoneuron (MN)-selective protein inclusions and axonal degeneration but the underlying mechanisms of such are unknown. Using induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs) from patients with mutation in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1)gene, we show that spinal MNs, but rarely non-MNs, exhibited neurofilament (NF) aggregation followed by neurite degeneration when glia were not present. These changes were associated with decreased stability of NF-L mRNA and binding of its 3′ UTR by mutant SOD1 and thus altered protein proportion of NF subunits. Such MN-selective changes were mimicked by expression of a single copy of the mutant SOD1 in human embryonic stem cells and were prevented by genetic correction of the SOD1 mutation in patient’s iPSCs. Importantly, conditional expression of NF-L in the SOD1 iPSC-derived MNs corrected the NF subunit proportion, mitigating NF aggregation and neurite degeneration. Thus, NF misregulation underlies mutant SOD1-mediated NF aggregation and axonal degeneration in ALS MNs. PMID:24704493

  17. In-cell NMR reveals potential precursor of toxic species from SOD1 fALS mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia; Rubino, Jeffrey T.; Kozyreva, Tatiana; Cantini, Francesca; Banci, Lucia

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene are related to familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Here we exploit in-cell NMR to characterize the protein folding and maturation of a series of fALS-linked SOD1 mutants in human cells and to obtain insight into their behaviour in the cellular context, at the molecular level. The effect of various mutations on SOD1 maturation are investigated by changing the availability of metal ions in the cells, and by coexpressing the copper chaperone for SOD1, hCCS. We observe for most of the mutants the occurrence of an unstructured SOD1 species, unable to bind zinc. This species may be a common precursor of potentially toxic oligomeric species, that are associated with fALS. Coexpression of hCCS in the presence of copper restores the correct maturation of the SOD1 mutants and prevents the formation of the unstructured species, confirming that hCCS also acts as a molecular chaperone.

  18. Analysis of Mutant SOD1 Electrophoretic Mobility by Blue Native Gel Electrophoresis; Evidence for Soluble Multimeric Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Hilda H.; Borchelt, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) cause familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Disease causing mutations have diverse consequences on the activity and half-life of the protein, ranging from complete inactivity and short half-life to full activity and long-half-life. Uniformly, disease causing mutations induce the protein to misfold and aggregate and such aggregation tendencies are readily visualized by over-expression of the proteins in cultured cells. In the present study we have investigated the potential of using immunoblotting of proteins separated by Blue-Native gel electrophoresis (BNGE) as a means to identify soluble multimeric forms of mutant protein. We find that over-expressed wild-type human SOD1 (hSOD1) is generally not prone to form soluble high molecular weight entities that can be separated by BNGE. For ALS mutant SOD1, we observe that for all mutants examined (A4V, G37R, G85R, G93A, and L126Z), immunoblots of BN-gels separating protein solubilized by digitonin demonstrated varied amounts of high molecular weight immunoreactive entities. These entities lacked reactivity to ubiquitin and were partially dissociated by reducing agents. With the exception of the G93A mutant, these entities were not reactive to the C4F6 conformational antibody. Collectively, these data demonstrate that BNGE can be used to assess the formation of soluble multimeric assemblies of mutant SOD1. PMID:25121776

  19. Destabilizing Protein Polymorphisms in the Genetic Background Direct Phenotypic Expression of Mutant SOD1 Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Krupinski, Thomas; Garcia, Susana; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles. PMID:19266020

  20. Destabilizing protein polymorphisms in the genetic background direct phenotypic expression of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Krupinski, Thomas; Garcia, Susana; Morimoto, Richard I

    2009-03-01

    Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles. PMID:19266020

  1. Oral treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) increases mutant SOD1 in vivo but protects motor neurons and improves the phenotype of a transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Blaine R; Lim, Nastasia K H; McAllum, Erin J; Donnelly, Paul S; Hare, Dominic J; Doble, Philip A; Turner, Bradley J; Price, Katherine A; Lim, Sin Chun; Paterson, Brett M; Hickey, James L; Rhoads, Timothy W; Williams, Jared R; Kanninen, Katja M; Hung, Lin W; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Grubman, Alexandra; Monty, Jean-Francois; Llanos, Roxana M; Kramer, David R; Mercer, Julian F B; Bush, Ashley I; Masters, Colin L; Duce, James A; Li, Qiao-Xin; Beckman, Joseph S; Barnham, Kevin J; White, Anthony R; Crouch, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the metallo-protein Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in humans and an expression level-dependent phenotype in transgenic rodents. We show that oral treatment with the therapeutic agent diacetyl-bis(4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)] increased the concentration of mutant SOD1 (SOD1G37R) in ALS model mice, but paradoxically improved locomotor function and survival of the mice. To determine why the mice with increased levels of mutant SOD1 had an improved phenotype, we analyzed tissues by mass spectrometry. These analyses revealed most SOD1 in the spinal cord tissue of the SOD1G37R mice was Cu deficient. Treating with Cu(II)(atsm) decreased the pool of Cu-deficient SOD1 and increased the pool of fully metallated (holo) SOD1. Tracking isotopically enriched (65)Cu(II)(atsm) confirmed the increase in holo-SOD1 involved transfer of Cu from Cu(II)(atsm) to SOD1, suggesting the improved locomotor function and survival of the Cu(II)(atsm)-treated SOD1G37R mice involved, at least in part, the ability of the compound to improve the Cu content of the mutant SOD1. This was supported by improved survival of SOD1G37R mice that expressed the human gene for the Cu uptake protein CTR1. Improving the metal content of mutant SOD1 in vivo with Cu(II)(atsm) did not decrease levels of misfolded SOD1. These outcomes indicate the metal content of SOD1 may be a greater determinant of the toxicity of the protein in mutant SOD1-associated forms of ALS than the mutations themselves. Improving the metal content of SOD1 therefore represents a valid therapeutic strategy for treating ALS caused by SOD1. PMID:24899723

  2. Silencing mutant SOD1 using RNAi protects against neurodegeneration and extends survival in an ALS model.

    PubMed

    Ralph, G Scott; Radcliffe, Pippa A; Day, Denise M; Carthy, Janine M; Leroux, Marie A; Lee, Debbie C P; Wong, Liang-Fong; Bilsland, Lynsey G; Greensmith, Linda; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2005-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease resulting in the selective death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Some familial cases of ALS are caused by dominant mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The emergence of interfering RNA (RNAi) for specific gene silencing could be therapeutically beneficial for the treatment of such dominantly inherited diseases. We generated a lentiviral vector to mediate expression of RNAi molecules specifically targeting the human SOD1 gene (SOD1). Injection of this vector into various muscle groups of mice engineered to overexpress a mutated form of human SOD1 (SOD1(G93A)) resulted in an efficient and specific reduction of SOD1 expression and improved survival of vulnerable motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. Furthermore, SOD1 silencing mediated an improved motor performance in these animals, resulting in a considerable delay in the onset of ALS symptoms by more than 100% and an extension in survival by nearly 80% of their normal life span. These data are the first to show a substantial extension of survival in an animal model of a fatal, dominantly inherited neurodegenerative condition using RNAi and provide the highest therapeutic efficacy observed in this field to date. PMID:15768029

  3. Mutant SOD1 Increases APP Expression and Phosphorylation in Cellular and Animal Models of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich-Toidman, Polina; Rabinovich-Nikitin, Inna; Ezra, Assaf; Barbiro, Beka; Fogel, Hilla; Slutsky, Inna; Solomon, Beka

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease and it is the most common adult onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons. There is currently no effective treatment for ALS and our understanding of the pathological mechanism is still far away from prevention and/or treatment of this devastating disease. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that undergoes processing either by β-secretase or α-secretase, followed by γ-secretase. In the present study, we show that APP levels, and aberrant phosphorylation, which is associated with enhanced β-secretase cleavage, are increased in SOD1G93A ALS mouse model. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis suggests a close interaction between SOD1 and APP at hippocampal synapses. Notably, SOD1G93A mutation induces APP-SOD1 conformational changes, indicating a crosstalk between these two signaling proteins. Inhibition of APP processing via monoclonal antibody called BBS that blocks APP β-secretase cleavage site, resulted in reduction of mutant SOD1G93A levels in animal and cellular models of ALS, significantly prolonged life span of SOD1G93A mice and diminished inflammation. Beyond its effect on toxic mutant SOD1G93A, BBS treatment resulted in a reduction in the levels of APP, its processing product soluble APPβ and pro-apoptotic p53. This study demonstrates that APP and its processing products contribute to ALS pathology through several different pathways; thus BBS antibody could be a promising neuroprotective strategy for treatment of this disease. PMID:26600047

  4. CHIP promotes proteasomal degradation of familial ALS-linked mutant SOD1 by ubiquitinating Hsp/Hsc70.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, Makoto; Kurisu, Junko; Tateno, Minako; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Nakayama, Kei-Ichi; Kato, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2004-07-01

    Over 100 mutants in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the precise mechanism by which they are degraded through a ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway (UPP) remains unclear. Here, we report that heat-shock protein (Hsp) or heat-shock cognate (Hsc)70, and the carboxyl terminus of the Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), are involved in proteasomal degradation of mutant SOD1. Only mutant SOD1 interacted with Hsp/Hsc70 in vivo, and in vitro experiments revealed that Hsp/Hsc70 preferentially interacted with apo-SOD1 or dithiothreitol (DTT)-treated holo-SOD1, compared with metallated or oxidized forms. CHIP, a binding partner of Hsp/Hsc70, interacted only with mutant SOD1 and promoted its degradation. Both Hsp70 and CHIP promoted polyubiquitination of mutant SOD1-associated molecules, but not of mutant SOD1, indicating that mutant SOD1 is not a substrate of CHIP. Moreover, mutant SOD1-associated Hsp/Hsc70, a known substrate of CHIP, was polyubiquitinated in vivo, and polyubiquitinated Hsc70 by CHIP interacted with the S5a subunit of the 26S proteasome in vitro. Furthermore, CHIP was predominantly expressed in spinal neurons, and ubiquitinated inclusions in the spinal motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice were CHIP-immunoreactive. Taken together, we propose a novel pathway in which ubiquitinated Hsp/Hsc70 might deliver mutant SOD1 to, and facilitate its degradation, at the proteasome. PMID:15198682

  5. Guanabenz Treatment Accelerates Disease in a Mutant SOD1 Mouse Model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fernando G.; Ping, Qinggong; Moreno, Andy J.; Kidd, Joshua D.; Thompson, Kenneth; Jiang, Bingbing; Lincecum, John M.; Wang, Monica Z.; De Zutter, Gerard S.; Tassinari, Valerie R.; Levine, Beth; Hatzipetros, Theo; Gill, Alan; Perrin, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons. The mechanisms leading to motor neuron degeneration in ALS are unclear. However, there is evidence for involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in ALS, notably in mutant SOD1 mediated models of ALS. Stress induced phosphorylation of the eIF2 alpha subunit by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha kinase 3 Perk activates the UPR. Guanabenz is a centrally acting alpha2 adrenergic receptor agonist shown to interact with a regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase, Pp1/Gadd34, and selectively disrupt the dephosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eif2alpha). Here we demonstrate that guanabenz is protective in fibroblasts expressing G93A mutant SOD1 when they are exposed to tunicamycin mediated ER stress. However, in contrast to other reports, guanabenz treatment accelerated ALS-like disease progression in a strain of mutant SOD1 transgenic ALS mice. This study highlights challenges of pharmacological interventions of cellular stress responses in whole animal models of ALS. PMID:26288094

  6. ALS-linked mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) alters mitochondrial protein composition and decreases protein import.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Vande Velde, Christine; Israelson, Adrian; Xie, Jing; Bailey, Aaron O; Dong, Meng-Qui; Chun, Seung-Joo; Roy, Tamal; Winer, Leah; Yates, John R; Capaldi, Roderick A; Cleveland, Don W; Miller, Timothy M

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) cause familial ALS. Mutant SOD1 preferentially associates with the cytoplasmic face of mitochondria from spinal cords of rats and mice expressing SOD1 mutations. Two-dimensional gels and multidimensional liquid chromatography, in combination with tandem mass spectrometry, revealed 33 proteins that were increased and 21 proteins that were decreased in SOD1(G93A) rat spinal cord mitochondria compared with SOD1(WT) spinal cord mitochondria. Analysis of this group of proteins revealed a higher-than-expected proportion involved in complex I and protein import pathways. Direct import assays revealed a 30% decrease in protein import only in spinal cord mitochondria, despite an increase in the mitochondrial import components TOM20, TOM22, and TOM40. Recombinant SOD1(G93A) or SOD1(G85R), but not SOD1(WT) or a Parkinson's disease-causing, misfolded α-synuclein(E46K) mutant, decreased protein import by >50% in nontransgenic mitochondria from spinal cord, but not from liver. Thus, altered mitochondrial protein content accompanied by selective decreases in protein import into spinal cord mitochondria comprises part of the mitochondrial damage arising from mutant SOD1. PMID:21078990

  7. Sequestosome 1/p62 links familial ALS mutant SOD1 to LC3 via an ubiquitin-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Jozsef; Strom, Anna-Lena; Kwinter, David M.; Kilty, Renee; Zhang, Jiayu; Shi, Ping; Fu, Weisi; Wooten, Marie W.; Zhu, Haining

    2009-01-01

    The p62/sequestosome 1 protein has been identified as a component of pathological protein inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). P62 has also been implicated in autophagy, a process of mass degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles. Autophagy is a critical pathway for degrading misfolded and/or damaged proteins, including the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mutants linked to familial ALS. We previously reported that p62 interacted with ALS mutants of SOD1 and that the ubiquitin-association (UBA) domain of p62 was dispensable for the interaction. In this study, we identified two distinct regions of p62 that were essential to its binding to mutant SOD1: the N-terminal PB1 domain (residues 1-104) and a separate internal region (residues 178–224) termed here as SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR). The PB1 domain is required for appropriate oligomeric status of p62 and the SMIR is the actual region interacting with mutant SOD1. Within the SMIR, the conserved W184, H190 and positively charged R183, R186, K187 and K189 residues are critical to the p62-mutant SOD1 interaction since substitution of these residues with alanine resulted in significantly abolished binding. In addition, SMIR and the p62 sequence responsible for the interaction with LC3, a protein essential for autophagy activation, are independent of each other. In cells lacking p62, the existence of mutant SOD1 in acidic autolysosomes decreased, suggesting that p62 can function as an adaptor between mutant SOD1 and the autophagy machinery. This study provides a novel molecular mechanism by which mutant SOD1 can be recognized by p62 in an ubiquitin-independent fashion and targeted for the autophagy-lysosome degradation pathway. PMID:19765191

  8. Inhibition of Pathogenic Mutant SOD1 Aggregation in Cultured Motor Neuronal Cells by Prevention of Its SUMOylation on Lysine 75.

    PubMed

    Dangoumau, Audrey; Marouillat, Sylviane; Burlaud Gaillard, Julien; Uzbekov, Rustem; Veyrat-Durebex, Charlotte; Blasco, Hélène; Arnoult, Christophe; Corcia, Philippe; Andres, Christian R; Vourc'h, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective death of motor neurons. Mutations in the SOD1 gene encoding the superoxide dismutase 1 are present in 15% of familial ALS cases and in 2% of sporadic cases. These mutations are associated with the formation of SOD1-positive aggregates. The mechanisms of aggregation remain unknown, but posttranslational modifications of SOD1 may be involved. Here, we report that NSC-34 motor neuronal cells expressing mutant SOD1 contained aggregates positive for small ubiquitin modifier-1 (SUMO-1), and in parallel a reduced level of free SUMO-1. CLEM (correlative light and electron microscopy) analysis showed nonorganized cytosolic aggregates for all mutations tested (SOD1A4V, SOD1V31A, and SOD1G93C). We next show that preventing the SUMOylation of mutant SOD1 by the substitution of lysine 75, the SUMOylation site of SOD1, significantly reduces the number of motor neuronal cells with aggregates. These results support the need for further research on the SUMOylation pathways, which may be a potential therapeutic target in ALS. PMID:26605782

  9. Prion-like propagation of mutant SOD1 misfolding and motor neuron disease spread along neuroanatomical pathways.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Jacob I; Fromholt, Susan E; O'Neal, Veronica M; Diamond, Jeffrey H; Borchelt, David R

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is that symptoms appear to spread along neuroanatomical pathways to engulf the motor nervous system, suggesting a propagative toxic entity could be involved in disease pathogenesis. Evidence for such a propagative entity emerged recently in studies using mice that express G85R-SOD1 mutant protein fused to YFP (G85R-SOD1:YFP). Heterozygous G85R-SOD1:YFP transgenic mice do not develop ALS symptoms out to 20 months of age. However, when newborns are injected with spinal homogenates from paralyzed mutant SOD1 mice, the G85R-SOD1:YFP mice develop paralysis as early as 6 months of age. We now demonstrate that injecting spinal homogenates from paralyzed mutant SOD1 mice into the sciatic nerves of adult G85R-SOD1:YFP mice produces a spreading motor neuron disease within 3.0 ± 0.2 months of injection. The formation of G85R-SOD1:YFP inclusion pathology spreads slowly in this model system; first appearing in the ipsilateral DRG, then lumbar spinal cord, before spreading rostrally up to the cervical cord by the time mice develop paralysis. Reactive astrogliosis mirrors the spread of inclusion pathology and motor neuron loss is most severe in lumbar cord. G85R-SOD1:YFP inclusion pathology quickly spreads to discrete neurons in the brainstem and midbrain that are synaptically connected to spinal neurons, suggesting a trans-synaptic propagation of misfolded protein. Taken together, the data presented here describe the first animal model that recapitulates the spreading phenotype observed in patients with ALS, and implicates the propagation of misfolded protein as a potential mechanism for the spreading of motor neuron disease. PMID:26650262

  10. Effects of ALS-related SOD1 mutants on dynein- and KIF5-mediated retrograde and anterograde axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ping; Ström, Anna-Lena; Gal, Jozsef; Zhu, Haining

    2010-01-01

    Transport of material and signals between extensive neuronal processes and the cell body is essential to neuronal physiology and survival. Slowing of axonal transport has been shown to occur before the onset of symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have previously shown that several familial ALS-linked copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mutants (A4V, G85R and G93A) interacted and co-localized with the retrograde dynein-dynactin motor complex in cultured cells and affected tissues of ALS mice. We also found that the interaction between mutant SOD1 and the dynein motor played a critical role in the formation of large inclusions containing mutant SOD1. In this study, we showed that, in contrast to the dynein situation, mutant SOD1 did not interact with anterograde transport motors of the kinesin-1 family (KIF5A, B and C). Using dynein and kinesin accumulation at the sciatic nerve ligation sites as a surrogate measurement of axonal transport, we also showed that dynein mediated retrograde transport was slower in G93A than in WT mice at an early pre-symptomatic stage. While no decrease in KIF5A-mediated anterograde transport was detected, the anterograde transport of dynein heavy chain as a cargo was observed in the pre-symptomatic G93A mice. The results from this study along with other recently published work support that mutant SOD1 might only interact with and interfere with some kinesin members which in turn could result in the impairment of a selective subset of cargos. Although it remains to be further investigated how mutant SOD1 affect different axonal transport motor proteins and various cargos, it is evident that mutant SOD1 can induce defects in axonal transport, which subsequently contribute to the propagation of toxic effects and ultimately motor neuron death in ALS. PMID:20510358

  11. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 and TDP43 trigger motoneuron death that is mediated via sodium channels and nitroxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Fabiola; Cortes, Nicole; Abarzua, Sebastian; Dyrda, Agnieszka; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motor neurons. Multiple disease-causing mutations, including in the genes for SOD1 and TDP-43, have been identified in ALS. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS: we have shown that media conditioned by astrocytes carrying mutant SOD1G93A contains toxic factor(s) that kill motoneurons by activating voltage-sensitive sodium (Nav) channels. In contrast, a recent study suggests that astrocytes expressing mutated TDP43 contribute to ALS pathology, but do so via cell-autonomous processes and lack non-cell-autonomous toxicity. Here we investigate whether astrocytes that express diverse ALS-causing mutations release toxic factor(s) that induce motoneuron death, and if so, whether they do so via a common pathogenic pathway. We exposed primary cultures of wild-type spinal cord cells to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes (ACM) that express SOD1 (ACM-SOD1G93A and ACM-SOD1G86R) or TDP43 (ACM-TDP43A315T) mutants; we show that such exposure rapidly (within 30–60 min) increases dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence (indicative of nitroxidative stress) and leads to extensive motoneuron-specific death within a few days. Co-application of the diverse ACMs with anti-oxidants Trolox or esculetin (but not with resveratrol) strongly improves motoneuron survival. We also find that co-incubation of the cultures in the ACMs with Nav channel blockers (including mexiletine, spermidine, or riluzole) prevents both intracellular nitroxidative stress and motoneuron death. Together, our data document that two completely unrelated ALS models lead to the death of motoneuron via non-cell-autonomous processes, and show that astrocytes expressing mutations in SOD1 and TDP43 trigger such cell death through a common pathogenic pathway that involves nitroxidative stress, induced at least in part by Nav channel activity. PMID:24570655

  12. An ALS-linked mutant SOD1 produces a locomotor defect associated with aggregation and synaptic dysfunction when expressed in neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiou; Farr, George W; Hall, David H; Li, Fei; Furtak, Krystyna; Dreier, Lars; Horwich, Arthur L

    2009-01-01

    The nature of toxic effects exerted on neurons by misfolded proteins, occurring in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, is poorly understood. One approach to this problem is to measure effects when such proteins are expressed in heterologous neurons. We report on effects of an ALS-associated, misfolding-prone mutant human SOD1, G85R, when expressed in the neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stable mutant transgenic animals, but not wild-type human SOD1 transgenics, exhibited a strong locomotor defect associated with the presence, specifically in mutant animals, of both soluble oligomers and insoluble aggregates of G85R protein. A whole-genome RNAi screen identified chaperones and other components whose deficiency increased aggregation and further diminished locomotion. The nature of the locomotor defect was investigated. Mutant animals were resistant to paralysis by the cholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb, while exhibiting normal sensitivity to the cholinergic agonist levamisole and normal muscle morphology. When fluorescently labeled presynaptic components were examined in the dorsal nerve cord, decreased numbers of puncta corresponding to neuromuscular junctions were observed in mutant animals and brightness was also diminished. At the EM level, mutant animals exhibited a reduced number of synaptic vesicles. Neurotoxicity in this system thus appears to be mediated by misfolded SOD1 and is exerted on synaptic vesicle biogenesis and/or trafficking. PMID:19165329

  13. An ALS-Linked Mutant SOD1 Produces a Locomotor Defect Associated with Aggregation and Synaptic Dysfunction When Expressed in Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiou; Farr, George W.; Hall, David H.; Li, Fei; Furtak, Krystyna; Dreier, Lars; Horwich, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    The nature of toxic effects exerted on neurons by misfolded proteins, occurring in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, is poorly understood. One approach to this problem is to measure effects when such proteins are expressed in heterologous neurons. We report on effects of an ALS-associated, misfolding-prone mutant human SOD1, G85R, when expressed in the neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stable mutant transgenic animals, but not wild-type human SOD1 transgenics, exhibited a strong locomotor defect associated with the presence, specifically in mutant animals, of both soluble oligomers and insoluble aggregates of G85R protein. A whole-genome RNAi screen identified chaperones and other components whose deficiency increased aggregation and further diminished locomotion. The nature of the locomotor defect was investigated. Mutant animals were resistant to paralysis by the cholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb, while exhibiting normal sensitivity to the cholinergic agonist levamisole and normal muscle morphology. When fluorescently labeled presynaptic components were examined in the dorsal nerve cord, decreased numbers of puncta corresponding to neuromuscular junctions were observed in mutant animals and brightness was also diminished. At the EM level, mutant animals exhibited a reduced number of synaptic vesicles. Neurotoxicity in this system thus appears to be mediated by misfolded SOD1 and is exerted on synaptic vesicle biogenesis and/or trafficking. PMID:19165329

  14. Overexpression of survival motor neuron improves neuromuscular function and motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Bradley J.; Alfazema, Neza; Sheean, Rebecca K.; Sleigh, James N.; Davies, Kay E.; Horne, Malcolm K.; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy results from diminished levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein in spinal motor neurons. Low levels of SMN also occur in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and genetic reduction of SMN levels exacerbates the phenotype of transgenic SOD1G93A mice. Here, we demonstrate that SMN protein is significantly reduced in the spinal cords of patients with sporadic ALS. To test the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS, we overexpressed SMN in 2 different strains of SOD1G93A mice. Neuronal overexpression of SMN significantly preserved locomotor function, rescued motor neurons, and attenuated astrogliosis in spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice. Despite this, survival was not prolonged, most likely resulting from SMN mislocalization and depletion of gems in motor neurons of symptomatic mice. Our results reveal that SMN upregulation slows locomotor deficit onset and motor neuron loss in this mouse model of ALS. However, disruption of SMN nuclear complexes by high levels of mutant SOD1, even in the presence of SMN overexpression, might limit its survival promoting effects in this specific mouse model. Studies in emerging mouse models of ALS are therefore warranted to further explore the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS. PMID:24210254

  15. Superoxide Dismutase (Sod-1) Null Mutants of Neurospora Crassa: Oxidative Stress Sensitivity, Spontaneous Mutation Rate and Response to Mutagens

    PubMed Central

    Chary, P.; Dillon, D.; Schroeder, A. L.; Natvig, D. O.

    1994-01-01

    Enzymatic superoxide-dismutase activity is believed to be important in defense against the toxic effects of superoxide. Although superoxide dismutases are among the best studied proteins, numerous questions remain concerning the specific biological roles of the various superoxide-dismutase types. In part, this is because the proposed damaging effects of superoxide are manifold, ranging from inactivation of certain metabolic enzymes to DNA damage. Studies with superoxide-deficient mutants have proven valuable, but surprisingly few such studies have been reported. We have constructed and characterized Neurospora crassa mutants that are null for sod-1, the gene that encodes copper-zinc superoxide dismutase. Mutant strains are sensitive to paraquat and elevated oxygen concentrations, and they exhibit an increased spontaneous mutation rate. They appear to have near wild-type sensitivities to near- and far-UV, heat shock and γ-irradiation. Unlike the equivalent Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant and the sodA sodB double mutant of Escherichia coli, they do not exhibit aerobic auxotrophy. These results are discussed in the context of an attempt to identify consensus phenotypes among superoxide dismutase-deficient mutants. N. crassa sod-1 null mutant strains were also employed in genetic and subcellular fractionation studies. Results support the hypothesis that a single gene (sod-1), located between Fsr-12 and leu-3 on linkage group I, is responsible for most or all CuZn superoxide dismutase activity in this organism. PMID:8088518

  16. Substantially elevating the levels of αB-crystallin in spinal motor neurons of mutant SOD1 mice does not significantly delay paralysis or attenuate mutant protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guilian; Fromholt, Susan; Ayers, Jacob I.; Brown, Hilda; Siemienski, Zoe; Crosby, Keith W.; Mayer, Christopher A.; Janus, Christopher; Borchelt, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There has been great interest in enhancing endogenous protein maintenance pathways such as the heat-shock chaperone response, as it is postulated that enhancing clearance of misfolded proteins could have beneficial disease modifying effects in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. In cultured cell models of mutant SOD1 aggregation, co-expression of αB-crystallin (αB-crys) has been shown to inhibit the formation of detergent-insoluble forms of mutant protein. Here, we describe the generation of a new line of transgenic mice that express αB-crys at >6-fold the normal level in spinal cord, with robust increases in immunoreactivity throughout the spinal cord grey matter and, specifically, in spinal motor neurons. Surprisingly, spinal cords of mice expressing αB-crys alone contained 20% more motor neurons per section than littermate controls. Raising αB-crys by these levels in mice transgenic for either G93A or L126Z mutant SOD1 had no effect on the age at which paralysis developed. In the G93A mice, which showed the most robust degree of motor neuron loss, the number of these cells declined by the same proportion as in mice expressing the mutant SOD1 alone. In paralyzed bigenic mice, the levels of detergent-insoluble, misfolded, mutant SOD1 were similar to those of mice expressing mutant SOD1 alone. These findings indicate that raising the levels of αB-crys in spinal motor neurons by 6-fold does not produce the therapeutic effects predicted by cell culture models of mutant SOD1 aggregation. PMID:25557022

  17. Mutant Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase (Gars) Ameliorates SOD1G93A Motor Neuron Degeneration Phenotype but Has Little Affect on Loa Dynein Heavy Chain Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hazel P.; Chia, Ruth; Achilli, Francesca; Bryson, J. Barney; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background In humans, mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system, and clinical phenotypes ranging from Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy to a severe infantile form of spinal muscular atrophy. GARS is ubiquitously expressed and may have functions in addition to its canonical role in protein synthesis through catalyzing the addition of glycine to cognate tRNAs. Methodology/Principal Findings We have recently described a new mouse model with a point mutation in the Gars gene resulting in a cysteine to arginine change at residue 201. Heterozygous GarsC201R/+ mice have locomotor and sensory deficits. In an investigation of genetic mutations that lead to death of motor and sensory neurons, we have crossed the GarsC201R/+ mice to two other mutants: the TgSOD1G93A model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the Legs at odd angles mouse (Dync1h1Loa) which has a defect in the heavy chain of the dynein complex. We found the Dync1h1Loa/+;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mice are more impaired than either parent, and this is may be an additive effect of both mutations. Surprisingly, the GarsC201R mutation significantly delayed disease onset in the SOD1G93A;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mutant mice and increased lifespan by 29% on the genetic background investigated. Conclusions/Significance These findings raise intriguing possibilities for the study of pathogenetic mechanisms in all three mouse mutant strains. PMID:19593442

  18. Mutant SOD1G93A Triggers Mitochondrial Fragmentation in Spinal Cord Motor Neurons: Neuroprotection by SIRT3 and PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjun; Song, Yuting; Kincaid, Brad; Bossy, Blaise; Bossy-Wetzel, Ella

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) gene cause an inherited form of ALS with upper and lower motor neuron loss. The mechanism underlying mutant SOD1-mediated motor neuron degeneration remains unclear. While defects in mitochondrial dynamics contribute to neurodegeneration, including ALS, previous reports remain conflicted. Here, we report an improved technique to isolate, transfect, and culture rat spinal cord motor neurons. Using this improved system, we demonstrate that mutant SOD1G93A triggers a significant decrease in mitochondrial length and an accumulation of round fragmented mitochondria. The increase of fragmented mitochondria coincides with an arrest in both anterograde and retrograde axonal transport and increased cell death. In addition, mutant SOD1G93A induces a reduction in neurite length and branching that is accompanied with an abnormal accumulation of round mitochondria in growth cones. Furthermore, restoration of the mitochondrial fission and fusion balance by dominant-negative dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) expression rescues the mutant SOD1G93A-induced defects in mitochondrial morphology, dynamics, and cell viability. Interestingly, both SIRT3 and PGC-1α protect against mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal cell death by mutant SOD1G93A. This data suggests that impairment in mitochondrial dynamics participates in ALS and restoring this defect might provide protection against mutant SOD1G93A-induced neuronal injury. PMID:22819776

  19. Distinct partitioning of ALS associated TDP-43, FUS and SOD1 mutants into cellular inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Farrawell, Natalie E.; Lambert-Smith, Isabella A.; Warraich, Sadaf T.; Blair, Ian P.; Saunders, Darren N.; Hatters, Danny M.; Yerbury, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease associated with protein misfolding and aggregation. Most cases are characterized by TDP-43 positive inclusions, while a minority of familial ALS cases are instead FUS and SOD1 positive respectively. Cells can generate inclusions of variable type including previously characterized aggresomes, IPOD or JUNQ structures depending on the misfolded protein. SOD1 invariably forms JUNQ inclusions but it remains unclear whether other ALS protein aggregates arise as one of these previously described inclusion types or form unique structures. Here we show that FUS variably partitioned to IPOD, JUNQ or alternate structures, contain a mobile fraction, were not microtubule dependent and initially did not contain ubiquitin. TDP-43 inclusions formed in a microtubule independent manner, did not contain a mobile fraction but variably colocalized to JUNQ inclusions and another alternate structure. We conclude that the RNA binding proteins TDP-43 and FUS do not consistently fit the currently characterised inclusion models suggesting that cells have a larger repertoire for generating inclusions than currently thought, and imply that toxicity in ALS does not stem from a particular aggregation process or aggregate structure. PMID:26293199

  20. A comprehensive assessment of the SOD1G93A low-copy transgenic mouse, which models human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Kalmar, Bernadett; Essa, Shafa; Ricketts, Thomas; Joyce, Peter; Kent, Rosie; Rowe, Claire; Parker, Andy; Gray, Anna; Hafezparast, Majid; Thorpe, Julian R.; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The disorder generally strikes in mid-life, relentlessly leading to paralysis and death, typically 3–5 years after diagnosis. No effective treatments are available. Up to 10% of ALS is familial, usually autosomal dominant. Several causative genes are known and, of these, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is by far the most frequently found, accounting for up to 20% of familial ALS. A range of human mutant SOD1 transgenic mouse strains has been produced, and these largely successfully model the human disease. Of these, the most widely used is the SOD1 mouse, which expresses a human SOD1 transgene with a causative G93A mutation. This mouse model is excellent for many purposes but carries up to 25 copies of the transgene and produces a great excess of SOD1 protein, which might affect our interpretation of disease processes. A variant of this strain carries a deletion of the transgene array such that the copy number is dropped to eight to ten mutant SOD1 genes. This ‘deleted’ ‘low-copy’ mouse undergoes a slower course of disease, over many months. Here we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of phenotype, including nerve and muscle physiology and histology, to add to our knowledge of this ‘deleted’ strain and give baseline data for future studies. We find differences in phenotype that arise from genetic background and sex, and we quantify the loss of nerve and muscle function over time. The slowly progressive pathology observed in this mouse strain could provide us with a more appropriate model for studying early-stage pathological processes in ALS and aid the development of therapies for early-stage treatments. PMID:21540242

  1. A comprehensive assessment of the SOD1G93A low-copy transgenic mouse, which models human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Kalmar, Bernadett; Essa, Shafa; Ricketts, Thomas; Joyce, Peter; Kent, Rosie; Rowe, Claire; Parker, Andy; Gray, Anna; Hafezparast, Majid; Thorpe, Julian R; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2011-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that results in the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The disorder generally strikes in mid-life, relentlessly leading to paralysis and death, typically 3-5 years after diagnosis. No effective treatments are available. Up to 10% of ALS is familial, usually autosomal dominant. Several causative genes are known and, of these, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is by far the most frequently found, accounting for up to 20% of familial ALS. A range of human mutant SOD1 transgenic mouse strains has been produced, and these largely successfully model the human disease. Of these, the most widely used is the SOD1 mouse, which expresses a human SOD1 transgene with a causative G93A mutation. This mouse model is excellent for many purposes but carries up to 25 copies of the transgene and produces a great excess of SOD1 protein, which might affect our interpretation of disease processes. A variant of this strain carries a deletion of the transgene array such that the copy number is dropped to eight to ten mutant SOD1 genes. This 'deleted' 'low-copy' mouse undergoes a slower course of disease, over many months. Here we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of phenotype, including nerve and muscle physiology and histology, to add to our knowledge of this 'deleted' strain and give baseline data for future studies. We find differences in phenotype that arise from genetic background and sex, and we quantify the loss of nerve and muscle function over time. The slowly progressive pathology observed in this mouse strain could provide us with a more appropriate model for studying early-stage pathological processes in ALS and aid the development of therapies for early-stage treatments. PMID:21540242

  2. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  3. Mice Overexpressing Both Non-Mutated Human SOD1 and Mutated SOD1G93A Genes: A Competent Experimental Model for Studying Iron Metabolism in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gajowiak, Anna; Styś, Agnieszka; Starzyński, Rafał R.; Bednarz, Aleksandra; Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Staroń, Robert; Lipiński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration and loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex. Up to 10% of ALS cases are inherited (familial, fALS) and associated with mutations, frequently in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Rodent transgenic models of ALS are often used to elucidate a complex pathogenesis of this disease. Of importance, both ALS patients and animals carrying mutated human SOD1 gene show symptoms of oxidative stress and iron metabolism misregulation. The aim of our study was to characterize changes in iron metabolism in one of the most commonly used models of ALS – transgenic mice overexpressing human mutated SOD1G93A gene. We analyzed the expression of iron-related genes in asymptomatic, 2-month-old and symptomatic, 4-month-old SOD1G93A mice. In parallel, respective age-matched mice overexpressing human non-mutated SOD1 transgene and control mice were analyzed. We demonstrate that the overexpression of both SOD1 and SOD1G93A genes account for a substantial increase in SOD1 protein levels and activity in selected tissues and that not all the changes in iron metabolism genes expression are specific for the overexpression of the mutated form of SOD1. PMID:26778957

  4. Talampanel reduces the level of motoneuronal calcium in transgenic mutant SOD1 mice only if applied presymptomatically

    PubMed Central

    Paizs, Melinda; Tortarolo, Massimo; Bendotti, Caterina; Engelhardt, Jozsef I; Siklós, László

    2011-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of treatment with talampanel in a mutant SOD1 mouse model of ALS by measuring intracellular calcium levels and loss of spinal motor neurons. We intended to mimic the clinical study; hence, treatment was started when the clinical symptoms were already present. The data were compared with the results of similar treatment started at a presymptomatic stage. Transgenic and wild-type mice were treated either with talampanel or with vehicle, starting in pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages. The density of motor neurons was determined by the physical disector, and their intracellular calcium level was assayed electron microscopically. Results showed that motor neurons in the SOD1 mice exhibited an elevated calcium level, which could be reduced, but not restored, with talampanel only when the treatment was started presymptomatically. Treatment in either presymptomatic or symptomatic stages failed to rescue the motor neurons. We conclude that talampanel reduces motoneuronal calcium in a mouse model of ALS, but its efficacy declines as the disease progresses, suggesting that medication initiation in the earlier stages of the disease might be more effective. PMID:21623665

  5. Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins potently ubiquitylate and degrade familial ALS-related mutant SOD1 proteins and reduce their cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Niwa, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Miho; Ito, Takashi; Sone, Jun; Doyu, Manabu; Urano, Fumihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2007-02-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Dorfin is a ubiquitin ligase (E3) that degrades mutant SOD1 proteins, which are responsible for familial ALS. Although Dorfin has potential as an anti-ALS molecule, its life in cells is short. To improve its stability and enhance its E3 activity, we developed chimeric proteins containing the substrate-binding hydrophobic portion of Dorfin and the U-box domain of the carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), which has strong E3 activity through the U-box domain. All the Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins were more stable in cells than was wild-type Dorfin (Dorfin(WT)). One of the Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins, Dorfin-CHIP(L), ubiquitylated mutant SOD1 more effectively than did Dorfin(WT) and CHIP in vivo, and degraded mutant SOD1 protein more rapidly than Dorfin(WT) does. Furthermore, Dorfin-CHIP(L) rescued neuronal cells from mutant SOD1-associated toxicity and reduced the aggresome formation induced by mutant SOD1 more effectively than did Dorfin(WT). PMID:17157513

  6. Bid Promotes K63-Linked Polyubiquitination of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) and Sensitizes to Mutant SOD1-Induced Proinflammatory Signaling in Microglia123

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Sinéad

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene contribute to motoneuron degeneration and are evident in 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Mutant SOD1 induces microglial activation through a stimulation of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4). In the present study, we identified the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bid as a positive regulator of mutant SOD1-induced TLR-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in microglia. bid-deficient primary mouse microglia showed reduced NF-κB signaling in response to TLR4 activation or exposure to conditioned medium derived from SOD1 G93A expressing NSC-34 cells. Attenuation of NF-κB signaling in bid-deficient microglia was associated with lower levels of phosphorylated IKKα/β and p65, with a delayed degradation of IκBα and enhanced degradation of Peli1. Upstream of IKK, we found that Bid interacted with, and promoted, the K63-linked polyubiquitination of the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in microglia. Our study suggests a key role for Bid in the regulation of TLR4-NF-κB proinflammatory signaling during mutant SOD1-induced disease pathology. Bid promotes TLR4-NF-κB signaling by interacting with TRAF6 and promoting TRAF6 K63-linked polyubiquitination in microglia. PMID:27257617

  7. Marked synergism between mutant SOD1 and glutamate transport inhibition in the induction of motor neuronal degeneration in spinal cord slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Z; Weiss, John H

    2012-04-11

    Loss of astrocytic glutamate transport capacity in ALS spinal cord supports an excitotoxic contribution to motor neuron (MN) damage in the disease, and dominant gain of function mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause certain familial forms of ALS. We have used organotypic slice cultures from wild type and G93A SOD1 mutant rat spinal cords to examine interactions between excitotoxicity and the presence of mutant SOD1 in the induction of MN degeneration. Slice cultures were prepared from 1 week old pups, and after an additional week in vitro, some were exposed to either a low level (30 μM) of the glutamate uptake inhibitor, trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) for 3 weeks, or a higher level (50 μM) for 48 h, followed by histochemical labeling to assess MN injury. In wild type animals these exposures caused relatively little MN degeneration. Similarly, little MN degeneration was seen in slices from SOD1 mutant animals that were not exposed to PDC. However, addition of PDC to SOD1 mutant slices resulted in substantial MN injury, which was markedly attenuated by a Ca2+ permeable AMPA-type (Ca-AMPA) glutamate channel blocker, or by a nitric oxide synthase antagonist. These observations illustrate the utility of the organotypic culture model for the investigation of intracellular interactions underlying MN degeneration in ALS, and support the hypothesis that activation of Ca-AMPA channels on MNs provides a metabolic burden that synergizes with deleterious effects of mutant SOD1 in the induction of MN injury. PMID:22370146

  8. Structural and biophysical properties of metal-free pathogenic SOD1 mutants A4V and G93A

    SciTech Connect

    Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Strange, Richard W.; Whitson, Lisa J.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Narayana, Narendra; Taylor, Alexander B.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Holloway, Stephen P.; Hasnain, S.Samar; Hart, P. John

    2010-07-19

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the destruction of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. A subset of ALS cases are linked to dominant mutations in copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The pathogenic SOD1 variants A4V and G93A have been the foci of multiple studies aimed at understanding the molecular basis for SOD1-linked ALS. The A4V variant is responsible for the majority of familial ALS cases in North America, causing rapidly progressing paralysis once symptoms begin and the G93A SOD1 variant is overexpressed in often studied murine models of the disease. Here we report the three-dimensional structures of metal-free A4V and of metal-bound and metal-free G93A SOD1. In the metal-free structures, the metal-binding loop elements are observed to be severely disordered, suggesting that these variants may share mechanisms of aggregation proposed previously for other pathogenic SOD1 proteins.

  9. A mutation in the dynein heavy chain gene compensates for energy deficit of mutant SOD1 mice and increases potentially neuroprotective IGF-1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons. ALS patients, as well as animal models such as mice overexpressing mutant SOD1s, are characterized by increased energy expenditure. In mice, this hypermetabolism leads to energy deficit and precipitates motor neuron degeneration. Recent studies have shown that mutations in the gene encoding the dynein heavy chain protein are able to extend lifespan of mutant SOD1 mice. It remains unknown whether the protection offered by these dynein mutations relies on a compensation of energy metabolism defects. Results SOD1(G93A) mice were crossbred with mice harboring the dynein mutant Cramping allele (Cra/+ mice). Dynein mutation increased adipose stores in compound transgenic mice through increasing carbohydrate oxidation and sparing lipids. Metabolic changes that occurred in double transgenic mice were accompanied by the normalization of the expression of key mRNAs in the white adipose tissue and liver. Furthermore, Dynein Cra mutation rescued decreased post-prandial plasma triglycerides and decreased non esterified fatty acids upon fasting. In SOD1(G93A) mice, the dynein Cra mutation led to increased expression of IGF-1 in the liver, increased systemic IGF-1 and, most importantly, to increased spinal IGF-1 levels that are potentially neuroprotective. Conclusions These findings suggest that the protection against SOD1(G93A) offered by the Cramping mutation in the dynein gene is, at least partially, mediated by a reversal in energy deficit and increased IGF-1 availability to motor neurons. PMID:21521523

  10. Repetitive Nerve Stimulation Transiently Opens the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore in Motor Nerve Terminals of Symptomatic Mutant SOD1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khanh T.; Barrett, John N.; García-Chacón, Luis; David, Gavriel; Barrett, Ellen F.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria in motor nerve terminals temporarily sequester large Ca2+ loads during repetitive stimulation. In wild-type mice this Ca2+ uptake produces a small (<5 mV), transient depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm, motor nerve stimulated with at 100 Hz for 5 s). We demonstrate that this stimulation-induced Ψm depolarization attains much higher amplitudes in motor terminals of symptomatic mice expressing the G93A or G85R mutation of human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). These large Ψm depolarizations decayed slowly and incremented with successive stimulus trains. Additional Ψm depolarizations occurred that were not synchronized with stimulation. These large Ψm depolarizations were reduced (a) by cyclosporin A (CsA, 1-2 uM), which inhibits opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), or (b) by replacing bath Ca2+ with Sr2+, which enters motor terminals and mitochondria but does not support mPTP opening. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the large Ψm depolarizations evoked by repetitive stimulation in motor terminals of symptomatic fALS mice result from mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the likelihood of transient mPTP opening during Ca2+ influx. Such mPTP openings, a sign of mitochondrial stress, would disrupt motor terminal handling of Ca2+ loads and might thereby contribute to motor terminal degeneration in fALS mice. Ψm depolarizations resembling those in symptomatic fALS mice could be elicited in wild-type mice following 0.5-1 hr exposure to diamide (200 μM), which produces an oxidative stress, but these depolarizations were not reduced by CsA. PMID:21310237

  11. Repetitive nerve stimulation transiently opens the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in motor nerve terminals of symptomatic mutant SOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh T; Barrett, John N; García-Chacón, Luis; David, Gavriel; Barrett, Ellen F

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria in motor nerve terminals temporarily sequester large Ca(2+) loads during repetitive stimulation. In wild-type mice this Ca(2+) uptake produces a small (<5 mV), transient depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψ(m), motor nerve stimulated at 100 Hz for 5s). We demonstrate that this stimulation-induced Ψ(m) depolarization attains much higher amplitudes in motor terminals of symptomatic mice expressing the G93A or G85R mutation of human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). These large Ψ(m) depolarizations decayed slowly and incremented with successive stimulus trains. Additional Ψ(m) depolarizations occurred that were not synchronized with stimulation. These large Ψ(m) depolarizations were reduced (a) by cyclosporin A (CsA, 1-2 μM), which inhibits opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), or (b) by replacing bath Ca(2+) with Sr(2+), which enters motor terminals and mitochondria but does not support mPTP opening. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the large Ψ(m) depolarizations evoked by repetitive stimulation in motor terminals of symptomatic fALS mice result from mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the likelihood of transient mPTP opening during Ca(2+) influx. Such mPTP openings, a sign of mitochondrial stress, would disrupt motor terminal handling of Ca(2+) loads and might thereby contribute to motor terminal degeneration in fALS mice. Ψ(m) depolarizations resembling those in symptomatic fALS mice could be elicited in wild-type mice following a 0.5-1h exposure to diamide (200 μM), which produces an oxidative stress, but these depolarizations were not reduced by CsA. PMID:21310237

  12. TDP-43 or FUS-induced misfolded human wild-type SOD1 can propagate intercellularly in a prion-like fashion

    PubMed Central

    Pokrishevsky, Edward; Grad, Leslie I.; Cashman, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which appears to spread through the neuroaxis in a spatiotemporally restricted manner, is linked to heritable mutations in genes encoding SOD1, TDP-43, FUS, C9ORF72, or can occur sporadically without recognized genetic mutations. Misfolded human wild-type (HuWt) SOD1 has been detected in both familial and sporadic ALS patients, despite mutations in SOD1 accounting for only 2% of total cases. We previously showed that accumulation of pathological TDP-43 or FUS coexist with misfolded HuWtSOD1 in patient motor neurons, and can trigger its misfolding in cultured cells. Here, we used immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that TDP-43 or FUS-induced misfolded HuWtSOD1 can propagate from cell-to-cell via conditioned media, and seed cytotoxic misfolding of endogenous HuWtSOD1 in the recipient cells in a prion-like fashion. Knockdown of SOD1 using siRNA in recipient cells, or incubation of conditioned media with misfolded SOD1-specific antibodies, inhibits intercellular transmission, indicating that HuWtSOD1 is an obligate seed and substrate of propagated misfolding. In this system, intercellular spread of SOD1 misfolding is not accompanied by transmission of TDP-43 or FUS pathology. Our findings argue that pathological TDP-43 and FUS may exert motor neuron pathology in ALS through the initiation of propagated misfolding of SOD1. PMID:26926802

  13. Therapeutic rAAVrh10 Mediated SOD1 Silencing in Adult SOD1G93A Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Florie; Gernoux, Gwladys; Cardozo, Brynn; Metterville, Jake P.; Toro Cabreja, Gabriela C.; Song, Lina; Su, Qin; Gao, Guang Ping; Elmallah, Mai K.; Brown, Robert H.; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease; survival in ALS is typically 3–5 years. No treatment extends patient survival by more than three months. Approximately 20% of familial ALS and 1–3% of sporadic ALS patients carry a mutation in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). In a transgenic ALS mouse model expressing the mutant SOD1G93A protein, silencing the SOD1 gene prolongs survival. One study reports a therapeutic effect of silencing the SOD1 gene in systemically treated adult ALS mice; this was achieved with a short hairpin RNA, a silencing molecule that has raised multiple safety concerns, and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) 9. We report here a silencing method based on an artificial microRNA termed miR-SOD1 systemically delivered using adeno-associated virus rAAVrh10, a serotype with a demonstrated safety profile in CNS clinical trials. Silencing of SOD1 in adult SOD1G93A transgenic mice with this construct profoundly delayed both disease onset and death in the SOD1G93A mice, and significantly preserved muscle strength and motor and respiratory functions. We also document that intrathecal delivery of the same rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 in nonhuman primates significantly and safely silences SOD1 in lower motor neurons. This study supports the view that rAAVrh10-miR-SOD1 merits further development for the treatment of SOD1-linked ALS in humans. PMID:26710998

  14. Enhancing NAD+ Salvage Pathway Reverts the Toxicity of Primary Astrocytes Expressing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1).

    PubMed

    Harlan, Benjamin A; Pehar, Mariana; Sharma, Deep R; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-05-13

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) participates in redox reactions and NAD(+)-dependent signaling pathways. Although the redox reactions are critical for efficient mitochondrial metabolism, they are not accompanied by any net consumption of the nucleotide. On the contrary, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes lead to its degradation. Three distinct families of enzymes consume NAD(+) as substrate: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, ADP-ribosyl cyclases (CD38 and CD157), and sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Because all of the above enzymes generate nicotinamide as a byproduct, mammalian cells have evolved an NAD(+) salvage pathway capable of resynthesizing NAD(+) from nicotinamide. Overexpression of the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, increases total and mitochondrial NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Moreover, targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase to the mitochondria also enhances NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes. Supplementation with the NAD(+) precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside also increases NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations account for up to 20% of familial ALS and 1-2% of apparently sporadic ALS cases. Primary astrocytes isolated from mutant human superoxide dismutase 1-overexpressing mice as well as human post-mortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Increasing total and mitochondrial NAD(+) content in ALS astrocytes increases oxidative stress resistance and reverts their toxicity toward co-cultured motor neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancing the NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent astrocyte-mediated motor neuron death in ALS. PMID:27002158

  15. Differential effect of oxidative or excitotoxic stress on the transcriptional profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1 cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Boutahar, Nadia; Wierinckx, Anne; Camdessanche, Jean Philippe; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Reynaud, Evelyne; Lassabliere, François; Lachuer, Joël; Borg, Jacques

    2011-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, lethal, degenerative disorder of motor neurons. The causes of most cases of ALS are as yet undefined. In a previous study, it was shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and H(2)O(2) stimuli reduce neuronal survival in cortical neurons in culture (Boutahar et al., 2008). To identify variations in gene expression in response to these neurotoxins in transgenic vs. control cortical neurons cultures, both microarray and RT-PCR analysis were performed. High-density oligonucleotide microarrays showed changes in the expression of about 600 genes involved in protein degradation, neurotrophic factors pathway, cell cycle, inflammation, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, transcription, or signalling. The most up-regulated genes following H(2)O(2) treatment were involved in cytoskeletal organization and axonal transport, such as ARAP2, KIF17, and DKK2, or in trophic factors pathways, such as insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP4), FGF17, and serpin2. The most down-regulated genes were involved in ion transport, such as TRPV1. After NMDA treatment, the most up-regulated genes were involved in protein degradation, such as ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I and cathepsin H, and the most down-regulated genes were involved in ion transport, such as SCN7A. We conclude that these neurotoxins act through different transcriptional inductions, and these changes may reflect an adaptative cellular response to the cellular stress induced by the neurotoxins involved in ALS in the presence of mutant human SOD1. PMID:21647936

  16. Translational profiling identifies a cascade of damage initiated in motor neurons and spreading to glia in mutant SOD1-mediated ALS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuying; Sun, Ying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Ferraiuolo, Laura; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Zou, Yiyang; Drenner, Kevin; Wang, Yin; Ditsworth, Dara; Tokunaga, Seiya; Kopelevich, Alex; Kaspar, Brian K.; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Cleveland, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous expression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-causing mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) provokes noncell autonomous paralytic disease. By combining ribosome affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing, a cascade of mutant SOD1-dependent, cell type-specific changes are now identified. Initial mutant-dependent damage is restricted to motor neurons and includes synapse and metabolic abnormalities, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and selective activation of the PRKR-like ER kinase (PERK) arm of the unfolded protein response. PERK activation correlates with what we identify as a naturally low level of ER chaperones in motor neurons. Early changes in astrocytes occur in genes that are involved in inflammation and metabolism and are targets of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and liver X receptor transcription factors. Dysregulation of myelination and lipid signaling pathways and activation of ETS transcription factors occur in oligodendrocytes only after disease initiation. Thus, pathogenesis involves a temporal cascade of cell type-selective damage initiating in motor neurons, with subsequent damage within glia driving disease propagation. PMID:26621731

  17. SALS-linked WT-SOD1 adopts a highly similar helical conformation as FALS-causing L126Z-SOD1 in a membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Liangzhong; Song, Jianxing

    2016-09-01

    So far >180 mutations have been identified within the 153-residue human SOD1 to cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), while wild-type (WT) SOD1 was intriguingly implicated in sporadic ALS (SALS). SOD1 mutations lead to ALS by a dominant gain of cytotoxicity but its mechanism still remains elusive. Previously functional studies have revealed that SOD1 mutants became unexpectedly associated with organelle membranes. Indeed we decoded that the ALS-causing truncation mutant L126Z-SOD1 with an elevated toxicity completely loses the ability to fold into the native β-barrel structure but acquire a novel capacity to interact with membranes by forming helices over hydrophobic/amphiphilic segments. Very recently, the abnormal insertion of SOD1 mutants into ER membrane has been functionally characterized to trigger ER stress, an initial event of a cascade of cell-specific damages in ALS pathogenesis. Here we attempted to understand the mechanism for gain of cytotoxicity of the WT SOD1. We obtained atomic-resolution evidence that the nascent WT SOD1 without metalation and disulfide bridge is also highly disordered as L126Z. Most importantly, it owns the same capacity in interacting with membranes by forming very similar helices over the first 125 residues identical to L126Z-SOD1, plus an additional hydrophobic helix over Leu144-Ala152. Our study thus implies that the WT and mutant SOD1 indeed converge on a common mechanism for gain of cytotoxicity by abnormally interacting with membranes. Moreover, any genetic/environmental factors which can delay or impair its maturation might act to transform SOD1 into cytotoxic forms with the acquired capacity to abnormally interact with membranes. PMID:27378311

  18. Quercetin protects primary human osteoblasts exposed to cigarette smoke through activation of the antioxidative enzymes HO-1 and SOD-1.

    PubMed

    Braun, Karl F; Ehnert, Sabrina; Freude, Thomas; Egaña, José T; Schenck, Thilo L; Buchholz, Arne; Schmitt, Andreas; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Schyschka, Lilianna; Neumaier, Markus; Stöckle, Ulrich; Nussler, Andreas K

    2011-01-01

    Smokers frequently suffer from impaired fracture healing often due to poor bone quality and stability. Cigarette smoking harms bone cells and their homeostasis by increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether Quercetin, a naturally occurring antioxidant, can protect osteoblasts from the toxic effects of smoking. Human osteoblasts exposed to cigarette smoke medium (CSM) rapidly produced ROS and their viability decreased concentration- and time-dependently. Co-, pre- and postincubation with Quercetin dose-dependently improved their viability. Quercetin increased the expression of the anti-oxidative enzymes heme-oxygenase- (HO-) 1 and superoxide-dismutase- (SOD-) 1. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abolished the protective effect of Quercetin. Our results demonstrate that CSM damages human osteoblasts by accumulation of ROS. Quercetin can diminish this damage by scavenging the radicals and by upregulating the expression of HO-1 and SOD-1. Thus, a dietary supplementation with Quercetin could improve bone matter, stability and even fracture healing in smokers. PMID:22203790

  19. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1 sequesters Hu antigen R (HuR) and TIA-1-related protein (TIAR): implications for impaired post-transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liang; Wang, Shuying; Zheng, Lei; Li, Xuelin; Suswam, Esther A; Zhang, Xiaowen; Wheeler, Crystal G; Nabors, L B; Filippova, Natalia; King, Peter H

    2009-12-01

    Down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the mouse leads to progressive and selective degeneration of motor neurons similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In mice expressing ALS-associated mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), VEGF mRNA expression in the spinal cord declines significantly prior to the onset of clinical manifestations. In vitro models suggest that dysregulation of VEGF mRNA stability contributes to that decline. Here, we show that the major RNA stabilizer, Hu Antigen R (HuR), and TIA-1-related protein (TIAR) colocalize with mutant SOD1 in mouse spinal cord extracts and cultured glioma cells. The colocalization was markedly reduced or abolished by RNase treatment. Immunoanalysis of transfected cells indicated that colocalization occurred in insoluble aggregates and inclusions. RNA immunoprecipitation showed a significant loss of VEGF mRNA binding to HuR and TIAR in mutant SOD1 cells, and there was marked depletion of HuR from polysomes. Ectopic expression of HuR in mutant SOD1 cells more than doubled the mRNA half-life of VEGF and significantly increased expression to that of wild-type SOD1 control. Cellular effects produced by mutant SOD1, including impaired mitochondrial function and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, were reversed by HuR in a gene dose-dependent pattern. In summary, our findings indicate that mutant SOD1 impairs post-transcriptional regulation by sequestering key regulatory RNA-binding proteins. The rescue effect of HuR suggests that this impairment, whether related to VEGF or other potential mRNA targets, contributes to cytotoxicity in ALS. PMID:19805546

  20. Overexpression of human SOD1 in VDAC1-less yeast restores mitochondrial functionality modulating beta-barrel outer membrane protein genes.

    PubMed

    Magrì, Andrea; Di Rosa, Maria Carmela; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Guarino, Francesca; Reina, Simona; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1), the most important antioxidant defense against ROS in eukaryotic cells, localizes in cytosol and intermembrane space of mitochondria (IMS). Several evidences show a SOD1 intersection with both fermentative and respiratory metabolism. The Voltage Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) is the main pore-forming protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), and is considered the gatekeeper of mitochondrial metabolism. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking VDAC1 (Δpor1) is a very convenient model system, since it shows an impaired growth rate on non-fermentable carbon source. Transformation of Δpor1 yeast with human SOD1 completely restores the cell growth deficit in non-fermentative conditions and re-establishes the physiological levels of ROS, as well as the mitochondrial membrane potential. No similar result was found upon yeast SOD1 overexpression. A previous report highlighted the action of SOD1 as a transcription factor. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that β-barrel outer-membrane encoding-genes por2, tom40, sam50 are induced by hSOD1, but the same effect was not obtained in Δpor1Δpor2 yeast, indicating a crucial function for yVDAC2. Since the lack of VDAC1 in yeast can be considered a stress factor for the cell, hSOD1 could relieve it stimulating the expression of genes bringing to the recovery of the MOM function. Our results suggest a direct influence of SOD1 on VDAC. PMID:26947057

  1. Structures of the G85R Variant of SOD1 in Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiaohang; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Seetharaman, Sai V.; Whitson, Lisa J.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Holloway, Stephen P.; Strange, Richard W.; Doucette, Peter A.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Padua, Shelby; Cohlberg, Jeffrey A.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Hart, P. John

    2008-07-21

    Mutations in the gene encoding human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause a dominant form of the progressive neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Transgenic mice expressing the human G85R SOD1 variant develop paralytic symptoms concomitant with the appearance of SOD1-enriched proteinaceous inclusions in their neural tissues. The process(es) through which misfolding or aggregation of G85R SOD1 induces motor neuron toxicity is not understood. Here we present structures of the human G85R SOD1 variant determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. Alterations in structure of the metal-binding loop elements relative to the wild type enzyme suggest a molecular basis for the metal ion deficiency of the G85R SOD1 protein observed in the central nervous system of transgenic mice and in purified recombinant G85R SOD1. These findings support the notion that metal-deficient and/or disulfide-reduced mutant SOD1 species contribute to toxicity in SOD1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  2. PGC-1α Silencing Compounds the Perturbation of Mitochondrial Function Caused by Mutant SOD1 in Skeletal Muscle of ALS Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yan; Yin, Xiang; Wang, Shuyu; Jiang, Hongquan; Wang, Xudong; Ren, Ming; Su, Xiang-ping; Lei, Shi; Feng, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease causing death of motor neurons. This study investigated the roles of energy metabolism in the pathogenesis of ALS in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model. Control and SOD1(G93A) mice were administered with shcontrol or shPGC-1α in combination with PBS or thiazolidinedione (TZD) for 8 weeks. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. ROS and fibrosis were assessed with a colorimetric kit and Sirius staining, respectively. Inflammatory cytokines were measured using ELISA kits. The levels of tissue ROS and serum inflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in SOD1(G93A) mice compared to control mice, and knocking down peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) drastically increased cytokine levels in both control and SOD1(G93A) mice. Muscle fibrosis was much severer in SOD1(G93A) mice, and worsened by silencing PGC-1α and attenuated by TZD. The expression levels of PGC-1α, SOD1, UCP2, and cytochrome C were substantially reduced by shPGC-1α and increased by TZD in muscle of both control and SOD1(G93A) mice, whereas the level of NF-κB was significantly elevated in SOD1(G93A) mice, which was further increased by PGC-1α silencing. These data indicated that disruption of energy homeostasis would exacerbate the pathological changes caused by SOD1 mutations to promote the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:26539112

  3. Molecular Chaperone Mediated Late-Stage Neuroprotection in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Anna L.; Dick, James R.; Kanuga, Naheed; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are associated with familial ALS and lead to SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation. Here we show that the molecular chaperone, HSJ1 (DNAJB2), mutations in which cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy, can reduce mutant SOD1 aggregation and improve motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 models of ALS. Overexpression of human HSJ1a (hHSJ1a) in vivo in motor neurons of SOD1G93A transgenic mice ameliorated disease. In particular, there was a significant improvement in muscle force, increased motor unit number and enhanced motor neuron survival. hHSJ1a was present in a complex with SOD1G93A and led to reduced SOD1 aggregation at late stages of disease progression. We also observed altered ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the double transgenic animals, suggesting that ubiquitin modification might be important for the observed improvements. In a cell model of SOD1G93A aggregation, HSJ1a preferentially bound to mutant SOD1, enhanced SOD1 ubiquitylation and reduced SOD1 aggregation in a J-domain and ubiquitin interaction motif (UIM) dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that HSJ1a acts on mutant SOD1 through a combination of chaperone, co-chaperone and pro-ubiquitylation activity. These results show that targeting SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation in vivo can be neuroprotective and suggest that manipulation of DnaJ molecular chaperones might be useful in the treatment of ALS. PMID:24023695

  4. Spinal cord pathology is ameliorated by P2X7 antagonism in a SOD1-mutant mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Apolloni, Savina; Amadio, Susanna; Parisi, Chiara; Matteucci, Alessandra; Potenza, Rosa L; Armida, Monica; Popoli, Patrizia; D'Ambrosi, Nadia; Volonté, Cinzia

    2014-09-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the role of P2X7, a receptor for extracellular ATP, in modulating physiopathological mechanisms in the central nervous system. In particular, P2X7 has been shown to be implicated in neuropsychiatry, chronic pain, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Remarkably, P2X7 has also been shown to be a 'gene modifier' in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): the receptor is upregulated in spinal cord microglia in human and rat at advanced stages of the disease; in vitro, activation of P2X7 exacerbates pro-inflammatory responses in microglia that have an ALS phenotype, as well as toxicity towards neuronal cells. Despite this detrimental in vitro role of P2X7, in SOD1-G93A mice lacking P2X7, the clinical onset of ALS was significantly accelerated and disease progression worsened, thus indicating that the receptor might have some beneficial effects, at least at certain stages of disease. In order to clarify this dual action of P2X7 in ALS pathogenesis, in the present work we used the antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG), a blood-brain barrier permeable and safe drug that has already been proven to reduce neuroinflammation in traumatic brain injury, cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, neuropathic pain and experimental autoimmune encephalitis. We tested BBG in the SOD1-G93A ALS mouse model at asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic and late pre-symptomatic phases of disease. BBG at late pre-onset significantly enhanced motor neuron survival and reduced microgliosis in lumbar spinal cord, modulating inflammatory markers such as NF-κB, NADPH oxidase 2, interleukin-1β, interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This was accompanied by delayed onset and improved general conditions and motor performance, in both male and female mice, although survival appeared unaffected. Our results prove the twofold role of P2X7 in the course of ALS and establish that P2X7 modulation might represent a promising therapeutic strategy by

  5. The Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture on the Central Nervous System and Muscle in an Animal hSOD1G93A Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Cai, MuDan; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the degeneration of lower and upper motor neurons, leading to muscle paralysis and respiratory failure. However, there is no effective drug or therapy to treat ALS. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including acupuncture, pharmacopuncture, herbal medicine, and massage is popular due to the significant limitations of conventional therapy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA), also known as one of pharmacopunctures, has been used in Oriental medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of BVA on the central nervous system (CNS) and muscle in symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice, an animal model of ALS. Our findings show that BVA at ST36 enhanced motor function and decreased motor neuron death in the spinal cord compared to that observed in hSOD1G93A transgenic mice injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with BV. Furthermore, BV treatment at ST36 eliminated signaling downstream of inflammatory proteins such as TLR4 in the spinal cords of symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. However, i.p. treatment with BV reduced the levels of TNF-α and Bcl-2 expression in the muscle hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that BV pharmacopuncture into certain acupoints may act as a chemical stimulant to activate those acupoints and subsequently engage the endogenous immune modulatory system in the CNS in an animal model of ALS. PMID:25781653

  6. Disrupted Zinc-Binding Sites in Structures of Pathogenic SOD1 Variants D124V and H80R

    PubMed Central

    Seetharaman, Sai V.; Winkler, Duane D.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Cao, Xiaohang; Whitson, Lisa J.; Doucette, Peter A.; Valentine, Joan S.; Schirf, Virgil; Demeler, Borries; Carroll, Mark C.; Culotta, Valeria C.; Hart, P. John

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause an inherited form of the fatal neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we present structures of the pathogenic SOD1 variants D124V and H80R, both of which demonstrate compromised zinc-binding sites. The disruption of the zinc-binding sites in H80R SOD1 leads to conformational changes in loop elements, permitting non-native SOD1-SOD1 interactions that mediate the assembly of these proteins into higher order filamentous arrays. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments indicate that these SOD1 variants are more prone to monomerization than is the wild type enzyme. Although D124V and H80R SOD1 proteins appear to have fully functional copper-binding sites, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometery (ICP-MS) and anomalous scattering X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that zinc (not copper) occupies the copper-binding sites in these variants. The absence of copper in these proteins, together with the results of covalent thiol modification experiments in yeast strains with and without the gene encoding the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS), suggest that CCS may not fully act on newly translated forms of these polypeptides. Overall, these findings lend support to the hypothesis that immature mutant SOD1 species contribute to toxicity in SOD1-linked ALS. PMID:20515040

  7. An emerging role for misfolded wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rotunno, Melissa S.; Bosco, Daryl A.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that targets motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death within a few years of disease onset. While several genes have been linked to the inheritable, or familial, form of ALS, much less is known about the cause(s) of sporadic ALS, which accounts for ~90% of ALS cases. Due to the clinical similarities between familial and sporadic ALS, it is plausible that both forms of the disease converge on a common pathway and, therefore, involve common factors. Recent evidence suggests the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) protein to be one such factor that is common to both sporadic and familial ALS. In 1993, mutations were uncovered in SOD1 that represent the first known genetic cause of familial ALS. While the exact mechanism of mutant-SOD1 toxicity is still not known today, most evidence points to a gain of toxic function that stems, at least in part, from the propensity of this protein to misfold. In the wild-type SOD1 protein, non-genetic perturbations such as metal depletion, disruption of the quaternary structure, and oxidation, can also induce SOD1 to misfold. In fact, these aforementioned post-translational modifications cause wild-type SOD1 to adopt a “toxic conformation” that is similar to familial ALS-linked SOD1 variants. These observations, together with the detection of misfolded wild-type SOD1 within human post-mortem sporadic ALS samples, have been used to support the controversial hypothesis that misfolded forms of wild-type SOD1 contribute to sporadic ALS pathogenesis. In this review, we present data from the literature that both support and contradict this hypothesis. We also discuss SOD1 as a potential therapeutic target for both familial and sporadic ALS. PMID:24379756

  8. ALS-linked SOD1 in glial cells enhances ß-N-Methylamino L-Alanine (BMAA)-induced toxicity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Rafique; Zhang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the role of environmental agents in ALS remains poorly understood. To this end, we used transgenic fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) to explore the interaction between mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and chemicals such as ß-N-methylamino L-alanine (BMAA), the herbicide agent paraquat, and superoxide species. We expressed ALS-linked human SOD1 (hSOD1A4V, and hSOD1G85R), hSOD1wt as well as the Drosophila native SOD1 (dSOD1) in motoneurons (MNs) or in glial cells alone and simultaneously in both types of cells. We then examined the effect of BMAA (3 mM), paraquat (20 mM), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1%) on the lifespan of SOD1-expressing flies. Our data show that glial expression of mutant and wild type hSOD1s reduces the ability of flies to climb. Further, we show that while all three chemicals significantly shorten the lifespan of flies, mutant SOD1 does not have a significant additional effect on the lifespan of flies fed on paraquat, but further shortens the lifespan of flies fed on H2O2. Finally, we show that BMAA shows a dramatic cell-type specific effect with mutant SOD1. Flies with expression of mutant hSOD1 in MNs survived longer on BMAA compared to control flies. In contrast, BMAA significantly shortened the lifespan of flies expressing mutant hSOD1 in glia. Consistent with a neuronal protection role, flies expressing these mutant hSOD1s in both MNs and glia also lived longer. Hence, our studies reveal a synergistic effect of mutant SOD1 with H2O2 and novel roles for mutant hSOD1s in neurons to reduce BMAA toxicity and in glia to enhance the toxicity of BMAA in flies. PMID:24627764

  9. Transcriptome Profiling Following Neuronal and Glial Expression of ALS-Linked SOD1 in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kumimoto, Emily L.; Fore, Taylor R.; Zhang, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) generally is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene account for approximately 20% of familial ALS and 2% of all ALS cases. Although a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain mutant SOD1 toxicity, the molecular mechanisms of the disease remain unclear. SOD1-linked ALS is thought to function in a non–cell-autonomous manner such that motoneurons are critical for the onset, and glia contribute to progression of the disease. Recently, it has been shown in Drosophila melanogaster that expression of human SOD1 in a subset of neuronal cells causes synaptic transmission defects, modified motor function, and altered sensitivity to compounds that induce oxidative stress. Here we used the Gal4-UAS (Upstream Activation Sequence) system to further characterize flies expressing wild-type Drosophila SOD1 (dSOD1) and the mutant human SOD1G85R (G85R) allele in motoneurons and glia. Cell-specific expression of both dSOD1 and G85R was found to influence lifespan, affect sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, and alter lipid peroxidation levels. To better understand the genetic consequences of G85R expression in motoneurons and glia, we conducted microarray analysis of both young flies (5 days old) and old flies (45 days old) expressing G85R selectively in motoneurons or glia and concurrently in motoneurons and glia. Results from this microarray experiment identified candidate genes for further investigation and may help elucidate the individual and combined contributions of motoneurons and glia in ALS. PMID:23550139

  10. FUS and TARDBP but not SOD1 interact in genetic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kabashi, Edor; Bercier, Valérie; Lissouba, Alexandra; Liao, Meijiang; Brustein, Edna; Rouleau, Guy A; Drapeau, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the SOD1 and TARDBP genes have been commonly identified in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Recently, mutations in the Fused in sarcoma gene (FUS) were identified in familial (FALS) ALS cases and sporadic (SALS) patients. Similarly to TDP-43 (coded by TARDBP gene), FUS is an RNA binding protein. Using the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we examined the consequences of expressing human wild-type (WT) FUS and three ALS-related mutations, as well as their interactions with TARDBP and SOD1. Knockdown of zebrafish Fus yielded a motor phenotype that could be rescued upon co-expression of wild-type human FUS. In contrast, the two most frequent ALS-related FUS mutations, R521H and R521C, unlike S57Δ, failed to rescue the knockdown phenotype, indicating loss of function. The R521H mutation caused a toxic gain of function when expressed alone, similar to the phenotype observed upon knockdown of zebrafish Fus. This phenotype was not aggravated by co-expression of both mutant human TARDBP (G348C) and FUS (R521H) or by knockdown of both zebrafish Tardbp and Fus, consistent with a common pathogenic mechanism. We also observed that WT FUS rescued the Tardbp knockdown phenotype, but not vice versa, suggesting that TARDBP acts upstream of FUS in this pathway. In addition we observed that WT SOD1 failed to rescue the phenotype observed upon overexpression of mutant TARDBP or FUS or upon knockdown of Tardbp or Fus; similarly, WT TARDBP or FUS also failed to rescue the phenotype induced by mutant SOD1 (G93A). Finally, overexpression of mutant SOD1 exacerbated the motor phenotype caused by overexpression of mutant FUS. Together our results indicate that TARDBP and FUS act in a pathogenic pathway that is independent of SOD1. PMID:21829392

  11. FUS and TARDBP but Not SOD1 Interact in Genetic Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kabashi, Edor; Bercier, Valérie; Lissouba, Alexandra; Liao, Meijiang; Brustein, Edna; Rouleau, Guy A.; Drapeau, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the SOD1 and TARDBP genes have been commonly identified in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Recently, mutations in the Fused in sarcoma gene (FUS) were identified in familial (FALS) ALS cases and sporadic (SALS) patients. Similarly to TDP-43 (coded by TARDBP gene), FUS is an RNA binding protein. Using the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we examined the consequences of expressing human wild-type (WT) FUS and three ALS–related mutations, as well as their interactions with TARDBP and SOD1. Knockdown of zebrafish Fus yielded a motor phenotype that could be rescued upon co-expression of wild-type human FUS. In contrast, the two most frequent ALS–related FUS mutations, R521H and R521C, unlike S57Δ, failed to rescue the knockdown phenotype, indicating loss of function. The R521H mutation caused a toxic gain of function when expressed alone, similar to the phenotype observed upon knockdown of zebrafish Fus. This phenotype was not aggravated by co-expression of both mutant human TARDBP (G348C) and FUS (R521H) or by knockdown of both zebrafish Tardbp and Fus, consistent with a common pathogenic mechanism. We also observed that WT FUS rescued the Tardbp knockdown phenotype, but not vice versa, suggesting that TARDBP acts upstream of FUS in this pathway. In addition we observed that WT SOD1 failed to rescue the phenotype observed upon overexpression of mutant TARDBP or FUS or upon knockdown of Tardbp or Fus; similarly, WT TARDBP or FUS also failed to rescue the phenotype induced by mutant SOD1 (G93A). Finally, overexpression of mutant SOD1 exacerbated the motor phenotype caused by overexpression of mutant FUS. Together our results indicate that TARDBP and FUS act in a pathogenic pathway that is independent of SOD1. PMID:21829392

  12. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with the SOD1 mutations].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masashi; Warita, Hitoshi; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2008-11-01

    Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) have been linked to some familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In familial ALS kinders with mutations in the SOD1 gene, the age of onset of weakness varies greatly but the duration of illness appears to be characteristic to each mutation. For example, in patients with the L84V mutation, the average life expectancy is less than 1.5 year after the onset of symptoms, whereas patients harboring the H46R mutation have an average life expectancy of 18 years after the disease onset. In view of the evidence supporting the idea that familial ALS variants of SOD1 enzymes acquire toxic properties, the variations in the duration of illness in the different kinders might arise because each mutation imparts different degrees of toxicity to the mutant protein. We developed rats that express a human SOD1 transgene with two different ALS-associated mutations (G93A and H46R) develop striking motor neuron degeneration and paralysis. The larger size of this rat model as compared with the ALS mice will facilitate studies involving manipulations of spinal fluid (implantation of intrathecal catheters for chronic therapeutic studies; CSF sampling) and spinal cord (e.g., direct administration of viral- and cell-mediated therapies). Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is one of the most potent survival-promoting factors for motor neurons. To examine its both protective effect on motor neurons and therapeutic potential, we administered human recombinant HGF (hrHGF) by continuous intrathecal delivery to G93A transgenic (Tg) rats at onset of paralysis for 4 weeks. Intrathecal administration of hrHGF attenuates motor neuron degeneration and prolonged the duration of the disease by 63%. Our results indicated the therapeutic efficacy of continuous intrathecal administration of hrHGF in Tg rats. The results should prompt further clinical trials in ALS using continuous intrathecal administration of hrHGF. PMID:19198133

  13. The effect of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked exogenous SOD1-G93A on electrophysiological properties and intracellular calcium in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Milošević, Milena; Bataveljić, Danijela; Nikolić, Ljiljana; Bijelić, Dunja; Andjus, Pavle

    2016-01-01

    Over 150 mutations in the SOD1 gene that encodes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause 20-25% of familial ALS, albeit without a known gain-of-function mechanism. ALS is also non-cell-autonomous, the interactions between motor neurons and their glial neighbours being implicated in disease progression. The aim here was to investigate the biophysical effects of the exogenous human mutant SOD1-G93A on rat astrocytes in culture. Primary cortical astrocyte cultures were treated with recombinant human apo- mSOD1-G93A vs. wild-type control (wtSOD1) and recorded by patch-clamp and calcium imaging. Results showed that exogenous mSOD1 as well as wtSOD1 induced a decrease of membrane resistance, the effect being persistent (up to 13 min) only for the mutant form. Similarly, whole-cell inward currents in astrocytes were augmented by both wt and mSOD1, but the effect was twice larger and only progressed continuously for the latter. Both forms of SOD1 also induced a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) activity, the effect being dependent on external Ca(2+) and again only persisted with mSOD1, becoming significantly different from wtSOD1 only at longer times (14 min). In conclusion, this study points to membrane permeability and Ca(2+) signalling as processes affected by SOD1-G93A that presents the humoral factor triggering the role of astrocytes in ALS pathophysiology. PMID:26892977

  14. Disease Mechanisms in ALS: Misfolded SOD1 Transferred Through Exosome-Dependent and Exosome-Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Judith M; Fernando, Sarah M; Grad, Leslie I; Hill, Andrew F; Turner, Bradley J; Yerbury, Justin J; Cashman, Neil R

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal adult-onset neuromuscular degenerative disorder with a poorly defined etiology. ALS patients experience motor weakness, which starts focally and spreads throughout the nervous system, culminating in paralysis and death within a few years of diagnosis. While the vast majority of clinical ALS is sporadic with no known cause, mutations in human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) cause about 20 % of inherited cases of ALS. ALS with SOD1 mutations is caused by a toxic gain of function associated with the propensity of mutant SOD1 to misfold, presenting a non-native structure. The mechanisms responsible for the progressive spreading of ALS pathology have been the focus of intense study. We have shown that misfolded SOD1 protein can seed misfolding and aggregation of endogenous wild-type SOD1 similar to amyloid-β and prion protein seeding. Our recent observations demonstrate a transfer of the misfolded SOD1 species from cell to cell, modeling the intercellular transmission of disease through the neuroaxis. We have shown that both mutant and misfolded wild-type SOD1 can traverse cell-to-cell, either as protein aggregates that are released from dying cells and taken up by neighboring cells via macropinocytosis, or in association with vesicles which are released into the extracellular environment. Furthermore, once misfolding of wild-type SOD1 has been initiated in a human cell culture, it can induce misfolding in naïve cell cultures over multiple passages of media transfer long after the initial misfolding template is degraded. Herein we review the data on mechanisms of intercellular transmission of misfolded SOD1. PMID:26908139

  15. Liver specific expression of Cu/ZnSOD extends the lifespan of Sod1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael; Bokov, Alex; Ikeno, Yuji; Jang, Young C.; Perez, Viviana I.; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in mice (Sod1−/− mice) leads to shortened lifespan with a dramatic increase in hepatocellular carcinoma and accelerated aging phenotypes, including early onset sarcopenia. To study the tissue specific effects of oxidative stress in the Sod1−/− mice, we generated mice that only express the human SOD1 gene specifically in the liver of Sod1−/− mice (Sod1−/−/hSOD1alb mice). Expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1−/− mice improved liver function, reduced oxidative damage in liver, and partially restored the expression of several genes involved in tumorigenesis, which are abnormally expressed in the livers of the Sod1−/− mice. However, liver specific expression of hSOD1 did not prevent the loss of body weight and muscle mass and alterations in the structure of neuromuscular junctions. The expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1−/− mice significantly improved the lifespan of Sod1−/− mice; however, the lifespan of the Sod1−/−/hSOD1alb mice was still significantly shorter than wild type mice. PMID:26839948

  16. Wild-type SOD1 overexpression accelerates disease onset of a G85R SOD1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Deng, Han-Xiang; Grisotti, Gabriella; Zhai, Hong; Siddique, Teepu; Roos, Raymond P.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 10% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases are familial (FALS), and ∼25% of FALS cases are caused by mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase type 1 (SOD1). Mutant (MT) SOD1 is thought to be pathogenic because it misfolds and aggregates. A number of transgenic mice have been generated that express different MTSOD1s as transgenes and exhibit an ALS-like disease. Although one study found that overexpression of human wild-type (WT) SOD1 did not affect disease in G85R transgenic mice, more recent reports claim that overexpression of WTSOD1 in other MTSOD1 transgenic mice hastened disease, raising a possibility that the effect of WTSOD1 overexpression in this FALS mouse model is mutant-specific. In order to clarify this issue, we studied the effect of WTSOD1 overexpression in a G85R transgenic mouse that we recently generated. We found that G85R/WTSOD1 double transgenic mice had an acceleration of disease onset and shortened survival compared with G85R single transgenic mice; in addition, there was an earlier appearance of pathological and immunohistochemical abnormalities. The spinal cord insoluble fraction from G85R/WTSOD1 mice had evidence of G85R–WTSOD1 heterodimers and WTSOD1 homodimers (in addition to G85R homodimers) with intermolecular disulfide bond cross-linking. These studies suggest that WTSOD1 can be recruited into disease-associated aggregates by redox processes, providing an explanation for the accelerated disease seen in G85R mice following WTSOD1 overexpression, and suggesting the importance of incorrect disulfide-linked protein as key to MTSOD1 toxicity. PMID:19233858

  17. Breed Distribution of SOD1 Alleles Previously Associated with Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, R; Coates, JR; Johnson, GC; Hansen, L; Awano, T; Kolicheski, A; Ivansson, E; Perloski, M; Lindblad-Toh, K; O'Brien, DP; Guo, J; Katz, ML; Johnson, GS

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports associated 2 mutant SOD1 alleles (SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T) with degenerative myelopathy in 6 canine breeds. The distribution of these alleles in other breeds has not been reported. Objective To describe the distribution of SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T in 222 breeds. Animals DNA from 33,747 dogs was genotyped at SOD1:c.118, SOD1:c.52, or both. Spinal cord sections from 249 of these dogs were examined. Methods Retrospective analysis of 35,359 previously determined genotypes at SOD1:c.118G>A or SOD1:c.52A>T and prospective survey to update the clinical status of a subset of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias. Results The SOD1:c.118A allele was found in cross-bred dogs and in 124 different canine breeds whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele was only found in Bernese Mountain Dogs. Most of the dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A homozygotes, but 8 dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes and had no other sequence variants in their SOD1 amino acid coding regions. The updated clinical conditions of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias suggest that SOD1:c.118A homozygotes are at a much higher risk of developing degenerative myelopathy than are SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes. Conclusions and Clinical Importance We conclude that the SOD1:c.118A allele is widespread and common among privately owned dogs whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele is rare and appears to be limited to Bernese Mountain Dogs. We also conclude that breeding to avoid the production of SOD1:c.118A homozygotes is a rational strategy. PMID:24524809

  18. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) as a Chaperone Inhibiting Accumulation of Misfolded SOD1

    PubMed Central

    Israelson, Adrian; Ditsworth, Dara; Sun, Shuying; Song, SungWon; Liang, Jason; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Abu-Hamad, Salah; Zoltsman, Guy; Shani, Tom; Maldonado, Marcus; Bui, Anh; Navarro, Michael; Zhou, Huilin; Marsala, Martin; Kaspar, Brian K.; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Cleveland, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons and accompanied by accumulation of misfolded SOD1 onto the cytoplasmic faces of intracellular organelles, including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Using inhibition of misfolded SOD1 deposition onto mitochondria as an assay, a chaperone activity abundant in non-neuronal tissues is now purified and identified to be the multifunctional macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), whose activities include an ATP-independent protein folding chaperone. Purified MIF is shown to directly inhibit mutant SOD1 misfolding. Elevating MIF in neuronal cells suppresses accumulation of misfolded SOD1 and its association with mitochondria and ER and extends survival of mutant SOD1-expressing motor neurons. Accumulated MIF protein is identified to be low in motor neurons, implicating correspondingly low chaperone activity as a component of vulnerability to mutant SOD1 misfolding and supporting therapies to enhance intracellular MIF chaperone activity. PMID:25801706

  19. Morpholino-mediated SOD1 reduction ameliorates an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nizzardo, M.; Simone, C.; Rizzo, F.; Ulzi, G.; Ramirez, A.; Rizzuti, M.; Bordoni, A.; Bucchia, M.; Gatti, S.; Bresolin, N.; Comi, G. P.; Corti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity due to the accumulation of mutant proteins is thought to drive pathogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS); these mutations result in progressive motor neuron death through one or more acquired toxicities. Interestingly, SOD1 is not only responsible for fALS but may also play a significant role in sporadic ALS; therefore, SOD1 represents a promising therapeutic target. Here, we report slowed disease progression, improved neuromuscular function, and increased survival in an in vivo ALS model following therapeutic delivery of morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) designed to reduce the synthesis of human SOD1. Neuropathological analysis demonstrated increased motor neuron and axon numbers and a remarkable reduction in astrogliosis and microgliosis. To test this strategy in a human model, we treated human fALS induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived motor neurons with MOs; these cells exhibited increased survival and reduced expression of apoptotic markers. Our data demonstrated the efficacy of MO-mediated therapy in mouse and human ALS models, setting the stage for human clinical trials. PMID:26878886

  20. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: recent insights from transgenic animal models with SOD1 mutations].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masashi

    2004-11-01

    Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) have been linked to some familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In order to reproduce the different degree of toxicity to the mutant protein by mutations, we generated new transgenic mice with two mutations from which the progression of the disease in human family is rapid (L84V) or extremely slow (H46R). By comparing the two transgenic mice with different SOD1 mutations, we demonstrate that the time course and the first symptoms in these mice were likely to human SOD1-mediated familial ALS. In addition, we report here that rats that express a human SOD1 transgene with two different ALS-associated mutations (G93A and H46R) develop striking motor neuron degeneration and paralysis. The larger size of this rat model as compared with the ALS mice will facilitate studies involving manipulations of spinal fluid (implantation of intrathecal catheters for chronic therapeutic studies; CSF sampling) and spinal cord (e.g., direct administration of viral- and cell-mediated therapies). Using this rat model we showed that intrathecal administration of the hepatocyte growth factor attenuates motoneuron death and prolongs the duration of the disease of transgenic rats. PMID:15651292

  1. Prognostic role of "prion-like propagation" in SOD1-linked familial ALS: an alternative view.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Keizo; Nakano, Imaharu

    2014-01-01

    "Prion-like propagation" has recently been proposed for disease spread in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1)-linked familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Pathological SOD1 conformers are presumed to propagate via cell-to-cell transmission. In this model, the risk-based kinetics of neuronal cell loss over time appears to be represented by a sigmoidal function that reflects the kinetics of intercellular transmission. Here, we describe an alternative view of prion-like propagation in SOD1-linked ALS - its relation to disease prognosis under the protective-aggregation hypothesis. Nucleation-dependent polymerization has been widely accepted as the molecular mechanism of prion propagation. If toxic species of misfolded SOD1, as soluble oligomers, are formed as on-pathway intermediates of nucleation-dependent polymerization, further fibril extension via sequential addition of monomeric mutant SOD1 would be protective against neurodegeneration. This is because the concentration of unfolded mutant SOD1 monomers, which serve as precursor of nucleation and toxic species of mutant SOD1, would decline in proportion to the extent of aggregation. The nucleation process requires that native conformers exist in an unfolded state that may result from escaping the cellular protein quality control machinery. However, prion-like propagation-SOD1 aggregated form self-propagates by imposing its altered conformation on normal SOD1-appears to antagonize the protective role of aggregate growth. The cross-seeding reaction with normal SOD1 would lead to a failure to reduce the concentration of unfolded mutant SOD1 monomers, resulting in continuous nucleation and subsequent generation of toxic species, and influence disease prognosis. In this alternative view, the kinetics of neuronal loss appears to be represented by an exponential function, with decreasing risk reflecting the protective role of aggregate and the potential for cross-seeding reactions between mutant SOD1 and normal

  2. Mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cause novel protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kunst, C B; Mezey, E; Brownstein, M J; Patterson, D

    1997-01-01

    A subset of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-a fatal disorder characterised by progressive motor neuron degeneration) cases are due to mutations in the gene encoding Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Two mutations which have been successfully used to generate transgenic mice that develop an ALS-like syndrome are glycine 85 to arginine (G85R) and glycine 93 to alanine (G93A) with the mutant SOD1 allele overexpressed in a normal mouse genetic background. No ALS-like phenotype is observed in mice overexpressing wild-type SOD1 or mice without any SOD1 activity. These dominant mutations, which do not necessarily decrease SOD1 activity, may confer a gain of function that is selectively lethal to motor neurons. The yeast interaction trap system allowed us to determine whether these mutations in SOD1 caused novel protein interactions not observed with wild-type SOD1 and which might participate in the generation of the ALS phenotype. Two proteins, lysyl-tRNA synthetase and translocon-associated protein delta, interact with mutant forms of SOD1 but not with wild-type SOD1. The specificity of the interactions was confirmed by the coimmunoprecipitation of mutant SOD1 and the expressed proteins. These proteins are expressed in ventral cord, lending support to the relevance of this interaction to motor neuron disease. PMID:8988176

  3. Astrocytes expressing ALS-linked mutated SOD1 release factors selectively toxic to motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Makiko; Re, Diane B; Nagata, Tetsuya; Chalazonitis, Alcmène; Jessell, Thomas M; Wichterle, Hynek; Przedborski, Serge

    2007-05-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) cause a form of the fatal paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), presumably by a combination of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous processes. Here, we show that expression of mutated human SOD1 in primary mouse spinal motor neurons does not provoke motor neuron degeneration. Conversely, rodent astrocytes expressing mutated SOD1 kill spinal primary and embryonic mouse stem cell-derived motor neurons. This is triggered by soluble toxic factor(s) through a Bax-dependent mechanism. However, mutant astrocytes do not cause the death of spinal GABAergic or dorsal root ganglion neurons or of embryonic stem cell-derived interneurons. In contrast to astrocytes, fibroblasts, microglia, cortical neurons and myocytes expressing mutated SOD1 do not cause overt neurotoxicity. These findings indicate that astrocytes may play a role in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in ALS. Identification of the astrocyte-derived soluble factor(s) may have far-reaching implications for ALS from both a pathogenic and therapeutic standpoint. PMID:17435755

  4. Astrocytes expressing ALS-linked mutated SOD1 release factors selectively toxic to motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Makiko; Re, Diane B; Nagata, Tetsuya; Chalazonitis, Alcmène; Jessell, Thomas M; Wichterle, Hynek; Przedborski, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) cause a form of the fatal paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), presumably by a combination of cell-autonomous and non–cell-autonomous processes. Here, we show that expression of mutated human SOD1 in primary mouse spinal motor neurons does not provoke motor neuron degeneration. Conversely, rodent astrocytes expressing mutated SOD1 kill spinal primary and embryonic mouse stem cell–derived motor neurons. This is triggered by soluble toxic factor(s) through a Bax-dependent mechanism. However, mutant astrocytes do not cause the death of spinal GABAergic or dorsal root ganglion neurons or of embryonic stem cell–derived interneurons. In contrast to astrocytes, fibroblasts, microglia, cortical neurons and myocytes expressing mutated SOD1 do not cause overt neurotoxicity. These findings indicate that astrocytes may play a role in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in ALS. Identification of the astrocyte-derived soluble factor(s) may have far-reaching implications for ALS from both a pathogenic and therapeutic standpoint. PMID:17435755

  5. Abnormal Intracellular Calcium Signaling and SNARE-Dependent Exocytosis Contributes to SOD1G93A Astrocyte-Mediated Toxicity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Ng, Seng Kah; Diaz, Natalia; Burstein, Suzanne; Morel, Lydie; Osgood, Alexandra; Sider, Brittany; Higashimori, Haruki; Haydon, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurons are progressively and predominantly degenerated in ALS, which is not only induced by multiple intrinsic pathways but also significantly influenced by the neighboring glial cells. In particular, astrocytes derived from the SOD1 mutant mouse model of ALS or from human familial or sporadic ALS patient brain tissue directly induce motor neuron death in culture; however, the mechanisms of pathological astroglial secretion remain unclear. Here we investigated abnormal calcium homeostasis and altered exocytosis in SOD1G93A astrocytes. We found that purinergic stimulation induces excess calcium release from the ER stores in SOD1G93A astrocytes, which results from the abnormal ER calcium accumulation and is independent of clearance mechanisms. Furthermore, pharmacological studies suggested that store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), a calcium refilling mechanism responsive to ER calcium depletion, is enhanced in SOD1G93A astrocytes. We found that oxidant-induced increased S-glutathionylation and calcium-independent puncta formation of the ER calcium sensor STIM1 underlies the abnormal SOCE response in SOD1G93A astrocytes. Enhanced SOCE contributes to ER calcium overload in SOD1G93A astrocytes and excess calcium release from the ER during ATP stimulation. In addition, ER calcium release induces elevated ATP release from SOD1G93A astrocytes, which can be inhibited by the overexpression of dominant-negative SNARE. Selective inhibition of exocytosis in SOD1G93A astrocytes significantly prevents astrocyte-mediated toxicity to motor neurons and delays disease onset in SOD1G93A mice. Our results characterize a novel mechanism responsible for calcium dysregulation in SOD1G93A astrocytes and provide the first in vivo evidence that astrocyte exocytosis contributes to the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:24501372

  6. Copper Homeostasis as a Therapeutic Target in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with SOD1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Eiichi; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease affecting both upper and lower motor neurons, and currently, there is no cure or effective treatment. Mutations in a gene encoding a ubiquitous antioxidant enzyme, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), have been first identified as a cause of familial forms of ALS. It is widely accepted that mutant SOD1 proteins cause the disease through a gain in toxicity but not through a loss of its physiological function. SOD1 is a major copper-binding protein and regulates copper homeostasis in the cell; therefore, a toxicity of mutant SOD1 could arise from the disruption of copper homeostasis. In this review, we will briefly review recent studies implying roles of copper homeostasis in the pathogenesis of SOD1-ALS and highlight the therapeutic interventions focusing on pharmacological as well as genetic regulations of copper homeostasis to modify the pathological process in SOD1-ALS. PMID:27136532

  7. A faulty interaction between SOD1 and hCCS in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Gareth S. A.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Hasnain, S. Samar

    2016-01-01

    A proportion of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases result from impaired mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) maturation. The copper chaperone for SOD1 (hCCS) forms a transient complex with SOD1 and catalyses the final stages of its maturation. We find that a neurodegenerative disease-associated hCCS mutation abrogates the interaction with SOD1 by inhibiting hCCS zinc binding. Analogously, SOD1 zinc loss has a detrimental effect on the formation, structure and disassociation of the hCCS-SOD1 heterodimer. This suggests that hCCS functionality is impaired by ALS mutations that reduce SOD1 zinc affinity. Furthermore, stabilization of wild-type SOD1 by chemical modification including cisplatination, inhibits complex formation. We hypothesize that drug molecules designed to stabilize ALS SOD1 mutants that also target the wild-type form will lead to characteristics common in SOD1 knock-outs. Our work demonstrates the applicability of chromatographic SAXS when studying biomolecules predisposed to aggregation or dissociation; attributes frequently reported for complexes involved in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27282955

  8. A faulty interaction between SOD1 and hCCS in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gareth S A; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Hasnain, S Samar

    2016-01-01

    A proportion of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases result from impaired mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) maturation. The copper chaperone for SOD1 (hCCS) forms a transient complex with SOD1 and catalyses the final stages of its maturation. We find that a neurodegenerative disease-associated hCCS mutation abrogates the interaction with SOD1 by inhibiting hCCS zinc binding. Analogously, SOD1 zinc loss has a detrimental effect on the formation, structure and disassociation of the hCCS-SOD1 heterodimer. This suggests that hCCS functionality is impaired by ALS mutations that reduce SOD1 zinc affinity. Furthermore, stabilization of wild-type SOD1 by chemical modification including cisplatination, inhibits complex formation. We hypothesize that drug molecules designed to stabilize ALS SOD1 mutants that also target the wild-type form will lead to characteristics common in SOD1 knock-outs. Our work demonstrates the applicability of chromatographic SAXS when studying biomolecules predisposed to aggregation or dissociation; attributes frequently reported for complexes involved in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27282955

  9. ALS-linked misfolded SOD1 species have divergent impacts on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pickles, Sarah; Semmler, Sabrina; Broom, Helen R; Destroismaisons, Laurie; Legroux, Laurine; Arbour, Nathalie; Meiering, Elizabeth; Cashman, Neil R; Vande Velde, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20 % of familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is caused by mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1), which leads to misfolding of the SOD1 protein, resulting in a toxic gain of function. Several conformation-restricted antibodies have been generated that specifically recognize misfolded SOD1 protein, and have been used as therapeutics in pre-clinical models. Misfolded SOD1 selectively associates with spinal cord mitochondria in SOD1 rodent models. Using the SOD1(G93A) rat model, we find that SOD1 conformational specific antibodies AMF7-63 and DSE2-3H1 labeled a fibrillar network concentrated in the anterior horn; while A5C3, B8H10, C4F6 and D3H5 labeled motor neurons as well as puncta in the neuropil. There is a time-dependent accumulation of misfolded SOD1 at the surface of spinal cord mitochondria with AMF7-63-labeled mitochondria having increased volume in contrast to a mitochondrial subset labeled with B8H10. In spinal cord homogenates and isolated mitochondria, AMF7-63, DSE2-3H1 and B8H10 detect misfolded SOD1 aggregates. SOD1 that lacks its metal cofactors has an increased affinity for naïve mitochondria and misfolded SOD1 antibodies B8H10 and DSE2-3H1 readily detect demetalated mutant and wild-type SOD1. Together, these data suggest that multiple non-native species of misfolded SOD1 may exist, some of which are associated with mitochondrial damage. Conformational antibodies are invaluable tools to identify and characterize the variation in misfolded SOD1 species with regards to biochemical characteristics and toxicity. This information is highly relevant to the further development of these reagents as therapeutics. PMID:27121871

  10. Endogenous macrophage migration inhibitory factor reduces the accumulation and toxicity of misfolded SOD1 in a mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Leyton-Jaimes, Marcel F; Benaim, Clara; Abu-Hamad, Salah; Kahn, Joy; Guetta, Amos; Bucala, Richard; Israelson, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. It has been suggested that the toxicity of mutant SOD1 results from its misfolding and accumulation on the cytoplasmic faces of intracellular organelles, including the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of ALS-affected tissues. Recently, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was shown to directly inhibit the accumulation of misfolded SOD1 and its binding to intracellular membranes, but the role of endogenous MIF in modulating SOD1 misfolding in vivo remains unknown. To elucidate this role, we bred MIF-deficient mice with SOD1(G85R) mice, which express a dismutase-inactive mutant of SOD1 and are considered a model of familial ALS. We found that the accumulation of misfolded SOD1, its association with mitochondrial and ER membranes, and the levels of sedimentable insoluble SOD1 aggregates were significantly higher in the spinal cords of SOD1(G85R)-MIF(-/-) mice than in their SOD1(G85R)-MIF(+/+) littermates. Moreover, increasing MIF expression in neuronal cultures inhibited the accumulation of misfolded SOD1 and rescued from mutant SOD1-induced cell death. In contrast, the complete elimination of endogenous MIF accelerated disease onset and late disease progression and shortened the lifespan of the SOD1(G85R) mutant mice. These findings indicate that MIF plays a significant role in the folding and misfolding of SOD1 in vivo, and they have implications for the potential therapeutic role of up-regulating MIF within the nervous system to modulate the selective accumulation of misfolded SOD1. PMID:27551074

  11. Oligomerization of Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) by Docosahexaenoic Acid and Its Hydroperoxides In Vitro: Aggregation Dependence on Fatty Acid Unsaturation and Thiols

    PubMed Central

    Appolinário, Patricia Postilione; Medinas, Danilo Bilches; Chaves-Filho, Adriano B.; Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C.; Cussiol, José Renato Rosa; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares; Augusto, Ohara; Miyamoto, Sayuri

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, n-3, DHA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid highly enriched in the brain. This fatty acid can be easily oxidized yielding hydroperoxides as primary products. Cu, Zn-Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) aggregation is a common hallmark of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and the molecular mechanisms behind their formation are not completely understood. Here we investigated the effect of DHA and its hydroperoxides (DHAOOH) on human SOD1 oligomerization in vitro. DHA induced the formation of high-molecular-weight (HMW) SOD1 species (>700 kDa). Aggregation was dependent on free thiols and occurred primarily with the protein in its apo-form. SOD1 incubation with DHA was accompanied by changes in protein structure leading to exposure of protein hydrophobic patches and formation of non-amyloid aggregates. Site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that Cys 6 and Cys 111 in wild-type and Cys 6 in ALS-linked G93A mutant are required for aggregation. In contrast, DHAOOH did not induce HMW species formation but promoted abnormal covalent dimerization of apo-SOD1 that was resistant to SDS and thiol reductants. Overall, our data demonstrate that DHA and DHAOOH induce distinct types of apo-SOD1 oligomerization leading to the formation of HMW and low-molecular-weight species, respectively. PMID:25928076

  12. Impairment of SOD1-G93A motility is linked to mitochondrial movement in axons of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae Ryul; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is a well-known antioxidant enzyme. Mutation of SOD1 is closely associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, the pathologic pathways linking neurodegenerative diseases with mutation of SOD1 remain elusive. Here, we investigated the motility of SOD1-WT and -G93A (a pathogenic mutant of SOD1), and observed correlation of axonal transport of the mutant protein with mitochondria in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. The SOD1-G93A mutant showed significant accumulation at vGlut1-positive synaptic boutons and in cell bodies, compared to SOD1-WT. The proportions of motile WT and G93A proteins were similar (~30 %) while the motility velocity of SOD1-G93A was significantly slower (~40 %) than that of the WT counterpart. This motility defect of SOD1-G93A was highly correlated with mitochondrial movement. Our results collectively suggest that the SOD1-G93A mutant has a defect in motility that is linked to mitochondrial transport in axons. PMID:27464601

  13. hSOD1 promotes tau phosphorylation and toxicity in the Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunpeng; Wu, Zhihao; Zhou, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation has been found in several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Down syndrome, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, factors affecting tau hyperphosphorylation are not yet clearly understood. SOD1, a Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase whose mutations can cause adult-onset ALS, is believed to be involved in the pathology of Down syndrome. In this work, the model organism Drosophila was used to study the possible link between hSOD1 and tau. Our results show that hSOD1, and to a higher degree hSOD1(A4V), can increase tau toxicity in Drosophila and exacerbate the corresponding neurodegeneration phenotype. The increased tau toxicity appears to be explainable by elevated tau phosphorylation. Tau(S2A), a tau mutant with impaired phosphorylation capabilities, does not respond to expression of hSOD1 and hSOD1(A4V). We suggest that increased SOD1 expression can lead to tau hyperphosphorylation, which might serve as an important contributing factor to the etiology of Down syndrome and SOD1-related ALS disease. PMID:25524953

  14. A cytoplasmic Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase SOD1 contributes to hyphal growth and virulence of Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yao, Sheng-Hua; Guo, Yan; Wang, Yan-Zhang; Zhang, Dong; Xu, Ling; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are scavengers of superoxide radicals, one of the main reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell. SOD-based ROS scavenging system constitutes the frontline defense against intra- and extracellular ROS, but the roles of SODs in the important cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum are not very clear. There are five SOD genes in F. graminearum genome, encoding cytoplasmic Cu-Zn SOD1 and MnSOD3, mitochondrial MnSOD2 and FeSOD4, and extracellular CuSOD5. Previous studies reported that the expression of SOD1 increased during infection of wheat coleoptiles and florets. In this work we showed that the recombinant SOD1 protein had the superoxide dismutase activity in vitro, and that the SOD1-mRFP fusion protein localized in the cytoplasm of F. graminearum. The Δsod1 mutants had slightly reduced hyphal growth and markedly increased sensitivity to the intracellular ROS generator menadione. The conidial germination under extracellular oxidative stress was significantly delayed in the mutants. Wheat floret infection assay showed that the Δsod1 mutants had a reduced pathogenicity. Furthermore, the Δsod1 mutants had a significant reduction in production of deoxynivalenol mycotoxin. Our results indicate that the cytoplasmic Cu-Zn SOD1 affects fungal growth probably depending on detoxification of intracellular superoxide radicals, and that SOD1-mediated deoxynivalenol production contributes to the virulence of F. graminearum in wheat head infection. PMID:27037138

  15. SOD1 nanozyme with reduced toxicity and MPS accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhang; Arounleut, Phonepasong; Rheiner, Steven; Bae, Younsoo; Kabanov, Alexander V; Milligan, Carol; Manickam, Devika S

    2016-06-10

    We previously developed a "cage"-like nano-formulation (nanozyme) for copper/Zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) by polyion condensation with a conventional block copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-PLL) followed by chemical cross-linking. Herein we report a new SOD1 nanozyme based on PEG-b-poly(aspartate diethyltriamine) (PEG-PAsp(DET), or PEG-DET for short) engineered for chronic dosing. This new nanozyme was spherical (Rg/Rh=0.785), and hollow (60% water composition) nanoparticles with colloidal properties similar to PLL-based nanozyme. It was better tolerated by brain microvessel endothelial/neuronal cells, and accumulated less in the liver and spleen. This formulation reduced the infarct volumes by more than 50% in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. However, it was not effective at preventing neuromuscular junction denervation in a mutant SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To our knowledge, this work is the first report of using PEG-DET for protein delivery and a direct comparison between two cationic block copolymers demonstrating the effect of polymer structure in modulating the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) accumulation of polyion complexes. PMID:26928528

  16. SOD1 mutations disrupt redox-sensitive Rac regulation of NADPH oxidase in a familial ALS model

    PubMed Central

    Harraz, Maged M.; Marden, Jennifer J.; Zhou, Weihong; Zhang, Yulong; Williams, Aislinn; Sharov, Victor S.; Nelson, Kathryn; Luo, Meihui; Paulson, Henry; Schöneich, Christian; Engelhardt, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with enhanced redox stress caused by dominant mutations in superoxide dismutase–1 (SOD1). SOD1 is a cytosolic enzyme that facilitates the conversion of superoxide (O2•–) to H2O2. Here we demonstrate that SOD1 is not just a catabolic enzyme, but can also directly regulate NADPH oxidase–dependent (Nox-dependent) O2•– production by binding Rac1 and inhibiting its GTPase activity. Oxidation of Rac1 by H2O2 uncoupled SOD1 binding in a reversible fashion, producing a self-regulating redox sensor for Nox-derived O2•– production. This process of redox-sensitive uncoupling of SOD1 from Rac1 was defective in SOD1 ALS mutants, leading to enhanced Rac1/Nox activation in transgenic mouse tissues and cell lines expressing ALS SOD1 mutants. Glial cell toxicity associated with expression of SOD1 mutants in culture was significantly attenuated by treatment with the Nox inhibitor apocynin. Treatment of ALS mice with apocynin also significantly increased their average life span. This redox sensor mechanism may explain the gain-of-function seen with certain SOD1 mutations associated with ALS and defines new therapeutic targets. PMID:18219391

  17. Extended survival of misfolded G85R SOD1-linked ALS mice by transgenic expression of chaperone Hsp110

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Maria; Fenton, Wayne A.; Li, Di; Furtak, Krystyna; Horwich, Arthur L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that mammalian cells contain a cytosolic protein disaggregation machinery comprised of Hsc70, DnaJ homologs, and Hsp110 proteins, the last of which acts to accelerate a rate-limiting step of nucleotide exchange of Hsc70. We tested the ability of transgenic overexpression of a Thy1 promoter-driven human Hsp110 protein, HspA4L (Apg1), in neuronal cells of a transgenic G85R SOD1YFP ALS mouse strain to improve survival. Notably, G85R is a mutant version of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) that is unable to reach native form and that is prone to aggregation, with prominent YFP-fluorescent aggregates observed in the motor neurons of the transgenic mice as early as 1 mo of age. The several-fold overexpression of Hsp110 in motor neurons of these mice was associated with an increased median survival from ∼5.5 to 7.5 mo and increased maximum survival from 6.5 to 12 mo. Improvement of survival was also observed for a G93A mutant SOD1 ALS strain. We conclude that neurodegeneration associated with cytosolic misfolding and aggregation can be ameliorated by overexpression of Hsp110, likely enhancing the function of a cytosolic disaggregation machinery. PMID:27114530

  18. Extended survival of misfolded G85R SOD1-linked ALS mice by transgenic expression of chaperone Hsp110.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Maria; Fenton, Wayne A; Li, Di; Furtak, Krystyna; Horwich, Arthur L

    2016-05-10

    Recent studies have indicated that mammalian cells contain a cytosolic protein disaggregation machinery comprised of Hsc70, DnaJ homologs, and Hsp110 proteins, the last of which acts to accelerate a rate-limiting step of nucleotide exchange of Hsc70. We tested the ability of transgenic overexpression of a Thy1 promoter-driven human Hsp110 protein, HspA4L (Apg1), in neuronal cells of a transgenic G85R SOD1YFP ALS mouse strain to improve survival. Notably, G85R is a mutant version of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) that is unable to reach native form and that is prone to aggregation, with prominent YFP-fluorescent aggregates observed in the motor neurons of the transgenic mice as early as 1 mo of age. The several-fold overexpression of Hsp110 in motor neurons of these mice was associated with an increased median survival from ∼5.5 to 7.5 mo and increased maximum survival from 6.5 to 12 mo. Improvement of survival was also observed for a G93A mutant SOD1 ALS strain. We conclude that neurodegeneration associated with cytosolic misfolding and aggregation can be ameliorated by overexpression of Hsp110, likely enhancing the function of a cytosolic disaggregation machinery. PMID:27114530

  19. The Influenza Virus H5N1 Infection Can Induce ROS Production for Viral Replication and Host Cell Death in A549 Cells Modulated by Human Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian; Wang, Ruifang; Zou, Wei; Sun, Xin; Liu, Xiaokun; Zhao, Lianzhong; Wang, Shengyu; Jin, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 infections are often accompanied by excessive pro-inflammatory response, high viral titer, and apoptosis; as such, the efficient control of these infections poses a great challenge. The pathogenesis of influenza virus infection is also related to oxidative stress. However, the role of endogenic genes with antioxidant effect in the control of influenza viruses, especially H5N1 viruses, should be further investigated. In this study, the H5N1 infection in lung epithelial cells decreased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) expression at mRNA and protein levels. Forced SOD1 expression significantly inhibited the H5N1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, decreased pro-inflammatory response, prevented p65 and p38 phosphorylation, and impeded viral ribonucleoprotein nuclear export and viral replication. The SOD1 overexpression also rescued H5N1-induced cellular apoptosis and alleviated H5N1-caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, this study described the role of SOD1 in the replication of H5N1 influenza virus and emphasized the relevance of this enzyme in the control of H5N1 replication in epithelial cells. Pharmacological modulation or targeting SOD1 may open a new way to fight H5N1 influenza virus. PMID:26761025

  20. SOD1 Integrates Signals from Oxygen and Glucose to Repress Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Reddi, Amit R.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) is an abundant enzyme that has been best studied as a regulator of antioxidant defence. Using the yeast S. cerevisiae, we report that SOD1 transmits signals from oxygen and glucose to repress respiration. The mechanism involves SOD1-mediated stabilization of two casein kinase 1-gamma (CK1γ) homologs, Yck1p and Yck2p, required for respiratory repression. SOD1 binds a C-terminal degron we identified in Yck1p/Yck2p, and promotes kinase stability by catalyzing superoxide conversion to peroxide. The effects of SOD1 on CK1γ stability are also observed with mammalian SOD1 and CK1γ and in a human cell line. Therefore in a single circuit, oxygen, glucose, and reactive oxygen can repress respiration through SOD1/ CK1γ signaling. Our data therefore may provide mechanistic insight into how rapidly proliferating cells and many cancers accomplish glucose-mediated repression in favour of aerobic glycolysis. PMID:23332757

  1. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  2. Oxidation of the Tryptophan 32 Residue of Human Superoxide Dismutase 1 Caused by Its Bicarbonate-dependent Peroxidase Activity Triggers the Non-amyloid Aggregation of the Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Fernando R.; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F.; Lima, Filipe S.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-01-01

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1WT and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp32 residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp32 residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1WT and hSOD1G93A mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp32 residue in the process. The results showed that Trp32 residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp32 residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1W32F mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp32 residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. PMID:25237191

  3. In vivo kinetic approach reveals slow SOD1 turnover in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Matthew J.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Reddy, Naveen C.; Chott, Robert; Self, Wade K.; Weihl, Conrad C.; Jockel-Balsarotti, Jennifer; Varadhachary, Arun S.; Bucelli, Robert C.; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Bateman, Randall J.; Miller, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies that target disease-associated transcripts are being developed for a variety of neurodegenerative syndromes. Protein levels change as a function of their half-life, a property that critically influences the timing and application of therapeutics. In addition, both protein kinetics and concentration may play important roles in neurodegeneration; therefore, it is essential to understand in vivo protein kinetics, including half-life. Here, we applied a stable isotope-labeling technique in combination with mass spectrometric detection and determined the in vivo kinetics of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), mutation of which causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Application of this method to human SOD1-expressing rats demonstrated that SOD1 is a long-lived protein, with a similar half-life in both the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and the CNS. Additionally, in these animals, the half-life of SOD1 was longest in the CNS when compared with other tissues. Evaluation of this method in human subjects demonstrated successful incorporation of the isotope label in the CSF and confirmed that SOD1 is a long-lived protein in the CSF of healthy individuals. Together, the results of this study provide important insight into SOD1 kinetics and support application of this technique to the design and implementation of clinical trials that target long-lived CNS proteins. PMID:26075819

  4. Accumulation and aggregate formation of mutant superoxide dismutase 1 in canine degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, S; Kobatake, Y; Suzuki, R; Tsukui, T; Kato, S; Yamato, O; Sakai, H; Urushitani, M; Maeda, S; Kamishina, H

    2015-09-10

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder that has recently been linked to mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. We generated a polyclonal antibody against canine SOD1 to further characterize the mutant SOD1 protein and its involvement in DM pathogenesis. This antibody (SYN3554) was highly specific to canine SOD1 and had the ability to reveal distinct cytoplasmic aggregates in cultured cells expressing canine mutant SOD1 and also in the spinal neurons of symptomatic homozygotes. A similar staining pattern was observed in asymptomatic homozygotes. SOD1 aggregates were not detected in the spinal neurons of heterozygotes; the accumulation of SOD1 was also detected in the reactive astrocytes of homozygotes and heterozygotes to a similar extent. Our results support the hypothesis that the cytoplasmic accumulation and aggregate formation of the mutant SOD1 protein, especially in astrocytes, are closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM. Therefore, this disease is regarded as a spontaneous large-animal model of SOD1-mediated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in humans. PMID:26162235

  5. Adeno Associated Viral Vector Delivered RNAi for Gene Therapy of SOD1 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Lorelei; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are a leading cause of ALS, responsible for up to 20% of familial cases. Although the exact mechanism by which mutant SOD1 causes disease remains unknown, multiple studies have shown that reduction of the mutant species leads to delayed disease onset and extension of lifespan of animal models. This makes SOD1 an ideal target for gene therapy coupling adeno associated virus vector (AAV) gene delivery with RNAi molecules. In this review we summarize the studies done thus far attempting to decrease SOD1 gene expression, using AAV vectors as delivery tools, and RNAi as therapeutic molecules. Current hurdles to be overcome, such as the need for widespread gene delivery through the entire central nervous system (CNS), are discussed. Continued efforts to improve current AAV delivery methods and capsids will accelerate the application of these therapeutics to the clinic. PMID:27531973

  6. Adeno Associated Viral Vector Delivered RNAi for Gene Therapy of SOD1 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Lorelei; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are a leading cause of ALS, responsible for up to 20% of familial cases. Although the exact mechanism by which mutant SOD1 causes disease remains unknown, multiple studies have shown that reduction of the mutant species leads to delayed disease onset and extension of lifespan of animal models. This makes SOD1 an ideal target for gene therapy coupling adeno associated virus vector (AAV) gene delivery with RNAi molecules. In this review we summarize the studies done thus far attempting to decrease SOD1 gene expression, using AAV vectors as delivery tools, and RNAi as therapeutic molecules. Current hurdles to be overcome, such as the need for widespread gene delivery through the entire central nervous system (CNS), are discussed. Continued efforts to improve current AAV delivery methods and capsids will accelerate the application of these therapeutics to the clinic. PMID:27531973

  7. Interaction between dimer interface residues of native and mutated SOD1 protein: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Keerthana, S P; Kolandaivel, P

    2015-04-01

    Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is a highly conserved bimetallic protein enzyme, used for the scavenging the superoxide radicals (O2 (-)) produced due to aerobic metabolism in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Over 100 mutations have been identified and found to be in the homodimeric structure of SOD1. The enzyme has to be maintained in its dimeric state for the structural stability and enzymatic activity. From our investigation, we found that the mutations apart from the dimer interface residues are found to affect the dimer stability of protein and hence enhancing the aggregation and misfolding tendency of mutated protein. The homodimeric state of SOD1 is found to be held together by the non-covalent interactions. The molecular dynamics simulation has been used to study the hydrogen bond interactions between the dimer interface residues of the monomers in native and mutated forms of SOD1 in apo- and holo-states. The results obtained by this analysis reveal the fact that the loss of hydrogen bond interactions between the monomers of the dimer is responsible for the reduced stability of the apo- and holo-mutant forms of SOD1. The conformers with dimer interface residues in native and mutated protein obtained by the molecular dynamics simulation is subjected to quantum mechanical study using M052X/6-31G(d) level of theory. The charge transfer between N-H···O interactions in the dimer interface residues were studied. The weak interaction between the monomers of the dimer accounts for the reduced dimerization and enhanced deformation energy in the mutated SOD1 protein. PMID:25578810

  8. HIV-TAT mediated protein transduction of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) protects skin cells from ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced skin injury remains a serious concern during radiotherapy. Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD, SOD1) is a conserved enzyme for scavenging superoxide radical in cells. Because of the integrity of cell membranes, exogenous molecule is not able to be incorporated into cells, which limited the application of natural SOD1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of HIV-TAT protein transduction domain mediated protein transduction of SOD1 (TAT-SOD1) against ionizing radiation. Methods The recombinant TAT-SOD1 and SOD1 were obtained by prokaryotic–based protein expression system. The transduction effect and biological activity of TAT-SOD1 was measured by immunofluorescence and antioxidant capability assays in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Mito-Tracker staining, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation assay, cell apoptosis analysis and malondialdehyde (MDA) assay were used to access the protective effect of TAT- SOD1. Results Uptake of TAT-SOD1 by HaCaT cells retained its biological activity. Compared with natural SOD1, the application of TAT-SOD1 significantly enhanced the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by X-ray irradiation. Moreover, TAT-SOD1 reduced ROS and preserved mitochondrial integrity after radiation exposure in HaCaT cells. Radiation-induced γH2AX foci, which are representative of DNA double strand breaks, were decreased by pretreatment with TAT-SOD1. Furthermore, subcutaneous application of TAT-SOD1 resulted in a significant decrease in 45 Gy electron beam-induced ROS and MDA concentration in the skins of rats. Conclusions This study provides evidences for the protective role of TAT-SOD1 in alleviating radiation-induced damage in HaCaT cells and rat skins, which suggests a new therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced skin injury. PMID:24175971

  9. Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle Fibers of SOD1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagahisa, Hiroshi; Okabe, Kazuma; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) knockout (KO) mice are known as an aging model in some aspects, but the damage and regeneration process of each fiber type have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, we investigated the damage and satellite cell state of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice (6 months old) using immunohistochemical staining and real-time RT-PCR. The proportion of central nuclei-containing Type IIx/b fibers in the deep and superficial portions of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly higher in SOD1 KO than control mice. The number of satellite cells per muscle fiber decreased in all muscle fiber types in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of Pax7 and myogenin, which are expressed in satellite cells in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation states, significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of SOD1 KO mice. Furthermore, mRNA of myosin heavy chain-embryonic, which is expressed in the early phase of muscle regeneration, significantly increased in SOD1 KO mice. It was suggested that muscle is damaged by reactive oxygen species produced in the mitochondrial intermembrane space in Type IIxb fibers, accelerating the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells through growth factors in SOD1 KO mice. PMID:26798428

  10. Strategies for stabilizing superoxide dismutase (SOD1), the protein destabilized in the most common form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Jared R.; Boggio, Kristin J.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Agar, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder characterized by the death of both upper and lower motor neurons and by 3- to 5-yr median survival postdiagnosis. The only US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for the treatment of ALS, Riluzole, has at best, moderate effect on patient survival and quality of life; therefore innovative approaches are needed to combat neurodegenerative disease. Some familial forms of ALS (fALS) have been linked to mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The dominant inheritance of mutant SOD1 and lack of symptoms in knockout mice suggest a “gain of toxic function” as opposed to a loss of function. A prevailing hypothesis for the mechanism of the toxicity of fALS-SOD1 variants, or the gain of toxic function, involves dimer destabilization and dissociation as an early step in SOD1 aggregation. Therefore, stabilizing the SOD1 dimer, thus preventing aggregation, is a potential therapeutic strategy. Here, we report a strategy in which we chemically cross-link the SOD1 dimer using two adjacent cysteine residues on each respective monomer (Cys111). Stabilization, measured as an increase in melting temperature, of ∼20 °C and ∼45 °C was observed for two mutants, G93A and G85R, respectively. This stabilization is the largest for SOD1, and to the best of our knowledge, for any disease-related protein. In addition, chemical cross-linking conferred activity upon G85R, an otherwise inactive mutant. These results demonstrate that targeting these cysteine residues is an important new strategy for development of ALS therapies. PMID:21098299

  11. Evolutionary Mutant Models for Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, R. Craig; Cresko, William; Detrich, H. William; Postlethwait, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although induced mutations in traditional laboratory animals have been valuable as models for human diseases, they have some important limitations. Here we propose a complementary approach to discover genes and mechanisms that might contribute to human disorders: the analysis of evolutionary mutant models whose adaptive phenotypes mimic maladaptive human diseases. If the type and mode of action of mutations favored by natural selection in wild populations are similar to those that contribute to human diseases, then studies in evolutionary mutant models have the potential to identify novel genetic factors and gene-by-environment interactions that affect human health and underlie human disease. PMID:19108930

  12. Apparent segregation distortion for the SOD1 mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, J.B.; Pericak-Vance, M.A.; Hentati, A.

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a short duration form onset to death. Approximately 15% of all ALS cases are familial. Of this a subset of families ({approximately}20%) are caused by mutations in the SOD1 gene on chromosome 21. The recent identification of SOD1 as the causative factor in a subset of families has enabled us to classify at-risk as well as symptomatic SOD1 mutation carriers in completed sibships. Our investigations suggest that the transmission of the SOD1 mutation from parent to child occurs substantially more often than 50% of the time. At the present time we have examined this phenomena in 17 SOD1/ALS families with mutations in exons 1 (N=6 families), 2 (N=2), 4 (N=8) and 5 (N=1). In fully ascertained sibships from a mutation-carrying parent, there were 318 offspring available for mutation evaluation. Of these, 195 were found to have the SOD1 mutation, while 123 were without the mutation. These data result in a segregation ratio of 0.61 [chi-square = 16.3, P<0.0001]. Analysis of the individual exon mutation types indicated that the majority of the distortion was occurring in the exon 4 mutation families [chi-square=13.4, p<0.001 vs. non-4, chi-square=4.97, p<0.05]. These findings are of interest in light of the recent report of meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus, a CTG repeat expansion, variable onset, neurological disorder on chromosome 19. Additional SOD1/ALS mutation families are presently under study and these data will be similarily evaluated. Future studies include the genotyping of human sperm specimens for SOD1 mutation-bearing males. The possibility that over 66% of children of a mutation carrier could inherit the mutation preferentially would dramatically alter the counseling risk in such families. These studies provide further evidence of the occurrence of segregation distortion in humans.

  13. Voltage-gated calcium channels are abnormal in cultured spinal motoneurons in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motoneurons. Hyperexcitability and excitotoxicity have been implicated in the early pathogenesis of ALS. Studies addressing excitotoxic motoneuron death and intracellular Ca(2+) overload have mostly focused on Ca(2+) influx through AMPA glutamate receptors. However, intrinsic excitability of motoneurons through voltage-gated ion channels may also have a role in the neurodegeneration. In this study we examined the function and localization of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in cultured spinal cord motoneurons from mice expressing a mutant form of human superoxide dismutase-1 with a Gly93→Ala substitution (G93A-SOD1). Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we showed that high voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) currents are increased in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, but low voltage activated Ca(2+) currents are not affected. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons also have altered persistent Ca(2+) current mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Quantitative single-cell RT-PCR revealed higher levels of Ca1a, Ca1b, Ca1c, and Ca1e subunit mRNA expression in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, indicating that the increase of HVA Ca(2+) currents may result from upregulation of Ca(2+) channel mRNA expression in motoneurons. The localizations of the Ca1B N-type and Ca1D L-type Ca(2+) channels in motoneurons were examined by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons had increased Ca1B channels on the plasma membrane of soma and dendrites. Ca1D channels are similar on the plasma membrane of soma and lower on the plasma membrane of dendrites of G93A-SOD1 motoneurons. Our study demonstrates that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels have aberrant functions and localizations in ALS mouse motoneurons. The increased HVA Ca(2+) currents and PCCa current could contribute to early pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27151771

  14. Motoneuron differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from SOD1G93A mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiao-Li; Ye, Cheng-Hui; Liu, Qiang; Wan, Jian-bo; Zhen, Jun; Xiang, Andy Peng; Li, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Yitao; Su, Huangxing; Lu, Xi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly affecting motor neurons. Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) account for about 20% of familial ALS patients. A robust supply of motoneurons carrying the mutated gene would help understand the causes of motoneuron death and develop new therapeutics for the disease. Here, we established induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from SOD1G93A mice and compared their potency in motoneuron generation with normal iPS cells and mouse embryonic stem cells (E14). Our results showed that iPS cells derived from SOD1G93A mice possessed the similar potency in neuronal differentiation to normal iPS cells and E14 cells and can be efficiently driven to motoneuron-like phenotype. These cells exhibited typical neuronal morphology, expressed key motoneuron markers, including ChAT and HB9, and generated repetitive trains of action potentials. Furthermore, these neurons highly expressed human SOD-1 and exhibited shorter neurites compared to controls. The present study provides evidence that ALS-iPS cells can be used as disease models in high-throughput screening and mechanistic studies due to their ability to efficiently differentiate into specific neuronal subtypes. PMID:23724084

  15. Canine degenerative myelopathy: biochemical characterization of superoxide dismutase 1 in the first naturally occurring non-human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Matthew J; Beckett, Jeffrey; Coates, Joan R; Miller, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in canine superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) have recently been shown to cause canine degenerative myelopathy, a disabling neurodegenerative disorder affecting specific breeds of dogs characterized by progressive motor neuron loss and paralysis until death, or more common, euthanasia. This discovery makes canine degenerative myelopathy the first and only naturally occurring non-human model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), closely paralleling the clinical, pathological, and genetic presentation of its human counterpart, SOD1-mediated familial ALS. To further understand the biochemical role that canine SOD1 plays in this disease and how it may be similar to human SOD1, we characterized the only two SOD1 mutations described in affected dogs to date, E40K and T18S. We show that a detergent-insoluble species of mutant SOD1 is present in spinal cords of affected dogs that increases with disease progression. Our in vitro results indicate that both canine SOD1 mutants form enzymatically active dimers, arguing against a loss of function in affected homozygous animals. Further studies show that these mutants, like most human SOD1 mutants, have an increased propensity to form aggregates in cell culture, with 10-20% of cells possessing visible aggregates. Creation of the E40K mutation in human SOD1 recapitulates the normal enzymatic activity but not the aggregation propensity seen with the canine mutant. Our findings lend strong biochemical support to the toxic role of SOD1 in canine degenerative myelopathy and establish close parallels for the role mutant SOD1 plays in both canine and human disorders. PMID:23707216

  16. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  17. Sertoli cells improve survival of motor neurons in SOD1 transgenic mice, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hemendinger, Richelle; Wang, Jay; Malik, Saafan; Persinski, Rafal; Copeland, Jane; Emerich, Dwaine; Gores, Paul; Halberstadt, Craig; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey

    2005-12-01

    Cell replacement therapy has been widely suggested as a treatment for multiple diseases including motor neuron disease. A variety of donor cells have been tested for treatment including isolated preparations from bone marrow and embryonic spinal cord. Another cell source, Sertoli cells, have been successfully used in models of diabetes, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. The ability of these cells to secrete cytoprotective proteins and their role as 'nurse cells' supporting the function of other cell types in the testes suggest their potential use as neuroprotective cells. The current study examines the ability of Sertoli cells injected into the parenchyma of the spinal cord to protect motor neurons in a mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Seventy transgenic mice expressing the mutant (G93A) human Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) received a unilateral spinal injection of Sertoli-enriched testicular cells into the L4-L5 ventral horn (1 x 10(5) cells total) prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. The animals were euthanized at the end stage of the disease. Histological and morphometric analyses of the transplant site were performed. A significant increase in the number of surviving ChAT positive motor neurons was found ipsilateral to the injection compared with contralateral and uninjected spinal cord. The ipsilateral increase in motor neuron density was dependent upon proximity to the injection site. Sections rostral or caudal to the injection site did not display a similar difference in motor neuron density. Implantation of a Sertoli-cell-enriched preparation has a significant neuroprotective benefit to vulnerable motor neurons in the SOD1 transgenic model. The therapeutic benefit may be the result of secreted neurotrophic factors present at a critical stage of motor neuron degeneration in this model. PMID:16242126

  18. Effect of neuroprotective drugs on gene expression in G93A/SOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Sheila; Moore, Dan H; Smith, Andrew P; Lee, Nancy M

    2005-08-01

    Gene expression analysis is a powerful tool that has been used to define the pathological processes underlying many diseases. Several laboratories, including our own, have used this approach to identify molecular abnormalities in the G93A/SOD1 mouse, an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we report the results of analysis of an expanded panel of genes throughout the entire lifetime in the spinal cord of these animals. In addition to upregulation of microglia/neuroinflammatory genes identified previously, we observed upregulation of metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I, MT-II). MT-I and MT-II play an important role in disposition of zinc ion, and other studies have also indicated their levels are altered in development of motor neuron disease in these animals. We also analyzed the effect on these expression profiles of several candidate drugs that have been shown to have neuroprotective effects in vivo or in vitro. That is, we asked whether administration to the G93A/SOD1 mice of any of these drugs could reverse the alterations in gene expression patterns that occur as the animals develop. The mice were given daily doses of these drugs when they were 9-11 weeks old, at a stage early in development of motor neuron disease, continuing for 5 weeks, at which time they were sacrificed. Treatment of the mice with l-carnosine, a dipeptide that scavenges free radicals and chelates zinc, did not affect expression of any of the genes altered in these animals. However, it did upregulate 3 genes unaffected by the presence of the G93A/SOD1 mutation: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (EAAT2). In contrast, metallothionein-III (MT-III) was downregulated. Treatment of the animals with baicalein, an herbal extract with anti-inflammatory and numerous other effects, downregulated the microglia markers CD68, CD80, and CD86, all of which were upregulated in untreated mutant animals. Baicalein

  19. Amino acids as biomarkers in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Bame, Monica; Grier, Robert E; Needleman, Richard; Brusilow, William S A

    2014-01-01

    The development of therapies for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) has been hindered by the lack of biomarkers for both identifying early disease and for monitoring the effectiveness of drugs. The identification of ALS biomarkers in presymptomatic individuals might also provide clues to the earliest biochemical correlates of the disease. Previous attempts to use plasma metabolites as biomarkers have led to contradictory results, presumably because of heterogeneity in both the underlying genetics and the disease stage in the clinical population. To eliminate these two sources of heterogeneity we have characterized plasma amino acids and other metabolites in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model for ALS. Presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice have significant differences in concentrations of several plasma metabolites compared to wild type animals, most notably in the concentrations of aspartate, cystine/cysteine, and phosphoethanolamine, and in changes indicative of methylation defects. There are significant changes in amino acid compositions between 50 and 70days of age in both the SOD1(G93A) and wild type mice, and several of the age-related and disease-related differences in metabolite concentration were also gender-specific. Many of the SOD1(G93A)-related differences could be altered by treatment of mice with methionine sulfoximine, which extends the lifespan of this mouse, inhibits glutamine synthetase, and modifies brain methylation reactions. These studies show that assaying plasma metabolites can effectively distinguish transgenic mice from wild type, suggesting that one or more plasma metabolites might be useful biomarkers for the disease in humans, especially if genetic and longitudinal analysis is used to reduce population heterogeneity. PMID:24129262

  20. The Disulfide Bond, but Not Zinc or Dimerization, Controls Initiation and Seeded Growth in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Madhuri; Nwadibia, Ekeoma; Strong, Cynthia D; Gralla, Edith Butler; Valentine, Joan Selverstone; Whitelegge, Julian P

    2015-12-18

    Aggregation of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a defining feature of familial ALS caused by inherited mutations in the sod1 gene, and misfolded and aggregated forms of wild-type SOD1 are found in both sporadic and familial ALS cases. Mature SOD1 owes its exceptional stability to a number of post-translational modifications as follows: formation of the intramolecular disulfide bond, binding of copper and zinc, and dimerization. Loss of stability due to the failure to acquire one or more of these modifications is proposed to lead to aggregation in vivo. Previously, we showed that the presence of apo-, disulfide-reduced SOD1, the most immature form of SOD1, results in initiation of fibrillation of more mature forms that have an intact Cys-57-Cys-146 disulfide bond and are partially metallated. In this study, we examine the ability of each of the above post-translational modifications to modulate fibril initiation and seeded growth. Cobalt or zinc binding, despite conferring great structural stability, neither inhibits the initiation propensity of disulfide-reduced SOD1 nor consistently protects disulfide-oxidized SOD1 from being recruited into growing fibrils across wild-type and a number of ALS mutants. In contrast, reduction of the disulfide bond, known to be necessary for fibril initiation, also allows for faster recruitment during seeded amyloid growth. These results identify separate factors that differently influence seeded growth and initiation and indicate a lack of correlation between the overall thermodynamic stability of partially mature SOD1 states and their ability to initiate fibrillation or be recruited by a growing fibril. PMID:26511321

  1. Rab1-dependent ER-Golgi transport dysfunction is a common pathogenic mechanism in SOD1, TDP-43 and FUS-associated ALS.

    PubMed

    Soo, Kai Y; Halloran, Mark; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Parakh, Sonam; Toth, Reka P; Southam, Katherine A; McLean, Catriona A; Lock, Peter; King, Anna; Farg, Manal A; Atkin, Julie D

    2015-11-01

    Several diverse proteins are linked genetically/pathologically to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) including SOD1, TDP-43 and FUS. Using a variety of cellular and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that ALS-associated mutant TDP-43, FUS and SOD1 inhibit protein transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus in neuronal cells. ER-Golgi transport was also inhibited in embryonic cortical and motor neurons obtained from a widely used animal model (SOD1(G93A) mice), validating this mechanism as an early event in disease. Each protein inhibited transport by distinct mechanisms, but each process was dependent on Rab1. Mutant TDP-43 and mutant FUS both inhibited the incorporation of secretory protein cargo into COPII vesicles as they bud from the ER, and inhibited transport from ER to the ER-Golgi intermediate (ERGIC) compartment. TDP-43 was detected on the cytoplasmic face of the ER membrane, whereas FUS was present within the ER, suggesting that transport is inhibited from the cytoplasm by mutant TDP-43, and from the ER by mutant FUS. In contrast, mutant SOD1 destabilised microtubules and inhibited transport from the ERGIC compartment to Golgi, but not from ER to ERGIC. Rab1 performs multiple roles in ER-Golgi transport, and over-expression of Rab1 restored ER-Golgi transport, and prevented ER stress, mSOD1 inclusion formation and induction of apoptosis, in cells expressing mutant TDP-43, FUS or SOD1. Rab1 also co-localised extensively with mutant TDP-43, FUS and SOD1 in neuronal cells, and Rab1 formed inclusions in motor neurons of spinal cords from sporadic ALS patients, which were positive for ubiquitinated TDP-43, implying that Rab1 is misfolded and dysfunctional in sporadic disease. These results demonstrate that ALS-mutant forms of TDP-43, FUS, and SOD1 all perturb protein transport in the early secretory pathway, between ER and Golgi compartments. These data also imply that restoring Rab1-mediated ER

  2. Genome-wide association analysis reveals a SOD1 mutation in canine degenerative myelopathy that resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Awano, Tomoyuki; Johnson, Gary S; Wade, Claire M; Katz, Martin L; Johnson, Gayle C; Taylor, Jeremy F; Perloski, Michele; Biagi, Tara; Baranowska, Izabella; Long, Sam; March, Philip A; Olby, Natasha J; Shelton, G Diane; Khan, Shahnawaz; O'Brien, Dennis P; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Coates, Joan R

    2009-02-24

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease prevalent in several dog breeds. Typically, the initial progressive upper motor neuron spastic and general proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs occurs at 8 years of age or older. If euthanasia is delayed, the clinical signs will ascend, causing flaccid tetraparesis and other lower motor neuron signs. DNA samples from 38 DM-affected Pembroke Welsh corgi cases and 17 related clinically normal controls were used for genome-wide association mapping, which produced the strongest associations with markers on CFA31 in a region containing the canine SOD1 gene. SOD1 was considered a regional candidate gene because mutations in human SOD1 can cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an adult-onset fatal paralytic neurodegenerative disease with both upper and lower motor neuron involvement. The resequencing of SOD1 in normal and affected dogs revealed a G to A transition, resulting in an E40K missense mutation. Homozygosity for the A allele was associated with DM in 5 dog breeds: Pembroke Welsh corgi, Boxer, Rhodesian ridgeback, German Shepherd dog, and Chesapeake Bay retriever. Microscopic examination of spinal cords from affected dogs revealed myelin and axon loss affecting the lateral white matter and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions that bind anti-superoxide dismutase 1 antibodies. These inclusions are similar to those seen in spinal cord sections from ALS patients with SOD1 mutations. Our findings identify canine DM to be the first recognized spontaneously occurring animal model for ALS. PMID:19188595

  3. Enhancing mitochondrial calcium buffering capacity reduces aggregation of misfolded SOD1 and motor neuron cell death without extending survival in mouse models of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Han, Joo Seok; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Vetto, Anne P; Lee, Sandra K; Tseng, Eva; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-03-13

    Mitochondria have been proposed as targets for toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, fatal adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons. A decrease in the capacity of spinal cord mitochondria to buffer calcium (Ca(2+)) has been observed in mice expressing ALS-linked mutants of SOD1 that develop motor neuron disease with many of the key pathological hallmarks seen in ALS patients. In mice expressing three different ALS-causing SOD1 mutants, we now test the contribution of the loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+)-buffering capacity to disease mechanism(s) by eliminating ubiquitous expression of cyclophilin D, a critical regulator of Ca(2+)-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore that determines mitochondrial Ca(2+) content. A chronic increase in mitochondrial buffering of Ca(2+) in the absence of cyclophilin D was maintained throughout disease course and was associated with improved mitochondrial ATP synthesis, reduced mitochondrial swelling, and retention of normal morphology. This was accompanied by an attenuation of glial activation, reduction in levels of misfolded SOD1 aggregates in the spinal cord, and a significant suppression of motor neuron death throughout disease. Despite this, muscle denervation, motor axon degeneration, and disease progression and survival were unaffected, thereby eliminating mutant SOD1-mediated loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering capacity, altered mitochondrial morphology, motor neuron death, and misfolded SOD1 aggregates, as primary contributors to disease mechanism for fatal paralysis in these models of familial ALS. PMID:23486940

  4. The SOD1 transgene expressed in erythroid cells alleviates fatal phenotype in congenic NZB/NZW-F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Noriyuki; Konno, Tasuku; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Saori; Lee, Jaeyong; Okada, Futoshi; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Homma, Takujiro; Fujii, Junichi

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress due to a superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) deficiency causes anemia and autoimmune responses, which are phenotypically similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in C57BL/6 mice and aggravates AIHA pathogenesis in New Zealand black (NZB) mice. We report herein on an evaluation of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a model mouse with inherited SLE, that is, F1 mice of the NZB × New Zealand white (NZW) strain. The ROS levels within red blood cells (RBCs) of the F1 mice were similar to the NZW mice but lower compared to the NZB mice throughout adult period. Regarding SLE pathogenesis, we examined the effects of an SOD1 deficiency or the overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells by establishing corresponding congenic F1 mice. A SOD1 deficiency caused an elevation in ROS production, methemoglobin content, and hyperoxidation of peroxiredoxin in RBC of the F1 mice, which were all consistent with elevated oxidative stress. However, while the overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells extended the life span of the congenic F1 mice, the SOD1 deficiency had no effect on life span compared to wild-type F1 mice. It is generally recognized that NZW mice possess a larval defect in the immune system and that NZB mice trigger an autoimmune reaction in the F1 mice. Our results suggest that the oxidative insult originated from the NZB mouse background has a functional role in triggering an aberrant immune reaction, leading to fatal responses in F1 mice. PMID:27080108

  5. Wild-type Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase stabilizes mutant variants by heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Anna; Besemer, Anna S; Liebl, Martina; Hellmann, Nadja; Koziollek-Drechsler, Ingrid; Ip, Philbert; Decker, Heinz; Robertson, Janice; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Behl, Christian; Clement, Albrecht M

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are responsible for a subset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases presumably by the acquisition of as yet unknown toxic properties. Additional overexpression of wild-type SOD1 in mutant SOD1 transgenic mice did not improve but rather accelerated the disease course. Recently, it was documented that the presence of wild-type SOD1 (SOD(WT)) reduced the aggregation propensity of mutant SOD1 by the formation of heterodimers between mutant and SOD1(WT) and that these heterodimers displayed at least a similar toxicity in cellular and animal models. In this study we investigated the biochemical and biophysical properties of obligate SOD1 dimers that were connected by a peptide linker. Circular dichroism spectra indicate an increased number of unstructured residues in SOD1 mutants. However, SOD1(WT) stabilized the folding of heterodimers compared to mutant homodimers as evidenced by an increase in resistance against proteolytic degradation. Heterodimerization also reduced the affinity of mutant SOD1 to antibodies detecting misfolded SOD1. In addition, the formation of obligate dimers resulted in a detection of substantial dismutase activity even of the relatively labile SOD1(G85R) mutant. These data indicate that soluble, dismutase-active SOD1 dimers might contribute at least partially to mutant SOD1 toxicity. PMID:24200866

  6. Genetic Biomarkers for ALS Disease in Transgenic SOD1G93A Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Ana C.; Manzano, Raquel; Atencia-Cibreiro, Gabriela; Oliván, Sara; Muñoz, María J.; Zaragoza, Pilar; Cordero-Vázquez, Pilar; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; García-Redondo, Alberto; Osta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of both familial and sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are unknown, although growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle tissue is a primary target of ALS toxicity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed on transgenic SOD1G93A mice, a mouse model of ALS, to determine genetic biomarkers of disease longevity. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane, and three biopsy samples were obtained per animal at the three main stages of the disease. Transcriptional expression levels of seventeen genes, Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbxo32, Gsr, Impa1, Mef2c, Mt2, Myf5, Myod1, Myog, Nnt, Nogo A, Pax7, Rrad, Sln and Snx10, were tested in each muscle biopsy sample. Total RNA was extracted using TRIzol Reagent according to the manufacturer's protocol, and variations in gene expression were assayed by real-time PCR for all of the samples. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the linear correlation between transcriptional expression levels throughout disease progression and longevity. Consistent with the results obtained from total skeletal muscle of transgenic SOD1G93A mice and 74-day-old denervated mice, five genes (Mef2c, Gsr, Col19a1, Calm1 and Snx10) could be considered potential genetic biomarkers of longevity in transgenic SOD1G93A mice. These results are important because they may lead to the exploration of previously unexamined tissues in the search for new disease biomarkers and even to the application of these findings in human studies. PMID:22412900

  7. The WldS gene modestly prolongs survival in the SOD1G93A fALS mouse.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lindsey R; Culver, Deborah G; Davis, Albert A; Tennant, Philip; Wang, Minsheng; Coleman, Michael; Asress, Seneshaw; Adalbert, Robert; Alexander, Guillermo M; Glass, Jonathan D

    2005-01-01

    The "slow Wallerian degeneration" (Wld(S)) gene is neuroprotective in numerous models of axonal degeneration. Axonal degeneration is an early feature of disease progression in the SOD1G93A mouse, a widely used model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). We crossed the Wld(S) mouse with the SOD1G93A mouse to investigate whether the Wld(S) gene could prolong survival and modify neuropathology in these mice. SOD/Wld(S) mice showed levels of motor axon loss similar to that seen in SOD1G93A mice. The presence of the Wld(S) gene, however, modestly prolonged survival and delayed denervation at the neuromuscular junction. Prolonged survival was more prominent in female mice and did not depend on whether animals were heterozygous or homozygous for the Wld(S) gene. We also report that SOD1G93A mice show significant degeneration of sensory axons during the course of disease, supporting previous data from humans demonstrating that ALS is not purely a motor disorder. PMID:15837585

  8. Aggregation-triggering segments of SOD1 fibril formation support a common pathway for familial and sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Magdalena I; Sievers, Stuart A; Guenther, Elizabeth L; Johnson, Lisa M; Winkler, Duane D; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Sawaya, Michael R; Hart, P John; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-01

    ALS is a terminal disease of motor neurons that is characterized by accumulation of proteinaceous deposits in affected cells. Pathological deposition of mutated Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) accounts for ∼20% of the familial ALS (fALS) cases. However, understanding the molecular link between mutation and disease has been difficult, given that more than 140 different SOD1 mutants have been observed in fALS patients. In addition, the molecular origin of sporadic ALS (sALS) is unclear. By dissecting the amino acid sequence of SOD1, we identified four short segments with a high propensity for amyloid fibril formation. We find that fALS mutations in these segments do not reduce their propensity to form fibrils. The atomic structures of two fibril-forming segments from the C terminus, (101)DSVISLS(107) and (147)GVIGIAQ(153), reveal tightly packed β-sheets with steric zipper interfaces characteristic of the amyloid state. Based on these structures, we conclude that both C-terminal segments are likely to form aggregates if available for interaction. Proline substitutions in (101)DSVISLS(107) and (147)GVIGIAQ(153) impaired nucleation and fibril growth of full-length protein, confirming that these segments participate in aggregate formation. Our hypothesis is that improper protein maturation and incompletely folded states that render these aggregation-prone segments available for interaction offer a common molecular pathway for sALS and fALS. PMID:24344300

  9. Aggregation-triggering segments of SOD1 fibril formation support a common pathway for familial and sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Sievers, Stuart A.; Guenther, Elizabeth L.; Johnson, Lisa M.; Winkler, Duane D.; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Sawaya, Michael R.; Hart, P. John; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    ALS is a terminal disease of motor neurons that is characterized by accumulation of proteinaceous deposits in affected cells. Pathological deposition of mutated Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) accounts for ∼20% of the familial ALS (fALS) cases. However, understanding the molecular link between mutation and disease has been difficult, given that more than 140 different SOD1 mutants have been observed in fALS patients. In addition, the molecular origin of sporadic ALS (sALS) is unclear. By dissecting the amino acid sequence of SOD1, we identified four short segments with a high propensity for amyloid fibril formation. We find that fALS mutations in these segments do not reduce their propensity to form fibrils. The atomic structures of two fibril-forming segments from the C terminus, 101DSVISLS107 and 147GVIGIAQ153, reveal tightly packed β-sheets with steric zipper interfaces characteristic of the amyloid state. Based on these structures, we conclude that both C-terminal segments are likely to form aggregates if available for interaction. Proline substitutions in 101DSVISLS107 and 147GVIGIAQ153 impaired nucleation and fibril growth of full-length protein, confirming that these segments participate in aggregate formation. Our hypothesis is that improper protein maturation and incompletely folded states that render these aggregation-prone segments available for interaction offer a common molecular pathway for sALS and fALS. PMID:24344300

  10. Soma size and Cav1.3 channel expression in vulnerable and resistant motoneuron populations of the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Shoenfeld, Liza; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Fisher, Erika; Quinlan, Katharina A.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Powers, Randall K.; Heckman, Charles J.; Binder, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although the loss of motoneurons is an undisputed feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in man and in its animal models (SOD1 mutant mice), how the disease affects the size and excitability of motoneurons prior to their degeneration is not well understood. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that motoneurons in mutant SOD1G93A mice exhibit an enlargement of soma size (i.e., cross‐sectional area) and an increase in Cav1.3 channel expression at postnatal day 30, well before the manifestation of physiological symptoms that typically occur at p90 (Chiu et al. 1995). We made measurements of spinal and hypoglossal motoneurons vulnerable to degeneration, as well as motoneurons in the oculomotor nucleus that are resistant to degeneration. Overall, we found that the somata of motoneurons in male SOD1G93A mutants were larger than those in wild‐type transgenic males. When females were included in the two groups, significance was lost. Expression levels of the Cav1.3 channels were not differentiated by genotype, sex, or any interaction of the two. These results raise the intriguing possibility of an interaction between male sex steroid hormones and the SOD1 mutation in the etiopathogenesis of ALS. PMID:25107988

  11. Comparative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histopathological Correlates in Two SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Micotti, Edoardo; Paladini, Alessandra; Merlino, Giuseppe; Plebani, Laura; Forloni, Gianluigi; Modo, Michel; Bendotti, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal disease due to motoneuron degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming a promising non-invasive approach to monitor the disease course but a direct correlation with neuropathology is not feasible in human. Therefore in this study we aimed to examine MRI changes in relation to histopathology in two mouse models of ALS (C57BL6/J and 129S2/SvHsd SOD1G93A mice) with different disease onset and progression. A longitudinal in vivo analysis of T2 maps, compared to ex vivo histological changes, was performed on cranial motor nuclei. An increased T2 value was associated with a significant tissue vacuolization that occurred prior to motoneuron loss in the cranial nuclei of C57 SOD1G93A mice. Conversely, in 129Sv SOD1G93A mice, which exhibit a more severe phenotype, MRI detected a milder increase of T2 value, associated with a milder vacuolization. This suggests that alteration within brainstem nuclei is not predictive of a more severe phenotype in the SOD1G93A mouse model. Using an ex vivo paradigm, Diffusion Tensor Imaging was also applied to study white matter spinal cord degeneration. In contrast to degeneration of cranial nuclei, alterations in white matter and axons loss reflected the different disease phenotype of SOD1G93A mice. The correspondence between MRI and histology further highlights the potential of MRI to monitor progressive motoneuron and axonal degeneration non-invasively in vivo. The identification of prognostic markers of the disease nevertheless requires validation in multiple models of ALS to ensure that these are not merely model-specific. Eventually this approach has the potential to lead to the development of robust and validated non-invasive imaging biomarkers in ALS patients, which may help to monitor the efficacy of therapies. PMID:26132656

  12. Comparative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histopathological Correlates in Two SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Ilaria; Micotti, Edoardo; Paladini, Alessandra; Merlino, Giuseppe; Plebani, Laura; Forloni, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal disease due to motoneuron degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming a promising non-invasive approach to monitor the disease course but a direct correlation with neuropathology is not feasible in human. Therefore in this study we aimed to examine MRI changes in relation to histopathology in two mouse models of ALS (C57BL6/J and 129S2/SvHsd SOD1G93A mice) with different disease onset and progression. A longitudinal in vivo analysis of T2 maps, compared to ex vivo histological changes, was performed on cranial motor nuclei. An increased T2 value was associated with a significant tissue vacuolization that occurred prior to motoneuron loss in the cranial nuclei of C57 SOD1G93A mice. Conversely, in 129Sv SOD1G93A mice, which exhibit a more severe phenotype, MRI detected a milder increase of T2 value, associated with a milder vacuolization. This suggests that alteration within brainstem nuclei is not predictive of a more severe phenotype in the SOD1G93A mouse model. Using an ex vivo paradigm, Diffusion Tensor Imaging was also applied to study white matter spinal cord degeneration. In contrast to degeneration of cranial nuclei, alterations in white matter and axons loss reflected the different disease phenotype of SOD1G93A mice. The correspondence between MRI and histology further highlights the potential of MRI to monitor progressive motoneuron and axonal degeneration non-invasively in vivo. The identification of prognostic markers of the disease nevertheless requires validation in multiple models of ALS to ensure that these are not merely model-specific. Eventually this approach has the potential to lead to the development of robust and validated non-invasive imaging biomarkers in ALS patients, which may help to monitor the efficacy of therapies. PMID:26132656

  13. Characterization of early pathogenesis in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS: part I, background and methods

    PubMed Central

    Vinsant, Sharon; Mansfield, Carol; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Del Gaizo Moore, Victoria; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Hampton, Thomas G; Prevette, David; Caress, James; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Milligan, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Charcot first described amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 1869; however, its causes remain largely unknown and effective, long-term treatment strategies are not available. The first mouse model of ALS was developed after the identification of mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene in 1993, and accordingly most of our knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease comes from studies carried out using this animal model. Although numerous preclinical trials have been conducted in the mutant SOD1 mouse models, the results have been disappointing because they did not positively translate to clinical trials. One explanation may be that current understanding of when and where pathogenesis begins is insufficient to accurately guide preclinical trials. Further characterization of these early events may provide insight into disease onset, help in the discovery of presymptomatic diagnostic disease markers, and identify novel therapeutic targets. Here, we describe the rationale, approach, and methods for our extensive analysis of early changes that included an ultrastructural examination of central and peripheral components of the neuromuscular system in the SOD1G93A mouse and correlated these alterations with early muscle denervation, motor dysfunction, and motoneuron death. We also provide a discussion of published work to review what is known regarding early pathology in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS. The significance of this work is that we have examined early pathology simultaneously in both the spinal cord and peripheral neuromuscular system, and the results are presented in the companion paper (Part II, Results and Discussion). Our results provide evidence as to why a thorough characterization of animal models throughout the life span is critical for a strong foundation to design preclinical trials that may produce meaningful results. PMID:24381807

  14. Reduced net charge and heterogeneity of pI isoforms in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutants of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Roudeau, Stéphane; Chevreux, Sylviane; Carmona, Asuncion; Ortega, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) are related to mutations of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Aggregation of SOD1 plays a central role in the pathogenesis of fALS and altered metallation of SOD1 mutants could be involved in this process. Using IEF gel electrophoresis under non-denaturating conditions and particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis, we studied the pI distribution and metallation status of fALS SOD1 mutants (A4V, G93A, D125H) compared to human wild-type (hWT). SOD1 fALS mutants are characterized by a variable number of isoforms and higher pI compared to hWT, reflecting a reduced net charge that might explain their greater propensity to precipitation and aggregation. Cu/Zn ratios were slightly different for the predominant expressed isoforms of A4V, G93A, and D125H mutants compared to hWT. Differences in metallation were observed within each genotype, the more basic isoforms exhibiting lower Cu/Zn ratios. Moreover, we revealed the existence of a pool of fALS mutants SOD1 pI isoforms, slightly expressed (<10%), with a low Cu/Zn ratio and high pI values. Overall, IEF-PIXE results suggest that the toxicity of SOD1 mutants should be studied at the pI isoform level with a particular attention to the species with the lowest charges. PMID:26084641

  15. Aggregated α-Synuclein Increases SOD1 Oligomerization in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Koch, Yvonne; Helferich, Anika M; Steinacker, Petra; Oeckl, Patrick; Walther, Paul; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Danzer, Karin M; Otto, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Aggregation of misfolded disease-related proteins is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregate propagation accompanying disease progression has been demonstrated for different proteins (eg, for α-synuclein). Additional evidence supports aggregate cross-seeding activity for α-synuclein. For mutated superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), self-propagation of aggregation and cell-to-cell transmission have been demonstrated in vitro. However, there is a prominent lack of in vivo data concerning aggregation and cross-aggregation processes of SOD1. We analyzed the effect of α-synuclein and SOD1 seeds in cell culture using protein fragment complementation assay and intracerebral injection of α-synuclein and SOD1 seeds into SOD1(G93A) transgenic ALS mice. Survival of injected mice was determined, and SOD1 aggregates in the facial nuclei were quantified during disease course. We found that α-synuclein preformed fibrils increased the oligomerization rate of SOD1 in vivo and in vitro, whereas aggregated SOD1 did not exert any effect in both experimental setups. Notably, survival of ALS mice was not changed after inoculation of preformed fibrils. We conclude that misfolded α-synuclein can increase SOD1 aggregation and suppose that α-synuclein seeds are transported from the temporal cortex to the facial nuclei. However, unlike other proteins, the further enhancement of a self-aggregation process by additional SOD1 could not be confirmed in our models. PMID:27322773

  16. Monoaminergic control of spinal locomotor networks in SOD1G93A newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Milan, Léa; Barrière, Grégory; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene that encodes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are the cause of approximately 20% of familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. While ALS symptoms appear in adulthood, spinal motoneurons exhibit functional alterations as early as the embryonic and postnatal stages in the murine model of ALS, the SOD1 mice. Monoaminergic - i.e., dopaminergic (DA), serotoninergic (5-HT), and noradrenergic (NA) - pathways powerfully control spinal networks and contribute significantly to their embryonic and postnatal maturation. Alterations in monoaminergic neuromodulation during development could therefore lead to impairments in the motoneuronal physiology. In this study, we sought to determine whether the monoaminergic spinal systems are modified in the early stages of development in SOD1 mice. Using a post-mortem analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), monoaminergic neuromodulators and their metabolites were quantified in the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1 and wild-type (WT) mice aged one postnatal day (P1) and P10. This analysis underscores an increased content of DA in the SOD1 lumbar spinal cord compared to that of WT mice but failed to reveal any modification of the other monoaminergic contents. In a next step, we compared the efficiency of the monoaminergic compounds in triggering and modulating fictive locomotion in WT and SOD1 mice. This study was performed in P1-P3 SOD1 mice and age-matched control littermates using extracellular recordings from the lumbar ventral roots in the in vitro isolated spinal cord preparation. This analysis revealed that the spinal networks of SOD1(G93A) mice could generate normal locomotor activity in the presence of NMA-5-HT. Interestingly, we also observed that SOD1 spinal networks have an increased sensitivity to NA compared to WT spinal circuits but exhibited similar DA responses. PMID:25071458

  17. Altered calcium homeostasis in spinal motoneurons but not in oculomotor neurons of SOD-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Siklós, L; Engelhardt, J I; Reaume, A G; Scott, R W; Adalbert, R; Obál, I; Appel, S H

    2000-05-01

    SOD-1-deficient mice demonstrate no loss of motoneurons but are still vulnerable to axotomy and ischemic insults. To investigate possible reasons for vulnerability of motoneuron populations, we studied changes in ultrastructural calcium distribution during maturation in spinal- and oculomotor neurons in SOD-1(-/-) mice. Between 3 and 11 months the cytoplasmic component of the intracellular calcium changed at a lower rate in spinal motoneurons and motor axon terminals in the interosseus muscle of SOD-1(-/-) animals compared to wild-type controls. No such dissimilarities were noted in the oculomotor system, or in mitochondrial calcium contents of either cell type. These data suggest that the lack of SOD-1 may be associated with vulnerability to insult by depletion of non-mitochondrial calcium stores selectively in motoneurons lacking parvalbumin and/or calbindin D28K. PMID:10805095

  18. Genetic Disruption of SOD1 Gene Causes Glucose Intolerance and Impairs β-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Salmon, Adam B.; Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Li, Mengyao; Balas, Bogdan; Guardado-Mendoza, Rodolfo; Giaccari, Andrea; Reddick, Robert L.; Reyna, Sara M.; Weir, Gordon; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Van Remmen, Holly; Musi, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, it is not clear whether oxidative damage is a cause or a consequence of the metabolic abnormalities present in diabetic subjects. The goal of this study was to determine whether inducing oxidative damage through genetic ablation of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) leads to abnormalities in glucose homeostasis. We studied SOD1-null mice and wild-type (WT) littermates. Glucose tolerance was evaluated with intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity was quantitated with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. β-Cell function was determined with the hyperglycemic clamp and morphometric analysis of pancreatic islets. Genetic ablation of SOD1 caused glucose intolerance, which was associated with reduced in vivo β-cell insulin secretion and decreased β-cell volume. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not significantly altered in SOD1-null mice. High-fat diet caused glucose intolerance in WT mice but did not further worsen the glucose intolerance observed in standard chow–fed SOD1-null mice. Our findings suggest that oxidative stress per se does not play a major role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and demonstrate that oxidative stress caused by SOD1 ablation leads to glucose intolerance secondary to β-cell dysfunction. PMID:24009256

  19. Genetic analysis and SOD1 mutation screening in Iranian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afagh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Rohani, Mohammad; Zamani, Babak; Sedighi, Behnaz; Shamshiri, Hosein; Fan, Jian-Bing; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2013-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease, and the most common in European populations. Results of genetic analysis and mutation screening of SOD1 in a cohort of 60 Iranian ALS patients are here reported. Initially, linkage analysis in 4 families identified a disease-linked locus that included the known ALS gene, SOD1. Screening of SOD1 identified homozygous p.Asp90Ala causing mutations in all the linked families. Haplotype analysis suggests that the p.Asp90Ala alleles in the Iranian patients might share a common founder with the renowned Scandinavian recessive p.Asp90Ala allele. Subsequent screening in all the patients resulted in identification of 3 other mutations in SOD1, including p.Leu84Phe in the homozygous state. Phenotypic features of the mutation-bearing patients are presented. SOD1 mutations were found in 11.7% of the cohort, 38.5% of the familial ALS probands, and 4.25% of the sporadic ALS cases. SOD1 mutations contribute significantly to ALS among Iranians. PMID:23062701

  20. SOD1A4V-mediated ALS: absence of a closely linked modifier gene and origination in Asia.

    PubMed

    Broom, W J; Johnson, D V; Auwarter, K E; Iafrate, A J; Russ, C; Al-Chalabi, A; Sapp, P C; McKenna-Yasek, D; Andersen, P M; Brown, R H

    2008-01-17

    Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) accounts for 10% of all ALS. Approximately 20% of cases are due to mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1). In North America, SOD1(A4V) is the most common SOD1 mutation. Carriers of the SOD1(A4V) mutation share a common phenotype with rapid disease progression and death on average occurring at 1.4 years (versus 3-5 years with other dominant SOD1 mutations). Previous studies of SOD1(A4V) carriers identified a common haplotype around the SOD1 locus, suggesting a common founder for most SOD1(A4V) patients. In the current study we sequenced the entire common haplotypic region around SOD1 to test the hypothesis that polymorphisms in either previously undescribed coding regions or non-coding regions around SOD1 are responsible for the more aggressive phenotype in SOD1(A4V)-mediated ALS. We narrowed the conserved region around the SOD1 gene in SOD1(A4V) ALS to 2.8Kb and identified five novel SNPs therein. None of these variants was specifically found in all SOD1(A4V) patients. It therefore appears likely that the aggressive nature of the SOD1(A4V) mutation is not a result of a modifying factor within the region around the SOD1 gene. Founder analysis estimates that the A4V mutation occurred 540 generations (approximately 12,000 years) ago (95% CI 480-700). The conserved minimal haplotype is statistically more similar to Asian than European population DNA sets, suggesting that the A4V mutation arose in native Asian-Americans who reached the Americas through the Bering Strait. PMID:18055113

  1. SOD1 (Copper/Zinc Superoxide Dismutase) Deficiency Drives Amyloid β Protein Oligomerization and Memory Loss in Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kazuma; Murata, Nakaba; Noda, Yoshihiro; Tahara, Shoichi; Kaneko, Takao; Kinoshita, Noriaki; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Barnham, Kevin J.; Irie, Kazuhiro; Shirasawa, Takuji; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is closely linked to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. Soluble amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers cause cognitive impairment and synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the relationship between oligomers, oxidative stress, and their localization during disease progression is uncertain. Our previous study demonstrated that mice deficient in cytoplasmic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD, SOD1) have features of drusen formation, a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (Imamura, Y., Noda, S., Hashizume, K., Shinoda, K., Yamaguchi, M., Uchiyama, S., Shimizu, T., Mizushima, Y., Shirasawa, T., and Tsubota, K. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 11282–11287). Amyloid assembly has been implicated as a common mechanism of plaque and drusen formation. Here, we show that Sod1 deficiency in an amyloid precursor protein-overexpressing mouse model (AD mouse, Tg2576) accelerated Aβ oligomerization and memory impairment as compared with control AD mouse and that these phenomena were basically mediated by oxidative damage. The increased plaque and neuronal inflammation were accompanied by the generation of Nϵ-carboxymethyl lysine in advanced glycation end products, a rapid marker of oxidative damage, induced by Sod1 gene-dependent reduction. The Sod1 deletion also caused Tau phosphorylation and the lower levels of synaptophysin. Furthermore, the levels of SOD1 were significantly decreased in human AD patients rather than non-AD age-matched individuals, but mitochondrial SOD (Mn-SOD, SOD2) and extracellular SOD (CuZn-SOD, SOD3) were not. These findings suggest that cytoplasmic superoxide radical plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of AD. Activation of Sod1 may be a therapeutic strategy for the inhibition of AD progression. PMID:22072713

  2. Acute intermittent hypoxia induced phrenic long-term facilitation despite increased SOD1 expression in a rat model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Nicole L; Satriotomo, Irawan; Harrigan, Daniel J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor neuron death. Since most ALS patients succumb to ventilatory failure from loss of respiratory motor neurons, any effective ALS treatment must preserve and/or restore breathing capacity. In rats over-expressing mutated super-oxide dismutase-1 (SOD1(G93A)), the capacity to increase phrenic motor output is decreased at disease end-stage, suggesting imminent ventilatory failure. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF), a form of spinal respiratory motor plasticity with potential to restore phrenic motor output in clinical disorders that compromise breathing. Since pLTF requires NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, it is blocked by NADPH oxidase inhibition and SOD mimetics in normal rats. Thus, we hypothesized that SOD1(G93A) (mutant; MT) rats do not express AIH-induced pLTF due to over-expression of active mutant superoxide dismutase-1. AIH-induced pLTF and hypoglossal (XII) LTF were assessed in young, pre-symptomatic and end-stage anesthetized MT rats and age-matched wild-type littermates. Contrary to predictions, pLTF and XII LTF were observed in MT rats at all ages; at end-stage, pLTF was actually enhanced. SOD1 levels were elevated in young and pre-symptomatic MT rats, yet superoxide accumulation in putative phrenic motor neurons (assessed with dihydroethidium) was unchanged; however, superoxide accumulation significantly decreased at end-stage. Thus, compensatory mechanisms appear to maintain ROS homoeostasis until late in disease progression, preserving AIH-induced respiratory plasticity. Following intrathecal injections of an NADPH oxidase inhibitor (apocynin; 600 μM; 12 μL), pLTF was abolished in pre-symptomatic, but not end-stage MT rats, demonstrating that pLTF is NADPH oxidase dependent in pre-symptomatic, but NADPH oxidase independent in end-stage MT rats. Mechanisms

  3. Polymorphism of the SOD1-DNA aggregation species can be modulated by DNA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Yin, Jun; Liu, Liang; Wang, Li; Liu, Changlin

    2008-12-01

    Proteinaceous aggregates rich in copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) have been found in both in vivo and in vitro models. We have shown that double-stranded DNA that acts as a template accelerates the in vitro formation of wild-type SOD1 aggregates. Here, we examined the polymorphism of templated-SOD1 aggregates generated in vitro upon association with DNA under different conditions. Electron microscopy imaging indicates that this polymorphism is capable of being manipulated by the shapes, structures, and doses of the DNAs tested. The nanometer- and micrometer-scale aggregates formed under acidic conditions and under neutral conditions containing ascorbate fall into three classes: aggregate monomers, oligomeric aggregates, and macroaggregates. The aggregate monomers observed at given DNA doses exhibit a polymorphism that is markedly corresponded to the coiled shapes of linear DNA and structures of plasmid DNA. On the other hand, the regularly branched structures observed under both atomic force microscopy and optical microscope indicate that the DNAs tested are simultaneously condensed into a nanoparticle with a specific morphology during SOD1 aggregation, revealing that SOD1 aggregation and DNA condensation are two concurrent phenomena. The results might provide the basis of therapeutic approaches to suppress the formation of toxic protein oligomers or aggregates by screening the toxicity of the protein aggregates with various sizes and morphologies. PMID:18690666

  4. Caspase 6 has a protective role in SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Marion C; Mitchem, Mollie R; König, Hans-Georg; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2016-06-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), it has been suggested that the process of neurodegeneration starts at the neuromuscular junction and is propagated back along axons towards motor neurons. Caspase-dependent pathways are well established as a cause of motor neuron death, and recent work in other disease models indicated a role for caspase 6 in axonal degeneration. Therefore we hypothesised that caspase 6 may be involved in motor neuron death in ALS. To investigate the role of caspase 6 in ALS we profiled protein levels of caspase-6 throughout disease progression in the ALS mouse model SOD1(G93A); this did not reveal differences in caspase 6 levels during disease. To investigate the role of caspase 6 further we generated a colony with SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice lacking caspase 6. Analysis of the transgenic SOD1(G93A); Casp6(-/-) revealed an exacerbated phenotype with motor dysfunction occurring earlier and a significantly shortened lifespan when compared to transgenic SOD1(G93A); Casp6(+/+) mice. Immunofluorescence analysis of the neuromuscular junction revealed no obvious difference between caspase 6(+/+) and caspase 6(-/-) in non-transgenic mice, while the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice showed severe degeneration compared to non-transgenic mice in both genotypes. Our data indicate that caspase-6 does not exacerbate ALS pathogenesis, but may have a protective role. PMID:26976329

  5. Lactobacillus crispatus and its nonaggregating mutant in human colonization trials.

    PubMed

    Cesena, C; Morelli, L; Alander, M; Siljander, T; Tuomola, E; Salminen, S; Mattila-Sandholm, T; Vilpponen-Salmela, T; von Wright, A

    2001-05-01

    A wild-type Lactobacillus crispatus, showing a cell aggregation phenotype and its spontaneous nonaggregating mutant were compared for their in vitro adhesion properties to human ileal mucus and to a cultured human colonic cell line (Caco2) and for their in vivo colonization and adhesion potential with colonoscopy patients as volunteers in feeding trials. The wild-type strain adhered better to mucus or to Caco2 cells than did the mutant. Altogether, three human trials with the wild type and two with the mutant strain were performed. In two of the trials, the wild type could be recovered from either fecal samples or biopsies taken from the colon, while the mutant strain could not be demonstrated in either of the trials where it was used. The L. crispatus colonies recovered from the trials were often mixed, and several enterococci and lactobacillus strains coaggregating with L. crispatus wild type could be isolated. The results indicate that the surface-mediated properties, such as aggregation, of lactobacilli can have a role in adhesion and colonization. PMID:11384025

  6. Human mutant huntingtin disrupts vocal learning in transgenic songbirds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Chun; Kohn, Jessica; Szwed, Sarah K; Pariser, Eben; Sepe, Sharon; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Oshimori, Naoki; Marsala, Martin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Lee, Ramee

    2015-11-01

    Speech and vocal impairments characterize many neurological disorders. However, the neurogenetic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, and current animal models do not have the necessary circuitry to recapitulate vocal learning deficits. We developed germline transgenic songbirds, zebra finches (Taneiopygia guttata) expressing human mutant huntingtin (mHTT), a protein responsible for the progressive deterioration of motor and cognitive function in Huntington's disease (HD). Although generally healthy, the mutant songbirds had severe vocal disorders, including poor vocal imitation, stuttering, and progressive syntax and syllable degradation. Their song abnormalities were associated with HD-related neuropathology and dysfunction of the cortical-basal ganglia (CBG) song circuit. These transgenics are, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimentally created, functional mutant songbirds. Their progressive and quantifiable vocal disorder, combined with circuit dysfunction in the CBG song system, offers a model for genetic manipulation and the development of therapeutic strategies for CBG-related vocal and motor disorders. PMID:26436900

  7. Antidepressants upregulate messenger RNA levels of the neuroprotective enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1).

    PubMed Central

    Li, X M; Chlan-Fourney, J; Juorio, A V; Bennett, V L; Shrikhande, S; Bowen, R C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of amitriptyline, bupropion, doxepin or venlafaxine on the gene expression of the neuroprotective enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in a catecholamine cell in vitro model. DESIGN: Molecular study of a cultured cell line. INTERVENTIONS: Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells were incubated in 1 and 10 mumol/L of various antidepressant medications for 24 or 48 hours. OUTCOME MEASURES: Northern blot analysis. RESULTS: Amitriptyline up-regulated SOD1 messenger RNA in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The greatest up-regulation was following incubation with 10 mumol/L amitriptyline for 48 hours. The addition of bupropion, doxepin or venlafaxine to PC12 cell cultures also up-regulated SOD1 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that some antidepressants have the ability to positively regulate neuroprotective genes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:10721683

  8. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Angela M.; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F.; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as “anti-chaperones” uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26490867

  9. Soluble RAGE Treatment Delays Progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in SOD1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Juranek, Judyta K.; Daffu, Gurdip K.; Geddis, Matthew S.; Li, Huilin; Rosario, Rosa; Kaplan, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Lauren; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal motor neuron disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and spasticity, remains largely unknown. Approximately 5–10% of cases are familial, and of those, 15–20% are associated with mutations in the gene encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Mutations of the SOD1 gene interrupt cellular homeostasis and contribute to cellular toxicity evoked by the presence of altered SOD1, along with other toxic species, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs trigger activation of their chief cell surface receptor, RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products), and induce RAGE-dependent cellular stress and inflammation in neurons, thereby affecting their function and leading to apoptosis. Here, we show for the first time that the expression of RAGE is higher in the SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS vs. wild-type mouse spinal cord. We tested whether pharmacological blockade of RAGE may delay the onset and progression of disease in this mouse model. Our findings reveal that treatment of SOD1 transgenic mice with soluble RAGE (sRAGE), a natural competitor of RAGE that sequesters RAGE ligands and blocks their interaction with cell surface RAGE, significantly delays the progression of ALS and prolongs life span compared to vehicle treatment. We demonstrate that in sRAGE-treated SOD1 transgenic animals at the final stage of the disease, a significantly higher number of neurons and lower number of astrocytes is detectable in the spinal cord. We conclude that RAGE antagonism may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for ALS intervention. PMID:27242430

  10. Tempol moderately extends survival in a hSOD1(G93A) ALS rat model by inhibiting neuronal cell loss, oxidative damage and levels of non-native hSOD1(G93A) forms.

    PubMed

    Linares, Edlaine; Seixas, Luciana V; dos Prazeres, Janaina N; Ladd, Fernando V L; Ladd, Aliny A B L; Coppi, Antonio A; Augusto, Ohara

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive dysfunction and death of motor neurons by mechanisms that remain unclear. Evidence indicates that oxidative mechanisms contribute to ALS pathology, but classical antioxidants have not performed well in clinical trials. Cyclic nitroxides are an alternative worth exploring because they are multifunctional antioxidants that display low toxicity in vivo. Here, we examine the effects of the cyclic nitroxide tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-1-oxyl) on ALS onset and progression in transgenic female rats over-expressing the mutant hSOD1(G93A) . Starting at 7 weeks of age, a high dose of tempol (155 mg/day/rat) in the rat´s drinking water had marginal effects on the disease onset but decelerated disease progression and extended survival by 9 days. In addition, tempol protected spinal cord tissues as monitored by the number of neuronal cells, and the reducing capability and levels of carbonylated proteins and non-native hSOD1 forms in spinal cord homogenates. Intraperitoneal tempol (26 mg/rat, 3 times/week) extended survival by 17 days. This group of rats, however, diverted to a decelerated disease progression. Therefore, it was inconclusive whether the higher protective effect of the lower i.p. dose was due to higher tempol bioavailability, decelerated disease development or both. Collectively, the results show that tempol moderately extends the survival of ALS rats while protecting their cellular and molecular structures against damage. Thus, the results provide proof that cyclic nitroxides are alternatives worth to be further tested in animal models of ALS. PMID:23405225

  11. Tempol Moderately Extends Survival in a hSOD1G93A ALS Rat Model by Inhibiting Neuronal Cell Loss, Oxidative Damage and Levels of Non-Native hSOD1G93A Forms

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Edlaine; Seixas, Luciana V.; dos Prazeres, Janaina N.; Ladd, Fernando V. L.; Ladd, Aliny A. B. L.; Coppi, Antonio A.; Augusto, Ohara

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive dysfunction and death of motor neurons by mechanisms that remain unclear. Evidence indicates that oxidative mechanisms contribute to ALS pathology, but classical antioxidants have not performed well in clinical trials. Cyclic nitroxides are an alternative worth exploring because they are multifunctional antioxidants that display low toxicity in vivo. Here, we examine the effects of the cyclic nitroxide tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-1-oxyl) on ALS onset and progression in transgenic female rats over-expressing the mutant hSOD1G93A . Starting at 7 weeks of age, a high dose of tempol (155 mg/day/rat) in the rat´s drinking water had marginal effects on the disease onset but decelerated disease progression and extended survival by 9 days. In addition, tempol protected spinal cord tissues as monitored by the number of neuronal cells, and the reducing capability and levels of carbonylated proteins and non-native hSOD1 forms in spinal cord homogenates. Intraperitoneal tempol (26 mg/rat, 3 times/week) extended survival by 17 days. This group of rats, however, diverted to a decelerated disease progression. Therefore, it was inconclusive whether the higher protective effect of the lower i.p. dose was due to higher tempol bioavailability, decelerated disease development or both. Collectively, the results show that tempol moderately extends the survival of ALS rats while protecting their cellular and molecular structures against damage. Thus, the results provide proof that cyclic nitroxides are alternatives worth to be further tested in animal models of ALS. PMID:23405225

  12. A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal(®)) Delays Disease Onset and Prevents Spinal Cord Glutathione Depletion in the hSOD1(G93A) Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Erika K; Winter, Aimee N; Wilkins, Heather M; Sumner, Whitney A; Duval, Nathan; Patterson, David; Linseman, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal(®), in the transgenic Gly position 93 to Ala (G93A) mutant hSOD1 (hSOD1(G93A)) mouse model of ALS. Immunocal(®) is rich in the GSH precursor, cystine, and is therefore capable of bolstering GSH content. Transgenic hSOD1(G93A) mice receiving Immunocal(®) displayed a significant delay in disease onset compared to untreated hSOD1(G93A) controls. Additionally, Immunocal(®) treatment significantly decreased the rate of decline in grip strength and prevented disease-associated reductions in whole blood and spinal cord tissue GSH levels in end-stage hSOD1(G93A) mice. However, Immunocal(®) did not extend survival, likely due to its inability to preserve the mitochondrial GSH pool in spinal cord. Combination treatment with Immunocal(®) and the anti-glutamatergic compound, riluzole, delayed disease onset and extended survival in hSOD1(G93A) mice. These findings demonstrate that sustaining tissue GSH with Immunocal(®) only modestly delays disease onset and slows the loss of skeletal muscle strength in hSOD1(G93A) mice. Moreover, the inability of Immunocal(®) to rescue mitochondrial GSH in spinal cord provides a possible mechanism for its lack of effect on survival and is a limiting factor in the potential utility of this supplement as a therapeutic for ALS. PMID:26785244

  13. A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal®) Delays Disease Onset and Prevents Spinal Cord Glutathione Depletion in the hSOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Erika K.; Winter, Aimee N.; Wilkins, Heather M.; Sumner, Whitney A.; Duval, Nathan; Patterson, David; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal®, in the transgenic Gly position 93 to Ala (G93A) mutant hSOD1 (hSOD1G93A) mouse model of ALS. Immunocal® is rich in the GSH precursor, cystine, and is therefore capable of bolstering GSH content. Transgenic hSOD1G93A mice receiving Immunocal® displayed a significant delay in disease onset compared to untreated hSOD1G93A controls. Additionally, Immunocal® treatment significantly decreased the rate of decline in grip strength and prevented disease-associated reductions in whole blood and spinal cord tissue GSH levels in end-stage hSOD1G93A mice. However, Immunocal® did not extend survival, likely due to its inability to preserve the mitochondrial GSH pool in spinal cord. Combination treatment with Immunocal® and the anti-glutamatergic compound, riluzole, delayed disease onset and extended survival in hSOD1G93A mice. These findings demonstrate that sustaining tissue GSH with Immunocal® only modestly delays disease onset and slows the loss of skeletal muscle strength in hSOD1G93A mice. Moreover, the inability of Immunocal® to rescue mitochondrial GSH in spinal cord provides a possible mechanism for its lack of effect on survival and is a limiting factor in the potential utility of this supplement as a therapeutic for ALS. PMID:26785244

  14. Paradoxical roles of serine racemase and D-serine in the G93A mSOD1 mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Misty; Marecki, John C.; Marinesco, Stephane; Labrie, Viviane; Roder, John C.; Barger, Steven W.; Crow, John P.

    2012-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous neurotransmitter that binds to the NMDA receptor, thereby increasing the affinity for glutamate, and the potential for excitotoxicity. The primary source of D-serine in vivo is enzymatic racemization by serine racemase (SR). Regulation of D-serine in vivo is poorly understood, but is thought to involve a combination of controlled production, synaptic reuptake by transporters, and intracellular degradation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). However, SR itself possesses a well-characterized eliminase activity which effectively degrades D-serine as well. D-serine is increased two-fold in spinal cords of G93A SOD1 mice – the standard model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS mice with SR disruption show earlier symptom onset, but survive longer (progression phase is slowed), in an SR-dependent manner. Paradoxically, administration of D-serine to ALS mice dramatically lowers cord levels of D-serine, leading to changes in onset and survival very similar to SR deletion. D-serine treatment also increases cord levels of the transporter Asc-1. Although the mechanism by which SOD1 mutations increases D-serine is not known, these results strongly suggest that SR and D-serine are fundamentally involved in both the presymptomatic and progression phases of disease, and offer a direct link between mutant SOD1 and a glial-derived toxic mediator. PMID:22117694

  15. Sensorimotor and cognitive functions in a SOD1(G37R) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filali, Mohammed; Lalonde, Robert; Rivest, Serge

    2011-11-20

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurological disorder involving degeneration of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord, leading to progressive atrophy of skeletal muscles and, ultimately, paralysis and death. Copper-mediated oxidative damage is proposed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) - linked hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To understand more clearly the pathogenesis of sensorimotor dysfunction and to find the most appropriate methods for early detection of symptoms and for monitoring them across time, a murine model was assessed at three time points (5, 8, and 11 months). Transgenic mice with the G37R mutation of human SOD1 exhibited earliest signs of dysfunction at 8 months in terms of a pathological hindpaw clasping reflex, as well as slowed movement time on a suspended bar, anomalies in footprint patterns, weaker grip strength, raised somatosensory thresholds, and deficits in passive avoidance learning, yielding a margin of 3-4 months before death to test experimental therapies. PMID:21816178

  16. An inactivating mutation in the SOD 1 gene causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pramatarova, A.; Rouleau, G.A.; Goto, J.

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by highly selective death of large motor neurons in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The familial form of ALS (FALS) accounts for approximately 10% of the cases and is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently the defective gene causing chromosome 21-linked FALS was shown to be the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD 1). However, the precise mechanism of neurotoxicity seen in FALS with SOD 1 mutations is still unknown. Until now all SOD 1 mutations reported were single base pair substitutions (missense). We have identified a nonsense mutation in exon 5 of the SOD 1 gene in a FALS kindred. This two base pair deletion provokes a frameshift and a predicted premature truncation of the protein. The region affected has a very important structural and functional role: it contains part of the active loop and is involved in dimer contact. We would predict that the loss of these structures would impair the functioning of the enzyme.

  17. CTT1 overexpression increases life span of calorie-restricted Saccharomyces cerevisiae deficient in Sod1.

    PubMed

    Rona, Germana; Herdeiro, Ricardo; Mathias, Cristiane Juliano; Torres, Fernando Araripe; Pereira, Marcos Dias; Eleutherio, Elis

    2015-06-01

    Studies using different organisms revealed that reducing calorie intake, without malnutrition, known as calorie restriction (CR), increases life span, but its mechanism is still unkown. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as eukaryotic model, we observed that Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1p) is required to increase longevity, as well as to confer protection against lipid and protein oxidation under CR. Old cells of sod1 strain also presented a premature induction of apoptosis. However, when CTT1 (which codes for cytosolic catalase) was overexpressed, sod1 and WT strains showed similar survival rates. Furthermore, CTT1 overexpression decreased lipid peroxidation and delayed the induction of apoptotic process. Superoxide is rapidly converted to hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutase, but it also undergoes spontaneous dismutation albeit at a slower rate. However, the quantity of peroxide produced from superoxide in this way is two-fold higher. Peroxide degradation, catalyzed by catalase, is of vital importance, because in the presence of a reducer transition metal peroxide is reduced to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, which reacts indiscriminately with most cellular constituents. These findings might explain why overexpression of catalase was able to overcome the deficiency of Sod1p, increasing life span in response to CR. PMID:25573485

  18. Degenerative myelopathy in German Shepherd Dog: comparison of two molecular assays for the identification of the SOD1:c.118G>A mutation.

    PubMed

    Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Spalenza, Veronica; Biasibetti, Elena; Bottero, Maria Teresa; Rasero, Roberto; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Sacchi, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a late-onset, slowly progressive degeneration of spinal cord white matter which is reported primarily in large breed dogs. The missense mutation SOD1:c.118G>A is associated with this pathology in several dog breeds, including the German Shepherd Dog (GSD). The aims of the present study were to develop a tool for the rapid screening of the SOD1 mutation site in dogs and to evaluate the association of the polymorphism with DM in the German Shepherd breed. Two different techniques were compared: a minisequencing test and a real-time pcr allelic discrimination assay. Both approaches resulted effective and efficient. A sample of 47 dogs were examined. Ten subjects presented the symptoms of the illness; for one of them the diagnosis was confirmed by postmortem investigations and it resulted to be an A/A homozygote. In another clinically suspected dog, heterozygote A/G, the histopathological examination of the medulla showed moderate axon and myelin degenerative changes. GSD shows a frequency of the mutant allele equal to 0.17, quite high being a high-risk allele. Because canine DM has a late onset in adulthood and homozygous mutant dogs are likely as fertile as other genotypes, the natural selection is mild and the mutant allele may reach high frequencies. A diagnostic test, easy to implement, may contribute to control the gene diffusion in populations. The SOD1:c.118G>A mutation could be a useful marker for breeding strategies intending to reduce the incidence of DM. PMID:24390315

  19. Human ARF4 expression rescues sec7 mutant yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, S B; Wu, C; Silve, S; Howell, K E; Melançon, P; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated traffic between compartments of the yeast secretory pathway involves recruitment of multiple cytosolic proteins for budding, targeting, and membrane fusion events. The SEC7 gene product (Sec7p) is a constituent of coat structures on transport vesicles en route to the Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify mammalian homologs of Sec7p and its interacting proteins, we used a genetic selection strategy in which a human HepG2 cDNA library was transformed into conditional-lethal yeast sec7 mutants. We isolated several clones capable of rescuing sec7 mutant growth at the restrictive temperature. The cDNA encoding the most effective suppressor was identified as human ADP ribosylation factor 4 (hARF4), a member of the GTPase family proposed to regulate recruitment of vesicle coat proteins in mammalian cells. Having identified a Sec7p-interacting protein rather than the mammalian Sec7p homolog, we provide evidence that hARF4 suppressed the sec7 mutation by restoring secretory pathway function. Shifting sec7 strains to the restrictive temperature results in the disappearance of the mutant Sec7p cytosolic pool without apparent changes in the membrane-associated fraction. The introduction of hARF4 to the cells maintained the balance between cytosolic and membrane-associated Sec7p pools. These results suggest a requirement for Sec7p cycling on and off of the membranes for cell growth and vesicular traffic. In addition, overexpression of the yeast GTPase-encoding genes ARF1 and ARF2, but not that of YPT1, suppressed the sec7 mutant growth phenotype in an allele-specific manner. This allele specificity indicates that individual ARFs are recruited to perform two different Sec7p-related functions in vesicle coat dynamics. PMID:8668142

  20. Peripheral hyperstimulation alters site of disease onset and course in SOD1 rats.

    PubMed

    Lepore, Angelo C; Tolmie, Christopher; O'Donnell, John; Wright, Megan C; Dejea, Christine; Rauck, Britta; Hoke, Ahmet; Ignagni, Anthony R; Onders, Raymond P; Maragakis, Nicholas J

    2010-09-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the exogenous temporal triggers that result in initial motor neuron death are not understood. Overactivation and consequent accelerated loss of vulnerable motor neurons is one theory of disease initiation. The vulnerability of motor neurons in response to chronic peripheral nerve hyperstimulation was tested in the SOD1(G93A) rat model of ALS. A novel in vivo technique for peripheral phrenic nerve stimulation was developed via intra-diaphragm muscle electrode implantation at the phrenic motor endpoint. Chronic bilateral phrenic nerve hyperstimulation in SOD1(G93A) rats accelerated disease progression, including shortened lifespan, hastened motor neuron loss and increased denervation at diaphragm neuromuscular junctions. Hyperstimulation also resulted in focal decline in adjacent forelimb function. These results show that peripheral phrenic nerve hyperstimulation accelerates cell death of vulnerable spinal motor neurons, modifies both temporal and anatomical onset of disease, and leads to involvement of disease in adjacent anatomical regions in this ALS model. PMID:20381620

  1. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage: importance in non-SOD1 ALS

    PubMed Central

    Carrì, Maria Teresa; Valle, Cristiana; Bozzo, Francesca; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that mitochondrial damage (MD) is both the major contributor to oxidative stress (OS) (the condition arising from unbalance between production and removal of reactive oxygen species) and one of the major consequences of OS, because of the high dependance of mitochondrial function on redox-sensitive targets such as intact membranes. Conditions in which neuronal cells are not able to cope with MD and OS seem to lead or contribute to several neurodegenerative diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), at least in the most studied superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1)-linked genetic variant. As summarized in this review, new evidence indicates that MD and OS play a role also in non-SOD1 ALS and thus they may represent a target for therapy despite previous failures in clinical trials. PMID:25741238

  2. SOD1 mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Results from a multicenter Italian study.

    PubMed

    Battistini, Stefania; Giannini, Fabio; Greco, Giuseppe; Bibbò, Giuseppe; Ferrera, Loreta; Marini, Valeria; Causarano, Renzo; Casula, Michela; Lando, Giuliana; Patrosso, Maria Cristina; Caponnetto, Claudia; Origone, Paola; Marocchi, Alessandro; Del Corona, Alberto; Siciliano, Gabriele; Carrera, Paola; Mascia, Vincenzo; Giagheddu, Marcello; Carcassi, Carlo; Orrù, Sandro; Garrè, Cecilia; Penco, Silvana

    2005-07-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), the most common form among motoneuron diseases, is characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative process involving motor neurons in the motor cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. Sporadic (SALS) accounts for the majority of patients but in about 10% of ALS cases the disease is inherited (FALS), usually as an autosomal dominant trait. In the present study we show the results of a referred based multicenter study on the distribution of SOD1 gene mutations in the largest cohort of Italian ALS patients described so far. Two hundred and sixty-four patients (39 FALS and 225 SALS) of Italian origin were studied. In 7 out of 39 FALS patients we found the following SOD1 gene mutations: i) a new G12R missense mutation in exon 1, found in a patient with a slowly progressive disease course; ii) the G41S mutation, in four unrelated patients with rapidly progressive course complicated with cognitive decline in two of them; iii) the L114F mutation, in a patient with a slowly progressive phenotype; iv) the D90A mutation, in a heterozygous patient with atypical phenotype. In addition, in one SALS patient a previously reported synonymous variant S59S was identified. In 17 (3 FALS and 14 SALS) out of 264 patients (6.4 %) the polymorphism A-->C at position 34 of intron 3 (IVS3: + 34 A-->C) was found, and in one FALS patient a novel variant IVS3 + 62 T-->C was identified. The frequency of SOD1 gene mutations (17.9 %) in FALS cases was comparable with that found in other surveys with a similar sample size of ALS cases. No SOD1 gene mutations have been identified in SALS cases. Within FALS cases, The most frequent mutation was the G41S identified in four FALS. PMID:15789135

  3. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1G93A Mice following Motor Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A.; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B.; McGuire, Susan O.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.; Foecking, Eileen M.; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4+ T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1G93A). SOD1G93A mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4+ T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1G93A mice exhibit abnormal CD4+ T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  4. Thermal fluctuations of immature SOD1 lead to separate folding and misfolding pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, Ashok; Rumfeldt, Jessica AO; Broom, Helen R; Doyle, Colleen M; Bouvignies, Guillaume; Meiering, Elizabeth M; Kay, Lewis E

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving cytotoxic conformations of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). A major challenge in understanding ALS disease pathology has been the identification and atomic-level characterization of these conformers. Here, we use a combination of NMR methods to detect four distinct sparsely populated and transiently formed thermally accessible conformers in equilibrium with the native state of immature SOD1 (apoSOD12SH). Structural models of two of these establish that they possess features present in the mature dimeric protein. In contrast, the other two are non-native oligomers in which the native dimer interface and the electrostatic loop mediate the formation of aberrant intermolecular interactions. Our results show that apoSOD12SH has a rugged free energy landscape that codes for distinct kinetic pathways leading to either maturation or non-native association and provide a starting point for a detailed atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms of SOD1 oligomerization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07296.001 PMID:26099300

  5. Th17 Cell Response in SOD1(G93A) Mice following Motor Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ni, Allen; Yang, Tao; Mesnard-Hoaglin, Nichole A; Gutierrez, Rafael; Stubbs, Evan B; McGuire, Susan O; Sanders, Virginia M; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M; Xin, Junping

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of ALS has been reported for veterans, varsity athletes, and professional football players. The mechanism underlying the increased risk in these populations has not been identified; however, it has been proposed that motor nerve injury may trigger immune responses which, in turn, can accelerate the progression of ALS. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal immune reactions and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALS, but the specific immune cells involved have not been clearly defined. To understand how nerve injury and immune responses may contribute to ALS development, we investigated responses of CD4(+) T cell after facial motor nerve axotomy (FNA) at a presymptomatic stage in a transgenic mouse model of ALS (B6SJL SOD1(G93A)). SOD1(G93A) mice, compared with WT mice, displayed an increase in the basal activation state of CD4(+) T cells and higher frequency of Th17 cells, which were further enhanced by FNA. In conclusion, SOD1(G93A) mice exhibit abnormal CD4(+) T cell activation with increased levels of Th17 cells prior to the onset of neurological symptoms. Motor nerve injury exacerbates Th17 cell responses and may contribute to the development of ALS, especially in those who carry genetic susceptibility to this disease. PMID:27194826

  6. Intrathecal Delivery of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Protects the Structure of Altered Perineuronal Nets in SOD1 Rats and Amends the Course of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Forostyak, Serhiy; Homola, Ales; Turnovcova, Karolina; Svitil, Pavel; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in a lethal outcome. We studied changes in ventral horn perineuronal nets (PNNs) of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) rats during the normal disease course and after the intrathecal application (5 × 105 cells) of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) postsymptom manifestation. We found that MSCs ameliorated disease progression, significantly improved motor activity, and prolonged survival. For the first time, we report that SOD1 rats have an abnormal disorganized PNN structure around the spinal motoneurons and give different expression profiles of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), such as versican, aggrecan, and phosphacan, but not link protein-1. Additionally, SOD1 rats had different profiles for CSPG gene expression (Versican, Hapln1, Neurocan, and Tenascin-R), whereas Aggrecan and Brevican profiles remained unchanged. The application of MSCs preserved PNN structure, accompanied by better survival of motorneurons. We measured the concentration of cytokines (IL-1α, MCP-1, TNF-α, GM-CSF, IL-4, and IFN-γ) in the rats' cerebrospinal fluid and found significantly higher concentrations of IL-1α and MCP-1. Our results show that PNN and cytokine homeostasis are altered in the SOD1 rat model of ALS. These changes could potentially serve as biological markers for the diagnosis, assessment of treatment efficacy, and prognosis of ALS. We also show that the administration of human MSCs is a safe procedure that delays the loss of motor function and increases the overall survival of symptomatic ALS animals, by remodeling the recipients' pattern of gene expression and having neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects. Stem Cells 2014;32:3163–3172 PMID:25113670

  7. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Activation of EGFR by small compounds through coupling the generation of hydrogen peroxide to stable dimerization of Cu/Zn SOD1

    PubMed Central

    Sakanyan, Vehary; Hulin, Philippe; Alves de Sousa, Rodolphe; Silva, Viviane A. O.; Hambardzumyan, Artur; Nedellec, Steven; Tomasoni, Christophe; Logé, Cédric; Pineau, Charles; Roussakis, Christos; Fleury, Fabrice; Artaud, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cell signaling by reactive chemicals and pollutants is an important issue for human health. It has been shown that lipophilic nitro-benzoxadiazole (NBD) compounds rapidly move across the plasma membrane and enhance Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells. Unlike ligand-dependent activation, the mechanism of this induction relies on the generation of hydrogen peroxide, which is involved in the activation of the catalytic site of the receptor and the inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-1B. Production of H2O2 during redox transformation of NBD compounds is associated with the transition of a monomeric form of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) to stable dimers. The highly stable and functionally active SOD1 dimer, in the absence of adequate activities in downstream reactions, promotes the disproportionate production and accumulation of intracellular hydrogen peroxide shortly after exposure to NBD compounds. The intrinsic fluorescence of small compounds was used to demonstrate their binding to SOD1. Our data indicate that H2O2 and concomitantly generated electrophilic intermediates behave as independent entities, but all contribute to the biological reactivity of NBD compounds. This study opens a promising path to identify new biomarkers of oxidative/electrophilic stress in the progression of cancer and other diseases. PMID:26883293

  9. Activation of EGFR by small compounds through coupling the generation of hydrogen peroxide to stable dimerization of Cu/Zn SOD1.

    PubMed

    Sakanyan, Vehary; Hulin, Philippe; Alves de Sousa, Rodolphe; Silva, Viviane A O; Hambardzumyan, Artur; Nedellec, Steven; Tomasoni, Christophe; Logé, Cédric; Pineau, Charles; Roussakis, Christos; Fleury, Fabrice; Artaud, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cell signaling by reactive chemicals and pollutants is an important issue for human health. It has been shown that lipophilic nitro-benzoxadiazole (NBD) compounds rapidly move across the plasma membrane and enhance Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells. Unlike ligand-dependent activation, the mechanism of this induction relies on the generation of hydrogen peroxide, which is involved in the activation of the catalytic site of the receptor and the inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-1B. Production of H2O2 during redox transformation of NBD compounds is associated with the transition of a monomeric form of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) to stable dimers. The highly stable and functionally active SOD1 dimer, in the absence of adequate activities in downstream reactions, promotes the disproportionate production and accumulation of intracellular hydrogen peroxide shortly after exposure to NBD compounds. The intrinsic fluorescence of small compounds was used to demonstrate their binding to SOD1. Our data indicate that H2O2 and concomitantly generated electrophilic intermediates behave as independent entities, but all contribute to the biological reactivity of NBD compounds. This study opens a promising path to identify new biomarkers of oxidative/electrophilic stress in the progression of cancer and other diseases. PMID:26883293

  10. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Cohen-Hadad, Yaara; Aharoni, Shira; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Schonberger, Oshrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Zeligson, Sharon; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX) human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA) from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19), monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19) and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC) line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve. PMID:26473610

  11. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Cohen-Hadad, Yaara; Aharoni, Shira; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Schonberger, Oshrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Zeligson, Sharon; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX) human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA) from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19), monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19) and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC) line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve. PMID:26473610

  12. Oxidative Stress Induced Age Dependent Meibomian Gland Dysfunction in Cu, Zn-Superoxide Dismutase-1 (Sod1) Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Osama M. A.; Dogru, Murat; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Igarashi, Ayako; Kojima, Takashi; Wakamatsu, Tais Hitomi; Inaba, Takaaki; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to investigate alterations in the meibomian gland (MG) in Cu, Zn-Superoxide Dismutase-1 knockout (Sod1−/−) mouse. Methods Tear function tests [Break up time (BUT) and cotton thread] and ocular vital staining test were performed on Sod1−/− male mice (n = 24) aged 10 and 50 weeks, and age and sex matched wild–type (+/+) mice (n = 25). Tear and serum samples were collected at sacrifice for inflammatory cytokine assays. MG specimens underwent Hematoxylin and Eosin staining, Mallory staining for fibrosis, Oil Red O lipid staining, TUNEL staining, immunohistochemistry stainings for 4HNE, 8-OHdG and CD45. Transmission electron microscopic examination (TEM) was also performed. Results Corneal vital staining scores in the Sod1−/− mice were significantly higher compared with the wild type mice throughout the follow-up. Tear and serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels also showed significant elevations in the 10 to 50 week Sod1−/− mice. Oil Red O staining showed an accumulation of large lipid droplets in the Sod1−/− mice at 50 weeks. Immunohistochemistry revealed both increased TUNEL and oxidative stress marker stainings of the MG acinar epithelium in the Sod1−/− mice compared to the wild type mice. Immunohistochemistry staining for CD45 showed increasing inflammatory cell infiltrates from 10 to 50 weeks in the Sod1−/− mice compared to the wild type mice. TEM revealed prominent mitochondrial changes in 50 week Sod1−/− mice. Conclusions Our results suggest that reactive oxygen species might play a vital role in the pathogensis of meibomian gland dysfunction. The Sod1−/− mouse appears to be a promising model for the study of reactive oxygen species associated MG alterations. PMID:25036096

  13. A possible human homologue for the mouse mutant disorganisation.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, R M; Donnai, D

    1989-01-01

    The mouse mutant disorganisation (Ds) is a semidominant gene with variable penetrance in heterozygotes and lethality in homozygotes; 67% of heterozygotes have multiple defects and the rest have single defects. Fifty-three percent have cranioschisis and execephaly, 40% have hamartomas represented by papillae of variable size and shape protruding from the body, sometimes containing cartilage, and 33% have limb abnormalities. A child is presented with defects similar to those seen in mice heterozygous for Ds. He had shortening of the upper and lower segments of the right leg with a popliteal web and nine toes on the same side. A finger-like structure arose from the abdomen and one kidney was absent. The homology between this infant and Ds mice is discussed and published reports of human cases with similar abnormalities are reviewed. Images PMID:2664177

  14. The multivariate Meixner polynomials as matrix elements of SO(d, 1) representations on oscillator states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genest, Vincent X.; Miki, Hiroshi; Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    The multivariate Meixner polynomials are shown to arise as matrix elements of unitary representations of the SO(d, 1) group on oscillator states. These polynomials depend on d discrete variables and are orthogonal with respect to the negative multinomial distribution. The emphasis is put on the bivariate case for which the SO(2, 1) connection is used to derive the main properties of the polynomials: orthogonality relation, raising/lowering relations, generating function, recurrence relations and difference equations as well as explicit expressions in terms of standard (univariate) Krawtchouk and Meixner polynomials. It is explained how these results generalize directly to d variables.

  15. Reactive oxygen species on bone mineral density and mechanics in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smietana, Michael J.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Faulkner, John A.; Brooks, Susan V.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be a factor in the onset of a number of age-associated conditions, including loss of BMD. {yields} Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) deficient mice have increased ROS, reduced bone mineral density, decreased bending stiffness, and decreased strength compared to WT controls. {yields} Increased ROS caused by the deficiency of Sod1, may be responsible for the changes in BMD and bone mechanics and therefore represent an appropriate model for studying mechanisms of age-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in a number of degenerative conditions including osteoporosis. Mice deficient in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) (Sod1{sup -/-} mice) have elevated oxidative stress and decreased muscle mass and strength compared to wild-type mice (WT) and appear to have an accelerated muscular aging phenotype. Thus, Sod1{sup -/-} mice may be a good model for evaluating the effects of free radical generation on diseases associated with aging. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the structural integrity of bone as measured by bending stiffness (EI; N/mm{sup 2}) and strength (MPa) is diminished in Sod1{sup -/-} compared to WT mice. Femurs were obtained from male and female WT and Sod1{sup -/-} mice at 8 months of age and three-point bending tests were used to determine bending stiffness and strength. Bones were also analyzed for bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cc) using micro-computed tomography. Femurs were approximately equal in length across all groups, and there were no significant differences in BMD or EI with respect to gender in either genotype. Although male and female mice demonstrated similar properties within each genotype, Sod1{sup -/-} mice exhibited lower BMD and EI of femurs from both males and females compared with gender matched WT mice. Strength of femurs was also lower in Sod1{sup -/-} mice compared to WT as well as between genders. These

  16. Involvement of sensory innervation in the skin of SOD1(G93A) ALS mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel A; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Vilches, Jorge J; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Sensory alterations have been described in both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and mouse models. While involvement of intraepidermal and subepidermal axons has been shown in skin biopsies of ALS patients, it is unclear if the SOD1(G93A) mouse presents similar alterations. We analyzed the epidermal and dermal innervation, based on PGP9.5 immunostaining, of SOD1(G93A) mice at different stages. The results showed a marked reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, Meissner's corpuscles, and subepidermal nerve density already at 4 weeks. This loss of innervation progressed over time. Dermal axonal density decreased at a later stage of the disease. There was a gradient of axonal loss, with a more severe decline in the epidermis compared with deeper structures, indicating a distal axonal neuropathy as the mechanism of degeneration. These findings suggest that the analysis of the cutaneous sensory innervation may be an accessible and useful tool to assess the neurodegeneration process in motoneuron diseases. PMID:26880731

  17. Cytosolic localization of Fox proteins in motor neurons of G93A SOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoxing; Turnbull, Patrick C; Crapper, Eli Prentice; Wang, Henan; Drannik, Anna; Jiang, Fan; Xia, Sean; Turnbull, John

    2016-05-01

    NeuN is a nuclear protein expressed exclusively in mature neurons and has served for many years as a reliable neuronal marker in immunohistochemical labeling studies. In 2009, NeuN was identified as Fox3, one of three closely related RNA binding proteins important in pre-mRNA splicing. During the course of a previous study using G93A SOD1 mice, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we observed that NeuN was significantly redistributed to the cytosol. Since altered splicing may be important in the pathogenesis of ALS, we compared the localization (predominantly nuclear or cytosolic) of all three Fox proteins in the lumbar spinal cord of wild-type and G93A SOD1 mice before and after the development of clinical signs of disease. The Fox proteins regulate their own splicing, and we also examined the major Fox protein isoforms in nuclear and cytosolic fractions of lumbar spinal cord by Western blotting. We report here that Fox3 and Fox2 undergo a major cytosolic relocalization in this ALS model that increases with age and that is associated with progressive alterations in the splicing profiles of all three Fox proteins. PMID:26724814

  18. Phenotypes of Myopathy-Related Beta-Tropomyosin Mutants in Human and Mouse Tissue Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Rahl, Karin; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Tajsharghi, Homa

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in TPM2 result in a variety of myopathies characterised by variable clinical and morphological features. We used human and mouse cultured cells to study the effects of β-TM mutants. The mutants induced a range of phenotypes in human myoblasts, which generally changed upon differentiation to myotubes. Human myotubes transfected with the E41K-β-TMEGFP mutant showed perinuclear aggregates. The G53ins-β-TMEGFP mutant tended to accumulate in myoblasts but was incorporated into filamentous structures of myotubes. The K49del-β-TMEGFP and E122K-β-TMEGFP mutants induced the formation of rod-like structures in human cells. The N202K-β-TMEGFP mutant failed to integrate into thin filaments and formed accumulations in myotubes. The accumulation of mutant β-TMEGFP in the perinuclear and peripheral areas of the cells was the striking feature in C2C12. We demonstrated that human tissue culture is a suitable system for studying the early stages of altered myofibrilogenesis and morphological changes linked to myopathy-related β-TM mutants. In addition, the histopathological phenotype associated with expression of the various mutant proteins depends on the cell type and varies with the maturation of the muscle cell. Further, the phenotype is a combinatorial effect of the specific amino acid change and the temporal expression of the mutant protein. PMID:24039757

  19. Expression of a pathogenic mutation of SOD1 sensitizes aprataxin-deficient cells and mice to oxidative stress and triggers hallmarks of premature ageing

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Jean; Page, Tristan K.W.; Chiang, Shih-Chieh; Kalmar, Bernadett; Bode, David; Greensmith, Linda; Mckinnon, Peter J; Thorpe, Julian R.; Hafezparast, Majid; El-Khamisy, Sherif F.

    2015-01-01

    Aprataxin (APTX) deficiency causes progressive cerebellar degeneration, ataxia and oculomotor apraxia in man. Cell free assays and crystal structure studies demonstrate a role for APTX in resolving 5′-adenylated nucleic acid breaks, however, APTX function in vertebrates remains unclear due to the lack of an appropriate model system. Here, we generated a murine model in which a pathogenic mutant of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1G93A) is expressed in an Aptx−/− mouse strain. We report a delayed population doubling and accelerated senescence in Aptx−/− primary mouse fibroblasts, which is not due to detectable telomere instability or cell cycle deregulation but is associated with a reduction in transcription recovery following oxidative stress. Expression of SOD1G93A uncovers a survival defect ex vivo in cultured cells and in vivo in tissues lacking Aptx. The surviving neurons feature numerous and deep nuclear envelope invaginations, a hallmark of cellular stress. Furthermore, they possess an elevated number of high-density nuclear regions and a concomitant increase in histone H3 K9 trimethylation, hallmarks of silenced chromatin. Finally, the accelerated cellular senescence was also observed at the organismal level as shown by down-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hallmark of premature ageing. Together, this study demonstrates a protective role of Aptx in vivo and suggests that its loss results in progressive accumulation of DNA breaks in the nervous system, triggering hallmarks of premature ageing, systemically. PMID:25274775

  20. Expression of a pathogenic mutation of SOD1 sensitizes aprataxin-deficient cells and mice to oxidative stress and triggers hallmarks of premature ageing.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jean; Page, Tristan K W; Chiang, Shih-Chieh; Kalmar, Bernadett; Bode, David; Greensmith, Linda; Mckinnon, Peter J; Thorpe, Julian R; Hafezparast, Majid; El-Khamisy, Sherif F

    2015-02-01

    Aprataxin (APTX) deficiency causes progressive cerebellar degeneration, ataxia and oculomotor apraxia in man. Cell free assays and crystal structure studies demonstrate a role for APTX in resolving 5'-adenylated nucleic acid breaks, however, APTX function in vertebrates remains unclear due to the lack of an appropriate model system. Here, we generated a murine model in which a pathogenic mutant of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1(G93A)) is expressed in an Aptx-/- mouse strain. We report a delayed population doubling and accelerated senescence in Aptx-/- primary mouse fibroblasts, which is not due to detectable telomere instability or cell cycle deregulation but is associated with a reduction in transcription recovery following oxidative stress. Expression of SOD1(G93A) uncovers a survival defect ex vivo in cultured cells and in vivo in tissues lacking Aptx. The surviving neurons feature numerous and deep nuclear envelope invaginations, a hallmark of cellular stress. Furthermore, they possess an elevated number of high-density nuclear regions and a concomitant increase in histone H3 K9 trimethylation, hallmarks of silenced chromatin. Finally, the accelerated cellular senescence was also observed at the organismal level as shown by down-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a hallmark of premature ageing. Together, this study demonstrates a protective role of Aptx in vivo and suggests that its loss results in progressive accumulation of DNA breaks in the nervous system, triggering hallmarks of premature ageing, systemically. PMID:25274775

  1. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2 (∙-)), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2 (∙-) may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  2. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi (Jack)

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2∙−), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2∙− may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  3. Use of recombinant approaches to construct human cytomegalovirus mutants.

    PubMed

    Dekhtiarenko, Iryna; Cičin-Šain, Luka; Messerle, Martin

    2014-01-01

    To fully understand the function of cytomegalovirus (CMV) genes, it is imperative that they be studied in the context of infection. Therefore, the targeted deletion of individual viral genes and the comparison of loss of function viral mutants to the wild-type virus allow the identification of the relevance and role for a particular gene in the viral replication cycle. Targeted CMV mutagenesis has made huge advances over the past 15 years. The cloning of CMV genomes into (E. coli) as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) allows not only quick and efficient deletion of viral genomic regions, individual genes, or single nucleotide exchanges in the viral genome but also the insertion of heterologous genetic sequences for gain of function approaches. The conceptual advantage of this strategy is that it overcomes the restrictions of recombinant technologies in cell culture systems. Namely, recombination in infected cells occurs only in a few clones, and their selection is not possible if the targeted genes are relevant for virus replication and are not able to compete for growth against the unrecombined viruses. On the other hand, BAC mutagenesis enables the selection for antibiotic resistance in E. coli, allowing a selective growth advantage to the recombined genomes. Here we describe the methods used for the generation of a CMV BAC, targeted mutagenesis of BAC clones, and transfection of human cells with CMV BAC DNA in order to reconstitute the viral infection process. PMID:24639218

  4. Astrocytes drive upregulation of the multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1 (P-Glycoprotein) in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier in mutant superoxide dismutase 1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Lichter, Jessica; Sarlo, Mark; Markandaiah, Shashirekha S; McAvoy, Kevin; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Jablonski, Michael R; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy of drugs targeting the CNS is influenced by their limited brain access, which can lead to complete pharmacoresistance. Recently a tissue-specific and selective upregulation of the multidrug efflux transporter ABCB1 or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the spinal cord of both patients and the mutant SOD1-G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease that prevalently kills motor neurons has been reported. Here, we extended the analysis of P-gp expression in the SOD1-G93A ALS mouse model and found that P-gp upregulation was restricted to endothelial cells of the capillaries, while P-gp expression was not detected in other cells of the spinal cord parenchyma such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. Using both in vitro human and mouse models of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we found that mutant SOD1 astrocytes were driving P-gp upregulation in endothelial cells. In addition, a significant increase in reactive oxygen species production, Nrf2 and NFκB activation in endothelial cells exposed to mutant SOD1 astrocytes in both human and murine BBB models were observed. Most interestingly, astrocytes expressing FUS-H517Q, a different familial ALS-linked mutated gene, also drove NFκB-dependent upregulation of P-gp. However, the pathway was not dependent on oxidative stress but rather involved TNF-α release. Overall, these findings indicated that nuclear translocation of NFκB was a converging mechanism used by endothelial cells of the BBB to upregulate P-gp expression in mutant SOD1-linked ALS and possibly other forms of familial ALS. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1298-1313. PMID:27158936

  5. Degenerative myelopathy associated with a missense mutation in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene progresses to peripheral neuropathy in Pembroke Welsh corgis and boxers.

    PubMed

    Shelton, G Diane; Johnson, Gayle C; O'Brien, Dennis P; Katz, Martin L; Pesayco, Jill P; Chang, Brian J; Mizisin, Andrew P; Coates, Joan R

    2012-07-15

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an adult-onset, fatal neurodegenerative disease with many similarities to an upper-motor-neuron-onset form of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), that results from mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. DM occurs in many dog breeds, including the Pembroke Welsh Corgi and Boxer. The initial upper motor neuron degeneration produces spastic paraparesis and affected dogs develop general proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs. Dog owners usually elect euthanasia when their dog becomes paraplegic. When euthanasia is delayed, lower motor neuron signs including ascending tetraparesis, flaccid paralysis and widespread muscle atrophy emerge. For this study, muscle and peripheral nerve specimens were evaluated at varying disease stages from DM-affected Pembroke Welsh Corgis and Boxers that were homozygous for the SOD1 mutation and had spinal cord histopathology consistent with DM. Comparisons were made with age- and breed-matched control dogs. Here we provide evidence that Pembroke Welsh Corgis and Boxers with chronic DM develop muscle atrophy consistent with denervation, peripheral nerve pathology consistent with an axonopathy, and to a lesser degree demyelination. Canine DM has been proposed as a potential spontaneous animal disease model of human ALS. The results of this study provide further support that canine DM recapitulates one form of the corresponding human disorder and should serve as a valuable animal model to develop therapeutic strategies. PMID:22542607

  6. Arresting Amyloid with Coulomb’s Law: Acetylation of ALS-Linked SOD1 by Aspirin Impedes Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Abdolvahabi, Alireza; Shi, Yunhua; Rhodes, Nicholas R.; Cook, Nathan P.; Martí, Angel A.; Shaw, Bryan F.

    2015-01-01

    Although the magnitude of a protein’s net charge (Z) can control its rate of self-assembly into amyloid, and its interactions with cellular membranes, the net charge of a protein is not viewed as a druggable parameter. This article demonstrates that aspirin (the quintessential acylating pharmacon) can inhibit the amyloidogenesis of superoxide dismutase (SOD1) by increasing the intrinsic net negative charge of the polypeptide, i.e., by acetylation (neutralization) of multiple lysines. The protective effects of acetylation were diminished (but not abolished) in 100 mM NaCl and were statistically significant: a total of 432 thioflavin-T amyloid assays were performed for all studied proteins. The acetylation of as few as three lysines by aspirin in A4V apo-SOD1—a variant that causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)—delayed amyloid nucleation by 38% and slowed amyloid propagation by twofold. Lysines in wild-type- and ALS-variant apo-SOD1 could also be peracetylated with aspirin after fibrillization, resulting in supercharged fibrils, with increases in formal net charge of ∼2 million units. Peracetylated SOD1 amyloid defibrillized at temperatures below unacetylated fibrils, and below the melting temperature of native Cu2,Zn2-SOD1 (e.g., fibril Tm = 84.49°C for acetylated D90A apo-SOD1 fibrils). Targeting the net charge of native or misfolded proteins with small molecules—analogous to how an enzyme’s Km or Vmax are medicinally targeted—holds promise as a strategy in the design of therapies for diseases linked to protein self-assembly. PMID:25762331

  7. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  8. T2-weighted MRI detects presymptomatic pathology in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew C; Serres, Sébastien; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Stolp, Helen B; Anthony, Daniel C; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R; Sibson, Nicola R

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has been identified as a potential therapeutic target in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but relevant biomarkers are needed. The superoxide dismutase (SOD1)G93A transgenic mouse model of ALS offers a unique opportunity to study and potentially manipulate presymptomatic pathology. While T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be sensitive to pathologic changes at symptom onset, no earlier biomarkers were previously identified and the underlying histopathologic correlates remain uncertain. To address these issues, we used a multimodal MRI approach targeting structural (T2, T1, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR)), vascular (gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid), and endothelial (vascular cell adhesion molecule–microparticles of iron oxide) changes, together with histopathologic analysis from presymptomatic to symptomatic stages of disease. Presymptomatic changes in brainstem nuclei were evident on T2-weighted images from as early as 60 days (P<0.05). Histologic indices of vacuolation, astro- and microglial activation all correlated with T2-weighted changes. Significant reductions in ADC (P<0.01) and MTR (P<0.05) were found at 120 days in the same brainstem nuclei. No changes in T1 relaxation, vascular permeability, or endothelial activation were found at any stage of disease. These findings suggest that T2-weighted MRI offers the strongest biomarker potential in this model, and that MRI has unique potential for noninvasive and longitudinal assessment of presymptomatically applied therapeutic and neuroprotective agents. PMID:24496176

  9. T₂-weighted MRI detects presymptomatic pathology in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Evans, Matthew C; Serres, Sébastien; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Stolp, Helen B; Anthony, Daniel C; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R; Sibson, Nicola R

    2014-05-01

    Neuroinflammation has been identified as a potential therapeutic target in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but relevant biomarkers are needed. The superoxide dismutase (SOD1)(G93A) transgenic mouse model of ALS offers a unique opportunity to study and potentially manipulate presymptomatic pathology. While T₂-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be sensitive to pathologic changes at symptom onset, no earlier biomarkers were previously identified and the underlying histopathologic correlates remain uncertain. To address these issues, we used a multimodal MRI approach targeting structural (T₂, T₁, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR)), vascular (gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid), and endothelial (vascular cell adhesion molecule-microparticles of iron oxide) changes, together with histopathologic analysis from presymptomatic to symptomatic stages of disease. Presymptomatic changes in brainstem nuclei were evident on T₂-weighted images from as early as 60 days (P<0.05). Histologic indices of vacuolation, astro- and microglial activation all correlated with T₂-weighted changes. Significant reductions in ADC (P<0.01) and MTR (P<0.05) were found at 120 days in the same brainstem nuclei. No changes in T₁ relaxation, vascular permeability, or endothelial activation were found at any stage of disease. These findings suggest that T₂-weighted MRI offers the strongest biomarker potential in this model, and that MRI has unique potential for noninvasive and longitudinal assessment of presymptomatically applied therapeutic and neuroprotective agents. PMID:24496176

  10. Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for SOD1-Associated Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Pathogenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chestkov, I. V.; Vasilieva, E. A.; Illarioshkin, S. N.; Lagarkova, M. A.; Kiselev, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic reprogramming technology allows one to generate pluripotent stem cells for individual patients. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), can be an unlimited source of specialized cell types for the body. Thus, autologous somatic cell replacement therapy becomes possible, as well as the generation of in vitro cell models for studying the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and drug discovery. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder that leads to a loss of upper and lower motor neurons. About 10% of cases are genetically inherited, and the most common familial form of ALS is associated with mutations in the SOD1 gene. We used the reprogramming technology to generate induced pluripotent stem cells with patients with familial ALS. Patient-specific iPS cells were obtained by both integration and transgene-free delivery methods of reprogramming transcription factors. These iPS cells have the properties of pluripotent cells and are capable of direct differentiation into motor neurons. PMID:24772327

  11. Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for SOD1-Associated Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Pathogenesis Studies.

    PubMed

    Chestkov, I V; Vasilieva, E A; Illarioshkin, S N; Lagarkova, M A; Kiselev, S L

    2014-01-01

    The genetic reprogramming technology allows one to generate pluripotent stem cells for individual patients. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), can be an unlimited source of specialized cell types for the body. Thus, autologous somatic cell replacement therapy becomes possible, as well as the generation of in vitro cell models for studying the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and drug discovery. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder that leads to a loss of upper and lower motor neurons. About 10% of cases are genetically inherited, and the most common familial form of ALS is associated with mutations in the SOD1 gene. We used the reprogramming technology to generate induced pluripotent stem cells with patients with familial ALS. Patient-specific iPS cells were obtained by both integration and transgene-free delivery methods of reprogramming transcription factors. These iPS cells have the properties of pluripotent cells and are capable of direct differentiation into motor neurons. PMID:24772327

  12. Muscle Expression of SOD1G93A Modulates microRNA and mRNA Transcription Pattern Associated with the Myelination Process in the Spinal Cord of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Bernardini, Camilla; Martini, Martina; Baranzini, Mirko; Barba, Marta; Musarò, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A crucial system severely affected in several neuromuscular diseases is the loss of effective connection between muscle and nerve, leading to a pathological non-communication between the two tissues. One of the best examples of impaired interplay between muscle and nerve is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons and muscle atrophy. Increasing evidences suggest that damage to motor neurons is enhanced by alterations in the neighboring non-neuronal cells and indicate that altered skeletal muscle might be the source of signals that impinge motor neuron activity and survival. Here we investigated whether muscle selective expression of SOD1G93A mutant gene modulates mRNAs and miRNAs expression at the level of spinal cord of MLC/SOD1G93A mice. Using a Taqman array, the Affymetrix Mouse Gene 2.0 ST approach and the MiRwalk 2.0 database, which provides information on miRNA and their predicted target genes, we revealed that muscle specific expression of SOD1G93A modulates relevant molecules of the genetic and epigenetic circuitry of myelin homeostasis in spinal cord of transgenic mice. Our study provides insights into the pathophysiological interplay between muscle and nerve and supports the hypothesis that muscle is a source of signals that can either positively or negatively affect the nervous system. PMID:26648847

  13. SOD1 overexpression prevents acute hyperglycemia-induced cerebral myogenic dysfunction: relevance to contralateral hemisphere and stroke outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Li, Weiguo; Hafez, Sherif; Abdelsaid, Mohammed; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Admission hyperglycemia (HG) amplifies vascular injury and neurological deficits in acute ischemic stroke, but the mechanisms remain controversial. We recently reported that ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury impairs the myogenic response in both hemispheres via increased nitration. However, whether HG amplifies contralateral myogenic dysfunction and whether loss of tone in the contralateral hemisphere contributes to stroke outcomes remain to be determined. Our hypothesis was that contralateral myogenic dysfunction worsens stroke outcomes after acute hyperglycemic stroke in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. Male wild-type or SOD1 transgenic rats were injected with saline or 40% glucose solution 10 min before surgery and then subjected to 30 min of ischemia/45 min or 24 h of reperfusion. In another set of animals (n = 5), SOD1 was overexpressed only in the contralateral hemisphere by stereotaxic adenovirus injection 2–3 wk before I/R. Myogenic tone and neurovascular outcomes were determined. HG exacerbated myogenic dysfunction in contralateral side only, which was associated with infarct size expansion, increased edema, and more pronounced neurological deficit. Global and selective SOD1 overexpression restored myogenic reactivity in ipsilateral and contralateral sides, respectively, and enhanced neurovascular outcomes. In conclusion, our results show that SOD1 overexpression nullified the detrimental effects of HG on myogenic tone and stroke outcomes and that the contralateral hemisphere may be a novel target for the management of acute hyperglycemic stroke. PMID:25552308

  14. Characterization of the Contribution of Genetic Background and Gender to Disease Progression in the SOD1 G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pfohl, Stephen R.; Halicek, Martin T.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequently used model to examine ALS pathophysiology. There is a lack of homogeneity in usage of the SOD1 G93A mouse, including differences in genetic background and gender, which could confound the field’s results. Objective In an analysis of 97 studies, we characterized the ALS progression for the high transgene copy control SOD1 G93A mouse on the basis of disease onset, overall lifespan, and disease duration for male and female mice on the B6SJL and C57BL/6J genetic backgrounds and quantified magnitudes of differences between groups. Methods Mean age at onset, onset assessment measure, disease duration, and overall lifespan data from each study were extracted and statistically modeled as the response of linear regression with the sex and genetic background factored as predictors. Additional examination was performed on differing experimental onset and endpoint assessment measures. Results C57BL/6 background mice show delayed onset of symptoms, increased lifespan, and an extended disease duration compared to their sex-matched B6SJL counterparts. Female B6SJL generally experience extended lifespan and delayed onset compared to their male counterparts, while female mice on the C57BL/6 background show delayed onset but no difference in survival compared to their male counterparts. Finally, different experimental protocols (tremor, rotarod, etc.) for onset determination result in notably different onset means. Conclusions Overall, the observed effect of sex on disease endpoints was smaller than that which can be attributed to the genetic background. The often-reported increase in lifespan for female mice was observed only for mice on the B6SJL background, implicating a strain-dependent effect of sex on disease progression that manifests despite identical mutant SOD1 expression. PMID:26594635

  15. Calpastatin inhibits motor neuron death and increases survival of hSOD1(G93A) mice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mala V; Campbell, Jabbar; Palaniappan, Arti; Kumar, Asok; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron disease with a poorly understood cause and no effective treatment. Given that calpains mediate neurodegeneration in other pathological states and are abnormally activated in ALS, we investigated the possible ameliorative effects of inhibiting calpain over-activation in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic (Tg) mice in vivo by neuron-specific over-expression of calpastatin (CAST), the highly selective endogenous inhibitor of calpains. Our data indicate that over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) mice, which lowered calpain activation to levels comparable to wild-type mice, inhibited the abnormal breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (spectrin, MAP2 and neurofilaments), and ameliorated motor axon loss. Disease onset in hSOD1(G93A) /CAST mice compared to littermate hSOD1(G93A) mice is delayed, which accounts for their longer time of survival. We also find that neuronal over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice inhibited production of putative neurotoxic caspase-cleaved tau and activation of Cdk5, which have been implicated in neurodegeneration in ALS models, and also reduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers. Our data indicate that inhibition of calpain with CAST is neuroprotective in an ALS mouse model. CAST (encoding calpastatin) inhibits hyperactivated calpain to prevent motor neuron disease operating through a cascade of events as indicated in the schematic, with relevance to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We propose that over-expression of CAST in motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) mice inhibits activation of CDK5, breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (NFs, MAP2 and Tau) and regulatory molecules (Cam Kinase IV, Calcineurin A), and disease-causing proteins (TDP-43, α-Synuclein and Huntingtin) to prevent neuronal loss and delay neurological deficits. In our experiments, CAST could also inhibit cleavage of Bid, Bax, AIF to prevent mitochondrial, ER and lysosome-mediated cell death mechanisms. Similarly

  16. TDP-43 modification in the hSOD1(G93A) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cai, MuDan; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult onset disease that produces gradual motor neuron cell death in the spinal cord (SP). Recently, transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43), a critical component of insoluble ubiquitinated inclusions, has received attention in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and ALS. TDP-43 modifications, including hyperphosphorylation, truncation, and ubiquitination, have been reported in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs). However, the pathogenic mechanism of TDP-43 in ALS is unclear. To determine the association between TDP-43 and neurotoxicity in an ALS model, we characterized TDP-43 expression in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice (Tg) as an ALS animal model. TDP-43 was expressed by astrocytes and microglial cells in the SP of hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice. In addition, the expression of phosphorylated and truncated TDP-43 increased in the SP of ALS mice compared with age-matched non-Tg. Furthermore, the serum iron concentration and expression of transferrin, a homeostasis-related iron protein, in the SP were increased relative to non-Tg. The protein expression level of HO-1 related to oxidative stress was increased in the SP of hSOD1(G93A) Tg relative to non-Tg. We show that an increase of TDP-43 modification, including phosphorylation or truncation, associates with dysfunctional iron homeostasis and an increase in oxidative stress in the SP of symptomatic hSOD1(G93A) Tg. These findings suggest that modified TDP-43 may be involved in motor neuron death in the SP of a SOD1(G93A)-expressing familial ALS (fALS) animal model. PMID:25213598

  17. SOD1, but not SOD3, deficiency accelerates diabetic renal injury in C57BL/6-Ins2Akita diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroki; Fujishima, Hiromi; Takahashi, Keiko; Sato, Takehiro; Shimizu, Tatsunori; Morii, Tsukasa; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shirasawa, Takuji; Qi, Zhonghua; Breyer, Matthew D.; Harris, Raymond C.; Yamada, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Takamune

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a major defender against excessive superoxide generated under hyperglycemia. We have recently reported that renal SOD1 (cytosolic CuZn-SOD) and SOD3 (extracellular CuZn-SOD) isoenzymes are remarkably down-regulated in KK/Ta-Ins2Akita diabetic mice, which exhibit progressive diabetic nephropathy (DN), but not in DN-resistant C57BL/6- Ins2Akita (C57BL/6-Akita) diabetic mice. To determine the role of SOD1 and SOD3 in DN, we generated C57BL/6-Akita diabetic mice with deficiency of SOD1 and/or SOD3 and investigated their renal phenotype at the age of 20 weeks. Increased glomerular superoxide levels were observed in SOD1−/−SOD3+/+ and SOD1−/−SOD3−/− C57BL/6-Akita mice but not in SOD1+/+SOD3−/− C57BL/6-Akita mice. The SOD1−/−SOD3+/+ and SOD1−/−SOD3−/− C57BL/6-Akita mice exhibited higher glomerular filtration rate, increased urinary albumin levels, and advanced mesangial expansion as compared with SOD1+/+SOD3+/+ C57BL/6-Akita mice, yet the severity of DN did not differ between the SOD1−/−SOD3+/+ and SOD1−/−SOD3−/− C57BL/6-Akita groups. Increased renal mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), reduced glomerular nitric oxide (NO), and increased renal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production were noted in the SOD1−/−SOD3+/+ and SOD1−/−SOD3−/− C57BL/6-Akita mice. This finding indicates that such renal changes in fibrogenic cytokines, NO, and PGE2, possibly caused by superoxide excess, would contribute to the development of overt albuminuria by promoting mesangial expansion, endothelial dysfunction, and glomerular hyperfiltration. The present results demonstrate that deficiency of SOD1, but not SOD3, increases renal superoxide in the setting of diabetes and causes overt renal injury in nephropathy-resistant diabetic mice, and that SOD3 deficiency does not provide additive effects on the severity of DN in SOD1-deficient C57BL/6-Akita mice

  18. Structures of PmSOD1 and PmSOD2, two superoxide dismutases from the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Schott, Eric J; Vasta, Gerardo R; Silva, Abelardo M

    2006-11-01

    Perkinsus marinus, a facultative intracellular parasite of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, is responsible for mass mortalities of oyster populations. P. marinus trophozoites survive and proliferate within oyster hemocytes, invading most tissues and fluids, thus causing a systemic infection that eventually kills the host. The phagocytosis of P. marinus trophozoites lacks a respiratory burst, suggesting that the parasite has mechanisms that actively abrogate the host's oxidative defense responses. One mechanism and the first line of defense against oxidative damage is the dismutation of superoxide radical to molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutases (SODs). P. marinus possesses two iron-cofactored SODs, PmSOD1 and PmSOD2. Here, the crystallization and X-ray structures of both PmSOD1 and PmSOD2 are presented. PMID:17077482

  19. Screening of SOD1, FUS and TARDBP genes in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in central-southern China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lihua; Jiao, Bin; Xiao, Tingting; Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Zhifan; Du, Juan; Yan, Xinxiang; Wang, Junling; Tang, Beisha; Shen, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons of the brain, brainstem and spinal cord. To date, mutations in more than 30 genes have been linked to the pathogenesis of ALS. Among them, SOD1, FUS and TARDBP are ranked as the three most common genes associated with ALS. However, no mutation analysis has been reported in central-southern China. In this study, we sequenced SOD1, FUS and TARDBP in a central-southern Chinese cohort of 173 patients with ALS (15 familial ALS and 158 sporadic ALS) to detect mutations. As a result, five missense mutations in SOD1, namely, p.D101N, p.D101G, p.C111Y, p.N86S and p.V87A, were identified in three unrelated familial probands and three sporadic cases; two mutations in FUS were found in two unrelated familial probands, including an insertion mutation (p.P525_Y526insY) and a missense mutation (p.R521H); no variants of TARDBP were observed in patients. Therefore, SOD1 mutations were present in 20.0% of familial ALS patients and 1.9% of sporadic ALS patients, while FUS mutations were responsible for 13.3% of familial ALS cases, and TARDBP mutations were rare in either familial or sporadic ALS cases. This study broadens the known mutational spectrum in patients with ALS and further demonstrates the necessity for genetic screening in ALS patients from central-southern China. PMID:27604643

  20. Screening of SOD1, FUS and TARDBP genes in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in central-southern China

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lihua; Jiao, Bin; Xiao, Tingting; Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Zhifan; Du, Juan; Yan, Xinxiang; Wang, Junling; Tang, Beisha; Shen, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons of the brain, brainstem and spinal cord. To date, mutations in more than 30 genes have been linked to the pathogenesis of ALS. Among them, SOD1, FUS and TARDBP are ranked as the three most common genes associated with ALS. However, no mutation analysis has been reported in central-southern China. In this study, we sequenced SOD1, FUS and TARDBP in a central-southern Chinese cohort of 173 patients with ALS (15 familial ALS and 158 sporadic ALS) to detect mutations. As a result, five missense mutations in SOD1, namely, p.D101N, p.D101G, p.C111Y, p.N86S and p.V87A, were identified in three unrelated familial probands and three sporadic cases; two mutations in FUS were found in two unrelated familial probands, including an insertion mutation (p.P525_Y526insY) and a missense mutation (p.R521H); no variants of TARDBP were observed in patients. Therefore, SOD1 mutations were present in 20.0% of familial ALS patients and 1.9% of sporadic ALS patients, while FUS mutations were responsible for 13.3% of familial ALS cases, and TARDBP mutations were rare in either familial or sporadic ALS cases. This study broadens the known mutational spectrum in patients with ALS and further demonstrates the necessity for genetic screening in ALS patients from central-southern China. PMID:27604643

  1. Rosmarinic Acid Alleviates Neurological Symptoms in the G93A-SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Choi, Juli; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in paralysis of voluntary skeletal muscles and eventually death, usually within 2~3 years of symptom onset. The pathophysiology mechanism underlying ALS is not yet clearly understood. Moreover the available medication for treating ALS, riluzole, only modestly improves neurological symptoms and increases survival by a few months. Therefore, improved therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In the present study, we investigated whether rosmarinic acid has a therapeutic potential to alleviate neurological deterioration in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS. Treatment of G93A-SOD1 transgenic mice with rosmarinic acid from 7 weeks of age at the dose of 400 mg/kg/day significantly extended survival, and relieved motor function deficits. Specifically, disease onset and symptom progression were delayed by more than one month. These symptomatic improvements were correlated with decreased oxidative stress and reduced neuronal loss in the ventral horns of G93A-SOD1 mice. These results support that rosmarinic acid is a potentially useful supplement for relieving ALS symptoms. PMID:26713081

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis lipophosphoglycan mutants have reduced adherence and cytotoxicity to human ectocervical cells.

    PubMed

    Bastida-Corcuera, Felix D; Okumura, Cheryl Y; Colocoussi, Angie; Johnson, Patricia J

    2005-11-01

    The extracellular human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis is covered by a dense glycocalyx thought to play a role in host-parasite interactions. The main component of the glycocalyx is lipophosphoglycan (LPG), a polysaccharide anchored in the plasma membrane by inositol phosphoceramide. To study the role of LPG in trichomonads, we produced T. vaginalis LPG mutants by chemical mutagenesis and lectin selection and characterized them using morphological, biochemical, and functional assays. Two independently selected LPG mutants, with growth rates comparable to that of the wild-type (parent) strain, lost the ability to bind the lectins Ricinnus comunis agglutinin I (RCA120) and wheat germ agglutinin, indicating alterations in surface galactose and glucosamine residues. LPG isolated from mutants migrated faster than parent strain LPG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting the mutants had shorter LPG molecules. Dionex high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection analyses revealed galactosamine, glucosamine, galactose, glucose, mannose/xylose, and rhamnose as the main monosaccharides of T. vaginalis parent strain LPG. LPG from both mutants showed a reduction of galactose and glucosamine, corresponding with the reduced size of their LPG molecules and inability to bind the lectins RCA120 and wheat germ agglutinin. Mutant parasites were defective in attachment to plastic, a characteristic associated with avirulent strains of T. vaginalis. Moreover, the mutants were less adherent and less cytotoxic to human vaginal ectocervical cells in vitro than the parental strain. Finally, while parent strain LPG could inhibit the attachment of parent strain parasites to vaginal cells, LPG from either mutant could not inhibit attachment. These combined results demonstrate that T. vaginalis adherence to host cells is LPG mediated and that an altered LPG leads to reduced adherence and cytotoxicity of this parasite. PMID

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis Lipophosphoglycan Mutants Have Reduced Adherence and Cytotoxicity to Human Ectocervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Corcuera, Felix D.; Okumura, Cheryl Y.; Colocoussi, Angie; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2005-01-01

    The extracellular human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis is covered by a dense glycocalyx thought to play a role in host-parasite interactions. The main component of the glycocalyx is lipophosphoglycan (LPG), a polysaccharide anchored in the plasma membrane by inositol phosphoceramide. To study the role of LPG in trichomonads, we produced T. vaginalis LPG mutants by chemical mutagenesis and lectin selection and characterized them using morphological, biochemical, and functional assays. Two independently selected LPG mutants, with growth rates comparable to that of the wild-type (parent) strain, lost the ability to bind the lectins Ricinnus comunis agglutinin I (RCA120) and wheat germ agglutinin, indicating alterations in surface galactose and glucosamine residues. LPG isolated from mutants migrated faster than parent strain LPG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting the mutants had shorter LPG molecules. Dionex high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection analyses revealed galactosamine, glucosamine, galactose, glucose, mannose/xylose, and rhamnose as the main monosaccharides of T. vaginalis parent strain LPG. LPG from both mutants showed a reduction of galactose and glucosamine, corresponding with the reduced size of their LPG molecules and inability to bind the lectins RCA120 and wheat germ agglutinin. Mutant parasites were defective in attachment to plastic, a characteristic associated with avirulent strains of T. vaginalis. Moreover, the mutants were less adherent and less cytotoxic to human vaginal ectocervical cells in vitro than the parental strain. Finally, while parent strain LPG could inhibit the attachment of parent strain parasites to vaginal cells, LPG from either mutant could not inhibit attachment. These combined results demonstrate that T. vaginalis adherence to host cells is LPG mediated and that an altered LPG leads to reduced adherence and cytotoxicity of this parasite. PMID

  4. Extra virgin olive oil intake delays the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with reduced reticulum stress and autophagy in muscle of SOD1G93A mice.

    PubMed

    Oliván, Sara; Martínez-Beamonte, Roberto; Calvo, Ana C; Surra, Joaquín C; Manzano, Raquel; Arnal, Carmen; Osta, Rosario; Osada, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease associated with mutations in antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase 1. Albeit there is no treatment for this disease, new insights related to an exacerbated lipid metabolism have been reported. In connection with the hypermetabolic lipid status, the hypothesis whether nature of dietary fat might delay the progression of the disease was tested by using a transgenic mouse that overexpresses the human SOD1G93A variant. For this purpose, SOD1G93A mice were assigned randomly to one of the following three experimental groups: (1) a standard chow diet (control, n=21), (2) a chow diet enriched with 20% (w/w) extra virgin olive oil (EVOO, n=22) and (3) a chow diet containing 20% palm oil (palm, n=20). They received the diets for 8 weeks and the progression of the disease was assessed. On the standard chow diet, average plasma cholesterol levels were lower than those mice receiving the high-fat diets. Mice fed an EVOO diet showed a significant higher survival and better motor performance than control mice. EVOO group mice survived longer and showed better motor performance and larger muscle fiber area than animals receiving palm. Moreover, the EVOO-enriched diet improved the muscle status as shown by expression of myogenic factors (Myod1 and Myog) and autophagy markers (LC3 and Beclin1), as well as diminished endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through decreasing Atf6 and Grp78. Our results demonstrate that EVOO may be effective in increasing survival rate, improving motor coordination together with a potential amelioration of ER stress, autophagy and muscle damage. PMID:24917047

  5. Unglycosylated recombinant human glutathione peroxidase 3 mutant from Escherichia coli is active as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yu, Yang; Xing, Ruiqing; Guo, Xiao; Liu, Dali; Wei, Jingyan; Song, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is a glycosylated member of GPx family and can catalyze the reaction of different types of peroxides with GSH to form their corresponding alcohols in vitro. The active center of GPx3 is selenocysteine (Sec), which is incorporated into proteins by a specific mechanism. In this study, we prepared a recombinant human GPx3 (rhGPx3) mutant with all Cys changed to Ser from a Cys auxotrophic strain of E. coli, BL21(DE3)cys. Although lacking post-translational modification, rhGPx3 mutant still retained the ability to reduce H2O2 and PLPC-OOH. Study on the quaternary structure suggested that rhGPx3 mutant existed as a monomer in solution, which is different from native tetrameric GPx3. Loss of the catalytic activity was considered to be attributed to both the absence of glycosylation and the failure of the tetramer. Further analysis was performed to compare the structures of rhGPx3 and GPx4 mutant, which were quite similar except for oligomerization loop. The differences of amino acid composition and electrostatic potentials on the oligomerization loop may affect the binding of large substrates to rhGPx3 mutant. This research provides an important foundation for biosynthesis of functionally selenium-containing GPx3 mutant in E.coli. PMID:25331785

  6. Marked changes in dendritic structure and spine density precede significant neuronal death in vulnerable cortical pyramidal neuron populations in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Matthew J; Mu, Erica W H; Noakes, Peter G; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Bellingham, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterised by the death of upper (corticospinal) and lower motor neurons (MNs) with progressive muscle weakness. This incurable disease is clinically heterogeneous and its aetiology remains unknown. Increased excitability of corticospinal MNs has been observed prior to symptoms in human and rodent studies. Increased excitability has been correlated with structural changes in neuronal dendritic arbors and spines for decades. Here, using a modified Golgi-Cox staining method, we have made the first longitudinal study examining the dendrites of pyramidal neurons from the motor cortex, medial pre-frontal cortex, somatosensory cortex and entorhinal cortex of hSOD1(G93A) (SOD1) mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermate controls at postnatal (P) days 8-15, 28-35, 65-75 and 120. Progressive decreases in dendritic length and spine density commencing at pre-symptomatic ages (P8-15 or P28-35) were observed in layer V pyramidal neurons within the motor cortex and medial pre-frontal cortex of SOD1 mice compared to WT mice. Spine loss without concurrent dendritic pathology was present in the pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex from disease-onset (P65-75). Our results from the SOD1 model suggest that dendritic and dendritic spine changes foreshadow and underpin the neuromotor phenotypes present in ALS and may contribute to the varied cognitive, executive function and extra-motor symptoms commonly seen in ALS patients. Determining if these phenomena are compensatory or maladaptive may help explain differential susceptibility of neurons to degeneration in ALS. PMID:27488828

  7. Expression of human AChR extracellular domain mutants with improved characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Giastas, Petros; Bitzopoulou, Kalliopi; Evangelakou, Panagiota; Sideri, Anastasia; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2014-02-01

    The muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has a central role in neuromuscular transmission, and is the major target in the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG). We created mutants of the extracellular domains (ECDs) of the human α1, β1, δ and ε AChR subunits, whereby their Cys-loop was exchanged for that of the acetylcholine binding protein. The mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and had improved solubility resulting in 2- to 43-fold higher expression yields compared to the wild type. An additional mutant was created for the α1 ECD restoring its glycosylation site within the Cys-loop and its α-bungarotoxin binding ability. Furthermore, we constructed dimeric and pentameric concatamers of the mutant ECDs. All concatamers were successfully expressed as soluble secreted proteins, although the pentamers had about 10-fold lower expression than the dimers and were more susceptible to fragmentation. Initial crystallizations with the mutant ECDs were promising, and we reproducibly obtained crystals of the β1 ECD, diffracting at ~12 Å. Further optimization is underway to obtain crystals suitable for high resolution crystallography. The proteins described herein are useful tools in structural studies of the human muscle AChR and can be used in applications requiring high yields such as therapeutic adsorbents for MG autoantibodies. PMID:24246999

  8. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:27001628

  9. Modulation of cellular and viral promoters by mutant human p53 proteins found in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deb, S; Jackson, C T; Subler, M A; Martin, D W

    1992-01-01

    Wild-type p53 has recently been shown to repress transcription from several cellular and viral promoters. Since p53 mutations are the most frequently reported genetic defects in human cancers, it becomes important to study the effects of mutations of p53 on promoter functions. We, therefore, have studied the effects of wild-type and mutant human p53 on the human proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter and on several viral promoters, including the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL9 promoter, the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoter-enhancer, and the long terminal repeat promoters of Rous sarcoma virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. HeLa cells were cotransfected with a wild-type or mutant p53 expression vector and a plasmid containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene under viral (or cellular) promoter control. As expected, expression of the wild-type p53 inhibited promoter function. Expression of a p53 with a mutation at any one of the four amino acid positions 175, 248, 273, or 281, however, correlated with a significant increase of the PCNA promoter activity (2- to 11-fold). The viral promoters were also activated, although to a somewhat lesser extent. We also showed that activation by a mutant p53 requires a minimal promoter containing a lone TATA box. A more significant increase (25-fold) in activation occurs when the promoter contains a binding site for the activating transcription factor or cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Using Saos-2 cells that do not express p53, we showed that activation by a mutant p53 was a direct enhancement. The mutant forms of p53 used in this study are found in various cancer cells. The activation of PCNA by mutant p53s may indicate a way to increase cell proliferation by the mutant p53s. Thus, our data indicate a possible functional role for the mutants of p53 found in cancer cells in activating several important loci, including PCNA. Images PMID:1356162

  10. Consequences of zygote injection and germline transfer of mutant human mitochondrial DNA in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Mehta, Arpit; Hentall, Ian D; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Lewin, Alfred S; Guy, John

    2015-10-20

    Considerable evidence supports mutations in mitochondrial genes as the cause of maternally inherited diseases affecting tissues that rely primarily on oxidative energy metabolism, usually the nervous system, the heart, and skeletal muscles. Mitochondrial diseases are diverse, and animal models currently are limited. Here we introduced a mutant human mitochondrial gene responsible for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) into the mouse germ line using fluorescence imaging for tissue-specific enrichment in the target retinal ganglion cells. A mitochondria-targeted adeno-associated virus (MTS-AAV) containing the mutant human NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4) gene followed by mitochondrial-encoded mCherry was microinjected into zygotes. Female founders with mCherry fluorescence on ophthalmoscopy were backcrossed with normal males for eight generations. Mutant human ND4 DNA was 20% of mouse ND4 and did not integrate into the host genome. Translated human ND4 protein assembled into host respiratory complexes, decreasing respiratory chain function and increasing oxidative stress. Swelling of the optic nerve head was followed by progressive demise of ganglion cells and their axons, the hallmarks of human LHON. Early visual loss that began at 3 mo and progressed to blindness 8 mo after birth was reversed by intraocular injection of MTS-AAV expressing wild-type human ND4. The technology of introducing human mitochondrial genes into the mouse germ line has never been described, to our knowledge, and has implications not only for creating animal models recapitulating the counterpart human disorder but more importantly for reversing the adverse effects of the mutant gene using gene therapy to deliver the wild-type allele. PMID:26438859

  11. Neurodegenerative mutants in Drosophila: a means to identify genes and mechanisms involved in human diseases?

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Doris

    2005-11-01

    There are 50 ways to leave your lover (Simon 1987) but many more to kill your brain cells. Several neurodegenerative diseases in humans, like Alzheimer's disease, have been intensely studied but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unknown for most of them. For those syndromes where associated gene products have been identified their biochemistry and physiological as well as pathogenic function is often still under debate. This is in part due to the inherent limitations of genetic analyses in humans and other mammals and therefore experimentally accessible invertebrate in vivo models, such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, have recently been introduced to investigate neurodegenerative syndromes. Several laboratories have used transgenic approaches in Drosophila to study the human genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases. This has added substantially to our understanding of the mechanisms leading to neurodegenerative diseases in humans. The isolation and characterization of Drosophila mutants, which display a variety of neurodegenerative phenotypes, also provide valuable insights into genes, pathways, and mechanisms causing neurodegeneration. So far only about two dozen such mutants have been described but already their characterization reveals an involvement of various cellular functions in neurodegeneration, ranging from preventing oxidative stress to RNA editing. Some of the isolated genes can already be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases and hopefully the isolation and characterization of more of these mutants, together with an analysis of homologous genes in vertebrate models, will provide insights into the genetic and molecular basis of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16187075

  12. Neuroprotective Effect of Bexarotene in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Riancho, Javier; Ruiz-Soto, María; Berciano, María T.; Berciano, José; Lafarga, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive weakness and muscle atrophy related to the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs) without a curative treatment. There is experimental evidence suggesting that retinoids may be involved in ALS pathogenesis. Bexarotene (Bxt) is a retinoid-X receptor agonist used in the treatment of cutaneous lymphoma with a favorable safety profile whose effects have been recently investigated in other neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we analyze the potential therapeutic effect of Bxt in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Mice were treated with Bxt or vehicle five times per week from day 60 onward. Survival, weight, and neuromuscular function studies together with histological and biochemical analyses were performed. Bxt significantly delayed motor function deterioration, ameliorated the loss of body weight, and extended mice survival up to 30% of the symptomatic period. Histological analyses of the lumbosacral spinal cord revealed that Bxt markedly delayed the early motor-neuron degeneration occurring at presymptomatic stages in ALS-transgenic mice. Bxt treatment contributed to preserve the MN homeostasis in the SOD1G93A mice. Particularly, it reduced the neuronal loss and the chromatolytic response, induced nucleolar hypertrophy, decreased the formation of ubiquitylated inclusions, and modulated the lysosomal response. As an agonist of the retinoic-X receptor (RXR) pathway, Bxt notably increased the nuclear expression of the RXRα throughout transcriptionally active euchromatin domains. Bxt also contributed to protect the MN environment by reducing reactive astrogliosis and preserving perisomatic synapsis. Overall, these neuroprotective effects suggest that treatment with Bxt could be useful in ALS, particularly in those cases related to SOD1 mutations. PMID:26190974

  13. Comparison of dendritic calcium transients in juvenile wild type and SOD1(G93A) mouse lumbar motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Katharina A; Lamano, Jonathan B; Samuels, Julienne; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of spinal motoneurons in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown alterations long before disease onset, including increased dendritic branching, increased persistent Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents, and impaired axonal transport. In this study dendritic Ca(2+) entry was investigated using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp of juvenile (P4-11) motoneurons. Neurons were filled with both Ca(2+) Green-1 and Texas Red dextrans, and line scans performed throughout. Steps were taken to account for different sources of variability, including (1) dye filling and laser penetration, (2) dendritic anatomy, and (3) the time elapsed from the start of recording. First, Ca(2+) Green-1 fluorescence was normalized by Texas Red; next, neurons were reconstructed so anatomy could be evaluated; finally, time was recorded. Customized software detected the largest Ca(2+) transients (area under the curve) from each line scan and matched it with parameters above. Overall, larger dendritic diameter and shorter path distance from the soma were significant predictors of larger transients, while time was not significant up to 2 h (data thereafter was dropped). However, Ca(2+) transients showed additional variability. Controlling for previous factors, significant variation was found between Ca(2+) signals from different processes of the same neuron in 3/7 neurons. This could reflect differential expression of Ca(2+) channels, local neuromodulation or other variations. Finally, Ca(2+) transients in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons were significantly smaller than in non-transgenic motoneurons. In conclusion, motoneuron processes show highly variable Ca(2+) transients, but these transients are smaller overall in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons. PMID:25914627

  14. Recent progress towards an effective treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using the SOD1 mouse model in a preclinical setting.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, fatal and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. Motor neurone degeneration can be caused by genetic mutation but the exact etiology of the disease, particularly for sporadic illness, still remains unclear. Therapeutics which target known pathogenic mechanisms involved in ALS, such as protein aggregation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria dysfunction, are currently being pursued in order to provide neuroprotection which may be able to slow down, or perhaps even halt, disease progression. This present review focuses on the compounds which have been recently evaluated using the SOD1 mouse model, the most widely used preclinical model for ALS research. PMID:27012524

  15. A human brain tumor-derived PDGFR-alpha deletion mutant is transforming.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I D; Dirks, P B

    2003-02-01

    Aberrant receptor tyrosine kinase signaling plays an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of brain tumors. We have been studying a previously identified human glioblastoma-derived PDGFR-alpha mutant that has an in-frame deletion in the extracellular domain, causing loss of exons 8 and 9 (PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)). In the primary tumor, this deletion mutant receptor was shown to be amplified and overexpressed. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression, activity, localization, and transformation properties of this deletion mutant. In the absence of serum, or PDGF-AA, PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, indicating ligand-independent autoactivation. Localization by staining and cell surface biotinylation studies revealed expression of the deletion mutant predominantly in the cytoplasm, with very little present on the cell surface. To determine if PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was oncogenic, we transfected wild-type and mutant receptors into Rat1 cells and performed analyses of cell growth, in vitro transformation, and subcutaneous growth in the nude mouse. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing cells displayed enhanced cell growth and survival in low serum, and formed foci in monolayer cultures. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing Rat1 cells were also tumorigenic when injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Expression of PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was also associated with increased c-Jun phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF ligand, demonstrating also that the mutant receptor is associated with altered intracellular signaling. These data demonstrate that PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) is transforming, and it is the first demonstration of a naturally occurring tumor-derived mutant PDGFR-alpha with oncogenic properties. PMID:12569364

  16. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  17. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  18. Activation of AMPK attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury by upregulation of PGC1α and SOD1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guizuo; Song, Yang; Feng, Wei; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Yanting; Xie, Xinming; Pan, Yilin; Ke, Rui; Li, Shaojun; Li, Fangwei; Yang, Lan; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that an imbalance between oxidation and antioxidation is involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been shown to inhibit the occurrence of ALI/ARDS. However, it is unknown whether activation of AMPK benefits ALI/ARDS by restoration of the oxidant and antioxidant balance, and which mechanisms are responsible for this process. The present study aimed to address these issues. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced pronounced pathological changes of ALI in mice; these were accompanied by elevated production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) compared with control mice. Prior treatment of mice with the AMPK agonist metformin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced development of ALI, reduced the elevation of MDA and increased the activity of SOD. Further analysis indicated that activation of AMPK also stimulated the protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). This study suggests that activation of AMPK by metformin inhibits oxidative stress by upregulation of PGC1α and SOD1, thereby suppressing the development of ALI/ARDS, and has potential value in the clinical treatment of such conditions. PMID:27602077

  19. Time-Point Dependent Activation of Autophagy and the UPS in SOD1G93A Mice Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana Cristina; Gasco, Samanta; Muñoz, María Jesús; Zaragoza, Pilar; Osta, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a selective loss of motor neurons together with a progressive muscle weakness. Albeit the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease remain unknown, growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle can be a target of ALS toxicity. In particular, the two main intracellular degradation mechanisms, autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome degradative system (UPS) have been poorly studied in this tissue. In this study we investigated the activation of autophagy and the UPS as well as apoptosis in the skeletal muscle from SOD1G93A mice along disease progression. Our results showed a significant upregulation of proteasome activity at early symptomatic stage, while the autophagy activation was found at presymptomatic and terminal stages. The mRNA upregulated levels of LC3, p62, Beclin1, Atg5 and E2f1 were only observed at symptomatic and terminal stages, which reinforced the time-point activation of autophagy. Furthermore, no apoptosis activation was observed along disease progression. The combined data provided clear evidence for the first time that there is a time-point dependent activation of autophagy and UPS in the skeletal muscle from SOD1G93A mice. PMID:26244336

  20. Experimental therapy of human glioma by means of a genetically engineered virus mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Martuza, R.L.; Malick, A.; Markert, J.M.; Ruffner, K.L.; Coen, D.M. )

    1991-05-10

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and are almost always fatal. A thymidine kinase-negative mutant of herpes simplex virus-1 (dlsptk) that is attenuated for neurovirulence was tested as a possible treatment for gliomas. In cell culture, dlsptk killed two long-term human glioma lines and three short-term human glioma cell populations. In nude mice with implanted subcutaneous and subrenal U87 human gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk caused growth inhibition. In nude mice with intracranial U87 gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk prolonged survival. Genetically engineered viruses such as dlsptk merit further evaluation as novel antineoplastic agents.

  1. A novel 10-base pair insertion mutation in exon 5 of the SOD1 gene in a Chinese family with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyu; Li, Mao; Zhu, Wenjia; Mao, Fengbiao; Wang, Jiesi; Sun, Zhongsheng; Huang, Xusheng

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease. Several genes are associated with ALS. Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is one of the most commonly mutated genes in ALS, and more than 160 mutations in SOD1 have been reported. We reported a novel heterozygous insertion mutation that led to a frameshift and a premature termination at position 136 in exon 5 of the SOD1 gene (c.392_393insGCAAAGGTGG; p.N132Qfs*5) in a Chinese familial ALS pedigree. This mutation in the pedigree demonstrated an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and a phenotype characterized by an early onset (approximately 34 years old) with a relatively rapid course (approximately 2 years) and limb onset with respiratory involvement. The clinical feature of the p.N132Qfs*5 mutation was nearly identical to a previously reported mutation (Gly127insTGGG). Experiments in G127X mice demonstrated that the G127X mutation was pathogenic. SOD1 activity in the p.N132Qfs*5 mutation carriers in the family decreased significantly compared with normal family members. In conclusion, we identified a novel SOD1 mutation in an ALS family, which is an important addition to the catalog of SOD1 mutations in ALS. PMID:27297615

  2. GLT1 overexpression in SOD1(G93A) mouse cervical spinal cord does not preserve diaphragm function or extend disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hala, Tamara J; Seetharam, Suneil; Poulsen, David J; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by relatively rapid degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons, with death normally occurring 2-5years following diagnosis primarily due to respiratory paralysis resulting from phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) loss and consequent diaphragm denervation. In ALS, cellular abnormalities are not limited to MNs. For example, decreased levels and aberrant functioning of the major central nervous system (CNS) glutamate transporter, GLT1, occur in spinal cord and motor cortex astrocytes of both humans with ALS and in SOD1(G93A) rodents, a widely studied ALS animal model. This results in dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis and consequent glutamate excitotoxicity, a primary mechanism responsible for MN loss in ALS animal models and in the human disease. Given these observations of GLT1 dysfunction in areas of MN loss, as well as the importance of testing therapeutic strategies for preserving PhMNs in ALS, we evaluated intraspinal delivery of an adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8)-Gfa2 vector to the cervical spinal cord ventral horn of SOD1(G93A) ALS mice for focally restoring intraspinal GLT1 expression. AAV8 was specifically injected into the ventral horn bilaterally throughout the cervical enlargement at 110days of age, a clinically-relevant time point coinciding with phenotypic/symptomatic disease onset. Intraspinal delivery of AAV8-Gfa2-GLT1 resulted in robust transduction primarily of GFAP(+) astrocytes that persisted until disease endstage, as well as a 2-3-fold increase in total intraspinal GLT1 protein expression in the ventral horn. Despite this robust level of astrocyte transduction and GLT1 elevation, GLT1 overexpression did not protect PhMNs, preserve histological PhMN innervation of the diaphragm NMJ, or prevent decline in diaphragmatic respiratory function as assessed by phrenic nerve-diaphragm compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recordings compared to control AAV8-Gfa2-eGFP injected

  3. Pharmacological NAD-Boosting Strategies Improve Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Complex I-Mutant Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Felici, Roberta; Lapucci, Andrea; Cavone, Leonardo; Pratesi, Sara; Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are devastating genetic diseases for which efficacious therapies are still an unmet need. Recent studies report that increased availability of intracellular NAD obtained by inhibition of the NAD-consuming enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 or supplementation with the NAD-precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) ameliorates energetic derangement and symptoms in mouse models of mitochondrial disorders. Whether these pharmacological approaches also improve bioenergetics of human cells harboring mitochondrial defects is unknown. It is also unclear whether the same signaling cascade is prompted by PARP-1 inhibitors and NR supplementation to improve mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we show that human fibroblasts mutant for the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 (NDUFS1) subunit of respiratory complex I have similar ATP, NAD, and mitochondrial content compared with control cells, but show reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mutant cells also show increased transcript levels of mitochondrial DNA but not nuclear DNA respiratory complex subunits, suggesting activation of a compensatory response. At variance with prior work in mice, however, NR supplementation, but not PARP-1 inhibition, increased intracellular NAD content in NDUFS1 mutant human fibroblasts. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibitors, but not NR supplementation, increased transcription of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes constitutively induced in mutant cells. Still, both NR and PARP-1 inhibitors restored mitochondrial membrane potential and increased organelle content as well as oxidative activity of NDUFS1-deficient fibroblasts. Overall, data provide the first evidence that in human cells harboring a mitochondrial respiratory defect exposure to NR or PARP-1, inhibitors activate different signaling pathways that are not invariantly prompted by NAD increases, but equally able to improve energetic

  4. Effectors and potential targets selectively upregulated in human KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyu; Sordella, Raffaella; Powers, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and proteomic analysis of human tumor samples can provide an important compliment to information obtained from model systems. Here we examined protein and gene expression from the Cancer Genome and Proteome Atlases (TCGA and TCPA) to characterize proteins and protein-coding genes that are selectively upregulated in KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas. Phosphoprotein activation of several MAPK signaling components was considerably stronger in KRAS-mutants than any other group of tumors, even those with activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and BRAF. Co-occurring mutations in KRAS-mutants were associated with differential activation of PDK1 and PKC-alpha. Genes showing strong activation in RNA-seq data included negative regulators of RTK/RAF/MAPK signaling along with potential oncogenic effectors including activators of Rac and Rho proteins and the receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase genes PTPRM and PTPRE. These results corroborate RAF/MAPK signaling as an important therapeutic target in KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and pinpoint new potential targets. PMID:27301828

  5. Conformational stability and warfarin-binding properties of human serum albumin studied by recombinant mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, H; Kragh-Hansen, U; Tanase, S; Nakajou, K; Mitarai, M; Iwao, Y; Maruyama, T; Otagiri, M

    2001-01-01

    Correctly folded recombinant wild-type human serum albumin and the single-residue mutants K199A, W214A, R218H and H242Q were produced with the use of a yeast expression system. The changes in R218H resulted in a pronounced decrease in intrinsic fluorescence. Thermodynamic parameters for thermal denaturation of the present mutants and of five additional mutants have been determined, showing small increases in stability for two mutants (R218H and H242Q) and a larger decrease in stability for one (W214A). In the last of these, denaturation was a heterogeneous process starting at physiological temperature. The high-affinity binding constant for warfarin at pH 7.4 was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy: there was a significant increase in affinity for binding of warfarin to H242Q and K199A and a smaller decrease in affinity for W214A and R218H. The findings show that Trp-214 is not as essential for the high-affinity binding of warfarin as has previously been thought. PMID:11415459

  6. Cross-triggered and cascaded recycling amplification for ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing of the mutant human p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiyun; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Based on an endonuclease-assisted, cross-triggered and cascaded recycling amplification strategy, the construction of a simple electrochemical sensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of the mutant p53 gene in human serum is described. Using this new signal amplification approach, the sub-femtomolar level of the mutant p53 gene can be selectively detected. PMID:27331773

  7. Depressed excitability and ion currents linked to slow exocytotic fusion pore in chromaffin cells of the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Gallardo, Enrique; de Pascual, Ricardo; Fernández-Morales, José-Carlos; Arranz-Tagarro, Juan-Alberto; Maroto, Marcos; Nanclares, Carmen; Gandía, Luis; de Diego, Antonio M G; Padín, Juan-Fernando; García, Antonio G

    2015-01-01

    Altered synaptic transmission with excess glutamate release has been implicated in the loss of motoneurons occurring in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Hyperexcitability or hypoexcitability of motoneurons from mice carrying the ALS mutation SOD1(G93A) (mSOD1) has also been reported. Here we have investigated the excitability, the ion currents, and the kinetics of the exocytotic fusion pore in chromaffin cells from postnatal day 90 to postnatal day 130 mSOD1 mice, when motor deficits are already established. With respect to wild-type (WT), mSOD1 chromaffin cells had a decrease in the following parameters: 95% in spontaneous action potentials, 70% in nicotinic current for acetylcholine (ACh), 35% in Na(+) current, 40% in Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current, and 53% in voltage-dependent K(+) current. Ca(2+) current was increased by 37%, but the ACh-evoked elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) was unchanged. Single exocytotic spike events triggered by ACh had the following differences (mSOD1 vs. WT): 36% lower rise rate, 60% higher decay time, 51% higher half-width, 13% lower amplitude, and 61% higher quantal size. The expression of the α3-subtype of nicotinic receptors and proteins of the exocytotic machinery was unchanged in the brain and adrenal medulla of mSOD1, with respect to WT mice. A slower fusion pore opening, expansion, and closure are likely linked to the pronounced reduction in cell excitability and in the ion currents driving action potentials in mSOD1, compared with WT chromaffin cells. PMID:25377090

  8. Group II archaeal chaperonin recognition of partially folded human γD-crystallin mutants.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Oksana A; Yang, Jingkun; King, Jonathan A; Knee, Kelly M

    2014-06-01

    The features in partially folded intermediates that allow the group II chaperonins to distinguish partially folded from native states remain unclear. The archaeal group II chaperonin from Methanococcus Mauripaludis (Mm-Cpn) assists the in vitro refolding of the well-characterized β-sheet lens protein human γD-crystallin (HγD-Crys). The domain interface and buried cores of this Greek key conformation include side chains, which might be exposed in partially folded intermediates. We sought to assess whether particular features buried in the native state, but absent from the native protein surface, might serve as recognition signals. The features tested were (a) paired aromatic side chains, (b) side chains in the interface between the duplicated domains of HγD-Crys, and (c) side chains in the buried core which result in congenital cataract when substituted. We tested the Mm-Cpn suppression of aggregation of these HγD-Crys mutants upon dilution out of denaturant. Mm-Cpn was capable of suppressing the off-pathway aggregation of the three classes of mutants indicating that the buried residues were not recognition signals. In fact, Mm-Cpn recognized the HγD-Crys mutants better than (wild-type) WT and refolded most mutant HγD-Crys to levels twice that of WT HγD-Crys. This presumably represents the increased population or longer lifetimes of the partially folded intermediates of the mutant proteins. The results suggest that Mm-Cpn does not recognize the features of HγD-Crys tested-paired aromatics, exposed domain interface, or destabilized core-but rather recognizes other features of the partially folded β-sheet conformation that are absent or inaccessible in the native state of HγD-Crys. PMID:24615724

  9. Human Sco1 functional studies and pathological implications of the P174L mutant

    PubMed Central

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Leontari, Iliana; Martinelli, Manuele; Palumaa, Peep; Sillard, Rannar; Wang, Shenlin

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenic mutant (P174L) of human Sco1 produces respiratory chain deficiency associated with cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) assembly defects. The solution structure of the mutant in its Cu(I) form shows that Leu-174 prevents the formation of a well packed hydrophobic region around the metal-binding site and causes a reduction of the affinity of copper(I) for the protein. KD values for Cu(I)WT-HSco1 and Cu(I)P174L-HSco1 are ≈10−17 and ≈10−13, respectively. The reduction potentials of the two apo proteins are similar, but slower reduction/oxidation rates are found for the mutant with respect to the WT. The mitochondrial metallochaperone in the partially oxidized Cu1(I)Cox172S-S form, at variance with the fully reduced Cu4(I)Cox17, interacts transiently with both WT-HSco1 and the mutant, forming the Cox17/Cu(I)/HSco1 complex, but copper is efficiently transferred only in the case of WT protein. Cu1(I)Cox172S-S indeed has an affinity for copper(I) (KD ≈ 10−15) higher than that of the P174L-HSco1 mutant but lower than that of WT-HSco1. We propose that HSco1 mutation, altering the structure around the metal-binding site, affects both copper(I) binding and redox properties of the protein, thus impairing the efficiency of copper transfer to CcO. The pathogenic mutation therefore could (i) lessen the Sco1 affinity for copper(I) and hence copper supply for CcO or (ii) decrease the efficiency of reduction of CcO thiols involved in copper binding, or both effects could be produced by the mutation. PMID:17182746

  10. Group II archaeal chaperonin recognition of partially folded human γD-crystallin mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, Oksana A; Yang, Jingkun; King, Jonathan A; Knee, Kelly M

    2014-01-01

    The features in partially folded intermediates that allow the group II chaperonins to distinguish partially folded from native states remain unclear. The archaeal group II chaperonin from Methanococcus Mauripaludis (Mm-Cpn) assists the in vitro refolding of the well-characterized β-sheet lens protein human γD-crystallin (HγD-Crys). The domain interface and buried cores of this Greek key conformation include side chains, which might be exposed in partially folded intermediates. We sought to assess whether particular features buried in the native state, but absent from the native protein surface, might serve as recognition signals. The features tested were (a) paired aromatic side chains, (b) side chains in the interface between the duplicated domains of HγD-Crys, and (c) side chains in the buried core which result in congenital cataract when substituted. We tested the Mm-Cpn suppression of aggregation of these HγD-Crys mutants upon dilution out of denaturant. Mm-Cpn was capable of suppressing the off-pathway aggregation of the three classes of mutants indicating that the buried residues were not recognition signals. In fact, Mm-Cpn recognized the HγD-Crys mutants better than (wild-type) WT and refolded most mutant HγD-Crys to levels twice that of WT HγD-Crys. This presumably represents the increased population or longer lifetimes of the partially folded intermediates of the mutant proteins. The results suggest that Mm-Cpn does not recognize the features of HγD-Crys tested—paired aromatics, exposed domain interface, or destabilized core—but rather recognizes other features of the partially folded β-sheet conformation that are absent or inaccessible in the native state of HγD-Crys. PMID:24615724

  11. Insights into prevention of human neural tube defects by folic acid arising from consideration of mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J

    2009-04-01

    Almost 30 years after the initial study by Richard W. Smithells and coworkers, it is still unknown how maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents human neural tube defects (NTDs). In this article, questions about human NTD prevention are considered in relation to three groups of mouse models: NTD mutants that respond to folate, NTD mutants and strains that do not respond to folate, and mutants involving folate-pathway genes. Of the 200 mouse NTD mutants, only a few have been tested with folate; half respond and half do not. Among responsive mutants, folic acid supplementation reduces exencephaly and/or spina bifida aperta frequency in the Sp(2H), Sp, Cd, Cited2, Cart1, and Gcn5 mutants. Prevention ranges from 35 to 85%. The responsive Sp(2H) (Pax3) mutant has abnormal folate metabolism, but the responsive Cited2 mutant does not. Neither folic nor folinic acid reduces NTD frequency in Axd, Grhl3, Fkbp8, Map3k4, or Nog mutants or in the curly tail or SELH/Bc strains. Spina bifida frequency is reduced in Axd by methionine and in curly tail by inositol. Exencephaly frequency is reduced in SELH/Bc by an alternative commercial ration. Mutations in folate-pathway genes do not cause NTDs, except for 30% exencephaly in folate-treated Folr1. Among folate-pathway mutants, neural tube closure is normal in Cbs, Folr2, Mthfd1, Mthfd2, Mthfr, and Shmt1 mutants. Embryos die by midgestation in Folr1, Mtr, Mtrr, and RFC1 mutants. The mouse models point to genetic heterogeneity in the ability to respond to folic acid and also to heterogeneity in genetic cause of NTDs that can be prevented by folic acid. PMID:19117321

  12. Quantitative assessment of hsp70, IL-1β and TNF-α in the spinal cord of dogs with E40K SOD1-associated degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Lovett, M C; Coates, J R; Shu, Y; Oglesbee, M J; Fenner, W; Moore, S A

    2014-05-01

    Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive adult-onset neurodegenerative disease commonly associated with an E40K missense mutation in the SOD1 gene. DM has many similarities to some familial forms of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and may serve as an important disease model for therapy development. Pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and heat shock protein (hsp) 70 play a role in the pathogenesis of ALS. The focus of the current work was to determine whether an inflammatory phenotype is present in canine DM as defined by IL-1β, TNF-α, and hsp70 responses in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and spinal cord tissue. Concentrations of hsp70, IL-1β and TNF-α were below the limits of detection by ELISA in the CSF of both normal and DM-affected dogs. Immunohistochemical staining for hsp70 was significantly increased in ependymal cells lining the spinal cord central canal of DM-affected dogs (P = 0.003). This was not associated with increased IL-1β or TNF-α staining, but was associated with increased CD18 staining in the gray matter of DM-affected dogs. These results suggest that hsp70 in spinal cord tissue is a potential inflammatory signature in canine DM. PMID:24662024

  13. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of {gamma}-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  14. Femtosecond Fluorescence Spectra of Tryptophan in Human γ-Crystallin Mutants: Site-Dependent Ultrafast Quenching

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Jiejin; Toptygin, Dmitri; Tcherkasskaya, Olga; Callis, Patrik; King, Jonathan; Brand, Ludwig; Knutson, Jay R.

    2012-01-01

    The eye lens crystallin proteins are subject to UV irradiation throughout life, and the photochemistry of damage proceeds through the excited state; thus, their tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence lifetimes are physiologically important properties. The time resolved fluorescence spectra of single Trps in human γD- and γS-crystallins have been measured with both an upconversion spectrophotofluorometer on the 300fs to 100ps time scale, and a time correlated single photon counting apparatus on the 100ps to 10ns time scale, respectively. Three Trps in each wild type protein were replaced by phenylalanine, leading to single-Trp mutants: W68-only and W156-only of HγD- and W72-only and W162-only of HγS-crystallin. These proteins exhibit similar ultrafast signatures: positive definite decay associated spectra (DAS) for 50 – 65ps decay constants that indicate dominance of fast, heterogeneous quenching. The quenched population (judged by amplitude) of this DAS differs among mutants. Trps 68, 156 in human γD- and Trp72 in human γS-crystallin are buried, but water can reach amide oxygen and ring HE1 atoms through narrow channels. QM-MM simulations of quenching by electron transfer predict heterogeneous decay times from 50–500 ps that agree with our experimental results. Further analysis of apparent radiative lifetimes allow us to deduce that substantial subpopulations of Trp are fully quenched in even faster (sub-300 fs) processes for several of the mutants. The quenching of Trp fluorescence of human γD- and γS-crystallin may protect them from ambient light induced photo damage. PMID:19919143

  15. Trophic and proliferative effects of Shh on motor neurons in embryonic spinal cord culture from wildtype and G93A SOD1 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The developmental morphogen sonic hedgehog (Shh) may continue to play a trophic role in the support of terminally-differentiated motor neurons, of potential relevance to motor neuron disease. In addition, it may support the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous stem cells along motor neuronal lineages. As such, we have examined the trophic and proliferative effects of Shh supplementation or Shh antagonism in embryonic spinal cord cell cultures derived from wildtype or G93A SOD1 mice, a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Results Shh supported survival, and stimulated growth of motor neurons, neurite outgrowth, and neurosphere formation in primary culture derived from both G93A SOD1 and WT mice. Shh increased the percentage of ciliated motor neurons, especially in G93A SOD1 culture. Shh-treated cultures showed increased neuronal proliferation compared to controls and especially cyclopamine treated cultures, from G93A SOD1 and WT mice. Moreover, Shh enhanced cell survival and differentiation of motor neuron precursors in WT culture. Conclusions Shh is neurotrophic to motor neurons and has mitogenic effects in WT and mSOD1 G93A culture in vitro. PMID:24119209

  16. Effects of Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (sod1) Genotype and Genetic Background on Growth, Reproduction and Defense in Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Kaitlin M.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Larson, Maureen K.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata to the trematode Schistosoma mansoni is correlated with allelic variation at copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (sod1). We tested whether there is a fitness cost associated with carrying the most resistant allele in three outbred laboratory populations of snails. These three populations were derived from the same base population, but differed in average resistance. Under controlled laboratory conditions we found no cost of carrying the most resistant allele in terms of fecundity, and a possible advantage in terms of growth and mortality. These results suggest that it might be possible to drive resistant alleles of sod1 into natural populations of the snail vector for the purpose of controlling transmission of S. mansoni. However, we did observe a strong effect of genetic background on the association between sod1 genotype and resistance. sod1 genotype explained substantial variance in resistance among individuals in the most resistant genetic background, but had little effect in the least resistant genetic background. Thus, epistatic interactions with other loci may be as important a consideration as costs of resistance in the use of sod1 for vector manipulation. PMID:22724037

  17. Interactions of Attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis phoP Mutant with Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Nadia L.; Gomez, Ana B.; Neyrolles, Olivier; Gicquel, Brigitte; Martin, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis phoP mutant SO2 derived from a clinical isolate was shown to be attenuated in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and in vivo mouse infection model and has demonstrated a high potential as attenuated vaccine candidate against tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyze the adhesion and the intracellular growth and trafficking of SO2 in human macrophages. Our results indicate an enhanced adhesion to phagocitic cells and impaired intracellular replication of SO2 in both monocyte-derived macrophages and human cell line THP-1 in comparison with the wild type strain, consistent with murine model. Intracellular trafficking analysis in human THP-1 cells suggest that attenuation of SO2 within macrophages could be due to an impaired ability to block phagosome-lysosome fusion compared with the parental M. tuberculosis strain. No differences were found between SO2 and the wild-type strains in the release and mycobacterial susceptibility to nitric oxide (NO) produced by infected macrophages. Conclusions/Significance SO2 has enhanced ability to bind human macrophages and differs in intracellular trafficking as to wild-type M. tuberculosis. The altered lipid profile expression of the phoP mutant SO2 and its inability to secrete ESAT-6 is discussed. PMID:20885976

  18. Mutant p53 cooperates with ETS and selectively up-regulates human MDR1 not MRP1.

    PubMed

    Sampath, J; Sun, D; Kidd, V J; Grenet, J; Gandhi, A; Shapiro, L H; Wang, Q; Zambetti, G P; Schuetz, J D

    2001-10-19

    The most frequently expressed drug resistance genes, MDR1 and MRP1, occur in human tumors with mutant p53. However, it was unknown if mutant p53 transcriptionally regulated both MDR1 and MRP1. We demonstrated that mutant p53 did not activate either the MRP1 promoter or the endogenous gene. In contrast, mutant p53 strongly up-regulated the MDR1 promoter and expression of the endogenous MDR1 gene. Notably, cells that expressed either a transcriptionally inactive mutant p53 or the empty vector showed no endogenous MDR1 up-regulation. Transcriptional activation of the MDR1 promoter by mutant p53 required an Ets binding site, and mutant p53 and Ets-1 synergistically activated MDR1 transcription. Biochemical analysis revealed that Ets-1 interacted exclusively with mutant p53s in vivo but not with wild-type p53. These findings are the first to demonstrate the induction of endogenous MDR1 by mutant p53 and provide insight into the mechanism. PMID:11483599

  19. Production of functional small interfering RNAs by an amino-terminal deletion mutant of human Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Whisnant, Adam W.; Kornepati, Anand V. R.; Marshall, Joy B.; Bogerd, Hal P.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) functions as a potent antiviral innate-immune response in plants and invertebrates, mammalian somatic cells appear incapable of mounting an RNAi response and few, if any, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can be detected. To examine why siRNA production is inefficient, we have generated double-knockout human cells lacking both Dicer and protein kinase RNA-activated. Using these cells, which tolerate double-stranded RNA expression, we show that a mutant form of human Dicer lacking the amino-terminal helicase domain can process double-stranded RNAs to produce high levels of siRNAs that are readily detectable by Northern blot, are loaded into RNA-induced silencing complexes, and can effectively and specifically inhibit the expression of cognate mRNAs. Remarkably, overexpression of this mutant Dicer, but not wild-type Dicer, also resulted in a partial inhibition of Influenza A virus—but not poliovirus—replication in human cells. PMID:26621737

  20. Receptor tyrosine kinases exert dominant control over PI3K signaling in human KRAS mutant colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ebi, Hiromichi; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Singh, Anurag; Chen, Zhao; Song, Youngchul; Lifshits, Eugene; Ryan, David P.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Benes, Cyril; Settleman, Jeffrey; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Cantley, Lewis C.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Therapies inhibiting receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are effective against some human cancers when they lead to simultaneous downregulation of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling. However, mutant KRAS has the capacity to directly activate ERK and PI3K signaling, and this is thought to underlie the resistance of KRAS mutant cancers to RTK inhibitors. Here, we have elucidated the molecular regulation of both the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells and identified combination therapies that lead to robust cancer cell apoptosis. KRAS knockdown using shRNA suppressed ERK signaling in all of the human KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cell lines examined. However, no decrease, and actually a modest increase, in AKT phosphorylation was often seen. By performing PI3K immunoprecipitations, we determined that RTKs, often IGF-IR, regulated PI3K signaling in the KRAS mutant cell lines. This conclusion was also supported by the observation that specific RTK inhibition led to marked suppression of PI3K signaling and biochemical assessment of patient specimens. Interestingly, combination of RTK and MEK inhibitors led to concomitant inhibition of PI3K and MEK signaling, marked growth suppression, and robust apoptosis of human KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro and upon xenografting in mice. These findings provide a framework for utilizing RTK inhibitors in the treatment of KRAS mutant colorectal cancers. PMID:21985784

  1. Gene expression changes in spinal motoneurons of the SOD1G93A transgenic model for ALS after treatment with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Alexandre; Kastner, Stefan; Chatzikonstantinou, Eva; Pitzer, Claudia; Plaas, Christian; Kirsch, Friederike; Wafzig, Oliver; Krüger, Carola; Spoelgen, Robert; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Gretz, Norbert; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable fatal motoneuron disease with a lifetime risk of approximately 1:400. It is characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting, and death ensuing 3–5 years after diagnosis. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a drug candidate for ALS, with evidence for efficacy from animal studies and interesting data from pilot clinical trials. To gain insight into the disease mechanisms and mode of action of G-CSF, we performed gene expression profiling on isolated lumbar motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice, the most frequently studied animal model for ALS, with and without G-CSF treatment. Results: Motoneurons from SOD1G93A mice present a distinct gene expression profile in comparison to controls already at an early disease stage (11 weeks of age), when treatment was initiated. The degree of deregulation increases at a time where motor symptoms are obvious (15 weeks of age). Upon G-CSF treatment, transcriptomic deregulations of SOD1G93A motoneurons were notably restored. Discriminant analysis revealed that SOD1 mice treated with G-CSF has a transcriptom close to presymptomatic SOD1 mice or wild type mice. Some interesting genes modulated by G-CSF treatment relate to neuromuscular function such as CCR4-NOT or Prss12. Conclusions: Our data suggest that G-CSF is able to re-adjust gene expression in symptomatic SOD1G93A motoneurons. This provides further arguments for G-CSF as a promising drug candidate for ALS. PMID:25653590

  2. Early gene expression changes in skeletal muscle from SOD1(G93A) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis animal model.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriela P; Maximino, Jessica R; Maschietto, Mariana; Zanoteli, Edmar; Puga, Renato D; Lima, Leandro; Carraro, Dirce M; Chadi, Gerson

    2014-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons. Familial ALS is strongly associated to dominant mutations in the gene for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Recent evidences point to skeletal muscle as a primary target in the ALS mouse model. Wnt/PI3 K signaling pathways and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have important roles in maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Wnt/PI3 K pathways and EMT gene expression profile were investigated in gastrocnemius muscle from SOD1(G93A) mouse model and age-paired wild-type control in the presymptomatic ages of 40 and 80 days aiming the early neuromuscular abnormalities that precede motor neuron death in ALS. A customized cDNA microarray platform containing 326 genes of Wnt/PI3 K and EMT was used and results revealed eight up-regulated (Loxl2, Pik4ca, Fzd9, Cul1, Ctnnd1, Snf1lk, Prkx, Dner) and nine down-regulated (Pik3c2a, Ripk4, Id2, C1qdc1, Eif2ak2, Rac3, Cds1, Inppl1, Tbl1x) genes at 40 days, and also one up-regulated (Pik3ca) and five down-regulated (Cd44, Eef2 k, Fzd2, Crebbp, Piki3r1) genes at 80 days. Also, protein-protein interaction networks grown from the differentially expressed genes of 40 and 80 days old mice have identified Grb2 and Src genes in both presymptomatic ages, thus playing a potential central role in the disease mechanisms. mRNA and protein levels for Grb2 and Src were found to be increased in 80 days old ALS mice. Gene expression changes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic ALS mice at presymptomatic periods of disease gave further evidence of early neuromuscular abnormalities that precede motor neuron death. The results were discussed in terms of initial triggering for neuronal degeneration and muscle adaptation to keep function before the onset of symptoms. PMID:24442855

  3. Superoxide dismutases, SOD1 and SOD2, play a distinct role in the fat body during pupation in silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Yosui; Ito, Katsuhiko; Ono, Hiromasa; Nakazato, Takeru; Bono, Hidemasa; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Sato, Ryoichi; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Satoh, Jun-ichi; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Fugo, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    One way that aerobic biological systems counteract the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is with superoxide dismutase proteins SOD1 and SOD2 that metabolize superoxide radicals to molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide or scavenge oxygen radicals produced by the extensive oxidation-reduction and electron-transport reactions that occur in mitochondria. We characterized SOD1 and SOD2 of Bombyx mori isolated from the fat body of larvae. Immunological analysis demonstrated the presence of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 in the silk gland, midgut, fat body, Malpighian tubules, testis and ovary from larvae to adults. We found that BmSOD2 had a unique expression pattern in the fat body through the fifth instar larval developmental stage. The anti-oxidative functions of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 were assessed by exposing larvae to insecticide rotenone or vasodilator isosorbide dinitrate, which is an ROS generator in BmN4 cells; however, exposure to these compounds had no effect on the expression levels of either BmSOD protein. Next, we investigated the physiological role of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 under environmental oxidative stress, applied through whole-body UV irradiation and assayed using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting and microarray analysis. The mRNA expression level of both BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 was markedly increased but protein expression level was increased only slightly. To examine the differences in mRNA and protein level due to UV irradiation intensity, we performed microarray analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that genes in the insulin signaling pathway and PPAR signaling pathway were significantly up-regulated after 6 and 12 hours of UV irradiation. Taken together, the activities of BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 may be related to the response to UV irradiation stress in B. mori. These results suggest that BmSOD1 and BmSOD2 modulate environmental oxidative stress in the cell and have a specific role in fat body of B. mori during pupation. PMID:25714339

  4. Human Neural Stem Cell Replacement Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis by Spinal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hefferan, Michael P.; Galik, Jan; Kakinohana, Osamu; Sekerkova, Gabriela; Santucci, Camila; Marsala, Silvia; Navarro, Roman; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Johe, Karl; Feldman, Eva; Cleveland, Don W.; Marsala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutation in the ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) causes an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Mutant synthesis in motor neurons drives disease onset and early disease progression. Previous experimental studies have shown that spinal grafting of human fetal spinal neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A rats leads to a moderate therapeutical effect as evidenced by local α-motoneuron sparing and extension of lifespan. The aim of the present study was to analyze the degree of therapeutical effect of hNSCs once grafted into the lumbar spinal ventral horn in presymptomatic immunosuppressed SOD1G93A rats and to assess the presence and functional integrity of the descending motor system in symptomatic SOD1G93A animals. Methods/Principal Findings Presymptomatic SOD1G93A rats (60–65 days old) received spinal lumbar injections of hNSCs. After cell grafting, disease onset, disease progression and lifespan were analyzed. In separate symptomatic SOD1G93A rats, the presence and functional conductivity of descending motor tracts (corticospinal and rubrospinal) was analyzed by spinal surface recording electrodes after electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. Silver impregnation of lumbar spinal cord sections and descending motor axon counting in plastic spinal cord sections were used to validate morphologically the integrity of descending motor tracts. Grafting of hNSCs into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A rats protected α-motoneurons in the vicinity of grafted cells, provided transient functional improvement, but offered no protection to α-motoneuron pools distant from grafted lumbar segments. Analysis of motor-evoked potentials recorded from the thoracic spinal cord of symptomatic SOD1G93A rats showed a near complete loss of descending motor tract conduction, corresponding to a significant (50–65%) loss of large caliber descending motor axons. Conclusions/Significance These data

  5. Introduction of yeast artificial chromosomes containing mutant human amyloid precursor protein genes into transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Call, L.M.; Lamb, B.T.; Boese, K.F.

    1994-09-01

    Several hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed for the generation and deposition of the amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptide in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). These include overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, as suggested by Down Syndrome (DS, trisomy 21), and mutation of APP, as suggested by mutations associated with the presence of disease/amyloid deposition in some cases of familial AD (FAD). Although numerous in vitro studies have lead to certain insights into the molecular basis for amyloid deposition, the mechanisms(s) of amyloidogenesis in vivo remains poorly defined. To examine the effect of FAD mutations on amyloidogenesis in an animal model, we have focused on producing APP YAC transgenic mice containing the human APP gene with FAD mutations. These APP YAC transgenics are being produced by introduction of a 650 kb APP YAC through lipid-mediated transfection of ES cells. This strategy has two principal advantages: the APP genomic sequences contain transcriptional regulatory elements required for proper spatial and temporal expression and contain appropriate splice donor and acceptor sites needed to generate the entire spectrum of alternatively spliced APP transcripts. As a first step, we cloned the genomic regions surrounding APP exons 16 and 17 from an APP YAC sublibrary. Both the Swedish and the 717 mutations were then introduced into exons 16 and 17, respectively, by PCR mutagenesis, and subsequently transferred into the 650 kb APP YAC by a two step gene replacement in yeast. The mutant YACs have been introduced into ES cells, and we have determined that these cells are expressing human mutant APP mRNA and protein. These cells are being used to generate transgenic mice. This paradigm should provide the appropriate test of whether a mutant APP gene is capable of producing AD-like pathology in a mouse model.

  6. The silkworm mutant lemon (lemon lethal) is a potential insect model for human sepiapterin reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Katsuma, Susumu; Daimon, Takaaki; Banno, Yutaka; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru

    2009-04-24

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases, which control the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. BH4 deficiency has been associated with many neuropsychological disorders. An inherited defect in BH4 biosynthesis is caused by the deficiency of sepiapterin reductase (SPR), which catalyzes the biosynthesis of BH4 from guanosine triphosphate at the terminal step. The human SPR gene has been mapped at the PARK3 locus, which is related to the onset of Parkinson disease. In this study, we report that mutant strains, lemon (lem) and its lethal allele lemon lethal (lem(1)) with yellow body coloration, of the silkworm Bombyx mori could be used as the first insect model for human SPR deficiency diseases. We demonstrated that mutations in the SPR gene (BmSpr) were responsible for the irregular body coloration of lem and lem(l). Moreover, biochemical analysis revealed that SPR activity in lem(l) larvae was almost completely diminished, resulting in a lethal phenotype that the larvae cannot feed and that die immediately after the first ecdysis. Oral administration of BH4 and dopamine to lem(l) larvae effectively increased their survival rates and feeding abilities. Our data demonstrate that BmSPR plays a crucial role in the generation of BH4, and monoamine neurotransmitters in silkworms and the lem (lem(l)) mutant strains will be an invaluable resource to address many questions regarding SPR and BH4 deficiencies. PMID:19246455

  7. Defining peripheral nervous system dysfunction in the SOD-1G93A transgenic rat model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riva, Nilo; Chaabane, Linda; Peviani, Marco; Ungaro, Daniela; Domi, Teuta; Dina, Giorgia; Bianchi, Francesca; Spano, Giorgia; Cerri, Federica; Podini, Paola; Corbo, Massimo; Carro, Ubaldo Del; Comi, Giancarlo; Bendotti, Caterina; Quattrini, Angelo

    2014-07-01

    Growing evidence indicates that alterations within the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are involved at an early stage in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenetic cascade. In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic analyses, and histologic analyses were used to monitor the extent of PNS damage in the hSOD-1 ALS rat model. The imaging signature of the disease was defined using in vivo MRI of the sciatic nerve. Initial abnormalities were detected in the nerves by an increase in T2 relaxation time before the onset of clinical disease; diffusion MRI showed a progressive increase in mean and radial diffusivity and reduction of fractional anisotropy at advanced stages of disease. Histologic analysis demonstrated early impairment of the blood-nerve barrier followed by acute axonal degeneration associated with endoneurial edema and macrophage response in motor nerve compartments. Progressive axonal degeneration and motor nerve fiber loss correlated with MRI and neurophysiologic changes. These functional and morphologic investigations of the PNS might be applied in following disease progression in preclinical therapeutic studies. This study establishes the PNS signature in this rat ALS model (shedding new light into pathogenesis) and provides a rationale for translating into future systematic MRI studies of PNS involvement in patients with ALS. PMID:24918640

  8. Resveratrol Ameliorates Motor Neuron Degeneration and Improves Survival in SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lin; Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Jia; Le, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has recently been used as a supplemental treatment for several neurological and nonneurological diseases. It is not known whether resveratrol has neuroprotective effect on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To assess the effect of resveratrol on the disease, we tested this agent on an ALS model of SOD1G93A transgenic mouse. Rotarod measurement was performed to measure the motor function of the ALS mice. Nissl staining and SMI-32 immunofluorescent staining were used to determine motor neurons survival in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), succinic dehydrogenase (SDH), and cytochrome oxidase (COX) staining were applied to pathologically analyze the skeletal muscles of the ALS mice. We found that resveratrol treatment significantly delayed the disease onset and prolonged the lifespan of the ALS mice. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment attenuated motor neuron loss, relieved muscle atrophy, and improved mitochondrial function of muscle fibers in the ALS mice. In addition, we demonstrated that resveratrol exerted these neuroprotective effects mainly through increasing the expression of Sirt1, consequently suppressing oxidative stress and downregulating p53 and its related apoptotic pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that resveratrol might provide a promising therapeutic intervention for ALS. PMID:25057490

  9. Mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with mutant human α-actinin-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmer, Sabine; Blair, Daniel; Kasza, Karen; Weitz, David

    2007-03-01

    Globular actin can be polymerized in vitro to form F-actin in the presence of various binding proteins. These networks often exhibit dramatic nonlinear rheological response to imposed strains. We study the rheological properties of F-actin networks crosslinked with human α-actinin-4. A single genetic mutation of the α-actinin-4 protein is associated with focal and segmented glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a genetic disorder which leads to renal failure. Mechanically, the mutant crosslinker has an increased binding strength compared to the wild type. We will show that human α-actinin-4, displays a unique stiffening response. Moreover, we also demonstrate that a single point mutation dramatically effects the inherent relaxation time of the crosslinked network.

  10. Tryptophan 32 potentiates aggregation and cytotoxicity of a copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mutant associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David M; Gibbs, Bernard F; Kabashi, Edor; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D; Agar, Jeffrey N

    2007-06-01

    One familial form of the neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the gene encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD-1). This study provides in vivo evidence that normally occurring oxidative modification to SOD-1 promotes aggregation and toxicity of mutant proteins. The oxidation of Trp-32 was identified as a normal modification being present in both wild-type enzyme and SOD-1 with the disease-causing mutation, G93A, isolated from erythrocytes. Mutating Trp-32 to a residue with a slower rate of oxidative modification, phenylalanine, decreased both the cytotoxicity of mutant SOD-1 and its propensity to form cytoplasmic inclusions in motor neurons of dissociated mouse spinal cord cultures. PMID:17389599

  11. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) inhibits ERK phosphorylation by muscarinic receptor modulation in rat pituitary GH3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Secondo, Agnese; De Mizio, Mariarosaria; Zirpoli, Laura; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Mondola, Paolo

    2008-11-07

    The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) belongs to a family of isoenzymes that are able to dismutate the oxygen superoxide in hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. This enzyme is secreted by many cellular lines and it is also released trough a calcium-dependent depolarization mechanism involving SNARE protein SNAP 25. Using rat pituitary GH3 cells that express muscarinic receptors we found that SOD1 inhibits P-ERK1/2 pathway trough an interaction with muscarinic M1 receptor. This effect is strengthened by oxotremorine, a muscarinic M agonist and partially reverted by pyrenzepine, an antagonist of M1 receptor; moreover this effect is independent from increased intracellular calcium concentration induced by SOD1. Finally, P-ERK1/2 inhibition was accompanied by the reduction of GH3 cell proliferation. These data indicate that SOD1 beside the well studied antioxidant properties can be considered as a neuromodulator able to affect mitogen-activated protein kinase in rat pituitary cells trough a M1 muscarinic receptor.

  12. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D C; McCloskey, D A; Simard, L R; McInnes, R R

    1990-01-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. We previously established by complementation analysis that 28 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, we sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 (approximately 1% of residual ASAL activity), from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283----T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. Expression in COS cells demonstrated that the R95C mutation produces normal amounts of ASAL mRNA but little protein and less than 1% ASAL activity. We observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5' 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. We conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus. Images PMID:2263616

  13. Human Defensin 5 Disulfide Array Mutants: Disulfide Bond Deletion Attenuates Antibacterial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Wan, Andrea; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5, HD5ox to specify the oxidized and disulfide linked form) is a 32-residue cysteine-rich host-defense peptide, expressed and released by small intestinal Paneth cells, that exhibits antibacterial activity against a number of Gram-negative and –positive bacterial strains. To ascertain the contributions of its disulfide array to structure, antimicrobial activity, and proteolytic stability, a series of HD5 double mutant peptides where pairs of cysteine residues corresponding to native disulfide linkages (Cys3—Cys31, Cys5—Cys20, Cys10—Cys30) were mutated to Ser or Ala residues were overexpressed in E. coli, purified and characterized. A hexa mutant peptide, HD5[Serhexa], where all six native Cys residues are replaced by Ser residues was also evaluated. Removal of a single native S—S linkage influences oxidative folding and regioisomerization, antibacterial activity, Gram-negative bacterial membrane permeabilization, and proteolytic stability. Whereas the majority of the HD5 mutant peptides show low-micromolar activity against Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 25922 in colony counting assays, the wild-type disulfide array is essential for low-micromolar activity against Gram-positive S. aureus ATCC 25923. Removal of a single disulfide bond attenuates the activity observed for HD5ox against this Gram-positive bacterial strain. This observation supports the notion that the HD5ox mechanism of antibacterial action differs for Gram-negative and Gram-positive species (Wei, G.; de Leeuw, E., Pazgier, M., Yuan, W., Zou, G., Wang, J., Ericksen, B., Lu, W.-Y.; Lehrer, R. I.; Lu, W. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 29180-29192), and that the native disulfide array is a requirement for its activity against S. aureus. PMID:21861459

  14. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: Mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.C. ); McCloskey, D.A.; Simard, L.R.; McInnes, R.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. The authors previously established by complementation analysis that 29 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, they sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283{r arrow} T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. They observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5{prime} 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. They conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus.

  15. Structural study of the G57W mutant of human gamma-S-crystallin, associated with congenital cataract

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ismail; Chandani, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human γS-crystallin (CrygS) is an important component of the human eye lens nucleus and cortex. The mutation G57W in the molecule is reported to be associated with congenital cataract in children. We compare the conformational features and aggregation properties of the mutant protein G57W with the wild-type CrygS to understand how the structural changes in the mutant are related to the mechanism of opacification. Methods Wild-type and mutant proteins were cloned, expressed, and purified, and their structural properties were studied in solution. Conformational features and the structural stability of the proteins were compared in solution, using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopic analysis, and the proteins’ tendencies to aggregate were compared using extrinsic spectral probes. In addition, we analyzed the proteins’ structural differences with extensive molecular modeling in silico. Results CD and intrinsic fluorescence analysis suggested the secondary and tertiary structures of the mutant are slightly altered. Experiments using extrinsic spectral probes revealed that the compact close-packed structure is loosened somewhat, and the mutant tends to self-aggregate. Denaturation (both thermal and chemical) studies indicate that the replacement of glycine (G) in position 57 by tryptophan (W) lowered the structural stability of the molecule. Further, the mutant had a tendency to precipitate and scatters light more easily than the wild-type. Conclusions The replacement of glycine at position 57 by the tryptophan residue in human γS-crystallin weakens the stability of the mutant molecule and causes the molecule to self-aggregate, thus generating light-scattering particles. This set of changes in the mutant offers a molecular insight into the mechanism of opacification. PMID:27440995

  16. Autoradiographic detection of diphtheria toxin resistant mutants in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.S.; Singh, B.

    1985-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure for the detection of diphtheria toxin (DT) resistant (Dip/sub R/) mutants in human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cells has been developed. The assay is based on the observation that when HDFs from confluent cultures are seeded in medium containing 0.01 flocculating units/ml or higher concentration of DT, protein synthesis in sensitive cells is severely inhibited by 4-6 hr. If at this or later time, a radiolabeled protein precursor (eg, /sup 3/H-leucine) is added to the culture, it is almost exclusively incorporated into the resistant cells, which are then readily identified by autoradiography. These studies provide strong evidence that the labeled cells identified by autoradiography are bona fide Dip/sub R/ mutants. The detection of Dip/sub R/ cells by autoradiography is apparently not affected by the presence of the sensitive cells in the mixtures. The spontaneous frequency of Dip/sub R/ cells in HDFs has been found to be in the range of 1-5 x 10/sup -6/, and this increases in a dose dependent manner upon treatment with the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate. These results indicate that the autoradiographic assay could be used for quantitative mutagenesis. Since the autoradiographic assay does not depend on cell division, it may prove useful in estimating the incidence of pre-existing mutations in cell populations that either do not divide or have very limited growth potential (eg, lymphocytes, muscle cells, neurons, senescent fibroblasts, etc.).

  17. Structural Insight Into the Altered Substrate Specificity of Human Cytochrome P450 2a6 Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Sansen, S.; Hsu, M.-H.; Stout, C.David.; Johnson, E.F.

    2007-07-12

    Human P450 2A6 displays a small active site that is well adapted for the oxidation of small planar substrates. Mutagenesis of CYP2A6 resulted in an increased catalytic efficiency for indole biotransformation to pigments and conferred a capacity to oxidize substituted indoles (Wu, Z.-L., Podust, L.M., Guengerich, F.P. J. Biol. Chem. 49 (2005) 41090-41100.). Here, we describe the structural basis that underlies the altered metabolic profile of three mutant enzymes, P450 2A6 N297Q, L240C/N297Q and N297Q/I300V. The Asn297 substitution abolishes a potential hydrogen bonding interaction with substrates in the active site, and replaces a structural water molecule between the helix B-C region and helix I while maintaining structural hydrogen bonding interactions. The structures of the P450 2A6 N297Q/L240C and N297Q/I300V mutants provide clues as to how the protein can adapt to fit the larger substituted indoles in the active site, and enable a comparison with other P450 family 2 enzymes for which the residue at the equivalent position was seen to function in isozyme specificity, structural integrity and protein flexibility.

  18. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington’s Disease T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James R. C.; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington’s disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington’s disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington’s disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington’s disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington’s disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington’s disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system. PMID:26529236

  19. A truncating SOD1 mutation, p.Gly141X, is associated with clinical and pathologic heterogeneity, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masataka; Bieniek, Kevin F; Lin, Wen-Lang; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Murray, Melissa E; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Desaro, Pamela; Baker, Matthew C; Rutherford, Nicola J; Robertson, Janice; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W; Boylan, Kevin B

    2015-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons, but it is increasingly recognized to affect other systems, with cognitive impairment resembling frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in some patients. We report clinical and pathologic findings of a family with ALS due to a truncating mutation, p.Gly141X, in copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The proband presented clinically with FTD and later showed progressive motor neuron disease, while all other family members had early-onset and rapidly progressive ALS without significant cognitive deficits. Pathologic examination of both the proband and her daughter revealed degeneration of corticospinal tracts and motor neurons in brain and spinal cord compatible with ALS. On the other hand, the proband also had neocortical and limbic system degeneration with pleomorphic neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. Extramotor pathology in her daughter was relatively restricted to the hypothalamus and extrapyramidal system, but not the neocortex. The inclusions in the proband and her daughter were immunoreactive for SOD1, but negative for TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43). In the proband, a number of the neocortical inclusions were immunopositive for α-internexin, initially suggesting a diagnosis of atypical FTLD, but there was no evidence of fused in sarcoma (FUS) immunoreactivity, which is often detected in atypical FTLD. Analogous to atypical FTLD, neuronal inclusions had variable co-localization of SOD1 and α-internexin. The current classification of FTLD is based on the major constituent protein: FTLD-tau, FTLD-TDP-43, and FTLD-FUS. The proband in this family indicates that SOD1, while rare, can also be the substrate of FTLD, in addition to the more common presentation of ALS. The explanation for clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of SOD1 mutations, including the p.Gly141X mutation, remains unresolved. PMID:25917047

  20. Comparative morphometric analysis of microglia in the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Yamada, Jun; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Jinno, Shozo

    2016-05-01

    It has long been recognized that reactive microglia undergo a series of phenotypic changes accompanying morphological transformation. However, the morphological classification of microglia has not yet been achieved. To address this issue, here we morphometrically analysed three-dimensionally reconstructed ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1-immunoreactive (Iba1(+) ) microglia in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that microglia were objectively divided into four groups: type S (named after surveillant microglia) and types R1, R2 and R3 (named after reactive microglia). For the purpose of comparative morphometry, we also analysed two pharmacological disease models using wild-type mice: 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced axonopathy and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. Type S microglia showed a typical ramified morphology of surveillant microglia, and were mostly observed in wild-type controls. Type R1 microglia were seen at the early stage of disease in SOD1(G93A) mice, and also frequently occurred in IDPN-treated mice. They exhibited small cell bodies with shorter and simple processes. Type R2 microglia were morphologically similar to type R1 microglia, but only transiently occurred in the middle stage of disease in SOD1(G93A) mice and in IDPN-treated mice. Type R3 microglia exhibited a bushy shape, and were observed in the end stage of disease in SOD1(G93A) mice and in LPS-treated mice. These findings indicate that microglia of SOD1(G93A) mice can be classified into four types, and also suggest that the phenotypic changes may be induced by the events related to axonopathy and neuroinflammation. PMID:26946061

  1. Lysosomal and phagocytic activity is increased in astrocytes during disease progression in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David J.; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Keatinge, Marcus; Sokhi, Dilraj; Viskaitis, Paulius; Heath, Paul R.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, gene expression profiling of astrocytes from the pre-symptomatic stage of the SOD1G93A model of ALS has revealed reduced lactate metabolism and altered trophic support. Here, we have performed microarray analysis of symptomatic and late-stage disease astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the lumbar spinal cord of the SOD1G93A mouse to complete the picture of astrocyte behavior throughout the disease course. Astrocytes at symptomatic and late-stage disease show a distinct up-regulation of transcripts defining a reactive phenotype, such as those involved in the lysosome and phagocytic pathways. Functional analysis of hexosaminidase B enzyme activity in the spinal cord and of astrocyte phagocytic ability has demonstrated a significant increase in lysosomal enzyme activity and phagocytic activity in SOD1G93A vs. littermate controls, validating the findings of the microarray study. In addition to the increased reactivity seen at both stages, astrocytes from late-stage disease showed decreased expression of many transcripts involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Staining for the master regulator of cholesterol synthesis, SREBP2, has revealed an increased localization to the cytoplasm of astrocytes and motor neurons in late-stage SOD1G93A spinal cord, indicating that down-regulation of transcripts may be due to an excess of cholesterol in the CNS during late-stage disease possibly due to phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Our data reveal that SOD1G93A astrocytes are characterized more by a loss of supportive function than a toxic phenotype during ALS disease progression and future studies should focus upon restorative therapies. PMID:26528138

  2. A botanical containing freeze dried açai pulp promotes healthy aging and reduces oxidative damage in sod1 knockdown flies.

    PubMed

    Laslo, Mara; Sun, Xiaoping; Hsiao, Cheng-Te; Wu, Wells W; Shen, Rong-Fong; Zou, Sige

    2013-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a critical enzyme against oxidative stress, is implicated in aging and degenerative diseases. We previously showed that a nutraceutical containing freeze-dried açai pulp promotes survival of flies fed a high-fat diet or sod1 knockdown flies fed a standard diet. Here, we investigated the effect of açai supplementation initiated at the early or late young adulthood on lifespan, physiological function, and oxidative damage in sod1 knockdown flies. We found that Açai supplementation extended lifespan even when started at the age of 10 days, which is the time shortly before the mortality rate of flies accelerated. Life-long açai supplementation increased lifetime reproductive output in sod1 knockdown flies. Our molecular studies indicate that açai supplementation reduced the protein levels of genes involved in oxidative stress response, cellular growth, and nutrient metabolism. Açai supplementation also affected the protein levels of ribosomal proteins. In addition, açai supplementation decreased the transcript levels of genes involved in oxidative stress response and gluconeogenesis, while increasing the transcript levels of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Moreover, açai supplementation reduced the level of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts, a lipid peroxidation marker. Our findings suggest that açai supplementation promotes healthy aging in sod1-deficient flies partly through reducing oxidative damage, and modulating nutrient metabolism and oxidative stress response pathways. Our findings provide a foundation to further evaluate the viability of using açai as an effective dietary intervention to promote healthy aging and alleviate symptoms of diseases with a high level of oxidative stress. PMID:22639178

  3. Growth inhibition of BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells by expression of mutant telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rugang; Wang, Xingwang; Guo, Lixia; Xie, Hong

    2002-01-10

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies in Asia and Africa. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is expressed in HCC but absent in normal human liver cells, which is consistent with the expression pattern of telomerase. In the present study, expression of a dominant-negative form of hTERT (DN-hTERT) resulted in inhibition of telomerase activity and decreased mean telomeric length of BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells, whereas expression of wild-type hTERT (WT-hTERT) and control vector had no such effects. Cell growth was inhibited by this mutant (DN-hTERT), which was consistent with the changes in telomerase level. Flattened large cells were found in late generations with the DN-hTERT treatment. When mean telomeric length of DN-hTERT-transfected cells reached a critical length (about 1.7 kb), apoptosis was induced. Tumorigenicity of DN-hTERT-expressing cells was eliminated in vivo. These data indicated that hTERT was essential for the growth of hepatoma cells. hTERT can also be used as an important target for anti-HCC drug screening. PMID:11774261

  4. Protein structure. Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-01-30

    The 18-kilodalton translocator protein (TSPO), proposed to be a key player in cholesterol transport into mitochondria, is highly expressed in steroidogenic tissues, metastatic cancer, and inflammatory and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. TSPO ligands, including benzodiazepine drugs, are implicated in regulating apoptosis and are extensively used in diagnostic imaging. We report crystal structures (at 1.8, 2.4, and 2.5 angstrom resolution) of TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and a mutant that mimics the human Ala(147)→Thr(147) polymorphism associated with psychiatric disorders and reduced pregnenolone production. Crystals obtained in the lipidic cubic phase reveal the binding site of an endogenous porphyrin ligand and conformational effects of the mutation. The three crystal structures show the same tightly interacting dimer and provide insights into the controversial physiological role of TSPO and how the mutation affects cholesterol binding. PMID:25635101

  5. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shu-Jun; Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han; Shih, Wen-Ling; Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of mutant and wild-type human. beta. -actin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, J.; Gunning, P.; Porreca, P.; Ng, S.Y.; Lin, C.H.; Kedes, L.

    1984-10-01

    There are more than 20 ..beta..-actin-specific sequences in the human genome, many of which are pseudogenes. To facilitate the isolation of potentially functional ..beta..-actin genes, they used the new method of B. Seed for selecting genomic clones by homologous recombination. A derivative of the ..pi..VX miniplasmid, ..pi..AN7..beta..1, was constructed by insertion of the 600-base-pair 3' untranslated region of the ..beta..-actin mRNA expressed in human fibroblasts. Five clones containing ..beta..-actin sequences were selected from an amplified human fetal gene library by homologous recombination between library phage and the miniplasmid. One of these clones contained a complete ..beta..-actin gene with a coding sequence identical to that determined for the mRNA of human fibroblasts. A DNA fragment consisting of mostly intervening sequences from this gene was then use to identify 13 independent recombinant copies of the analogous gene from two specially constructed gene libraries, each containing one of the two types of mutant ..beta..-actin genes found in a line of neoplastic human fibroblasts. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences encoded by the unmutated gene predict that a guanine-to-adenine transition is responsible for the glycine-to-aspartic acid mutation at codon 244 and would also result in the loss of a HaeIII site. Detection of this HaeIII polymorphism among the fibroblast-derived closed verified the identity of the ..beta..-actin gene expressed in human fibroblasts.

  7. Overexpression of wild-type or mutants forms of CEBPA alter normal human hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, O; Lan-Lan Smith, S; Griessinger, E; Reyal, Y; Vargaftig, J; Lister, T A; Fitzgibbon, J; Bonnet, D

    2012-07-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα/CEBPA) is mutated in approximately 8% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in both familial and sporadic AML and, with FLT3 and NPM1, has received most attention as a predictive marker of outcome in patients with normal karyotype disease. Mutations clustering to either the N- or C-terminal (N- and C-ter) portions of the protein have different consequences on the protein function. In familial cases, the N-ter form is inherited with patients exhibiting long latency period before the onset of overt disease, typically with the acquisition of a C-ter mutation. Despite the essential insights murine models provide the functional consequences of wild-type C/EBPα in human hematopoiesis and how different mutations are involved in AML development have received less attention. Our data underline the critical role of C/EBPα in human hematopoiesis and demonstrate that C/EBPα mutations (alone or in combination) are insufficient to convert normal human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells into leukemic-initiating cells, although individually each altered normal hematopoiesis. It provides the first insight into the effects of N- and C-ter mutations acting alone and to the combined effects of N/C double mutants. Our results mimicked closely what happens in CEBPA mutated patients. PMID:22371011

  8. Aggregation propensities of superoxide dismutase G93 hotspot mutants mirror ALS clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Ashley J.; Shin, David S.; Merz, Gregory E.; Rambo, Robert P.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Dyer, Kevin N.; Borbat, Peter P.; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.; Tainer, John A.; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein framework alterations in heritable Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) mutants cause misassembly and aggregation in cells affected by the motor neuron disease ALS. However, the mechanistic relationship between superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations and human disease is controversial, with many hypotheses postulated for the propensity of specific SOD mutants to cause ALS. Here, we experimentally identify distinguishing attributes of ALS mutant SOD proteins that correlate with clinical severity by applying solution biophysical techniques to six ALS mutants at human SOD hotspot glycine 93. A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) assay and other structural methods assessed aggregation propensity by defining the size and shape of fibrillar SOD aggregates after mild biochemical perturbations. Inductively coupled plasma MS quantified metal ion binding stoichiometry, and pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy evaluated the Cu2+ binding site and defined cross-dimer copper–copper distance distributions. Importantly, we find that copper deficiency in these mutants promotes aggregation in a manner strikingly consistent with their clinical severities. G93 mutants seem to properly incorporate metal ions under physiological conditions when assisted by the copper chaperone but release copper under destabilizing conditions more readily than the WT enzyme. Altered intradimer flexibility in ALS mutants may cause differential metal retention and promote distinct aggregation trends observed for mutant proteins in vitro and in ALS patients. Combined biophysical and structural results test and link copper retention to the framework destabilization hypothesis as a unifying general mechanism for both SOD aggregation and ALS disease progression, with implications for disease severity and therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:25316790

  9. Structural characterization of V57D and V57P mutants of human cystatin C, an amyloidogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowska, Marta; Szymańska, Aneta; Skowron, Piotr; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2013-04-01

    Val57 point mutants of human cystatin C, which were designed to assess the influence of changes in the properties of the L1 loop on the dimerization propensity, were structurally characterized. Wild-type human cystatin C (hCC wt) is a low-molecular-mass protein (120 amino-acid residues, 13 343 Da) that is found in all nucleated cells. Physiologically, it functions as a potent regulator of cysteine protease activity. While the biologically active hCC wt is a monomeric protein, all crystallization efforts to date have resulted in a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimeric structure. In the recently published structure of a mutated hCC, the monomeric fold was preserved by a stabilization of the conformationally constrained loop L1 caused by a single amino-acid substitution: Val57Asn. Additional hCC mutants were obtained in order to elucidate the relationship between the stability of the L1 loop and the propensity of human cystatin C to dimerize. In one mutant Val57 was substituted by an aspartic acid residue, which is favoured in β-turns, and in the second mutant proline, a residue known for broadening turns, was substituted for the same Val57. Here, 2.26 and 3.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the V57D andV57P mutants of hCC are reported and their dimeric architecture is discussed in terms of the stabilization and destabilization effects of the introduced mutations.

  10. A Neisseria gonorrhoeae Immunoglobulin A1 Protease Mutant Is Infectious in the Human Challenge Model of Urethral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, Diana B.; Johnston, David M.; Koymen, Hakan O.; Cohen, Myron S.; Cannon, Janne G.

    1999-01-01

    Many mucosal pathogens, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, produce proteases that cleave immunoglobulin A (IgA), the predominant immunoglobulin class produced at mucosal surfaces. While considerable circumstantial evidence suggests that IgA1 protease contributes to gonococcal virulence, there is no direct evidence that N. gonorrhoeae requires IgA1 protease activity to infect a human host. We constructed a N. gonorrhoeae iga mutant without introducing new antibiotic resistance markers into the final mutant strain and used human experimental infection to test the ability of the mutant to colonize the male urethra and to cause gonococcal urethritis. Four of the five male volunteers inoculated with the Iga− mutant became infected. In every respect—clinical signs and symptoms, incubation period between inoculation and infection, and the proportion of volunteers infected—the outcome of human experimental infection with FA1090iga was indistinguishable from that previously reported for a variant of parent strain FA1090 matching the mutant in expression of Opa proteins, lipooligosaccharide, and pilin. These results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae does not require IgA1 protease production to cause experimental urethritis in males. PMID:10338512

  11. Distinct cerebral lesions in sporadic and 'D90A' SOD1 ALS: studies with [11C]flumazenil PET.

    PubMed

    Turner, M R; Hammers, A; Al-Chalabi, A; Shaw, C E; Andersen, P M; Brooks, D J; Leigh, P N

    2005-06-01

    Five to ten percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases are associated with mutations of the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene, and the 'D90A' mutation is associated with a unique phenotype and markedly slower disease progression (mean survival time 14 years). Relative sparing of inhibitory cortical neuronal circuits might be one mechanism contributing to the slower progression in patients homozygous for the D90A mutation (homD90A). The GABA(A) receptor PET ligand [11C]flumazenil has demonstrated motor and extra-motor cortical changes in sporadic ALS. In this study, we used [11C]flumazenil PET to explore differences in the pattern of cortical involvement between sporadic and genetically homogeneous ALS groups. Twenty-four sporadic ALS (sALS) and 10 homD90A patients underwent [11C]flumazenil PET of the brain. In addition, two subjects homozygous for the D90A mutation, but without symptoms or signs ('pre-symptomatic', psD90A), also underwent imaging. Results for each group were compared with those for 24 healthy controls of similar age. Decreases in the binding of [11C]flumazenil in the sALS group were found within premotor regions, motor cortex and posterior motor association areas. In the homD90A group of ALS patients, however, decreases were concentrated in the left fronto-temporal junction and anterior cingulate gyrus. In the two psD90A subjects, a small focus of reduced [11C]flumazenil binding at the left fronto-temporal junction was seen, similar to the pattern seen in the clinically affected patients. Within the sALS group, there was no statistically significant association between decreases in cortical [11C]flumazenil binding and revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R score), whereas the upper motor neuron (UMN) score correlated with widespread and marked cortical decreases over the dominant hemisphere. In the homD90A group, there was a stronger statistical association between reduced cortical [11C]flumazenil binding and the ALSFRS-R, rather

  12. Enhanced ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of catalytically deficient human choline acetyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed

    Morey, Trevor M; Albers, Shawn; Shilton, Brian H; Rylett, R Jane

    2016-05-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is essential for cholinergic neuron function as it mediates synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. ChAT mutations have been linked to the neuromuscular disorder congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). One CMS-related ChAT mutation, V18M, reduces enzyme activity and cellular protein levels, and is positioned within a highly conserved proline-rich motif with the sequence 14 PKLPVPP20 . We demonstrate that N-terminal truncation that includes this proline-rich motif, as well as mutation of prolines-17/19 together to alanine (P17A/P19A), dramatically reduces ChAT steady-state protein levels and cellular activity when expressed in cholinergic SN56 neural cells. The in vitro activity of bacterially expressed recombinant P17A/P19A-ChAT is also reduced, although this is not caused by changes in protein secondary structure or thermal stability. Treatment of SN56 cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 increases cellular P17A/P19A-ChAT steady-state protein levels, and by immunoprecipitation we found that ChAT is ubiquitinated and that polyubiquitination of P17A/P19A-ChAT is increased compared to wild-type (WT) ChAT. Using a novel fluorescent-biorthogonal pulse-chase protocol in SN56 cells, we determined that the protein half-life of P17A/P19A-ChAT (2.2 h) is substantially reduced compared to WT-ChAT (19.7 h). Lastly, we show that two CMS-related ChAT mutants (V18M and A513T) have enhanced ubiquitination, and that treatment with MG132 can partially restore both the steady-state protein levels as well as cellular activity of some CMS-mutant ChAT. These results identify a novel mechanism for regulation of ChAT through the ubiquitin-proteasome system that is influenced by the conserved N-terminal proline-rich motif of ChAT and may be implicated in CMS pathology. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) synthesizes acetylcholine in cholinergic neurons. In this study we find that steady-state protein levels of human 69-kDa ChAT are regulated by

  13. Reversion of a transcriptionally defective MHC class II-negative human B-cell mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ombra, M N; Perfetto, C; Autiero, M; Anzisi, A M; Pasquinelli, R; Maffei, A; Del Pozzo, G; Guardiola, J

    1993-01-01

    RJ2.2.5, a mutant derived from the human B-lymphoma cell, Raji, is unable to express the MHC class II genes because of a recessive transcriptional defect attributed to the lack of an activator function. We report the isolation of a RJ2.2.5 revertant, namely AR, in which the expression of the mRNAs encoded by these genes is restored. Comparison of the binding of nuclear extracts or of partially purified nuclear preparations from the wild-type, the mutant and the revertant cells to a conserved MHC class II promoter element, the X-box, showed no alteration in the mobility of the complexes thus formed. However, in extracts from RJ2.2.5, and other MHC class II negative cell lines, such as HeLa, the amount of complex observed was significantly higher than in wild-type Raji cells. Furthermore, the binding activity exhibited by the AR revertant was lower than that of the RJ2.2.5 and higher than that of Raji. The use of specific monoclonal antibodies indicated that in all cases c-Jun and c-Fos or antigenically related proteins were required for binding. An inverse correlation between the level of DNA-protein complex formed and the level of MHC class II gene mRNA expressed in the three cell lines was apparent, suggesting that overexpression of a DNA binding factor forming complexes with class II promoter elements may cause repression of MHC class II transcription. A model which reconciles the previously ascertained recessivity of the phenotype of the mutation carried by RJ2.2.5 with the findings reported here is discussed. Images PMID:8441650

  14. Expression of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in human chondrocytes induces the pseudoachondroplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Thomas M; Alcorn, Joseph L; Haynes, Richard; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2006-04-01

    Over 70 mutations in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a large extracellular pentameric glycoprotein synthesized by chondrocytes, have been identified as causing two skeletal dysplasias: multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED/EDM1), and a dwarfing condition, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). These mutations induce misfolding of intracellular COMP, resulting in retention of the protein in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of chondrocytes. This accumulation of COMP in the rER creates the phenotypic enlarged rER cisternae in the cells, which is believed to compromise chondrocyte function and eventually cause cell death. To study the molecular mechanisms involved with the disease, we sought to develop an in vitro model that recapitulates the PSACH phenotype. Normal human chondrocytes were transfected with wildtype (wt-) COMP or with mutant COMP (D469del; mt-) recombinant adenoviruses and grown in a nonattachment redifferentiating culture system that provides an environment allowing formation of a differentiated chondrocyte nodule. Visualization of normal cells expressing COMP suggested the hallmarks of the PSACH phenotype. Mutant COMP expressed in normal cells was retained in enlarged rER cisternae, which also retained IX collagen (COL9) and matrilin-3 (MATN3). Although these proteins were secreted normally into the ECM of the wt-COMP nodules, reduced secretion of these proteins was observed in nodules composed of cells transfected with mt-COMP. The findings complement those found in chondrocytes from PSACH patient growth plates. This new model system allows for production of PSACH chondrocyte pathology in normal costochondral chondrocytes and can be used for future mechanistic and potential gene therapy studies. PMID:16514635

  15. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  16. Fast Skeletal Muscle Troponin Activator tirasemtiv Increases Muscle Function and Performance in the B6SJL-SOD1G93A ALS Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryans, Julie; Russell, Alan J.; Jia, Zhiheng; Hinken, Aaron C.; Morgans, David J.; Malik, Fady I.; Jasper, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss resulting in muscle atrophy, declining muscle function, and eventual paralysis. Patients typically die from respiratory failure 3 to 5 years from the onset of symptoms. Tirasemtiv is a fast skeletal troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium; this mechanism of action amplifies the response of muscle to neuromuscular input producing greater force when nerve input is reduced. Here, we demonstrate that a single dose of tirasemtiv significantly increases submaximal isometric force, forelimb grip strength, grid hang time, and rotarod performance in a female transgenic mouse model (B6SJL-SOD1G93A) of ALS with functional deficits. Additionally, diaphragm force and tidal volume are significantly higher in tirasemtiv-treated female B6SJL-SOD1G93A mice. These results support the potential of fast skeletal troponin activators to improve muscle function in neuromuscular diseases. PMID:24805850

  17. ALS mouse model SOD1G93A displays early pathology of sensory small fibers associated to accumulation of a neurotoxic splice variant of peripherin.

    PubMed

    Sassone, Jenny; Taiana, Michela; Lombardi, Raffaella; Porretta-Serapiglia, Carla; Freschi, Mattia; Bonanno, Silvia; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Caravello, Francesca; Bendotti, Caterina; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-04-15

    Growing evidence suggests that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a multisystem neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects motor neurons and, though less evidently, other neuronal systems. About 75% of sporadic and familial ALS patients show a subclinical degeneration of small-diameter fibers, as measured by loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), but the underlying biological causes are unknown. Small-diameter fibers are derived from small-diameter sensory neurons, located in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whose biochemical hallmark is the expression of type III intermediate filament peripherin. We tested here the hypothesis that small-diameter DRG neurons of ALS mouse model SOD1(G93A)suffer from axonal stress and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that SOD1(G93A)mice display small fiber pathology, as measured by IENF loss, which precedes the onset of the disease. In vitro small-diameter DRG neurons of SOD1(G93A)mice show axonal stress features and accumulation of a peripherin splice variant, named peripherin56, which causes axonal stress through disassembling light and medium neurofilament subunits (NFL and NFM, respectively). Our findings first demonstrate that small-diameter DRG neurons of the ALS mouse model SOD1(G93A)display axonal stress in vitro and in vivo, thus sustaining the hypothesis that the effects of ALS disease spread beyond motor neurons. These results suggest a molecular mechanism for the small fiber pathology found in ALS patients. Finally, our data agree with previous findings, suggesting a key role of peripherin in the ALS pathogenesis, thus highlighting that DRG neurons mirror some dysfunctions found in motor neurons. PMID:26908600

  18. Plasma Neurofilament Heavy Chain Levels Correlate to Markers of Late Stage Disease Progression and Treatment Response in SOD1G93A Mice that Model ALS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Hua; Petzold, Axel; Kalmar, Bernadett; Dick, James; Malaspina, Andrea; Greensmith, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to death, typically within 3–5 years of symptom onset. The diagnosis of ALS is largely reliant on clinical assessment and electrophysiological findings. Neither specific investigative tools nor reliable biomarkers are currently available to enable an early diagnosis or monitoring of disease progression, hindering the design of treatment trials. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, using the well-established SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS and a new in-house ELISA method, we have validated that plasma neurofilament heavy chain protein (NfH) levels correlate with both functional markers of late stage disease progression and treatment response. We detected a significant increase in plasma levels of phosphorylated NfH during disease progression in SOD1G93A mice from 105 days onwards. Moreover, increased plasma NfH levels correlated with the decline in muscle force, motor unit survival and, more significantly, with the loss of spinal motor neurons in SOD1 mice during this critical period of decline. Importantly, mice treated with the disease modifying compound arimoclomol had lower plasma NfH levels, suggesting plasma NfH levels could be validated as an outcome measure for treatment trials. Conclusions/Significance These results show that plasma NfH levels closely reflect later stages of disease progression and therapeutic response in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS and may potentially be a valuable biomarker of later disease progression in ALS. PMID:22815892

  19. Iron-sulfur cluster damage by the superoxide radical in neural tissues of the SOD1(G93A) ALS rat model.

    PubMed

    Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Mojović, Miloš; Stamenković, Stefan; Jovanović, Miloš; Selaković, Vesna; Andjus, Pavle; Bačić, Goran

    2016-07-01

    Extensive clinical investigations, in hand with biochemical and biophysical research, have associated brain iron accumulation with the pathogenesis of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease. The origin of iron is still not identified, but it is proposed that it forms redox active complexes that can participate in the Fenton reaction generating the toxic hydroxyl radical. In this paper, the state of iron in the neural tissues isolated from SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats was investigated using low temperature EPR spectroscopy and is compared with that of nontransgenic (NTg) littermates. The results showed that iron in neural tissues is present as high- and low-spin, heme and non-heme iron. It appears that the SOD1(G93A) rat neural tissues were most likely exposed in vivo to higher amounts of reactive oxygen species when compared to the corresponding NTg tissues, as they showed increased oxidized [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster content relative to [4Fe-4S](1+). Also, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was found to be reduced in these tissues, which may be associated with the observed uncoupling of heme a3 Fe and CuB in the O2-reduction site of the enzyme. Furthermore, the SOD1(G93A) rat spinal cords and brainstems contained more manganese, presumably from MnSOD, than those of NTg rats. The addition of potassium superoxide to all neural tissues ex vivo, led to the [4Fe-4S]→[3Fe-4S] cluster conversion and concurrent release of Fe. These results suggest that the superoxide anion may be the cause of the observed oxidative damage to SOD1(G93A) rat neural tissues and that the iron-sulfur clusters may be the source of poorly liganded redox active iron implicated in ALS pathogenesis. Low temperature EPR spectroscopy appears to be a valuable tool in assessing the role of metals in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27130034

  20. Genetic background effects on disease onset and lifespan of the mutant dynactin p150Glued mouse model of motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Heiman-Patterson, Terry D; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Sher, Roger B; Jiang, Juliann; Welsh, Priscilla; Dixon, Meredith C; Jeffrey, Jeremy I; Wong, Philip; Cox, Gregory A; Alexander, Guillermo M

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting motor neurons in the central nervous system. Although most cases of ALS are sporadic, about 5-10% of cases are familial (FALS) with approximately 20% of FALS caused by mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. We have reported that hSOD1-G93A transgenic mice modeling this disease show a more severe phenotype when the transgene is bred on a pure SJL background and a milder phenotype when bred on a pure B6 background and that these phenotype differences link to a region on mouse Chromosome 17.To examine whether other models of motor neuron degeneration are affected by genetic background, we bred the mutant human dynactin p150Glued (G59S-hDCTN1) transgene onto inbred SJL and B6 congenic lines. This model is based on an autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease in humans linked to a mutation in the p150Glued subunit of the dynactin complex. As seen in hSOD1-G93A mice, we observed a more severe phenotype with earlier disease onset (p<0.001) and decreased survival (p<0.00001) when the G59S-hDCTN1 transgene was bred onto the SJL background and delayed onset (p<0.0001) with increased survival (p<0.00001) when bred onto the B6 background. Furthermore, B6 mice with an SJL derived chromosome 17 interval previously shown to delay disease onset in hSOD1-G93A mice also showed delays onset in G59S-hDCTN1 mice suggesting that at least some genetic modifiers are shared. We have shown that genetic background influences phenotype in G59S-hDCTN1 mice, in part through a region of chromosome 17 similar to the G93-hSOD1 ALS mouse model. These results support the presence of genetic modifiers in both these models some of which may be shared. Identification of these modifiers will highlight intracellular pathways involved in motor neuron disease and provide new therapeutic targets that may be applicable to motor neuron degeneration. PMID:25763819

  1. Administration of 4-(α-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate delays disease phenotype in SOD1(G93A) rats: a transgenic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Galuppo, Maria; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Iori, Renato; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    4-(α-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl glucosinolate (glucomoringin, GMG) is a compound found in Moringa oleifera seeds. Myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis at neutral pH of GMG releases the biologically active compound 4-(α-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate (GMG-ITC). The present study was designed to test the potential therapeutic effectiveness of GMG-ITC to counteract the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using SOD1tg rats, which physiologically develops SOD1(G93A) at about 16 weeks of life, and can be considered a genetic model of disease. Rats were treated once a day with GMG (10 mg/Kg) bioactivated with myrosinase (20 µL/rat) via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection for two weeks before disease onset and the treatment was prolonged for further two weeks before the sacrifice. Immune-inflammatory markers as well as apoptotic pathway were investigated to establish whether GMG-ITC could represent a new promising tool in clinical practice to prevent ALS. Achieved data display clear differences in molecular and biological profiles between treated and untreated SOD1tg rats leading to guessing that GMG-ITC can interfere with the pathophysiological mechanisms at the basis of ALS development. Therefore, GMG-ITC produced from myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of pure GMG could be a candidate for further studies aimed to assess its possible use in clinical practice for the prevention or to slow down this disease. PMID:26075221

  2. Administration of 4-(α-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl Isothiocyanate Delays Disease Phenotype in SOD1G93A Rats: A Transgenic Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    4-(α-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl glucosinolate (glucomoringin, GMG) is a compound found in Moringa oleifera seeds. Myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis at neutral pH of GMG releases the biologically active compound 4-(α-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate (GMG-ITC). The present study was designed to test the potential therapeutic effectiveness of GMG-ITC to counteract the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using SOD1tg rats, which physiologically develops SOD1G93A at about 16 weeks of life, and can be considered a genetic model of disease. Rats were treated once a day with GMG (10 mg/Kg) bioactivated with myrosinase (20 µL/rat) via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection for two weeks before disease onset and the treatment was prolonged for further two weeks before the sacrifice. Immune-inflammatory markers as well as apoptotic pathway were investigated to establish whether GMG-ITC could represent a new promising tool in clinical practice to prevent ALS. Achieved data display clear differences in molecular and biological profiles between treated and untreated SOD1tg rats leading to guessing that GMG-ITC can interfere with the pathophysiological mechanisms at the basis of ALS development. Therefore, GMG-ITC produced from myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of pure GMG could be a candidate for further studies aimed to assess its possible use in clinical practice for the prevention or to slow down this disease. PMID:26075221

  3. Beneficial Effects of Multitarget Iron Chelator on Central Nervous System and Gastrocnemius Muscle in SOD1(G93A) Transgenic ALS Mice.

    PubMed

    Golko-Perez, Sagit; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B H; Weinreb, Orly

    2016-08-01

    Accumulation of evidence has demonstrated high levels of iron in the central nervous system of both sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and in ALS mouse models. In accordance, iron chelation therapy was found to exert beneficial effects on ALS mice. Our group has designed and synthesized series of multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron-chelating compounds for neurodegenerative diseases. Recent study has shown that co-administration of one of these drugs, VAR10303 with high calorie/energy-supplemented diet (VAR-ced), initiated after the appearance of disease symptoms improved motor performance, extended survival, and attenuated iron accumulation and motoneuron loss in SOD1(G93A) mice. Since VAR was found to exert diverse pharmacological properties associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in the gastrocnemius (GNS) muscle, we further assessed in the current study the impact of VAR-ced on additional neurorescue-associated molecular targets in the GNS and frontal cortex in SOD1(G93A) mice. The results show that VAR-ced treatment upregulated the expression of various HIF-1α-target glycolytic genes and elevated the levels of Bcl-2, neurotrophic factors, and AKT/GSK3β signaling in the GNS and frontal cortex of SOD1(G93A) mice, suggesting that these protective regulatory parameters regulated by VAR-ced treatment may be associated with the beneficial effects of the drug observed on ALS mice. PMID:27173029

  4. Bee Venom Acupuncture Augments Anti-Inflammation in the Peripheral Organs of hSOD1G93A Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Hwa; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) includes progressively degenerated motor neurons in the brainstem, motor cortex, and spinal cord. Recent reports demonstrate the dysfunction of multiple organs, including the lungs, spleen, and liver, in ALS animals and patients. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been used for treating inflammatory diseases in Oriental Medicine. In a previous study, we demonstrated that BV prevented motor neuron death and increased anti-inflammation in the spinal cord of symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. In this study, we examined whether BVA’s effects depend on acupuncture point (ST36) in the organs, including the liver, spleen and kidney, of hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. We found that BV treatment at ST36 reduces inflammation in the liver, spleen, and kidney compared with saline-treatment at ST36 and BV injected intraperitoneally in symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. Those findings suggest that BV treatment combined with acupuncture stimulation is more effective at reducing inflammation and increasing immune responses compared with only BV treatment, at least in an ALS animal model. PMID:26230709

  5. An In silico Based Comparison of Drug Interactions in Wild and Mutant Human β-tubulin through Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chellasamy, Selvaakumar; Mohammed, Sudheer M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tubulin protein being the fundamental unit of microtubules is actively involved in cell division thus making them a potential anti-cancer drug target. In spite of many reported drugs against tubulin, few of them have started developing resistance in human β-tubulin due to amino acid substitutions. Methods In this study we generated three mutants (F270V, A364T and Q292E) using Modeller9v10 which were targeted with compounds from higher and lower plants along with marine isolates using iGEMDOCK2.0 to identify their residual interactions. Results The mutant F270V does not bring in any increase in the binding affinity in comparison with the taxol-wild type due to their conservative substitutions. However, it increases the volume of the active site. A364T mutant brings a better binding among few of the marine and higher plants isolates due to the substitution of the non-reactive methyl group with the polar residue. But this leads to reduced active site volume. Finally the mutant Q292E from epothilone binding site brings a remarkable change in drug binding in the mutants in comparison with the wild type due to the substitution of uncharged residue with the charged one. But as such there was no change in the volume of the active site observed in them. Conclusion Lower plants extracts were reported to exhibit better interactions with the taxol and epothilone binding sites. Whereas marine and higher plants isolates shows significant interactions only in the wild type instead of the mutants. In addition to this, the residual substitutions were also found to alter the conformations of the active sites in mutants PMID:24834310

  6. Cyclophilin A-Dependent Restriction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Capsid Mutants for Infection of Nondividing Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Mingli; Yang, Ruifeng; Aiken, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Among retroviruses, lentiviruses are unusual in their ability to efficiently infect both dividing and nondividing cells, such as activated T cells and macrophages, respectively. Recent studies implicate the viral capsid protein (CA) as a key determinant of cell-cycle-independent infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We investigated the effects of the host cell protein cyclophilin A (CypA), which binds to HIV-1 CA, on HIV-1 infection of nondividing cells. The HIV-1 CA mutants A92E, T54A, and R132K were impaired for infection of aphidicolin-arrested HeLa cells, but not HOS cells. The mutants synthesized normal quantities of two-long-terminal-repeat circles in arrested HeLa cells, indicating that the mutant preintegration complexes can enter the nuclei of both dividing and nondividing cells. The impaired infectivity of the CA mutants on both dividing and nondividing HeLa cells was relieved by either pharmacological or genetic disruption of the CypA-CA interaction or by RNA interference-mediated depletion of CypA expression in target cells. A second-site suppressor of the CypA-restricted phenotype also restored the ability of CypA-restricted HIV-1 mutants to infect growth-arrested HeLa cells. These results indicate that CypA-restricted mutants are specifically impaired at a step between nuclear import and integration in nondividing HeLa cells. This study reveals a novel target cell-specific restriction of HIV-1 CA mutants in nondividing cells that is dependent on CypA-CA interactions. PMID:18829762

  7. Genetic and immunochemical analysis of mutant p53 in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bartek, J; Iggo, R; Gannon, J; Lane, D P

    1990-06-01

    The expression of the tumour suppressor gene p53 was analysed in 11 human breast cancer cell lines by immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and cDNA sequencing. We used a panel of anti-p53 monoclonal antibodies for cell staining and found abnormalities in every case. Eight of the cell lines produce a form of p53 which can be immunoprecipitated by the monoclonal antibody PAb240 but not by PAb1620. In the murine system PAb240 only immunoprecipitates mutant p53. We sequenced p53 cDNA directly from four of the PAb240 positive cell lines using asymmetric PCR templates. All four contained missense mutations in p53 RNA, with no detectable expression of the wild type sequence. Different residues were affected in each cell line, but all the mutations changed amino acids conserved from man to Xenopus. These results imply that as in the murine system, the PAb240 antibody reliably detects a wide variety of p53 mutations and that these mutations have a common effect on the structure of p53. Immunohistochemical data suggest that p53 mutation is the commonest genetic alteration so far detected in primary breast cancer. PMID:1694291

  8. Structure analysis of the protein transduction domain of human Period1 and its mutant analogs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao Lin; Xie, Jun; Niu, Bo; Hu, Xiao Nian; Gao, Yang; Xiang, Qian; Zhang, Yue Hong; Guo, Yong; Zhang, Zheng Guo

    2005-04-01

    Human Period1 (hPer1) has been proved to be able to translocate into cells in a protein transduction manner. The segment of amino acids 830-845 of hPer1 is its protein transduction domain (PTD). In order to explore the membrane penetrating mechanism of hPer1-PTD and the physico-chemical properties necessary in the process, Ala scanning mutation method was used to investigate the variation in the peptide internalization. To further investigate the related physico-chemical requirements, the three dimensional structures of hPer1-PTD and its mutant analogs were simulated by Rosetta method. The electrostatic potentials and energies of these structures were calculated using the Delphi algorithm to solve Poisson-Boltzman equation. The hydrophobicity was assessed by the percentage of the nonpolar area in SAS (solvent accessible surface (SAS)). It has been proved that the Arg836 was the key residue for peptide internalization. When this Arg mutated into Ala, the peptide could not cross the membrane. The large enough area with positive charge was the decisive factor for hPer1-PTD. The alpha-helical structure seemed to play an assistant role so as to enable the positive charge connected in spatial arrangement. PMID:15781181

  9. Precise identification of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antigen processing mutant.

    PubMed

    Zimbwa, Peter; Milicic, Anita; Frater, John; Scriba, Thomas J; Willis, Antony; Goulder, Philip J R; Pillay, Tilly; Gunthard, Huldrych; Weber, Jonathan N; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Phillips, Rodney E

    2007-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evokes a strong immune response, but the virus persists. Polymorphisms within known antigenic sites result in loss of immune recognition and can be positively selected. Amino acid variation outside known HLA class I restricted epitopes can also enable immune escape by interfering with the processing of the optimal peptide antigen. However, the lack of precise rules dictating epitope generation and the enormous genetic diversity of HIV make prediction of processing mutants very difficult. Polymorphism E169D in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is significantly associated with HLA-B*0702 in HIV-1-infected individuals. This polymorphism does not map within a known HLA-B*0702 epitope; instead, it is located five residues downstream of a HLA-B*0702-restricted epitope SPAIFQSSM (SM9). Here we investigate the association between E169D and HLA-B*0702 for immune escape via the SM9 epitope. We show that this single amino acid variation prevents the immune recognition of the flanked SM9 epitope by cytotoxic T cells through lack of generation of the epitope, which is a result of aberrant proteasomal cleavage. The E169D polymorphism also maps within and abrogates the recognition of an HLA-A*03-restricted RT epitope MR9. This study highlights the potential for using known statistical associations as indicators for viral escape but also the complexity involved in interpreting the immunological consequences of amino acid changes in HIV sequences. PMID:17108020

  10. L-Ascorbic acid can abrogate SVCT-2-dependent cetuximab resistance mediated by mutant KRAS in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo-A; Lee, Dae-Hee; Moon, Jai-Hee; Hong, Seung-Woo; Shin, Jae-Sik; Hwang, Ih Yeon; Shin, Yu Jin; Kim, Jeong Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Kim, Seung-Mi; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Seul; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jung Shin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, TaeWon; Lee, Wang Jae

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer patients with mutant KRAS are resistant to cetuximab, an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is an effective clinical therapy for patients with wild-type KRAS. Numerous combinatorial therapies have been tested to overcome the resistance to cetuximab. However, no combinations have been found that can be used as effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that L-ascorbic acid partners with cetuximab to induce killing effects, which are influenced by sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT-2) in human colon cancer cells with a mutant KRAS. L-Ascorbic acid treatment of human colon cancer cells that express a mutant KRAS differentially and synergistically induced cell death with cetuximab in a SVCT-2-dependent manner. The ectopic expression of SVCT-2 induced sensitivity to L-ascorbic acid treatment in human colon cancer cells that do not express SVCT-2, whereas the knockdown of endogenous SVCT-2 induced resistance to L-ascorbic acid treatment in SVCT-2-positive cells. Moreover, tumor regression via the administration of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab in mice bearing tumor cell xenografts corresponded to SVCT-2 protein levels. Interestingly, cell death induced by the combination of L-ascorbic acid and cetuximab resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. These cell death mechanisms were related to a disruption of the ERK pathway and were represented by the impaired activation of RAFs and the activation of the ASK-1-p38 pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that resistance to cetuximab in human colon cancer patients with a mutant KRAS can be bypassed by L-ascorbic acid in an SVCT-2-dependent manner. Furthermore, SVCT-2 in mutant KRAS colon cancer may act as a potent marker for potentiating L-ascorbic acid co-treatment with cetuximab. PMID:27012422

  11. Mislocalization of prelamin A Tyr646Phe mutant to the nuclear pore complex in human embryonic kidney 293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K. . E-mail: anil.agarwal@utsouthwestern.edu

    2007-03-30

    Mature lamin A is formed after post-translational processing of prelamin A, which includes prenylation and carboxymethylation of cysteine 661 in the CaaX motif, followed by two proteolytic cleavages by zinc metalloprotease (ZMPSTE24). We expressed several prelamin A mutants, C661S (defective in prenylation), Y646F (designed to undergo prenylation but not second proteolytic cleavage), double mutant, Y646F/C661S and Y646X (mature lamin A), and the wild-type construct in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Only the Y646F mutant co-localized with nuclear pore complex proteins, including Nup53 and Nup98, whereas the other mutants localized to the nuclear envelope rim. The cells expressing Y646F mutant also revealed abnormal nuclear morphology which was partially rescued with the farnesyl transferase inhibitors. These data suggest that the unprenylated prelamin A is not toxic to the cells. The toxicity of prenylated prelamin A may be due to its association and/or accumulation at the nuclear pore complex which could be partially reversed by farnesyl transferase inhibitors.

  12. Structural characterization of V57D and V57P mutants of human cystatin C, an amyloidogenic protein

    PubMed Central

    Orlikowska, Marta; Szymańska, Aneta; Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Skowron, Piotr; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Wild-type human cystatin C (hCC wt) is a low-molecular-mass protein (120 amino-acid residues, 13 343 Da) that is found in all nucleated cells. Physiologically, it functions as a potent regulator of cysteine protease activity. While the biologically active hCC wt is a monomeric protein, all crystallization efforts to date have resulted in a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimeric structure. In the recently published structure of a mutated hCC, the monomeric fold was preserved by a stabilization of the conformationally constrained loop L1 caused by a single amino-acid substitution: Val57Asn. Additional hCC mutants were obtained in order to elucidate the relationship between the stability of the L1 loop and the propensity of human cystatin C to dimerize. In one mutant Val57 was substituted by an aspartic acid residue, which is favoured in β-turns, and in the second mutant proline, a residue known for broadening turns, was substituted for the same Val57. Here, 2.26 and 3.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the V57D andV57P mutants of hCC are reported and their dimeric architecture is discussed in terms of the stabilization and destabilization effects of the introduced mutations. PMID:23519666

  13. An Fgf8 Mouse Mutant Phenocopies Human 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Deborah U.; Fotheringham, Lori K.; Brewer, Judson A.; Muglia, Louis J.; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Capecchi, Mario R.; Moon, Anne M.

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Deletion of chromosome 22q11, the most common microdeletion detected in humans, is associated with a life-threatening array of birth defects. Although 90% of affected individuals share the same three megabase deletion, their phenotype is highly variable and includes craniofacial and cardiovascular anomalies, hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus with associated deficiency of T cells, hypocalcemia with hypoplasia or aplasia of the parathyroids, and a variety of central nervous system abnormalities. Because ablation of neural crest in chicks produces many features of the deletion 22q11 syndrome, it has been proposed that haploinsufficiency in this region impacts neural crest function during cardiac and pharyngeal arch development. Few factors required for migration, survival, proliferation and subsequent differentiation of pharyngeal arch neural crest and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme into their respective cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and glandular derivatives have been identified. However, the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and pharyngeal endoderm function is becoming increasingly clear. Fibroblast growth factor 8 is a signaling molecule expressed in the ectoderm and endoderm of the developing pharyngeal arches and known to play an important role in survival and patterning of first arch tissues. We demonstrate a dosage-sensitive requirement for FGF8 during development of pharyngeal arch, pharyngeal pouch and neural crest-derived tissues. We show that FGF8 deficient embryos have lethal malformations of the cardiac outflow tract, great vessels and heart due, at least in part, to failure to form the fourth pharyngeal arch arteries, altered expression of Fgf10 in the pharyngeal mesenchyme, and abnormal apoptosis in pharyngeal and cardiac neural crest. The Fgf8 mutants described herein display the complete array of cardiovascular, glandular and craniofacial phenotypes seen in human deletion 22q11 syndromes. This represents the first single gene

  14. Novel Mutants Define Genes Required for the Expression of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen DM: Evidence for Loci on Human Chromosome 6p

    PubMed Central

    Fling, Steven P.; Rak, Jennifer; Muczynski, Kimberly A.; Arp, Benjamin; Pious, Donald

    1997-01-01

    We and others have shown that the products of the HLA-DM locus are required for the intracellular assembly of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules with cognate peptides for antigen presentation. HLA-DM heterodimers mediate the dissociation of invariant chain (Ii)-derived class II–associated Ii peptides (CLIP) from class II molecules and facilitate the loading of class II molecules with antigenic peptides. Here we describe novel APC mutants with defects in the formation of class II–peptide complexes. These mutants express class II molecules which are conformationally altered, and an aberrantly high percentage of these class II molecules are associated with Ii-derived CLIP. This phenotype resembles that of DM null mutants. However, we show that the defects in two of these new mutants do not map to the DM locus. Nevertheless, our evidence suggests that the antigen processing defective phenotype in these mutants results from deficient DM expression. These mutants thus appear to define genes in which mutations have differential effects on the expression of conventional class II molecules and DM molecules. Our data are most consistent with these factors mapping to human chromosome 6p. Previous data have suggested that the expression of DM and class II genes are coordinately regulated. The results reported here suggest that DM and class II can also be differentially regulated, and that this differential regulation has significant effects on class II–restricted antigen processing. PMID:9348304

  15. Type I Vs. Type II Cytokine Levels as a Function of SOD1 G93A Mouse Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeyachandran, Amilia; Mertens, Benjamin; McKissick, Eric A.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motoneuron disease that is characterized by the degradation of neurons throughout the central nervous system. Inflammation have been cited a key contributor to ALS neurodegeneration, but the timeline of cytokine upregulation remains unresolved. The goal of this study was to temporally examine the correlation between the varying levels of pro-inflammatory type I cytokines (IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-12, TNF-α, and GFAP) and anti-inflammatory type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) throughout the progression of ALS in the SOD1 G93A mouse model. Cytokine level data from high copy SOD1 G93A transgenic mice was collected from 66 peer-reviewed studies. For each corresponding experimental time point, the ratio of transgenic to wild type (TG/WT) cytokine was calculated. One-way ANOVA and t-tests with Bonferonni correction were used to analyze the data. Meta-analysis was performed for four discrete stages: early, pre-onset, post-onset, and end stage. A significant increase in TG cytokine levels was found when compared to WT cytokine levels across the entire SOD1 G93A lifespan for majority of the cytokines. The rates of change of the individual cytokines, and type I and type II were not significantly different; however, the mean fold change of type I was expressed at significantly higher levels than type II levels across all stages with the difference between the means becoming more pronounced at the end stage. An overexpression of cytokines occurred both before and after the onset of ALS symptoms. The trend between pro-inflammatory type I and type II cytokine mean levels indicate a progressive instability of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as anti-inflammatory cytokines fail to mediate the pronounced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Very early immunoregulatory treatment is necessary to successfully interrupt ALS-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:26648846

  16. Gene expression analysis of the murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: studies of the Leu126delTT mutation in SOD1.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yasuyo; Yasui, Kenichi; Kitayama, Michio; Doi, Koji; Nakano, Toshiya; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji

    2007-07-30

    The pathogenic events that lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have not been elucidated. We previously described familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) caused by a Leu126delTT mutation in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) and have produced transgenic mice (TgM) carrying the same mutation (SOD1(L126delTT) TgM), which exhibited distinct ALS-like motor symptoms and pathological findings. In this study, we analyzed gene expression in the spinal cord of SOD1(L126delTT) TgM by cDNA microarray. Eleven genes were upregulated and two genes downregulated in pre-symptomatic TgM. In post-symptomatic TgM, 54 genes were upregulated and four genes downregulated. We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of 10 of the 54 upregulated genes in the post-symptomatic TgM. The results of real-time PCR were consistent with those obtained by microarray for micro-crystallin (Crym), heat shock protein 1 (Hspb1/HSP27), serine proteinase inhibitor clade A member 3N (Serpina3n), complement component 1q subcomponent beta polypeptide (C1qb), cathepsin H (Ctsh) and polyadenylate binding protein-interacting protein 1 (Paip1). In immunohistochemical analysis, Hsbp1/HSP27 and Ctsh expression levels were increased in reactive astrocytes at the ventral horn of the spinal cord in post-symptomatic TgM, as were Crym, some of Ctsh and Paip1 in microglial cells. Increased expression of those genes was not observed in the control mice. These four genes may be related to the pathogenesis of FALS, especially with regard to the progression of reactive astrocytes and the inflammatory response of microglial cells. PMID:17583678

  17. Comparison of the crystal structure and function to wild-type and His25Ala mutant human heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Hong; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zi-Li; Xia, Zhen-Wei

    2009-03-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme metabolism. It regulates serum bilirubin level. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that the proximal residue histidine 25 (His25) plays a key role in hHO-1 activity. A highly purified hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was generated and crystallized with a new expression system. The crystal structure of the mutant was determined by X-ray diffraction technology and molecular replacement at the resolution of 2.8 A, and the model of hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was refined. The final crystallographic and free R factors were 0.245 and 0.283, respectively. The standard bond length deviation was 0.007 A, and the standard bond angle deviation was 1.3 degrees . The mutation of His25 to Ala led to an empty pocket underneath the ferric ion in the heme, leading to loss of binding iron ligand. Although this did not cause an overall structural change, the enzymatic activity of the mutant hHO-1 was reduced by 90%. By supplementing imidazole, the HO-1 activity was restored approximately 90% to its normal level. These data suggest that Ala25 remains unchanged in the structure compared to His25, but the important catalytic function of hHO-1 is lost. Thus, it appears that His25 is a crucial residue for proper hHO-1 catalysis. PMID:19212657

  18. Xenopus pax6 mutants affect eye development and other organ systems, and have phenotypic similarities to human aniridia patients.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Nakajima, Keisuke; Odeleye, Akinleye O; Zimmerman, Keith B; Fish, Margaret B; Yaoita, Yoshio; Chojnowski, Jena L; Lauderdale, James D; Netland, Peter A; Grainger, Robert M

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the Pax6 gene cause ocular defects in both vertebrate and invertebrate animal species, and the disease aniridia in humans. Despite extensive experimentation on this gene in multiple species, including humans, we still do not understand the earliest effects on development mediated by this gene. This prompted us to develop pax6 mutant lines in Xenopus tropicalis taking advantage of the utility of the Xenopus system for examining early development and in addition to establish a model for studying the human disease aniridia in an accessible lower vertebrate. We have generated mutants in pax6 by using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) constructs for gene editing in X. tropicalis. Embryos with putative null mutations show severe eye abnormalities and changes in brain development, as assessed by changes in morphology and gene expression. One gene that we found is downregulated very early in development in these pax6 mutants is myc, a gene involved in pluripotency and progenitor cell maintenance and likely a mediator of some key pax6 functions in the embryo. Changes in gene expression in the developing brain and pancreas reflect other important functions of pax6 during development. In mutations with partial loss of pax6 function eye development is initially relatively normal but froglets show an underdeveloped iris, similar to the classic phenotype (aniridia) seen in human patients with PAX6 mutations. Other eye abnormalities observed in these froglets, including cataracts and corneal defects, are also common in human aniridia. The frog model thus allows us to examine the earliest deficits in eye formation as a result of pax6 lesions, and provides a useful model for understanding the developmental basis for the aniridia phenotype seen in humans. PMID:25724657

  19. Insights on the structural perturbations in human MTHFR Ala222Val mutant by protein modeling and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abhinand, P A; Shaikh, Faraz; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Radadiya, Ashish; Bhaskar, L V K S; Shah, Anamik; Ragunath, P K

    2016-04-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) protein catalyzes the only biochemical reaction which produces methyltetrahydrofolate, the active form of folic acid essential for several molecular functions. The Ala222Val polymorphism of human MTHFR encodes a thermolabile protein associated with increased risk of neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease. Experimental studies have shown that the mutation does not affect the kinetic properties of MTHFR, but inactivates the protein by increasing flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) loss. The lack of completely solved crystal structure of MTHFR is an impediment in understanding the structural perturbations caused by the Ala222Val mutation; computational modeling provides a suitable alternative. The three-dimensional structure of human MTHFR protein was obtained through homology modeling, by taking the MTHFR structures from Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus as templates. Subsequently, the modeled structure was docked with FAD using Glide, which revealed a very good binding affinity, authenticated by a Glide XP score of -10.3983 (kcal mol(-1)). The MTHFR was mutated by changing Alanine 222 to Valine. The wild-type MTHFR-FAD complex and the Ala222Val mutant MTHFR-FAD complex were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation over 50 ns period. The average difference in backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) between wild and mutant variant was found to be ~.11 Å. The greater degree of fluctuations in the mutant protein translates to increased conformational stability as a result of mutation. The FAD-binding ability of the mutant MTHFR was also found to be significantly lowered as a result of decreased protein grip caused by increased conformational flexibility. The study provides insights into the Ala222Val mutation of human MTHFR that induces major conformational changes in the tertiary structure, causing a significant reduction in the FAD-binding affinity. PMID:26273990

  20. Rescue of noncultivatable human rotavirus by gene reassortment during mixed infection with ts mutants of a cultivatable bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H B; Kalica, A R; Wyatt, R G; Jones, R W; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1981-01-01

    Fastidious human rotaviruses that did not undergo productive infection in tissue culture were rescued by genetic reassortment during mixed infection with a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of a cultivatable bovine rotavirus. In this manner, the genes of the fastidious rotavirus that restricted growth in vitro were replaced by the corresponding genes from a tissue culture-adapted rotavirus. We recovered genetically reassorted viruses that grew to high titer and were neutralized specifically by hyperimmune guinea pig type 1 or type 2 human rotavirus antiserum. Preliminary RNA analysis of these clones disclosed that they were indeed viruses with reassorted genes. Images PMID:6264442

  1. Analysis of Human Cell Heterokaryons Demonstrates that Target Cell Restriction of Cyclosporine-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Mutants Is Genetically Dominant▿

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chisu; Aiken, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The host cell protein cyclophilin A (CypA) binds to CA of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and promotes HIV-1 infection of target cells. Disruption of the CypA-CA interaction, either by mutation of the CA residue at G89 or P90 or with the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine (CsA), reduces HIV-1 infection. Two CA mutants, A92E and G94D, previously were identified by selection for growth of wild-type HIV-1 in cultures of CD4+ HeLa cell cultures containing CsA. Interestingly, infection of some cell lines by these mutants is enhanced in the presence of CsA, while in other cell lines these mutants are minimally affected by the drug. Little is known about this cell-dependent phenotype of the A92E and G94D mutants, except that it is not dependent on expression of the host factor TRIM5α. Here, we show that infection by the A92E and G94D mutants is restricted at an early postentry stage of the HIV-1 life cycle. Analysis of heterokaryons between CsA-dependent HeLa-P4 cells and CsA-independent 293T cells indicated that the CsA-dependent infection by A92E and G94D mutants is due to a dominant cellular restriction. We also show that addition of CsA to target cells inhibits infection by wild-type HIV-1 prior to reverse transcription. Collectively, these results support the existence of a cell-specific human cellular factor capable of restricting HIV-1 at an early postentry step by a CypA-dependent mechanism. PMID:17715216

  2. Non-invasive assessment of animal exercise stress: real-time PCR of GLUT4, COX2, SOD1 and HSP70 in avalanche military dog saliva.

    PubMed

    Diverio, S; Guelfi, G; Barbato, O; Di Mari, W; Egidi, M G; Santoro, M M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase mRNA expression of a growing number of genes. The aim of this study was to assess if mRNA expression of the metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4), COX2 (cyclooxygenase 2), SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1) and HSP70 (heat shock protein 70) in saliva changes following acute exercise stress in dogs. For this purpose, 12 avalanche dogs of the Italian Military Force Guardia di Finanza were monitored during simulation of a search for a buried person in an artificial avalanche area. Rectal temperature (RT) and saliva samples were collected the day before the trial (T0), immediately after the descent from a helicopter at the onset of a simulated avalanche search and rescue operation (T1), after the discovery of the buried person (T2) and 2 h later (T3). Expressions of GLUT4, SOD1, COX2 and HSP70 were measured by real-time PCR. The simulated avalanche search and rescue operation was shown to exert a significant effect on RT, as well as on the expression of all metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes investigated, which peaked at T2. The observed expression patterns indicate an acute exercise stress-induced upregulation, as confirmed by the reductions in expression at T3. Moreover, our findings indicate that saliva is useful for assessing metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes without the need for restraint, which could affect working dog performance. PMID:25245143

  3. State of the field: An informatics-based systematic review of the SOD1-G93A amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Renaid B; Irvin, Cameron W; Tilva, Keval R; Mitchell, Cassie S

    2015-01-01

    Numerous sub-cellular through system-level disturbances have been identified in over 1300 articles examining the superoxide dismutase-1 guanine 93 to alanine (SOD1-G93A) transgenic mouse amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathophysiology. Manual assessment of such a broad literature base is daunting. We performed a comprehensive informatics-based systematic review or 'field analysis' to agnostically compute and map the current state of the field. Text mining of recaptured articles was used to quantify published data topic breadth and frequency. We constructed a nine-category pathophysiological function-based ontology to systematically organize and quantify the field's primary data. Results demonstrated that the distribution of primary research belonging to each category is: systemic measures an motor function, 59%; inflammation, 46%; cellular energetics, 37%; proteomics, 31%; neural excitability, 22%; apoptosis, 20%; oxidative stress, 18%; aberrant cellular chemistry, 14%; axonal transport, 10%. We constructed a SOD1-G93A field map that visually illustrates and categorizes the 85% most frequently assessed sub-topics. Finally, we present the literature-cited significance of frequently published terms and uncover thinly investigated areas. In conclusion, most articles individually examine at least two categories, which is indicative of the numerous underlying pathophysiological interrelationships. An essential future path is examination of cross-category pathophysiological interrelationships and their co-correspondence to homeostatic regulation and disease progression. PMID:25998063

  4. State of the field: An informatics-based systematic review of the SOD1-G93A amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Renaid B.; Irvin, Cameron W.; Tilva, Keval R.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous sub-cellular through system-level disturbances have been identified in over 1300 articles examining the superoxide dismutase-1 guanine 93 to alanine (SOD1-G93A) transgenic mouse amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathophysiology. Manual assessment of such a broad literature base is daunting. We performed a comprehensive informatics-based systematic review or ‘field analysis’ to agnostically compute and map the current state of the field. Text mining of recaptured articles was used to quantify published data topic breadth and frequency. We constructed a nine-category pathophysiological function-based ontology to systematically organize and quantify the field's primary data. Results demonstrated that the distribution of primary research belonging to each category is: systemic measures an motor function, 59%; inflammation, 46%; cellular energetics, 37%; proteomics, 31%; neural excitability, 22%; apoptosis, 20%; oxidative stress, 18%; aberrant cellular chemistry, 14%; axonal transport, 10%. We constructed a SOD1-G93A field map that visually illustrates and categorizes the 85% most frequently assessed sub-topics. Finally, we present the literature-cited significance of frequently published terms and uncover thinly investigated areas. In conclusion, most articles individually examine at least two categories, which is indicative of the numerous underlying pathophysiological interrelationships. An essential future path is examination of cross-category pathophysiological interrelationships and their co-correspondence to homeostatic regulation and disease progression. PMID:25998063

  5. Neurodegenerative disease-associated mutants of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase present individual molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Gaudry, Agnès; Karim, Loukmane; Schwenzer, Hagen; Wien, Frank; Roblin, Pierre; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The effects of these mutations on the structure and function of the enzymes remain to be established. Here, we investigate six mutants of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase correlated with leukoencephalopathies. Our integrated strategy, combining an ensemble of biochemical and biophysical approaches, reveals that mutants are diversely affected with respect to their solubility in cellular extracts and stability in solution, but not in architecture. Mutations with mild effects on solubility occur in patients as allelic combinations whereas those with strong effects on solubility or on aminoacylation are necessarily associated with a partially functional allele. The fact that all mutations show individual molecular and cellular signatures and affect amino acids only conserved in mammals, points towards an alternative function besides aminoacylation. PMID:26620921

  6. The modeling of Alzheimer's disease by the overexpression of mutant Presenilin 1 in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Honda, Makoto; Minami, Itsunari; Tooi, Norie; Morone, Nobuhiro; Nishioka, Hisae; Uemura, Kengo; Kinoshita, Ayae; Heuser, John E; Nakatsuji, Norio; Aiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-15

    Cellular disease models are useful tools for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research. Pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are promising materials for creating cellular models of such diseases. In the present study, we established cellular models of AD in hESCs that overexpressed the mutant Presenilin 1 (PS1) gene with the use of a site-specific gene integration system. The overexpression of PS1 did not affect the undifferentiated status or the neural differentiation ability of the hESCs. We found increases in the ratios of amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42)/Aβ40 and Aβ43/Aβ40. Furthermore, synaptic dysfunction was observed in a cellular model of AD that overexpressed mutant PS1. These results suggest that the AD phenotypes, in particular, the electrophysiological abnormality of the synapses in our AD models might be useful for AD research and drug discovery. PMID:26687948

  7. DNA damage processing by human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase mutants with the occluded active site.

    PubMed

    Lukina, Maria V; Popov, Alexander V; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Fedorova, Olga S; Zharkov, Dmitry O

    2013-10-01

    8-Oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) removes premutagenic lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) from DNA and then nicks the nascent abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic) site by β-elimination. Although the structure of OGG1 bound to damaged DNA is known, the dynamic aspects of 8-oxo-G recognition are not well understood. To comprehend the mechanisms of substrate recognition and processing, we have constructed OGG1 mutants with the active site occluded by replacement of Cys-253, which forms a wall of the base-binding pocket, with bulky leucine or isoleucine. The conformational dynamics of OGG1 mutants were characterized by single-turnover kinetics and stopped-flow kinetics with fluorescent detection. Additionally, the conformational mobility of wild type and the mutant OGG1 substrate complex was assessed using molecular dynamics simulations. Although pocket occlusion distorted the active site and greatly decreased the catalytic activity of OGG1, it did not fully prevent processing of 8-oxo-G and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. Both mutants were notably stimulated in the presence of free 8-bromoguanine, indicating that this base can bind to the distorted OGG1 and facilitate β-elimination. The results agree with the concept of enzyme plasticity, suggesting that the active site of OGG1 is flexible enough to compensate partially for distortions caused by mutation. PMID:23955443

  8. Expression of the ALS-causing variant hSOD1G93A leads to an impaired integrity and altered regulation of claudin-5 expression in an in vitro blood–spinal cord barrier model

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Sabrina; Storck, Steffen E; Hameister, Erik; Behl, Christian; Weggen, Sascha; Clement, Albrecht M; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive paralysis due to the loss of primary and secondary motor neurons. Mutations in the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene are associated with familial ALS and to date numerous hypotheses for ALS pathology exist including impairment of the blood–spinal cord barrier. In transgenic mice carrying mutated SOD1 genes, a disrupted blood–spinal cord barrier as well as decreased levels of tight junction (TJ) proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5 were detected. Here, we examined TJ protein levels and barrier function of primary blood–spinal cord barrier endothelial cells of presymptomatic hSOD1G93A mice and bEnd.3 cells stably expressing hSOD1G93A. In both cellular systems, we observed reduced claudin-5 levels and a decreased transendothelial resistance (TER) as well as an increased apparent permeability. Analysis of the β-catenin/AKT/forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) pathway and the FoxO1-regulated activity of the claudin-5 promoter revealed a repression of the claudin-5 gene expression in hSOD1G93A cells, which was depended on the phosphorylation status of FoxO1. These results strongly indicate that mutated SOD1 affects the expression and localization of TJ proteins leading to impaired integrity and breakdown of the blood–spinal cord barrier. PMID:25853911

  9. Wild-Type-Like Viral Replication Potential of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Mutants Lacking Palmitoylation Signals

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Woan-Eng; Lin, Hui-Hua; Chen, Steve S.-L.

    2005-01-01

    Palmitoylation of the cytoplasmic domain of the human immunodeficiency type virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) transmembrane protein, gp41, has been implicated in Env targeting to detergent-resistant lipid rafts, Env incorporation into the virus, and viral infectivity. In contrast, we provide evidence here to show that HIV-1 infectivity, Env targeting to lipid rafts, and Env incorporation into the virus are independent of cytoplasmic tail palmitoylation. The T-cell (T)-tropic HXB2-based virus, which utilizes CXCR4 as the entry coreceptor, carrying a Cys-to-Ser mutation at residue 764 or 837 or at both replicated with wild-type (WT) virus replication kinetics in CD4+ T cells. The properties of Env expression, precursor processing, cell surface expression, and Env incorporation of these three mutant viruses were normal compared to those of the WT virus. These three mutant Env proteins all effectively mediated one-cycle virus infection. When the Cys residues were replaced by Ala residues, all single and double mutants still retained the phenotypes of infectivity, Env incorporation, and lipid raft localization of the WT Env. When Cys-to-Ala substitutions were introduced into the macrophage (M)-tropic ConB virus, which utilizes CCR5 as the coreceptor, these mutations did not affect the replication potential, Env phenotypes, lipid raft targeting, or Env assembly into the virus of the WT Env. These T- and M-tropic mutants also productively replicated in human primary CD4+ T cells. Moreover, mutations at both Cys residues significantly reduced the level of palmitoylation of the Env. Our results together support the notion that palmitoylation of the cytoplasmic tail of the HIV-1 Env is not essential for the HIV-1 virus life cycle. PMID:15956582

  10. Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency: Activity in Normal, Mutant, and Heterozygote-Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.; Seegmiller, J. Edwin

    1970-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients deficient for the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRT) activity show very low but nevertheless significant levels of apparent PRT enzyme despite absence of detectable activity (<0.004% of normal) in erythrocytes of the same patients. In fibroblasts this mutant enzyme is more heat labile than the normal enzyme. These findings indicate that PRT deficiency in this disorder is not due to a deletion mutation of the PRT locus. Individual cultured skin fibroblasts from heterozygote females for PRT deficiency show normal, intermediate, or very low levels of PRT activity. The mosaicism demonstrated in the heterozygotes for this X-linked disorder accounts for the cells with normal and very low activities of PRT. Intermediate activity can best be explained by the phenomenon of metabolic cooperation presumably from the transfer of either PRT enzyme or messenger RNA, from normal to mutant cells. Images PMID:5267139

  11. Replication of HIV-1 deleted Nef mutants in chronically immune activated human T cells.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Nahor, Orit; Maayan, Shlomo; Peden, Keith W C; Rabinowitz, Ruth; Schlesinger, Michael; Alian, Akram; Panet, Amos

    2002-11-10

    Lymphocytes (PBMC) obtained from blood of HIV-sera negative Ethiopian immigrants (ETH) were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection in vitro with no need for stimulation by mitogens. As the HIV nef gene product has been shown to enhance viral replication in stimulated primary lymphocytes, we investigated in this work the role of Nef in viral replication in the ETH cells. Lymphocytes obtained from ETH individuals supported high replication of wild-type HIV-1 and low but significant replication level of the two deleted Nef mutants (encode truncated Nef proteins consisting only of either the first 35 or the first 86 amino acids of Nef). In contrast, no replication was observed in nonactivated cells obtained from non-ETH individuals. After activation of the PBMC from ETH individuals with PHA, replication of both wild-type strains and the two deleted Nef mutant viruses further increased. The CD4(+) T cells of ETH individuals exhibited elevated levels of the surface activation markers CD45RO and HLA-DR, compared with T cells derived from non-ETH group. Likewise, expression of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on these cells was higher in the ETH group than in the non-ETH group. Replication of HIV-1 wild-type and the isogenic-deleted Nef mutants was significantly correlated with the proportion of ETH cells expressing CD45RO and the chemokine receptors. This study suggests that HIV-1 may respond differently to several activation states characteristic of T cells. One activation state, defined by chronically activated lymphocytes from ETH individuals, is permissive to the wild-type HIV-1 and, to a lesser degree, to the Nef mutants. Further activation of these cells by exogenous stimuli enhances replication of the virus. Our results support the notion that Nef enhances the basal level of T cell activation and consequently, viral replication. PMID:12482665

  12. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in skeletal muscle of G93A*SOD1 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dapeng; Wang, Yan; Chin, Eva R.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are one of the genetic causes of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Although the primary symptom of ALS is muscle weakness, the link between SOD1 mutations, cellular dysfunction and muscle atrophy and weakness is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize cellular markers of ER stress in skeletal muscle across the lifespan of G93A*SOD1 (ALS-Tg) mice. Muscles were obtained from ALS-Tg and age-matched wild type (WT) mice at 70d (pre-symptomatic), 90d and 120–140d (symptomatic) and analyzed for ER stress markers. In white gastrocnemius (WG) muscle, ER stress sensors PERK and IRE1α were upregulated ~2-fold at 70d and remained (PERK) or increased further (IRE1α) at 120–140d. Phospho-eIF2α, a downstream target of PERK and an inhibitor of protein translation, was increased by 70d and increased further to 12.9-fold at 120–140d. IRE1α upregulation leads to increased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) to the XBP-1s isoform. XBP-1s transcript was increased at 90d and 120–140d indicating activation of IRE1α signaling. The ER chaperone/heat shock protein Grp78/BiP was upregulated 2-fold at 70d and 90d and increased to 6.1-fold by 120–140d. The ER-stress-specific apoptotic signaling protein CHOP was upregulated 2-fold at 70d and 90d and increased to 13.3-fold at 120–140d indicating progressive activation of an apoptotic signal in muscle. There was a greater increase in Grp78/BiP and CHOP in WG vs. the more oxidative red gastrocnemius (RG) ALS-Tg at 120–140d indicating greater ER stress and apoptosis in fast glycolytic muscle. These data show that the ER stress response is activated in skeletal muscle of ALS-Tg mice by an early pre-symptomatic age and increases with disease progression. These data suggest a mechanism by which myocellular ER stress leads to reduced protein translation and contributes to muscle atrophy and weakness in ALS. PMID:26041991

  13. Alterations in mitosis and cell cycle progression caused by a mutant lamin A known to accelerate human aging.

    PubMed

    Dechat, Thomas; Shimi, Takeshi; Adam, Stephen A; Rusinol, Antonio E; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Sinensky, Michael S; Goldman, Robert D

    2007-03-20

    Mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A (LA) cause the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome. The most common of these mutations results in the expression of a mutant LA, with a 50-aa deletion within its C terminus. In this study, we demonstrate that this deletion leads to a stable farnesylation and carboxymethylation of the mutant LA (LADelta50/progerin). These modifications cause an abnormal association of LADelta50/progerin with membranes during mitosis, which delays the onset and progression of cytokinesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the targeting of nuclear envelope/lamina components into daughter cell nuclei in early G(1) is impaired in cells expressing LADelta50/progerin. The mutant LA also appears to be responsible for defects in the retinoblastoma protein-mediated transition into S-phase, most likely by inhibiting the hyperphosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein by cyclin D1/cdk4. These results provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for premature aging and also shed light on the role of lamins in the normal process of human aging. PMID:17360326

  14. Active site mutants of human secreted Group IIA Phospholipase A2 lacking hydrolytic activity retain their bactericidal effect.

    PubMed

    Chioato, Lucimara; Aragão, Elisangela Aparecida; Ferreira, Tatiana Lopes; Ward, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    The Human Secreted Group IIA Phospholipase A(2) (hsPLA2GIIA) presents potent bactericidal activity, and is considered to contribute to the acute-phase immune response. Hydrolysis of inner membrane phospholipids is suggested to underlie the bactericidal activity, and we have evaluated this proposal by comparing catalytic activity with bactericidal and liposome membrane damaging effects of the G30S, H48Q and D49K hsPLA2GIIA mutants. All mutants showed severely impaired hydrolytic activities against mixed DOPC:DOPG liposome membranes, however the bactericidal effect against Micrococcus luteus was less affected, with 50% killing at concentrations of 1, 3, 7 and 9 μg/mL for the wild-type, D49K, H48Q and G30S mutants respectively. Furthermore, all proteins showed Ca(2+)-independent damaging activity against liposome membranes demonstrating that in addition to the hydrolysis-dependent membrane damage, the hsPLA2GIIA presents a mechanism for permeabilization of phospholipid bilayers that is independent of catalytic activity, which may play a role in the bactericidal function of the protein. PMID:21986368

  15. Heterodimerization of Two Pathological Mutants Enhances the Activity of Human Phosphomannomutase2

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Giuseppina; Monti, Maria Chiara; Citro, Valentina; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The most frequent disorder of glycosylation is due to mutations in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase2 (PMM2-CDG). For this disease, which is autosomal and recessive, there is no cure at present. Most patients are composite heterozygous and carry one allele encoding an inactive mutant, R141H, and one encoding a hypomorphic mutant. Phosphomannomutase2 is a dimer. We reproduced composite heterozygosity in vitro by mixing R141H either with the wild type protein or the most common hypomorphic mutant F119L and compared the quaternary structure, the activity and the stability of the heterodimeric enzymes. We demonstrated that the activity of R141H/F119L heterodimers in vitro, which reproduces the protein found in patients, has the same activity of wild type/R141H, which reproduces the protein found in healthy carriers. On the other hand the stability of R141H/F119L appears to be reduced both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that a therapy designed to enhance protein stability such as those based on pharmacological chaperones or modulation of proteostasis could be beneficial for PMM2-CDG patients carrying R141H/F119L genotype as well as for other genotypes where protein stability rather than specific activity is affected by mutations. PMID:26488408

  16. A human TRIM5alpha B30.2/SPRY domain mutant gains the ability to restrict and prematurely uncoat B-tropic murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Perron, Michel; McGee-Estrada, Kathleen; Hanna, Robert; Maillard, Pierre V; Trono, Didier; Sodroski, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Human TRIM5alpha restricts N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV) but not B-tropic MLV (B-MLV) infection. Here we study B30.2/SPRY domain mutants of human TRIM5alpha that acquire the ability to inhibit B-MLV infection prior to reverse transcription without losing the ability to restrict N-MLV infection. Remarkably, these mutants gain the ability to decrease the amount of particulate B-MLV capsids in the cytosol of infected cells. In addition, these mutants gain the ability to restrict SIV(mac) and HIV-2 infection. B-MLV and SIV(mac) infections were blocked by the mutant TRIM5alpha proteins prior to reverse transcription. Thus, the range of retroviruses restricted by human TRIM5alpha can be increased by changes in the B30.2/SPRY domain, which also result in the ability to cause premature uncoating of the restricted retroviral capsid. PMID:18586294

  17. Regiospecificity determinants of human heme oxygenase: differential NADPH- and ascorbate-dependent heme cleavage by the R183E mutant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; Lad, Latesh; Poulos, Thomas L; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2005-01-28

    The ability of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) R183E mutant to oxidize heme in reactions supported by either NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase or ascorbic acid has been compared. The NADPH-dependent reaction, like that of wild-type hHO-1, yields exclusively biliverdin IXalpha. In contrast, the R183E mutant with ascorbic acid as the reductant produces biliverdin IXalpha (79 +/- 4%), IXdelta (19 +/- 3%), and a trace of IXbeta. In the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, the yield of biliverdin IXdelta is decreased to 8 +/- 1% with a corresponding increase in biliverdin IXalpha. Spectroscopic analysis of the NADPH-dependent reaction shows that the R183E ferric biliverdin complex accumulates, because reduction of the iron, which is required for sequential iron and biliverdin release, is impaired. Reversal of the charge at position 183 makes reduction of the iron more difficult. The crystal structure of the R183E mutant, determined in the ferric and ferrous-NO bound forms, shows that the heme primarily adopts the same orientation as in wild-type hHO-1. The structure of the Fe(II).NO complex suggests that an altered active site hydrogen bonding network supports catalysis in the R183E mutant. Furthermore, Arg-183 contributes to the regiospecificity of the wild-type enzyme, but its contribution is not critical. The results indicate that the ascorbate-dependent reaction is subject to a lower degree of regiochemical control than the NADPH-dependent reaction. Ascorbate may be able to reduce the R183E ferric and ferrous dioxygen complexes in active site conformations that cannot be reduced by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. PMID:15525643

  18. Cyclopropane fatty acid synthase mutants of probiotic human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri are defective in TNF inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Saulnier, Delphine; Thomas, Carissa M; Versalovic, James

    2011-01-01

    Although commensal microbes have been shown to modulate host immune responses, many of the bacterial factors that mediate immune regulation remain unidentified. Select strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri synthesize immunomodulins that potently inhibit production of the inflammatory cytokine TNF. In this study, genetic and genomic approaches were used to identify and investigate L. reuteri genes required for human TNF immunomodulatory activity. Analysis of membrane fatty acids from multiple L. reuteri strains cultured in MRS medium showed that only TNF inhibitory strains produced the cyclopropane fatty acid (CFA) lactobacillic acid. The enzyme cyclopropane fatty acid synthase is required for synthesis of CFAs such as lactobacillic acid, therefore the cfa gene was inactivated and supernatants from the cfa mutant strain were assayed for TNF inhibitory activity. We found that supernatants from the wild-type strain, but not the cfa mutant, suppressed TNF production by activated THP-1 human monocytoid cells. Although this suggested a direct role for lactobacillic acid in immunomodulation, purified lactobacillic acid did not suppress TNF at physiologically relevant concentrations. We further analyzed TNF inhibitory and TNF non-inhibitory strains under different growth conditions and found that lactobacillic acid production did not correlate with TNF inhibition. These results indicate that cfa indirectly contributed to L. reuteri immunomodulatory activity and suggest that other mechanisms, such as decreased membrane fluidity or altered expression of immunomodulins, result in the loss of TNF inhibitory activity. By increasing our understanding of immunomodulation by probiotic species, beneficial microbes can be rationally selected to alleviate intestinal inflammation. PMID:21637024

  19. Structural Dynamics of Human Argonaute2 and Its Interaction with siRNAs Designed to Target Mutant tdp43

    PubMed Central

    Bhandare, Vishwambhar

    2016-01-01

    The human Argonaute2 protein (Ago2) is a key player in RNA interference pathway and small RNA recognition by Ago2 is the crucial step in siRNA mediated gene silencing mechanism. The present study highlights the structural and functional dynamics of human Ago2 and the interaction mechanism of Ago2 with a set of seven siRNAs for the first time. The human Ago2 protein adopts two conformations such as “open” and “close” during the simulation of 25 ns. One of the domains named as PAZ, which is responsible for anchoring the 3′-end of siRNA guide strand, is observed as a highly flexible region. The interaction between Ago2 and siRNA, analyzed using a set of siRNAs (targeting at positions 128, 251, 341, 383, 537, 1113, and 1115 of mRNA) designed to target tdp43 mutants causing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) disease, revealed the stable and strong recognition of siRNA by the Ago2 protein during dynamics. Among the studied siRNAs, the siRNA341 is identified as a potent siRNA to recognize Ago2 and hence could be used further as a possible siRNA candidate to target the mutant tdp43 protein for the treatment of ALS patients. PMID:27110240

  20. Genotyping assays for the canine degenerative myelopathy-associated c.118G>A (p.E40K) mutation of the SOD1 gene using conventional and real-time PCR methods: a high prevalence in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi breed in Japan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hye-Sook; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Mizukami, Keijiro; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Katayama, Masaaki; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Yabuki, Akira; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy is an adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in multiple dog breeds, particularly Pembroke Welsh Corgis. Recently, a degenerative myelopathy-associated mutation of the canine SOD1 gene was identified as c.118G>A (p.E40K). In the present study, genotyping assays using conventional and real-time PCR methods were developed, and a preliminary genotyping survey was performed on 122 randomly selected Pembroke Welsh Corgis without any degenerative myelopathy-related clinical signs to determine the current allele frequency in Japan. Both of the assays provided clear-cut genotyping. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the G/G wild-type, G/A heterozygote and A/A homozygote to be 9.0, 42.6 and 48.4%, respectively, indicating that the prevalence of the mutant A allele (69.7%) in Pembroke Welsh Corgis is extremely high in Japan. PMID:23328634

  1. INaP selective inhibition reverts precocious inter- and motorneurons hyperexcitability in the Sod1-G93R zebrafish ALS model.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Lorena; Ghilardi, Anna; Rottoli, Elsa; De Maglie, Marcella; Prosperi, Laura; Perego, Carla; Baruscotti, Mirko; Bucchi, Annalisa; Del Giacco, Luca; Francolini, Maura

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic role of SOD1 mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was investigated using a zebrafish disease model stably expressing the ALS-linked G93R mutation. In addition to the main pathological features of ALS shown by adult fish, we found remarkably precocious alterations in the development of motor nerve circuitry and embryo behavior, and suggest that these alterations are prompted by interneuron and motor neuron hyperexcitability triggered by anomalies in the persistent pacemaker sodium current INaP. The riluzole-induced modulation of INaP reduced spinal neuron excitability, reverted the behavioral phenotypes and improved the deficits in motor nerve circuitry development, thus shedding new light on the use of riluzole in the management of ALS. Our findings provide a valid phenotype-based tool for unbiased in vivo drug screening that can be used to develop new therapies. PMID:27079797

  2. INaP selective inhibition reverts precocious inter- and motorneurons hyperexcitability in the Sod1-G93R zebrafish ALS model

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Lorena; Ghilardi, Anna; Rottoli, Elsa; De Maglie, Marcella; Prosperi, Laura; Perego, Carla; Baruscotti, Mirko; Bucchi, Annalisa; Del Giacco, Luca; Francolini, Maura

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic role of SOD1 mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was investigated using a zebrafish disease model stably expressing the ALS-linked G93R mutation. In addition to the main pathological features of ALS shown by adult fish, we found remarkably precocious alterations in the development of motor nerve circuitry and embryo behavior, and suggest that these alterations are prompted by interneuron and motor neuron hyperexcitability triggered by anomalies in the persistent pacemaker sodium current INaP. The riluzole-induced modulation of INaP reduced spinal neuron excitability, reverted the behavioral phenotypes and improved the deficits in motor nerve circuitry development, thus shedding new light on the use of riluzole in the management of ALS. Our findings provide a valid phenotype-based tool for unbiased in vivo drug screening that can be used to develop new therapies. PMID:27079797

  3. Deregulated expression of cytoskeleton related genes in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve of presymptomatic SOD1G93A Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Maximino, Jessica R.; de Oliveira, Gabriela P.; Alves, Chrystian J.; Chadi, Gerson

    2014-01-01

    Early molecular events related to cytoskeleton are poorly described in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), especially in the Schwann cell (SC), which offers strong trophic support to motor neurons. Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) tool identified cytoskeleton-related genes by employing the Cellular Component Ontology (CCO) in a large gene profiling of lumbar spinal cord and sciatic nerve of presymptomatic SOD1G93A mice. One and five CCO terms related to cytoskeleton were described from the spinal cord deregulated genes of 40 days (actin cytoskeleton) and 80 days (microtubule cytoskeleton, cytoskeleton part, actin cytoskeleton, neurofilament cytoskeleton, and cytoskeleton) old transgene mice, respectively. Also, four terms were depicted from the deregulated genes of sciatic nerve of 60 days old transgenes (actin cytoskeleton, cytoskeleton part, microtubule cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton). Kif1b was the unique deregulated gene in more than one studied region or presymptomatic age. The expression of Kif1b [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)] elevated in the lumbar spinal cord (40 days old) and decreased in the sciatic nerve (60 days old) of presymptomatic ALS mice, results that were in line to microarray findings. Upregulation (24.8 fold) of Kif1b was seen in laser microdissected enriched immunolabeled motor neurons from the spinal cord of 40 days old presymptomatic SOD1G93A mice. Furthermore, Kif1b was dowregulated in the sciatic nerve Schwann cells of presymptomatic ALS mice (60 days old) that were enriched by means of cell microdissection (6.35 fold), cell sorting (3.53 fold), and primary culture (2.70 fold) technologies. The gene regulation of cytoskeleton molecules is an important occurrence in motor neurons and Schwann cells in presymptomatic stages of ALS and may be relevant in the dying back mechanisms of neuronal death. Furthermore, a differential regulation of Kif1b in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve cells

  4. Human-mouse interspecies collagen I heterotrimer is functional during embryonic development of Mov13 mutant mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Bateman, J F; Schnieke, A; Sharpe, A; Barker, D; Mascara, T; Eyre, D; Bruns, R; Krimpenfort, P; Berns, A

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen chain could form an in vivo functional interspecies heterotrimer with the mouse pro alpha 2(I) collagen chain, we introduced the human COL1A1 gene into Mov13 mice which have a functional deletion of the endogenous COL1A1 gene. Transgenic mouse strains (HucI and HucII) carrying the human COL1A1 gene were first generated by microinjecting the COL1A1 gene into wild-type mouse embryos. Genetic evidence indicated that the transgene in the HucI strain was closely linked to the endogenous mouse COL1A1 gene and was X linked in the HucII transgenic strain. Northern (RNA) blot and S1 protection analyses showed that the transgene was expressed in the appropriate tissue-specific manner and as efficiently as the endogenous COL1A1 gene. HucII mice were crossed with Mov13 mice to transfer the human transgene into the mutant strain. Whereas homozygous Mov13 embryos die between days 13 and 14 of gestation, the presence of the transgene permitted apparently normal development of the mutant embryos to birth. This indicated that the mouse-human interspecies collagen I heterotrimer was functional in the animal. The rescue was, however, only partial, as all homozygotes died within 36 h after delivery, with signs of internal bleeding. This could have been due to a functional defect in the interspecies hybrid collagen. Extensive analysis failed to reveal any biochemical or morphological abnormalities of the collagen I molecules in Mov13-HucII embryos.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1690840

  5. Two distinct genetic loci regulating class II gene expression are defective in human mutant and patient cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Accolla, R S; Pious, D; Zegers, B J; Strominger, J L

    1988-01-01

    Heterokaryons were prepared and analyzed shortly after cell fusion using two mutant class-II-negative human B cell lines (RJ 2.2.5 and 6.1.6) and a cell line (TF) from a patient with a class-II-negative Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome. The resulting transient heterokaryons were analyzed by using an anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibody to assess the cell surface expression of HLA-DR (the major subtype of class II antigens) by immunofluorescence microscopy and by using uniformly 32P-labeled SP6 RNA probes in Northern blots and RNase protection assays to assess mRNA synthesis. We find that class II gene expression in a B cell line from a Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome patient (TF) is rescued by a B cell line which expresses class II antigens indicating that this disease, at least in part, is caused by a defect(s) in a genetic locus encoding a factor(s) necessary for class II gene expression. Secondly, reciprocal genetic complementation was demonstrated in the heterokaryons 6.1.6 x RJ 2.2.5 and TF x RJ 2.2.5 (but not in TF x 6.1.6) by detection of cell surface DR by immunofluorescence microscopy and by a novel class II mRNA typing technique which allows characterization of distinct class II alleles. Thus, the two mutants generated in vitro have defects at two different genetic loci encoding specific regulatory factors necessary for human class II gene expression. One of these mutant cell lines, but not the other, complements the defect in the patient cell line, TF. Images PMID:2458252

  6. A Dimeric Mutant of Human Pancreatic Ribonuclease with Selective Cytotoxicity toward Malignant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, Renata; di Gaetano, Sonia; de Lorenzo, Claudia; Grauso, Michela; Monaco, Carmen; Spalletti-Cernia, Daniela; Laccetti, Paolo; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Matousek, Josef; D'Alessio, Giuseppe

    1999-07-01

    Monomeric human pancreatic RNase, devoid of any biological activity other than its RNA degrading ability, was engineered into a dimeric protein with a cytotoxic action on mouse and human tumor cells, but lacking any appreciable toxicity on mouse and human normal cells. This dimeric variant of human pancreas RNase selectively sensitizes to apoptotic death cells derived from a human thyroid tumor. Because of its selectivity for tumor cells, and because of its human origin, this protein represents a potentially very attractive, novel tool for anticancer therapy.

  7. The zebrafish mutant lbk/vam6 resembles human multisystemic disorders caused by aberrant trafficking of endosomal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Schonthaler, Helia B; Fleisch, Valerie C; Biehlmaier, Oliver; Makhankov, Yuri; Rinner, Oliver; Bahadori, Ronja; Geisler, Robert; Schwarz, Heinz; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Dahm, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    The trafficking of intracellular vesicles is essential for a number of cellular processes and defects in this process have been implicated in a wide range of human diseases. We identify the zebrafish mutant lbk as a novel model for such disorders. lbk displays hypopigmentation of skin melanocytes and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), an absence of iridophore reflections, defects in internal organs (liver, intestine) as well as functional defects in vision and the innate immune system (macrophages). Positional cloning, an allele screen, rescue experiments and morpholino knock-down reveal a mutation in the zebrafish orthologue of the vam6/vps39 gene. Vam6p is part of the HOPS complex, which is essential for vesicle tethering and fusion. Affected cells in the lbk RPE, liver, intestine and macrophages display increased numbers and enlarged intracellular vesicles. Physiological and behavioural analyses reveal severe defects in visual ability in lbk mutants. The present study provides the first phenotypic description of a lack of vam6 gene function in a multicellular organism. lbk shares many of the characteristics of human diseases and suggests a novel disease gene for pathologies associated with defective vesicle transport, including the arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, the Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, the Chediak-Higashi syndrome and the Griscelli syndrome. PMID:18077594

  8. Comparative Analyses of Cu-Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) and Thioredoxin Reductase (TrxR) at the mRNA Level between Apis mellifera L. and Apis cerana F. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Lee, Soon-Gyu; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2016-01-01

    This study compared stress-induced expression of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) genes in the European honeybee Apis mellifera L. and Asian honeybee Apis cerana F. Expression of both SOD1 and TrxR rapidly increased up to 5 h after exposure to cold (4°C) or heat (37°C) treatment and then gradually decreased, with a stronger effect induced by cold stress in A. mellifera compared with A. cerana. Injection of stress-inducing substances (methyl viologen, [MV] and H2O2) also increased SOD1 and TrxR expression in both A. mellifera and A. cerana, and this effect was more pronounced with MV than H2O2. Additionally, we heterologously expressed the A. mellifera and A. cerana SOD1 and TrxR proteins in an Escherichia coli expression system, and detection by SDS-PAGE, confirmed by Western blotting using anti-His tag antibodies, revealed bands at 16 and 60 kDa, respectively. Our results show that the expression patterns of SOD1 and TrxR differ between A. mellifera and A. cerana under conditions of low or high temperature as well as oxidative stress. PMID:26798140

  9. Comparative Analyses of Cu-Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) and Thioredoxin Reductase (TrxR) at the mRNA Level between Apis mellifera L. and Apis cerana F. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Under Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Lee, Soon-Gyu; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2016-01-01

    This study compared stress-induced expression of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) genes in the European honeybee Apis mellifera L. and Asian honeybee Apis cerana F. Expression of both SOD1 and TrxR rapidly increased up to 5 h after exposure to cold (4 °C) or heat (37 °C) treatment and then gradually decreased, with a stronger effect induced by cold stress in A. mellifera compared with A. cerana. Injection of stress-inducing substances (methyl viologen, [MV] and H2O2) also increased SOD1 and TrxR expression in both A. mellifera and A. cerana, and this effect was more pronounced with MV than H2O2. Additionally, we heterologously expressed the A. mellifera and A. cerana SOD1 and TrxR proteins in an Escherichia coli expression system, and detection by SDS-PAGE, confirmed by Western blotting using anti-His tag antibodies, revealed bands at 16 and 60 kDa, respectively. Our results show that the expression patterns of SOD1 and TrxR differ between A. mellifera and A. cerana under conditions of low or high temperature as well as oxidative stress. PMID:26798140

  10. Longitudinal study of the in vivo hprt mutant frequency in human T-lymphocytes as determined by a cell cloning assay

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Sullivan, L.M.; Booker, J.K.; Pornelos, B.S.; Falta, M.T.; Greene, C.J.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo frequency of mutants resulting from mutation at the hprt locus in human T-lymphocytes can be determined by a cloning assay. This assay quantifies the frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant (TG{sup r}) T-cells through growth of colonies in 96-well microtiter dishes. The reproducibility of the TG{sup r} mutant frequency values has now been assessed in a longitudinal study of six individuals employing 4-5 blood samples over a 26-37 week time period. Cloning assays were performed with both fresh and cryopreserved cell samples. No significant differences were found among the mutant frequency values for multiple samples from each individual with both fresh and cryopreserved cell samples. These results demonstrate the reproducibility of this cloning assay for in vivo mutant frequency determinations in human T-lymphocytes.

  11. Molecular determinants for the high constitutive activity of the human histamine H4 receptor: functional studies on orthologues and mutants

    PubMed Central

    Wifling, D; Löffel, K; Nordemann, U; Strasser, A; Bernhardt, G; Dove, S; Seifert, R; Buschauer, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Some histamine H4 receptor ligands act as inverse agonists at the human H4 receptor (hH4R), a receptor with exceptionally high constitutive activity, but as neutral antagonists or partial agonists at the constitutively inactive mouse H4 receptor (mH4R) and rat H4 receptor (rH4R). To study molecular determinants of constitutive activity, H4 receptor reciprocal mutants were constructed: single mutants: hH4R-F169V, mH4R-V171F, hH4R-S179A, hH4R-S179M; double mutants: hH4R-F169V+S179A, hH4R-F169V+S179M and mH4R-V171F+M181S. Experimental Approach Site-directed mutagenesis with pVL1392 plasmids containing hH4 or mH4 receptors were performed. Wild-type or mutant receptors were co-expressed with Gαi2 and Gβ1γ2 in Sf9 cells. Membranes were studied in saturation and competition binding assays ([3H]-histamine), and in functional [35S]-GTPγS assays with inverse, partial and full agonists of the hH4 receptor. Key Results Constitutive activity decreased from the hH4 receptor via the hH4R-F169V mutant to the hH4R-F169V+S179A and hH4R-F169V+S179M double mutants. F169 alone or in concert with S179 plays a major role in stabilizing a ligand-free active state of the hH4 receptor. Partial inverse hH4 receptor agonists like JNJ7777120 behaved as neutral antagonists or partial agonists at species orthologues with lower or no constitutive activity. Some partial and full hH4 receptor agonists showed decreased maximal effects and potencies at hH4R-F169V and double mutants. However, the mutation of S179 in the hH4 receptor to M as in mH4 receptor or A as in rH4 receptor did not significantly reduce constitutive activity. Conclusions and Implications F169 and S179 are key amino acids for the high constitutive activity of hH4 receptors and may also be of relevance for other constitutively active GPCRs. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update published in volume 170 issue 1. To view the other articles in this issue visit

  12. A drosophila genetic resource of mutants to study mechanisms underlying human genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Jaiswal, Manish; Charng, Wu-Lin; Gambin, Tomasz; Karaca, Ender; Mirzaa, Ghayda; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Sandoval, Hector; Haelterman, Nele A; Xiong, Bo; Zhang, Ke; Bayat, Vafa; David, Gabriela; Li, Tongchao; Chen, Kuchuan; Gala, Upasana; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Penney, Samantha; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; de Ligt, Joep; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Xie, Yajing; Tsang, Stephen H; Parman, Yesim; Sivaci, Merve; Battaloglu, Esra; Muzny, Donna; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Lin-Moore, Alexander T; Clark, Robin D; Curry, Cynthia J; Link, Nichole; Schulze, Karen L; Boerwinkle, Eric; Dobyns, William B; Allikmets, Rando; Gibbs, Richard A; Chen, Rui; Lupski, James R; Wangler, Michael F; Bellen, Hugo J

    2014-09-25

    Invertebrate model systems are powerful tools for studying human disease owing to their genetic tractability and ease of screening. We conducted a mosaic genetic screen of lethal mutations on the Drosophila X chromosome to identify genes required for the development, function, and maintenance of the nervous system. We identified 165 genes, most of whose function has not been studied in vivo. In parallel, we investigated rare variant alleles in 1,929 human exomes from families with unsolved Mendelian disease. Genes that are essential in flies and have multiple human homologs were found to be likely to be associated with human diseases. Merging the human data sets with the fly genes allowed us to identify disease-associated mutations in six families and to provide insights into microcephaly associated with brain dysgenesis. This bidirectional synergism between fly genetics and human genomics facilitates the functional annotation of evolutionarily conserved genes involved in human health. PMID:25259927

  13. A Drosophila genetic resource of mutants to study mechanisms underlying human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Jaiswal, Manish; Charng, Wu-Lin; Gambin, Tomasz; Karaca, Ender; Mirzaa, Ghayda; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Sandoval, Hector; Haelterman, Nele A.; Xiong, Bo; Zhang, Ke; Bayat, Vafa; David, Gabriela; Li, Tongchao; Chen, Kuchuan; Gala, Upasana; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Penney, Samantha; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; de Ligt, Joep; Jhangiani, Shalini; Xie, Yajing; Tsang, Stephen H.; Parman, Yesim; Sivaci, Merve; Battaloglu, Esra; Muzny, Donna; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Lin-Moore, Alexander T.; Clark, Robin D.; Curry, Cynthia J.; Link, Nichole; Schulze, Karen L.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Dobyns, William B.; Allikmets, Rando; Gibbs, Richard A.; Chen, Rui; Lupski, James R.; Wangler, Michael F.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Invertebrate model systems are powerful tools for studying human disease owing to their genetic tractability and ease of screening. We conducted a mosaic genetic screen of lethal mutations on the Drosophila X-chromosome to identify genes required for the development, function, and maintenance of the nervous system. We identified 165 genes, most of whose function has not been studied in vivo. In parallel, we investigated rare variant alleles in 1,929 human exomes from families with unsolved Mendelian disease. Genes that are essential in flies and have multiple human homologs were found to be likely to be associated with human diseases. Merging the human datasets with the fly genes allowed us to identify disease-associated mutations in six families and to provide insights into microcephaly associated with brain dysgenesis. This bidirectional synergism between fly genetics and human genomics facilitates the functional annotation of evolutionarily conserved genes involved in human health. PMID:25259927

  14. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses {beta}-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system.

  15. Mitochondrial protein oxidation in yeast mutants lacking manganese-(MnSOD) or copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD): evidence that MnSOD and CuZnSOD have both unique and overlapping functions in protecting mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kristin M; Dirmeier, Reinhard; Engle, Marcella; Poyton, Robert O

    2004-12-10

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses two forms of superoxide dismutase (SOD): MnSOD, encoded by SOD2, which is located within the mitochondrial matrix, and CuZnSOD, encoded by SOD1, which is located in both the cytosol and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Because two different SOD enzymes are located in the mitochondrion, we examined the relative roles of each in protecting mitochondria against oxidative stress. Using protein carbonylation as a measure of oxidative stress, we have found no correlation between overall levels of respiration and the level of oxidative mitochondrial protein damage in either wild type or sod mutant strains. Moreover, mitochondrial protein carbonylation levels in sod1, sod2, and sod1sod2 mutants are not elevated in cells harvested from mid-logarithmic and early stationary phases, suggesting that neither MnSOD nor CuZnSOD is required for protecting the majority of mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage during these early phases of growth. During late stationary phase, mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases in all strains, particularly in sod1 and sod1sod2 mutants. By using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have found that specific proteins become carbonylated in sod1 and sod2 mutants. We identified six mitochondrial protein spots representing five unique proteins that become carbonylated in a sod1 mutant and 19 mitochondrial protein spots representing 11 unique proteins that become carbonylated in a sod2 mutant. Although some of the same proteins are carbonylated in both mutants, other proteins are not. These findings indicate that MnSOD and CuZnSOD have both unique and overlapping functions in the mitochondrion. PMID:15385544

  16. Two classes of human papillomavirus type 16 E1 mutants suggest pleiotropic conformational constraints affecting E1 multimerization, E2 interaction, and interaction with cellular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Yasugi, T; Vidal, M; Sakai, H; Howley, P M; Benson, J D

    1997-01-01

    Random mutagenesis of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E1 was used to generate E1 missense mutants defective for interaction with either hUBC9 or 16E1-BP, two cDNAs encoding proteins that have been identified by their ability to interact with HPV16 E1 in two-hybrid assays. hUBC9, the human counterpart of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UBC9, is a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme known to be involved in cell cycle progression. 16E1-BP encodes a protein of no known function but does contain an ATPase signature motif. Eight hUBC9 or 16E1-BP interaction-defective HPV16 E1 missense mutants were identified and characterized for origin-dependent transient DNA replication, ATPase activity, and various protein-protein interaction phenotypes. Six of these mutant E1 proteins were significantly impaired for replication. Among these, two classes of replication-defective HPV16 E1 missense mutants were observed. One class, represented by the S330R replication-defective mutant (containing an S-to-R change at position 330), remained competent for all protein-protein interactions tested, with the exception of hUBC9 association. Furthermore, this mutant, unlike the other replication-defective HPV16 E1 missense mutants, had a strong dominant negative replication phenotype in transient-replication assays. The other class, represented by five of the missense mutants, was defective for multiple protein-protein interactions, usually including, but not limited to, the interaction defect for which each mutant was originally selected. In many cases, a single missense mutation in one region of HPV16 E1 had pleiotropic effects, even upon activities thought to be associated with other domains of HPV16 E1. This suggests that E1 proteins are not modular but may instead be composed of multiple structurally and/or functionally interdependent domains. PMID:9223484

  17. Intra-host competition between nef-defective escape mutants and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Altes, H K; Jansen, V A

    2000-01-01

    Various forms of nef genes with deletions at conserved positions along the sequence have been reported to persist in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients. We investigate the forces maintaining such variants in the proviral population. The main selection pressures are preservation of function and host immune response. The crippled Nef protein might have fewer epitopes, and as such be less visible to the specific immune response, but it will lose some function. Does a trade-off between avoidance of the immune response and loss of function explain the dynamics of the crippled virus found in the patients? To answer this question, we formulated a deterministic model of the virus-host interactions. We found that when the crippled protein presents few epitopes and suffers little loss of function, the two viral types can coexist. Otherwise, the wild-type comes to prevail. The mutant form might initially dominate, but as the selective pressure by the CD84+ T cells decreases over the course of infection, the advantage for the crippled form of losing epitopes disappears. Hence, we go from a situation of coexistence of wild-type and mutant, to a situation of only full-length nef. The results are discussed in the context of the suggested use of live attenuated vaccines having deletions in nef. PMID:10687825

  18. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  19. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  20. Internalization and desensitization of the oxytocin receptor is inhibited by Dynamin and clathrin mutants in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, M P; Ayad, V J; Mundell, S J; McArdle, C A; Kelly, E; López Bernal, A

    2006-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT) has long been used as an uterotonic during labor management in women, and yet responses to OT infusion remain variable and unpredictable among patients. The investigation of oxytocin receptor (OTR) regulation will benefit labor management, because the clinical practice of continuous iv infusion of OT is not optimal. As with other G protein-coupled receptors, it is likely that the OTR internalizes and/or desensitizes upon continuous agonist exposure. The mechanisms by which this might occur, however, are unclear. Here we explore OTR internalization and desensitization in human embryonic kidney cells by utilizing inhibitors of heterologous second messenger systems and recently available mutant cDNA constructs. We report rapid and extensive internalization and desensitization of the OTR upon agonist exposure. Internalization was unaffected by inhibitors of protein kinase C or Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependant kinase II but was significantly reduced after transfection with dominant-negative mutant cDNAs of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, beta-Arrestin2, Dynamin, and Eps15 (a component of clathrin-coated pits). Moreover, desensitization of the OTR, measured by a calcium mobilization assay, was also inhibited by the aforementioned cDNA constructs. Thus, our data demonstrate, for the first time, the importance of the classical clathrin-mediated pathway during agonist-induced OTR internalization and desensitization. PMID:16179383

  1. Accelerated telomere shortening and replicative senescence in human fibroblasts overexpressing mutant and wild-type lamin A

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectable WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes.

  2. A low, adaptive dose of gamma-rays reduced the number and altered the spectrum of S1- mutants in human-hamster hybrid AL cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Gustafson, D. L.; Wong, J. C.; Waldren, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effects of a low, adaptive dose of 137Cs-gamma-irradiation (0.04 Gy) on the number and kinds of mutants induced in AL human-hamster hybrid cells by a later challenge dose of 4 Gy. The yield of S1- mutants was significantly less (by 53%) after exposure to both the adaptive and challenge doses compared to the challenge dose alone. The yield of hprt- mutants was similarly decreased. Incubation with cycloheximide (CX) or 3-aminobenzamide largely negated the decrease in mutant yield. The adaptive dose did not perturb the cell cycle, was not cytotoxic, and did not of itself increase the mutant yield above background. The adaptive dose did, however, alter the spectrum of S1- mutants from populations exposed only to the adaptive dose, as well as affecting the spectrum of S1- mutants generated by the challenge dose. The major change in both cases was a significant increase in the proportion of complex mutations compared to small mutations and simple deletions.

  3. Delayed Induction of Human NTE (PNPLA6) Rescues Neurodegeneration and Mobility Defects of Drosophila swiss cheese (sws) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sujkowski, Alyson; Rainier, Shirley; Fink, John K.; Wessells, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Human PNPLA6 gene encodes Neuropathy Target Esterase protein (NTE). PNPLA6 gene mutations cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG39 HSP), Gordon-Holmes syndrome, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndromes, Laurence-Moon syndrome, and Oliver-McFarlane syndrome. Mutations in the Drosophila NTE homolog swiss cheese (sws) cause early-onset, progressive behavioral defects and neurodegeneration characterized by vacuole formation. We investigated sws5 flies and show for the first time that this allele causes progressive vacuolar formation in the brain and progressive deterioration of negative geotaxis speed and endurance. We demonstrate that inducible, neuron-specific expression of full-length human wildtype NTE reduces vacuole formation and substantially rescues mobility. Indeed, neuron-specific expression of wildtype human NTE is capable of rescuing mobility defects after 10 days of adult life at 29°C, when significant degeneration has already occurred, and significantly extends longevity of mutants at 25°C. These results raise the exciting possibility that late induction of NTE function may reduce or ameliorate neurodegeneration in humans even after symptoms begin. In addition, these results highlight the utility of negative geotaxis endurance as a new assay for longitudinal tracking of degenerative phenotypes in Drosophila. PMID:26671664

  4. Delayed Induction of Human NTE (PNPLA6) Rescues Neurodegeneration and Mobility Defects of Drosophila swiss cheese (sws) Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sujkowski, Alyson; Rainier, Shirley; Fink, John K; Wessells, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Human PNPLA6 gene encodes Neuropathy Target Esterase protein (NTE). PNPLA6 gene mutations cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG39 HSP), Gordon-Holmes syndrome, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndromes, Laurence-Moon syndrome, and Oliver-McFarlane syndrome. Mutations in the Drosophila NTE homolog swiss cheese (sws) cause early-onset, progressive behavioral defects and neurodegeneration characterized by vacuole formation. We investigated sws5 flies and show for the first time that this allele causes progressive vacuolar formation in the brain and progressive deterioration of negative geotaxis speed and endurance. We demonstrate that inducible, neuron-specific expression of full-length human wildtype NTE reduces vacuole formation and substantially rescues mobility. Indeed, neuron-specific expression of wildtype human NTE is capable of rescuing mobility defects after 10 days of adult life at 29°C, when significant degeneration has already occurred, and significantly extends longevity of mutants at 25°C. These results raise the exciting possibility that late induction of NTE function may reduce or ameliorate neurodegeneration in humans even after symptoms begin. In addition, these results highlight the utility of negative geotaxis endurance as a new assay for longitudinal tracking of degenerative phenotypes in Drosophila. PMID:26671664

  5. Selection of diverse and clinically relevant integrase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakahara, Koichiro; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kodama, Makoto; Endoh, Takeshi; Oosugi, Eiichi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Murai, Hitoshi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward; Foster, Scott; Underwood, Mark; Johns, Brian; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-11-01

    Resistance passage studies were conducted with five INIs (integrase inhibitors) that have been tested in clinical trials to date: a new naphthyridinone-type INI S/GSK-364735, raltegravir, elvitegravir, L-870,810 and S-1360. In establishing the passage system and starting from concentrations several fold above the EC(50) value, resistance mutations against S-1360 and related diketoacid-type compounds could be isolated from infected MT-2 cell cultures from day 14 to 28. Q148R and F121Y were the two main pathways of resistance to S/GSK-364735. Q148R/K and N155H, which were found in patients failing raltegravir treatment in Phase IIb studies, were observed during passage with raltegravir with this method. The fold resistance of 40 mutant molecular clones versus wild type virus was compared with these five INIs. The overall resistance pattern of S/GSK-364735 was similar to that of raltegravir and other INIs. However, different fold resistances of particular mutations were noted among different INIs, reflecting a potential to develop INIs with distinctly different resistant profiles. PMID:18625269

  6. Analysis of mutant quantity and quality in human-hamster hybrid AL and AL-179 cells exposed to 137Cs-gamma or HZE-Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldren, C.; Vannais, D.; Drabek, R.; Gustafson, D.; Kraemer, S.; Lenarczyk, M.; Kronenberg, A.; Hei, T.; Ueno, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We measured the number of mutants and the kinds of mutations induced by 137Cs-gamma and by HZE-Fe (56Fe [600 MeV/amu, LET = 190 KeV/micrometer) in standard AL human hamster hybrid cells and in a new variant hybrid, AL-179. We found that HZE-Fe was more mutagenic than 137Cs-gamma per unit dose (about 1.6 fold), but was slightly less mutagenic per mean lethal dose, DO, at both the S1 and hprt- loci of AL cells. On the other hand, HZE-Fe induced about nine fold more complex S1- mutants than 137Cs-gamma rays, 28% vs 3%. 137Cs-gamma rays induced about twice as many S1- mutants and hprt-mutants in AL-179 as in AL cells, and about nine times more of the former were complex, and potentially unstable kinds of mutations.

  7. QUANTIFICATION AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF HRPT MUTANTS OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Somatic mutations have been implicated as critical early events in carcinogenesis. oint mutations, deletion and translocation events have been shown to activate oncogenes or inactivate suppressor oncogenes. n human population monitoring, quantitative analysis of mutation events t...

  8. Expression and characterization of recombinant human factor V and a mutant lacking a major portion of the connecting region

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, W.H.; Devore-Carter, D.; Ortel, T.L. )

    1990-07-24

    Human coagulation factor V is a protein cofactor that is an essential component of the prothrombinase complex. A full-length factor V cDNA has been subcloned into the mammalian expression vector pDX and used to transfect COS cells. Approximately 95 {plus minus} 4% of the recombinant human factor V (rHFV) synthesized in COS cells is secreted into the culture medium. Factor V activity determined by fibrometer assay increased approximately 5-fold from 0.027 {plus minus} 0.012 to 0.124 {plus minus} 0.044 unit/mL following activation by the factor V activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom (RVV-V). A chromogenic assay specific for factor Va indicated that recombinant factor V had 3.8 {plus minus} 1.3% of the activity of the activated protein. The estimated specific activity of the recombinant factor Va was approximately 1,800 {plus minus} 500 units/mg, which is similar to the specific activity of purified plasma factor Va of 1,700-2,000 units/mg. Immunoprecipitation of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled rHFV revealed a single high molecular mass component. Treatment of rHFV with thrombin or RVV-V resulted in the formation of proteolytic products that were similar to those seen with plasma factor V. The authors have also expressed a mutant, rHFV-des-B{sub 811-1441}, that lacks a large portion of the highly glycosylated connecting region that is present in factor V. This mutant constitutively expressed 38 {plus minus} 7% of the activity of the RVV-V-activated protein. These results suggest that one of the functions of the large connecting region in factor V is to inhibit constitutive procoagulant activity.

  9. para-Phenylenediamine-induced autophagy in human uroepithelial cell line mediated mutant p53 and activation of ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Hung, Wen-Chun; Chye, Soi-Moi; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2011-12-01

    para-Phenylenediamine (p-PD) is a major aromatic amine that is a widely used commercial oxidative-type hair dye. Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the use of p-PD-based hair dyes might be related to increased risk of human malignant tumors including bladder cancer. However, the effects of p-PD on autophagy in human uroepithelial cells (SV-HUC-1) is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that p-PD can activate the extracellular signaling-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway in SV-HUC-1 cells. In addition, we observed that autophagosomes increased in p-PD-treated SV-HUC-1 cells as shown by electron microscopy. Our results showed incremental increase of the concentrations, Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3B), which are important regulators of autophagosomes. In contrast, the MEK inhibitor (U0126) was suppressed autophagy and the effect of p-PD on ERK1/2, Beclin-1 and LC3B proteins expression, except for mutant p53. In this study, we demonstrated that inactivation of p53 induces a potent autophagy response. Finally, our results suggest that p-PD can activate the ERK1/2 signaling pathway and mutant p53, leading to the stimulation of autophagy in SV-HUC-1 cells. These results provide us with new insights for the understanding of the mechanism of p-PD-induced cell death in urothelial cells. PMID:21741467

  10. Dysregulated expression of death, stress and mitochondrion related genes in the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic SOD1G93A mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Chrystian J.; Maximino, Jessica R.; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells are the main source of paracrine support to motor neurons. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been correlated to motor neuron death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Despite the involvement of Schwann cells in early neuromuscular disruption in ALS, detailed molecular events of a dying-back triggering are unknown. Sciatic nerves of presymptomatic (60-day-old) SOD1G93A mice were submitted to a high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis. DAVID demonstrated the deregulated genes related to death, stress and mitochondrion, which allowed the identification of Cell cycle, ErbB signaling, Tryptophan metabolism and Rig-I-like receptor signaling as the most representative KEGG pathways. The protein-protein interaction networks based upon deregulated genes have identified the top hubs (TRAF2, H2AFX, E2F1, FOXO3, MSH2, NGFR, TGFBR1) and bottlenecks (TRAF2, E2F1, CDKN1B, TWIST1, FOXO3). Schwann cells were enriched from the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic mice using flow cytometry cell sorting. qPCR showed the up regulated (Ngfr, Cdnkn1b, E2f1, Traf2 and Erbb3, H2afx, Cdkn1a, Hspa1, Prdx, Mapk10) and down-regulated (Foxo3, Mtor) genes in the enriched Schwann cells. In conclusion, molecular analyses in the presymptomatic sciatic nerve demonstrated the involvement of death, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial pathways in the Schwann cell non-autonomous mechanisms in the early stages of ALS. PMID:26339226

  11. Acute Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Exacerbate Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in the SOD1 (G93A) Rat Model(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Gretchen M; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Lamb, Alexander; Gowing, Genevieve; Shelest, Oksana; Alkaslasi, Mor; Ley, Eric J; Svendsen, Clive N

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease in which upper and lower motor neurons degenerate, leading to muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death within 3 to 5 years of onset. While a small percentage of ALS cases are genetically linked, the majority are sporadic with unknown origin. Currently, etiological links are associated with disease onset without mechanistic understanding. Of all the putative risk factors, however, head trauma has emerged as a consistent candidate for initiating the molecular cascades of ALS. Here, we test the hypothesis that traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the SOD1 (G93A) transgenic rat model of ALS leads to early disease onset and shortened lifespan. We demonstrate, however, that a one-time acute focal injury caused by controlled cortical impact does not affect disease onset or survival. Establishing the negligible involvement of a single acute focal brain injury in an ALS rat model increases the current understanding of the disease. Critically, untangling a single focal TBI from multiple mild injuries provides a rationale for scientists and physicians to increase focus on repeat injuries to hopefully pinpoint a contributing cause of ALS. PMID:26464984

  12. Characterization of human torsinA and its dystonia-associated mutant form.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghua; Zolkiewska, Anna; Zolkiewski, Michal

    2003-01-01

    Deletion of a single glutamate in torsinA correlates with early-onset dystonia, the most severe form of a neurological disorder characterized by uncontrollable muscle contractions. TorsinA is targeted to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) in eukaryotic cells. We investigated the processing and membrane association of torsinA and the dystonia-associated Glu-deletion mutant (torsinAdeltaE). We found that the signal sequence of torsinA (residues 1-20 from the 40 amino-acid long N-terminal hydrophobic region) is cleaved in Drosophila S2 cells, as shown by the N-terminal sequencing after partial protein purification. TorsinA is not secreted from S2 cells. Consistently, sodium carbonate extraction and Triton X-114 treatment showed that torsinA is associated with the ER membrane in CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. In contrast, a variant of torsinA that contains the native signal sequence without the hydrophobic region Ile24-Pro40 does not associate with the membranes in CHO cells, and a truncated torsinA without the 40 N-terminal amino acids is secreted in the S2 culture. Thus the 20-amino-acid-long hydrophobic segment in torsinA, which remains at the N-terminus after signal-peptide cleavage, is responsible for the membrane anchoring of torsinA. TorsinAdeltaE showed similar cleavage of the 20 N-terminal amino acids and membrane association properties similar to wild-type torsinA but, unlike the wild-type, torsinAdeltaE was not secreted in the S2 culture even after deletion of the membrane-anchoring segment. This indicates that the dystonia-associated mutation produces a structurally distinct, possibly misfolded, form of torsinA, which cannot be properly processed in the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells. PMID:12780349

  13. Effects of mycoplasma contamination on phenotypic expression of mitochondrial mutants in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1981-04-01

    HeLa cells sensitive to the mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibitors erythromycin (ERY) and chloramphenicol (CAP) and HeLa variants resistant to the effects of these drugs were purposefully infected with drug-sensitive and -resistnat mycoplasma strains. Mycoplasma hyorhinis and the ERY-resistant strain of Mycoplasma orale, MO-ERY/sup r/, did not influence the growth of HeLa and ERY-resistant ERY2301 cells in the presence or absence of ERY. M. hyorhinis also did not affect the growth of HeLa and CAP-resistant Cap-2 cells in the presence or absence of CAP. However, both HeLa and Cap-2 cells infected with the CAP-resistant strain of M. hyorhinis, MH-CAP/sup r/, were more sensitive to the cytotoxix effect of CAP. This maybe due to the glucose dependence of the cells, which was compromised by the increased utilization of glucose by MH-CAP/sup r/ in these infected cell cultures. In vitro protein synthesis by isolated mitochondria was significantly altered by mycoplasma infection of the various cell lines. A substantial number of mycoplasmas copurified with the mitochondria, resulting in up to a sevenfold increase in the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. More importantly, the apparent drug sensitivity or resistance of mitchondrial preparations from mycoplasma-infected cells reflected the drug sensitivity or resistance of the contaminating mycoplasmas. These results illustrate the hazards in interpreting mitochondrial protein synthesis data derived from mycoplasma-infected cell lines, particularly putative mitochondrially encoded mutants resistant to inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  14. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of an Arg sub 152 yields Glu site-directed mutant of recombinant human blood clotting factor VII

    SciTech Connect

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W. ); Berkner, K.L. )

    1990-04-03

    Coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as a single-chain zymogen of a serine protease and is converted to its activated two-chain form, factor VIIa, by cleavage of an internal peptide bond located at Arg{sub 152}-Ile{sub 153}. Previous studies using serine protease active-site inhibitors suggest that zymogen factor VII may possess sufficient proteolytic activity to initiate the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. In order to assess the putative intrinsic proteolytic activity of single-chain factor VII, the authors have constructed a site-specific mutant of recombinant human factor VII in which arginine-152 has been replaced with a glutamic acid residue. Mutant factor VII was purified in a single step from culture supernatants of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with a plasmid containing the sequence for Arg{sub 152} {yields} Glu factor VII using a calcium-dependent, murine anti-factor VII monoclonal antibody column. The clotting activity of mutant factor VII was completely inhibited following incubation with dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that the apparent clotting activity of mutant factor VII was due to a contaminating serine protease. Immunoblots of mutant factor VII with human factor IXa revealed no cleavage, whereas incubation of mutant factor VII with human factor Xa resulted in cleavage of mutant factor VII and the formation of a lower molecular weight degradation product migrating at M{sup r}{approx}40 000. The results are consistent with the proposal that zymogen factor VII possesses no intrinsic proteolytic activity toward factor X or factor IX.

  15. Folding and Rescue of a Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Trafficking Mutant Identified Using Human-Murine Chimeric Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Da Paula, Ana Carina; Sousa, Marisa; Xu, Zhe; Dawson, Elizabeth S.; Boyd, A. Christopher; Sheppard, David N.; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2010-01-01

    Impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel causes cystic fibrosis, a fatal genetic disease. Here, to gain insight into CFTR structure and function, we exploited interspecies differences between CFTR homologues using human (h)-murine (m) CFTR chimeras containing murine nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) or regulatory domain on an hCFTR backbone. Among 15 hmCFTR chimeras analyzed, all but two were correctly processed, one containing part of mNBD1 and another containing part of mNBD2. Based on physicochemical distance analysis of divergent residues between human and murine CFTR in the two misprocessed hmCFTR chimeras, we generated point mutations for analysis of respective CFTR processing and functional properties. We identified one amino acid substitution (K584E-CFTR) that disrupts CFTR processing in NBD1. No single mutation was identified in NBD2 that disrupts protein processing. However, a number of NBD2 mutants altered channel function. Analysis of structural models of CFTR identified that although Lys584 interacts with residue Leu581 in human CFTR Glu584 interacts with Phe581 in mouse CFTR. Introduction of the murine residue (Phe581) in cis with K584E in human CFTR rescued the processing and trafficking defects of K584E-CFTR. Our data demonstrate that human-murine CFTR chimeras may be used to validate structural models of full-length CFTR. We also conclude that hmCFTR chimeras are a valuable tool to elucidate interactions between different domains of CFTR. PMID:20551307

  16. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  17. Angiogenesis in Pituitary Adenomas: Human Studies and New Mutant Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Cristina, Carolina; Demarchi, Gianina; Lopez Vicchi, Felicitas; Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Perrone, Sofia; Ornstein, Ana Maria; Berner, Silvia Inés; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2014-01-01

    The role of angiogenesis in pituitary tumor development has been questioned, as pituitary tumors have been usually found to be less vascularized than the normal pituitary tissue. Nevertheless, a significantly higher degree of vasculature has been shown in invasive or macropituitary prolactinomas when compared to noninvasive and microprolactinomas. Many growth factors and their receptors are involved in pituitary tumor development. For example, VEGF, FGF-2, FGFR1, and PTTG, which give a particular vascular phenotype, are modified in human and experimental pituitary adenomas of different histotypes. In particular, vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, the central mediator of angiogenesis in endocrine glands, was encountered in experimental and human pituitary tumors at different levels of expression and, in particular, was higher in dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas. Furthermore, several anti-VEGF techniques lowered tumor burden in human and experimental pituitary adenomas. Therefore, even though the role of angiogenesis in pituitary adenomas is contentious, VEGF, making permeable pituitary endothelia, might contribute to adequate temporal vascular supply and mechanisms other than endothelial cell proliferation. The study of angiogenic factor expression in aggressive prolactinomas with resistance to dopamine agonists will yield important data in the search of therapeutical alternatives. PMID:25505910

  18. Genotypic stability, segregation and selection in heteroplasmic human cell lines containing np 3243 mutant mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, S K; Hance, N; El Meziane, A; Juhola, M K; Juhola, K M; Karhu, R; Spelbrink, J N; Holt, I J; Jacobs, H T

    2000-01-01

    The mitochondrial genotype of heteroplasmic human cell lines containing the pathological np 3243 mtDNA mutation, plus or minus its suppressor at np 12300, has been followed over long periods in culture. Cell lines containing various different proportions of mutant mtDNA remained generally at a consistent, average heteroplasmy value over at least 30 wk of culture in nonselective media and exhibited minimal mitotic segregation, with a segregation number comparable with mtDNA copy number (>/=1000). Growth in selective medium of cells at 99% np 3243 mutant mtDNA did, however, allow the isolation of clones with lower levels of the mutation, against a background of massive cell death. As a rare event, cell lines exhibited a sudden and dramatic diversification of heteroplasmy levels, accompanied by a shift in the average heteroplasmy level over a short period (<8 wk), indicating selection. One such episode was associated with a gain of chromosome 9. Analysis of respiratory phenotype and mitochondrial genotype of cell clones from such cultures revealed that stable heteroplasmy values were generally reestablished within a few weeks, in a reproducible but clone-specific fashion. This occurred independently of any straightforward phenotypic selection at the individual cell-clone level. Our findings are consistent with several alternate views of mtDNA organization in mammalian cells. One model that is supported by our data is that mtDNA is found in nucleoids containing many copies of the genome, which can themselves be heteroplasmic, and which are faithfully replicated. We interpret diversification and shifts of heteroplasmy level as resulting from a reorganization of such nucleoids, under nuclear genetic control. Abrupt remodeling of nucleoids in vivo would have major implications for understanding the developmental consequences of heteroplasmy, including mitochondrial disease phenotype and progression. PMID:10628996

  19. Differential Impact of LPG-and PG-Deficient Leishmania major Mutants on the Immune Response of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Asha; Hickerson, Suzanne; Mostrom, Janet; Turco, Salvatore J.; Beverley, Stephen M.; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background Leishmania major infection induces robust interleukin-12 (IL12) production in human dendritic cells (hDC), ultimately resulting in Th1-mediated immunity and clinical resolution. The surface of Leishmania parasites is covered in a dense glycocalyx consisting of primarily lipophosphoglycan (LPG) and other phosphoglycan-containing molecules (PGs), making these glycoconjugates the likely pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) responsible for IL12 induction. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we explored the role of parasite glycoconjugates on the hDC IL12 response by generating L. major Friedlin V1 mutants defective in LPG alone, (FV1 lpg1-), or generally deficient for all PGs, (FV1 lpg2-). Infection with metacyclic, infective stage, L. major or purified LPG induced high levels of IL12B subunit gene transcripts in hDCs, which was abrogated with FV1 lpg1- infections. In contrast, hDC infections with FV1 lpg2- displayed increased IL12B expression, suggesting other PG-related/LPG2 dependent molecules may act to dampen the immune response. Global transcriptional profiling comparing WT, FV1 lpg1-, FV1 lpg2- infections revealed that FV1 lpg1- mutants entered hDCs in a silent fashion as indicated by repression of gene expression. Transcription factor binding site analysis suggests that LPG recognition by hDCs induces IL-12 in a signaling cascade resulting in Nuclear Factor κ B (NFκB) and Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF) mediated transcription. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that L. major LPG is a major PAMP recognized by hDC to induce IL12-mediated protective immunity and that there is a complex interplay between PG-baring Leishmania surface glycoconjugates that result in modulation of host cellular IL12. PMID:26630499

  20. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C; Wilky, Breelyn A; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  1. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C.; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  2. Novel Rabies Virus-Neutralizing Epitope Recognized by Human Monoclonal Antibody: Fine Mapping and Escape Mutant Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Rice, Amy; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Milosz; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Meloen, Rob H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Visser, Therese J.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Alexander B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We produced two previously described potent rabies virus-neutralizing human MAbs, CR57 and CRJB, in human PER.C6 cells. The two MAbs competed for binding to rabies virus glycoprotein. Using CR57 and a set of 15-mer overlapping peptides covering the glycoprotein ectodomain, a neutralization domain was identified between amino acids (aa) 218 and 240. The minimal binding region was identified as KLCGVL (aa 226 to 231), with key residues K-CGV- identified by alanine replacement scanning. The critical binding region of this novel nonconformational rabies virus epitope is highly conserved within rabies viruses of genotype 1. Subsequently, we generated six rabies virus variants escaping neutralization by CR57 and six variants escaping CRJB. The CR57 escape mutants were only partially covered by CRJB, and all CRJB-resistant variants completely escaped neutralization by CR57. Without exception, the CR57-resistant variants showed a mutation at key residues within the defined minimal binding region, while the CRJB escape viruses showed a single mutation distant from the CR57 epitope (N182D) combined with mutations in the CR57 epitope. The competition between CR57 and CRJB, the in vitro escape profile, and the apparent overlap between the recognized epitopes argues against including both CR57 and CRJB in a MAb cocktail aimed at replacing classical immunoglobulin preparations. PMID:15795253

  3. Spread of Mutant Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus with Reduced Affinity to Human CD26 during the South Korean Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Cheon, Shinhye; Min, Chan-Ki; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Kang, Ying Jin; Cha, Young-Je; Kang, Ju-Il; Han, Seong Kyu; Ha, Na-Young; Kim, Gwanghun; Aigerim, Abdimadiyeva; Shin, Hyun Mu; Choi, Myung-Sik; Kim, Sanguk; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The newly emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a severe respiratory infection with a high mortality rate (~35%). MERS-CoV has been a global threat due to continuous outbreaks in the Arabian peninsula and international spread by infected travelers since 2012. From May to July 2015, a large outbreak initiated by an infected traveler from the Arabian peninsula swept South Korea and resulted in 186 confirmed cases with 38 deaths (case fatality rate, 20.4%). Here, we show the rapid emergence and spread of a mutant MERS-CoV with reduced affinity to the human CD26 receptor during the South Korean outbreak. We isolated 13 new viral genomes from 14 infected patients treated at a hospital and found that 12 of these genomes possess a point mutation in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of viral spike (S) protein. Specifically, 11 of these genomes have an I529T mutation in RBD, and 1 has a D510G mutation. Strikingly, both mutations result in reduced affinity of RBD to human CD26 compared to wild-type RBD, as measured by surface plasmon resonance analysis and cellular binding assay. Additionally, pseudotyped virus bearing an I529T mutation in S protein showed reduced entry into host cells compared to virus with wild-type S protein. These unexpected findings suggest that MERS-CoV adaptation during human-to-human spread may be driven by host immunological pressure such as neutralizing antibodies, resulting in reduced affinity to host receptor, and thereby impairs viral fitness and virulence, rather than positive selection for a better affinity to CD26. PMID:26933050

  4. [Construction and expression of six deletion mutants of human astrovirus C-terminal nsP1a/4 protein].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Ke; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-ming; Sui, Ting-ting; Wang, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the leading causes of actue virual diarrhea in infants. HAstV-induced epithdlial cell apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of HAstV infection. Our previous study indicated that HAstV non-structural protein nsPla C-terminal protein nsPla/4 was the major apoptosis functional protein and probably contained the main apoptosis domains. In order to screen for astrovirus encoded apoptotic protien, nsPla/4 and six turncated proteins, which possessed nsPla/4 protein different function domain ,were cloned into green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector pEG-FP-N3. After 24-72 h transfection, the fusion protein expression in BHK21 cells, was analysis by fluorescence microscope and Western blot. The results indicated seven fusion proteins were observed successfully in BHK21 cell after transfected for 24 h. Western blot analysis showed that the level of fusion protein expressed in BHK21 cells was increased significantly at 72h compared to 48h in transfected cells. The successful expression of deletion mutants of nsPla/4 protein was an important foundation to gain further insights into the function of apoptosis domains of nsPla/4 protein and it would also provide research platform to further confirm the molecule pathogenic mechanism of human astrovirus. PMID:24386845

  5. Genomic Profiling of a Human Organotypic Model of AEC Syndrome Reveals ZNF750 as an Essential Downstream Target of Mutant TP63

    PubMed Central

    Zarnegar, Brian J.; Webster, Dan E.; Lopez-Pajares, Vanessa; Vander Stoep Hunt, Brook; Qu, Kun; Yan, Karen J.; Berk, David R.; Sen, George L.; Khavari, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The basis for impaired differentiation in TP63 mutant ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (AEC) syndrome is unknown. Human epidermis harboring AEC TP63 mutants recapitulated this impairment, along with downregulation of differentiation activators, including HOPX, GRHL3, KLF4, PRDM1, and ZNF750. Gene-set enrichment analysis indicated that disrupted expression of epidermal differentiation programs under the control of ZNF750 and KLF4 accounted for the majority of disrupted epidermal differentiation resulting from AEC mutant TP63. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and ChIP-sequencing of TP63 binding in differentiated keratinocytes revealed ZNF750 as a direct target of wild-type and AEC mutant TP63. Restoring ZNF750 to AEC model tissue rescued activator expression and differentiation, indicating that AEC TP63-mediated ZNF750 inhibition contributes to differentiation defects in AEC. Incorporating disease-causing mutants into regenerated human tissue can thus dissect pathomechanisms and identify targets that reverse disease features. PMID:22922031

  6. Human mitochondrial ferritin improves respiratory function in yeast mutants deficient in iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis, but is not a functional homologue of yeast frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Sutak, Robert; Seguin, Alexandra; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Oddou, Jean-Louis; Dancis, Andrew; Tachezy, Jan; Latour, Jean-Marc; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We overexpressed human mitochondrial ferritin in frataxin-deficient yeast cells (Δyfh1), but also in another mutant affected in [Fe-S] assembly (Δggc1). Ferritin was correctly processed and expressed in the mitochondria of these cells, but the fraction of total mitochondrial iron bound to ferritin was very low, and most of the iron remained in the form of insoluble particles of ferric phosphate in these mitochondria, as evidenced by gel filtration analysis of the mitochondrial matrix (fast protein liquid chromatography [FPLC]) and by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mutant cells in which ferritin was overexpressed still accumulated iron in the mitochondria and remained deficient in [Fe-S] assembly, suggesting that human mitochondrial ferritin is not a functional homologue of yeast frataxin. However, the respiratory function was improved in these mutants, which correlates with an improvement of cytochrome and heme synthesis. Overexpression of mitochondrial ferritin in [Fe-S] mutants resulted in the appearance of a small pool of high-spin ferrous iron in the mitochondria, which was probably responsible for the improvement of heme synthesis and of the respiratory function in these mutants. PMID:22950017

  7. Analyzing the 3D Structure of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II and Its Mutants Using Deep View and the Protein Data Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ship, Noam J.; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2005-01-01

    The self directed study of a 3D image of a biomolecule stresses the complex nature of the intra- and intermolecular interactions that come together to define its structure. This is made up of a series of in vitro experiments with a wild-type and mutants forms of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) that examine the structure function relationship…

  8. Fipronil induced oxidative stress involves alterations in SOD1 and catalase gene expression in male mice liver: Protection by vitamins E and C.

    PubMed

    Badgujar, Prarabdh C; Chandratre, Gauri A; Pawar, Nitin N; Telang, A G; Kurade, N P

    2016-09-01

    In the present investigation, hepatic oxidative stress induced by fipronil was evaluated in male mice. We also investigated whether pretreatment with antioxidant vitamins E and C could protect mice against these effects. Several studies conducted in cell lines have shown fipronil as a potent oxidant; however, no information is available regarding its oxidative stress inducing potential in an animal model. Out of 8 mice groups, fipronil was administered to three groups at low, medium, and high dose based on its oral LD50 (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg). All three doses of fipronil caused a significant increase in the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level with concomitant increase in the absolute and relative weight of liver. High dose of fipronil caused significant down-regulation in the hepatic mRNA expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (0.412 ± 0.01 and 0.376 ± 0.05-fold, respectively) as well as an increase in the lipid peroxidation (LPO). Also, decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes; SOD, catalase, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and the content of nonantioxidant enzymes; glutathione and total thiol were recorded. Histopathological examination of liver revealed dose dependant changes such as severe fatty degeneration and vacuolation leading to hepatocellular necrosis. Prior administration of vitamin E or vitamin C against fipronil high dose caused decrease in lipid peroxidation and increased activity of antioxidant enzymes. Severe reduction observed in functional activities of antioxidant enzymes was aptly substantiated by down-regulation seen in their relative mRNA expression. Thus results of the present study imply that liver is an important target organ for fipronil and similar to in vitro reports, it induces oxidative stress in the mice liver, which in turn could be responsible for its hepatotoxic nature. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1147-1158, 2016. PMID

  9. Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.; Brooks, Craig R.; Lam, Albert Q.; Fu, Hongxia; Morizane, Ryuji; Agrawal, Vishesh; Saad, Abdelaziz F.; Li, Michelle K.; Hughes, Michael R.; Werff, Ryan Vander; Peters, Derek T.; Lu, Junjie; Baccei, Anna; Siedlecki, Andrew M.; Valerius, M. Todd; Musunuru, Kiran; McNagny, Kelly M.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Zhou, Jing; Lerou, Paul H.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26493500

  10. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in cohesin mutant human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinglan; Zhang, Zhe; Bando, Masashige; Itoh, Takehiko; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Li, Jennifer R.; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Tatsuro, Kondo; Kline, Antonie D.; Chang, Celia; Vega, Hugo; Jackson, Laird G.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Krantz, Ian D.

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin complex has recently been shown to be a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression, although the mechanisms by which it exerts its effects are poorly understood. We have undertaken a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in cohesin-deficient cell lines from probands with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Heterozygous mutations in NIPBL, SMC1A and SMC3 genes account for ∼65% of individuals with CdLS. SMC1A and SMC3 are subunits of the cohesin complex that controls sister chromatid cohesion, whereas NIPBL facilitates cohesin loading and unloading. We have examined the methylation status of 27 578 CpG dinucleotides in 72 CdLS and control samples. We have documented the DNA methylation pattern in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as well as identified specific differential DNA methylation in CdLS. Subgroups of CdLS probands and controls can be classified using selected CpG loci. The X chromosome was also found to have a unique DNA methylation pattern in CdLS. Cohesin preferentially binds to hypo-methylated DNA in control LCLs, whereas the differential DNA methylation alters cohesin binding in CdLS. Our results suggest that in addition to DNA methylation multiple mechanisms may be involved in transcriptional regulation in human cells and in the resultant gene misexpression in CdLS. PMID:20448023

  11. PTEN Redundancy: Overexpressing lpten, a Homolog of Dictyostelium discoideum ptenA, the Ortholog of Human PTEN, Rescues All Behavioral Defects of the Mutant ptenA−

    PubMed Central

    Lusche, Daniel F.; Wessels, Deborah; Richardson, Nicole A.; Russell, Kanoe B.; Hanson, Brett M.; Soll, Benjamin A.; Lin, Benjamin H.; Soll, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN are associated with a significant proportion of human cancers. Because the human genome also contains several homologs of PTEN, we considered the hypothesis that if a homolog, functionally redundant with PTEN, can be overexpressed, it may rescue the defects of a PTEN mutant. We have performed an initial test of this hypothesis in the model system Dictyostelium discoideum, which contains an ortholog of human PTEN, ptenA. Deletion of ptenA results in defects in motility, chemotaxis, aggregation and multicellular morphogenesis. D. discoideum also contains lpten, a newly discovered homolog of ptenA. Overexpressing lpten completely rescues all developmental and behavioral defects of the D. discoideum mutant ptenA−. This hypothesis must now be tested in human cells. PMID:25247494

  12. Structures of Wild-Type and Mutant Human Spermidine/Spermine N1-acetyltransferase, a Potential Therapeutic Drug Target

    SciTech Connect

    Bewley,M.; Graziano, V.; Jiang, J.; Matz, E.; Studier, F.; Pegg, A.; Coleman, C.; Flanagan, J.

    2006-01-01

    Spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SSAT) is a key enzyme in the control of polyamine levels in human cells, as acetylation of spermidine and spermine triggers export or degradation. Increased intracellular polyamine levels accompany several types of cancers as well as other human diseases, and compounds that affect the expression, activity, or stability of SSAT are being explored as potential therapeutic drugs. We have expressed human SSAT from the cloned cDNA in Escherichia coli and have determined high-resolution structures of wild-type and mutant SSAT, as the free dimer and in binary and ternary complexes with CoA, acetyl-CoA (AcCoA), spermine, and the inhibitor N{sup 1},N{sup 11}-bis-(ethyl)-norspermine (BE-3-3-3). These structures show details of binding sites for cofactor, substrates, and inhibitor and provide a framework to understand enzymatic activity, mutations, and the action of potential drugs. Two dimer conformations were observed: a symmetric form with two open surface channels capable of binding substrate or cofactor, and an asymmetric form in which only one of the surface channels appears capable of binding and acetylating polyamines. SSAT was found to self-acetylate lysine-26 in the presence of AcCoA and absence of substrate, a reaction apparently catalyzed by AcCoA bound in the second channel of the asymmetric dimer. These unexpected and intriguing complexities seem likely to have some as yet undefined role in regulating SSAT activity or stability as a part of polyamine homeostasis. Sequence signatures group SSAT with proteins that appear to have thialysine N{sup {var_epsilon}}-acetyltransferase activity.

  13. Nuclear export of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev is mediated by its activation domain and is blocked by transdominant negative mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Szilvay, A M; Brokstad, K A; Kopperud, R; Haukenes, G; Kalland, K H

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev moves repeatedly between the cytoplasm, a perinuclear zone, the nucleoli, and nucleoplasmic speckles. In this study, we demonstrated by both indirect immunofluorescence and Western immunoblot analysis that nuclear exit of Rev transdominant negative mutants was defective compared with that of wild-type Rev. The basic and activation domains of Rev signal import and export, respectively, of Rev across the nuclear membrane. In cotransfection experiments, mutants containing mutations of Rev inhibited the nuclear egress of wild-type Rev, thus revealing a novel transdominant negative phenotype. PMID:7745679

  14. Functional characterisation of the S512Y mutant vanilloid human TRPV1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kathy G; Garrett, Elizabeth M; Rutter, A Richard; Bonnert, Timothy P; Jarolimek, Wolfgang; Seabrook, Guy R

    2005-11-01

    1 Mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels include the nonselective cation channel TRPV1, which is activated by a range of stimuli including low pH, vanilloids and heat. Previously, selective mutagenesis experiments identified an intracellular residue (S512Y) critical to discriminating between pH and vanilloid (capsaicin) gating of the rat TRPV1 receptor. 2 In this study, switching the equivalent residue in the human TRPV1 (which has some significant differences with the rat TRPV1) also rendered this channel relatively insensitive to activation by capsaicin and proved critical in determining the receptor's sensitivity to the putative endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA), suggesting a similar mode of activation for these two agonists. 3 Potency of pH gating was reduced; however, voltage-dependent outward rectification properties of the pH-dependent current and gating by heat and pH sensitisation of the S512Y heat response remained unaffected. 4 Surprisingly, residual capsaicin gating was detected and could be sensitised by pH even in the presence of a competitive antagonist. Taken together, these findings indicate that effective functional interaction of capsaicin with the S512Y channel still occurred, although the vanilloid-dependent gating per se was severely compromised. 5 This observation provides additional evidence for capsaicin interacting at multiple sites, distinct from the S512 residue located close to the intracellular face of the pore. PMID:16100528

  15. Site-directed mutants of human RECQ1 reveal functional importance of the zinc binding domain.

    PubMed

    Sami, Furqan; Gary, Ronald K; Fang, Yayin; Sharma, Sudha

    2016-08-01

    RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of ATP-dependent DNA-unwinding enzymes with key roles in DNA replication and repair in all kingdoms of life. The RECQ1 gene encodes the most abundant RecQ homolog in humans. We engineered full-length RECQ1 harboring point mutations in the zinc-binding motif (amino acids 419-480) within the conserved RecQ-specific-C-terminal (RQC) domain known to be critical for diverse biochemical and cellular functions of RecQ helicases. Wild-type RECQ1 contains a zinc ion. Substitution of three of the four conserved cysteine residues that coordinate zinc severely impaired the ATPase and DNA unwinding activities but retained DNA binding and single strand DNA annealing activities. Furthermore, alteration of these residues attenuated zinc binding and significantly changed the overall conformation of full-length RECQ1 protein. In contrast, substitution of cysteine residue at position 471 resulted in a wild-type like RECQ1 protein. Differential contribution of the conserved cysteine residues to the structure and functions of the RECQ1 protein is also inferred by homology modeling. Overall, our results indicate that the zinc binding motif in the RQC domain of RECQ1 is a key structural element that is essential for the structure-functions of RECQ1. Given the recent association of RECQ1 mutations with breast cancer, these results will contribute to understanding the molecular basis of RECQ1 functions in cancer etiology. PMID:27248010

  16. SOD1 Gene +35A/C (exon3/intron3) Polymorphism in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Nithya, K.; Angeline, T.; Isabel, W.; Asirvatham, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase is an antioxidant enzyme that is involved in defence mechanisms against oxidative stress. Cu/Zn SOD is a variant that is located in exon3/intron3 boundary. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the Cu/Zn SOD (+35A/C) gene polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus among south Indian population. The study included patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 100) and healthy controls (n = 75). DNA was isolated from the blood and genotyping of Cu/Zn SOD gene polymorphism was done by polymerase chain reaction based restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Occurrence of different genotypes and normal (A) and mutant (C) allele frequencies were determined. The frequency of the three genotypes of the total subjects was as follows: homozygous wild-type A/A (95%), heterozygous genotype A/C (3%), and homozygous mutant C/C (2%). The mutant (C) allele and the mutant genotypes (AC/CC) were found to be completely absent among the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Absence of mutant genotype (CC) shows that the Cu/Zn SOD gene polymorphism may not be associated with the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus among south Indian population. PMID:27190652

  17. Correlation of Recombinant Integrase Activity and Functional Preintegration Complex Formation during Acute Infection by Replication-Defective Integrase Mutant Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies characterized two types of replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase mutants: class I, which are specifically blocked at the integration step, and class II, which harbor additional virion production and/or reverse transcription defects. Class I mutant enzymes supported little if any metal ion-dependent 3′-processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro, whereas class II enzymes displayed partial or full catalytic function in studies with simplified assay designs, suggesting that defective interaction(s) with heterologous integrase binding proteins might underlie the class II mutant viral phenotype. To address this hypothesis, class I and II mutant enzymes were interrogated under expanded sets of in vitro conditions. The majority failed to catalyze the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA, highlighting defective integrase function as the root cause of most class II in addition to all class I mutant virus infection defects. One mutant protein, K264E, in contrast, could support the wild-type level of concerted integration activity. After accounting for its inherent reverse transcription defect, HIV-1K264E moreover formed preintegration complexes that supported the efficient integration of endogenous viral DNA in vitro and normal levels and sequences of 2-long terminal repeat-containing circle junctions during acute infection. K264E integrase furthermore efficiently interacted in vitro with two heterologous binding partners, LEDGF/p75 and reverse transcriptase. Our results underscore the physiological relevance of concerted integration assays for tests of integrase mutant function and suggest that the K264E mutation disrupts an interaction with an intranuclear integrase binding partner that is important for HIV-1 integration. PMID:22278243

  18. New contributions to the study of common double mutants in the human LDL receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, M Teresa; Cenarro, Ana; Tejedor, Diego; Stef, Marianne; Palacios, Lourdes; de Castro, Isabel; García-Otín, Angel L; Monteagudo, Luis V; Civeira, Fernando; Pocovi, Miguel

    2011-11-01

    Variations in the gene encoding the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) can cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders in humans. The functional effects of the p.Gln92Glu and p.Asn564His alterations are predicted as benign, but the c.313 + 1G>C and p.Lys799_Phe801del changes are believed to cause disease. Although p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C have been observed only in Spain, p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del are widespread in Western Europe. In order to estimate the ages (t generations) of these four variants of the gene, to determine their possible origin and to consider the influence of age and selective pressure on their spread, we analyzed 86 healthy individuals and 126 FH patients in Spain. Most of the FH patients investigated carried two of these four LDLR variants simultaneously, while only one patient carried three of them simultaneously. Haplotype analyses were based on five LDLR SNPs: c.81T>C, c.1413G>A, c.1725C>T, c.1959T>C and c.2232G>A. The results suggest that p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C arose at about the same time (99 and 103 generations ago, respectively) in the CACTG haplotype and that p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del appeared in the CGCCG haplotype and might be slightly more recent variations (92 and 95 generations ago, respectively). Low selective pressures could explain the maintenance of these variants in spite of their ages. The origin of p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C appears to be in Spain whereas p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del could have been introduced in Spain by Celtic migrations in the seventh to fifth centuries BC. PMID:21935675

  19. New contributions to the study of common double mutants in the human LDL receptor gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, M. Teresa; Cenarro, Ana; Tejedor, Diego; Stef, Marianne; Palacios, Lourdes; de Castro, Isabel; García-Otín, Ángel L.; Monteagudo, Luis V.; Civeira, Fernando; Pocovi, Miguel

    2011-11-01

    Variations in the gene encoding the low-density lipoprotein receptor ( LDLR) can cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders in humans. The functional effects of the p.Gln92Glu and p.Asn564His alterations are predicted as benign, but the c.313 + 1G>C and p.Lys799_Phe801del changes are believed to cause disease. Although p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C have been observed only in Spain, p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del are widespread in Western Europe. In order to estimate the ages ( t generations) of these four variants of the gene, to determine their possible origin and to consider the influence of age and selective pressure on their spread, we analyzed 86 healthy individuals and 126 FH patients in Spain. Most of the FH patients investigated carried two of these four LDLR variants simultaneously, while only one patient carried three of them simultaneously. Haplotype analyses were based on five LDLR SNPs: c.81T>C, c.1413G>A, c.1725C>T, c.1959T>C and c.2232G>A. The results suggest that p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C arose at about the same time (99 and 103 generations ago, respectively) in the CACTG haplotype and that p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del appeared in the CGCCG haplotype and might be slightly more recent variations (92 and 95 generations ago, respectively). Low selective pressures could explain the maintenance of these variants in spite of their ages. The origin of p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C appears to be in Spain whereas p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del could have been introduced in Spain by Celtic migrations in the seventh to fifth centuries BC.

  20. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy and Parenchymal Amyloid Deposition in Transgenic Mice Expressing the Danish Mutant Form of Human BRI2

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Ruben; Barbeito, Ana G; Miravalle, Leticia; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2009-01-01

    Familial Danish dementia (FDD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by the presence of cataracts, hearing impairment, cerebellar ataxia and dementia. Neuropathologically, FDD is characterized by the presence of widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), parenchymal amyloid deposition and neurofibrillary tangles. FDD is caused by a 10-nucleotide duplication-insertion in the BRI2 gene that generates a larger-than-normal precursor protein, of which the Danish amyloid subunit (ADan) comprises the last 34 amino acids. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model for FDD (Tg-FDD) in which the mouse Prnp (prion protein) promoter drives the expression of the Danish mutant form of human BRI2. The main neuropathological findings in Tg-FDD mice are the presence of widespread CAA and parenchymal deposition of ADan. In addition, we observe the presence of amyloid-associated gliosis, an inflammatory response and deposition of oligomeric ADan. As the animals aged, they showed abnormal grooming behavior, an arched back, and walked with a wide-based gait and shorter steps. This mouse model may give insights on the pathogenesis of FDD and will prove useful for the development of therapeutics. Moreover, the study of Tg-FDD mice may offer new insights into the role of amyloid in neurodegeneration in other disorders, including Alzheimer disease. PMID:18410407

  1. Characterization of Mutants of Human Small Heat Shock Protein HspB1 Carrying Replacements in the N-Terminal Domain and Associated with Hereditary Motor Neuron Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Muranova, Lydia K.; Weeks, Stephen D.; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Gusev, Nikolai B.

    2015-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties of the mutations G34R, P39L and E41K in the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein B1 (HspB1), which have been associated with hereditary motor neuron neuropathy, were analyzed. Heat-induced aggregation of all mutants started at lower temperatures than for the wild type protein. All mutations decreased susceptibility of the N- and C-terminal parts of HspB1 to chymotrypsinolysis. All mutants formed stable homooligomers with a slightly larger apparent molecular weight compared to the wild type protein. All mutations analyzed decreased or completely prevented phosphorylation-induced dissociation of HspB1 oligomers. When mixed with HspB6 and heated, all mutants yielded heterooligomers with apparent molecular weights close to ~400 kDa. Finally, the three HspB1 mutants possessed lower chaperone-like activity towards model substrates (lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase and insulin) compared to the wild type protein, conversely the environmental probe bis-ANS yielded higher fluorescence with the mutants than with the wild type protein. Thus, in vitro the analyzed N-terminal mutations increase stability of large HspB1 homooligomers, prevent their phosphorylation-dependent dissociation, modulate their interaction with HspB6 and decrease their chaperoning capacity, preventing normal functioning of HspB1. PMID:25965061

  2. Assembly-defective point mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag precursor phenotypically expressed in recombinant baculovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S S; Boulanger, P

    1993-01-01

    Two substitution mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene product were isolated after nitrous acid mutagenesis of a recombinant baculovirus expressing a non-N-myristylated, p6-deleted Gag precursor (Pr49). Both mutants failed to assemble intracellular Gag virus-like particles, as does the parental recombinant, and therefore expressed a self-assembly defective (Sad) phenotype in insect cells. The mutations consisted of nonconservative changes involving highly conserved hydrophobic residues in the p24 domain, Leu to Pro at position 268 (L268P) and Leu to Ser at amino acid 322 (L322S). Experimental data suggested that the two mutated residues belonged to functionally different regions of the Gag precursor. (i) A partial complementation effect between the two mutants for Gag precursor assembly was observed in coinfection experiments. (ii) The two mutations showed different phenotypes when placed in the N-myristylated context, of which only the L268P mutation abolished extracellular budding and release of Gag particles at the plasma membrane. Both L268P and L322S mutants had a trans-dominant negative effect on the intracellular assembly of a non-N-myristylated, full-length (Pr55) Gag precursor expressed by a coinfecting recombinant. None of the mutants, however, showed any detectable effect in trans on membrane targeting and budding of the coexpressed N-myristylated wild-type Gag precursor. Images PMID:8474175

  3. p-Phenylenediamine induced DNA damage in SV-40 immortalized human uroepithelial cells and expression of mutant p53 and COX-2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Hung, Wen-Chun; Kang, Wan-Yi; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2007-04-25

    p-Phenylenediamine (p-PD) is the main aromatic amine used in the formulation of hair dyes. Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the use of p-PD-based hair dyes might be related to increased risk of human malignant tumors including bladder cancer and hematopoietic cancers. However, the toxicity and genotoxicity of p-PD on urothelial cells has not been reported yet. Therefore, we investigated the genotoxicity of p-PD on human urothelial cells and study its association with the expression of oncoproteins p53 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Our results revealed that p-PD was able to induce DNA damage determined by Comet assay. In addition, our immunocytochemical and Western blotting results showed that p-PD induced overexpression of mutant p53 and COX-2 in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between mutant p53 and COX-2 expression shows strong correlation. Furthermore, the accumulation of mutant p53 was linearly correlated with Comet scores. These results suggest that p-PD can induce DNA damage and accumulation of mutant p53 and COX-2 proteins; this may be one of the possible mechanisms that cause genotoxic carcinogenesis in the urothelial cells. PMID:17403587

  4. Progressive renal injury from transgenic expression of human carbonic anhydrase IV folding mutants is enhanced by deficiency of p58IPK.

    PubMed

    Datta, Rupak; Shah, Gul N; Rubbelke, Timothy S; Waheed, Abdul; Rauchman, Michael; Goodman, Alan G; Katze, Michael G; Sly, William S

    2010-04-01

    Mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase IV (hCAIV) have been associated with retinal degeneration in an autosomal-dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP17). Prior in vitro cell culture studies confirmed that all of the RP17-associated hCAIV mutations cause protein misfolding, leading to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis in cells expressing the mutant proteins. To evaluate the physiological impacts of these folding mutants in other carbonic anhydrase IV-producing tissues, we generated two transgenic mouse lines expressing R219S or R14W hCAIV under control of the endogenous hCAIV promoter. Expression of either of these mutant proteins in kidneys caused progressive renal injury in male transgenic mice as evidenced by an age-dependent increase in the tubule cell apoptosis starting at approximately 20 weeks of age and vacuolization throughout the renal cortex in older mice. Up-regulation of the ER chaperone, BiP, was observed in the cells of the renal cortex of the male transgenic mice, suggesting ER stress as a causal factor for the renal injury. The renal injury inflicted by expression of the folding mutants was markedly enhanced by haploinsufficiency of the ER cochaperone p58(IPK). The transgenic mice expressing the hCAIV folding mutants on a p58(IPK) heterozygous background showed extensive renal tubular apoptosis by approximately 10 weeks of age in both male and female mice. These data indicate that expression of the RP17-associated folding mutants of hCAIV can adversely affect tissues beyond the retina and their in vivo proteotoxicity is sensitive to modulation of the protein folding environment of the ER. PMID:20308551

  5. Progressive renal injury from transgenic expression of human carbonic anhydrase IV folding mutants is enhanced by deficiency of p58IPK

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rupak; Shah, Gul N.; Rubbelke, Timothy S.; Waheed, Abdul; Rauchman, Michael; Goodman, Alan G.; Katze, Michael G.; Sly, William S.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the human carbonic anhydrase IV (hCAIV) have been associated with retinal degeneration in an autosomal-dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP17). Prior in vitro cell culture studies confirmed that all of the RP17-associated hCAIV mutations cause protein misfolding, leading to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress–induced apoptosis in cells expressing the mutant proteins. To evaluate the physiological impacts of these folding mutants in other carbonic anhydrase IV–producing tissues, we generated two transgenic mouse lines expressing R219S or R14W hCAIV under control of the endogenous hCAIV promoter. Expression of either of these mutant proteins in kidneys caused progressive renal injury in male transgenic mice as evidenced by an age-dependent increase in the tubule cell apoptosis starting at approximately 20 weeks of age and vacuolization throughout the renal cortex in older mice. Up-regulation of the ER chaperone, BiP, was observed in the cells of the renal cortex of the male transgenic mice, suggesting ER stress as a causal factor for the renal injury. The renal injury inflicted by expression of the folding mutants was markedly enhanced by haploinsufficiency of the ER cochaperone p58IPK. The transgenic mice expressing the hCAIV folding mutants on a p58IPK heterozygous background showed extensive renal tubular apoptosis by approximately 10 weeks of age in both male and female mice. These data indicate that expression of the RP17-associated folding mutants of hCAIV can adversely affect tissues beyond the retina and their in vivo proteotoxicity is sensitive to modulation of the protein folding environment of the ER. PMID:20308551

  6. Spectral and metal-binding properties of three single-point tryptophan mutants of the human transferrin N-lobe.

    PubMed Central

    He, Q Y; Mason, A B; Lyons, B A; Tam, B M; Nguyen, V; MacGillivray, R T; Woodworth, R C

    2001-01-01

    Human serum transferrin N-lobe (hTF/2N) contains three conserved tryptophan residues, Trp(8), Trp(128) and Trp(264), located in three different environments. The present report addresses the different contributions of the three tryptophan residues to the UV-visible, fluorescence and NMR spectra of hTF/2N and the effect of the mutations at each tryptophan residue on the iron-binding properties of the protein. Trp(8) resides in a hydrophobic box containing a cluster of three phenylalanine side chains and is H bonded through the indole N to an adjacent water cluster lying between two beta-sheets containing Trp(8) and Lys(296) respectively. The fluorescence of Trp(8) may be quenched by the benzene rings. The apparent increase in the rate of iron release from the Trp(8)-->Tyr mutant could be due to the interference of the mutation with the H-bond linkage resulting in an effect on the second shell network. The partial quenching in the fluorescence of Trp(128) results from the nearby His(119) residue. Difference-fluorescence spectra reveal that any protein containing Trp(128) shows a blue shift upon binding metal ion, and the NMR signal of Trp(128) broadens out and disappears upon the binding of paramagnetic metals to the protein. These data imply that Trp(128) is a major fluorescent and NMR reporter group for metal binding, and possibly for cleft closure in hTF/2N. Trp(264) is located on the surface of the protein and does not connect to any functional residues. This explains the facts that Trp(264) is the major contributor to both the absorbance and fluorescence spectra, has a strong NMR signal and the mutation at Trp(264) has little effect on the iron-binding and release behaviours of the protein. PMID:11171122

  7. Stability and sequence-specific DNA binding of activation-labile mutants of the human glucocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Elsasser, M.S.; Eisen, L.P.; Harmon, J.M. ); Riegel, A.T. )

    1991-11-19

    The stability and DNA-binding properties of activation-labile (act{sup 1}) human glucocorticoid receptors (hGRs) from the glucocorticoid-resistant mutant 3R7.6TG.4 were investigated. These receptors are able to bind reversible associating ligands with normal affinity and specificity, but become unstable during attempted activation to the DNA binding form. Affinity labeling and immunochemical analysis demonstrated that act{sup 1} receptors are not preferentially proteolyzed during attempted activation. In addition, analysis of binding to calf thymus DNA showed that after loss of ligand, act{sup 1} receptors retain the ability to bind to DNA nonspecifically. A 370 bp MMTV promoter fragment containing multiple GREs and an upstream 342 bp fragment lacking GRE sequences were used to assess the binding of act{sup 1} hGR to specific DNA sequences. Immunoadsorption of hGR-DNA complexes after incubation with {sup 32}P-end-labeled fragments showed that both normal and act{sup 1} both normal and act{sup 1} hGRs could be blocked with a synthetic oligonucleotide containing a perfect palindromic GRE, but not with an oligonucleotide in which the GRE was replaced by and ERE. Analogous results were obtained for normal and act{sup 1} hGR activated in the absence of ligand, or after incubation with the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486. These results suggest that sequence-specific binding of the hGR does not require the presence of bound ligand and suggest a role for the ligand in trans-activation of hormonally responsive genes.

  8. GATA2 is epigenetically repressed in human and mouse lung tumors and is not requisite for survival of KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Mathewos; Yingling, Christin M.; Snider, Amanda M.; Do, Kieu; Juri, Daniel E.; Picchi, Maria A.; Zhang, Xiequn; Liu, Yushi; Leng, Shuguang; Tellez, Carmen S.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction GATA2 was recently described as a critical survival factor and therapeutic target for KRAS mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, whether this role is affected by epigenetic repression of GATA2 in lung cancer is unclear. Methods GATA2 expression and promoter CpG island methylation were evaluated using human and mouse NSCLC cell lines and tumor-normal pairs. In vitro assays were used to study GATA2 repression on cell survival and during tobacco carcinogen-induced transformation. Results GATA2 expression in KRAS wild-type (n=15) and mutant (n=10) NSCLC cell lines and primary lung tumors (n=24) was significantly lower, 1.3–33.6-fold (p=2.2×10−9), compared to corresponding normal lung. GATA2 promoter was unmethylated in normal lung (0/10) but frequently methylated in lung tumors (96%, 159/165) and NSCLC cell lines (97%, 30/31). This highly prevalent aberrant methylation was independently validated using TCGA data for 369 NSCLC tumor-normal pairs. In vitro studies using an established carcinogen-induced pre-malignancy model revealed that GATA2 expression was initially repressed by chromatin remodeling followed by cytosine methylation during transformation. Similarly, expression of Gata2 in NNK-induced mouse lung tumors (n=6) and cell lines (n=5) was 5-fold and 100-fold lower, respectively, than normal mouse lung. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of GATA2 in KRAS mutant [human (n=4) and murine (n=5)] and wild-type [human (n=4)] NSCLC cell lines showed that further reduction of expression (up to 95%) does not induce cell death. Conclusion GATA2 is epigenetically repressed in human and mouse lung tumors and its further inhibition is not a valid therapeutic strategy for KRAS mutant lung cancer. PMID:24807155

  9. Wild-type human γD-crystallin promotes aggregation of its oxidation-mimicking, misfolding-prone W42Q mutant.

    PubMed

    Serebryany, Eugene; King, Jonathan A

    2015-05-01

    Non-native protein conformers generated by mutation or chemical damage template aggregation of wild-type, undamaged polypeptides in diseases ranging from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to cancer. We tested for such interactions in the natively monomeric human eye lens protein γd-crystallin, whose aggregation leads to cataract disease. The oxidation-mimicking W42Q mutant of γd-crystallin formed non-native polymers starting from a native-like state under physiological conditions. Aggregation occurred in the temperature range 35-45 °C, in which the mutant protein began to lose the native conformation of its N-terminal domain. Surprisingly, wild-type γd-crystallin promoted W42Q polymerization in a catalytic manner, even at mutant concentrations too low for homogeneous nucleation to occur. The presence of wild-type protein also downshifted the temperature range of W42Q aggregation. W42Q aggregation required formation of a non-native intramolecular disulfide bond but not intermolecular cross-linking. Transient WT/W42Q binding may catalyze this oxidative misfolding event in the mutant. That a more stable variant in a mixture can specifically promote aggregation of a less stable one rationalizes how extensive aggregation of rare damaged polypeptides can occur during the course of aging. PMID:25787081

  10. Reversion of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase mutant at a second site restores enzyme function and virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, B; Carlini, F; Verani, P; Engelman, A

    1996-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the retroviral RNA genome into the host cell genome is essential for viral replication. The virion-associated integrase protein, encoded by the 3' end of the viral pol gene, is required for integration. Stable virus-producing T-cell lines were established for replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 carrying single amino acid substitutions at conserved residues in the catalytic domain of integrase. Phenotypically reverted virus was detected 12 weeks after transfection with the integrase mutant carrying the P-109-->S mutation (P109S). Unlike the defective P109S virus, the revertant virus (designated P109SR) grew in CD4+ SupT1 cells. In addition to the Ser substitution at Pro-109, P109SR had a second substitution of Ala for Thr at position 125 in integrase. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to show that the P109S T125A genotype was responsible for the P109SR replication phenotype. The T125A substitution also rescued the in vitro enzyme activities of recombinant P109S integrase protein. P109S integrase did not display detectable 3' processing or DNA strand transfer activity, although 5 to 10% of wild-type disintegration activity was detected. P109S T125A integrase displayed nearly wild-type levels of 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities, confirming that T125A is a second-site intragenic suppressor of P109S. P109S integrase ran as a large aggregate on a size exclusion column, whereas wild-type integrase ran as a monomer and P109S T125A integrase ran as a mixed population. Pro-109 and Thr-125 are not immediately adjacent in the crystal structure of the integrase catalytic domain. We suggest that the T125A substitution restores integrase function by stabilizing a structural alteration(s) induced by the P109S mutation. PMID:8970947

  11. Preparation, characterization and refolding in vitro of a recombinant human cyclophilin A mutant: effect of a single Pro/Ser substitution on cyclophilin A structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ren; Yan, Xiao; Luo, Man; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant cyclophilin A (CypA) mutant, which carries a serine instead of proline at sequence 16, was prepared for structural and functional assessment for human CypA. Soluble expression of the recombinant CypA mutant in E. coli was obtained under 30 degrees C, 180 rpm culture condition after being induced by IPTG. Ion exchange chromatography was used to purify the CypA mutant in a single step, and a high activity recovery of target protein with a high purity was achieved. Peptide fragments produced by trypsin proteolysis were applied to MALDI-TOF-MS, and searching results from the NCBI protein databank confirmed the protein attribution as well as the mutation sequence. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity was assayed for the CypA mutant using tetrapeptide substrate Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide, and the calculated kcat/Km value was 1.5 x 106 M-1 s-1 at 10 degrees C, which was 10-fold lower than the previously reported constant for wild-type CypA. An Eyring plot was also carried out. Inhibition by cyclosporine A demonstrated that the IC50 value was 26.5 nM. Meanwhile the expected enhancement of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence was quenched by the mutation. The effect of CypA mutant on accelerating protein refolding in vitro was investigated in ribonuclease A refolding process, and it was found that 10% slow phase could be catalyzed by CypA. The protein was subject to urea and GdmCl denaturation, where both activity and fluorescence served as structural probes. Activity recovery indicated this CypA mutant was extremely sensitive to GdmCl and the susceptibility to urea was increased. Low pH could also destabilize CypA. Furthermore the refolding of this CypA mutant itself was studied. Although the activity yield was nearly unchanged, the former proposed folding/assembly pathway might be altered. Fluorescence chart also demonstrated that the folding time was extended, and fast-folding and slow-folding analysis indicated the slow-folding rate constant

  12. Biochemical and functional analyses of gp130 mutants unveil JAK1 as a novel therapeutic target in human inflammatory hepatocellular adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Poussin, Karine; Pilati, Camilla; Couchy, Gabrielle; Calderaro, Julien; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Bacq, Yannick; Paradis, Valérie; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Sturm, Nathalie; Ramos, Jeanne; Guettier, Catherine; Bardier-Dupas, Armelle; Boulai, Anais; Wendum, Dominique; Selves, Janick; Izard, Tina; Nault, Jean-Charles; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory hepatocellular adenomas (IHCAs) are benign liver lesions that can be characterized histologically by the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate and at the molecular level by the overexpression of acute phase inflammatory response genes. Recurrent somatic mutations of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) signal transducer (IL6ST) locus, encoding the critical component of the IL-6 signal transduction machinery gp130, are present in 60% of IHCAs and in a subset (2%) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCCs). By screening of 256 human hepatic adenoma specimens (the largest genetic analysis of IL6ST performed to date in this setting), we identified 24 distinct somatic IL6ST mutations among 66 mutant adenomas. The functional analysis of nine different gp130 mutants expressed in hepatic cancer cell lines consistently revealed the constitutive and IL-6-independent activation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. We further demonstrated that the signaling activity of mutant gp130 in IHCA remains responsive to suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), a physiological gp130 inhibitor. Specifically, cells expressing a double mutant variant of gp130 with a disrupted SOCS3-binding site at residue 759 (Y186/Y759F) displayed a hyperactivation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) as compared with cells expressing the endogenous IHCA-associated Y186 gp130 mutant. Notably, we identified that constitutive signaling via gp130 in IHCA requires the Janus kinase family member JAK1, but not JAK2 or tyrosine kinase 2. In support of this notion, AG490, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively blocks JAK2, had no effect on gp130 activity. In stark contrast, we showed that ruxolitinib, a JAK1/JAK2-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat patients with myelofibrosis, dramatically impaired JAK1-STAT signaling downstream of all IHCA-associated gp130 mutants. In conclusion, our findings provide a rationale for the use of JAK1 inhibitors for the treatment of HCAs

  13. Effects of a non-IGF binding mutant of IGFBP-5 on cell death in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Perks, C M; McCaig, C; Clarke, J B; Clemmons, D R; Holly, J M P

    2002-06-28

    We have demonstrated previously that IGFBP-5 alone had no effect on cell death but modulated ceramide-induced apoptosis in Hs578T IGF non-responsive cells. To investigate if IGFBP-5 maintains its intrinsic ability to modulate apoptosis in IGF-responsive cells, we used a non-IGF binding mutant of IGFBP-5. In Hs578T cells, non-glycosylated, glycosylated or mutant IGFBP-5 alone each had no effect on cell death, whereas all forms inhibited ceramide-induced apoptosis. In IGF-responsive MCF-7 cells, each wild type form reduced ceramide-induced cell death but mutant IGFBP-5 was without effect. In the presence of mutant IGFBP-5, however, IGF-I no longer conferred survival and in the presence of wild type IGFBP-5, long R3 IGF-I was also unable to confer survival. In summary, all forms of IGFBP-5 modulated ceramide-induced apoptosis in Hs578T cells. In MCF-7 cells, IGF-I-induced survival could be facilitated by IGFBP-5, but also blocked by IGFBP-5 if association with IGFBP-5 was prevented. PMID:12074575

  14. A natural human IgM that binds to gangliosides is therapeutic in murine models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Denic, Aleksandar; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Wootla, Bharath; Papke, Louisa M.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Yoo, Daehan; Shaver, Jonah; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Pease, Larry R.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, fatal neurological disease that primarily affects spinal cord anterior horn cells and their axons for which there is no treatment. Here we report the use of a recombinant natural human IgM that binds to the surface of neurons and supports neurite extension, rHIgM12, as a therapeutic strategy in murine models of human ALS. A single 200 µg intraperitoneal dose of rHIgM12 increases survival in two independent genetic-based mutant SOD1 mouse strains (SOD1G86R and SOD1G93A) by 8 and 10 days, delays the onset of neurological deficits by 16 days, delays the onset of weight loss by 5 days, and preserves spinal cord axons and anterior horn neurons. Immuno-overlay of thin layer chromatography and surface plasmon resonance show that rHIgM12 binds with high affinity to the complex gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Addition of rHIgM12 to neurons in culture increases α-tubulin tyrosination levels, suggesting an alteration of microtubule dynamics. We previously reported that a single peripheral dose of rHIgM12 preserved neurological function in a murine model of demyelination with axon loss. Because rHIgM12 improves three different models of neurological disease, we propose that the IgM might act late in the cascade of neuronal stress and/or death by a broad mechanism. PMID:26035393

  15. A natural human IgM that binds to gangliosides is therapeutic in murine models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohua; Denic, Aleksandar; Jordan, Luke R; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Warrington, Arthur E; Wootla, Bharath; Papke, Louisa M; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Yoo, Daehan; Shaver, Jonah; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Pease, Larry R; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, fatal neurological disease that primarily affects spinal cord anterior horn cells and their axons for which there is no treatment. Here we report the use of a recombinant natural human IgM that binds to the surface of neurons and supports neurite extension, rHIgM12, as a therapeutic strategy in murine models of human ALS. A single 200 µg intraperitoneal dose of rHIgM12 increases survival in two independent genetic-based mutant SOD1 mouse strains (SOD1G86R and SOD1G93A) by 8 and 10 days, delays the onset of neurological deficits by 16 days, delays the onset of weight loss by 5 days, and preserves spinal cord axons and anterior horn neurons. Immuno-overlay of thin layer chromatography and surface plasmon resonance show that rHIgM12 binds with high affinity to the complex gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Addition of rHIgM12 to neurons in culture increases α-tubulin tyrosination levels, suggesting an alteration of microtubule dynamics. We previously reported that a single peripheral dose of rHIgM12 preserved neurological function in a murine model of demyelination with axon loss. Because rHIgM12 improves three different models of neurological disease, we propose that the IgM might act late in the cascade of neuronal stress and/or death by a broad mechanism. PMID:26035393

  16. Effects of mutant human Ki-ras{sup G12C} gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Floyd, Heather S.; Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2008-08-15

    Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 {mu}g/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras{sup G12C} expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models.

  17. Dynamics of the Peripheral Membrane Protein P2 from Human Myelin Measured by Neutron Scattering—A Comparison between Wild-Type Protein and a Hinge Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Laulumaa, Saara; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtimäki, Mari; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Koza, Michael M.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin protein P2 is a fatty acid-binding structural component of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system, and its function is related to its membrane binding capacity. Here, the link between P2 protein dynamics and structure and function was studied using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS). The P38G mutation, at the hinge between the β barrel and the α-helical lid, increased the lipid stacking capacity of human P2 in vitro, and the mutated protein was also functional in cultured cells. The P38G mutation did not change the overall structure of the protein. For a deeper insight into P2 structure-function relationships, information on protein dynamics in the 10 ps to 1 ns time scale was obtained using EINS. Values of mean square displacements mainly from protein H atoms were extracted for wild-type P2 and the P38G mutant and compared. Our results show that at physiological temperatures, the P38G mutant is more dynamic than the wild-type P2 protein, especially on a slow 1-ns time scale. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the enhanced dynamics of the mutant variant, especially within the portal region in the presence of bound fatty acid. The increased softness of the hinge mutant of human myelin P2 protein is likely related to an enhanced flexibility of the portal region of this fatty acid-binding protein, as well as to its interactions with the lipid bilayer surface requiring conformational adaptations. PMID:26068118

  18. A human FSHB transgene encoding the double N-glycosylation mutant (Asn(7Δ) Asn(24Δ)) FSHβ subunit fails to rescue Fshb null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huizhen; Butnev, Vladimir; Bousfield, George R; Kumar, T Rajendra

    2016-05-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a gonadotrope-derived heterodimeric glycoprotein. Both the common α- and hormone-specific β subunits contain Asn-linked N-glycan chains. Recently, macroheterogeneous FSH glycoforms consisting of β-subunits that differ in N-glycan number were identified in pituitaries of several species and subsequently the recombinant human FSH glycoforms biochemically characterized. Although chemical modification and in vitro site-directed mutagenesis studies defined the roles of N-glycans on gonadotropin subunits, in vivo functional analyses in a whole-animal setting are lacking. Here, we have generated transgenic mice with gonadotrope-specific expression of either an HFSHB(WT) transgene that encodes human FSHβ WT subunit or an HFSHB(dgc) transgene that encodes a human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, and separately introduced these transgenes onto Fshb null background using a genetic rescue strategy. We demonstrate that the human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, unlike human FSHβ WT subunit, inefficiently combines with the mouse α-subunit in pituitaries of Fshb null mice. FSH dimer containing this mutant FSHβ subunit is inefficiently secreted with very low levels detectable in serum. Fshb null male mice expressing HFSHB(dgc) transgene are fertile and exhibit testis tubule size and sperm number similar to those of Fshb null mice. Fshb null female mice expressing the mutant, but not WT human FSHβ subunit-containing FSH dimer are infertile, demonstrate no evidence of estrus cycles, and many of the FSH-responsive genes remain suppressed in their ovaries. Thus, HFSHB(dgc) unlike HFSHB(WT) transgene does not rescue Fshb null mice. Our genetic approach provides direct in vivo evidence that N-linked glycans on FSHβ subunit are essential for its efficient assembly with the α-subunit to form FSH heterodimer in pituitary. Our studies also reveal that N-glycans on FSHβ subunit are

  19. Bloom’s and Werner’s syndrome genes suppress hyperrecombination in yeast sgs1 mutant: Implication for genomic instability in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Kazutsune; Kato, Jun-ichi; Shimamoto, Akira; Goto, Makoto; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Bloom’s syndrome (BS) and Werner’s syndrome (WS) are genetic disorders in which an increased rate of chromosomal aberration is detected. The genes responsible for these diseases, BLM and WRN, have been found to be homologs of Escherichia coli recQ and Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGS1 genes. Here we show that yeast Sgs1 helicase acts as a suppressor of illegitimate recombination through homologous recombination and that human BLM and WRN helicases can suppress the increased homologous and illegitimate recombinations in the S. cerevisiae sgs1 mutant. The results imply a role of BLM and WRN helicases to control genomic stability in human cells. Similar to Sgs1 helicase, BLM helicase suppressed the cell growth in the top3 sgs1 mutation background and restored the increased sensitivity of the sgs1 mutant to hydroxyurea, but the WRN helicase did not. We discussed differential roles of BLM and WRN helicases in human cells. BLM- and WRN-bearing yeasts provide new useful models to investigate human BS and WS diseases. PMID:9671747

  20. The Overexpression of TDP-43 Protein in the Neuron and Oligodendrocyte Cells Causes the Progressive Motor Neuron Degeneration in the SOD1 G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiao; Liang, Huiting; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Renshi

    2016-01-01

    The recent investigation suggested that the TDP-43 protein was closely related to the motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the pathogenesis contributed to motor neuron degeneration largely remained unknown. Therefore, we detected the alteration of TDP-43 expression and distribution in the adult spinal cord of the SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse model for searching the possible pathogenesis of ALS. We examined the TDP-43 expression and distribution in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells in the adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic model by the fluorescent immunohistochemical technology. We revealed that the amount of TDP-43 positive cell was cervical>lumbar>thoracic segment, that in the ventral horn was more than that in the dorsal horn, a few of TDP-43 protein sparsely expressed and distributed in the other regions, the TDP-43 protein weren't detected in the white matter and the central canal. The TDP-43 protein was mostly expressed and distributed in the nuclear of neuron cells and the cytoplasm of oligodendrocyte cells of the gray matter surrounding the central canal of spinal cord by the granular shape in the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice. The amount of TDP-43 positive cell significantly increased at the onset and progression stages of ALS following with the increase of neuron death in spinal cord, particularly in the ventral horn of cervical segment at the progression stage. Our results suggested that the overexpression of TDP-43 protein in the neuron and oligodendrocyte cell causes the progressive motor neuron degeneration in the ALS-like mouse model. PMID:27570488

  1. The Overexpression of TDP-43 Protein in the Neuron and Oligodendrocyte Cells Causes the Progressive Motor Neuron Degeneration in the SOD1 G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiao; Liang, Huiting; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Renshi

    2016-01-01

    The recent investigation suggested that the TDP-43 protein was closely related to the motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the pathogenesis contributed to motor neuron degeneration largely remained unknown. Therefore, we detected the alteration of TDP-43 expression and distribution in the adult spinal cord of the SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse model for searching the possible pathogenesis of ALS. We examined the TDP-43 expression and distribution in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells in the adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic model by the fluorescent immunohistochemical technology. We revealed that the amount of TDP-43 positive cell was cervical>lumbar>thoracic segment, that in the ventral horn was more than that in the dorsal horn, a few of TDP-43 protein sparsely expressed and distributed in the other regions, the TDP-43 protein weren't detected in the white matter and the central canal. The TDP-43 protein was mostly expressed and distributed in the nuclear of neuron cells and the cytoplasm of oligodendrocyte cells of the gray matter surrounding the central canal of spinal cord by the granular shape in the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice. The amount of TDP-43 positive cell significantly increased at the onset and progression stages of ALS following with the increase of neuron death in spinal cord, particularly in the ventral horn of cervical segment at the progression stage. Our results suggested that the overexpression of TDP-43 protein in the neuron and oligodendrocyte cell causes the progressive motor neuron degeneration in the ALS-like mouse model. PMID:27570488

  2. Response to Comment on "Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism".

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-10-30

    Wang comments that the diffraction data for the structure of the A139T mutant of translocator protein TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides should be used to 1.65 instead of 1.8 angstroms and that the density interpreted as porphyrin and monoolein is better fitted as polyethylene glycol. Although different practices of data processing exist, in this case they do not substantially influence the final map. Additional data are presented supporting the fit of a porphyrin and monooleins. PMID:26516277

  3. Preparation, crystallization, and preliminary crystallographic analysis of wild-type and mutant human TREM-2 ectodomains linked to neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kober, Daniel L; Wanhainen, Kelsey M; Johnson, Britney M; Randolph, David T; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Tom J

    2014-04-01

    TREM-2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2) is an innate immune receptor expressed on dendritic cells, macrophages, osteoclasts, and microglia. Recent genetic studies have reported the occurrence of point mutations in TREM-2 that correlate with a dramatically increased risk for the development of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and Parkinson's disease. Structural and biophysical studies of wild-type and mutant TREM-2 ectodomains are required to understand the functional consequences of these mutations. In order to facilitate these studies, we undertook the production and crystallization of these proteins. Here we demonstrate that, unlike many single Ig domain proteins, TREM-2 could not be readily refolded from bacterially-expressed inclusion bodies. Instead, we developed a mammalian-cell based expression system for the successful production of wild-type and mutant TREM-2 proteins in milligram quantities and a single-chromatography-step purification scheme that produced diffraction-quality crystals. These crystals diffract to a resolution of 3.3 Å and produce data sufficient for structure determination. We describe herein the procedures to produce wild-type and mutant human TREM-2 Ig domains in sufficient quantities for structural and biophysical studies. Such studies are crucial to understand the functional consequences of TREM-2 point mutations linked to the development of neurodegenerative diseases and, ultimately, to develop patient-specific molecular therapies to treat them. PMID:24508568

  4. Prolonged retention after aggregation into secretory granules of human R183H-growth hormone (GH), a mutant that causes autosomal dominant GH deficiency type II.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong Lian; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Waters, Michael J; Dannies, Priscilla S

    2002-11-01

    Human R183H-GH causes autosomal dominant GH deficiency type II. Because we show here that the mutant hormone is fully bioactive, we have sought to locate an impairment in its progress through the secretory pathway as assessed by pulse chase experiments. Newly synthesized wild-type and R183H-GH were stable when expressed transiently in AtT20 cells, and both formed equivalent amounts of Lubrol-insoluble aggregates within 40 min after synthesis. There was no evidence for intermolecular disulfide bond formation in aggregates of wild-type hormone or the R183H mutant. Both wild-type and R183H-GH were packaged into secretory granules, assessed by the ability of 1 mM BaCl2 to stimulate release and by immunocytochemistry. The mutant differed from wild-type hormone in its retention in the cells after packaging into secretory granules; 50% more R183H-GH than wild-type aggregates were retained in AtT20 cells 120 min after synthesis, and stimulated release of R183H-GH or a mixture of R183H-GH and wild-type that had been retained in the cell was reduced. The longer retention of R183H-GH aggregates indicates that a single point mutation in a protein contained in secretory granules affects the rate of secretory granule release. PMID:12399418

  5. A small disturbance, but a serious disease: the possible mechanism of D52H-mutant of human PRS1 that causes gout.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Li, Jianzhong; Ma, Jin; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2013-06-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase isoform 1 (PRS1) has an essential role in the de novo and salvage synthesis of human purine and pyrimidine nucleotides. The dysfunction of PRS1 will dramatically influence nucleotides' concentration in patient's body and lead to different kinds of disorders (such as hyperuricemia, gout and deafness). The D52H missense mutation of PRS1 will lead to a conspicuous phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate content elevation in the erythrocyte of patients and finally induce hyperuricemia and serious gout. In this study, the enzyme activity analysis indicated that D52H-mutant possessed similar catalytic activity to the wild-type PRS1, and the 2.27 Å resolution D52H-mutant crystal structure revealed that the stable interaction network surrounding the 52 position of PRS1 would be completely destroyed by the substitution of histidine. These interaction variations would further influence the conformation of ADP-binding pocket of D52H-mutant and reduced the inhibitor sensitivity of PRS1 in patient's body. PMID:23509005

  6. Differential effects of prenatal and postnatal expressions of mutant human DISC1 on neurobehavioral phenotypes in transgenic mice: evidence for neurodevelopmental origin of major psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Y; Abazyan, B; Nomura, J; Kim, R; Ladenheim, B; Krasnova, I N; Sawa, A; Margolis, R L; Cadet, J L; Mori, S; Vogel, M W; Ross, C A; Pletnikov, M V

    2011-03-01

    Strong genetic evidence implicates mutations and polymorphisms in the gene Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) as risk factors for both schizophrenia and mood disorders. Recent studies have shown that DISC1 has important functions in both brain development and adult brain function. We have described earlier a transgenic mouse model of inducible expression of mutant human DISC1 (hDISC1) that acts in a dominant-negative manner to induce the marked neurobehavioral abnormalities. To gain insight into the roles of DISC1 at various stages of neurodevelopment, we examined the effects of mutant hDISC1 expressed during (1) only prenatal period, (2) only postnatal period, or (3) both periods. All periods of expression similarly led to decreased levels of cortical dopamine (DA) and fewer parvalbumin-positive neurons in the cortex. Combined prenatal and postnatal expression produced increased aggression and enhanced response to psychostimulants in male mice along with increased linear density of dendritic spines on neurons of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and lower levels of endogenous DISC1 and LIS1. Prenatal expression only resulted in smaller brain volume, whereas selective postnatal expression gave rise to decreased social behavior in male mice and depression-like responses in female mice as well as enlarged lateral ventricles and decreased DA content in the hippocampus of female mice, and decreased level of endogenous DISC1. Our data show that mutant hDISC1 exerts differential effects on neurobehavioral phenotypes, depending on the stage of development at which the protein is expressed. The multiple and diverse abnormalities detected in mutant DISC1 mice are reminiscent of findings in major mental diseases. PMID:20048751

  7. Basal and treatment-induced activation of AKT mediates resistance to cell death by AZD6244 (ARRY-142886) in Braf-mutant human cutaneous melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Y.N. Vashisht; Deng, Wanleng; Woodman, Scott E.; Komurov, Kakajan; Ram, Prahlad; Smith, Paul D.; Davies, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of melanomas demonstrate constitutive activation of the RAS-RAF-MEK-MAPK pathway. AZD6244 is a selective MEK1/2 inhibitor which markedly reduces tumor P-MAPK levels, but it produced few clinical responses in melanoma patients. An improved understanding of the determinants of resistance to AZD6244 may lead to improved patient selection and effective combinatorial approaches. The effects of AZD6244 on cell growth and survival were tested in a total of 14 Braf-mutant and 3 wild-type human cutaneous melanoma cell lines. Quantitative assessment of phospho-protein levels in the Braf-mutant cell lines by reverse phase protein array (RPPA) analysis showed no significant association between P-MEK or P-MAPK levels and AZD6244 sensitivity, but activation-specific markers in the PI3K-AKT pathway correlated with resistance. We also identified resistant cell lines without basal activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. RPPA characterization of the time-dependent changes in signaling pathways revealed that AZD6244 produced durable and potent inhibition of P-MAPK in sensitive and resistant Braf-mutant cell lines, but several resistant lines demonstrated AZD6244-induced activation of AKT. In contrast, sensitive cell lines demonstrated AZD6244 treatment-induced upregulation of PTEN protein and mRNA expression. Inhibition of AKT, TORC1/2, or IGF1R blocked AZD6244-induced activation of AKT and resulted in synergistic cell killing with AZD6244. These findings identify basal and treatment-induced regulation of the PI3K-AKT pathway as a critical regulator of AZD6244 sensitivity in Braf-mutant cutaneous melanoma cells, the novel regulation of PTEN expression by AZD6244 in sensitive cells, and suggest new combinatorial approaches for patients. PMID:20959481

  8. Effect of an EDA-A1 gene mutant on the proliferation and cell cycle distribution of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    LEI, KE; WANG, LUNCHANG; MA, BING; SHI, PING; LI, LONGJIANG; CHE, TUANJIE; HE, XIANGYI

    2016-01-01

    Ectodysplasin (EDA) gene mutation is associated with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ectodysplasin, transcript variant 1 (EDA-A1) on the proliferation and cell cycle of ECV304 human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Recombinant eukaryotic expression vectors containing mutant (M) and wild-type (W) EDA-A1 coding sequences, pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-M and pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-W, respectively, were transfected into ECV304 cells. The EDA-A1 gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the protein was detected by western blotting. The EDA-A1 gene and protein were detected in ECV304 cells transfected with pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-M and pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-W, but not in ECV304 cells transfected with empty plasmid or cells that had not undergone transfection. Compared with the control group, the EDA-A1 gene mutant significantly decreased the proliferation of ECV304 cells and its inhibition rate was 45.70% (P<0.01), whereas the wild-type EDA-A1 gene did not cause such growth inhibition (P>0.05). A significant increase of the fraction of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle was observed in the ECV304 cells of the mutant group compared with wild type group, with an increase in the S phase population and a concomitant reduction in the G2/M phase population (P<0.05). These results indicate that compared with the wild-type gene, transfection with a mutant EDA-A1 gene inhibited the proliferation and cell cycle of cultured HUVECs. PMID:26893642

  9. Fluorescence and UV resonance Raman study of peptide-vesicle interactions of human cathelicidin LL-37 and its F6W and F17W mutants.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jonathan E; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Cogen, Anna L; Gallo, Richard L; Kim, Judy E

    2009-12-01

    LL-37 is a broad-spectrum human antimicrobial peptide in the cathelicidin family. Potency assays in the form of minimal inhibitory concentration and vesicle leakage indicate that the single-tryptophan mutants, F6W and F17W, are as effective at killing bacteria and disrupting membranes as the native, tryptophan-free LL-37 peptide. Steady-state fluorescence and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy of F6W and F17W reveal molecular details of these tryptophan residues. The local environment polarity, hydrogen bond strength of the indole N-H moiety, and rotational freedom decrease for both F6W and F17W in the presence of carbonate ions relative to in pure distilled water; these results are consistent with burial of the hydrophobic region of alpha-helical LL-37 in oligomeric cores induced in the presence of carbonate ions. Differences in the spectroscopic properties of the carbonate-induced alpha-helical forms of F6W and F17W reflect the presence of a local lysine residue near F6W that makes the microenvironment of F6W more polar than that of F17W. In the presence of lipid vesicles, the mutants undergo additional loss of environment polarity, hydrogen bond strength, and rotational freedom. Quenching experiments utilizing brominated lipids reveal that the tryptophan residues in both mutants are essentially equidistant from the bilayer center and that bromines closer to the bilayer center, in the 9,10 positions, quench fluorescence more efficiently than those closer to the headgroups (6,7 positions). These results support carpeting or toroidal pore mechanisms of membrane disruption by LL-37 and demonstrate that the combination of tryptophan mutants and sensitive spectroscopic tools may provide important molecular clues about antimicrobial action. PMID:19894716

  10. Design and expression of human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor extracellular domain mutants with enhanced solubility and ligand-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Zouridakis, Marios; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Eliopoulos, Elias; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2009-02-01

    In order to facilitate structural studies of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), we designed several mutants, since the wild-type-ECD forms large oligomers and microaggregates, and expressed them in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mutant design was based on a 3D model of human alpha7-nAChR-ECD, constructed using as templates the X-ray crystal structure of the homologous acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) and the electron microscopy structure of the Torpedo alpha-nAChR-ECD. At least one mutant, mut10, carrying six single-point mutations (Phe3Tyr, Val69Thr, Cys116Ser, Ile165Thr, Val177Thr, Phe187Tyr) and the replacement of its Cys-loop with the corresponding and more hydrophilic AChBP Cys-loop, was expressed with a 4-fold higher expression yield (1.2 mg/L) than the wild-type alpha7-ECD, existing exclusively as a soluble oligomeric, probably pentameric, form, at concentrations up to at least 10 mg/mL, as judged by gel filtration and dynamic light scattering. This mutant displayed a significantly improved (125)I-alpha-bungarotoxin-binding affinity (K(d)=24 nM) compared to the wild-type-ECD (K(d)=70 nM), the binding being inhibited by unlabelled alpha-bungarotoxin, d-tubocurarine or nicotine (K(i) of 21.5 nM, 127 microM and 17.5 mM, respectively). Circular dichroism studies of mut10 revealed (a) a similar secondary structure composition ( approximately 5% alpha-helix, approximately 45% beta-sheet) to that of the AChBP, Torpedo alpha-nAChR-ECD, and mouse alpha1-nAChR-ECD, (b) a well-defined tertiary structure and (c) binding of small cholinergic ligands at micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed well-assembled, probably pentameric, particles of mut10. Finally, since deglycosylation did not alter its solubility or ligand-binding properties, mut10, in either its glycosylated or deglycosylated form, is a promising alpha7-ECD mutant for structural studies, useful for the rational drug design to

  11. TNF-α produced by SEC2 mutant (SAM-3)-activated human T cells induces apoptosis of HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojun; Xu, Mingkai; Song, Yubo; Su, Zhencheng; Zhang, Huiwen; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins C2 (SEC2) is a classical model of superantigens (SAg), which has the powerful ability to activate T cells as well as induce massive cytokine production. This property makes SEC2 and its mutants well concerned as a potential new immune-regulatory agent for cancer therapy. We previously constructed a SEC2 mutant named SAM-3, which had prominently antitumor activity in BALB/c mice model. But, the underlying molecular mechanism for stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and antitumor effect on human tumor cells induced by SAM-3 is not clear. Here, we showed that SAM-3 could activate human TCR Vβ 12, 13A, 14, 15, 17, and 20 CD8(+) subgroup T cells, which secreted the cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, and exhibit stimulation activity in a dose-dependent manner. TNF-α secreted from activated T cells could induce apoptosis and G1-phase arrest and lead to the antitumor effect in HepG2 cells. Meanwhile, SAM-3 upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) mRNA and activity of caspase-3 and caspase-8. We also found that the antitumor activity and activity of caspase-3 and caspase-8 were decreased when the neutralizing TNF-α monoclonal antibody presented. These data suggest that TNF-α secreted by SAM-3-activated T cells is an important factor in inducing apoptosis in HepG2 cells. PMID:26536876

  12. A homologous genetic basis of the murine cpfl1 mutant and human achromatopsia linked to mutations in the PDE6C gene

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo; Grau, Tanja; Dangel, Susann; Hurd, Ron; Jurklies, Bernhard; Sener, E. Cumhur; Andreasson, Sten; Dollfus, Helene; Baumann, Britta; Bolz, Sylvia; Artemyev, Nikolai; Kohl, Susanne; Heckenlively, John; Wissinger, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Retinal cone photoreceptors mediate fine visual acuity, daylight vision, and color vision. Congenital hereditary conditions in which there is a lack of cone function in humans cause achromatopsia, an autosomal recessive trait, characterized by low vision, photophobia, and lack of color discrimination. Herein we report the identification of mutations in the PDE6C gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cone photoreceptor phosphodiesterase as a cause of autosomal recessive achromatopsia. Moreover, we show that the spontaneous mouse mutant cpfl1 that features a lack of cone function and rapid degeneration of the cone photoreceptors represents a homologous mouse model for PDE6C associated achromatopsia. PMID:19887631

  13. Diffuse Glomerular Nodular Lesions in Diabetic Pigs Carrying a Dominant-Negative Mutant Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-Alpha, an Inheritant Diabetic Gene in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Satoshi; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Yokoo, Takashi; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Nagata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular nodular lesions, known as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, are a pathological hallmark of progressive human diabetic nephropathy. We have induced severe diabetes in pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α) P291fsinsC, a maturity-onset diabetes of the young type-3 (MODY3) gene in humans. In this model, glomerular pathology revealed that formation of diffuse glomerul