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Sample records for human ocular cells

  1. Co-ordinated ocular development from human iPS cells and recovery of corneal function.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryuhei; Ishikawa, Yuki; Sasamoto, Yuzuru; Katori, Ryosuke; Nomura, Naoki; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Araki, Saori; Soma, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Quantock, Andrew J; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji

    2016-03-17

    The eye is a complex organ with highly specialized constituent tissues derived from different primordial cell lineages. The retina, for example, develops from neuroectoderm via the optic vesicle, the corneal epithelium is descended from surface ectoderm, while the iris and collagen-rich stroma of the cornea have a neural crest origin. Recent work with pluripotent stem cells in culture has revealed a previously under-appreciated level of intrinsic cellular self-organization, with a focus on the retina and retinal cells. Moreover, we and others have demonstrated the in vitro induction of a corneal epithelial cell phenotype from pluripotent stem cells. These studies, however, have a single, tissue-specific focus and fail to reflect the complexity of whole eye development. Here we demonstrate the generation from human induced pluripotent stem cells of a self-formed ectodermal autonomous multi-zone (SEAM) of ocular cells. In some respects the concentric SEAM mimics whole-eye development because cell location within different zones is indicative of lineage, spanning the ocular surface ectoderm, lens, neuro-retina, and retinal pigment epithelium. It thus represents a promising resource for new and ongoing studies of ocular morphogenesis. The approach also has translational potential and to illustrate this we show that cells isolated from the ocular surface ectodermal zone of the SEAM can be sorted and expanded ex vivo to form a corneal epithelium that recovers function in an experimentally induced animal model of corneal blindness. PMID:26958835

  2. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes. PMID:25704934

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Extra Ocular Muscle Harbor Neuroectodermal Differentiation Potential.

    PubMed

    Mawrie, Darilang; Kumar, Atul; Magdalene, Damaris; Bhattacharyya, Jina; Jaganathan, Bithiah Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been proposed as suitable candidates for cell therapy for neurological disorderssince they exhibit good neuronal differentiation capacity. However, for better therapeutic outcomes, it is necessary to isolate MSC from a suitable tissue sourcethat posses high neuronal differentiation. In this context, we isolated MSC from extra ocular muscle (EOM) tissue and tested the in vitro neuronal differentiation potential. In the current study, EOM tissue derived MSC were characterized and compared with bone marrow derived MSC. We found that EOM derived MSC proliferated as a monolayer and showed similarities in morphology, growth properties and cell surface marker expression with bone marrow derived MSC and expressed high levels of NES, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 in its undifferentiated state. They also expressed embryonic cell surface marker SSEA4 and their intracellular mitochondrial distribution pattern was similar to that of multipotent stem cells. Although EOM derived MSC differentiated readily into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, they differentiated more efficiently into neuroectodermal cells. The differentiation into neuroectodermal cellswas confirmed by the expression of neuronal markers NGFR and MAP2B. Thus, EOM derived MSC might be good candidates for stem cell based therapies for treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27248788

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Extra Ocular Muscle Harbor Neuroectodermal Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Magdalene, Damaris; Bhattacharyya, Jina; Jaganathan, Bithiah Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been proposed as suitable candidates for cell therapy for neurological disorderssince they exhibit good neuronal differentiation capacity. However, for better therapeutic outcomes, it is necessary to isolate MSC from a suitable tissue sourcethat posses high neuronal differentiation. In this context, we isolated MSC from extra ocular muscle (EOM) tissue and tested the in vitro neuronal differentiation potential. In the current study, EOM tissue derived MSC were characterized and compared with bone marrow derived MSC. We found that EOM derived MSC proliferated as a monolayer and showed similarities in morphology, growth properties and cell surface marker expression with bone marrow derived MSC and expressed high levels of NES, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 in its undifferentiated state. They also expressed embryonic cell surface marker SSEA4 and their intracellular mitochondrial distribution pattern was similar to that of multipotent stem cells. Although EOM derived MSC differentiated readily into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, they differentiated more efficiently into neuroectodermal cells. The differentiation into neuroectodermal cellswas confirmed by the expression of neuronal markers NGFR and MAP2B. Thus, EOM derived MSC might be good candidates for stem cell based therapies for treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27248788

  5. Dynamic change in natural killer cell type in the human ocular mucosa in situ as means of immune evasion by adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yawata, N; Selva, K J; Liu, Y-C; Tan, K P; Lee, A W L; Siak, J; Lan, W; Vania, M; Arundhati, A; Tong, L; Li, J; Mehta, J S; Yawata, M

    2016-01-01

    The most severe form of virus-induced inflammation at the ocular surface is epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), often caused by group D human adenoviruses (HAdVs). We investigated the dynamics and mechanisms of changes in natural killer (NK) cell types in the human ocular mucosal surface in situ over the course of infection. In the acute phase of infection, the mature CD56(dim)NK cells that comprise a major subpopulation in the normal human conjunctiva are replaced by CD56(bright)NK cells recruited to the ocular surface by chemokines produced by the infected epithelium, and NKG2A-expressing CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cells become the major subpopulations in severe inflammation. These NK cells attracted to the mucosal surface are however incapable of mounting a strong antiviral response because of upregulation of the inhibitory ligand human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) on infected epithelium. Furthermore, group D HAdVs downregulate ligands for activating NK cell receptors, thus rendering even the mature NKG2A(-)NK cells unresponsive, an immune-escape mechanism distinct from other adenoviruses. Our findings imply that the EKC-causing group D HAdVs utilize these multiple pathways to inhibit antiviral NK cell responses in the initial stages of the infection. PMID:26080707

  6. Progenitor cells for ocular surface regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Nieto-Nicolau, Nuria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are essential for maintaining the cornea's transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio-replacement, such as cultured limbal epithelial transplantation and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation, present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiencies. Another emerging therapeutic strategy consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins using tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal stromal cells, represents a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases and also offers a more rational, less invasive and more physiological approach to ocular surface regeneration. PMID:23257987

  7. [Principles of treatment in ocular burns regarding the ocular surface and limbal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Potop, V; Dumitrache, Marieta

    2005-01-01

    The term ocular surface emphasizes the functional interdependence of the nonkeratinizing epithelium of cornea and conjunctiva. The limbal stem cells are responsible for replacement of corneal epithelium following ocular surface injuries. Over the past decades important advances in the management of chemical injury have occurred based on the application of theories on ocular surface and limbal stem cells. PMID:16245740

  8. The role of nitric oxide in ocular surface cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Chan; Park, Gun Sic; Kim, Jin Kook; Kim, Young Myeong

    2002-06-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ocular surface remains unknown. We investigated the conditions leading to an increase of NO generation in tear and the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue. We evaluated the dual action (cell survival or cell death) of NO depending on its amount. We measured the concentration of nitrite plus nitrate in the tears of ocular surface diseases and examined the main source of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). When cultured human corneal fibroblast were treated with NO producing donor with or without serum, the viabilities of cells was studied. We found that the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue were corneal epithelium, fibroblast, endothelium, and inflammatory cells. Three forms of NOS (eNOS, bNOS, and iNOS) were expressed in experimentally induced inflammation. In the fibroblast culture system, the NO donor (SNAP, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine) prevented the death of corneal fibroblast cells caused by serum deprivation in a dose dependent manner up to 500 micrometer SNAP, but a higher dose decreased cell viability. This study suggested that NO might act as a double-edged sword in ocular surface diseases depending on the degree of inflammation related with NO concentration. PMID:12068145

  9. Effects of benzalkonium chloride-preserved, polyquad-preserved, and sofZia-preserved topical glaucoma medications on human ocular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ammar, David A; Noecker, Robert J; Kahook, Malik Y

    2010-11-01

    INTRODUCTION|: To investigate potentially adverse effects of different topical glaucoma medications and preservatives on cultured ocular epithelial cells. METHODS|: Confluent cultures of human corneal (10.014 pRSV-T) and conjunctival cells (1-5c-4) were assayed with 100 μL of different glaucoma medications for 25 minutes at 37°C and 5% CO₂. We also tested the preservative sofZia® (Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX, USA), as well as a range of concentrations of the preservative benzalkonium chloride (BAK; 0.001% to 0.050%). Balanced salt solution was used as the "live" control and a solution containing 70% methanol and 0.2% saponin was used as a "dead" control. The LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) was used to determine the percentage of dead and live cells via ethidium homodimer and calcein fluorescence, respectively. RESULTS|: The toxicity of the prostaglandin analogs latanoprost, tafluprost and travoprost preserved with BAK was similar to the toxicity observed in their respective BAK concentrations. The prostaglandin analog travoprost (0.004%) preserved with the oxidizing preservative sofZia had much greater corneal and conjunctival cell survival than travoprost preserved with BAK. Travoprost (0.004%) containing polyquad also performed statistically better than its BAK-preserved formulation. CONCLUSION|: Ocular surface side effects have previously been demonstrated with chronic, long-term exposure to intraocular pressure-lowering medications containing the common preservative BAK. BAK alone has significant in-vitro cytotoxicity to cultured ocular epithelial cells. Substitution of BAK with polyquad or sofZia resulted in significantly higher percentages of live conjunctival and corneal cells. Further studies are needed to understand the- clinical implications of these findings. PMID:20931366

  10. Toxicity analysis of ocular prosthesis acrylic resin with or without pigment incorporation in human conjunctival cell line.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha de

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pigment incorporation on the cytotoxicity of ocular prosthesis N1 color acrylic resin. Nine samples were manufactured by heat-polymerization in water bath and divided into 3 groups: acrylic resin without pigment incorporation (group R), acrylic resin with pigment incorporation (group RP), and acrylic pigment (group P). Eluates formed after 72h of sample immersion in medium were incubated with conjunctival cell line (Chang conjunctival cells) for 72h. The negative control group consisted in medium without samples (group C). The cytotoxic effect from the eluates was evaluated using MTT assay (cell proliferation), ELISA assay (quantification of IL1β, IL6, TNF α and CCL3/MIP1α) and RT-PCR assay (mRNA expression of COL IV, TGF β and MMP9). Data were submitted to ANOVA with Bonferroni post-tests (p<0.05). All groups were considered non-cytotoxic based on cell proliferation. However, resin with pigment incorporation showed significant IL6 quantity increase. Resin without pigment incorporation exhibited higher mRNA expression of COL IV, MMP9 and TGF β, however it was also observed for the negative control group. The materials exhibited divergent biological behavior. Despite the pigment incorporation that resulted in an increase of IL6, no cytotoxicity was observed based on cell proliferation. PMID:27521695

  11. Ocular surface reconstruction using stem cell and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro; Inatomi, Tsutomu; Sotozono, Chie; Koizumi, Noriko; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    Most human sensory information is gained through eyesight, and integrity of the ocular surface, including cornea and conjunctiva, is known to be indispensable for good vision. It is believed that severe damage to corneal epithelial stem cells results in devastating ocular surface disease, and many researchers and scientists have tried to reconstruct the ocular surface using medical and surgical approaches. Ocular surface reconstruction via regenerative therapy is a newly developed medical field that promises to be the next generation of therapeutic modalities, based on the use of tissue-specific stem cells to generate biological substitutes and improve tissue functions. The accomplishment of these objectives depends on three key factors: stem cells, which have highly proliferative capacities and longevities; the substrates determining the environmental niche; and growth factors that support them appropriately. This manuscript describes the diligent development of ocular surface reconstruction using tissue engineering techniques, both past and present, and discusses and validates their future use for regenerative therapy in this field. PMID:26187034

  12. Transforming ocular surface stem cell research into successful clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Virender S; Jain, Rajat; Basu, Sayan; Bagadi, Anupam B; Sureka, Shraddha; Mariappan, Indumathi; MacNeil, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    It has only been a quarter of a century since the discovery of adult stem cells at the human corneo-scleral limbus. These limbal stem cells are responsible for generating a constant and unending supply of corneal epithelial cells throughout life, thus maintaining a stable and uniformly refractive corneal surface. Establishing this hitherto unknown association between ocular surface disease and limbal dysfunction helped usher in therapeutic approaches that successfully addressed blinding conditions such as ocular burns, which were previously considered incurable. Subsequent advances in ocular surface biology through basic science research have translated into innovations that have made the surgical technique of limbal stem cell transplantation simpler and more predictable. This review recapitulates the basic biology of the limbus and the rationale and principles of limbal stem cell transplantation in ocular surface disease. An evidence-based algorithm is presented, which is tailored to clinical considerations such as laterality of affliction, severity of limbal damage and concurrent need for other procedures. Additionally, novel findings in the form of factors influencing the survival and function of limbal stem cells after transplantation and the possibility of substituting limbal cells with epithelial stem cells of other lineages is also discussed. Finally this review focuses on the future directions in which both basic science and clinical research in this field is headed. PMID:24492499

  13. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-γ– and TNF-α–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P < 0.015). Conclusions. The results of this preclinical trial support the screening strategy used to select the HSV-1 ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitopes, emphasize their valuable immunogenic and protective efficacy against ocular herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  14. Ocular Stem Cell Research from Basic Science to Clinical Application: A Report from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Hong; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Chen, Shuyi; Li, Wei; Xu, Guo-Tong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Kang; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Liu, Yizhi; Xie, Ting; Chan, Chi-Chao; Zack, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise for treating a wide variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders of the eye. The eye is an ideal organ for stem cell therapy because of its relative immunological privilege, surgical accessibility, and its being a self-contained system. The eye also has many potential target diseases amenable to stem cell-based treatment, such as corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among them, AMD and glaucoma are the two most common diseases, affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recent results on the clinical trial of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in treating dry AMD and Stargardt’s disease in the US, Japan, England, and China have generated great excitement and hope. This marks the beginning of the ocular stem cell therapy era. The recent Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium discussed the potential applications of various stem cell types in stem cell-based therapies, drug discoveries and tissue engineering for treating ocular diseases. PMID:27102165

  15. Plasticity of the human otolith-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Smith, T. R.; Furman, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The eye movement response to earth vertical axis rotation in the dark, a semicircular canal stimulus, can be altered by prior exposure to combined visual-vestibular stimuli. Such plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has not been described for earth horizontal axis rotation, a dynamic otolith stimulus. Twenty normal human subjects underwent one of two types of adaptation paradigms designed either to attenuate or enhance the gain of the semicircular canal-ocular reflex prior to undergoing otolith-ocular reflex testing with horizontal axis rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stripe pattern that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity. Pre- and post-adaptation horizontal axis rotations were at 60 degrees/s in the dark and produced a modulation in the slow component velocity of nystagmus having a frequency of 0.17 Hz due to putative stimulation of the otolith organs. Results showed that the magnitude of this modulation component response was altered in a manner similar to the alteration in semicircular canal-ocular responses. These results suggest that physiologic alteration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex using deliberately mismatched visual and semicircular canal stimuli induces changes in both canal-ocular and otolith-ocular responses. We postulate, therefore, that central nervous system pathways responsible for controlling the gains of canal-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes are shared.

  16. Proteomics Analysis of Molecular Risk Factors in the Ocular Hypertensive Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiangjun; Hondur, Gözde; Li, Ming; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Tezel, Gülgün

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To better understand ocular hypertension–induced early molecular alterations that may determine the initiation of neurodegeneration in human glaucoma, this study analyzed retinal proteomic alterations in the ocular hypertensive human retina. Methods Retina samples were obtained from six human donors with ocular hypertension (without glaucomatous injury) and six age- and sex-matched normotensive controls. Retinal proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography and linear ion trap mass spectrometry) using oxygen isotope labeling for relative quantification of protein expression. Proteomics data were validated by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of selected proteins. Results Out of over 2000 retinal proteins quantified, hundreds exhibited over 2-fold increased or decreased expression in ocular hypertensive samples relative to normotensive controls. Bioinformatics linked the proteomics datasets to various pathways important for maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the ocular hypertensive retina. Upregulated proteins included various heat shock proteins, ubiquitin proteasome pathway components, antioxidants, and DNA repair enzymes, while many proteins involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation exhibited downregulation in the ocular hypertensive retina. Despite the altered protein expression reflecting intrinsic adaptive/protective responses against mitochondrial energy failure, oxidative stress, and unfolded proteins, no alterations suggestive of an ongoing cell death process or neuroinflammation were detectable. Conclusions This study provides information about ocular hypertension–related molecular risk factors for glaucoma development. Molecular alterations detected in the ocular hypertensive human retina as opposed to previously detected alterations in human donor retinas with clinically manifest glaucoma suggest that proteome alterations determine the individual threshold to tolerate the ocular

  17. ELECTRICAL SIGNALING IN CONTROL OF OCULAR CELL BEHAVIORS

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Chalmers, Laura; Cao, Lin; Viera, Ana C.; Mannis, Mark; Reid, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Epithelia of the cornea, lens and retina contain a vast array of ion channels and pumps. Together they produce a polarized flow of ions in and out of cells, as well as across the epithelia. These naturally occurring ion fluxes are essential to the hydration and metabolism of the ocular tissues, especially for the avascular cornea and lens. The directional transport of ions generates electric fields and currents in those tissues. Applied electric fields affect migration, division and proliferation of ocular cells which are important in homeostasis and healing of the ocular tissues. Abnormalities in any of those aspects may underlie many ocular diseases, for example chronic corneal ulcers, posterior capsule opacity after cataract surgery, and retinopathies. Electric field-inducing cellular responses, termed electrical signaling here, therefore may be an unexpected yet powerful mechanism in regulating ocular cell behavior. Both endogenous electric fields and applied electric fields could be exploited to regulate ocular cells. We aim to briefly describe the physiology of the naturally occurring electrical activities in the corneal, lens, and retinal epithelia, to provide experimental evidence of the effects of electric fields on ocular cell behaviors, and to suggest possible clinical implications. PMID:22020127

  18. An Update on Ocular Surface Epithelial Stem Cells: Cornea and Conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Tiago; Scott, Deborah; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    The human ocular surface (front surface of the eye) is formed by two different types of epithelia: the corneal epithelium centrally and the conjunctival epithelium that surrounds this. These two epithelia are maintained by different stem cell populations (limbal stem cells for the corneal epithelium and the conjunctival epithelial stem cells). In this review, we provide an update on our understanding of these epithelia and their stem cells systems, including embryology, new markers, and controversy around the location of these stem cells. We also provide an update on the translation of this understanding into clinical applications for the treatment of debilitating ocular surface diseases. PMID:26146504

  19. Porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 and Chlamydia suis to modelize ocular chlamydiosis.

    PubMed

    Käser, Tobias; Cnudde, Thomas; Hamonic, Glenn; Rieder, Meghanne; Pasternak, J Alex; Lai, Ken; Tikoo, Suresh K; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, François

    2015-08-15

    Human ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections can lead to trachoma, the major cause of infectious blindness worldwide. Trachoma control strategies are very helpful but logistically challenging, and a trachoma vaccine is needed but not available. Pigs are a valuable large animal model for various immunological questions and could facilitate the study of human ocular chlamydial infections. In addition, a recent study identified the zoonotic potential of Chlamydia suis, the natural pathogen of pigs. In terms of the One Health Initiative, understanding the host-pathogen-interactions and finding a vaccine for porcine chlamydia infections would also benefit human health. Thus, we infected the porcine retinal cell line VIDO R1 with C. suis and analyzed the chlamydial life cycle and the innate immune response of the infected cells. Our results indicate that C. suis completes its life cycle in VIDO R1 cells within 48 h, comparable to C. trachomatis in humans. C. suis infection of VIDO R1 cells led to increased levels of various innate immune mediators like pathogen recognition receptors, cytokines and chemokines including IL6, TNFα, and MMP9, also most relevant in human C. trachomatis infections. These results illustrate the first steps in the host-pathogen-interactions of ocular C. suis infections in pigs and show their similarity to C. trachomatis infections in humans, justifying further testing of pigs as an animal model for human trachoma. PMID:26103808

  20. Transplant related ocular surface disorders: Advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation after ocular complications secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Erin D; Mahomed, Faheem; Hans, Amneet K; Dalal, Jignesh D

    2016-05-01

    HSCT has been linked to the development of an assortment of ocular surface complications with the potential to lead to permanent visual impairment if left untreated or if not treated early in the course of disease. Strategies for therapy include maintenance of lubrication and tear preservation, prevention of evaporation, decreasing inflammation, and providing epithelial support. The ultimate aim of treatment is to prevent permanent ocular sequelae through prompt ophthalmology consultation and the use of advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation. We describe several rehabilitation options of ocular surface complications occurring secondarily during the post-HSCT course. PMID:26869458

  1. Characterization of full-length recombinant human Proteoglycan 4 as an ocular surface boundary lubricant.

    PubMed

    Samsom, Michael L; Morrison, Sheila; Masala, Nemanja; Sullivan, Benjamin D; Sullivan, David A; Sheardown, Heather; Schmidt, Tannin A

    2014-10-01

    Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4, or lubricin) is a lubricating mucin-like glycoprotein recently discovered at the ocular surface, where it functions as a boundary lubricant and appears to play a protective role. Recent technological advances have enabled abundant expression of full-length recombinant human PRG4 (rhPRG4). The objectives of this study were to 1) biochemically characterize the gross structure and glycosylations of full-length rhPRG4, and 2) assess the ocular surface boundary lubricating ability of rhPRG4 at both human cornea-eyelid and human cornea-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) biointerfaces. rhPRG4 expressed by a Chinese hamster ovary cell line was characterized and compared to native bovine PRG4 by SDS-PAGE western blotting, and protein identity was assessed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Human corneas were articulated against PDMS or human eyelids, at effective sliding velocities of 0.3-30 mm/s under physiological loads of ∼15 kPa, to assess and compare the ocular lubricating ability of rhPRG4 to PRG4. Samples were tested serially in PRG4, rhPRG4 (both 300 μg/ml), then saline. Western blotting indicated that rhPRG4 had immunoreactivity at the appropriate apparent molecular weight, and possessed O-linked glycosylation consistent with that of PRG4. rhPRG4 protein identity was confirmed by MS/MS. Both PRG4 and rhPRG4 significantly, and similarly, reduced friction compared to saline at both human cornea - PDMS and human cornea-eyelid biointerfaces. In conclusion, the rhPRG4 studied here demonstrated appropriate higher order structure, O-linked glycosylations, and ocular surface boundary lubricating. Purified rhPRG4 may have clinical utility as a topical treatment of dry eye disease or contact lens biomaterial coating to promote more comfortable wear. PMID:24997456

  2. A simplified technique for in situ excision of cornea and evisceration of retinal tissue from human ocular globe.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Camposampiero, Davide; Karali, Marianthi; Ponzin, Diego; Salvalaio, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    Enucleation is the process of retrieving the ocular globe from a cadaveric donor leaving the rest of the globe undisturbed. Excision refers to the retrieval of ocular tissues, especially cornea, by cutting it separate from the ocular globe. Evisceration is the process of removing the internal organs referred here as retina. The ocular globe consists of the cornea, the sclera, the vitreous body, the lens, the iris, the retina, the choroid, muscles etc (Suppl. Figure 1). When a patient is suffering from corneal damage, the cornea needs to be removed and a healthy one must be transplanted by keratoplastic surgeries. Genetic disorders or defects in retinal function can compromise vision. Human ocular globes can be used for various surgical procedures such as eye banking, transplantation of human cornea or sclera and research on ocular tissues. However, there is little information available on human corneal and retinal excision, probably due to the limited accessibility to human tissues. Most of the studies describing similar procedures are performed on animal models. Research scientists rely on the availability of properly dissected and well-conserved ocular tissues in order to extend the knowledge on human eye development, homeostasis and function. As we receive high amount of ocular globes out of which approximately 40% (Table 1) of them are used for research purposes, we are able to perform huge amount of experiments on these tissues, defining techniques to excise and preserve them regularly. The cornea is an avascular tissue which enables the transmission of light onto the retina and for this purpose should always maintain a good degree of transparency. Within the cornea, the limbus region, which is a reservoir of the stem cells, helps the reconstruction of epithelial cells and restricts the overgrowth of the conjunctiva maintaining corneal transparency and clarity. The size and thickness of the cornea are critical for clear vision, as changes in either of them

  3. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Xue; Wang, Ning-Li; Lu, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology. PMID:26086019

  4. Influence of substrate on corneal epithelial cell viability within ocular surface models.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yun; Foster, James; Mi, Shengli; Chen, Bo; Connon, Che John

    2012-08-01

    Corneal tissue engineering has improved dramatically over recent years. It is now possible to apply these technological advancements to the development of superior in vitro ocular surface models to reduce animal testing. We aim to show the effect different substrates can have on the viability of expanded corneal epithelial cells and that those which more accurately mimic the stromal surface provide the most protection against toxic assault. Compressed collagen gel as a substrate for the expansion of a human epithelial cell line was compared against two well-known substrates for modelling the ocular surface (polycarbonate membrane and conventional collagen gel). Cells were expanded over 10 days at which point cell stratification, cell number and expression of junctional proteins were assessed by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The effect of increasing concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate on epithelial cell viability was quantified by MTT assay. Results showed improvement in terms of stratification, cell number and tight junction expression in human epithelial cells expanded upon either the polycarbonate membrane or compressed collagen gel when compared to a the use of a conventional collagen gel. However, cell viability was significantly higher in cells expanded upon the compressed collagen gel. We conclude that the more naturalistic composition and mechanical properties of compressed collagen gels produces a more robust corneal model. PMID:22683913

  5. Coxsackievirus A24 Variant Uses Sialic Acid-Containing O-Linked Glycoconjugates as Cellular Receptors on Human Ocular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Nitesh; Inoue, Hirotoshi; Jamshidi, Fariba; Storm, Rickard J.; Oberste, M. Steven; Arnberg, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v) is a main causative agent of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC), which is a highly contagious eye infection. Previously it has been suggested that CVA24v uses sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates as attachment receptors on corneal cells, but the nature of these receptors is poorly described. Here, we set out to characterize and identify the cellular components serving as receptors for CVA24v. Binding and infection experiments using corneal cells treated with deglycosylating enzymes or metabolic inhibitors of de novo glycosylation suggested that the receptor(s) used by CVA24v are constituted by sialylated O-linked glycans that are linked to one or more cell surface proteins but not to lipids. CVA24v bound better to mouse L929 cells overexpressing human P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) than to mock-transfected cells, suggesting that PSGL-1 is a candidate receptor for CVA24v. Finally, binding competition experiments using a library of mono- and oligosaccharides mimicking known PSGL-1 glycans suggested that CVA24v binds to Neu5Acα2,3Gal disaccharides (Neu5Ac is N-acetylneuraminic acid). These results provide further insights into the early steps of the CVA24v life cycle. PMID:21880775

  6. Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis-Causing Adenoviruses Induce MUC16 Ectodomain Release To Infect Ocular Surface Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Menon, Balaraj B; Zhou, Xiaohong; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James; Gipson, Ilene K

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV), species D in particular (HAdV-D), are frequently associated with epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). Although the infection originates at the ocular surface epithelium, the mechanisms by which HAdV-Ds bypass the membrane-associated mucin (MAM)-rich glycocalyx of the ocular surface epithelium to trigger infection and inflammation remain unknown. Here, we report that an EKC-causing adenovirus (HAdV-D37), but not a non-EKC-causing one (HAdV-D19p), induces ectodomain release of MUC16-a MAM with barrier functions at the ocular surface-from cultured human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. HAdV-D37, but not HAdV-D19p, is also found to decrease the glycocalyx barrier function of corneal epithelial cells, as determined by rose bengal dye penetrance assays. Furthermore, results from quantitative PCR (qPCR) amplification of viral genomic DNA using primers specific to a conserved region of the E1B gene show that, in comparison to infection by HAdV-D19p, infection by HAdV-D37 is significantly increased in corneal epithelial cells. Collectively, these results point to a MUC16 ectodomain release-dependent mechanism utilized by the EKC-causing HAdV-D37 to initiate infection at the ocular surface. These findings are important in terms of understanding the pathogenesis of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Similar MAM ectodomain release mechanisms may be prevalent across other mucosal epithelia in the body (e.g., the airway epithelium) that are prone to adenoviral infection. IMPORTANCE Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses that cause infections across all mucosal tissues in the body. At the ocular surface, HAdVs cause keratoconjunctivitis (E. Ford, K. E. Nelson, and D. Warren, Epidemiol Rev 9:244-261, 1987, and C. M. Robinson, D. Seto, M. S. Jones, D. W. Dyer, and J. Chodosh, Infect Genet Evol 11:1208-1217, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2011.04.031)-a highly contagious infection that accounts for nearly 60% of conjunctivitis cases

  7. Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis-Causing Adenoviruses Induce MUC16 Ectodomain Release To Infect Ocular Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohong; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James; Gipson, Ilene K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenoviruses (HAdV), species D in particular (HAdV-D), are frequently associated with epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). Although the infection originates at the ocular surface epithelium, the mechanisms by which HAdV-Ds bypass the membrane-associated mucin (MAM)-rich glycocalyx of the ocular surface epithelium to trigger infection and inflammation remain unknown. Here, we report that an EKC-causing adenovirus (HAdV-D37), but not a non-EKC-causing one (HAdV-D19p), induces ectodomain release of MUC16—a MAM with barrier functions at the ocular surface—from cultured human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. HAdV-D37, but not HAdV-D19p, is also found to decrease the glycocalyx barrier function of corneal epithelial cells, as determined by rose bengal dye penetrance assays. Furthermore, results from quantitative PCR (qPCR) amplification of viral genomic DNA using primers specific to a conserved region of the E1B gene show that, in comparison to infection by HAdV-D19p, infection by HAdV-D37 is significantly increased in corneal epithelial cells. Collectively, these results point to a MUC16 ectodomain release-dependent mechanism utilized by the EKC-causing HAdV-D37 to initiate infection at the ocular surface. These findings are important in terms of understanding the pathogenesis of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Similar MAM ectodomain release mechanisms may be prevalent across other mucosal epithelia in the body (e.g., the airway epithelium) that are prone to adenoviral infection. IMPORTANCE Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses that cause infections across all mucosal tissues in the body. At the ocular surface, HAdVs cause keratoconjunctivitis (E. Ford, K. E. Nelson, and D. Warren, Epidemiol Rev 9:244–261, 1987, and C. M. Robinson, D. Seto, M. S. Jones, D. W. Dyer, and J. Chodosh, Infect Genet Evol 11:1208–1217, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2011.04.031)—a highly contagious infection that accounts for nearly 60% of

  8. Ocular findings in human immunodeficiency virus patients in Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Kaleem, Mona A; Ramsahai, Shweta; Del Fierro, Katrina; Rasul, Samad; Onumah, Chavon; Lerebours, Valerie; Gajjala, Jhansi; Copeland, Robert A; Jones, Leslie S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of ocular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in Washington, DC in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This was a cross-sectional study of patients with HIV who were seen by the ophthalmology consultation service between September 2003 and May 2011 at a single academic institution in Washington, DC. Medical history and ophthalmic findings were reviewed. Patients with complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination were included. Descriptive statistics were performed. The records of 151 patients were included in the final analysis. All patients had complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination. Sixty-eight (45 %) patients and fifty-eight (50 %) of those with a diagnosis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. The leading anterior segment disease was herpes zoster ophthalmicus and the leading posterior segment disease was HIV retinopathy. Of the 151 included patients, 78 (52 %) were receiving HAART at the time of the examination. Thirty-one (42 %) of those not receiving HAART were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. In this study, we find that the overall prevalence of ocular disease has decreased since the introduction of HAART. However, HIV patients continue to be predisposed to developing ophthalmic disease at higher rates than the general population. Visual dysfunction remains an important source of morbidity in HIV patients, particularly in those with AIDS. Measures for improvement include increased communication between infectious disease specialists and ophthalmologists to ensure adherence to HAART and routine eye examinations. PMID:22450559

  9. Ocular input for human melatonin regulation: relevance to breast cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Levin, Robert; Brainard, George C.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer on women across the world has been extensive and severe. As prevalence of breast cancer is greatest in industrialized regions, exposure to light at night has been proposed as a potential risk factor. This theory is supported by the epidemiological observations of decreased breast cancer in blind women and increased breast cancer in women who do shift-work. In addition, human, animal and in vitro studies which have investigated the melatonin-cancer dynamic indicate an apparent relationship between light, melatonin and cancer, albeit complex. Recent developments in understanding melatonin regulation by light in humans are examined, with particular attention to factors that contribute to the sensitivity of the light-induced melatonin suppression response. Specifically, the role of spectral characteristics of light is addressed, and recent relevant action spectrum studies in humans and other mammalian species are discussed. Across five action spectra for circadian and other non-visual responses, a peak sensitivity between 446-484 nm was identified. Under highly controlled exposure circumstances, less than 1 lux of monochromatic light elicited a significant suppression of nocturnal melatonin. In view of the possible link between light exposure, melatonin suppression and cancer risk, it is important to continue to identify the basic related ocular physiology. Visual performance, rather than circadian function, has been the primary focus of architectural lighting systems. It is now necessary to reevaluate lighting strategies, with consideration of circadian influences, in an effort to maximize physiological homeostasis and health.

  10. Genetic diversity of Dirofilaria spp. isolated from subcutaneous and ocular lesions of human patients in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alice; Peix, Álvaro; Pavlikovskaya, Tamara; Sagach, Olga; Nikolaenko, Svetlana; Chizh, Nina; Kartashev, Vladimir; Simón, Fernando; Siles-Lucas, Mar

    2015-02-01

    This short communication describes the phylogenetic analysis of 48 Dirofilaria worms isolated from human patients in Ukraine. 102 cases were both of subcutaneous (47; 46.1%) and ocular (54; 52.9%) locations. Worms from 44 patients (15 subcutaneous and 29 ocular) were subjected to DNA extraction and amplification of a specific fragment of the 12S rRNA subunit, and sequences were used for phylogenetic analysis. Results showed that 13.8% of the ocular cases analyzed at molecular level were caused by Dirofilaria immitis. Very few cases of ocular human dirofilariosis due to D. immitis have been described in the literature to date, majority of them attributed to Dirofilaria repens. Our results show that ocular dirofilariosis cannot be excluded in areas of low endemicity for D. repens were D. immitis is also present. PMID:25447827

  11. Ocular surface stem cells and disease: current concepts and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ang, L P K; Tan, D T H

    2004-09-01

    Corneal and conjunctival epithelial stem cells are responsible for the homeostasis and regeneration of the ocular surface epithelium. Corneal epithelial stem cells reside in the basal region of the limbus, while the conjunctival forniceal region appears to be the site that is enriched in conjunctival stem cells. Ocular surface disease arising from limbal stem cell deficiency is characterised by persistent epithelial defects, corneal vascularisation, chronic inflammation, scarring and conjunctivalisation, resulting in visual loss. Limbal stem cell transplantation replaces the corneal stem cell population in these eyes with the hope of restoring vision. More recently, the use of bioengineered ocular surface tissue-equivalents has had promising results, and may represent the future for replacement and regeneration of ocular tissues in various ocular disorders. PMID:15531952

  12. Heterogeneity and persistence length in human ocular mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Round, A N; Berry, M; McMaster, T J; Stoll, S; Gowers, D; Corfield, A P; Miles, M J

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the heterogeneity and flexibility of human ocular mucins and their subunits. We have paid particular attention, in terms of theory and experiment, to the problem of inducing the polymers to assume equilibrium conformations at a surface. Mucins deposited from a buffer containing Ni(2+) ions adopt extended conformations on mica akin to those observed for DNA under similar conditions. The heterogeneity of the intracellular native mucins is evident from a histogram of contour lengths, reflecting, in part, the diversity of mucin gene products expressed. Reduction of the native mucin with dithiothreitol, thereby breaking the S==S bonds between cysteine residues, causes a marked reduction in polymer length. These results reflect the modes of transport and assembly of newly synthesized mucins in vivo. By modifying the worm-like chain model for applicability to two dimensions, we have confirmed that under the conditions employed mucin adsorbs to mica in an equilibrated conformation. The determined persistence length of the native mucin, 36 nm, is consistent with that of an extended, flexible polymer; such characteristics will influence the properties of the gels formed in vivo. PMID:12202389

  13. Ocular accommodative changes in humans induced by positional changes with respect to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, C. H.; Diamond, S. G.; Simpson, N. E.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study concerning ocular accommodation measurements in normal human subjects while they were rotated at a speed of 1 deg/sec about their naso-occipital axis. A few rotations were done about an interaural axis. It is shown that altering the head position with respect to gravity is followed by a change in ocular refraction, with the major change being in a lens-thickening or accommodative direction. Reasons for ascribing these changes to reflex changes in ocular accommodation are given. Arguments are presented relating this accommodative response to the utricles, which are nearly parallel to the earth horizontal.

  14. Potential Role of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (IPSCs) for Cell-Based Therapy of the Ocular Surface.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Nieto-Nicolau, Núria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M; Edel, Michael; B Álvarez-Palomo, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are crucial for maintaining the cornea's transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio replacement-cultured limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET) and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET)-present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) and restoring vision. Another emerging therapeutic approach consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins in association with tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal or induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), represent a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases, offering a more rational, less invasive, and better physiological treatment option in regenerative medicine for the ocular surface. This review will focus on the main concepts of cell-based therapies for the ocular surface and the future use of IPSCs to treat LSCD. PMID:26239129

  15. Potential Role of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (IPSCs) for Cell-Based Therapy of the Ocular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P.; Nieto-Nicolau, Núria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M.; Edel, Michael; Álvarez-Palomo, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are crucial for maintaining the cornea’s transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio replacement—cultured limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET) and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET)—present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) and restoring vision. Another emerging therapeutic approach consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins in association with tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal or induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), represent a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases, offering a more rational, less invasive, and better physiological treatment option in regenerative medicine for the ocular surface. This review will focus on the main concepts of cell-based therapies for the ocular surface and the future use of IPSCs to treat LSCD. PMID:26239129

  16. Topographical Control of Ocular Cell Types for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Kevin J.; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Tao, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Visual impairment affects over 285 million people worldwide and has a major impact on an individual’s quality of life. Tissue engineering has the potential to increase quality of life for many of these patients by preventing vision loss or restoring vision using cell-based therapies. However, these strategies will require an understanding of the microenvironmental factors that influence cell behavior. The eye is a well-organized organ whose structural complexity is essential for proper function. Interactions between ocular cells and their highly ordered extracellular matrix are necessary for maintaining key tissue properties including corneal transparency and retinal lamination. Therefore, it is not surprising that culturing these cells in vitro on traditional flat substrates result in irregular morphology. Instead, topographically patterned biomaterials better mimic native extracellular matrix and have been shown to elicit in vivo-like morphology and gene expression which is essential for tissue engineering. Herein we review multiple methods for producing well-controlled topography and discuss optimal biomaterial scaffold design for cells of the cornea, retina, and lens. PMID:23744715

  17. Antimicrobial efficacy and ocular cell toxicity from silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Colleen M.; Duchsherer, Nicole L.

    2009-01-01

    Silver in various forms has long been recognized for antimicrobial properties, both in biomedical devices and in eyes. However, soluble drugs used on the ocular surface are rapidly cleared through tear ducts and eventually ingested, resulting in decreased efficacy of the drug on its target tissue and potential concern for systemic side effects. Silver nanoparticles were studied as a source of anti-microbial silver for possible controlled-release contact lens controlled delivery formulations. Silver ion release over a period of several weeks from nanoparticle sources of various sizes and doses in vitro was evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA01. Mammalian cell viability and cytokine expression in response to silver nanoparticle exposure is evaluated using corneal epithelial cells and eye-associated macrophages cultured in vitro in serum-free media. Minimal microcidal and cell toxic effects were observed for several silver nanoparticle suspensions and aqueous extraction times for bulk total silver concentrations commensurate with comparative silver ion (e.g., Ag+(aq)) toxicity. This indicates that (1) silver particles themselves are not microcidal under conditions tested, and (2) insufficient silver ion is generated from these particles at these loadings to produce observable biological effects in these in vitro assays. If dosing allows substantially increased silver particle loading in the lens, the bactericidal efficacy of silver nanoparticles in vitro is one possible approach to limiting bacterial colonization problems associated with extended-wear contact lenses. PMID:19865601

  18. Therapeutic Immunization with a Mixture of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein D-Derived “Asymptomatic” Human CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes Decreases Spontaneous Ocular Shedding in Latently Infected HLA Transgenic Rabbits: Association with Low Frequency of Local PD-1+ TIM-3+ CD8+ Exhausted T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Geertsema, Roger; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Dasgupta, Gargi; Osorio, Nelson; Kalantari, Mina; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most blinding ocular herpetic disease is due to reactivation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) from latency rather than to primary acute infection. No herpes simplex vaccine is currently available for use in humans. In this study, we used the HLA-A*02:01 transgenic (HLA Tg) rabbit model of ocular herpes to assess the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine based on HSV-1 gD epitopes that are recognized mainly by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HLA-A*02:01-positive, HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitopes (gD53–61, gD70–78, and gD278–286) were linked with a promiscuous CD4+ T-cell epitope (gD287–317) to create 3 separate pairs of CD4-CD8 peptides, which were then each covalently coupled to an Nε-palmitoyl-lysine moiety, a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) ligand. This resulted in the construction of 3 CD4-CD8 lipopeptide vaccines. Latently infected HLA Tg rabbits were immunized with a mixture of these 3 ASYMP lipopeptide vaccines, delivered as eye drops in sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The ASYMP therapeutic vaccination (i) induced HSV-specific CD8+ T cells that prevent HSV-1 reactivation ex vivo from latently infected explanted trigeminal ganglia (TG), (ii) significantly reduced HSV-1 shedding detected in tears, (iii) boosted the number and function of HSV-1 gD epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in draining lymph nodes (DLN), conjunctiva, and TG, and (iv) was associated with fewer exhausted HSV-1 gD-specific PD-1+ TIM-3+ CD8+ T cells. The results underscore the potential of an ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitope-based therapeutic vaccine strategy against recurrent ocular herpes. IMPORTANCE Seventy percent to 90% of adults harbor herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which establishes lifelong latency in sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. This latent state sporadically switches to spontaneous reactivation, resulting in viral shedding in tears. Most

  19. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  20. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Ocular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Padma Priya; Syed, Sakinah; Mok, Pooi-Ling; Higuchi, Akon; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Awang Hamat, Rukman; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Sustenance of visual function is the ultimate focus of ophthalmologists. Failure of complete recovery of visual function and complications that follow conventional treatments have shifted search to a new form of therapy using stem cells. Stem cell progenitors play a major role in replenishing degenerated cells despite being present in low quantity and quiescence in our body. Unlike other tissues and cells, regeneration of new optic cells responsible for visual function is rarely observed. Understanding the transcription factors and genes responsible for optic cells development will assist scientists in formulating a strategy to activate and direct stem cells renewal and differentiation. We review the processes of human eye development and address the strategies that have been exploited in an effort to regain visual function in the preclinical and clinical state. The update of clinical findings of patients receiving stem cell treatment is also presented. PMID:27293447

  1. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Ocular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Padma Priya; Syed, Sakinah; Mok, Pooi-Ling; Higuchi, Akon; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.; Awang Hamat, Rukman; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Sustenance of visual function is the ultimate focus of ophthalmologists. Failure of complete recovery of visual function and complications that follow conventional treatments have shifted search to a new form of therapy using stem cells. Stem cell progenitors play a major role in replenishing degenerated cells despite being present in low quantity and quiescence in our body. Unlike other tissues and cells, regeneration of new optic cells responsible for visual function is rarely observed. Understanding the transcription factors and genes responsible for optic cells development will assist scientists in formulating a strategy to activate and direct stem cells renewal and differentiation. We review the processes of human eye development and address the strategies that have been exploited in an effort to regain visual function in the preclinical and clinical state. The update of clinical findings of patients receiving stem cell treatment is also presented. PMID:27293447

  2. Inter-ocular contrast normalization in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Farshad; Heeger, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The brain combines visual information from the two eyes and forms a coherent percept, even when inputs to the eyes are different. However, it is not clear how inputs from the two eyes are combined in visual cortex. We measured fMRI responses to single gratings presented monocularly, or pairs of gratings presented monocularly or dichoptically with several combinations of contrasts. Gratings had either the same orientation or orthogonal orientations (i.e., plaids). Observers performed a demanding task at fixation to minimize top-down modulation of the stimulus-evoked responses. Dichoptic presentation of compatible gratings (same orientation) evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating only when contrast was low (<10%). A model that assumes linear summation of activity from each eye failed to explain binocular responses at 10% contrast or higher. However, a model with binocular contrast normalization, such that activity from each eye reduced the gain for the other eye, fitted the results very well. Dichoptic presentation of orthogonal gratings evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating for all contrasts. However, activity evoked by dichoptic plaids was equal to that evoked by monocular plaids. Introducing an onset asynchrony (stimulating one eye 500 ms before the other, which under attentive vision results in flash suppression) had no impact on the results; the responses to dichoptic and monocular plaids were again equal. We conclude that when attention is diverted, inter-ocular suppression in V1 can be explained by a normalization model in which the mutual suppression between orthogonal orientations does not depend on the eye of origin, nor on the onset times, and cross-orientation suppression is weaker than inter-ocular (same orientation) suppression. PMID:19757952

  3. Ocular pneumoplethysmography can help in the diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Bosley, T M; Savino, P J; Sergott, R C; Eagle, R C; Sandy, R; Gee, W

    1989-03-01

    We compared the results of ocular pneumoplethysmography in nine patients who had a temporal artery biopsy (TAB) diagnostic of giant-cell arteritis with results of ocular pneumoplethysmography in nine patients with normal TAB results and 112 patients with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy or central retinal artery occlusion assumed to be nonarteritic. The mean +/- SD ocular pulse amplitude with ocular pneumoplethysmography was 3.9 +/- 1.8 mm in the group with abnormal TAB results and 10.6 +/- 4.0 mm in the group with normal TAB results. Every patient with abnormal TAB results had an average calculated ocular blood flow less than 0.60 mL/min, while only one patient with normal TAB results fell in this range. The average calculated ocular blood flow had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 93.4% in the diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis, with a diagnostic accuracy of 93.9%. These results rival the diagnostic accuracy of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and TAB results. PMID:2923561

  4. Binocular Coordination of the Human Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Off-axis Pitch Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Kaufman, G. D.; Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Head movements in the sagittal pitch plane typically involve off-axis rotation requiring both vertical and horizontal vergence ocular reflexes to compensate for angular and translational motion relative to visual targets of interest. The purpose of this study was to compare passive pitch VOR responses during rotation about an Earth-vertical axis (canal only cues) with off-axis rotation (canal and otolith cues). Methods. Eleven human subjects were oscillated sinusoidally at 0.13, 0.3 and 0.56 Hz while lying left-side down with the interaural axis either aligned with the axis of rotation or offset by 50 cm. In a second set of measurements, twelve subjects were also tested during sinusoidally varying centrifugation over the same frequency range. The modulation of vertical and horizontal vergence ocular responses was measured with a binocular videography system. Results. Off-axis pitch rotation enhanced the vertical VOR at lower frequencies and enhanced the vergence VOR at higher frequencies. During sinusoidally varying centrifugation, the opposite trend was observed for vergence, with both vertical and vergence vestibulo-ocular reflexes being suppressed at the highest frequency. Discussion. These differential effects of off-axis rotation over the 0.13 to 0.56 Hz range are consistent with the hypothesis that otolith-ocular reflexes are segregated in part on the basis of stimulus frequency. At the lower frequencies, tilt otolith-ocular responses compensate for declining canal input. At higher frequencies, translational otolith-ocular reflexes compensate for declining visual contributions to the kinematic demands required for fixating near targets.

  5. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  6. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex during linear locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. T.; Hirasaki, E.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During locomotion, there is a translation and compensatory rotation of the head in both the vertical and horizontal planes. During moderate to fast walking (100 m/min), vertical head translation occurs at the frequency of stepping (2 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.37 g. Lateral head translation occurs at the stride frequency (1 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.1 g. Peak head pitch and yaw angular velocities are approximately 17 degrees/s. The frequency and magnitude of these head movements are within the operational range of both the linear and angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (IVOR and aVOR). Vertical eye movements undergo a phase reversal from near to far targets. When viewing a far (>1 m) target, vertical eye velocity is typical of an aVOR response; that is, it is compensatory for head pitch. At close viewing distances (<1 m), vertical eye velocity is in phase with head pitch and is compensatory for vertical head translation, suggesting that the IVOR predominantly generates the eye movement response. Horizontal head movements during locomotion occur at the stride frequency of 1 Hz, where the IVOR gain is low. Horizontal eye movements are compensatory for head yaw at all viewing distances and are likely generated by the aVOR.

  7. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  8. Ocular Fluid As a Replacement for Serum in Cell Cryopreservation Media

    PubMed Central

    Venna, Naresh Kumar; Murthy, Ch Lakshmi N.; Idris, Mohammed M.; Goel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Cryostorage is of immense interest in biomedical research, especially for stem cell-based therapies and fertility preservation. Several protocols have been developed for efficient cryopreservation of cells and tissues, and a combination of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) is commonly used. However, there is a need for an alternative to FBS because of ethical reasons, high cost, and risk of contamination with blood-borne diseases. The objective of the present study was to examine the possibility of using buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) ocular fluid (BuOF) to replace FBS in cryomedia. Frozen–thawed cells, which were cryopreserved in a cryomedia with BuOF, were assessed for viability, early and late apoptosis, and proliferation. Three cell lines (CHO, HEK, and C18-4), mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, and primary cells, such as mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs), and mouse bone marrow cells (mBMCs), were cryopreserved in cryomedia containing 10% DMSO (D10) with 20% FBS (D10S20) or D10 with 20% BuOF (D10O20). For all three cell lines and mES cells cryopreserved in either D10S20 or D10O20, thawed cells showed no difference in cell viability or cell recovery. Western blot analysis of frozen–thawed-cultured cells revealed that the expression of Annexin V and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins, and the ratio of BAX/BCL2 proteins were similar in all three cell lines, mES cells, and hPBMCs cryopreserved in D10S20 and D10O20. However, initial cell viability, cell recovery after culture, and PCNA expression were significantly lower in MEF cells, and the BAX/BCL2 protein ratio was elevated in mBMCs cryopreserved in D10O20. Biochemical and proteomic analysis of BuOF showed the presence of several components that may have roles in imparting the cryoprotective property of BuOF. These results encourage further research to develop an efficient serum-free cryomedia for several cell types using

  9. SMOC1 is essential for ocular and limb development in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ippei; Hamanoue, Haruka; Terada, Koji; Tohma, Takaya; Megarbane, Andre; Chouery, Eliane; Abou-Ghoch, Joelle; Jalkh, Nadine; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Horie, Kyoji; Takeda, Junji; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Miyatake, Satoko; Nishimura, Akira; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Niikawa, Norio; Hirahara, Fumiki; Kaname, Tadashi; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Furukawa, Takahisa; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo

    2011-01-01

    Microphthalmia with limb anomalies (MLA) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder, presenting with anophthalmia or microphthalmia and hand and/or foot malformation. We mapped the MLA locus to 14q24 and successfully identified three homozygous (one nonsense and two splice site) mutations in the SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine)-related modular calcium binding 1 (SMOC1) in three families. Smoc1 is expressed in the developing optic stalk, ventral optic cup, and limbs of mouse embryos. Smoc1 null mice recapitulated MLA phenotypes, including aplasia or hypoplasia of optic nerves, hypoplastic fibula and bowed tibia, and syndactyly in limbs. A thinned and irregular ganglion cell layer and atrophy of the anteroventral part of the retina were also observed. Soft tissue syndactyly, resulting from inhibited apoptosis, was related to disturbed expression of genes involved in BMP signaling in the interdigital mesenchyme. Our findings indicate that SMOC1/Smoc1 is essential for ocular and limb development in both humans and mice. PMID:21194678

  10. Age-related changes in human vestibulo-ocular reflexes: Sinusoidal rotation and caloric tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.; Schoenhoff, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were characterized in 216 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. The object of this cross-sectional study was to determine the effects of aging on VOR dynamics, and to identify the distributions of parameters which describe VOR responses to caloric and to sinusoidal rotational stimuli in a putatively normal population. Caloric test parameters showed no consistent trend with age. Rotation test parameters showed declining response amplitude and slightly less compensatory response phase with increasing age. The magnitudes of these changes were not large relative to the variability within the population. The age-related trends in VOR were not consistent with the anatomic changes in the periphery reported by others which showed an increasing rate of peripheral hair cell and nerve fiber loss in subjects over 55 years. The poor correlation between physiological and anatomical data suggest that adaptive mechanisms in the central nervous system are important in maintaining the VOR.

  11. Behavior of human horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex in response to high-acceleration stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maas, E. F.; Huebner, W. P.; Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during transient, high-acceleration (1900-7100 deg/sec-squared) head rotations was studied in four human subjects. Such stimuli perturbed the angle of gaze and caused illusory movement of a viewed target (oscillopsia). The disturbance of gaze could be attributed to the latency of the VOR (which ranged from 6-15 ms) and inadequate compensatory eye rotations (median VOR gain ranged from 0.61-0.83).

  12. Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal marginal zone lymphomas express self polyreactive B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D; Bhatt, S; Lu, X; Guo, F; Veelken, H; Hsu, D K; Liu, F-T; Alvarez Cubela, S; Kunkalla, K; Vega, F; Chapman-Fredricks, J R; Lossos, I S

    2015-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (OAEMZLs) is poorly understood. OAEMZLs are monoclonal tumors expressing a biased repertoire of mutated surface immunoglobulins. Antigenic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) may have a role in the pathogenesis of these lymphomas. We have analyzed the reactivity of recombinant OAEMZL immunoglobulins. OAEMZL antibodies reacted with self-human antigens, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, HEp-2 immunofluorescence and human protein microarrays. All the analyzed recombinant antibodies (rAbs) exhibited polyreactivity by comprehensive protein array antibody reactivity and some rAbs also demonstrated rheumatoid factor activity. The identity of several reactive antigens was confirmed by microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The tested rAbs frequently reacted with shared intracellular and extracellular self-antigens (for example, galectin-3). Furthermore, these self-antigens induced BCR signaling in B cells expressing cognate surface immunoglobulins derived from OAEMZLs. These findings indicate that interactions between self-antigens and cognate OAEMZL tumor-derived BCRs are functional, inducing intracellular signaling. Overall, our findings suggest that self-antigen-induced BCR stimulation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of C. psittaci-negative OAEMZLs. PMID:25676418

  13. Ocular Graft Versus Host Disease Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Review of Current Knowledge and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Nassiri, Nariman; Eslani, Medi; Panahi, Nekoo; Mehravaran, Shiva; Ziaei, Alireza; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2013-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a common complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Ocular GVHD develops in approximately 40-60% of patients following allo-SCT and its most common clinical manifestations include keratoconjunctivitis sicca and cicatricial conjunctivitis. Ocular GVHD may lead to severe ocular surface disease, which can significantly diminish quality of life and restrict daily activities. It is thus important to monitor the condition closely since with timely diagnosis, irreversible damage can be avoided. The current review will focus on updated information regarding ocular GVHD. PMID:24653823

  14. Ocular syphilis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John P; Huang, Lynn L; Rosberger, Daniel F

    2015-06-01

    As Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease (AIDS) turns thirty-years old, much progress has been made. 56,000 new cases of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are expected in Americans this year. At least half or more will be in African Americans. Reports of the association between syphilis and HIV infection are well documented. We present a case of bilateral optic neuritis and panuveitis as the initial presentation in a previously undiagnosed patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:27269502

  15. Wakayama symposium: challenges of future research in ocular surface cell biology.

    PubMed

    Kao, Winston W-Y; Liu, Hongshan; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, surface ectoderm differentiates to form corneal, conjunctival, and eyelid epidermal epithelia, and glandular epithelium (lacrimal and meibomian glands). Periocular mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin migrate and differentiate, leading to the formation of corneal endothelium and the stromas of the cornea, conjunctiva, eyelids, and trabecular meshwork. The formation of functional ocular surface tissues requires coordinated spatial and temporal expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules of various cytokines and signaling pathways, and the synthesis and remodeling of unique extracellular matrix. Although bidirectional interactions and signaling between mesenchyme and epithelium are considered necessary for embryonic formation of ocular surface tissues and homeostasis in adults, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate such processes remain largely unknown. To investigate possible mechanisms, we have developed mouse models in which the gene functions of ocular surface epithelia and stromas can be altered by Doxycycline induction in spatial and temporal specific manners. PMID:23321356

  16. The role of nanotechnology in control of human diseases: perspectives in ocular surface diseases.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash P; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Padovani, Felipe Hering; Alves, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Nanotechnology is the creation and use of materials and devices on the same scale as molecules and intracellular structures, typically less than 100 nm in size. It is an emerging science and has made its way into pharmaceuticals to significantly improve the delivery and efficacy of drugs in a number of therapeutic areas, due to development of various nanoparticle-based products. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence that nanotechnology can help to overcome many of the ocular diseases and hence researchers are keenly interested in this science. Nanomedicines offer promise as viable alternatives to conventional drops, gels or ointments to improve drug delivery to the eye. Because of their small size, they are well tolerated, thus preventing washout, increase bioavailability and also help in specific drug delivery. This review describes the application of nanotechnology in the control of human diseases with special emphasis on various eye and ocular surfaces diseases. PMID:26189355

  17. Ocular manifestation of HIV/AIDS and correlation with CD4+ cells count among adult HIV/AIDS patients in Jimma town, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS is one of twenty first century’s challenges to human being with protean manifestation affecting nearly all organs of our body. It is causing high morbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa with numerous ocular complications and blindness. The purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of ocular manifestations of HIV/AIDS and their correlation with CD4+Tcells count. Methods A cross-sectional study was done on 348 HIV-positive patients presented to Anti-Retroviral Therapy clinics. Data were collected using face-to-face interview, clinical examination and laboratory investigation, and analyzed using SPSS version 13 software. Statistical association test was done and p<0.05 was considered significant. Other statistical tests like student t-test and logistic regression were also done. Results Of 348 patients, 175 were on antiretroviral therapy and 173 were not on therapy. The mean duration of therapy was 27 months. The overall prevalence of ocular manifestations was 25.3%. The commonest ocular manifestation was keratoconjunctivitis sicca (11.3%) followed by blepharitis (3.2%), molluscum contagiosum (2.6%), conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma (2.3%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (2.3%), cranial nerve palsies (2%), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) (1.2%), and HIV retinopathy (0.6%). HIV retinopathy and conjunctival microvasculopathy were common in patient with CD4+ count of <200 cells/μl while HZO and molluscum contagiosum were common in patients with CD4+ count of 200–499 cells/μl. Prevalence of ocular manifestation was higher among patients on HAART (32.6%) than those patients not on HAART (17.9%) (p<0.05). There was statistically significant association between ocular manifestation and sex, CD4+Tcells count, and age (p<0.05). CD4+ count, <200 cells/μl and age >35 years were independent risk factors for ocular manifestations. Conclusion The study showed that the prevalence of ocular manifestation of HIV/AIDS is

  18. Association of human papilloma virus with pterygia and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, N

    2012-02-01

    There are more microorganisms that colonize the human body than resident cells; some are commensal whereas others are pathogenic. Pathogenic microorganisms are sensed by the innate or adaptive immune system, an immune response is initiated, and the infection is often cleared. Some microorganisms have developed strategies to evade immune defenses, ensuring their long-term survival with potentially devastating consequences for the host. Approximately 18% of all cancers can be attributed to infective agents; the most common being Helicobacter pylori, Human papilloma virus (HPV) and Hepatitis B and C virus in causing stomach, cervical and liver carcinoma, respectively. This review focuses on whether HPV infection is necessary for initiating pterygia, a common benign condition and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), a rare disease with metastatic potential. The search engine PubMed was used to identify articles from the literature related to HPV and pterygium or conjunctival neoplasia. From 34 investigations that studied HPV in pterygia and OSSN, a prevalence rate of 18.6% (136/731) and 33.8% (144/426), respectively, was recorded. The variation in HPV prevalence (0-100%) for both disease groups may have arisen from study-design faults and the techniques used to identify the virus. Overall, the data suggest that HPV is not necessary for initiating either condition but may be a co-factor in susceptible hosts. Currently, over 60 million people worldwide have been immunized with HPV vaccines, but any effect on pterygium and OSSN development may not be known for some time as these lesions can evolve over decades or occur in older individuals. PMID:22134594

  19. Analysis of the volumetric relationship among human ocular, orbital and fronto-occipital cortical morphology.

    PubMed

    Masters, Michael; Bruner, Emiliano; Queer, Sarah; Traynor, Sarah; Senjem, Jess

    2015-10-01

    Recent research on the visual system has focused on investigating the relationship among eye (ocular), orbital, and visual cortical anatomy in humans. This issue is relevant in evolutionary and medical fields. In terms of evolution, only in modern humans and Neandertals are the orbits positioned beneath the frontal lobes, with consequent structural constraints. In terms of medicine, such constraints can be associated with minor deformation of the eye, vision defects, and patterns of integration among these features, and in association with the frontal lobes, are important to consider in reconstructive surgery. Further study is therefore necessary to establish how these variables are related, and to what extent ocular size is associated with orbital and cerebral cortical volumes. Relationships among these anatomical components were investigated using magnetic resonance images from a large sample of 83 individuals, which also included each subject's body height, age, sex, and uncorrected visual acuity score. Occipital and frontal gyri volumes were calculated using two different cortical parcellation tools in order to provide a better understanding of how the eye and orbit vary in relation to visual cortical gyri, and frontal cortical gyri which are not directly related to visual processing. Results indicated that ocular and orbital volumes were weakly correlated, and that eye volume explains only a small proportion of the variance in orbital volume. Ocular and orbital volumes were also found to be equally and, in most cases, more highly correlated with five frontal lobe gyri than with occipital lobe gyri associated with V1, V2, and V3 of the visual cortex. Additionally, after accounting for age and sex variation, the relationship between ocular and total visual cortical volume was no longer statistically significant, but remained significantly related to total frontal lobe volume. The relationship between orbital and visual cortical volumes remained significant for a

  20. Acetylation Preserves Retinal Ganglion Cell Structure and Function in a Chronic Model of Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Alsarraf, Oday; Fan, Jie; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Chou, C. James; Yates, Phillip W.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The current studies investigate if the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), can limit retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration in an ocular-hypertensive rat model. Methods. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated unilaterally in Brown Norway rats by hypertonic saline injection. Rats received either vehicle or VPA (100 mg/kg) treatment for 28 days. Retinal ganglion cell function and number were assessed by pattern electroretinogram (pERG) and retrograde FluoroGold labeling. Western blotting and a fluorescence assay were used for determination of histone H3 acetylation and HDAC activity, respectively, at 3-day, 1-week, and 2-week time points. Results. Hypertonic saline injections increased IOPs by 7 to 14 mm Hg. In vehicle-treated animals, ocular hypertension resulted in a 29.1% and 39.4% decrease in pERG amplitudes at 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and a 42.9% decrease in mean RGC density at 4 weeks. In comparison, VPA treatment yielded significant amplitude preservation at 2 and 4 weeks and showed significant RGC density preservation at 4 weeks. No significant difference in RGC densities or IOPs was measured between control eyes of vehicle- and VPA-treated rats. In ocular-hypertensive eyes, class I HDAC activity was significantly elevated within 1 week (13.3 ± 2.2%) and histone H3 acetylation was significantly reduced within 2 weeks following the induction of ocular hypertension. Conclusions. Increase in HDAC activity is a relatively early retinal event induced by elevated IOP, and suppressing HDAC activity can protect RGCs from ocular-hypertensive stress. Together these data provide a basis for developing HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of optic neuropathies. PMID:25358731

  1. Mutation of SALL2 causes recessive ocular coloboma in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Kelberman, Daniel; Islam, Lily; Lakowski, Jörn; Bacchelli, Chiara; Chanudet, Estelle; Lescai, Francesco; Patel, Aara; Stupka, Elia; Buck, Anja; Wolf, Stephan; Beales, Philip L.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Liasis, Alki; Lehmann, Ordan J.; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Nischal, Ken K.; Sowden, Jane C.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular coloboma is a congenital defect resulting from failure of normal closure of the optic fissure during embryonic eye development. This birth defect causes childhood blindness worldwide, yet the genetic etiology is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel homozygous mutation in the SALL2 gene in members of a consanguineous family affected with non-syndromic ocular coloboma variably affecting the iris and retina. This mutation, c.85G>T, introduces a premature termination codon (p.Glu29*) predicted to truncate the SALL2 protein so that it lacks three clusters of zinc-finger motifs that are essential for DNA-binding activity. This discovery identifies SALL2 as the third member of the Drosophila homeotic Spalt-like family of developmental transcription factor genes implicated in human disease. SALL2 is expressed in the developing human retina at the time of, and subsequent to, optic fissure closure. Analysis of Sall2-deficient mouse embryos revealed delayed apposition of the optic fissure margins and the persistence of an anterior retinal coloboma phenotype after birth. Sall2-deficient embryos displayed correct posterior closure toward the optic nerve head, and upon contact of the fissure margins, dissolution of the basal lamina occurred and PAX2, known to be critical for this process, was expressed normally. Anterior closure was disrupted with the fissure margins failing to meet, or in some cases misaligning leading to a retinal lesion. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, a role for SALL2 in eye morphogenesis and that loss of function of the gene causes ocular coloboma in humans and mice. PMID:24412933

  2. Mutation of SALL2 causes recessive ocular coloboma in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Kelberman, Daniel; Islam, Lily; Lakowski, Jörn; Bacchelli, Chiara; Chanudet, Estelle; Lescai, Francesco; Patel, Aara; Stupka, Elia; Buck, Anja; Wolf, Stephan; Beales, Philip L; Jacques, Thomas S; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Liasis, Alki; Lehmann, Ordan J; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Nischal, Ken K; Sowden, Jane C

    2014-05-15

    Ocular coloboma is a congenital defect resulting from failure of normal closure of the optic fissure during embryonic eye development. This birth defect causes childhood blindness worldwide, yet the genetic etiology is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel homozygous mutation in the SALL2 gene in members of a consanguineous family affected with non-syndromic ocular coloboma variably affecting the iris and retina. This mutation, c.85G>T, introduces a premature termination codon (p.Glu29*) predicted to truncate the SALL2 protein so that it lacks three clusters of zinc-finger motifs that are essential for DNA-binding activity. This discovery identifies SALL2 as the third member of the Drosophila homeotic Spalt-like family of developmental transcription factor genes implicated in human disease. SALL2 is expressed in the developing human retina at the time of, and subsequent to, optic fissure closure. Analysis of Sall2-deficient mouse embryos revealed delayed apposition of the optic fissure margins and the persistence of an anterior retinal coloboma phenotype after birth. Sall2-deficient embryos displayed correct posterior closure toward the optic nerve head, and upon contact of the fissure margins, dissolution of the basal lamina occurred and PAX2, known to be critical for this process, was expressed normally. Anterior closure was disrupted with the fissure margins failing to meet, or in some cases misaligning leading to a retinal lesion. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, a role for SALL2 in eye morphogenesis and that loss of function of the gene causes ocular coloboma in humans and mice. PMID:24412933

  3. Occlusion of retinal capillaries caused by glial cell proliferation in chronic ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, E; Ripandelli, G; Feher, J; Plateroti, A M; Plateroti, R; Kovacs, I; Plateroti, P; Taurone, S; Artico, M

    2015-01-01

    The inner blood-retinal barrier is a gliovascular unit in which glial cells surround capillary endothelial cells and regulate retinal capillaries by paracrine interactions. During chronic ocular inflammation, microvascular complications can give rise to vascular proliferative lesions, which compromise visual acuity. This pathologic remodelling caused by proliferating Müller cells determines occlusion of retinal capillaries. The aim of the present study was to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in the retinal capillaries in patients with post-traumatic chronic ocular inflammation or post-thrombotic vascular glaucoma. Moreover, we investigated the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in retinal inflammation. Our electron microscopy findings demonstrated that during chronic ocular inflammation, thickening of the basement membrane, loss of pericytes and endothelial cells and proliferation of Müller cells occur with irreversible occlusion of retinal capillaries. Angiogenesis takes place as part of a regenerative reaction that results in fibrosis. We believe that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of this disease although further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:25792393

  4. Ocular graft versus host disease in allogenic haematopoetic stem cell transplantation in a tertiary care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rehan; Nair, Sridevi; Seth, Tullika; Mishra, Pravas; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Agarwal, Tushar; Tandon, Radhika; Vanathi, Murugesan

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: This study was aimed to report the occurrence of ocular graft versus host disease (oGVHD) in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) patients in a tertiary care hospital setting. Methods: A cross-sectional study of ocular surface of allo-HSCT patients was done. Slit lamp biomicroscopy, symptom score, tear meniscus height, fluorescein tear break-up time, Schirmer's test I, ocular surface staining, dry eye severity, ocular surface disease index score were done. Indications for allo-HSCT, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, GVHD risk factor, systemic manifestation and treatment were also noted. Results: GVHD occurred in 44.4 per cent of 54 allo-HSCT patients (mean age 26.7 ± 12 yr) included in the study. GVHD risk factors identified included female gender, relapse, older age of donor, cytomagelo virus (CMV) reactivation, and multiparous female donors. oGVHD was noted in 31.5 per cent with mean time to occurrence being 17.8 ± 21.9 months after the allo-HSCT and was observed in 89.5 per cent of chronic GVHD cases. Acute GVHD (oral and dermatological) involvement showed a significant association with GVHD in our patients (P< 0.001, 0R 23.0, CI 6.4-82.1). Chronic GVHD was observed to be associated with the occurrence of oGVHD (dry eye) (P<0.001, OR = 24.0, CI 0.02 - 0.29). Of the 34 eyes with oGHVD, dry eye of level 3 severity was seen in 16, level 2 in six, level 1 in 12 eyes. Interpretation & conclusions: GVHD occurred in 44.4 per cent of the patients studied in the present study. Acute and chronic GVHD showed a strong association with oGVHD. Dry eye disease due to chronic oGVHD was observed in 17 (31.5%) of 54 allo-HSCT patient with chronic oGVHD occurring in 17 (89.4%) of chronic GVHD cases in allo-HSCT patients. Our study on oGVHD in post allo-HSCT patients in tertiary care centre points towards the fact that ocular morbidity due to dry eye disease as a result of oGVHD is a cause for concern in these patients

  5. Granulocytes in Ocular HSV-1 Infection: Opposing Roles of Mast Cells and Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Derek J.; Zheng, Min; Conrady, Christopher D.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The contributions of mast cells (MCs) to immunologic defense against pathogens in the eye are unknown. We have characterized pericorneal MCs as tissue-resident innate sentinels and determined their impact on the immune response to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), a common ocular pathogen. Methods. The impact of mast cells on the immune response to HSV-1 infection was investigated using MC-deficient KitW-sh mice. Virus titers, inflammatory cytokine production, eicosanoid profiles, cellular immune responses, and ocular pathology were evaluated and compared with C57BL/6J mice during an acute corneal HSV-1 infection. Results. Corneas of KitW-sh mice have higher viral titers, increased edema, and greater leukocyte infiltration following HSV-1 infection. Following infection, cytokine profiles were slightly elevated overall in KitW-sh mice. Eicosanoid profiles were remarkably different only when comparing uninfected corneas from both groups. Neutrophils within infected corneas expressed HSV-1 antigen, lytic genes, and served as a disease-causing vector when adoptively transferred into immunocompromised animals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells did not infiltrate into the cornea or suppress the expansion, recruitment, or cytokine production by CD8+ T cells following acute HSV-1 infection. Conclusions. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into host defense in the cornea and the pathogenesis of HSV-1 infection by identifying previously unacknowledged MCs as protective innate sentinels for infection of the ocular surface and reinforcing that neutrophils are detrimental to corneal infection. PMID:26066745

  6. Control of Cross Talk between Angiogenesis and Inflammation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Ocular Surface Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Zhao, Shao-zhen

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is beneficial in the treatment of ischemic heart disease and peripheral artery disease. However, it facilitates inflammatory cell filtration and inflammation cascade that disrupt the immune and angiogenesis privilege of the avascular cornea, resulting in ocular surface diseases and even vision loss. Although great progress has been achieved, healing of severe ocular surface injury and immunosuppression of corneal transplantation are the most difficult and challenging step in the treatment of ocular surface disorders. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), derived from various adult tissues, are able to differentiate into different cell types such as endothelial cells and fat cells. Although it is still under debate whether MSCs could give rise to functional corneal cells, recent results from different study groups showed that MSCs could improve corneal disease recovery through suppression of inflammation and modulation of immune cells. Thus, MSCs could become a promising tool for ocular surface disorders. In this review, we discussed how angiogenesis and inflammation are orchestrated in the pathogenesis of ocular surface disease. We overviewed and updated the knowledge of MSCs and then summarized the therapeutic potential of MSCs via control of angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune response in the treatment of ocular surface disease. PMID:27110252

  7. Dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head rotations in roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.; Tomsak, R. L.; Grant, M. P.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during roll head rotations in three human subjects using the magnetic search coil technique. In the first of two experiments, we quantify the behavior of the ocular motor plant in the torsional plane. The subject's eye was mechanically displaced into intorsion, extorsion or abduction, and the dynamic course of return of the eye to its resting position was measured. The mean predominant time constants of return were 210 msec from intorsion, 83 msec from extorsion, and 217 msec from abduction, although there was considerable variability of results from different trials and subjects. In the second experiment, we quantify the efficacy of velocity-to-position integration of the vestibular signal. Position-step stimuli were used to test the torsional or horizontal VOR, being applied with subjects heads erect or supine. After a torsional position-step, the eye drifted back to its resting position, but after a horizontal position-step the eye held its new horizontal position. To interpret these responses we used a simple model of the VOR with parameters of the ocular motor plant set to values determined during Exp 1. The time constant of the velocity-to-position neural integrator was smaller (typically 2 sec) in the torsional plane than in the horizontal plane (> 20 sec). No disconjugacy of torsional eye movements was observed. Thus, the dynamic properties of the VOR in roll differ significantly from those of the VOR in yaw, reflecting different visual demands placed on this reflex in these two planes.

  8. Hypercapnia-induced cerebral and ocular vasodilation is not altered by glibenclamide in humans.

    PubMed

    Bayerle-Eder, M; Wolzt, M; Polska, E; Langenberger, H; Pleiner, J; Teherani, D; Rainer, G; Polak, K; Eichler, H G; Schmetterer, L

    2000-06-01

    Carbon dioxide is an important regulator of vascular tone. Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K(ATP)) activation, significantly blunts vasodilation in response to hypercapnic acidosis in animals. We investigated whether glibenclamide also alters the cerebral and ocular vasodilator response to hypercapnia in humans. Ten healthy male subjects were studied in a controlled, randomized, double-blind two-way crossover study under normoxic and hypercapnic conditions. Glibenclamide (5 mg po) or insulin (0.3 mU. kg(-1). min(-1) iv) were administered with glucose to achieve comparable plasma insulin levels. In control experiments, five healthy volunteers received glibenclamide (5 mg) or nicorandil (40 mg) or glibenclamide and nicorandil in a randomized, three-way crossover study. Mean blood flow velocity and resistive index in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and in the ophthalmic artery (OA) were measured with Doppler sonography. Pulsatile choroidal blood flow was assessed with laser interferometric measurement of fundus pulsation. Forearm blood flow was measured with venous occlusion plethysmography. Hypercapnia increased ocular fundus pulsation amplitude by +18.2-22.3% (P < 0. 001) and mean flow velocity in the MCA by +27.4-33.3% (P < 0.001), but not in the OA (2.1-6.5%, P = 0.2). Forearm blood flow increased by 78.2% vs. baseline (P = 0.041) after nicorandil administration. Glibenclamide did not alter hypercapnia-induced changes in cerebral or ocular hemodynamics and did not affect systemic hemodynamics or forearm blood flow but significantly increased glucose utilization and blunted the nicorandil-induced vasodilation in the forearm. This suggests that hypercapnia-induced changes in the vascular beds under study are not mediated by activation of K(ATP) channels in humans. PMID:10848537

  9. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Other Innovative Strategies for the Treatment of Ocular Surface Diseases.

    PubMed

    Erbani, Johanna; Aberdam, Daniel; Larghero, Jerome; Vanneaux, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    The cornea provides two thirds of the refractive power of the eye and protection against insults such as infection and injury. The outermost tissue of the cornea is renewed by stem cells located in the limbus. Depletion or destruction of these stem cells may lead to blinding limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) that concerns millions of patients around the world. Innovative strategies based on adult stem cell therapies have been developed in the recent years but they are still facing numerous unresolved issues, and the long term results can be deceiving. Today there is a clear need to improve these therapies, and/or to develop new approaches for the treatment of LSCD. Here, we review the current cell-based therapies used for the treatment of ocular diseases, and discuss the potential of pluripotent stem cells (embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells) in corneal repair. As the secretion of paracrine factors is known to have a crucial role in maintaining stem cell homeostasis and in wound repair, we also consider the therapeutic potential of a promising novel pathway, the exosomes. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles that have the ability to transfer RNAs and proteins to recipient cells, and several studies demonstrated their role in cell protection and wound healing. Exosomes could circumvent the hurdles of stem-cell based approaches, and they could become a strong candidate as an alternative therapy for ocular surface diseases. PMID:26779895

  10. Ocular biocompatibility of carbodiimide cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogels for cell sheet delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang; Ma, David Hui-Kang; Cheng, Hsiao-Yun; Sun, Chi-Chin; Huang, Shu-Jung; Li, Ya-Ting; Hsiue, Ging-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Due to its innocuous nature, hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the most commonly used biopolymers for ophthalmic applications. We recently developed a cell sheet delivery system using carbodiimide cross-linked HA carriers. Chemical cross-linking provides an improvement in stability of polymer gels, but probably causes toxic side-effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the ocular biocompatibility of HA hydrogels cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). HA discs without cross-linking and glutaraldehyde (GTA) cross-linked HA samples were used for comparison. The disc implants were inserted in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes for 24 weeks and characterized by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, histology and scanning electron microscopy. The ophthalmic parameters obtained from biomicroscopic examinations were also scored to provide a quantitative grading system. Results of this study showed that the HA discs cross-linked with EDC had better ocular biocompatibility than those with GTA. The continued residence of GTA cross-linked HA implants in the intraocular cavity elicited severe tissue responses and significant foreign body reactions, whereas no adverse inflammatory reaction was observed after contact with non-cross-linked HA or EDC cross-linked HA samples. It is concluded that the cross-linking agent type gives influence on ocular biocompatibility of cell carriers and the EDC-HA hydrogel is an ideal candidate for use as an implantable material in cell sheet delivery applications. PMID:20178691

  11. Cell Fate and Differentiation of the Developing Ocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Greiling, Teri M. S.; Aose, Masamoto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Even though zebrafish development does not include the formation of a lens vesicle, the authors' hypothesis is that the processes of cell differentiation are similar in zebrafish and mammals and determine cell fates in the lens. Methods. Two-photon live embryo imaging was used to follow individual fluorescently labeled cells in real-time from the placode stage at 16 hours postfertilization (hpf) until obvious morphologic differentiation into epithelium or fiber cells had occurred at approximately 28 hpf. Immunohistochemistry was used to label proliferating, differentiating, and apoptotic cells. Results. Similar to the mammal, cells in the teleost peripheral lens placode migrated to the anterior lens mass and differentiated into an anterior epithelium. Cells in the central lens placode migrated to the posterior lens mass and differentiated into primary fiber cells. Anterior and posterior polarization in the zebrafish lens mass was similar to mammalian lens vesicle polarization. Primary fiber cell differentiation was apparent at approximately 21 hpf, before separation of the lens from the surface ectoderm, as evidenced by cell elongation, exit from the cell cycle, and expression of Zl-1, a marker for fiber differentiation. TUNEL labeling demonstrated that apoptosis was not a primary mechanism for lens separation from the surface ectoderm. Conclusions. Despite the absence of a lens vesicle in the zebrafish embryo, lens organogenesis appears to be well conserved among vertebrates. Results using three-dimensional live embryo imaging of zebrafish development showed minimal differences and strong similarities in the fate of cells in the zebrafish and mammalian lens placode. PMID:19834024

  12. Optimization of culture conditions for an efficient xeno-feeder free limbal cell culture system towards ocular surface regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Viji Mary; Prasad, Tilak; Kumary, T V

    2010-10-01

    Ex vivo expansion of limbal stem cells from a small biopsy and its subsequent transplantation is the golden choice of treatment for limbal stem cell deficiency. Use of murine 3T3 feeder layer is a prerequisite for this ex vivo expansion. There is an ever-increasing demand for feeder free cultures to avoid xenotoxicity and transmission of xeno-diseases to human system. This study was aimed to establish an efficient xeno-feeder free limbal culture system towards ocular surface regeneration. To study the effect of initial dispase treatment and culture system used, migratory distance of cells from explants was analyzed from phase contrast images using "interactive measurements" of Qwin software (Leica). Expression of p63 in different culture systems was studied by immunofluorescent staining, followed by quantitative confocal microscopy (Carl Zeiss). Results showed dispase treatment was not necessary for establishing limbal explant culture. A combination of Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium and Panserin 801 resulted in formation of autofeeder layer with maintenance of progenitor characteristics, thus mimicking natural tissue architecture. Further analysis of this culture system showed that cells could be cultured till confluency. Immunofluorescent staining of ABCG2 revealed presence of stem cell marker in the confluent cell layer. Scanning Electron Micrographs demonstrated homogenous population of tightly packed cells in this culture system. Replacement of bovine serum with autologous serum did not affect morphology or growth of cells in this culture system. This study will be a major step in the development of xeno-feeder free epithelial equivalents towards ocular surface reconstruction. PMID:20196106

  13. Optimised laser microdissection of the human ocular surface epithelial regions for microarray studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The most important challenge of performing insitu transcriptional profiling of the human ocular surface epithelial regions is obtaining samples in sufficient amounts, without contamination from adjacent tissue, as the region of interest is microscopic and closely apposed to other tissues regions. We have effectively collected ocular surface (OS) epithelial tissue samples from the Limbal Epithelial Crypt (LEC), limbus, cornea and conjunctiva of post-mortem cadaver eyes with laser microdissection (LMD) technique for gene expression studies with spotted oligonucleotide microarrays and Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Methods Human donor eyes (4 pairs for spotted oligonucleotide microarrays, 3 pairs for Gene 1.0 ST arrays) consented for research were included in this study with due ethical approval of the Nottingham Research Ethics Committee. Eye retrieval was performed within 36 hours of post-mortem period. The dissected corneoscleral buttons were immersed in OCT media and frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at −80°C till further use. Microscopic tissue sections of interest were taken on PALM slides and stained with Toluidine Blue for laser microdissection with PALM microbeam systems. Optimisation of the laser microdissection technique was crucial for efficient and cost effective sample collection. Results The starting concentration of RNA as stipulated by the protocol of microarray platforms was taken as the cut-off concentration of RNA samples in our studies. The area of LMD tissue processed for spotted oligonucleotide microarray study ranged from 86,253 μm2 in LEC to 392,887 μm2 in LEC stroma. The RNA concentration of the LMD samples ranged from 22 to 92 pg/μl. The recommended starting concentration of the RNA samples used for Gene 1.0 ST arrays was 6 ng/5 μl. To achieve the desired RNA concentration the area of ocular surface epithelial tissue sample processed for the Gene 1.0 ST array experiments was approximately 100,0000 μm2 to 130,0000 μm2. RNA

  14. The Human Vertical Translation Vestibulo-ocular Reflex (tVOR): Normal and Abnormal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ke; Walker, Mark F.; Joshi, Anand; Reschke, Millard; Strupp, Michael; Leigh, R. John

    2010-01-01

    Geometric considerations indicate that the human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) should have substantially different properties than the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR). Specifically, tVOR cannot simultaneously stabilize images of distant and near objects on the retina. Most studies make the tacit assumption that tVOR acts to stabilize foveal images even though, in humans, tVOR is reported to compensate for less than 60% of foveal image motion. We have determined that the compensation gain (eye rotational velocity / required eye rotational velocity to maintain foveal target fixation) of tVOR is held steady at ~ 0.6 during viewing of either near or distant targets during vertical (bob) translations in ambient illumination. We postulate that tVOR evolved not to stabilize the image of the target on the fovea, but rather to minimize retinal image motion between objects lying in different depth planes, in order to optimize motion parallax information. Such behavior is optimized when binocular visual cues of both far and distant targets are available in ambient light. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy or cerebellar ataxia show impaired ability to increase tVOR responses appropriately when they view near targets. In cerebellar patients, impaired ability to adjust tVOR responses to viewing conditions occurs despite intact ability to converge at near. Loss of the ability to adjust tVOR according to viewing conditions appears to represent a distinct disorder of vestibular function. PMID:19645882

  15. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)–polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen’s egg test–chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery. PMID:25670897

  16. [Regeneration of the ocular surface: stem cells and reconstructive techniques].

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Moreno, J; Prósper, F; García, M; Echeveste, J

    2008-01-01

    The cornea is a transparent tissue microscopically constituted by 5 well differentiated layers. The corneal epithelium is essential for corneal transparency and is found in a state of constant renovation throughout life on the basis of the population of limbocorneal stem cells. The localisation of these limbocorneal stem cells seems to be in the basal layers of the limbocorneal epithelium, of vital importance for maintaining the micro-environment of these limbocorneal stem cells, which depend on a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Limbic insufficiency occurs when there is a partial or total loss of these limbocorneal stem cells. These clinical features lead to a corneal clouding with a resulting loss of vision. In these cases, corneal transplant only represents a temporary replacement of the corneal epithelium; it is necessary to carry out a prior treatment involving transplant of the autologous or allogeneic limbus, which enables regeneration of the population of damaged limbocorneal cells. To reduce the risk involved in the transplant of the limbus of the donor eye, techniques of cultivation of limbocorneal cells on the basis of small limbocorneal biopsies are proposed. PMID:18496580

  17. Autophagy in the Eye: Implications for Ocular Cell Health

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Laura S.; Mitchell, Claire H.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a catabolic process by which a cell “eats” itself, turning over its own cellular constituents, plays a key role in cellular homeostasis. In an effort to maintain normal cellular function, autophagy is often up-regulated in response to environmental stresses and excessive organelle damage to facilitate aggregated protein removal. In the eye, virtually all cell types from those comprising the cornea in the front of the eye to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) providing a protective barrier for the retina at the back of the eye, rely on one or more aspects of autophagy to maintain structure and/or normal physiological function. In the lens autophagy plays a critical role in lens fiber cell maturation and the formation of the organelle free zone. Numerous studies delineating the role of Atg5, Vsp34 as well as FYCO1 in maintenance of lens transparency are discussed. Corneal endothelial dystrophies are also characterized as having elevated levels of autophagic proteins. Therefore, novel modulators of autophagy such as lithium and melatonin are proposed as new therapeutic strategies for this group of dystrophies. In addition, we summarize how corneal Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) infection subverts the cornea’s response to infection by inhibiting the normal autophagic response. Using glaucoma models we analyze the relative contribution of autophagy to cell death and cell survival. The cytoprotective role of autophagy is further discussed in an analysis of photoreceptor cell heath and function. We focus our analysis on the current understanding of autophagy in photoreceptor and RPE health, specifically on the diverse role of autophagy in rods and cones as well as its protective role in light induced degeneration. Lastly, in the RPE we highlight hybrid phagocytosis-autophagy pathways. This comprehensive review allows us to speculate on how alterations in various stages of autophagy contribute to glaucoma and retinal degenerations. PMID:24810222

  18. Immunofluorescence Tomography of Mouse Ocular Surface Epithelial Stem Cells and Their Niche Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Kavianpour, Behdad; Wu, Karen L.; Xie, Yilu; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Currently, there are no definitive immunomarkers for epithelial stem cells (corneal and conjunctival) or their poorly understood niche microenvironment. The H2B-GFP/K5tTA mouse enables visualization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), which exhibit the functional marker of stem cell quiescence. We used immunofluorescence tomography to evaluate putative stem cell markers and LRCs of the mouse ocular surface. Methods H2B-GFP/K5tTA mice were pulsed for 56 days and then chased with doxycycline to label LRCs. Limbus and eyelid tissue was 3-dimensionally (3-D) reconstructed using immunofluorescence tomography to identify and characterize LRCs using the putative stem cell markers sox9, keratin 19, lrig1, blimp1, and abcb5. Results After 28 days of chase, LRCs were localized to the entire limbus epithelium and, infrequently, the anterior limbal stroma. Label-retaining cells comprised 3% of limbal epithelial cells after 56 days of chase. Conjunctival LRCs were localized to the fornix and comprised 4% of the total fornix epithelial cells. No stem cell immunomarker was specific for ocular surface LRCs; however, blimp1 enriched for limbal basal epithelial cells and 100% of green fluorescent protein-positive (GFP+) cells at the limbus and fornix were found to be lrig1-positive. Conclusions Label-retaining cells represent a larger population of the mouse limbus than previously thought. They decrease in number with increased doxycycline chase, suggesting that LRC populations with different cell cycle lengths exist at the limbus. We conclude that current immunomarkers are unable to colocalize with the functional marker of epithelial stem cell quiescence; however, blimp1 may enrich for limbal epithelial basal cells. PMID:26559480

  19. The Visual System of Zebrafish and its Use to Model Human Ocular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gestri, Gaia; Link, Brian A; Neuhauss, Stephan CF

    2011-01-01

    Free swimming zebrafish larvae depend mainly on their sense of vision to evade predation and to catch prey. Hence there is strong selective pressure on the fast maturation of visual function and indeed the visual system already supports a number of visually-driven behaviors in the newly hatched larvae. The ability to exploit the genetic and embryonic accessibility of the zebrafish in combination with a behavioral assessment of visual system function has made the zebrafish a popular model to study vision and its diseases. Here, we review the anatomy, physiology and development of the zebrafish eye as the basis to relate the contributions of the zebrafish to our understanding of human ocular diseases. PMID:21595048

  20. Age-related changes in human vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes: Pseudorandom rotation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.; Schoenhoff, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and optokinetic reflex (OKR) were characterized in 216 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. The object of this cross-sectional study was to determine the effects of aging on VOR and OKR reflex dynamics, and to identify the distributions of parameters which describe VOR and OKR responses to pseudorandom stimuli in a putatively normal population. In general, VOR and OKR response parameters changed in a manner consistent with declining function with increasing age. For the VOR this was reflected in declining response amplitudes, although the magnitude of the decline was small relative to the variability of the data. For the OKR the lag time of the response, probably associated with the time required for visual information processing, increased linearly with age at a rate of about 1 ms per year.

  1. Oseltamivir inhibits influenza virus replication and transmission following ocular-only aerosol inoculation of ferrets.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Creager, Hannah M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2015-10-01

    Ocular exposure to influenza virus represents an alternate route of virus entry capable of establishing a respiratory infection in mammals, but the effectiveness of currently available antiviral treatments to limit virus replication within ocular tissue or inhibit virus spread from ocular sites to the respiratory tract is poorly understood. Using an inoculation method that delivers an aerosol inoculum exclusively to the ocular surface, we demonstrate that oral oseltamivir administration following ocular-only aerosol inoculation with multiple avian and human influenza viruses protected ferrets from a fatal and systemic infection, reduced clinical signs and symptoms of illness, and decreased virus transmissibility to susceptible contacts when a respiratory infection was initiated. The presence of oseltamivir further inhibited influenza virus replication in primary human corneal epithelial cells. These findings provide critical experimental evidence supporting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors during outbreaks of influenza virus resulting in ocular disease or following ocular exposure. PMID:26142497

  2. Raising cytosolic Cl− in cerebellar granule cells affects their excitability and vestibulo-ocular learning

    PubMed Central

    Seja, Patricia; Schonewille, Martijn; Spitzmaul, Guillermo; Badura, Aleksandra; Klein, Ilse; Rudhard, York; Wisden, William; Hübner, Christian A; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical throughput involved in motor control comprises granule cells (GCs) and Purkinje cells (PCs), both of which receive inhibitory GABAergic input from interneurons. The GABAergic input to PCs is essential for learning and consolidation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, but the role of GC excitability remains unclear. We now disrupted the Kcc2 K-Cl cotransporter specifically in either cell type to manipulate their excitability and inhibition by GABAA-receptor Cl− channels. Although Kcc2 may have a morphogenic role in synapse development, Kcc2 disruption neither changed synapse density nor spine morphology. In both GCs and PCs, disruption of Kcc2, but not Kcc3, increased [Cl−]i roughly two-fold. The reduced Cl− gradient nearly abolished GABA-induced hyperpolarization in PCs, but in GCs it merely affected excitability by membrane depolarization. Ablation of Kcc2 from GCs impaired consolidation of long-term phase learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, whereas baseline performance, short-term gain-decrease learning and gain consolidation remained intact. These functions, however, were affected by disruption of Kcc2 in PCs. GC excitability plays a previously unknown, but specific role in consolidation of phase learning. PMID:22252133

  3. Effective Melanin Depigmentation of Human and Murine Ocular Tissues: An Improved Method for Paraffin and Frozen Sections

    PubMed Central

    Manicam, Caroline; Pitz, Susanne; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The removal of excessive melanin pigments that obscure ocular tissue morphology is important to address scientific questions and for differential diagnosis of ocular tumours based on histology. Thus, the goal of the present study was to establish an effective and fast melanin bleaching method for paraffin and frozen mouse and human ocular tissues. Methods Paraffin-embedded and frozen ocular specimens from mice and human donors were subjected to bleaching employing two methods. The first employed potassium permanganate (KMnO4) with oxalic acid, and the second 10% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). To determine optimal bleaching conditions, depigmentation was carried out at various incubation times. The effect of diluents used for 10% H2O2 was assessed using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and deionized water. Three different slide types and two fixatives, which were ice-cold acetone with 80% methanol, and 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) were used to determine the optimal conditions for better tissue adherence during bleaching. All tissues were stained in hematoxylin and eosin for histological evaluation. Results Optimal bleaching was achieved using warm 10% H2O2 diluted in PBS at 65°C for 120 minutes. Chromium-gelatin-coated slides prevented tissue detachment. Adherence of cryosections was also improved with post-fixation using 4% PFA and overnight air-drying at RT after cryosectioning. Tissue morphology was preserved under these conditions. Conversely, tissues bleached in KMnO4/oxalic acid demonstrated poor depigmentation with extensive tissue damage. Conclusions Warm dilute H2O2 at 65°C for 120 minutes rapidly and effectively bleached both cryo- and paraffin sections of murine and human ocular tissues. PMID:25025426

  4. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Protect the Ocular Surface by Suppressing Inflammation in an Experimental Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Joung; Ko, Ah Young; Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Khwarg, Sang In; Oh, Joo Youn

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome (DES) is one of the most common ocular diseases affecting nearly 10% of the US population. Most of the currently available treatments are palliative, and few therapeutic agents target biological pathway of DES. Although DES is a multifactorial disease, it is well-known that inflammation in the ocular surface plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DES. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to repair tissues by modulating excessive immune responses in various diseases. Therefore, we here investigated the therapeutic potential of MSCs in a murine model of an inflammation-mediated dry eye that was induced by an intraorbital injection of concanavalin A. We found that a periorbital administration of MSCs reduced the infiltration of CD4+ T cells and the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the intraorbital gland and ocular surface. Also, MSCs significantly increased aqueous tear production and the number of conjunctival goblet cells. Subsequently, corneal epithelial integrity was well-preserved by MSCs. Together, the results demonstrate that MSCs protect the ocular surface by suppressing inflammation in DES, and suggest that MSCs may offer a therapy for a number of ocular surface diseases where inflammation plays a key role. PMID:25152016

  5. Ocular Hypotensive Effects of the ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Opener Cromakalim in Human and Murine Experimental Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Uttio; Bahler, Cindy K.; Holman, Bradley H.; Dosa, Peter I.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most prevalent and only treatable risk factor for glaucoma, a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Unfortunately, all current therapeutics used to treat elevated IOP and glaucoma have significant and sometimes irreversible side effects necessitating the development of novel compounds. We evaluated the IOP lowering ability of the broad spectrum KATP channel opener cromakalim. Cultured human anterior segments when treated with 2 μM cromakalim showed a decrease in pressure (19.33 ± 2.78 mmHg at 0 hours to 13.22 ± 2.64 mmHg at 24 hours; p<0.001) when compared to vehicle treated controls (15.89 ± 5.33 mmHg at 0 h to 15.56 ± 4.88 mmHg at 24 hours; p = 0.89). In wild-type C57BL/6 mice, cromakalim reduced IOP by 18.75 ± 2.22% compared to vehicle treated contralateral eyes (17.01 ± 0.32 mmHg at 0 hours to 13.82 ± 0.37 mmHg at 24 hours; n = 10, p = 0.002). Cromakalim demonstrated an additive effect when used in conjunction with latanoprost free acid, a common ocular hypotensive drug prescribed to patients with elevated IOP. To examine KATP channel subunit specificity, Kir6.2(-/-) mice were treated with cromakalim, but unlike wild-type animals, no change in IOP was noted. Histologic analysis of treated and control eyes in cultured human anterior segments and in mice showed similar cell numbers and extracellular matrix integrity within the trabecular meshwork, with no disruptions in the inner and outer walls of Schlemm’s canal. Together, these studies suggest that cromakalim is a potent ocular hypotensive agent that lowers IOP via activation of Kir6.2 containing KATP channels, its effect is additive when used in combination with the commonly used glaucoma drug latanoprost, and is not toxic to cells and tissues of the aqueous humor outflow pathway, making it a candidate for future therapeutic development. PMID:26535899

  6. Conjunctival polyploid cells and donor-derived myofibroblasts in ocular GvHD.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, D; Stenberg, K; Hanson, C; Stenevi, U; Brune, M

    2016-05-01

    After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), ocular GvHD is a common complication, typical symptoms being dry eye syndrome with features of fibrosis. In this study, we have identified and quantified two cell types-myofibroblasts (MFB) and polyploid (PP) cells-in the conjunctival surface of allo-SCT patients (pts) and have explored their kinetics and association with local and systemic GvHD. Results are compared with control groups of (a) pretransplant samples from allo-SCT patients, (b) recipients of autologous transplantation (auto-SCT) and (c) healthy controls. Imprint cytologies were obtained by pressing the conjunctival surface with a sterile, non-abrasive cellulose acetate filter (Millipore). After retraction, typically a monolayer of the outermost cells of the epithelium were retrieved. MFB were identified by immunofluorescent (IF) staining for alpha-smooth muscle protein. PP cells were detected by aberrant chromosome content analyzed via X/Y-FISH (X/Y fluorescence in situ hybridization). In female pts with a male donor (MF group), donor genotype were identified by sex chromosome detection using FISH methodology. IF and FISH methods were applied in situ on the same filter, and amounts of MFB and PP cells are expressed as the percentage of all cells on the filter. In all, 70 samples from 46 pts were obtained 1-122 months after allo-SCT. The total MFB density (MFB(TOT)) was higher in allo-SCT pts compared with healthy individuals and auto-SCT pts and increased by time after transplantation (P<0.001). In MF recipients, this increase proved to be due to a significant (P<0.001) and gradual elevation of donor-derived MFB (MFB(XY)), whereas recipient-derived MFB (MFB(XX)) did not vary over time. Clinical ocular GvHD correlated with MFB(XY)/MFB(TOT) ratio (P=0.034), whereas no association between MFB(TOT) or MFB(XY) systemic GvHD was observed. In the MF group (n=25), both MFB(XY) and MFB(XX) were detected on 28 of the 37 imprints (76

  7. Efficacy of Topical Immunoglobulins against Experimental Adenoviral Ocular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nwanegbo, Edward C.; Romanowski, Eric G.; Gordon, Y. Jerold; Gambotto, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Presently, there is no U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA)–approved antiviral therapy for the treatment of adenoviral (Ad) ocular infections. The goal of the present study was to determine the antiviral efficacy of human immunoglobulin (Ig), a preparation of highly purified and concentrated immunoglobulin (IgG) antibodies isolated from a large pool of human plasma donors, in vitro and on acute Ad replication in the Ad5 New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit ocular model. Methods The antiviral activity of human Ig against multiple wild-type and human ocular isolates of adenovirus serotypes was investigated in vitro by using neutralizing assays in different human epithelial cell lines. In vivo bilateral topical ocular toxicity and antiviral efficacy were evaluated with established Ad5/NZW rabbit ocular models. In vivo Ig antiviral results were compared with those obtained with topical 0.5% cidofovir and saline. Results In three different epithelial cell lines, ≤6.25 mg/mL of the Ig neutralized several wild-type adenoviral serotypes that cause ocular infections. A dose of ≤10 mg/mL neutralized 88% of ocular isolates of the adenovirus serotypes. After treatment of infected animals, adenovirus-positive cultures per total cultures (days 1–14; P = 0.021), the duration of Ad5 shedding, (P = 0.008), and the mean combined ocular viral titer during the early (days 1–5; P = 0.0001) and the late (days 7–14; P = 0.013) phases of infection were significantly lower in Ig-treated animals than in saline-treated animals and were similar to those in cidofovir-treated animals. Conclusions Ig demonstrated antiviral properties against multiple adenoviral serotypes in vitro and in the Ad5/NZW rabbit ocular model. Further studies are needed to advance topical immunoglobulin for treatment and prophylaxis of ocular infections. PMID:17724203

  8. Transplantation of ocular stem cells: the role of injury in incorporation and differentiation of grafted cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Chacko, David M; Das, Ani V; Zhao, Xing; James, Jackson; Bhattacharya, Sumitra; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2003-04-01

    The incorporation of transplanted cells into the host retina is one of the prerequisites for successful cell replacement therapy to treat retinal degeneration. To test the hypothesis that injury promotes cell incorporation, stem cells/progenitors were isolated from the retina, ciliary epithelium or limbal epithelium and transplanted into the eyes of rats with retinal injury. Different stem cell/progenitor populations incorporated into traumatized or diseased retina but not into the normal retina. The proportion of cells incorporated into the inner retina was consistently higher than in the outer retina. The transplanted cells expressed markers specific to cells of the lamina into which they were incorporated suggesting that cues for specific differentiation are localized within the inner and outer retina. These findings demonstrate that injury-induced cues play a significant role in promoting the incorporation of ocular stem cells/progenitors regardless of their origin or their differentiation along specific retinal sublineage. PMID:12668063

  9. A Unifying Concept of Uveal Pigment Cell Distribution and Dissemination Based on an Animal Model: Insights into Ocular Melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Christoph; Wackernagel, Werner; Grinninger, Petra; Mayer, Christoph; Schwab, Katharina; Langmann, Gerald; Richtig, Erika; Wedrich, Andreas; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Zalaudek, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented cells are derived from neural crest cells, which migrate along the peripheral nerve sheets into their specific final region. During their migration, cells progressively acquire pigment-producing capabilities, maturation, and the shape of melanocytes. These insights, along with specific clinical characteristics of melanocytic nevi, have led to new concepts of cutaneous, periocular, and iris nevogenesis. To further elucidate the specific ocular embryogenic melanoblast distribution and dissemination - that could explain the distinct distribution of uveal melanocytic neoplasms - we investigated the ocular pigmentation of dogs affected by a specific mutation called Merle, which results in either pigment- (wild type) or non-pigment- (mutated type) producing cells. Based on our observations, we propose a unifying concept of uveal pigment cell distribution and dissemination, which postulates melanoblast migration and maturation following the trigeminal V1 branch and, later, their entrance into the eye along the ciliary nerves and their finest iris branches. Our concept provides an explanation not only for the specific distribution of ocular melanocytic lesions, including uveal and iris nevi, but also for the different locations depending on the metastatic potential of the ocular melanoma. Though speculative, the higher metastatic potential of posterior uveal melanomas compared to iris melanomas may be related to a less differentiated stage in the maturation of migrating melanocytes in the posterior segment compared to the anterior segment of the eye. However, there is a need of further studies focusing on cell differentiation markers of melanocytes at different locations in the eye. PMID:27002320

  10. Muller glia, vision-guided ocular growth, retinal stem cells, and a little serendipity: the Cogan lecture.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andy J

    2011-09-01

    Hypothesis-driven science is expected to result in a continuum of studies and findings along a discrete path. By comparison, serendipity can lead to new directions that branch into different paths. Herein, I describe a diverse series of findings that were motivated by hypotheses, but driven by serendipity. I summarize how investigations into vision-guided ocular growth in the chick eye led to the identification of glucagonergic amacrine cells as key regulators of ocular elongation. Studies designed to assess the impact of the ablation of different types of neurons on vision-guided ocular growth led to the finding of numerous proliferating cells within damaged retinas. These proliferating cells were Müller glia-derived retinal progenitors with a capacity to produce new neurons. Studies designed to investigate Müller glia-derived progenitors led to the identification of a domain of neural stem cells that form a circumferential marginal zone (CMZ) that lines the periphery of the retina. Accelerated ocular growth, caused by visual deprivation, stimulated the proliferation of CMZ progenitors. We formulated a hypothesis that growth-regulating glucagonergic cells may regulate both overall eye size (scleral growth) and the growth of the retina (proliferation of CMZ cells). Subsequent studies identified unusual types of glucagonergic neurons with terminals that ramify within the CMZ; these cells use visual cues to control equatorial ocular growth and the proliferation of CMZ cells. Finally, while studying the signaling pathways that stimulate CMZ and Müller glia-derived progenitors, serendipity led to the discovery of a novel type of glial cell that is scattered across the inner retinal layers. PMID:21960640

  11. A Comparative Study of the Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Limbal Epithelial Stem Cells for Ocular Surface Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Trosan, Peter; Cejka, Cestmir; Javorkova, Eliska; Zajicova, Alena; Hermankova, Barbora; Chudickova, Milada; Cejkova, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy has become an attractive and promising approach for the treatment of severe injuries or thus-far incurable diseases. However, the use of stem cells is often limited by a shortage of available tissue-specific stem cells; therefore, other sources of stem cells are being investigated and tested. In this respect, mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have proven to be a promising stem cell type. In the present study, we prepared MSCs from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) or adipose tissue (Ad-MSCs) as well as limbal epithelial stem cells (LSCs), and their growth, differentiation, and secretory properties were compared. The cells were grown on nanofiber scaffolds and transferred onto the alkali-injured eye in a rabbit model, and their therapeutic potential was characterized. We found that BM-MSCs and tissue-specific LSCs had similar therapeutic effects. Clinical characterization of the healing process, as well as the evaluation of corneal thickness, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and the suppression of a local inflammatory reaction, were comparable in the BM-MSC- and LSC-treated eyes, but results were significantly better than in injured, untreated eyes or in eyes treated with a nanofiber scaffold alone or with a nanofiber scaffold seeded with Ad-MSCs. Taken together, the results show that BM-MSCs’ therapeutic effect on healing of injured corneal surface is comparable to that of tissue-specific LSCs. We suggest that BM-MSCs can be used for ocular surface regeneration in cases when autologous LSCs are absent or difficult to obtain. Significance Damage of ocular surface represents one of the most common causes of impaired vision or even blindness. Cell therapy, based on transplantation of stem cells, is an optimal treatment. However, if limbal stem cells (LSCs) are not available, other sources of stem cells are tested. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a convenient type of cell for stem cell therapy. The therapeutic potential of LSCs and MSCs was

  12. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; van Rhoon, G C; Verduijn, G M; Naus-Postema, N C; Paulides, M M

    2016-01-21

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg(-1)) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients' feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R (2) =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature simulations as a

  13. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Verduijn, G. M.; Naus-Postema, N. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg-1) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients’ feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R 2  =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature

  14. Dual adaptation and adaptive generalization of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R. B.; Bridgeman, B.; Williams, J. A.; Semmler, R.

    1998-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the possibility that the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is subject to dual adaptation (the ability to adapt to a sensory rearrangement more rapidly and/or more completely after repeated experience with it) and adaptive generalization (the ability to adapt more readily to a novel sensory rearrangement as a result of prior dual adaptation training). In Experiment 1, the subjects actively turned the head during alternating exposure to a visual-vestibular rearrangement (target/head gain = 0.5) and the normal situation (target/head gain = 0.0). These conditions produced both adaptation and dual adaptation of the VOR but no evidence of adaptive generalization when tested with a target/head gain of 1.0. Experiment 2, in which exposure to the 0.5 gain entailed externally controlled (i.e., passive) whole body rotation, resulted in VOR adaptation but no dual adaptation. As in Experiment 1, no evidence of adaptive generalization was found.

  15. Human ocular filariasis: further evidence on the zoonotic role of Onchocerca lupi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among ocular vector-borne pathogens, Onchocerca volvulus, the agent of the so-called “river blindness”, affects about 37 million people globally. Other Onchocerca spp. have been sporadically reported as zoonotic agents. Cases of canine onchocerciasis caused by Onchocerca lupi are on the rise in the United States and Europe. Its zoonotic role has been suspected but only recently ascertained in a single case from Turkey. The present study provides further evidence on the occurrence of O. lupi infesting human eyes in two patients from Turkey (case 1) and Tunisia (case 2). The importance of obtaining a correct sample collection and preparation of nematodes infesting human eyes is highlighted. Methods In both cases the parasites were identified with morpho-anatomical characters at the gross examination, histological analysis and anatomical description and also molecularly in case 1. Results The nematode from the first case was obviously O. lupi based on their morphology at the gross examination, histological analysis and anatomical description. In the second case, although the diagnostic cuticular characters were not completely developed, other features were congruent with the identification of O. lupi. Furthermore, the morphological identification was also molecularly confirmed in the Turkish case. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that O. lupi infestation is not an occasional finding but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of other zoonotic helminths causing eye infestation in humans (e.g., D. immitis and Dirofilaria repens). Both cases came from areas where no cases of canine onchocerciasis were previously reported in the literature, suggesting that an in depth appraisal of the infestation in canine populations is necessary. Physicians and ophthalmologists are advised on how to preserve nematode samples recovered surgically, to allow a definitive, correct etiological diagnosis. PMID:22541132

  16. In Vivo Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy of Human Meibomian Glands in Aging and Ocular Surface Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fasanella, Vincenzo; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Brescia, Lorenza; Di Staso, Federico; Ciancaglini, Marco; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Meibomian glands (MGs) play a crucial role in the ocular surface homeostasis by providing lipids to the superficial tear film. Their dysfunction destabilizes the tear film leading to a progressive loss of the ocular surface equilibrium and increasing the risk for dry eye. In fact, nowadays, the meibomian gland dysfunction is one of the leading causes of dry eye. Over the past decades, MGs have been mainly studied by using meibography, which, however, cannot image the glandular structure at a cellular level. The diffusion of the in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) provided a new approach for the structural assessment of MGs permitting a major step in the noninvasive evaluation of these structures. LSCM is capable of showing MGs modifications during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases such as dry eye, allergy, and autoimmune conditions and in the drug-induced ocular surface disease. On the other hand, LSCM may help clinicians in monitoring the tissue response to therapy. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge about the role of in vivo LSCM in the assessment of MGs during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases. PMID:27047965

  17. In Vivo Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy of Human Meibomian Glands in Aging and Ocular Surface Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fasanella, Vincenzo; Agnifili, Luca; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Brescia, Lorenza; Di Staso, Federico; Ciancaglini, Marco; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Meibomian glands (MGs) play a crucial role in the ocular surface homeostasis by providing lipids to the superficial tear film. Their dysfunction destabilizes the tear film leading to a progressive loss of the ocular surface equilibrium and increasing the risk for dry eye. In fact, nowadays, the meibomian gland dysfunction is one of the leading causes of dry eye. Over the past decades, MGs have been mainly studied by using meibography, which, however, cannot image the glandular structure at a cellular level. The diffusion of the in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) provided a new approach for the structural assessment of MGs permitting a major step in the noninvasive evaluation of these structures. LSCM is capable of showing MGs modifications during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases such as dry eye, allergy, and autoimmune conditions and in the drug-induced ocular surface disease. On the other hand, LSCM may help clinicians in monitoring the tissue response to therapy. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge about the role of in vivo LSCM in the assessment of MGs during aging and in the most diffuse ocular surface diseases. PMID:27047965

  18. Ocular motor responses to abrupt interaural head translation in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramat, Stefano; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We characterized the interaural translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in 6 normal humans to brief (approximately 200 ms), high-acceleration (0.4-1.4g) stimuli, while they fixed targets at 15 or 30 cm. The latency was 19 +/- 5 ms at 15-cm and 20 +/- 12 ms at 30-cm viewing. The gain was quantified using the ratio of actual to ideal behavior. The median position gain (at time of peak head velocity) was 0.38 and 0.37, and the median velocity gain, 0.52 and 0.62, at 15- and 30-cm viewing, respectively. These results suggest the tVOR scales proportionally at these viewing distances. Likewise, at both viewing distances, peak eye velocity scaled linearly with peak head velocity and gain was independent of peak head acceleration. A saccade commonly occurred in the compensatory direction, with a greater latency (165 vs. 145 ms) and lesser amplitude (1.8 vs. 3.2 deg) at 30- than 15-cm viewing. Even with saccades, the overall gain at the end of head movement was still considerably undercompensatory (medians 0.68 and 0.77 at 15- and 30-cm viewing). Monocular viewing was also assessed at 15-cm viewing. In 4 of 6 subjects, gains were the same as during binocular viewing and scaled closely with vergence angle. In sum the low tVOR gain and scaling of the response with viewing distance and head velocity extend previous results to higher acceleration stimuli. tVOR latency (approximately 20 ms) was lower than previously reported. Saccades are an integral part of the tVOR, and also scale with viewing distance.

  19. Human short-latency ocular vergence responses produced by interocular velocity differences.

    PubMed

    Sheliga, B M; Quaia, C; FitzGibbon, E J; Cumming, B G

    2016-08-01

    We studied human short-latency vergence eye movements to a novel stimulus that produces interocular velocity differences without a changing disparity signal. Sinusoidal luminance gratings moved in opposite directions (left vs. right; up vs. down) in the two eyes. The grating seen by each eye underwent ¼-wavelength shifts with each image update. This arrangement eliminated changing disparity cues, since the phase difference between the eyes alternated between 0° and 180°. We nevertheless observed robust short-latency vergence responses (VRs), whose sign was consistent with the interocular velocity differences (IOVDs), indicating that the IOVD cue in isolation can evoke short-latency VRs. The IOVD cue was effective only when the images seen by the two eyes overlapped in space. We observed equally robust VRs for opposite horizontal motions (left in one eye, right in the other) and opposite vertical motions (up in one eye, down in the other). Whereas the former are naturally generated by objects moving in depth, the latter are not part of our normal experience. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a behavioral consequence of vertical IOVD. This may reflect the fact that some neurons in area MT are sensitive to these motion signals (Czuba, Huk, Cormack, & Kohn, 2014). VRs were the strongest for spatial frequencies in the range of 0.35-1 c/°, much higher than the optimal spatial frequencies for evoking ocular-following responses observed during frontoparallel motion. This suggests that the two motion signals are detected by different neuronal populations. We also produced IOVD using moving uncorrelated one-dimensional white-noise stimuli. In this case the most effective stimuli have low speed, as predicted if the drive originates in neurons tuned to high spatial frequencies (Sheliga, Quaia, FitzGibbon, & Cumming, 2016). PMID:27548089

  20. Human short-latency ocular vergence responses produced by interocular velocity differences

    PubMed Central

    Sheliga, B. M.; Quaia, C.; FitzGibbon, E. J.; Cumming, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    We studied human short-latency vergence eye movements to a novel stimulus that produces interocular velocity differences without a changing disparity signal. Sinusoidal luminance gratings moved in opposite directions (left vs. right; up vs. down) in the two eyes. The grating seen by each eye underwent ¼-wavelength shifts with each image update. This arrangement eliminated changing disparity cues, since the phase difference between the eyes alternated between 0° and 180°. We nevertheless observed robust short-latency vergence responses (VRs), whose sign was consistent with the interocular velocity differences (IOVDs), indicating that the IOVD cue in isolation can evoke short-latency VRs. The IOVD cue was effective only when the images seen by the two eyes overlapped in space. We observed equally robust VRs for opposite horizontal motions (left in one eye, right in the other) and opposite vertical motions (up in one eye, down in the other). Whereas the former are naturally generated by objects moving in depth, the latter are not part of our normal experience. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a behavioral consequence of vertical IOVD. This may reflect the fact that some neurons in area MT are sensitive to these motion signals (Czuba, Huk, Cormack, & Kohn, 2014). VRs were the strongest for spatial frequencies in the range of 0.35–1 c/°, much higher than the optimal spatial frequencies for evoking ocular-following responses observed during frontoparallel motion. This suggests that the two motion signals are detected by different neuronal populations. We also produced IOVD using moving uncorrelated one-dimensional white-noise stimuli. In this case the most effective stimuli have low speed, as predicted if the drive originates in neurons tuned to high spatial frequencies (Sheliga, Quaia, FitzGibbon, & Cumming, 2016). PMID:27548089

  1. The effect of retinal image error update rate on human vestibulo-ocular reflex gain adaptation.

    PubMed

    Fadaee, Shannon B; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2016-04-01

    The primary function of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is to stabilise images on the retina during head movements. Retinal image movement is the likely feedback signal that drives VOR modification/adaptation for different viewing contexts. However, it is not clear whether a retinal image position or velocity error is used primarily as the feedback signal. Recent studies examining this signal are limited because they used near viewing to modify the VOR. However, it is not known whether near viewing drives VOR adaptation or is a pre-programmed contextual cue that modifies the VOR. Our study is based on analysis of the VOR evoked by horizontal head impulses during an established adaptation task. Fourteen human subjects underwent incremental unilateral VOR adaptation training and were tested using the scleral search coil technique over three separate sessions. The update rate of the laser target position (source of the retinal image error signal) used to drive VOR adaptation was different for each session [50 (once every 20 ms), 20 and 15/35 Hz]. Our results show unilateral VOR adaptation occurred at 50 and 20 Hz for both the active (23.0 ± 9.6 and 11.9 ± 9.1% increase on adapting side, respectively) and passive VOR (13.5 ± 14.9, 10.4 ± 12.2%). At 15 Hz, unilateral adaptation no longer occurred in the subject group for both the active and passive VOR, whereas individually, 4/9 subjects tested at 15 Hz had significant adaptation. Our findings suggest that 1-2 retinal image position error signals every 100 ms (i.e. target position update rate 15-20 Hz) are sufficient to drive VOR adaptation. PMID:26715411

  2. Ocular Reflex Phase During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation In Humans Is Modified By Head-On-Trunk Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott; Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard

    2005-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both horizontal and torsional eye velocity as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the modulation of these ocular reflexes would be modified by different head-on-trunk positions. Ten human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple cycles for each head-on-trunk position. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of torsional eye movements was greater at 0.125 Hz while the modulation of horizontal eye movements was greater at 0.5 Hz. Neither amplitude nor bias velocities were significantly altered by head-on-trunk position. The phases of both torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes, on the other hand, shifted towards alignment with the head. These results are consistent with the modulation of torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes during OVAR being primarily mediated by the otoliths in response to the sinusoidally varying linear acceleration along the interaural head axis.

  3. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase decreases elevated levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and apoptotic cell death in ocular hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, Mutay; Basaranlar, Goksun; Unal, Mustafa; Ciftcioglu, Akif; Derin, Narin; Mutus, Bulent

    2014-11-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and excessive nitric oxide production via induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuronal retinal cell death in ocular hypertension. Neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase)/ceramide pathway can regulate NOS2 expression, hence this study determined the role of selective neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) inhibition on retinal NOS2 levels, ER stress, apoptosis and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in a rat model of elevated intraocular pressure (EIOP). NOS2 expression and retinal protein nitration were significantly greater in EIOP and significantly decreased with N-SMase inhibition. A significant increase was observed in retinal ER stress markers pPERK, CHOP and GRP78 in EIOP, which were not significantly altered by N-SMase inhibition. Retinal TUNEL staining showed increased apoptosis in all EIOP groups; however N-SMase inhibition significantly decreased the percent of apoptotic cells in EIOP. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities were significantly increased in EIOP and returned to baseline levels following N-SMase inhibition. Latencies of all VEP components were significantly prolonged in EIOP and shortened following N-SMase inhibition. Data confirm the role of nitrative injury in EIOP and highlight the protective effect of N-SMase inhibition in EIOP via down-regulation of NOS2 levels and nitrative stress. - Highlights: • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases NOS2 levels in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases protein nitration in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases caspase activation in ocular hypertension. • Inhibition of N-SMase decreases apoptosis in ocular hypertension.

  4. The dynamic contributions of the otolith organs to human ocular torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Teiwes, W.; Clarke, A. H.; Scherer, H.; Young, L. R.

    1996-01-01

    We measured human ocular torsion (OT) monocularly (using video) and binocularly (using search coils) while sinusoidally accelerating (0.7 g) five human subjects along an earth-horizontal axis at five frequencies (0.35, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 Hz). The compensatory nature of OT was investigated by changing the relative orientation of the dynamic (linear acceleration) and static (gravitational) cues. Four subject orientations were investigated: (1) Y-upright-acceleration along the interaural (y) axis while upright; (2) Y-supine-acceleration along the y-axis while supine; (3) Z-RED-acceleration along the dorsoventral (z) axis with right ear down; (4) Z-supine-acceleration along the z-axis while supine. Linear acceleration in the Y-upright, Y-supine and Z-RED orientations elicited conjugate OT. The smaller response in the Z-supine orientation appeared disconjugate. The amplitude of the response decreased and the phase lag increased with increasing frequency for each orientation. This frequency dependence does not match the frequency response of the regular or irregular afferent otolith neurons; therefore the response dynamics cannot be explained by simple peripheral mechanisms. The Y-upright responses were larger than the Y-supine responses (P < 0.05). This difference indicates that OT must be more complicated than a simple low-pass filtered response to interaural shear force, since the dynamic shear force along the interaural axis was identical in these two orientations. The Y-supine responses were, in turn, larger than the Z-RED responses (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the vector sum of the Y-supine responses plus Z-RED responses was not significantly different (P = 0.99) from the Y-upright responses. This suggests that, in this frequency range, the conjugate OT response during Y-upright stimulation might be composed of two components: (1) a response to shear force along the y-axis (as in Y-supine stimulation), and (2) a response to roll tilt of gravitoinertial force (as

  5. Human ocular torsion during parabolic flights: an analysis with scleral search coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, B. S.; Money, K.; Howard, I.; Kirienko, N.; Johnson, W.; Lackner, J.; Dizio, P.; Evanoff, J.

    1992-01-01

    Rotation of the eyes about the visual axis is known as ocular torsion. A lateral inclination (a "roll") of the head induces ocular torsion in the opposite direction, a response known as ocular counterrolling. For six subjects, we recorded the static (head still) and dynamic (head in oscillatory roll motion) ocular torsion in normal 1 g condition and also during the microgravity and hypergravity periods of parabolic flight, using the electromagnetic scleral search coil technique. With the head still, the direction and magnitude of torsion that occurred in response to microgravity and hypergravity differed substantially from one individual to another, but there was a significant difference in torsional magnitude between the microgravity and hypergravity periods, for all static head positions including the upright position. Under normal 1 g conditions, counterrolling compensated for about 16% of (voluntary) static head roll, while dynamic counterroll was much larger, up to 36% of head roll at 0.55 Hz. With increasing frequency of head oscillation between 0.33 Hz and 0.55 Hz, the gain of counterrolling increased and there was no change in the phase relationship. The gain of dynamic counterroll (in response to voluntary head rolling) was not significantly less in hypogravity, suggesting that on the ground at these frequencies the contribution of gravity and gravity receptors to this reflex is redundant: this reflex is probably driven by the semicircular canals. In some subjects, the torsional displacement in microgravity is accompanied by micro-torsional oscillatory motion.

  6. A Novel Cell-Associated Protection Assay Demonstrates the Ability of Certain Antibiotics To Protect Ocular Surface Cell Lines from Subsequent Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Challenge▿†

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, J. B.; Romanowski, E. G.; Kowalski, R. P.; Mah, F. S.; Ling, Y.; Bilonick, R. A.; Shanks, R. M. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo effectiveness of topical antibiotics may depend on their ability to associate with epithelial cells to provide continued protection, but this contribution is not measured by standard antibiotic susceptibility tests. We report a new in vitro method that measures the ability of test antibiotics azithromycin (AZM), erythromycin (ERY), tetracycline (TET), and bacitracin (BAC) to associate with mammalian cells and to protect these cells from destruction by bacteria. Mammalian cell lines were grown to confluence using antibiotic-free medium and then incubated in medium containing a single antibiotic (0 to 512 μg/ml). After incubation, the cells were challenged with Staphylococcus aureus ocular isolates, without antibiotics added to the culture medium. Epithelial cell layer integrity was assessed by gentian violet staining, and the minimum cell layer protective concentration (MCPC) of an antibiotic sufficient to protect the mammalian cells from S. aureus was determined. Staining was also quantified and analyzed. Bacterial viability was determined by culture turbidity and growth on agar plates. Preincubation of Chang and human corneal limbal epithelial cells with AZM, ERY, and TET at ≥64 μg/ml provided protection against AZM-susceptible S. aureus strains, with increasing protection at higher concentrations. TET toxicity was demonstrated at >64 μg/ml, whereas AZM displayed toxicity to one cell line at 512 μg/ml. BAC failed to show consistent protection at any dose, despite bacterial susceptibility to BAC as determined by traditional antibiotic susceptibility testing. A range of antibiotic effectiveness was displayed in this cell association assay, providing data that may be considered in addition to traditional testing when determining therapeutic dosing regimens. PMID:21628536

  7. Differential Expression of Stem Cell Markers in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Dilip Kumar; Veena, Uppala; Kaliki, Swathi; Kethiri, Abhinav Reddy; Sangwan, Virender S; Ali, Mohammed Hasnat; Naik, Milind N; Singh, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasm (OSSN) is the neoplasia arising from the conjunctiva, cornea and limbus. OSSN ranges from mild, moderate, severe dysplasia, carcinoma in situ (CIS) to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recent findings on cancer stem cells theory indicate that population of stem-like cell as in neoplasia determines its heterogeneity and complexity leading to varying tumor development of metastatic behavior and recurrence. Cancer stem cell markers are not much explored in the cases of OSSN. In the present study, we aim to evaluate the expression of stem cells using stem cell markers mainly p63, ABCG2, c-KIT (CD117) and CD44 in OSSN tissue, which could have prognostic significance. The present study tries for the first time to explore expression of these stem markers in the cases of OSSN. These cases are subdivided into two groups. One group comprises of carcinoma in situ (n = 6) and the second group comprises of invasive carcinoma (n = 6). The mean age at presentation was 52 years; with 53 years for CIS group and 52 years for SCC group. From each group section from the paraffin block were taken for the IHC staining of p63, c-Kit, ABCG2 and CD44. Our experiments show high expression of P63 and CD44 in the cases of CIN and SCC. Both CIS and SCC displayed positive staining with p63, with more than 80% cells staining positive. However minimal expression of c-kit in both CIN and SCC. But surprisingly we got high expression of ABCG2 in cases of carcinoma in situ as compared to that of invasive squamous cell carcinoma. More than 50% of cells showed CD44 positivity in both CIS and SCC groups. Our results show for the first time that these four stem cells especially the limbal epithelium stem cells play a vital role in the genesis of OSSN but we need to explore more cases before establishing its clinical and biological significance. PMID:27584160

  8. Glycobiology of ocular angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Anna I; Cao, Zhiyi; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2014-12-01

    Ocular neovascularization can affect almost all the tissues of the eye: the cornea, the iris, the retina, and the choroid. Pathological neovascularization is the underlying cause of vision loss in common ocular conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age-related macular neovascularization. Glycosylation is the most common covalent posttranslational modification of proteins in mammalian cells. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that glycosylation influences the process of angiogenesis and impacts activation, proliferation, and migration of endothelial cells as well as the interaction of angiogenic endothelial cells with other cell types necessary to form blood vessels. Recent studies have provided evidence that members of the galectin class of β-galactoside-binding proteins modulate angiogenesis by novel carbohydrate-based recognition systems involving interactions between glycans of angiogenic cell surface receptors and galectins. This review discusses the significance of glycosylation and the role of galectins in the pathogenesis of ocular neovascularization. PMID:25108228

  9. EGCG prevents tryptophan oxidation of cataractous ocular lens human γ-crystallin in presence of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Ghosh, Ishita; Saha, Gautam; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the short range order of proteins present in the ocular lens leads to cataract resulting in a loss of transparency. Human γ-crystallin (HGC), a water soluble protein present in the lens is known to aggregate with aging. A modified form of HGC (HGC(c)) was isolated from cataractous human ocular lens extract and the number of Trp residues that undergo oxidation was determined. The extent of oxidized Trp (N-formyl kynurenine) in HGC due to cataract formation was determined, primarily using fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to retain its antioxidant effect even in the presence of H2O2 was investigated. This was monitored by its ability to prevent the modification of intact Trp residues in HGC(c) isolated from cataractous human eye lens. Significant Trp fluorescence quenching occurs on interaction of the green tea component, EGCG with HGC(c) accompanied by a red shift. Docking studies were employed to substantiate the experimental results. As eye lens proteins are prone to oxidative stress it is essential that a clear understanding of the effects of the components generated in vivo vis-à-vis the antioxidant effects of natural polyphenols be obtained. PMID:25841365

  10. Ocular blood flow decreases during passive heat stress in resting humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heat stress induces various physiological changes and so could influence ocular circulation. This study examined the effect of heat stress on ocular blood flow. Findings Ocular blood flow, end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) and blood pressure were measured for 12 healthy subjects wearing water-perfused tube-lined suits under two conditions of water circulation: (1) at 35°C (normothermia) for 30 min and (2) at 50°C for 90 min (passive heat stress). The blood-flow velocities in the superior temporal retinal arteriole (STRA), superior nasal retinal arteriole (SNRA), and the retinal and choroidal vessels (RCV) were measured using laser-speckle flowgraphy. Blood flow in the STRA and SNRA was calculated from the integral of a cross-sectional map of blood velocity. PETCO2 was clamped at the normothermia level by adding 5% CO2 to the inspired gas. Passive heat stress had no effect on the subjects’ blood pressures. The blood-flow velocity in the RCV was significantly lower after 30, 60 and 90 min of passive heat stress than the normothermic level, with a peak decrease of 18 ± 3% (mean ± SE) at 90 min. Blood flow in the STRA and SNRA decreased significantly after 90 min of passive heat stress conditions, with peak decreases of 14 ± 3% and 14 ± 4%, respectively. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that passive heat stress decreases ocular blood flow irrespective of the blood pressure or arterial partial pressure of CO2. PMID:24314154

  11. The human sound-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex and its electromyographic correlate

    PubMed Central

    Welgampola, Miriam S; Migliaccio, Americo A; Myrie, Oluwaseun A; Minor, Lloyd B; Carey, John P

    2009-01-01

    Objective Sound and vibration evoke a short-latency eye movement or “sound-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex” (VOR) and an infraorbital surface potential: the “ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential” (OVEMP). We examined their relationship by measuring the modulation of both responses by gaze and stimulus parameters. Methods In seven subjects with superior semicircular-canal dehiscence (SCD) and six controls, the sound-evoked VOR was measured in 3D using scleral search-coils. OVEMPs were recorded simultaneously, using surface electromyography. Results Eye movement onset (11.6±0.8ms) coincided with the OVEMP peak (12.1±0.35ms). OVEMP and VOR magnitudes were 5-15 times larger in SCD compared with controls. OVEMP amplitudes were maximal on up-gaze and abolished on down-gaze; VOR magnitudes were unaffected. When stimulus type was changed from sound to vibration, OVEMP and VOR changed concordantly: increasing in controls and decreasing in SCD. OVEMP and VOR tuned to identical stimulus frequencies. OVEMP and VOR magnitudes on up-gaze were significantly correlated (R=0.83-0.97). Conclusion Selective decrease of the OVEMP upon down-gaze is consistent with relaxation or retraction of the inferior oblique muscles. The temporal relationship of OVEMP and VOR and their identical modulation by external factors confirms a common origin. Significance Sound-evoked OVEMP and VOR represent the electrical and mechanical correlates of the same vestibulo-ocular response. PMID:19070541

  12. HLA-A02:01-restricted epitopes identified from the herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP11/12 preferentially recall polyfunctional effector memory CD8+ T cells from seropositive asymptomatic individuals and protect humanized HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice against ocular herpes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Spencer, Doran; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Huang, Jiawei; Scarfone, Vanessa M; Nesburn, Anthony B; Wechsler, Steven L; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-03-01

    The HSV type 1 tegument virion phosphoprotein (VP) 11/12 (VP11/12) is a major Ag targeted by CD8(+) T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether and which VP11/12 epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells play a role in the "natural" protection seen in seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction computer-assisted algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitopes from the 718-aa sequence of VP11/12. Three of 10 epitopes exhibited high-to-moderate binding affinity to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In 10 sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01-positive and HSV-1-seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust, and polyfunctional effector CD8(+) T cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer frequency, granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, CD107(a/b) cytotoxic degranulation, IFN-γ, and multiplex cytokines assays, were predominantly directed against three epitopes: VP11/1266-74, VP11/12220-228, and VP11/12702-710. Interestingly, ASYMP individuals had a significantly higher proportion of CD45RA(low)CCR7(low)CD44(high)CD62L(low)CD27(low)CD28(low)CD8(+) effector memory CD8(+) T cells (TEMs) specific to the three epitopes, compared with symptomatic individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpetic disease). Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three ASYMP CD8(+) TEM cell epitopes induced robust and polyfunctional epitope-specific CD8(+) TEM cells that were associated with a strong protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings outline phenotypic and functional features of protective HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells that should guide the development of an effective T cell-based herpes vaccine. PMID:25617474

  13. Hydrogels for ocular drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Marzieh; Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Omidi, Yadollah

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels, as crosslinked polymeric three dimensional networks, possess unique structure and behavior in response to the internal and/or external stimuli. As a result, they offer great prospective applications in drug delivery, cell therapy and human tissue engineering. Here, we highlight the potential of hydrogels in prolonged intraocular drug delivery and ocular surface therapy using stem cells incorporated hydrogels. PMID:26929918

  14. [Ocular syphilis].

    PubMed

    Chiquet, C; Khayi, H; Puech, C; Tonini, M; Pavese, P; Aptel, F; Romanet, J-P

    2014-04-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. Previously known as the "great imitator", this disease can have numerous and complex manifestations. The ophthalmologist should suspect the diagnosis in patients with uveitis or optic neuropathy and high-risk sexual behavior and/or another sexually transmitted disease (such as HIV) or those presenting with posterior placoid chorioretinitis or necrotising retinitis. Ocular involvement in acquired syphilis is rare, tending to occur during the secondary and tertiary stages of the disease. Syphilis may affect all the structures of the eye, but uveitis (accounting for 1-5% of the uveitis in a tertiary referral center) is the most common ocular finding. Granulomatous or non-granulomatous iridocyclitis (71%), panuveitis, posterior uveitis (8%) and keratouveitis (8%) are often described. In the secondary stage, the meninges and the central nervous system can be affected, sometimes with no symptoms, which justifies performing lumbar puncture in patients with uveitis and/or optic neuropathy. The diagnosis of ocular syphilis requires screening with a non-treponemal serology and confirmation with a treponemal-specific test. Parenterally administered penicillin G is considered first-line therapy for all stages of ocular syphilis. Systemic corticosteroids are an appropriate adjunct treatment for posterior uveitis, scleritis and optic neuritis if ocular inflammation is severe. Prolonged follow-up is necessary because of the possibility of relapse of the disease. With proper diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment, the majority of cases of ocular syphilis can be cured. PMID:24655791

  15. A direct test of Listing's law--I. Human ocular torsion measured in static tertiary positions.

    PubMed

    Ferman, L; Collewijn, H; Van den Berg, A V

    1987-01-01

    The validity of Listing's law was reinvestigated by means of a direct test. Horizontal, vertical and torsional eye movements were measured simultaneously with a recently developed scleral induction coil. Either eye of 4 subjects was measured monocularly. Eye position were measured in Fick coordinates and ocular torsion values were compared to the theoretical ones predicted by Listing's law. During consecutive measurements in the primary position torsion values were close to zero although considerable fluctuations of torsion were seen. Torsion values in the secondary positions were also close to zero. In the tertiary positions torsion in the direction as predicted by Listing's law and increasing with eccentricity was recorded. In the temporal quadrants mean torsion was quantitatively in agreement with Listing's law; torsion values in the nasal quadrants however showed systematically larger values and this discrepancy increased with eccentricity to more than 50%. Statistical support for this finding however, was seen only in 4 out of 8 eyes. Symmetry could be obtained by shifting the chosen horizontal primary position (gaze parallel to the midplane) in the temporal direction; as a consequence all measured torsion values would exceed the ones specified by Listing's law. Torsion values varied idiosyncratically among subjects and among the left and right eyes of any one subject. It is concluded that Listing's law specifies ocular torsion only approximately: physiological eye movements show considerable stochastical as well as systematical deviations from this law. PMID:3660654

  16. A comparison of the ocular hypotensive effect of 0.025% bromocriptine and 0.25% timolol eye drops in normal human volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    al-Sereiti, M R; Coakes, R L; O'Sullivan, D P; Turner, P

    1989-01-01

    1. The ocular hypotensive effect of 0.025% bromocriptine and 0.25% timolol eye drops was compared in nine healthy human volunteers, using non-contact tonometry. 2. Considering all post-dosing measurements compared with placebo and including the baseline values as continuous independent variables, using multiple linear regression analysis, both bromocriptine and timolol had a significant ocular hypotensive effect (P less than 0.0001) in the treated eye with a significant but lesser effect in the contralateral eye. 3. In the concentrations used, timolol was more efficacious than bromocriptine in lowering intraocular pressure (P less than 0.025). 4. Using other forms of vehicles for bromocriptine to improve efficacy and studying the ocular hypotensive effect of topical application of other dopamine-2-receptor agonists such as pergolide and lisuride was suggested. PMID:2590602

  17. Ocular Dominance Is Associated with the Ganglion Cell-Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness Profile in the Macula

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin A.; Kim, Jung-Sub; Jeong, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jin Ah; Park, Chan Kee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the characteristics of macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness profiles associated with ocular dominance. Setting Private practice, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Design Comparative case-control study. Methods Both eyes of 199 participants with no ophthalmic abnormalities were included. Participants were imaged by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and underwent dominant eye testing using a hole-in-a-card test (sighting dominance) at the same visit. Macular GCIPL, as well as circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness were compared for individual patients, according to ocular dominance. Results Ocular dominance occurred predominantly in the right eye (right vs. left: 72.36 vs. 27.60%; P < 0.001). In the comparison of macular GCIPL thickness, the average (81.27±5.01 μm vs. 80.66±6.31 μm in dominant vs. non-dominant eyes), inferonasal (81.39±5.47μm vs. 80.33±6.82μm, and inferior sectors (77.95±6.05μm vs. 76.97±8.15μm) were significantly different between dominant and non-dominant eyes (P = 0.040, 0.005, and 0.032, respectively). Significant predictors of average GCIPL thickness were spherical equivalent (β = 1.37, P<0.001), astigmatic power (β = 1.44, P = 0.009), disc area (β = 3.90, P < 0.001), average RNFL thickness (β = 0.22, P<0.001), average cup-to-disc ratio (β = 5.74, P = 0.002), difference between the inferior and superior quadrant RNFL thicknesses (β = 0.08, P = 0.024), and ocular dominance (β = 2.10, P = 0.020). On multivariate regression analysis, ocular dominance was correlated with average GCIPL thickness after adjusting for potential confounders (β = 1.63, P = 0.048). Conclusions Dominant eyes accompanied significantly thicker average macular GCIPL. This information suggests that macular GCIPL thickness may provide an indicator of the relative dominance of an eye. PMID:26918335

  18. [Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2002-12-01

    Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering using somatic stem cells is a second-generation modality. In order to treat bilaterally affected, severe ocular surface disorders, we investigated the transplantation of two types of cultivated mucosal epithelia: allogenic corneal epithelial stem cells, and autologous oral mucosal epithelial cells. For this, first, we summarized the clinical results of allogenic keratoepithelioplasty and limbal transplantation. In addition, we showed that the immunological shift from Th1 to Th2 by using keyhole limpet hemocyanin was effective in suppressing the incidence of immunological rejection. Second, we investigated the transplantation of cultivated human corneal epithelial stem cells onto amniotic membrane. The cultivated sheet was created by co-culture with 3T3 fibroblasts, using the air-lift method, in cultivating the corneal epithelial stem cell on the amniotic membrane. These cultivated cells demonstrated positive keratin 3 and 12 specific to in vivo corneal epithelium, tight junction related proteins, and telomerase activity. The transplanted allogenic human corneal epithelial sheet survived on the corneal surface in all cases, and was quite effective for achieving ocular surface stability in the acute phase of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, or chemical injury. However, a few cases developed immunological rejection or opportunistic infection. Third, to establish the transplantation of the autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial sheet, we performed animal experiments using rabbits. In vitro oral mucosal epithelial sheet showed histology similar to that of in vivo corneal epithelial sheet. It expressed positive keratin 3 as well. Since the autologous transplantation of this sheet survived on the ocular surface with the recovery of corneal transparency, a cultivated oral mucosal epithelium may become a substitute for corneal epithelium. Fourth, we created a cultivated human corneal

  19. Melatonin and Sleep-Wake Rhythms before and after Ocular Lens Replacement in Elderly Humans

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, Marina; Beersma, Domien; Daan, Serge; van der Pol, Bert; Kanis, Martijn; van Norren, Dick; Gordijn, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    Light of short wavelengths has been shown to play a key role in non-image forming responses. Due to aging, the ocular lens becomes more yellow reducing the transmission of short wavelengths in the elderly. In the present study, we make use of cataract surgery to investigate the effects of a relative increase of short wavelength transmission on melatonin- and sleep-wake rhythms (N = 14). We observed, on average, a delay of the sleep-wake and the nocturnal melatonin rhythms after cataract surgery. This delay is tentatively attributed to a relatively large increase of light transmittance in the evening hours more than an increase of the already relatively high light intensities found in the daytime. The later phase that we observed after cataract surgery (clear lens) as compared to the earlier phase observed before cataract (yellowish lens) is in agreement with the general later phase reported in the young (clear lens) population. PMID:26891336

  20. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Weight Loss and Reduced Body Temperature Determine Humane Endpoints in a Mouse Model of Ocular Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hankenson, F Claire; Ruskoski, Nicholas; van Saun, Marjorie; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Oh, Jaewook; Fraser, Nigel W

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been studied in well-established mouse models to generate latently infected animals for investigations into viral pathogenesis, latency mechanisms, and reactivation. Mice exhibit clinical signs of debilitating infection, during which time they may become severely ill before recovery or die spontaneously. Because the cohort of mice that does survive provides valuable data on latency, there is keen interest in developing methodologies for earlier detection and treatment of severe disease to ultimately increase survival rates. Here, BALB/c mice were inoculated ocularly with either a wildtype (LAT+) or mutant (LAT–) strain of HSV1. Mice were monitored daily through day 30 after infection; trigeminal ganglia were harvested at day 60 to assess viral DNA load. Cages were provided with nesting material, and fluid supplementation was administered to mice with body temperatures of 35 °C or lower, as measured by subcutaneous microchip thermometry. The results showed that infected mice with temperatures less than 34.5 °C did not recover to normothermia and were euthanized or spontaneously died, regardless of infective viral strain. By using a combination of criteria including body temperature (less than 34.5 °C) and weight loss (more than 0.05 g daily) for removal of animals from the study, approximately 98% of mice that died spontaneously could have been euthanized prior to death, without concern of potential recovery to the experimental endpoint (100% specificity). Frequent monitoring of alterations to general wellbeing, body temperature, and weight was crucial for establishing humane endpoints in this ocular HSV model. PMID:23849410

  2. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  3. Galectin-8 Ameliorates Murine Autoimmune Ocular Pathology and Promotes a Regulatory T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, James F.; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Mulki, Lama; Suryawanshi, Amol; Jiang, Shuhong; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Connor, Kip M.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Galectins have emerged as potent immunoregulatory agents that control chronic inflammation through distinct mechanisms. Here, we report that treatment with Galectin-8 (Gal-8), a tandem-repeat member of the galectin family, reduces retinal pathology and prevents photoreceptor cell damage in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveitis. Gal-8 treatment increased the number of regulatory T cells (Treg) in both the draining lymph node (dLN) and the inflamed retina. Moreover, a greater percentage of Treg cells in the dLN and retina of Gal-8 treated animals expressed the inhibitory coreceptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4, the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and the tissue-homing integrin CD103. Treg cells in the retina of Gal-8-treated mice were primarily inducible Treg cells that lack the expression of neuropilin-1. In addition, Gal-8 treatment blunted production of inflammatory cytokines by retinal T helper type (TH) 1 and TH17 cells. The effect of Gal-8 on T cell differentiation and/or function was specific for tissues undergoing an active immune response, as Gal-8 treatment had no effect on T cell populations in the spleen. Given the need for rational therapies for managing human uveitis, Gal-8 emerges as an attractive therapeutic candidate not only for treating retinal autoimmune diseases, but also for other TH1- and TH17-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26126176

  4. Protection of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Retinal Vasculature by Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in a Mouse Model of Acute Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Feng, Qian; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Lin, Bin; Chung, Sookja Kim; So, Kwok-Fai

    2012-01-01

    Acute ocular hypertension (AOH) is a condition found in acute glaucoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) and its protective mechanisms in the AOH insult. LBP has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effect in the chronic ocular hypertension (COH) experiments. AOH mouse model was induced in unilateral eye for one hour by introducing 90 mmHg ocular pressure. The animal was fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily from 7 days before the AOH insult till sacrifice at either day 4 or day 7 post insult. The neuroprotective effects of LBP on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and blood-retinal-barrier (BRB) were evaluated. In control AOH retina, loss of RGCs, thinning of IRL thickness, increased IgG leakage, broken tight junctions, and decreased density of retinal blood vessels were observed. However, in LBP-treated AOH retina, there was less loss of RGCs with thinning of IRL thickness, IgG leakage, more continued structure of tight junctions associated with higher level of occludin protein and the recovery of the blood vessel density when compared with vehicle-treated AOH retina. Moreover, we found that LBP provides neuroprotection by down-regulating RAGE, ET-1, Aβ and AGE in the retina, as well as their related signaling pathways, which was related to inhibiting vascular damages and the neuronal degeneration in AOH insults. The present study suggests that LBP could prevent damage to RGCs from AOH-induced ischemic injury; furthermore, through its effects on blood vessel protection, LBP would also be a potential treatment for vascular-related retinopathy. PMID:23094016

  5. Local resolved spectroscopy at the human ocular fundus in vivo: technique and clinical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Scibor, Mateusz

    1996-01-01

    Ocular fundus reflectometry is known as a method for the determination of the optical density of pigments at the eye ground. This has been described for diagnostic investigations at single locations. The new technique of imaging spectroscopy enables the recording of one dimensional local distribution of spectra from the fundus which is illuminated confocal to the entrance slit of a spectrograph. A fundus reflectometer consisting of a Zeiss fundus camera, an imaging spectrograph, and an intensified CCD-camera are presented. The local resolved spectra gained by this apparatus are approximated by a mathematical model on the basis of the anatomy of the fundus as a structure of layers with different optical properties. Each spectrum is assumed to be described by a function of the absorption spectra of the pigments found in the retinal and choroidal tissue. Assuming the existence of parameters which are independent from the fundus location we have to approximate the measured local distribution of spectra by a system of coupled non-linear equations. By a least square fit the local distribution of the extinction of melanin, xantophyll and hemoglobin may be obtained as well as the extension of pathologic alterations at the fundus. The benefits of the method for clinical diagnostics are discussed at first measurements from physiological and pathological examples.

  6. Alterations of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex in a simulated dive at 62 ATA.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, G M

    1976-06-01

    In an attempt to investigate some aspects of the high pressure nervous syndrome, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain was measured in two professional divers undergoing a simulated dive at 62 ATA. The aquanauts in a seated position were rotated sinusoidally around the vertical axis at a frequency of about 0.3 Hz over a 20 degrees range. Tests were performed at regular intervals prior to, during, and after the compression/decompression period. The rotations were applied either in total darkness or with a visual target rotating with the chair or with a target fixed to the chair-supporting frame. An infrared photoelectric system monitored eye movements. The results showed no spontaneous nystagmus, but two definite changes in VOR gain: (1) a slight but significant increase related to pressure increase, which may be due to an increase of the vestibular system excitability or a decrease of the cerebellar inhibition exerted upon the vestibular nuclei, and (2) an intermittently appearing increase (VOR gain between 1 and 1.3) during brief periods. The latter finding, not related to pressure, was interpreted as the expression of an underwater-adapted mode that may developed in professional divers submitted to the intensive use of magnifying diving-optical systems. PMID:951820

  7. Anisotropy in spatial summation properties of human Ocular-Following Response (OFR)

    PubMed Central

    Sheliga, B. M.; Quaia, C.; FitzGibbon, E. J.; Cumming, B.G.

    2015-01-01

    Using sinusoidal gratings we show that an increase in stimulus size confined to the dimension orthogonal to the axis of motion leads to stronger Ocular Following Responses (OFRs) up to a certain optimal size. An increase beyond this optimum produces smaller responses, indicating suppressive interactions. In sharp contrast, when the stimulus growth occurs parallel to the axis of motion OFR magnitudes increase monotonically both for horizontal and vertical directions of motion. Similar results are obtained with 1D white noise patterns. However, the OFR spatial anisotropy is minimal with 2D white noise patterns, revealing a pivotal role of orientation-selective (i.e., cortical) mechanisms in mediating this phenomenon. The lack of anisotropy for 2D patterns suggests that directional signals alone are not sufficient to elicit this suppression. The OFR spatial anisotropy is potentiated if a stationary grating is presented for 600-1000 ms before its motion commences, further emphasizing the importance of static orientation signals. These results suggest that the strength of cortical spatial interactions is asymmetric—i.e., larger in the direction of the ends than the flanks of an orientation-selective receptive field—which corroborates the existing neurophysiological evidence. PMID:25743079

  8. EEG and ocular correlates of circadian melatonin phase and human performance decrements during sleep loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Khalsa, S. B.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the associations between slow eye movements (SEMs), eye blink rate, waking electroencephalogram (EEG) power density, neurobehavioral performance, and the circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin in a cohort of 10 healthy men during up to 32 h of sustained wakefulness. The time course of neurobehavioral performance was characterized by fairly stable levels throughout the first 16 h of wakefulness followed by deterioration during the phase of melatonin secretion. This deterioration was closely associated with an increase in SEMs. Frontal low-frequency EEG activity (1-7 Hz) exhibited a prominent increase with time awake and little circadian modulation. EEG alpha activity exhibited circadian modulation. The dynamics of SEMs and EEG activity were phase locked to changes in neurobehavioral performance and lagged the plasma melatonin rhythm. The data indicate that frontal areas of the brain are more susceptible to sleep loss than occipital areas. Frontal EEG activity and ocular parameters may be used to monitor and predict changes in neurobehavioral performance associated with sleep loss and circadian misalignment.

  9. Clusterin Seals the Ocular Surface Barrier in Mouse Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Bauskar, Aditi; Mack, Wendy J.; Mauris, Jerome; Argüeso, Pablo; Heur, Martin; Nagel, Barbara A.; Kolar, Grant R.; Gleave, Martin E.; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Panjwani, Noorjahan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Wilson, Mark R.; Fini, M. Elizabeth; Jeong, Shinwu

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye is a common disorder caused by inadequate hydration of the ocular surface that results in disruption of barrier function. The homeostatic protein clusterin (CLU) is prominent at fluid-tissue interfaces throughout the body. CLU levels are reduced at the ocular surface in human inflammatory disorders that manifest as severe dry eye, as well as in a preclinical mouse model for desiccating stress that mimics dry eye. Using this mouse model, we show here that CLU prevents and ameliorates ocular surface barrier disruption by a remarkable sealing mechanism dependent on attainment of a critical all-or-none concentration. When the CLU level drops below the critical all-or-none threshold, the barrier becomes vulnerable to desiccating stress. CLU binds selectively to the ocular surface subjected to desiccating stress in vivo, and in vitro to the galectin LGALS3, a key barrier component. Positioned in this way, CLU not only physically seals the ocular surface barrier, but it also protects the barrier cells and prevents further damage to barrier structure. These findings define a fundamentally new mechanism for ocular surface protection and suggest CLU as a biotherapeutic for dry eye. PMID:26402857

  10. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  11. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-06-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  13. Ocular Toxicity Testing of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ocular testing to determine the toxicity of lunar dust. The OECD recommendations are reviewed. With these recommendations in mind the test methodology was to use EpiOcular, tissues derived from normal human epidermal keratinocytes, the cells of which have been differentiated on cell culture inserts to form a multi-layered structure, which closely parallels the corneal epithelium and to dose the tissue with 100 mg dust from various sources. The in-vitro study provides evidence that lunar dust is not severely corrosive or irritating, however, in vitro tests have limitations, and in vivo tests provides a more complete scenario, and information, it is recommended that in vivo tests be performed.

  14. Ocular onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Thylefors, B.

    1978-01-01

    Well over 20 million people in the world are infected with Onchocerca volvulus and it is probable that 200 000-500 000 people are blind as a result of this infection, which is the most important cause of blindness in certain areas of Africa and Latin America. Treatment of the disease is difficult and often produces serious adverse reactions in the patient. Combined use of diethylcarbamazine citrate and suramin is still the most suitable form of treatment. Screening for the early detection of cases at high risk of ocular manifestations must be organized, and their treatment undertaken, if blindness is to be avoided. Prevention of ocular onchocerciasis is feasible, using vector control methods to reduce transmission, but the procedures are costly and may have to be maintained for many years. Research is needed to improve treatment and to find a chemoprophylactic agent or a preventive vaccine. PMID:307448

  15. Homocysteine in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan; Ranimenon

    2015-10-23

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a derived sulfur-containing and non-proteinogenic amino acid. The metabolism of Hcy occurs either through the remethylation to methionine or transsulfuration to cysteine. Studies have identified hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) as one of the possible risk factors for a multitude of diseases including vascular, neurodegenerative and ocular diseases. Association of HHcy with eye diseases such as retinopathy, pseudoexfoliative glaucoma maculopathy, cataract, optic atrophy and retinal vessel atherosclerosis is established. The molecular mechanism underlying these ocular diseases has been reported as impaired vascular endothelial function, apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, extracellular matrix alterations, decreased lysyl oxidase activity and oxidative stress. The formed homocysteine-thiolactone in HHcy has stronger cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory properties which can induce lens opacification and optic nerve damage. The metabolism of Hcy requires enzymes with vitamins such as folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6. Despite the mixed conclusion of various studies regarding the level of these vitamins in elder people, studies recommended the treatment with folate and B12 to reduce Hcy levels in subjects with or without any defect in the enzymes involved in its metabolism. The levels of Hcy, folate, B6 as well as B12 should be measured early in patients with visual impairment that would aid to screen patients for life-threatening disorders related with HHcy. Elder patients may supplement with these vitamins in order to attenuate the ocular damages. This article discusses the association of Hcy in ocular diseases and the possible mechanism in the pathogenesis. PMID:26343924

  16. Incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles for ocular drug delivery enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Sun, Minjie; Ping, Qineng; Ying, Zhi; Liu, Wen

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the effect of liquid lipid incorporation on the physicochemical properties and ocular drug delivery enhancement of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and attempts to elucidate in vitro and in vivo the potential of NLCs for ocular drug delivery. The CyA-loaded or fluorescein-marked nanocarriers composed of Precifac ATO 5 and Miglyol 840 (as liquid lipid) were prepared by melting-emulsion technology, and the physicochemical properties of nanocarriers were determined. The uptake of nanocarriers by human corneal epithelia cell lines (SDHCEC) and rabbit cornea was examined. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging was used to investigate the ocular distribution of nanocarriers. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo acute tolerance were evaluated. The higher drug loading capacity and improved in vitro sustained drug release behavior of lipid nanoparticles was found with the incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles. The uptake of nanocarriers by the SDHCEC was increased with the increase in liquid lipid loading. The ex vivo fluorescence imaging of the ocular tissues indicated that the liquid lipid incorporation could improve the ocular retention and penetration of ocular therapeutics. No alternation was macroscopically observed in vivo after ocular surface exposure to nanocarriers. These results indicated that NLC was a biocompatible and potential nanocarrier for ocular drug delivery enhancement.

  17. A Role for Epha2 in Cell Migration and Refractive Organization of the Ocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; De Maria, Alicia; Bennett, Thomas; Shiels, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The Epha2 receptor is a surprisingly abundant component of the membrane proteome of vertebrate lenses. In humans, genetic studies have linked mutations in EPHA2 to inherited and age-related forms of cataract, but the function of Epha2 in the lens is obscure. To gain insights into the role of Epha2, a comparative analysis of lenses from wild-type and Epha2−/− mice was performed. Methods. Epha2 distribution was examined using immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis. Lens optical quality was assessed by laser refractometry. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze cellular phenotypes. Results. In wild-type lenses, Epha2 was expressed by lens epithelial cells and elongating fibers but was degraded during the later stages of fiber differentiation. Epha2-null lenses retained their transparency, but two key optical parameters, lens shape and internal composition, were compromised in Epha2−/− animals. Epha2-null lenses were smaller and more spherical than age-matched wild-type lenses, and laser refractometry revealed a significant decrease in refractive power of the outer cell layers of mutant lenses. In the absence of Epha2, fiber cells deviated from their normal course and terminated at sutures that were no longer centered on the optical axis. Patterning defects were also noted at the level of individual cells. Wild-type fiber cells had hexagonal cross-sectional profiles with membrane protrusions extending from the cell vertices. In contrast, Epha2−/− cells had irregular profiles, and protrusions extended from all membrane surfaces. Conclusions. These studies indicate that Epha2 is not required for transparency but does play an indispensable role in the cytoarchitecture and refractive quality of the lens. PMID:22167091

  18. Ocular-following responses to white noise stimuli in humans reveal a novel nonlinearity that results from temporal sampling.

    PubMed

    Sheliga, Boris M; Quaia, Christian; FitzGibbon, Edmond J; Cumming, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    White noise stimuli are frequently used to study the visual processing of broadband images in the laboratory. A common goal is to describe how responses are derived from Fourier components in the image. We investigated this issue by recording the ocular-following responses (OFRs) to white noise stimuli in human subjects. For a given speed we compared OFRs to unfiltered white noise with those to noise filtered with band-pass filters and notch filters. Removing components with low spatial frequency (SF) reduced OFR magnitudes, and the SF associated with the greatest reduction matched the SF that produced the maximal response when presented alone. This reduction declined rapidly with SF, compatible with a winner-take-all operation. Removing higher SF components increased OFR magnitudes. For higher speeds this effect became larger and propagated toward lower SFs. All of these effects were quantitatively well described by a model that combined two factors: (a) an excitatory drive that reflected the OFRs to individual Fourier components and (b) a suppression by higher SF channels where the temporal sampling of the display led to flicker. This nonlinear interaction has an important practical implication: Even with high refresh rates (150 Hz), the temporal sampling introduced by visual displays has a significant impact on visual processing. For instance, we show that this distorts speed tuning curves, shifting the peak to lower speeds. Careful attention to spectral content, in the light of this nonlinearity, is necessary to minimize the resulting artifact when using white noise patterns undergoing apparent motion. PMID:26762277

  19. Influence of stimulus interval on the habituation of vestibulo-ocular reflex and sensation of rotation in humans.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles; Tilikete, Caroline; Courjon, Jean-Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies in cats revealed that vestibular habituation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) only occurs when velocity steps are delivered during the secondary phase nystagmus, suggesting that the presence of anti-compensatory slow phases may trigger the habituation process. We verified this property in humans by comparing vestibular habituation of VOR and sensation of rotation when steps were delivered either immediately after the perception of self-rotation had stopped, which is shortly before the nystagmus reverses direction; or when steps were delivered 60s later, i.e. during the secondary phase. Vestibular habituation of the VOR occurred in both instances. However, the decrease in VOR peak slow phase velocity and time constant was larger when steps were delivered after nystagmus reversal compared to before nystagmus reversal. The duration of the perception of self-rotation habituated equally for both conditions. These results confirm that VOR habituation fully develops only when velocity steps are delivered after the primary phase nystagmus. This finding may be helpful for minimizing the impact of repetitive vestibular stimuli in protocols using crossover design for drug studies, testing recovery in vestibular patients, or training people for different gravitoinertial environments. PMID:23827218

  20. Ocular-following responses to white noise stimuli in humans reveal a novel nonlinearity that results from temporal sampling

    PubMed Central

    Sheliga, Boris M.; Quaia, Christian; FitzGibbon, Edmond J.; Cumming, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    White noise stimuli are frequently used to study the visual processing of broadband images in the laboratory. A common goal is to describe how responses are derived from Fourier components in the image. We investigated this issue by recording the ocular-following responses (OFRs) to white noise stimuli in human subjects. For a given speed we compared OFRs to unfiltered white noise with those to noise filtered with band-pass filters and notch filters. Removing components with low spatial frequency (SF) reduced OFR magnitudes, and the SF associated with the greatest reduction matched the SF that produced the maximal response when presented alone. This reduction declined rapidly with SF, compatible with a winner-take-all operation. Removing higher SF components increased OFR magnitudes. For higher speeds this effect became larger and propagated toward lower SFs. All of these effects were quantitatively well described by a model that combined two factors: (a) an excitatory drive that reflected the OFRs to individual Fourier components and (b) a suppression by higher SF channels where the temporal sampling of the display led to flicker. This nonlinear interaction has an important practical implication: Even with high refresh rates (150 Hz), the temporal sampling introduced by visual displays has a significant impact on visual processing. For instance, we show that this distorts speed tuning curves, shifting the peak to lower speeds. Careful attention to spectral content, in the light of this nonlinearity, is necessary to minimize the resulting artifact when using white noise patterns undergoing apparent motion. PMID:26762277

  1. Ocular Syphilis among HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jonathan Z.; Tucker, Joseph D.; Lobo, Ann-Marie; Marra, Christina M.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Papaliodis, George N.; Felsenstein, Donna; Durand, Marlene L.; Yawetz, Sigal; Robbins, Gregory K.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individual with ocular manifestations of secondary syphilis. Twelve other cases of HIV-associated ocular syphilis are also presented. Six of 12 individuals had normal cerebrospinal fluid study results, and 3 patients required retreatment within 1.5 years. In patients with HIV infection, clinicians should be vigilant for ocular syphilis despite normal cerebrospinal fluid measures and for syphilis reinfection. PMID:20604717

  2. Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.

  3. [Experimental model of ocular ischemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, T N; Chudin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review presents the most common methods of modeling of retinal ischemia in vitro (chemical ischemia with iodoacetic acid, incubation of the retinal pigment epithelium cells with oligomycin, deprivation of oxygen and glucose) and in vivo (a model with increased intraocular pressure, cerebral artery occlusion, chronic ligation of the carotid arteries, photocoagulation of the retinal vessels, occlusion of the central retinal artery, endothelin-1 administration). Modeling ischemic injury in rats is the most frequently used method in studies, because the blood supply of their eyes is similar to blood flow in the human eyes. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Application of methods depends on the purpose of the experimental study. Currently model of ocular ischemic disease can be obtained easily by injecting vasoconstrictive drug endothelin-1. It is the most widely used method of high intraocular pressure induced ocular ischemic damage similar to glaucoma, occlusion of central retinal artery or ophthalmic artery in human. The development of experimental models of ocular ischemic diseases and detailed investigation of mechanisms of impairment of microcirculation are useful for improve the efficiency of diagnostic and treatment of ischemic diseases of retina and optic nerve. PMID:25971134

  4. Flexibility of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation to modified visual input in human.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shoji; Hattori, Kosuke; Koizuka, Izumi

    2003-02-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) serves to keep images relatively stable on the retina. To maintain appropriate performance and minimize image slip throughout life, VOR is subjected to long-term adaptive regulation by visual input. It has been reported that adaptive changes in VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) are evoked either by fitting subjects with magnifying, miniaturizing, or reversing spectacles during normal behavior, or by moving a large visual field in or out of phase relative to the subject's head movement. The changes in VOR gain are frequency selective. Here, we examine the extent of VOR gain flexibility by causing VORs of similar direction to undergo different behavioral gain changes. Nine healthy adults participated in the study, ranging in age from 24 to 38 years (mean: 26 years) and with no history of neurotological symptoms. All subjects were clinically normal according to a screening battery that included combined neurologic and otologic physical examinations. Horizontal and vertical eye positions were recorded by bitemporal DC-coupled electro-oculography (EOG). The subject sat in a rotating chair. The axis of rotation of the body was always earth-vertical, with the interaural axis crossing the axis of rotation of the chair. The head was pointed 20 degrees downwards in all experiments and stabilized in this position using a chin rest. The chair was surrounded by a half-cylindrical optokinetic screen (78 cm in diameter) placed in front of the subject, onto which random dot patterns were projected. Goggles were used to ensure that the subject was in complete darkness during both pre- and postadaptation periods. The chair was rotated sinusoidally at maximum amplitude of 30 degrees or 60 degrees : for 30 degrees the stimulation was at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 Hz; for 60 degrees it was at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 Hz. VOR adaptation was obtained by inducing a retinal slip velocity by short-term alteration of the visual input of the large field; this change

  5. [Flexibility in the adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex to modified visual inputs in humans].

    PubMed

    Hattori, K; Watanabe, S; Nakamura, T; Kato, I

    2000-10-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) serves to stabilize images on the retina. To maintain appropriate performance and minimize image slippage throughout life, the VOR is subject to long-term adaptive regulation in response to visual input. Adaptive changes in VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) can be evoked either by fitting subjects with magnifying, miniaturizing, or reversing spectacles during normal behavior or by moving a large visual field in or out of phase relative to the subject's head movement. These changes exhibit frequency-selectivity. Here, we examine the flexibility of VOR gains by causing VOR in similar directions to undergo different behavioral gain changes. Nine healthy adults, ranging in age from 24 to 38 (mean 28.5) with no history of neurotological symptoms participated in the study. All subjects demonstrated clinically normal functioning on a screening battery of tests that included combined neurologic and otologic physical examinations. Horizontal and vertical eye positions were recorded by bitemporal DC coupled electrooculography (EOG). The subject sat in a rotating chair. The axis of rotation of the body was always earth-vertical, the interaural axis crossing the axis of rotation of the chair. The head was positioned at 20 degrees down in all experiments and was stabilized in this position using a chin rest. The chair was 78 cm in diameter and was shielded by a half-cylindrical optokinetic screen positioned in front of the subjects. Random dot patterns were projected onto this screen. During per- and post-adaptation periods, goggles were fitted to ensure that the subject was in complete darkness and the chair was rotated sinusoidally. The amplitude of the rotating chair was 30 degrees and 60 degrees. Frequencies of rotation were 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.3 Hz and 0.4 Hz for amplitudes of 30 degrees and 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, and 0.3 Hz for amplitudes of 60 degrees. To induce VOR adaptation, the retinal slippage velocity caused by the visual input of a

  6. Ocular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Novack, Gary D; Robin, Alan L

    2016-05-01

    Ophthalmic diseases include both those analogous to systemic diseases (eg, inflammation, infection, neuronal degeneration) and not analogous (eg, cataract, myopia). Many anterior segment diseases are treated pharmacologically through eye drops, which have an implied therapeutic index of local therapy. Unlike oral dosage forms administered for systemic diseases, eyedrops require patients not only to adhere to treatment, but to be able to accurately perform-ie, instill drops correctly. Anatomical and physiological barriers make topical delivery to the anterior chamber challenging-in some cases more challenging than absorption through the skin, nasal passages, or gut. Treatment of the posterior segment (eg, vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic nerve) is more challenging due to additional barriers. Recently, intravitreal injections have become a standard of care with biologics for the treatment of macular degeneration and other diseases. Although the eye has esterases, hydroxylases, and transporters, it has relatively little CYP450 enzymes. Because it is challenging to obtain drug concentrations at the target site, ocular clinical pharmacokinetics, and thus pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic interactions, are rarely available. Ophthalmic pharmaceuticals require consideration of solubility, physiological pH, and osmolarity, as well as sterility and stability, which in turn requires optimal pharmaceutics. Although applied locally, ocular medications may be absorbed systemically, which results in morbidity and mortality (eg, systemic hypotension, bronchospasm, and bradycardia). PMID:26360129

  7. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  8. Vaccination for protection of retinal ganglion cells against death from glutamate cytotoxicity and ocular hypertension: Implications for glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schori, Hadas; Kipnis, Jonathan; Yoles, Eti; Woldemussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A.; Schwartz, Michal

    2001-03-01

    Our group recently demonstrated that autoimmune T cells directed against central nervous system-associated myelin antigens protect neurons from secondary degeneration. We further showed that the synthetic peptide copolymer 1 (Cop-1), known to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, can be safely substituted for the natural myelin antigen in both passive and active immunization for neuroprotection of the injured optic nerve. Here we attempted to determine whether similar immunizations are protective from retinal ganglion cell loss resulting from a direct biochemical insult caused, for example, by glutamate (a major mediator of degeneration in acute and chronic optic nerve insults) and in a rat model of ocular hypertension. Passive immunization with T cells reactive to myelin basic protein or active immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-derived peptide, although neuroprotective after optic nerve injury, was ineffective against glutamate toxicity in mice and rats. In contrast, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells per square millimeter in glutamate-injected retinas was significantly larger in mice immunized 10 days previously with Cop-1 emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant than in mice injected with PBS in the same adjuvant (2,133 ± 270 and 1,329 ± 121, respectively, mean ± SEM; P < 0.02). A similar pattern was observed when mice were immunized on the day of glutamate injection (1,777 ± 101 compared with 1,414 ± 36; P <0.05), but not when they were immunized 48h later. These findings suggest that protection from glutamate toxicity requires reinforcement of the immune system by antigens that are different from those associated with myelin. The use of Cop-1 apparently circumvents this antigen specificity barrier. In the rat ocular hypertension model, which simulates glaucoma, immunization with Cop-1 significantly reduced the retinal ganglion cell loss from 27.8%±6.8% to 4.3%±1.6%, without affecting the intraocular pressure

  9. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kryczka, Tomasz; Wylęgała, Edward; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Midelfart, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years). The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye. PMID:25525621

  10. Defensins and Other Antimicrobial Peptides at the Ocular Surface

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Although constantly exposed to the environment and “foreign bodies” such as contact lenses and unwashed fingertips, the ocular surface succumbs to infection relatively infrequently. This is, in large part, due to a very active and robust innate immune response mounted at the ocular surface. Studies over the past 20 years have revealed that small peptides with antimicrobial activity are a major component of the human innate immune response system. The ocular surface is no exception, with peptides of the defensin and cathelicidin families being detected in the tear film and secreted by corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. There is also much evidence to suggest that the role of some antimicrobial peptides is not restricted to direct killing of pathogens, but, rather, that they function in various aspects of the immune response, including recruitment of immune cells, and through actions on dendritic cells provide a link to adaptive immunity. A role in wound healing is also supported. In this article, the properties, mechanisms of actions and functional roles of antimicrobial peptides are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the potential multifunctional roles of defensins and LL-37 (the only known human cathelicidin) at the ocular surface. PMID:17216098

  11. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to <3 lux for several hours. Light exerted an acute alerting response as assessed by a reduction in the incidence of slow-eye movements, a reduction of EEG activity in the theta-alpha frequencies (power density in the 5-9 Hz range) as well as a reduction in self-reported sleepiness. This alerting response was positively correlated with the degree of melatonin suppression by light. In accordance with the dose response function for circadian resetting and melatonin suppression, the responses of all three indices of alertness to variations in illuminance were consistent with a logistic dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  12. Herpesvirus Entry Mediator on Radiation-Resistant Cell Lineages Promotes Ocular Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Pathogenesis in an Entry-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Rebecca G.; Kopp, Sarah J.; Karaba, Andrew H.; Wilcox, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ocular herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection leads to a potentially blinding immunoinflammatory syndrome, herpes stromal keratitis (HSK). Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM), a widely expressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily member with diverse roles in immune signaling, facilitates viral entry through interactions with viral glycoprotein D (gD) and is important for HSV-1 pathogenesis. We subjected mice to corneal infection with an HSV-1 mutant in which HVEM-mediated entry was specifically abolished and found that the HVEM-entry mutant produced clinical disease comparable to that produced by the control virus. HVEM-mediated induction of corneal cytokines, which correlated with an HVEM-dependent increase in levels of corneal immune cell infiltrates, was also gD independent. Given the complexity of HVEM immune signaling, we used hematopoietic chimeric mice to determine which HVEM-expressing cells mediate HSV-1 pathogenesis in the eye. Regardless of whether the donor was a wild-type (WT) or HVEM knockout (KO) strain, HVEM KO recipients were protected from ocular HSV-1, suggesting that HVEM on radiation-resistant cell types, likely resident cells of the cornea, confers wild-type-like susceptibility to disease. Together, these data indicate that HVEM contributes to ocular pathogenesis independently of entry and point to an immunomodulatory role for this protein specifically on radiation-resistant cells. PMID:26489863

  13. Context-specific adaptation of the gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans.

    PubMed

    Shelhamer, M; Robinson, D A; Tan, H S

    1992-01-01

    Previous experiments show that altered visual feedback can change VOR gain. Such changes also presumably occur when eyeglasses are donned and doffed, or when bifocals are worn. In these cases, a nonvisual cue accompanies the required gain adjustment (frames on/off for eyeglasses, looking up/down for bifocals). We set out to show that a subject can establish two VOR gains, and to determine if one of the associated nonvisual cues alone is sufficient to subsequently determine which gain to employ. Each of three subjects sat in a rotating chair inside an OKN drum during 2 hours of sinusoidal rotation at 0.2 Hz, 30 degrees/s peak. For 10 minutes the chair and drum counterrotated , driving VOR gain toward 1.7, while subjects looked up 20 degrees. Chair and drum were then coupled for 10 minutes, driving gain toward zero, during which subjects looked down 20 degrees. This sequence was repeated for 2 hours. Immediately thereafter, VOR gains were measured while subjects looked alternately up and down, using 20 degrees to 40 degrees step rotations. A fixation target, presented before and after each step, provided accurate gain determination by measuring the size of the re-fixation saccade. Results show a consistent reduced VOR gain looking downward (average 6%) and increased gain looking upward (average 6%) and increased gain looking upward (average 8%). We conclude that humans can adjust their VOR gain dependent on a situational context; we speculate that this context can take many forms. PMID:1342386

  14. A fragment of human TrpRS as a potent antagonist of ocular angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Atsushi; Slike, Bonnie M.; Dorrell, Michael I.; Hood, John; Kinder, Karen; Ewalt, Karla L.; Cheresh, David; Schimmel, Paul; Friedlander, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis contributes directly to profound loss of vision associated with many diseases of the eye. Recent work suggests that human tyrosyl- and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetases (TrpRS) link protein synthesis to signal transduction pathways including angiogenesis. In this study, we show that a recombinant form of a COOH-terminal fragment of TrpRS is a potent antagonist of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis in a mouse model and of naturally occurring retinal angiogenesis in the neonatal mouse. The angiostatic activity is dose-dependent in both systems. The recombinant fragment is similar in size to one generated naturally by alternative splicing and can be produced by proteolysis of the full-length protein. In contrast, the full-length protein is inactive as an antagonist of angiogenesis. These results suggest that fragments of TrpRS, as naturally occurring and potentially nonimmunogenic anti-angiogenics, can be used for the treatment of neovascular eye diseases. PMID:11773625

  15. A fragment of human TrpRS as a potent antagonist of ocular angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Slike, Bonnie M; Dorrell, Michael I; Hood, John; Kinder, Karen; Ewalt, Karla L; Cheresh, David; Schimmel, Paul; Friedlander, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis contributes directly to profound loss of vision associated with many diseases of the eye. Recent work suggests that human tyrosyl- and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetases (TrpRS) link protein synthesis to signal transduction pathways including angiogenesis. In this study, we show that a recombinant form of a COOH-terminal fragment of TrpRS is a potent antagonist of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis in a mouse model and of naturally occurring retinal angiogenesis in the neonatal mouse. The angiostatic activity is dose-dependent in both systems. The recombinant fragment is similar in size to one generated naturally by alternative splicing and can be produced by proteolysis of the full-length protein. In contrast, the full-length protein is inactive as an antagonist of angiogenesis. These results suggest that fragments of TrpRS, as naturally occurring and potentially nonimmunogenic anti-angiogenics, can be used for the treatment of neovascular eye diseases. PMID:11773625

  16. Transmastoid galvanic stimulation does not affect the vergence-mediated gain increase of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Vergence is one of several viewing contexts that require an increase in the angular vestibular-ocular reflex (aVOR) response. A previous monkey study found that the vergence-mediated gain (eye/head velocity) increase of the aVOR was attenuated by 64% when anodic currents, which preferentially lower the activity of irregularly firing vestibular afferents, were delivered to both labyrinths. We sought to determine if there was similar evidence implicating a role for irregular afferents in the vergence-mediated gain increase of the human aVOR. Our study is based upon analysis of the aVOR evoked by head rotations, delivered passively while subjects viewed a near (15cm) or far (124cm) target and applying galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) via surface electrodes. We tested 12 subjects during 2–3 sessions each. Vestibular stimuli consisted of passive whole-body rotations (sinusoids from 0.05 – 3Hz and 12 – 25°/s, and transients with peak ~15°, 50°/s, 500°/s2) and head-on-body impulses (peak ~30°, 150°/s, 3000°/s2). GVS was on for 10s every 20s. All polarity combinations were tested, with emphasis on uni- and bi-lateral anodic inhibition. The average stimulus current was 5.9 ± 1.6 mA (range: 3 – 9.5 mA), vergence angle (during near-viewing) was 22.6 ± 2.8° and slow phase eye velocity caused by left anodic current stimulation with head stationary was −3.4 ± 1.1°/s, −0.2 ± 0.6°/s and 2.5 ± 1.4°/s (torsion, vertical, horizontal). No statistically significant GVS effects were observed, suggesting that surface electrode GVS has no effect on the vergence-mediated gain increase of the aVOR at the current levels (~6 mA) tolerated by most humans. We conclude that clinically practical transmastoid GVS does not effectively silence irregular afferents and hypothesize that currents > 10mA are needed to reproduce the monkey results. PMID:23150093

  17. Ocular sensitization of mice by live (but not irradiated) Chlamydia trachomatis serovar A

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, D.G.; Goodman, T.G.; Barsoum, I.S.

    1986-10-01

    Ocular exposure of mice to live elementary bodies of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar A results in immunological sensitization of the mice. This reactivity is manifested by the development of early (5 h) and delayed-type (24 h) dermal reactivity and serovar-specific antibody formation against either live or irradiated (100 kilorads) elementary bodies. Parallel ocular exposure of mice to irradiated elementary bodies does not result in this sensitization. The early and late dermal immune responses induced by ocular exposure to live organisms can be transferred to unexposed mice by serum and lymphoid cell transfers, respectively. It appears that successful murine ocular sensitization by human C. trachomatis serovar A elementary bodies is an ability manifested by live organisms and not by inactivated but antigenic organisms.

  18. Ocular Immune Privilege and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Allografts are afforded a level of protection from rejection within immune-privileged tissues. Immune-privileged tissues involve mechanisms that suppress inflammation and promote immune tolerance. There are anatomical features, soluble factors, membrane-associated proteins, and alternative antigen-presenting cells (APC) that contribute to allograft survival in the immune-privileged tissue. This review presents the current understanding of how the mechanism of ocular immune privilege promotes tolerogenic activity by APC, and T cells in response to the placement of foreign antigen within the ocular microenvironment. Discussed will be the unique anatomical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms that lessen the chance for graft destroying immune responses within the eye. As more is understood about the molecular mechanisms of ocular immune privilege greater is the potential for using these molecular mechanisms in therapies to prevent allograft rejection. PMID:26904026

  19. Ocular anatomy, ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution of a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y; Abramov, Andrey V; Mukhametov, Lev M; Rozanova, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the killer whale (Orcinus orca) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl violet. A distinctive feature of the killer whale's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 8 to 100 µm, with the majority of cells within a range of 20-40 µm. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed two spots of high cell density located in the temporal and nasal quadrants, 20 mm from the optic disk. The high-density areas were connected by a horizontal belt-like area passing below the optic disk of the retina. Peak cell densities in these areas were evaluated. Mean peak cell densities were 334 and 288 cells/mm(2) in the temporal and nasal high-density areas, respectively. With a posterior nodal distance of 19.5 mm, these high-density data predict a retinal resolution of 9.6' (3.1 cycles/deg.) and 12.6' (2.4 cycles/deg.) in the temporal and nasal areas, respectively, in water. PMID:23018493

  20. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Joan E. Wielgus, Albert R. Boyes, William K. Andley, Usha Chignell, Colin F.

    2008-04-01

    The water-soluble, hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26}] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have assessed fullerol's potential ocular toxicity by measuring its cytotoxicity and phototoxicity induced by UVA and visible light in vitro with human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3). Accumulation of nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm and cell viability estimated using MTS and LDH assays. Fullerol was cytotoxic to HLE B-3 cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 20 {mu}M. Exposure to either UVA or visible light in the presence of > 5 {mu}M fullerol-induced phototoxic damage. When cells were pretreated with non-toxic antioxidants: 20 {mu}M lutein, 1 mM N-acetyl cysteine, or 1 mM L-ascorbic acid prior to irradiation, only the singlet oxygen quencher-lutein significantly protected against fullerol photodamage. Apoptosis was observed in lens cells treated with fullerol whether or not the cells were irradiated, in the order UVA > visible light > dark. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that in the presence of the endogenous lens protein {alpha}-crystallin, large aggregates of fullerol were reduced. In conclusion, fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells. Although the acute toxicity of water-soluble nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} is low, these compounds are retained in the body for long periods, raising concern for their chronic toxic effect. Before fullerols are used to deliver drugs to the eye, they should be tested for photo- and cytotoxicity in vivo.

  1. Endothelial TWIST1 Promotes Pathological Ocular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Gong, Yan; Fu, Zhongjie; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pathological neovessel formation impacts many blinding vascular eye diseases. Identification of molecular signatures distinguishing pathological neovascularization from normal quiescent vessels is critical for developing new interventions. Twist-related protein 1 (TWIST1) is a transcription factor important in tumor and pulmonary angiogenesis. This study investigated the potential role of TWIST1 in modulating pathological ocular angiogenesis in mice. Methods. Twist1 expression and localization were analyzed in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Pathological ocular angiogenesis in Tie2-driven conditional Twist1 knockout mice were evaluated in both OIR and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. In addition, the effects of TWIST1 on angiogenesis and endothelial cell function were analyzed in sprouting assays of aortic rings and choroidal explants isolated from Twist1 knockout mice, and in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells treated with TWIST1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. TWIST1 is highly enriched in pathological neovessels in OIR retinas. Conditional Tie2-driven depletion of Twist1 significantly suppressed pathological neovessels in OIR without impacting developmental retinal angiogenesis. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model, Twist1 deficiency also resulted in significantly smaller lesions with decreased vascular leakage. In addition, loss of Twist1 significantly decreased vascular sprouting in both aortic ring and choroid explants. Knockdown of TWIST1 in endothelial cells led to dampened expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and decreased endothelial cell proliferation. Conclusions. Our study suggests that TWIST1 is a novel regulator of pathologic ocular angiogenesis and may represent a new molecular target for developing potential therapeutic treatments to suppress pathological neovascularization in vascular eye diseases. PMID:25414194

  2. Saccular impact on ocular torsion.

    PubMed

    De Graaf, B; Bos, J E; Groen, E

    1996-01-01

    When someone is tilted laterally, the shear force on the maculae of the utriculus and the sacculus is described by the sine and the cosine of the angle of tilt, respectively. So both the sacculus and the utriculus are stimulated, but in the literature, ocular torsion is normally attributed to utricular function alone (and, thus, seen as a response to y-axis linear acceleration). However, on the base of a series of experiments on a tilt chair, a linear track, human centrifuges, and during parabolic flights, we conclude that the sacculus contributes to ocular torsion as well (there is a response to z-axis linear acceleration). The data suggest that the ratio of the utricular and saccular impact on ocular torsion is 3:1. The utriculus generates conjugate and the sacculus disjunctive torsional eye movements. PMID:8886354

  3. [Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ma, N; Ye, J J

    2016-02-11

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a collection of inflammatory disorders associated with paradoxical worsening of preexisting infectious processes or emerging diseases or even dead after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in a period of recovery of immune function. Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is mainly caused by cytomegalovirus which performing a series of ocular inflammation accompanied with the increase of CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as cytomegalovirus retinitis, after HAART. With HAART widely used, the patients of IRIS gradually increased. But the clinical presentations of IRIS were various because of different pathogens. This review summarized the clinical manifestations, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment of ocular IRIS.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 51: 150-153). PMID:26906710

  4. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  5. Cell proliferation activity in posterior uveal melanoma after Ru-106 brachytherapy: an EORTC ocular oncology group study

    PubMed Central

    Pe'er, J.; Stefani, F.; Seregard, S.; Kivela, T.; Lommatzsch, P.; Prause, J.; Sobottka, B.; Damato, B.; Chowers, I.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate the cell proliferation activity in posterior uveal melanomas after Ru-106 brachytherapy.
METHODS—Eyes containing choroidal or ciliary body melanoma from seven ocular oncology centres, which were enucleated after first being treated by Ru-106 brachytherapy and which had enough melanoma tissue to enable histological assessment, were included. The 57 eligible specimens were divided into a group of 44 eyes that were enucleated because of tumour regrowth, and a non-recurrent group of 13 eyes that were enucleated because of complications such as neovascular glaucoma. 46 non-irradiated eyes harbouring uveal melanoma served as a control group. All specimens underwent routine processing. They were cut into 5 µm sections, and were stained with two main cell proliferation markers: PC-10 for PCNA and MIB-1 for Ki-67. The stained sections were assessed, and the cells that were positive in the immunostaining were counted in each section. The results were evaluated by various statistical methods.
RESULTS—The PC-10 score showed a statistically significant difference across the three groups (p = 0.002). The control group showed the highest PC-10 score (median 31.0 PCC/HPF) followed by the tumour regrowth group (median 4.9 PCC/HPF). The lowest PC-10 scores were found in the non-recurrent tumours (median 0.05 PCC/HPF). The MIB-1 score in the control group (median 5.77 PCC/HPF) was similar to the regrowth group (median 5.4 PCC/HPF). In contrast, the MIB-1 score in the non-recurrent tumours was statistically significantly lower (median 0.42 PCC/HPF). The PC-10 and MIB-1 scores were similar in tumours composed of either spindle cells or epithelioid cells in all groups.
CONCLUSIONS—The non-recurrent melanomas demonstrate significantly lower cellular proliferation activity than melanomas that showed regrowth or that were not irradiated at all. In our hands, PCNA gave more meaningful information than Ki-67. Our findings strongly support the need

  6. Nonhuman Primate Ocular Biometry

    PubMed Central

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine ocular growth in nonhuman primates (NHPs) from measurements on ex vivo eyes. Methods We obtained NHP eyes from animals that had been killed as part of other studies or because of health-related issues. Digital calipers were used to measure the horizontal, vertical, and anteroposterior globe diameters as well as corneal horizontal and vertical diameters of excised globes from 98 hamadryas baboons, 551 cynomolgus monkeys, and 112 rhesus monkeys, at ages ranging from 23 to 360 months. Isolated lens sagittal thickness and equatorial diameter were measured by shadowphotogrammetry. Wet and fixed dry weights were obtained for lenses. Results Nonhuman primate globe growth continues throughout life, slowing toward an asymptotic maximum. The final globe size scales with negative allometry to adult body size. Corneal growth ceases at around 20 months. Lens diameter increases but thickness decreases with increasing age. Nonhuman primate lens wet and dry weight accumulation is monophasic, continuing throughout life toward asymptotic maxima. The dry/wet weight ratio reaches a maximum of 0.33. Conclusions Nonhuman primate ocular globe and lens growth differ in several respects from those in humans. Although age-related losses of lens power and accommodative amplitude are similar, lens growth and properties are different indicating care should be taken in extrapolating NHP observations to the study of human accommodation. PMID:26780314

  7. Concise Review: Immunological Properties of Ocular Surface and Importance of Limbal Stem Cells for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shaharuddin, Bakiah; Ahmad, Sajjad; Meeson, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Cornea transplantation has been considered to be different from other solid organ transplantation because of the assumed immune-privileged state of the anterior chamber of the eye. Three major lines of thought regarding the molecular mechanisms of immune privilege in the eye are as follows: (a) anatomical, cellular, and molecular barriers in the eye; (b) anterior chamber-associated immune deviation; and (c) immunosuppressive microenvironment in the eye. However, cornea transplants suffer allograft rejection when breached by vascularization. In recent developments, cellular corneal transplantation from cultivated limbal epithelial cells has shown impressive advances as a future therapy. The limbal stem cell niche contains stem cells that promote proliferation and migration and have immunosuppressive mechanisms to protect them from immunological reactions. Limbal stem cells are also noted to display an enhanced expression of genes for the antiapoptotic proteins, a property that is imperative for the survival of transplanted tissues. Further investigation of the molecular mechanisms regulating the immune regulation of limbal stem cells is relevant in the clinical setting to promote the survival of whole corneal and limbal stem cell transplantation. PMID:23817133

  8. The Ocular Surface Chemical Burns

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular chemical burns are common and serious ocular emergencies that require immediate and intensive evaluation and care. The victims of such incidents are usually young, and therefore loss of vision and disfigurement could dramatically affect their lives. The clinical course can be divided into immediate, acute, early, and late reparative phases. The degree of limbal, corneal, and conjunctival involvement at the time of injury is critically associated with prognosis. The treatment starts with simple but vision saving steps and is continued with complicated surgical procedures later in the course of the disease. The goal of treatment is to restore the normal ocular surface anatomy and function. Limbal stem cell transplantation, amniotic membrane transplantation, and ultimately keratoprosthesis may be indicated depending on the patients' needs. PMID:25105018

  9. Unique and Analogous Functions of Aquaporin 0 for Fiber Cell Architecture and Ocular Lens Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, S. Sindhu; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Mathias, Richard T.; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) 1 and AQP0 water channels are expressed in lens epithelial and fiber cells, respectively, facilitating fluid circulation for nourishing the avascular lens to maintain transparency. Even though AQP0 water permeability is 40-fold less than AQP1, AQP0 is selectively expressed in the fibers. Delimited AQP0 fiber expression is attributed to a unique structural role as an adhesion protein. To validate this notion, we determined if wild type (WT) lens ultrastructure and fiber cell adhesion are different in AQP0−/−, and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− mice that transgenically express AQP1 (TgAQP1) in fiber cells without AQP0 (AQP0−/−). In WT, lenses were transparent with ‘Y’ sutures. Fibers contained opposite end curvature, lateral interdigitations and hexagonal shape, and were arranged as concentric growth shells. AQP0−/− lenses were cataractous, lacked ‘Y’ sutures, ordered packing and well-defined lateral interdigitations. TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses showed improvement in transparency and lateral interdigitations in the outer cortex while inner cortex and nuclear fibers were severely disintegrated. Transmission electron micrographs exhibited tightly packed fiber cells in WT whereas AQP0−/− and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses had wide extracellular spaces. Fibers were easily separable by teasing in AQP0−/− and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses compared to WT. Our data suggest that the increased water permeability through AQP1 does not compensate for loss of AQP0 expression in TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− mice. Fiber cell AQP0 expression is required to maintain their organization, which is a requisite for lens transparency. AQP0 appears necessary for cell-to-cell adhesion and thereby to minimize light scattering since in the AQP0−/− and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses, fiber cell disorganization was evident. PMID:21511033

  10. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation. PMID:27275439

  11. Dexamethasone induced ultrastructural changes in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; McCartney, M D; Miggans, S T; Clark, A F

    1993-09-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced ocular hypertension has been demonstrated in both animals and humans. It is possible that glucocorticoid-induced changes in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells are responsible for this hypertension. In order to elaborate further the effect of glucocorticoids on the trabecular meshwork, the ultrastructural consequences of dexamethasone (DEX) treatment were examined in three different human TM cell lines. Confluent TM cells were treated with 0.1 microM of DEX for 14 days, and then processed for light, epifluorescent microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of DEX treatment on TM cell and nuclear size was quantified using computer assisted morphometrics. Morphometric analysis showed a significant increase in both TM cell and nuclear size after 14 days of DEX treatment. Epifluorescent microscopy of rhodamine-phalloidin stained, control TM cells showed the normal arrangement of stress fibers. In contrast, DEX-treated TM cells showed unusual geodesic dome-like cross-linked actin networks. Control TM cells had the normal complement and arrangement of organelles as well as electron dense inclusions and large vacuoles. DEX-treated TM cells showed stacked arrangements of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, proliferation of the Golgi apparatus, pleomorphic nuclei and increased amounts of extracellular matrix material. The DEX-induced alterations observed in the present study may be an indication of the processes that are occurring in the in vivo disease process. PMID:8261790

  12. Review of Ocular Manifestations of Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: What an Ophthalmologist Needs to Know

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Judy J.; Sartori, Juliana; Aakalu, Vinay K.; Setabutr, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits, and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Myriad ophthalmologic findings are associated with NBCCS, including periocular BCCs, hypertelorism, strabismus, myelinated nerve fibers, and disorders of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium. We performed a literature search in PubMed for articles on the ophthalmologic manifestations of Gorlin syndrome, published between 1984 and 2014. Of 33 papers, 31 were included. Although Gorlin syndrome is due to mutations in a single gene, it displays variable phenotypic expressivity. Therefore, familiarity with this disorder across clinical specialties is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. The ophthalmologist should be included in the multidisciplinary team for the management of Gorlin syndrome in order to prevent visual loss and improve the quality of life of these patients. PMID:26692711

  13. Unique and analogous functions of aquaporin O for fiber cell architecture and ocular lens transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, S.S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Mathias, R. T.; Varadaraj, K.

    2011-09-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) 1 and AQP0 water channels are expressed in lens epithelial and fiber cells, respectively, facilitating fluid circulation for nourishing the avascular lens to maintain transparency. Even though AQP0 water permeability is 40-fold less than AQP1, AQP0 is selectively expressed in the fibers. Delimited AQP0 fiber expression is attributed to a unique structural role as an adhesion protein. To validate this notion, we determined if wild type (WT) lens ultrastructure and fibercell adhesion are different in AQP0{sup -/-}, and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} mice that transgenically express AQP1 (TgAQP1) in fibercells without AQP0 (AQP0{sup -/-}). In WT, lenses were transparent with 'Y' sutures. Fibers contained opposite end curvature, lateral interdigitations, hexagonal shape, and were arranged as concentric growth shells. AQP0{sup -/-}lenses were cataractous, lacked 'Y' sutures, ordered packing and well-defined lateral interdigitations. TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} lenses showed improvement in transparency and lateral interdigitations in the outer cortex while inner cortex and nuclear fibers were severely disintegrated. Transmission electron micrographs exhibited tightly packed fibercells in WT whereas AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-}lenses had wide extracellular spaces. Fibers were easily separable by teasing in AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-}lenses compared to WT. Our data suggest that the increased water permeability through AQP1 does not compensate for loss of AQP0 expression in TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} mice. Fibercell AQP0 expression is required to maintain their organization, which is a requisite for lenstransparency. AQP0 appears necessary for cell-to-cell adhesion and thereby to minimize light scattering since in the AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} lenses, fiber cell disorganization was evident.

  14. The Cervico-Ocular Reflex of normal human subjects in response to transient and sinusoidal trunk rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Robert N., Jr.; Thurston, Stephen E.; Becker, Keith R.; Ackley, Charles V.; Seidman, Scott H.; Leigh, R. John

    1994-01-01

    We used the magnetic search coil technique to measure the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (COR) of 8 subjects in response to transient or sinusoidal (0.1-1.0 Hz) trunk rotations while their heads were firmly immobilized. Although we were able to resolve eye rotations of less than 0.05 deg, the COR was hardly measurable (gain was always less than 0.07). This finding, made with the most precise measurement technique used to date, suggests that the COR makes a negligible contribution to the stability of gaze in normal subjects during natural activities.

  15. [Ocular fundus lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus model mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Yokoyama, T; Kodera, S; Zhang, D; Hirose, S

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate spontaneous development of the ocular fundus abnormalities associated with collagen disease, we investigated the ocular fundus lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) models. (NZW x BXSB) F1 mice were employed as SLE models with antiphospholipid syndrome. The abnormal findings in the ocular fundus were recorded with a fundus camera for small animals (KOWA Co., Ltd.), and the chorioretinal lesions were studied histopathologically. As in the systemic symptoms of SLE, the incidence of ocular fundus abnormalities in these (NZW x BXSB) F1 mice was significantly higher in males than in females, suggesting the influence of the Yaa (Y chromosome-linked autoimmune acceleration) gene. Lesions in the fundus appeared in the form of white spots, which increased in number along with the course of the disease. The lesion developed into retinal detachment in some animals. Dilatation of veins and narrowing of arteries were marked. These lesions were very similar to multifocal posterior pigment epitheliopathy (MPPE) in humans in that white spots appear first and then develop into exudative retinal detachment caused by retinal pigment epithelial disorder. Histopathological findings included 1. structural destruction of the photoreceptor cell layer, 2. degeneration and loss of the retinal pigment epithelium, and 3. narrowing and occlusion of the choriocapillaris associated with thrombus formation, cellular infiltration into the surrounding tissues, and wall thickening of the choroidal arterioles. The study of these SLE mouse may contribute to the elucidation of abnormalities in the fundus associated with collagen diseases, including the relationship between thrombus formation and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:9489364

  16. Ocular-specific ER stress reduction rescues glaucoma in murine glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Zode, Gulab S.; Sharma, Arti B.; Lin, Xiaolei; Searby, Charles C.; Bugge, Kevin; Kim, Gun Hee; Clark, Abbot F.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2014-01-01

    Administration of glucocorticoids induces ocular hypertension in some patients. If untreated, these patients can develop a secondary glaucoma that resembles primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The underlying pathology of glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma is not fully understood, due in part to lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, we developed a murine model of glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma that exhibits glaucoma features that are observed in patients. Treatment of WT mice with topical ocular 0.1% dexamethasone led to elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP), functional and structural loss of retinal ganglion cells, and axonal degeneration, resembling glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma in human patients. Furthermore, dexamethasone-induced ocular hypertension was associated with chronic ER stress of the trabecular meshwork (TM). Similar to patients, withdrawal of dexamethasone treatment reduced elevated IOP and ER stress in this animal model. Dexamethasone induced the transcriptional factor CHOP, a marker for chronic ER stress, in the anterior segment tissues, and Chop deletion reduced ER stress in these tissues and prevented dexamethasone-induced ocular hypertension. Furthermore, reduction of ER stress in the TM with sodium 4-phenylbutyrate prevented dexamethasone-induced ocular hypertension in WT mice. Our data indicate that ER stress contributes to glucocorticoid-induced ocular hypertension and suggest that reducing ER stress has potential as a therapeutic strategy for treating glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma. PMID:24691439

  17. Cultured corneal epithelia for ocular surface disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, I R

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the potential efficacy for autologous and allogeneic expanded corneal epithelial cell transplants derived from harvested limbal corneal epithelial stem cells cultured in vitro for the management of ocular surface disease. METHODS: Human Subjects. Of the 19 human subjects included, 18 (20 procedures) underwent in vitro cultured corneal epithelial cell transplants using various carriers for the epithelial cells to determine the most efficacious approach. Sixteen patients (18 procedures on 17 eyes) received autologous transplants, and 2 patients (1 procedure each) received allogeneic sibling grafts. The presumed corneal epithelial stem cells from 1 patient did not grow in vitro. The carriers for the expanded corneal epithelial cells included corneal stroma, type 1 collagen (Vitrogen), soft contact lenses, collagen shields, and amniotic membrane for the autologous grafts and only amniotic membrane for the allogeneic sibling grafts. Histologic confirmation was reviewed on selected donor grafts. Amniotic membrane as carrier. Further studies were made to determine whether amniotic membrane might be the best carrier for the expanding corneal epithelial cells. Seventeen different combinations of tryspinization, sonication, scraping, and washing were studied to find the simplest, most effective method for removing the amniotic epithelium while still preserving the histologic appearance of the basement membrane of the amnion. Presumed corneal epithelial stem cells were harvested and expanded in vitro and applied to the amniotic membrane to create a composite graft. Thus, the composite graft consisted of the amniotic membrane from which the original epithelium had been removed without significant histologic damage to the basement membrane, and the expanded corneal epithelial stem cells, which had been applied to and had successfully adhered to the denuded amniotic membrane. Animal model. Twelve rabbits had the ocular surface of 1 eye damaged in a standard

  18. Ultraviolet light and ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yam, Jason C S; Kwok, Alvin K H

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to review the association between ultraviolet (UV) light and ocular diseases. The data are sourced from the literature search of Medline up to Nov 2012, and the extracted data from original articles, review papers, and book chapters were reviewed. There is a strong evidence that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is associated with the formation of eyelid malignancies [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)], photokeratitis, climatic droplet keratopathy (CDK), pterygium, and cortical cataract. However, the evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is related to UV exposure. It is now suggested that AMD is probably related to visible radiation especially blue light, rather than UV exposure. From the results, it was concluded that eyelid malignancies (BCC and SCC), photokeratitis, CDK, pterygium, and cortical cataract are strongly associated with UVR exposure. Evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, OSSN, and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether AMD is related to UV exposure. Simple behaviural changes, appropriate clothing, wearing hats, and UV blocking spectacles, sunglasses or contact lens are effective measures for UV protection. PMID:23722672

  19. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  20. Interferon Regulator Factor 8 (IRF8) Limits Ocular Pathology during HSV-1 Infection by Restraining the Activation and Expansion of CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Rong; He, Chang; Mahdi, Rashid M.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C.; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF8) is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cell lineages and plays important roles in immunity to pathogens and cancer. Although IRF8 expression is induced in activated T cells, the functional relevance of IRF8 in T cell-mediated immunity is not well understood. In this study, we used mice with targeted deletion of Irf8 in T-cells (IRF8KO) to investigate the role of IRF8 in T cell-mediated responses during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection of the eye. In contrast to wild type mice, HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice mounted a more robust anti-HSV-1 immune response, which included marked expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) and enhanced elimination of virus within the trigeminal ganglion. However, the consequence of the enhanced immunological response was the development of ocular inflammation, limbitis, and neutrophilic infiltration into the cornea of HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice. Surprisingly, we observed a marked increase in virus-specific memory precursor effector cells (MPEC) in IRF8KO mice, suggesting that IRF8 might play a role in regulating the differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells to the memory phenotype. Together, our data suggest that IRF8 might play a role in restraining excess lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, modulating IRF8 levels in T cells can be exploited therapeutically to prevent immune-mediated ocular pathology during autoimmune and infectious diseases of the eye. PMID:27171004

  1. Ocular chemical injuries and their management

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parul; Tyagi, Manoj; Kumar, Yogesh; Gupta, K. K.; Sharma, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical burns represent potentially blinding ocular injuries and constitute a true ocular emergency requiring immediate assessment and initiation of treatment. The majority of victims are young and exposure occurs at home, work place and in association with criminal assaults. Alkali injuries occur more frequently than acid injuries. Chemical injuries of the eye produce extensive damage to the ocular surface epithelium, cornea, anterior segment and limbal stem cells resulting in permanent unilateral or bilateral visual impairment. Emergency management if appropriate may be single most important factor in determining visual outcome. This article reviews the emergency management and newer techniques to improve the prognosis of patients with chemical injuries. PMID:24082664

  2. The Role of Infectious Agents in the Etiology of Ocular Adnexal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Varun; Shen, Defen; Sieving, Pamela C.; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2008-01-01

    Given the fact that infectious agents contribute to around 18% of human cancers worldwide, it would seem prudent to explore their role in neoplasms of the ocular adnexa: primary malignancies of the conjunctiva, lacrimal glands, eyelids, and orbit. By elucidating the mechanisms by which infectious agents contribute to oncogenesis, the management, treatment, and prevention of these neoplasms may one day parallel what is already in place for cancers such as cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Antibiotic treatment and vaccines against infectious agents may herald a future with a curtailed role for traditional therapies of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Unlike other malignancies for which large epidemiological studies are available, analyzing ocular adnexal neoplasms is challenging as they are relatively rare. Additionally, putative infectious agents seemingly display an immense geographic variation that has led to much debate regarding the relative importance of one organism versus another. This review discusses the pathogenetic role of several microorganisms in different ocular adnexal malignancies, including human papilloma virus in conjunctival papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma, human immunodeficiency virus in conjunctival squamous carcinoma, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus or human herpes simplex virus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8) in conjunctival Kaposi sarcoma, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori,), Chlamydia, and hepatitis C virus in ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. Unlike cervical cancer where a single infectious agent, human papilloma virus, is found in greater than 99% of lesions, multiple organisms may play a role in the etiology of certain ocular adnexal neoplasms by acting through similar mechanisms of oncogenesis, including chronic antigenic stimulation and the action of infectious oncogenes. However, similar to other human malignancies

  3. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Used to detect eye problems in children through analysis of retinal reflexes, the system incorporates image processing techniques. VISISCREEN's photorefractor is basically a 35 millimeter camera with a telephoto lens and an electronic flash. By making a color photograph, the system can test the human eye for refractive error and obstruction in the cornea or lens. Ocular alignment problems are detected by imaging both eyes simultaneously. Electronic flash sends light into the eyes and the light is reflected from the retina back to the camera lens. Photorefractor analyzes the retinal reflexes generated by the subject's response to the flash and produces an image of the subject's eyes in which the pupils are variously colored. The nature of a defect, where such exists, is identifiable by atrained observer's visual examination.

  4. Photorefractor ocular screening system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John R. (Inventor); Kerr, Joseph H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting human eye defects, particularly detection of refractive error is presented. Eye reflex is recorded on color film when the eyes are exposed to a flash of light. The photographs are compared with predetermined standards to detect eye defects. The base structure of the ocular screening system is a folding interconnect structure, comprising hinged sections. Attached to one end of the structure is a head positioning station which comprises vertical support, a head positioning bracket having one end attached to the top of the support, and two head positioning lamps to verify precise head positioning. At the opposite end of the interconnect structure is a camera station with camera, electronic flash unit, and blinking fixation lamp, for photographing the eyes of persons being evaluated.

  5. Translational models of ocular disease.

    PubMed

    Zeiss, Caroline J

    2013-07-01

    Animals provide indispensable models to translate basic mechanistic discoveries and realize their therapeutic potential in humans. Conversely, advances in human medicine often inform management of similar conditions in clinical veterinary medicine. In this paper, key experimental model species are introduced, with emphasis on genetic contributions of the mouse. Its role and those of larger animal models are described in common ocular research areas including intraocular neoplasia, corneal epithelial and stromal disease, cataract, uveitis, glaucoma, and retinal dystrophies. Emphasis is placed on those conditions shared by humans and domestic animals, with the intent of exploring how the study of comparable conditions in humans, domestic animals, and laboratory animals informs one another. PMID:23750503

  6. Corneal Dendritic Cell Density Is Associated with Subbasal Nerve Plexus Features, Ocular Surface Disease Index, and Serum Vitamin D in Evaporative Dry Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Rohit; Sethu, Swaminathan; Deshmukh, Rashmi; Deshpande, Kalyani; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Agrawal, Aarti; Shroff, Rushad

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) has evolved into a major public health concern with ocular discomfort and pain being responsible for significant morbidity associated with DED. However, the etiopathological factors contributing to ocular pain associated with DED are not well understood. The current IVCM based study investigated the association between corneal dendritic cell density (DCD), corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBNP) features, and serum vitamin D and symptoms of evaporative dry eye (EDE). The study included age and sex matched 52 EDE patients and 43 heathy controls. A significant increase in the OSDI scores (discomfort subscale) was observed between EDE (median, 20.8) and control (median, 4.2) cohorts (P < 0.001). Similarly, an increase in DCD was observed between EDE (median, 48.1 cells/mm2) patients and controls (median, 5.6 cells/mm2) (P < 0.001). A significant decrease in SBNP features (corneal nerve fiber length, fiber density, fiber width, total branch density, nerve branch density, and fiber area) was observed in EDE patients with OSDI score >23 (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was observed between DCD and OSDI discomfort subscale (r = 0.348; P < 0.0003) and SBNP features. An inverse correlation was observed between vitamin D and OSDI scores (r = −0.332; P = 0.0095) and DCD with dendritic processes (r = −0.322; P = 0.0122). The findings implicate DCD, SBNP features, and vitamin D with EDE symptoms. PMID:26904676

  7. Multiple subclasses of Purkinje cells in the primate floccular complex provide similar signals to guide learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.

    1997-01-01

    The neural "learning rules" governing the induction of plasticity in the cerebellum were analyzed by recording the patterns of neural activity in awake, behaving animals during stimuli that induce a form of cerebellum-dependent learning. We recorded the simple- and complex-spike responses of a broad sample of Purkinje cells in the floccular complex during a number of stimulus conditions that induce motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Each subclass of Purkinje cells carried essentially the same information about required changes in the gain of the VOR. The correlation of simple-spike activity in Purkinje cells with activity in vestibular pathways could guide learning during low-frequency but not high-frequency stimuli. Climbing fiber activity could guide learning during all stimuli tested but only if compared with the activity present approximately 100 msec earlier in either vestibular pathways or Purkinje cells.

  8. Primary cutaneous extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the eyelid skin: Diagnostic clues and distinction from other ocular adnexal diseases.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Anna M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old man developed a rubbery thickening and erythema of his left lateral upper and lower eyelids and lateral canthus over several months. He was treated for an extended period of time for blepharitis and chalazia. Incisional biopsy eventually disclosed microscopically a hypercellular lymphoid population sparing the epidermis that surrounded adnexal structures and infiltrated between orbicularis muscle fibers. Immunohistochemically, the lesion was found to be composed of neoplastic, kappa-restricted B cells with an equal number of reactive T cells and small reactive follicles. The diagnosis was a primary cutaneous extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the eyelid skin (EMZL). We review the distinguishing clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical features of cutaneous EMZL and contrast those with EMZL of other ocular adnexal sites. Also offered is a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lymphomas of the eyelid skin, which are predominately T-cell lesions. PMID:26545575

  9. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  10. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  11. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  12. Lipid Nanoparticles for Ocular Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Rajala, Raju V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Lipids contain hydrocarbons and are the building blocks of cells. Lipids can naturally form themselves into nano-films and nano-structures, micelles, reverse micelles, and liposomes. Micelles or reverse micelles are monolayer structures, whereas liposomes are bilayer structures. Liposomes have been recognized as carriers for drug delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles and lipoplex (liposome-polycation-DNA complex), also called lipid nanoparticles, are currently used to deliver drugs and genes to ocular tissues. A solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) is typically spherical, and possesses a solid lipid core matrix that can solubilize lipophilic molecules. The lipid nanoparticle, called the liposome protamine/DNA lipoplex (LPD), is electrostatically assembled from cationic liposomes and an anionic protamine-DNA complex. The LPD nanoparticles contain a highly condensed DNA core surrounded by lipid bilayers. SLNs are extensively used to deliver drugs to the cornea. LPD nanoparticles are used to target the retina. Age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and diabetic retinopathy are the most common retinal diseases in humans. There have also been promising results achieved recently with LPD nanoparticles to deliver functional genes and micro RNA to treat retinal diseases. Here, we review recent advances in ocular drug and gene delivery employing lipid nanoparticles. PMID:26062170

  13. Evidence suggesting individual ocular motor control of each eye (muscle).

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, L F

    1994-01-01

    Current models of the ocular motor system are usually presented in their most reduced form, are unilateral in architecture, and precise yoking is presumed. Although this simplifies the models, it does not accurately simulate the actual neuroanatomy and limits the models to simple, stereotyped responses. Studies of normal humans and monkeys have demonstrated striking disconjugacies in normal responses. Normal saccades may be disconjugate, or 1 eye may exhibit a dynamic overshoot. Asymmetric vergence can result in disconjugate saccades, unequal magnification spectacles cause differential saccadic gain adjustment, and saccades to unequal disparities also cause unequal saccades in the 2 eyes. In strabismus, deviated eyes typically do not mimic the movements of the fixating eye nor do their latent or congenital nystagmus waveforms duplicate those of the fixating eye. In spasmus nutans, each eye oscillates independently of the other. In achiasmatic dogs, uni-ocular saccades and uni-ocular nystagmus waveforms are seen; the same may be true in human achiasma. These data from both normals and those with abnormalities suggest that current models for ocular motor control are inadequate representations of the actual system. The inability of unilateral, yoked control (or even bilateral, yoked control) system models to duplicate the ocular motor responses of binocular mammals suggests that their ocular motor systems evolved from the bilateral, independent control systems seen in chameleons. One need only postulate a yoking overlay superimposed on two independent control systems to achieve conjugacy (bilateral, yoked, independent control) of the eyes. Abnormalities producing grossly disconjugate eye movements may then be simulated using the independent control of each eye released by a deficiency in the yoking overlay. Independent control of each eye coupled with the essential bilateral brain stem architecture implies that each individual muscle is driven by independent

  14. Amitosis in human adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, M C; Pignatelli, D; Magalhães, M M

    1991-04-01

    Adrenal pieces obtained from 3 female and 2 male patients showed morphological figures of amitosis in adrenal zona reticularis cells. Such aspects were observed in both normal and hyperactive adrenals. Nuclei appeared constricted, heavily stained, with coarse chromatin, sometimes scattered among cytoplasmic organelles, but never marginating in crescentic caps. Cleavage of the cells originated two halves with a nucleolus in each pole. Binucleated cells were also seen in zona reticularis. The meaning of amitosis in human adrenal is discussed. PMID:1802124

  15. Human corneal stromal stem cells support limbal epithelial cells cultured on RAFT tissue equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Kureshi, Alvena K; Dziasko, Marc; Funderburgh, James L; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-01-01

    Human limbal epithelial cells (HLE) and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC) reside in close proximity in vivo in the corneal limbal stem cell niche. However, HLE are typically cultured in vitro without supporting niche cells. Here, we re-create the cell-cell juxtaposition of the native environment in vitro, to provide a tool for investigation of epithelial-stromal cell interactions and to optimize HLE culture conditions for potential therapeutic application. RAFT (Real Architecture For 3D Tissue) tissue equivalents (TEs) were used as a 3-dimensional substrate for co-culturing HLE and CSSC. Our results demonstrate that a monolayer of HLE that maintained expression of p63α, ABCB5, CK8 and CK15 (HLE markers), formed on the surface of RAFT TEs within 13 days of culture. CSSC remained in close proximity to HLE and maintained expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers. This simple technique has a short preparation time of only 15 days with the onset of HLE layering and differentiation observed. Furthermore, co-cultivation of HLE with another niche cell type (CSSC) directly on RAFT TEs, eliminates the requirement for animal-derived feeder cells. RAFT TEs may be useful for future therapeutic delivery of multiple cell types to restore the limbal niche following ocular surface injury or disease. PMID:26531048

  16. Human Ocular Counter-Rolling and Roll Tilt Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation after Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott J.

    2007-01-01

    Ocular counter-rolling (OCR) induced by whole body tilt in roll has been explored after spaceflight as an indicator of the adaptation of the otolith function to microgravity. It has been claimed that the overall pattern of OCR responses during static body tilt after spaceflight is indicative of a decreased role of the otolith function, but the results of these studies have not been consistent, mostly due to large variations in the OCR within and across individuals. By contrast with static head tilt, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) presents the advantage of generating a sinusoidal modulation of OCR, allowing averaged measurements over several cycles, thus improving measurement accuracy. Accordingly, OCR and the sense of roll tilt were evaluated in seven astronauts before and after spaceflight during OVAR at 45 /s in darkness at two angles of tilt (10 and 20 ). There was no significant difference in OCR during OVAR immediately after landing compared to preflight. However, the amplitude of the perceived roll tilt during OVAR was significantly larger immediately postflight, and then returned to control values in the following days. Since the OCR response is predominantly attributed to the shearing force exerted on the utricular macula, the absence of change in OCR postflight suggests that the peripheral otolith organs function normally after short-term spaceflight. However, the increased sense of roll tilt indicates an adaptation in the central processing of gravitational input, presumably related to a re-weigthing of the internal representation of gravitational vertical as a result of adaptation to microgravity.

  17. Pediatric ocular phthiriasis infestation.

    PubMed

    Kairys, D J; Webster, H J; Terry, J E

    1988-02-01

    Although pubic lice infestation of ocular regions is relatively uncommon, the optometrist needs to be aware of the diagnosis and treatment of louse-infested patients. A case report of ocular phthiriasis is presented along with a discussion of its etiology, clinical diagnosis and management. PMID:3361053

  18. Three-dimensional model of angiogenesis: coculture of human retinal cells with bovine aortic endothelial cells in the NASA bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Kamla; Sanford, Gary; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Brako, Lawrence; Kumar, Ravindra; Sroufe, Angela; Melhado, Caroline

    2003-10-01

    Ocular angiogenesis is the leading cause of blindness and is associated with diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. We describe, in this report, our preliminary studies using a horizontally rotating bioreactor (HRB), developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to explore growth and differentiation-associated events in the early phase of ocular angiogenesis. Human retinal (HRet) cells and bovine endothelial cells (ECs) were cocultured on laminin-coated Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads in an HRB for 1-36 days. Endothelial cells grown alone in the HRB remained cuboidal and were well differentiated. However, when HRet cells were cocultured with ECs, cordlike structures formed as early as 18-36 h and were positive for von Willebrand factor. In addition to the formation of cords and capillary-like structures, ECs showed the beginning of sprouts. The HRB seems not only to promote accelerated capillary formation, but also to enhance differentiation of retinal precursor cells. This leads to the formation of rosette-like structures (which may be aggregates of photoreceptors that were positive for rhodopsin). Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor was seen in retinal cells grown in the HRB as compared with monolayers and could be one of the factors responsible for accelerated capillary formation. Hence, the HRB promotes three-dimensional assembly and differentiation, possibly through promoting cell-to-cell interaction and/or secretion of growth and differentiation factors. PMID:14633374

  19. In vitro ultraviolet–induced damage in human corneal, lens, and retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyun-Yi; Sivak, Jacob G.; Jones, Lyndon W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to develop suitable in vitro methods to detect ocular epithelial cell damage when exposed to UV radiation, in an effort to evaluate UV-absorbing ophthalmic biomaterials. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC), lens epithelial cells (HLEC), and retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) were cultured and Ultraviolet A/Ultraviolet B (UVA/UVB) blocking filters and UVB-only blocking filters were placed between the cells and a UV light source. Cells were irradiated with UV radiations at various energy levels with and without filter protections. Cell viability after exposure was determined using the metabolic dye alamarBlue and by evaluating for changes in the nuclei, mitochondria, membrane permeability, and cell membranes of the cells using the fluorescent dyes Hoechst 33342, rhodamine 123, calcein AM, ethidium homodimer-1, and annexin V. High-resolution images of the cells were taken with a Zeiss 510 confocal laser scanning microscope. Results The alamarBlue assay results of UV-exposed cells without filters showed energy level-dependent decreases in cellular viability. However, UV treated cells with 400 nm LP filter protection showed the equivalent viability to untreated control cells at all energy levels. Also, UV irradiated cells with 320 nm LP filter showed lower cell viability than the unexposed control cells, yet higher viability than UV-exposed cells without filters in an energy level-dependent manner. The confocal microscopy results also showed that UV radiation can cause significant dose-dependent degradations of nuclei and mitochondria in ocular cells. The annexin V staining also showed an increased number of apoptotic cells after UV irradiation. Conclusions The findings suggest that UV-induced HCEC, HLEC, and ARPE-19 cell damage can be evaluated by bioassays that measure changes in the cell nuclei, mitochondria, cell membranes, and cell metabolism, and these assay methods provide a valuable in vitro model for evaluating the

  20. Suppression of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex by visual fixation or forced convergence in the dark, with a model interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gizzi, Martin S; Harper, Harry Wms

    2003-05-01

    Six normal humans experienced yaw axis steps of velocity at 120 degrees /s in the dark. During the post-rotary period, subjects either had a null-task (do nothing); an ocular motor task (forced convergence: crossing the eyes); or a visual task (fixating a head-stationary target against a background of 10 degrees light/dark bars). Tasks started at 3 s post-rotation, and lasted either 2, 5, 10, or 15 s. Ocular motor and visual tasks were tested on different days. Five repetitions of each task duration were recorded for each subject. A mean VOR gain of 0.52 was observed, which did not vary with experimental conditions. Both convergence and fixation markedly suppressed nystagmus; in fact, the VORs obtained with the two different tasks are superficially similar in appearance. However, mean null-task time-constants were 9.4 s for convergence days, but 8.4 s for fixation days, and there was a small but significant reduction in overall null-task VOR amplitude on fixation days. Also, post-convergence slow-phase velocities were slightly enhanced, while post-fixation velocities were significantly reduced. The time-constant of velocity storage was found to be 10.1 s for convergence responses and 8.2 s for fixation responses. These differences can be understood in terms of modifications in central velocity storage during visual fixation which do not occur with convergence. The mean fixation data were analyzed in the context of a VOR model well-established for monkey data. With appropriate choice of parameters, this model accurately reproduces most features of the human data. An estimate for the human cupula time-constant of 3.3 s is obtained. Compared with the monkey, fixation suppression is greater and post-fixation velocity reduction less. Retinal slip alone accounts well for this; "velocity dumping" by an integrator shunt must be slight if present at all. The model correctly represents the post-fixation VOR for all durations of fixation. PMID:12854056

  1. KLF4 Promotes Angiogenesis by Activating VEGF Signaling in Human Retinal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Yang, Chuanhe; Gu, Qingqing; Sims, Michelle; Gu, Weiwang; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.; Yue, Junming

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) has been implicated in regulating cell proliferation, migration and differentiation in a variety of human cells and is one of four factors required for the induction of pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. However, its role has not been addressed in ocular neovascular diseases. This study investigated the role of KLF4 in angiogenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs). The functional role of KLF4 in HRMECs was determined following lentiviral vector mediated inducible expression and shRNA knockdown of KLF4. Inducible expression of KLF4 promotes cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. In contrast, silencing KLF4 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, tube formation and induces apoptosis in HRMECs. KLF4 promotes angiogenesis by transcriptionally activating VEGF expression, thus activating the VEGF signaling pathway in HRMECs. PMID:26075898

  2. Cytotoxicity assessment of porous silicon microparticles for ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Eveliina; Rönkkö, Seppo; Hillebrand, Satu; Riikonen, Joakim; Xu, Wujun; Järvinen, Kristiina; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Kauppinen, Anu

    2016-03-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) is a promising material for the delivery and sustained release of therapeutic molecules in various tissues. Due to the constant rinsing of cornea by tear solution as well as the short half-life of intravitreal drugs, the eye is an attractive target for controlled drug delivery systems, such as PSi microparticles. Inherent barriers ensure that PSi particles are retained in the eye, releasing drugs at the desired speed until they slowly break down into harmless silicic acid. Here, we have examined the in vitro cytotoxicity of positively and negatively charged thermally oxidized (TOPSi) and thermally carbonized (TCPSi) porous silicon microparticles on human corneal epithelial (HCE) and retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. In addition to ocular assessment under an inverted microscope, cellular viability was evaluated using the CellTiter Blue™, CellTiter Fluor™, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. CellTiter Fluor proved to be a suitable assay but due to non-specific and interfering responses, neither CellTiter Blue nor LDH assays should be used when evaluating PSi particles. Our results suggest that the toxicity of PSi particles is concentration-dependent, but at least at concentrations less than 200μg/ml, both positively and negatively charged PSi particles are well tolerated by human corneal and retinal epithelial cells and therefore applicable for delivering drug molecules into ocular tissues. PMID:26686646

  3. ETS-1 and ETS-2 are upregulated in a transgenic mouse model of pigmented ocular neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    De la Houssaye, G.; Vieira, V.; Masson, C.; Beermann, F.; Dufier, J.L.; Menasche, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Choroidal melanoma is the most common primary malignant ocular tumor in human adults. Relevant mouse models of human uveal melanoma still remain to be developed. We have studied the transgenic mouse strain, Tyrp-1-TAg, to try to gain insight into possible molecular mechanisms common to pigmented ocular neoplasms occurring spontaneously in the eyes of these mice and human choroidal melanoma. The role of two members of the ETS (E26 avian leukemia oncogene) family of transcription factors, ETS-1 and ETS-2, has been investigated in many cancers but has not yet been studied in ocular tumors. Methods This is the first study describing the production and distribution of ETS-1 and ETS-2 mRNAs and proteins using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in murine ocular tissue sections of normal control eyes and tumoral eyes from mice of the same age. Using semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) and western blots experiments, we compared changes in ETS-1 and ETS-2 expression, their protein levels, and the regulation of some of their target gene expressions at different stages of the ocular tumoral progression in the transgenic mouse model, Tyrp-1-TAg, with those in normal eyes from control mice of the same age. Results In normal control adult mouse eyes, ETS-1 was mostly present in the nuclei of all neuroretinal layers whereas ETS-2 was mostly localized in the cytosol of the cell bodies of these layers with a smaller amount present in the nuclei. Both were found in the retinal pigmentary epithelium (RPE). ETS-1 and ETS-2 mRNA and protein levels were much higher in the ocular tissues of Tyrp-1-TAg mice than in control ocular tissues from wild-type mice. This upregulation was correlated with tumor progression. We also demonstrated upregulation of ETS-1 and ETS-2 target expressions in Tyrp-1-TAg mice when comparing with the same target expressions in control mice. Conclusions Our findings suggest that ETS-1 and ETS-2 are

  4. SIV replication in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Ryuta; Takeuchi, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 pandemic is believed to originate from cross-species transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) into human population. Such cross-species transmission, however, is not efficient in general, because viral replication is modulated by host cell factors, with the species-specificity of these factors affecting viral tropism. An understanding of those host cell factors that affect viral replication contributes to elucidation of the mechanism for determination of viral tropism. This review will focus an anti-viral effect of ApoB mRNA editing catalytic subunit, tripartite motif protein 5 alpha, and cyclophilins on SIV replication and provide insight into the mechanism of species-specific barriers against viral infection in human cells. It will then present our current understanding of the mechanism that may explain zoonotic transmission of retroviruses. PMID:22679440

  5. Influence of age, spatial memory, and ocular fixation on localization of auditory, visual, and bimodal targets by human subjects.

    PubMed

    Dobreva, Marina S; O'Neill, William E; Paige, Gary D

    2012-12-01

    A common complaint of the elderly is difficulty identifying and localizing auditory and visual sources, particularly in competing background noise. Spatial errors in the elderly may pose challenges and even threats to self and others during everyday activities, such as localizing sounds in a crowded room or driving in traffic. In this study, we investigated the influence of aging, spatial memory, and ocular fixation on the localization of auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual (bimodal) targets. Head-restrained young and elderly subjects localized targets in a dark, echo-attenuated room using a manual laser pointer. Localization accuracy and precision (repeatability) were quantified for both ongoing and transient (remembered) targets at response delays up to 10 s. Because eye movements bias auditory spatial perception, localization was assessed under target fixation (eyes free, pointer guided by foveal vision) and central fixation (eyes fixed straight ahead, pointer guided by peripheral vision) conditions. Spatial localization across the frontal field in young adults demonstrated (1) horizontal overshoot and vertical undershoot for ongoing auditory targets under target fixation conditions, but near-ideal horizontal localization with central fixation; (2) accurate and precise localization of ongoing visual targets guided by foveal vision under target fixation that degraded when guided by peripheral vision during central fixation; (3) overestimation in horizontal central space (±10°) of remembered auditory, visual, and bimodal targets with increasing response delay. In comparison with young adults, elderly subjects showed (1) worse precision in most paradigms, especially when localizing with peripheral vision under central fixation; (2) greatly impaired vertical localization of auditory and bimodal targets; (3) increased horizontal overshoot in the central field for remembered visual and bimodal targets across response delays; (4) greater vulnerability to

  6. Mucin Characteristics of Human Corneal-Limbal Epithelial Cells that Exclude the Rose Bengal Anionic Dye

    PubMed Central

    Argüeso, Pablo; Tisdale, Ann; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Sumiyoshi, Mika; Gipson, Ilene K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Rose bengal is an organic anionic dye used to assess damage of the ocular surface epithelium in ocular surface disease. It has been proposed that mucins have a protective role, preventing rose bengal staining of normal ocular surface epithelial cells. The current study was undertaken to evaluate rose bengal staining in a human corneal-limbal epithelial (HCLE) cell line known to produce and glycosylate membrane-associated mucins. Methods HCLE cells were grown to confluence in serum-free medium and switched to DMEM/F12 with 10% serum to promote differentiation. Immunolocalization of the membrane-associated mucins MUC1 and MUC16 and the T-antigen carbohydrate epitope was performed with the monoclonal antibodies HMFG-2 and OC125 and jacalin lectin, respectively. To assess dye uptake, cultures were incubated for 5 minutes with 0.1% rose bengal and photographed. To determine whether exclusion of negatively charged rose bengal requires a negative charge at the cell surface, cells were incubated with fluoresceinated cationized ferritin. The effect of hyperosmotic stress on rose bengal staining in vitro was evaluated by increasing the ion concentration (Ca+2 and Mg+2) in the rose bengal uptake assay. Results The cytoplasm and nucleus of confluent HCLE cells cultured in media without serum, lacking the expression of MUC16 but not MUC1, as well as human corneal fibroblasts, which do not express mucins, stained with rose bengal. Culture of HCLE cells in medium containing serum resulted in the formation of islands of stratified cells that excluded rose bengal. Apical cells of the stratified islands produced MUC16 and the T-antigen carbohydrate epitope on their apical surfaces. Colocalization experiments demonstrated that fluoresceinated cationized ferritin did not bind to these stratified cells, indicating that rose bengal is excluded from cells that lack negative charges. Increasing the amounts of divalent cations in the media reduced the cellular area protected

  7. A RAB3GAP1 SINE Insertion in Alaskan Huskies with Polyneuropathy, Ocular Abnormalities, and Neuronal Vacuolation (POANV) Resembling Human Warburg Micro Syndrome 1 (WARBM1)

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmer, Michaela; Oevermann, Anna; Borer-Germann, Stephanie E.; Gorgas, Daniela; Shelton, G. Diane; Drögemüller, Michaela; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Henke, Diana; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    We observed a hereditary phenotype in Alaskan Huskies that was characterized by polyneuropathy with ocular abnormalities and neuronal vacuolation (POANV). The affected dogs developed a progressive severe ataxia, which led to euthanasia between 8 and 16 months of age. The pedigrees were consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative genetic defect to a 4 Mb interval on chromosome 19 by a combined linkage and homozygosity mapping approach. Whole genome sequencing of one affected dog, an obligate carrier, and an unrelated control revealed a 218-bp SINE insertion into exon 7 of the RAB3GAP1 gene. The SINE insertion was perfectly associated with the disease phenotype in a cohort of 43 Alaskan Huskies, and it was absent from 541 control dogs of diverse other breeds. The SINE insertion induced aberrant splicing and led to a transcript with a greatly altered exon 7. RAB3GAP1 loss-of-function variants in humans cause Warburg Micro Syndrome 1 (WARBM1), which is characterized by additional developmental defects compared to canine POANV, whereas Rab3gap1-deficient mice have a much milder phenotype than either humans or dogs. Thus, the RAB3GAP1 mutant Alaskan Huskies provide an interesting intermediate phenotype that may help to better understand the function of RAB3GAP1 in development. Furthermore, the identification of the presumed causative genetic variant will enable genetic testing to avoid the nonintentional breeding of affected dogs. PMID:26596647

  8. Albinism: particular attention to the ocular motor system.

    PubMed

    Hertle, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize an understanding of the ocular motor system in patients with albinism. Other than the association of vertical eccentric gaze null positions and asymmetric, (a) periodic alternating nystagmus in a large percentage of patients, the ocular motor system in human albinism does not contain unique pathology, rather has "typical" types of infantile ocular oscillations and binocular disorders. Both the ocular motor and afferent visual system are affected to varying degrees in patients with albinism, thus, combined treatment of both systems will maximize visual function. PMID:24014991

  9. Mapping Molecular Differences and Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression in Segmental Outflow Pathways of the Human Ocular Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Vranka, Janice A.; Bradley, John M.; Yang, Yong-Feng; Keller, Kate E.; Acott, Ted S.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the primary risk factor for glaucoma, and lowering IOP remains the only effective treatment for glaucoma. The trabecular meshwork (TM) in the anterior chamber of the eye regulates IOP by generating resistance to aqueous humor outflow. Aqueous humor outflow is segmental, but molecular differences between high and low outflow regions of the TM are poorly understood. In this study, flow regions of the TM were characterized using fluorescent tracers and PCR arrays. Anterior segments from human donor eyes were perfused at physiological pressure in an ex vivo organ culture system. Fluorescently-labeled microspheres of various sizes were perfused into anterior segments to label flow regions. Actively perfused microspheres were segmentally distributed, whereas microspheres soaked passively into anterior segments uniformly labeled the TM and surrounding tissues with no apparent segmentation. Cell-tracker quantum dots (20 nm) were localized to the outer uveal and corneoscleral TM, whereas larger, modified microspheres (200 nm) localized throughout the TM layers and Schlemm’s canal. Distribution of fluorescent tracers demonstrated a variable labeling pattern on both a macro- and micro-scale. Quantitative PCR arrays allowed identification of a variety of extracellular matrix genes differentially expressed in high and low flow regions of the TM. Several collagen genes (COL16A1, COL4A2, COL6A1 and 2) and MMPs (1, 2, 3) were enriched in high, whereas COL15A1, and MMP16 were enriched in low flow regions. Matrix metalloproteinase activity was similar in high and low regions using a quantitative FRET peptide assay, whereas protein levels in tissues showed modest regional differences. These gene and protein differences across regions of the TM provide further evidence for a molecular basis of segmental flow routes within the aqueous outflow pathway. New insight into the molecular mechanisms of segmental aqueous outflow may aid in the design

  10. Preclinical pharmacology, ocular tolerability and ocular hypotensive efficacy of a novel non-peptide bradykinin mimetic small molecule.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Najam A; Li, Linya; Katoli, Parvaneh; Xu, Shouxi; Veltman, James; Li, Byron; Scott, Daniel; Wax, Martin; Gallar, Juana; Acosta, Carmen; Belmonte, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    We sought to characterize the ocular pharmacology, tolerability and intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy of FR-190997, a non-peptidic bradykinin (BK) B2-receptor agonist. FR-190997 possessed a relatively high receptor binding affinity (Ki = 27 nM) and a high in vitro potency (EC50 = 18.3 ± 4.4 nM) for inositol-1-phosphate generation via human cloned B2-receptors expressed in host cells with mimimal activity at B1-receptors. It also mobilized intracellular Ca2+ in isolated human trabecular meshwork (h-TM), ciliary muscle (h-CM), and in immortalized non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (h-iNPE) cells (EC50s = 167-384 nM; Emax = 32-86% of BK-induced response). HOE-140, a selective B2-receptor antagonist, potently blocked the latter effects of FR-190997 (e.g., IC50 = 7.3 ± 0.6 nM in h-CM cells). FR-190997 also stimulated the release of prostaglandins (PGs) from h-TM and h-CM cells (EC50s = 60-84 nM; Emax = 29-44% relative to max. BK-induced effects). FR-190997 (0.3-300 μg t.o.) did not activate cat corneal polymodal nociceptors and did not cause ocular discomfort in Dutch-Belted rabbits, but it was not well tolerated in New Zealand albino rabbits and Hartley guinea pigs. A single topical ocular (t.o.) dose of 1% FR-190997 in Dutch-Belted rabbits and mixed breed cats did not lower IOP. However, FR-190997 efficaciously lowered IOP of conscious ocular hypertensive cynomolgus monkey eyes (e.g., 34.5 ± 7.5% decrease; 6 h post-dose of 30 μg t.o.; n = 8). Thus, FR-190997 is an unexampled efficacious ocular hypotensive B2-receptor non-peptide BK agonist that activates multiple signaling pathways to cause IOP reduction. PMID:25307520

  11. Pathophysiology of ocular surface squamous neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gichuhi, Stephen; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi; Sagoo, Mandeep S.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is strongly associated with solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). Africa has the highest incidence rates in the world. Most lesions occur at the limbus within the interpalpebral fissure particularly the nasal sector. The nasal limbus receives the highest intensity of sunlight. Limbal epithelial crypts are concentrated nasally and contain niches of limbal epithelial stem cells in the basal layer. It is possible that these are the progenitor cells in OSSN. OSSN arises in the basal epithelial cells spreading towards the surface which resembles the movement of corneo-limbal stem cell progeny before it later invades through the basement membrane below. UV radiation damages DNA producing pyrimidine dimers in the DNA chain. Specific CC → TT base pair dimer transformations of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene occur in OSSN allowing cells with damaged DNA past the G1-S cell cycle checkpoint. UV radiation also causes local and systemic photoimmunosuppression and reactivates latent viruses such as HPV. The E7 proteins of HPV promote proliferation of infected epithelial cells via the retinoblastoma gene while E6 proteins prevent the p53 tumour suppressor gene from effecting cell-cycle arrest of DNA-damaged and infected cells. Immunosuppression from UV radiation, HIV and vitamin A deficiency impairs tumour immune surveillance allowing survival of aberrant cells. Tumour growth and metastases are enhanced by; telomerase reactivation which increases the number of cell divisions a cell can undergo; vascular endothelial growth factor for angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that destroy the intercellular matrix between cells. Despite these potential triggers, the disease is usually unilateral. It is unclear how HPV reaches the conjunctiva. PMID:25447808

  12. Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Rainey, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human adrenal cortex secretes mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens. These steroids are produced from unique cell types located within the three distinct zones of the adrenal cortex. Disruption of adrenal steroid production results in a variety of diseases that can lead to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, infertility and androgen excess. The adrenal cortex is also a common site for the development of adenomas, and rarely the site for the development of carcinomas. The adenomas can lead to diseases associated with adrenal steroid excess, while the carcinomas are particularly aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In vitro cell culture models provide an important tool to examine molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling both the normal and pathologic function of the adrenal cortex. Herein we discuss the human adrenocortical cell lines and their use as model systems for adrenal studies. PMID:21924324

  13. Ocular manifestation of Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amry, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ichthyosis is a rare dermato-ocular disease. This study evaluates the presenting ocular signs, symptoms, complications and prognosis of ichthyosis in a case series from Saudi Arabia. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed for 11 patients with ichthyosis who presented to King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over the last 20 years. Results The most common presenting ocular diagnosis was ectropion of both the lids. Two patients developed corneal perforation with poor prognosis. Most of the patients underwent skin grafting to repair eyelid ectropion. The visual prognosis was excellent because timely surgical interventions were performed. Hence the rate of corneal complications such as perforation was low. Conclusion The most ocular presentation of ichthyosis is ectropion of both the upper and lower lids. Despite good visual prognosis, there were some devastating corneal complications such as perforation with unpredictable outcomes. PMID:26949357

  14. Protective Effects of Human iPS-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells in Comparison with Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Neural Stem Cells on the Degenerating Retina in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianan; Mandai, Michiko; Kamao, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Tomoyo; Shikamura, Masayuki; Kawamata, Shin; Sugita, Sunao; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of visual impairments characterized by progressive rod photoreceptor cell loss due to a genetic background. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) predominantly secreted by the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) has been reported to protect photoreceptors in retinal degeneration models, including rd1. In addition, clinical trials are currently underway outside Japan using human mesenchymal stromal cells and human neural stem cells to protect photoreceptors in RP and dry age-related macular degeneration, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the rescue effects of induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-RPE cells in comparison with those types of cells used in clinical trials on photoreceptor degeneration in rd1 mice. Cells were injected into the subretinal space of immune-suppressed 2-week-old rd1 mice. The results demonstrated that human iPS-RPE cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration on postoperative days (PODs) 14 and 21 and survived longer up to at least 12 weeks after operation than the other two types of graft cells with less immune responses and apoptosis. The mean PEDF concentration in the intraocular fluid in RPE-transplanted eyes was more than 1 µg/ml at PODs 14 and 21, and this may have contributed to the protective effect of RPE transplantation. Our findings suggest that iPS-RPE cells serve as a competent source to delay photoreceptor degeneration through stable survival in degenerating ocular environment and by releasing neuroprotective factors such as PEDF. PMID:25728228

  15. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  16. Localisation of Epithelial Cells Capable of Holoclone Formation In Vitro and Direct Interaction with Stromal Cells in the Native Human Limbal Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Dziasko, Marc A.; Armer, Hannah E.; Levis, Hannah J.; Shortt, Alex J.; Tuft, Stephen; Daniels, Julie T.

    2014-01-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are essential to maintain the transparent ocular surface required for vision. Despite great advances in our understanding of ocular stem cell biology over the last decade, the exact location of the LESC niche remains unclear. In the present study we have used in vitro clonal analysis to confirm that limbal crypts provide a niche for the resident LESCs. We have used high-resolution imaging of the basal epithelial layer at the limbus to identify cells with a morphology consistent with stem cells that were only present within the basal layer of the limbal crypts. These cells are proximal to limbal stromal cells suggesting direct cell-to-cell interaction. Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) confirmed that the putative LESCs are indeed in direct contact with cells in the underlying stroma, a contact that is facilitated by focal basement membrane interruptions. Limbal mesenchymal cells previously identified in the human limbus collocate in the crypt-rich limbal stromal area in the vicinity of LESCs and may be involved in the cell-to-cell contact revealed by SBFSEM. We also observed a high population of melanocytes within the basal layer of the limbal crypts. From these observations we present a three dimensional reconstruction of the LESC niche in which the stem cell is closely associated and maintained by both dendritic pigmented limbal melanocytes and elongated limbal stromal cells. PMID:24714106

  17. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest. PMID:18522846

  18. Ambient Levels of Air Pollution Induce Goblet-Cell Hyperplasia in Human Conjunctival Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Novaes, Priscila; do Nascimento Saldiva, Paulo Hilário; Kara-José, Newton; Macchione, Mariângela; Matsuda, Monique; Racca, Lourdes; Berra, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Background Ocular mucosa is exposed constantly to the external environment, and chronic exposure to air pollution may affect the ocular surface. Objective We assessed the effect of air pollution on the ocular surface by combining determinations of individual exposure and conjunctival impression cytology. Methods A panel study was conducted with 29 volunteers recruited in two locations with different pollution levels: São Paulo (n = 13) and Divinolândia (n = 16). We assessed mean individual levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure for 7 days, using a passive sampler. Impression cytology samples were obtained from inferior tarsal conjunctiva. Comparisons between the two groups in terms of NO2 exposure and goblet-cell counts were performed using the Student t-test. Correlations between goblet-cells counts and corresponding individual NO2 exposure levels were determined using Spearman’s correlation. Results Individuals living in São Paulo received a significantly (p = 0.005) higher dose of NO2 (mean 32.47; SD 9.83) than those living in Divinolândia (mean 19.33; SD 5.24). There was a steady increase in goblet-cell counts, proportional to NO2 exposure (Spearman’s correlation = 0.566, p = 0.001), with a dose–response pattern. Conclusions A positive and significant association between exposure to air pollution and goblet-cell hyperplasia in human conjunctiva was detected. The combination of simple measurements of exposure and impression cytology was an effective and noninvasive approach for characterizing human response to ambient levels of air pollution. PMID:18087595

  19. Violating instructed human agency: An fMRI study on ocular tracking of biological and nonbiological motion stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gertz, Hanna; Hilger, Maximilian; Hegele, Mathias; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that beliefs about the human origin of a stimulus are capable of modulating the coupling of perception and action. Such beliefs can be based on top-down recognition of the identity of an actor or bottom-up observation of the behavior of the stimulus. Instructed human agency has been shown to lead to superior tracking performance of a moving dot as compared to instructed computer agency, especially when the dot followed a biological velocity profile and thus matched the predicted movement, whereas a violation of instructed human agency by a nonbiological dot motion impaired oculomotor tracking (Zwickel et al., 2012). This suggests that the instructed agency biases the selection of predictive models on the movement trajectory of the dot motion. The aim of the present fMRI study was to examine the neural correlates of top-down and bottom-up modulations of perception-action couplings by manipulating the instructed agency (human action vs. computer-generated action) and the observable behavior of the stimulus (biological vs. nonbiological velocity profile). To this end, participants performed an oculomotor tracking task in an MRI environment. Oculomotor tracking activated areas of the eye movement network. A right-hemisphere occipito-temporal cluster comprising the motion-sensitive area V5 showed a preference for the biological as compared to the nonbiological velocity profile. Importantly, a mismatch between instructed human agency and a nonbiological velocity profile primarily activated medial-frontal areas comprising the frontal pole, the paracingulate gyrus, and the anterior cingulate gyrus, as well as the cerebellum and the supplementary eye field as part of the eye movement network. This mismatch effect was specific to the instructed human agency and did not occur in conditions with a mismatch between instructed computer agency and a biological velocity profile. Our results support the hypothesis that humans activate a specific

  20. Loss of NHE8 expression impairs ocular surface function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hua; Zhao, Yang; Li, Jing; Wang, Mingwu; Lian, Fangru; Gao, Minghong

    2014-01-01

    Sodium/hydrogen exchanger (NHE) 8 is expressed at the apical membrane of the epithelial cells and plays important roles in neutral sodium absorption in the gastrointestinal tract and the kidney. It also has an important role in epithelial mucosal protection in the gastric gland and the intestine. Although NHE8 has broad tissue distribution, the precise location and the physiological role of NHE8 in the eye remain unknown. In the present study, we successfully detected the expression of NHE8 in the ocular surface by PCR and Western blot in human and mouse eyes. Immunohistochemistry staining located NHE8 protein at the plasma membrane of the epithelial cells in the conjunctiva, the cornea, and the lacrimal gland both in human and mouse. We also detected the expression of downregulated-in-adenoma (DRA, a Cl−/HCO3− transporter) in the ocular surface epithelial cells. Using NHE8−/− mouse model, we found that loss of NHE8 function resulted in reduced tear production and increased corneal staining. These NHE8−/− mice also showed increased expression of TNF-α and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) genes. The expression of epithelial keratinization marker genes, small proline-rich protein 2h (Sprr2h) and transglutaminase 1 (Tgm1), were also increased in NHE8−/− eyes. Furthermore, DRA expression in NHE8−/− mice was reduced in the conjunctiva, the cornea, and the lacrimal glands in association with a reduction in conjunctival mucosal pH. Altered ocular surface function and reduced epithelial DRA expression in NHE8−/− mice suggest that the role of NHE8 in ocular surface tissue involve in tear production and ocular epithelial protection. This study reveals a potential novel mechanism of dry eye condition involving abnormal NHE8 function. PMID:25377091

  1. Ocular Metabolism of Levobunolol: Historic and Emerging Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Dumouchel, Jennifer L; Dunne, Christine E; Saran, Chitra; Cirello, Amanda L; Gunduz, Mithat

    2016-08-01

    Although ocular transport and delivery have been well studied, metabolism in the eye is not well documented, even for clinically available medications such as levobunolol, a potent and nonselective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Recently, we reported an in vitro methodology that could be used to evaluate ocular metabolism across preclinical species and humans. The current investigation provides detailed in vitro ocular and liver metabolism of levobunolol in rat, rabbit, and human S9 fractions, including the formation of equipotent active metabolite, dihydrolevobunolol, with the help of high-resolution mass spectrometry. 11 of the 16 metabolites of levobunolol identified herein, including a direct acetyl conjugate of levobunolol observed in all ocular and liver fractions, have not been reported in the literature. The study documents the identification of six human ocular metabolites that have never been reported. The current investigation presents evidence for ocular and hepatic metabolism of levobunolol via non-cytochrome P450 pathways, which have not been comprehensively investigated to date. Our results indicated that rat liver S9 and human ocular S9 fractions formed the most metabolites. Furthermore, liver was a poor in vitro surrogate for eye, and rat and rabbit were poor surrogates for human in terms of the rate and extent of levobunolol metabolism. PMID:27190057

  2. Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells. PMID:17922198

  3. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  4. Current and emerging therapies for ocular neovascularisation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Alison L; Kent, David; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2014-01-01

    Ocular neovascularisation (ONV) is a pathological feature of many human blinding diseases. Here, we review current pharmacological therapies for these disorders and highlight emerging therapies in clinical trial for ONV. Finally, we discuss desirable characteristics of future ONV therapies, including innovative strategies for novel delivery to the back of the eye. PMID:24664773

  5. Developments in Ocular Genetics: 2013 Annual Review

    PubMed Central

    Aboobakar, Inas F.; Allingham, R. Rand

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To highlight major advancements in ocular genetics from the year 2013. Design Literature review. Methods A literature search was conducted on PubMed to identify articles pertaining to genetic influences on human eye diseases. This review focuses on manuscripts published in print or online in the English language between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013. A total of 120 papers from 2013 were included in this review. Results Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the genetic basis of a broad group of ocular disorders, including glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, keratoconus, Fuchs’ endothelial dystrophy, and refractive error. Conclusions The latest next-generation sequencing technologies have become extremely effective tools for identifying gene mutations associated with ocular disease. These technological advancements have also paved the way for utilization of genetic information in clinical practice, including disease diagnosis, prediction of treatment response and molecular interventions guided by gene-based knowledge. PMID:25097799

  6. Lipid Composition of the Human Eye: Are Red Blood Cells a Good Mirror of Retinal and Optic Nerve Fatty Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Niyazi; Berdeaux, Olivier; Grégoire, Stéphane; Cabaret, Stéphanie; Martine, Lucy; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P.; Bron, Alain M.; Bretillon, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    Background The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. Methodology and Principal Findings Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA) or optic nerve plasmalogens. Conclusions and Significance LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on optic nerve

  7. NGF Modulates trkANGFR/p75NTR in αSMA-Expressing Conjunctival Fibroblasts from Human Ocular Cicatricial Pemphigoid (OCP)

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Antonio; Sgrulletta, Roberto; Cortes, Magdalena; Normando, Eduardo Maria; Lambiase, Alessandro; Bonini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Objective In a previous study, we reported the upregulation of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and trkANGFR expression in Ocular Cicatricial Pemphigoid (OCP), an inflammatory and remodeling eye disease. Herein, we hypothesize a potential NGF-driven mechanism on fibroblasts (FBs) during OCP remodeling events. To verify, human derived OCP-FBs were isolated and characterized either at baseline or after NGF exposure. Materials and Methods Conjunctival biopsies were obtained from 7 patients having OCP and 6 control subjects (cataract surgery). Both conjunctivas and primary FB cultures were characterised for αSMA, NGF and trkANGFR/p75NTR expression. Subcultures were exposed to NGF and evaluated for αSMA, NGF, trkANGFR/p75NTR expression as well as TGFβ1/IL4 release. For analysis, early and advanced subgroups were defined according to clinical parameters. Results OCP-conjunctivas showed αSMA-expressing FBs and high NGF levels. Advanced OCP-FBs showed higher αSMA expression associated with higher p75NTR and lower trkANGFR expression, as compared to early counterparts. αSMA expression was in keeping with disease severity and correlated to p75NTR. NGF exposure did not affect trkANGFR levels in early OCP-FBs while decreased both αSMA/p75NTR expression and TGFβ1/IL4 release. These effects were not observed in advanced OCP-FBs. Conclusions Taken together, these data are suggestive for a NGF/p75NTR task in the potential modulation of OCP fibrosis and encourages further studies to fully understand the underlying mechanism occurring in fibrosis. NGF/p75NTR might be viewed as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26569118

  8. In vitro alternatives for ocular irritation.

    PubMed Central

    Curren, R D; Harbell, J W

    1998-01-01

    The necessity of using animals to test whether new chemicals and products are eye irritants has been questioned with increasing frequency and fervor over the last 20 years. During this time many new nonanimal methods have been proposed as reliable alternatives to the traditional rabbit (Draize) test. To date, however, none of these nonanimal (in vitro) tests have become universally accepted as a complete replacement for the Draize test. To understand why a complete replacement has not been found, one has to first understand the reasonably complex structure of the eye, the standard Draize scoring scale--which is based on a qualitative evaluation of three different tissues--the differences between human and rabbit eyes, the intrinsic variability of the animal test, and the details of the different in vitro tests that have been proposed as replacements. The in vitro tests vary from relatively simple assays using single cells to more sophisticated assays that use discarded animal tissue or artificially constructed human tissue. It is clear that appropriately designed in vitro tests will eventually give more useful mechanistic information about ocular injury from which we can more comfortably predict the risk of human eye irritation from new products and ingredients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9599696

  9. Anti-inflammatory effect of conditioned medium from human uterine cervical stem cells in uveitis.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Maria A; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Seoane, Samuel; Eiro, Noemi; Gonzalez, Francisco; Saa, Jorge; Vizoso, Francisco; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium from human uterine cervical stem cells (CM-hUCESCs) in uveitis. To do that, uveitis was induced in rats after footpad injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccaride (LPS). Human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells after LPS challenge were used to test anti-inflammatory effect of CM-hUCESCs 'ìn vitro'. Real-time PCR was used to evaluate mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interkeukin-6, interkeukin-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and the anti-inflammatory interkeukin-10. Leucocytes from aqueous humor (AqH) were quantified in a Neubauer chamber, and eye histopathological analysis was done with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Additionally, using a human cytokine antibody array we evaluated CM-hUCESCs to determine mediating proteins. Results showed that administration of CM-hUCESCs significantly reduced LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines both 'in vitro' and 'in vivo', and decreased leucocytes in AqH and ocular tissues. High levels of cytokines with anti-inflammatory effects were found in CM-hUCESCs, suggesting a possible role of these factors in reducing intraocular inflammation. In summary, treatment with CM-hUCESCs significantly reduces inflammation in uveitis. Our data indicate that CM-hUCESCs could be regarded as a potential therapeutic agent for patients suffering from ocular inflammation. PMID:27381329

  10. Ocular perfusion pressure and ocular blood flow in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Schmetterer, L

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy of unknown origin. It has been hypothesized that a vascular component is involved in glaucoma pathophysiology. This hypothesis has gained support from studies showing that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is a risk factor for the disease. The exact nature of the involvement is, however, still a matter of debate. Based on recent evidence we propose a model including primary and secondary insults in glaucoma. The primary insult appears to happen at the optic nerve head. Increased intraocular pressure and ischemia at the post-laminar optic nerve head affects retinal ganglion cell axons. Modulating factors are the biomechanical properties of the tissues and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. After this primary insult retinal ganglion cells function at a reduced energy level and are sensitive to secondary insults. These secondary insults may happen if ocular perfusion pressure falls below the lower limit of autoregulation or if neurovascular coupling fails. Evidence for both faulty autoregulation and reduced hyperemic response to neuronal stimulation has been provided in glaucoma patients. The mechanisms appear to involve vascular endothelial dysfunction and impaired astrocyte-vessel signaling. A more detailed understanding of these pathways is required to direct neuroprotective strategies via the neurovascular pathway. PMID:23009741

  11. Ocular perfusion pressure and ocular blood flow in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Schmetterer, L

    2013-02-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy of unknown origin. It has been hypothesized that a vascular component is involved in glaucoma pathophysiology. This hypothesis has gained support from studies showing that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is a risk factor for the disease. The exact nature of the involvement is, however, still a matter of debate. Based on recent evidence we propose a model including primary and secondary insults in glaucoma. The primary insult appears to happen at the optic nerve head. Increased intraocular pressure and ischemia at the post-laminar optic nerve head affects retinal ganglion cell axons. Modulating factors are the biomechanical properties of the tissues and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. After this primary insult retinal ganglion cells function at a reduced energy level and are sensitive to secondary insults. These secondary insults may happen if ocular perfusion pressure falls below the lower limit of autoregulation or if neurovascular coupling fails. Evidence for both faulty autoregulation and reduced hyperemic response to neuronal stimulation has been provided in glaucoma patients. The mechanisms appear to involve vascular endothelial dysfunction and impaired astrocyte-vessel signaling. A more detailed understanding of these pathways is required to direct neuroprotective strategies via the neurovascular pathway. PMID:23009741

  12. Using neural nets to measure ocular refractive errors: a proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netto, Antonio V.; Ferreira de Oliveira, Maria C.

    2002-12-01

    We propose the development of a functional system for diagnosing and measuring ocular refractive errors in the human eye (astigmatism, hypermetropia and myopia) by automatically analyzing images of the human ocular globe acquired with the Hartmann-Schack (HS) technique. HS images are to be input into a system capable of recognizing the presence of a refractive error and outputting a measure of such an error. The system should pre-process and image supplied by the acquisition technique and then use artificial neural networks combined with fuzzy logic to extract the necessary information and output an automated diagnosis of the refractive errors that may be present in the ocular globe under exam.

  13. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived limbal epithelial stem cells on bioengineered matrices for corneal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Alexandra; Ilmarinen, Tanja; Ratnayake, Anjula; Petrovski, Goran; Uusitalo, Hannu; Skottman, Heli; Rafat, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs), a type of tissue-specific stem cells located in the limbal palisades of Vogt at the corneo-scleral junction. Acute trauma or inflammatory disorders of the ocular surface can destroy these stem cells, leading to limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) - a painful and vision-threatening condition. Treating these disorders is often challenging and complex, especially in bilateral cases with extensive damage. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide new opportunities for corneal reconstruction using cell-based therapy. Here, we investigated the use of hPSC-derived LESC-like cells on bioengineered collagen matrices in serum-free conditions, aiming for clinical applications to reconstruct the corneal epithelium and partially replace the damaged stroma. Differentiation of hPSCs towards LESC-like cells was directed using small-molecule induction followed by maturation in corneal epithelium culture medium. After four to five weeks of culture, differentiated cells were seeded onto bioengineered matrices fabricated as transparent membranes of uniform thickness, using medical-grade porcine collagen type I and a hybrid cross-linking technology. The bioengineered matrices were fully transparent, with high water content and swelling capacity, and parallel lamellar microstructure. Cell proliferation of hPSC-LESCs was significantly higher on bioengineered matrices than on collagen-coated control wells after two weeks of culture, and LESC markers p63 and cytokeratin 15, along with proliferation marker Ki67 were expressed even after 30 days in culture. Overall, hPSC-LESCs retained their capacity to self-renew and proliferate, but were also able to terminally differentiate upon stimulation, as suggested by protein expression of cytokeratins 3 and 12. We propose the use of bioengineered collagen matrices as carriers for the clinically-relevant hPSC-derived LESC-like cells, as a novel tissue engineering approach for

  14. Ocular toxicity of fludarabine

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Herzlich, Alexandra A; Bishop, Rachel; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2008-01-01

    The purine analogs, fludarabine and cladribine represent an important class of chemotherapy agents used to treat a broad spectrum of lymphoid malignancies. Their toxicity profiles include dose-limiting myelosuppression, immunosuppression, opportunistic infection and severe neurotoxicity. This review summarizes the neurotoxicity of high- and standard-dose fludarabine, focusing on the clinical and pathological manifestations in the eye. The mechanisms of ocular toxicity are probably multifactorial. With increasing clinical use, an awareness of the neurological and ocular vulnerability, particularly to fludarabine, is important owing to the potential for life- and sight-threatening consequences. PMID:18461151

  15. New perspectives in ocular surface disorders. An integrated approach for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, V S; Tseng, S C

    2001-09-01

    The cornea, conjuctiva and the limbus comprise the tissues at the ocular surface. All of them are covered by stratified, squamous, non-keratinizing epithelium and a stable tear film. The ocular surface health is ensured by intimate relationship between ocular surface epithelia and the preocular team film. There are two types of ocular surface failure. The first one is characterized by squamous metaplasia and loss of goblet cells and mucin expression. This is consistent with unstable tear film which is the hallmark of various dry-eye disorders. The second type of ocular surface failure is characterized by the replacement of the normal corneal epithelium in a process called limbal stem cell deficiency. It is essential to establish accurate diagnosis for appropriate management of complex ocular surface disorders. There has been considerable advancement in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ocular surface disease. Management has improved with introduction of the limbal stem cell concept and use of amniotic membrane transplantation. PMID:15887723

  16. The EpiOcular Eye Irritation Test (EIT) for hazard identification and labelling of eye irritating chemicals: protocol optimisation for solid materials and the results after extended shipment.

    PubMed

    Kaluzhny, Yulia; Kandárová, Helena; Handa, Yuki; DeLuca, Jane; Truong, Thoa; Hunter, Amy; Kearney, Paul; d'Argembeau-Thornton, Laurence; Klausner, Mitchell

    2015-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and the EU REACH Regulation have reinforced the need for in vitro ocular test methods. Validated in vitro ocular toxicity tests that can predict the human response to chemicals, cosmetics and other consumer products are required for the safety assessment of materials that intentionally, or inadvertently, come into contact with the eye. The EpiOcular Eye Irritation Test (EIT), which uses the normal human cell-based EpiOcular™ tissue model, was developed to address this need. The EpiOcular-EIT is able to discriminate, with high sensitivity and accuracy, between ocular irritant/corrosive materials and those that require no labelling. Although the original EpiOcular-EIT protocol was successfully pre-validated in an international, multicentre study sponsored by COLIPA (the predecessor to Cosmetics Europe), data from two larger studies (the EURL ECVAM-COLIPA validation study and an independent in-house validation at BASF SE) resulted in a sensitivity for the protocol for solids that was below the acceptance criteria set by the Validation Management Group (VMG) for eye irritation, and indicated the need for improvement of the assay's sensitivity for solids. By increasing the exposure time for solid materials from 90 minutes to 6 hours, the optimised EpiOcular-EIT protocol achieved 100% sensitivity, 68.4% specificity and 84.6% accuracy, thereby meeting all the acceptance criteria set by the VMG. In addition, to satisfy the needs of Japan and the Pacific region, the EpiOcular-EIT method was evaluated for its performance after extended shipment and storage of the tissues (4-5 days), and it was confirmed that the assay performs with similar levels of sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility in these circumstances. PMID:25995013

  17. Delivery strategies for treatment of age-related ocular diseases: From a biological understanding to biomaterial solutions.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Payne, Samantha; Shoichet, Molly

    2015-12-10

    Age-related ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, result in life-long functional deficits and enormous global health care costs. As the worldwide population ages, vision loss has become a major concern for both economic and human health reasons. Due to recent research into biomaterials and nanotechnology major advances have been gained in the field of ocular delivery. This review provides a summary and discussion of the most recent strategies employed for the delivery of both drugs and cells to the eye to treat a variety of age-related diseases. It emphasizes the current challenges and limitations to ocular delivery and how the use of innovative materials can overcome these issues and ultimately provide treatment for age-related degeneration and regeneration of lost tissues. This review also provides critical considerations and an outlook for future studies in the field of ophthalmic delivery. PMID:26435454

  18. Neoplastic transformation of human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cancer induction by ionizing radiation as a risk assessment for workers subjected to high LET irradiation such as that found in space. The following ions were used for irradiation: Iron, Argon, Neon, and Lanthanum. Two tests were performed: growth in low serum and growth in agar were used as indicators of cell transformation. The specific aims of this project were to: (1) compare the effectiveness of various ions on degree of transformation of a single dose of the same RBE; (2) determine if successive irradiations with the same ion (Ge 600 MeV/u) increases the degree of transformation; (3) test if clones with the greatest degree of transformation produce tumors in nude mice; and (4) construct a cell hybrid of a transformed and control (non-transformed) clone. The cells used for this work are human mammary epithelial cells with an extended lifespan and selected for growth in MEM + 10% serum.

  19. Dynamics of the human linear vestibulo-ocular reflex at medium frequency and modification by short-term training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We study here the effect of a short-term training paradigm on the gain and phase of the human translational VOR (the linear VOR: LVOR). Subjects were exposed to lateral sinusoidal translations on a sled, at 0.5 Hz, 0.3 g peak acceleration. With subjects tracking a remembered target at 1.2 m, the LVOR (slow-phase) under these conditions typically has a phase lead or lag, and a gain that falls short of compensatory. To induce short-term adaptation (training), we presented an earth-fixed visual scene at 1.2 m during sinusoidal translation (x 1 viewing) for 20 minutes, so as to drive the LVOR toward compensatory phase and gain. We examined both the slow-phase and the saccadic responses to these stimuli. Testing after training showed changes in slow-component gain and phase which were mostly but not always in the compensatory direction. These changes were more consistent in naive subjects than in subjects who had previous LVOR experience. Changes in gain were seen with step as well as sinusoidal test stimuli; gain changes were not correlated with vergence changes. There was a strong correlation between gain changes and phase changes across subjects. Fast phases (catch-up saccades) formed a large component of the LVOR under our testing conditions (approximately 30% of the changes in gain but not in phase due to training.

  20. Experimental Models of Ocular Infection with Toxoplasma Gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dukaczewska, Agata; Tedesco, Roberto; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a vision-threatening disease and the major cause of posterior uveitis worldwide. In spite of the continuing global burden of ocular toxoplasmosis, many critical aspects of disease including the therapeutic approach to ocular toxoplasmosis are still under debate. To assist in addressing many aspects of the disease, numerous experimental models of ocular toxoplasmosis have been established. In this article, we present an overview on in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of ocular toxoplasmosis available to date. Experimental studies on ocular toxoplasmosis have recently focused on mice. However, the majority of murine models established so far are based on intraperitoneal and intraocular infection with Toxoplasma gondii. We therefore also present results obtained in an in vivo model using peroral infection of C57BL/6 and NMRI mice that reflects the natural route of infection and mimics the disease course in humans. While advances have been made in ex vivo model systems or larger animals to investigate specific aspects of ocular toxoplasmosis, laboratory mice continue to be the experimental model of choice for the investigation of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:26716018

  1. Molecular mechanism of ocular surface damage: Application to an in vitro dry eye model on human corneal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    De Servi, Barbara; Marasco, Daniela; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was concerned with the development of a new experimental model of dry eye using human reconstructed in vitro corneal epithelium (HCE). The model is based on the use of adapted culture conditions that induce relevant modifications at the cellular and molecular level thus mimicking dry eye. Methods The HCE model was maintained in a controlled environmental setting (relative humidity <40% and 40 °C temperature) for 24 h and up to 72 h to induce dry eye. The evolution of the dry eye condition was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry staining, scanning electron microscopy, and gene expression by using TaqMan gene assay technology (mucin-4 [MUC4], matrix metallopeptidase-9 [MMP9], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], and defensin β-2 [DEFB2). The effects of different commercially available tear substitutes on the induced dry eye condition were tested. Results This in vitro dry eye HCE model, that was well established within 24 h, has the characteristic features of a dry eye epithelium and could be satisfactorily used for preliminary assessment of the protective activity of some artificial tears. The transcriptional study of selected biomarkers showed an increase in MUC4, MMP9, TNF-α, and hBD-2 (DEFB2) gene expression. Conclusions By using a dynamic approach, we were able to define a biomarker gene signature of dry eye-induced effects that could be predictive of corneal damage in vivo and to discriminate the efficacy among different commercial artificial tears. PMID:21245952

  2. [Ocular Manifestations in Sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Walscheid, K; Tappeiner, C; Heiligenhaus, A

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory multi-organ disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterised by non-necrotising granulomata. Sarcoidosis predominantly manifests in the lung, but any other organ may be affected. Ocular involvement is present in about 25 to 50 % of patients. The most common ocular manifestation is uveitis, especially of the anterior eye segment. If ocular sarcoidosis is suspected, interdisciplinary assessment of the patient is mandatory, including laboratory tests, chest X-ray, assessment by a specialist in internal medicine and, ideally, histological evidence of granuloma formation in a tissue specimen. Other (infectious) causes of granulomatous inflammation need to be excluded, especially tuberculosis or syphilis. For the ophthalmological assessment, detection of granulomatous lesions is of particular importance, especially by visualising chorioretinal granuloma by fluorescein and indocyanin green angiography. Cystoid macular oedema and glaucoma are the most frequent complications limiting visual acuity. Corticosteroids, which can be administered either locally or systemically, are the mainstay of therapy. Depending on the clinical course and the development of ocular complications, systemic steroid-sparing immunosuppressive medication may be indicated. PMID:27187879

  3. Instrument Measures Ocular Counterrolling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitan, Barry M.; Reschke, Millard F.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, battery-powered, noninvasive unit replaces several pieces of equipment and operator. Instrument that looks like pair of goggles with small extension box measures ocular counterrotation. Called "otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation" (OTTR) goggles, used in studies of space motion sickness. Also adapted to use on Earth and determine extent of impairment in patients who have impaired otolith functions.

  4. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An ocular screening system designed for safe, convenient screening of large groups was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, leading to the formation of Medical Sciences Corporation. The system identifies visual defects accurately and inexpensively, and includes a photorefractor telephoto lens and an electronic flash. Medical Sciences Corporation is using the device to test at schools, industrial plants, etc.

  5. Novel Water-Soluble Mucoadhesive Carbosilane Dendrimers for Ocular Administration.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Osuna, I; Vicario-de-la-Torre, M; Andrés-Guerrero, V; Sánchez-Nieves, J; Guzmán-Navarro, M; de la Mata, F J; Gómez, R; de Las Heras, B; Argüeso, P; Ponchel, G; Herrero-Vanrell, R; Molina-Martínez, I T

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the potential use of water-soluble anionic and cationic carbosilane dendrimers (generations 1-3) as mucoadhesive polymers in eyedrop formulations. Cationic carbosilane dendrimers decorated with ammonium -NH3(+) groups were prepared by hydrosylilation of Boc-protected allylamine and followed by deprotection with HCl. Anionic carbosilane dendrimers with terminal carboxylate groups were also employed in this study. In vitro and in vivo tolerance studies were performed in human ocular epithelial cell lines and rabbit eyes respectively. The interaction of dendrimers with transmembrane ocular mucins was evaluated with a surface biosensor. As proof of concept, the hypotensive effect of a carbosilane dendrimer eyedrop formulation containing acetazolamide (ACZ), a poorly water-soluble drug with limited ocular penetration, was tested after instillation in normotensive rabbits. The methodology used to synthesize cationic dendrimers avoids the difficulty of obtaining neutral -NH2 dendrimers that require harsher reaction conditions and also present high aggregation tendency. Tolerance studies demonstrated that both prototypes of water-soluble anionic and cationic carbosilane dendrimers were well tolerated in a range of concentrations between 5 and 10 μM. Permanent interactions between cationic carbosilane dendrimers and ocular mucins were observed using biosensor assays, predominantly for the generation-three (G3) dendrimer. An eyedrop formulation containing G3 cationic carbosilane dendrimers (5 μM) and ACZ (0.07%) (289.4 mOsm; 5.6 pH; 41.7 mN/m) induced a rapid (onset time 1 h) and extended (up to 7 h) hypotensive effect, and led to a significant increment in the efficacy determined by AUC0(8h) and maximal intraocular pressure reduction. This work takes advantage of the high-affinity interaction between cationic carbosilane dendrimers and ocular transmembrane mucins, as well as the tensioactive behavior observed for these

  6. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  7. In vitro generation of pancreatic endocrine cells from human adult fibroblast-like limbal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Criscimanna, Angela; Zito, Giovanni; Taddeo, Annalisa; Richiusa, Pierina; Pitrone, Maria; Morreale, Daniele; Lodato, Gaetano; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Citarrella, Roberto; Galluzzo, Aldo; Giordano, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells might provide unlimited supply of transplantable cells for β-cell replacement therapy in diabetes. The human limbus is a highly specialized region hosting a well-recognized population of epithelial stem cells, which sustain the continuous renewal of the cornea, and the recently identified stromal fibroblast-like stem cells (f-LSCs), with apparent broader plasticity. However, the lack of specific molecular markers for the identification of the multipotent limbal subpopulation has so far limited the investigation of their differentiation potential. In this study we show that the human limbus contains uncommitted cells that could be potentially harnessed for the treatment of diabetes. Fourteen limbal biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing surgery for ocular diseases not involving the conjunctiva or corneal surface. We identified a subpopulation of f-LSCs characterized by robust proliferative capacity, expressing several pluripotent stem cell markers and exhibiting self-renewal ability. We then demonstrated the potential of f-LSCs to differentiate in vitro into functional insulin-secreting cells by developing a four-step differentiation protocol that efficiently directed f-LSCs towards the pancreatic endocrine cell fate. The expression of specific endodermal, pancreatic, islet, and β-cell markers, as well as functional properties of f-LSC-derived insulin-producing cells, were evaluated during differentiation. With our stage-specific approach, up to 77% of f-LSCs eventually differentiated into cells expressing insulin (also assessed as C-peptide) and exhibited phenotypic features of mature β-cells, such as expression of critical transcription factors and presence of secretory granules. Although insulin content was about 160-fold lower than what observed in adult islets, differentiated cells processed ∼98% of their proinsulin content, similar to mature β-cells. Moreover, they responded in vitro in a regulated manner to multiple secretory stimuli

  8. Time-dependent retinal ganglion cell loss, microglial activation and blood-retina-barrier tightness in an acute model of ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trost, A; Motloch, K; Bruckner, D; Schroedl, F; Bogner, B; Kaser-Eichberger, A; Runge, C; Strohmaier, C; Klein, B; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2015-07-01

    Glaucoma is a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, and is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure is a well known risk factor for the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and pharmacological or surgical lowering of intraocular pressure represents a standard procedure in glaucoma treatment. However, the treatment options are limited and although lowering of intraocular pressure impedes disease progression, glaucoma cannot be cured by the currently available therapy concepts. In an acute short-term ocular hypertension model in rat, we characterize RGC loss, but also microglial cell activation and vascular alterations of the retina at certain time points. The combination of these three parameters might facilitate a better evaluation of the disease progression, and could further serve as a new model to test novel treatment strategies at certain time points. Acute ocular hypertension (OHT) was induced by the injection of magnetic microbeads into the rat anterior chamber angle (n = 22) with magnetic position control, leading to constant elevation of IOP. At certain time points post injection (4d, 7d, 10d, 14d and 21d), RGC loss, microglial activation, and microvascular pericyte (PC) coverage was analyzed using immunohistochemistry with corresponding specific markers (Brn3a, Iba1, NG2). Additionally, the tightness of the retinal vasculature was determined via injections of Texas Red labeled dextran (10 kDa) and subsequently analyzed for vascular leakage. For documentation, confocal laser-scanning microscopy was used, followed by cell counts, capillary length measurements and morphological and statistical analysis. The injection of magnetic microbeads led to a progressive loss of RGCs at the five time points investigated (20.07%, 29.52%, 41.80%, 61.40% and 76.57%). Microglial cells increased in number and displayed an activated morphology

  9. Approaches to Study Human T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Van de Walle, Inge; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Not only is human T cell development characterized by unique changes in surface marker expression, but it also requires specific growth factors and conditions to mimic and study T cell development in vitro. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the specific aspects that need attention when performing T cell differentiation cultures with human progenitors. PMID:26294413

  10. Involvement of protein kinase C in phagocytosis of human retinal pigment epithelial cells and induction of matrix metalloproteinase secretion.

    PubMed

    Irschick, Eveline U; Haas, Gertrud; Troger, Josef; Ueberall, Florian; Huemer, Hartwig P

    2009-10-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in cell activation. We investigated PKC-mediated pathways and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in phagocytosis by human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). We used time-resolved fluorometry for europium-labeled microsphere uptake and gel zymography to assay the influence of PKC modulators. PKC inhibitors blocked phagocytosis by RPE. ARPE-19, a human RPE-cell line, showed reduced secretion of MMP-2, although MMP-9 secretion by PKC activation was conserved in both cell types, namely in the primary RPEs and in the RPE-cell line. Particle uptake by RPE cells requires activation of PKC; the use of PKC inhibitors as new anticancer drugs may possibly cause ocular side-effects. PMID:18641922

  11. Normal Ocular Development in Young Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Qiao-Grider, Ying; Hung, Li-Fang; Kee, Chea-su; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Smith, Earl L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize normal ocular development in infant monkeys and to establish both qualitative and quantitative relationships between human and monkey refractive development. Methods The subjects were 214 normal rhesus monkeys. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 204 monkeys at about 3 weeks of age and longitudinal data were obtained from 10 representative animals beginning at about 3 weeks of age for a period of up to 5 years. Ocular development was characterized via refractive status, corneal power, crystalline lens parameters, and the eye’s axial dimensions, which were determined by retinoscopy, keratometry, phakometry and A-scan ultrasonography, respectively. Results From birth to about 5 years of age, the growth curves for refractive error and most ocular components (excluding lens thickness and equivalent lens index) followed exponential trajectories and were highly coordinated between the two eyes. However, overall ocular growth was not a simple process of increasing the scale of each ocular component in a proportional manner. Instead the rates and relative amounts of change varied within and between ocular structures. Conclusion The configuration and contribution of the major ocular components in infant and adolescent monkey eyes are qualitatively and quantitatively very comparable to those in human eyes and their development proceeds in a similar manner in both species. As a consequence, in both species the adolescent eye is not simply a scaled version of the infant eye. PMID:17416396

  12. An Eye to a Kill: Using Predatory Bacteria to Control Gram-Negative Pathogens Associated with Ocular Infections

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Davra, Viral R.; Romanowski, Eric G.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Godboley, Dipti; Kadouri, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Ocular infections are a leading cause of vision loss. It has been previously suggested that predatory prokaryotes might be used as live antibiotics to control infections. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens ocular isolates were exposed to the predatory bacteria Micavibrio aeruginosavorus and Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus. All tested S. marcescens isolates were susceptible to predation by B. bacteriovorus strains 109J and HD100. Seven of the 10 P. aeruginosa isolates were susceptible to predation by B. bacteriovorus 109J with 80% being attacked by M. aeruginosavorus. All of the 19 tested isolates were found to be sensitive to at least one predator. To further investigate the effect of the predators on eukaryotic cells, human corneal-limbal epithelial (HCLE) cells were exposed to high concentrations of the predators. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that predatory bacteria do not damage ocular surface cells in vitro whereas the P. aeruginosa used as a positive control was highly toxic. Furthermore, no increase in the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-alpha was measured in HCLE cells after exposure to the predators. Finally, injection of high concentration of predatory bacteria into the hemocoel of Galleria mellonella, an established model system used to study microbial pathogenesis, did not result in any measurable negative effect to the host. Our results suggest that predatory bacteria could be considered in the near future as a safe topical bio-control agent to treat ocular infections. PMID:23824756

  13. Evaluation of the in vitro ocular toxicity of the fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; González-Barcia, Miguel; Gil-Martínez, María; Santiago Varela, María; Pardo, María; Blanco-Méndez, José; Piñeiro-Ces, Antonio; Lamas Díaz, María Jesús; Otero-Espinar, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    The use of parenteral antibiotic eye drop formulations with non-marketed compositions or concentrations, commonly called fortified antibiotic eye drops, is a common practice in Ophthalmology in the hospital setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro ocular toxicity of the main fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared in the Hospital Pharmacy Departments. We have conducted an in vitro experimental study in order to test the toxicity of gentamicin, amikacin, cefazolin, ceftazidime, vancomycin, colistimethate sodium and imipenem-cilastatin eye drops; their cytotoxicity and acute tissue irritation have been evaluated. Cell-based assays were performed on human stromal keratocytes, using a cell-based impedance biosensor system [xCELLigence Real-Time System Cell Analyzer (RTCA)], and the Hen's Egg Test for the ocular irritation tests. All the eye drops, except for vancomycin and imipenem, have shown a cytotoxic effect dependent on concentration and time; higher concentrations and longer exposure times will cause a steeper decline in the population of stromal keratocytes. Vancomycin showed a major initial cytotoxic effect, which was reverted over time; and imipenem appeared as a non-toxic compound for stromal cells. The eye drops with the highest irritating effect on the ocular surface were gentamicin and vancomycin. Those antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments included in this study were considered as compounds potentially cytotoxic for the ocular surface; this toxicity was dependent on the concentration used. PMID:27570987

  14. Keratin 14 Expression in Epithelial Progenitor Cells of the Developing Human Cornea.

    PubMed

    Eghtedari, Yas; Richardson, Alexander; Mai, Kelly; Heng, Benjamin; Guillemin, Gilles J; Wakefield, Denis; Di Girolamo, Nick

    2016-05-01

    A healthy and transparent cornea is essential for exquisite vision. During adulthood, its epithelium is constantly replenished through the activity of its stem cells (SCs). Precisely when these cells develop and their distribution across the ocular surface remain incompletely characterized in man. We postulated that the human fetal cornea harbors SCs that can be identified with keratin (K) 14 and αv-integrin, two markers we and others previously used to identify their adult counterparts. Immunofluorescence, cell culture, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and colony-forming assays were performed on fetal and adult biomaterial to locate progenitors and establish their phenotypic and functional properties. K14 was used to map the spatiotemporal distribution of precursor cell activity across the developing cornea, divulging a dynamic pattern of vertical and horizontal consolidated expression with increasing gestational age. K14 was coexpressed with αv-integrin in fetal and adult corneas and cultured corneolimbal epithelium, and colony-forming efficiency (an indicator of SC activity) was similar in cells from both sources. Finally, fetal cells were adherent, grew well, and maintained a K14 phenotype on contact lenses, a substrate we previously used to deliver cells to patients with blinding corneal disease. This study provides valuable insights into the development of the cornea, including the formation of the SC repository, the distribution of these cells across the ocular surface, and a preliminary attempt at harnessing, phenotyping, and functionally characterizing these cells. Future studies will focus on isolating fetal SCs to determine their utility as an alternative cell therapy for patients suffering from corneal blindness. PMID:26956898

  15. Ocular Surface Membrane-Associated Mucins.

    PubMed

    Ablamowicz, Anna F; Nichols, Jason J

    2016-07-01

    Ocular surface epithelial cells produce and secrete mucins that form a hydrophilic barrier for protection and lubrication of the eye. This barrier, the glycocalyx, is formed by high molecular weight heavily glycosylated membrane-associated mucins (MAMs) that include MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16. These mucins extend into the tear film from the anterior surfaces of the conjunctiva and cornea, and, through interactions with galectin-3, prevent penetrance of pathogens into the eye. Due primarily to the glycosylation of the mucins, the glycocalyx also creates less friction during blinking and enables the tear film to maintain wetting of the eye. The secretory mucins include soluble MUC7 and gel-forming MUC5AC. These mucins, particularly MUC5AC, assist with removal of debris from the tear film and contribute to the hydrophilicity of the tear film. While new methodologies and cell culture models have expanded our understanding of mucin structure and function on the ocular surface, there is still a paucity of studies characterizing the glycosylation of MAMs on a normal ocular surface and a diseased ocular surface. Although studies have shown alterations in mucin production and expression in dry eye diseases, the relationship between changes in mucins and functional consequences is unclear. This review focuses on comparing what is known about MAMs in wet-surfaced epithelia of the body to what has been studied on the eye. PMID:27154035

  16. Corneal Expression of SLURP-1 by Age, Sex, Genetic Strain, and Ocular Surface Health

    PubMed Central

    Swamynathan, Sudha; Delp, Emili E.; Harvey, Stephen A. K.; Loughner, Chelsea L.; Raju, Leela; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although secreted Ly6/urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor–related protein-1 (Slurp1) transcript is highly abundant in the mouse cornea, corresponding protein expression remains uncharacterized. Also, SLURP1 was undetected in previous tear proteomics studies, resulting in ambiguity about its baseline levels. Here, we examine mouse corneal Slurp1 expression in different sexes, age groups, strains, and health conditions, and quantify SLURP1 in human tears from healthy or inflamed ocular surfaces. Methods Expression of Slurp1 in embryonic day-13 (E13), E16, postnatal day-1 (PN1), PN10, PN20, and PN70 Balb/C, FVBN, C57Bl/6, and DBA/2J mouse corneas, Klf4Δ/ΔCE corneas with corneal epithelial–specific ablation of Klf4, migrating cells in wild-type corneal epithelial wound edge, and in corneas exposed to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) poly(I:C), zymosan-A, or Pam3Csk4 was examined by QPCR, immunoblots, and immunofluorescent staining. Human SLURP1 levels were quantified by ELISA in tears from 34 men and women aged 18 to 80 years. Results Expression of Slurp1, comparable in different strains and sexes, was low in E13, E16, PN1, and PN10 mouse corneas, and increased rapidly after eyelid opening in a Klf4-dependent manner. We found Slurp1 was downregulated in corneas exposed to PAMPs, and in migrating cells at the wound edge. Human SLURP1 expression, comparable in different sexes and age groups, was significantly decreased in tears from inflamed ocular surfaces (0.34%) than those from healthy individuals (0.77%). Conclusions These data describe the influence of age, sex, genetic background, and ocular surface health on mouse corneal expression of Slurp1, establish the baseline for human tear SLURP1 expression, and identify SLURP1 as a useful diagnostic and/or therapeutic target for inflammatory ocular surface disorders. PMID:26670825

  17. Topical, Aqueous, Clear Cyclosporine Formulation Design for Anterior and Posterior Ocular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cholkar, Kishore; Gilger, Brian C.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to optimize cyclosporine (CsA) nanomicellar solution and study in vivo ocular CsA tissue distribution with a topical drop. Methods: An optimized blend of hydrogenated castor oil-40 and octoxynol-40 was prepared to entrap CsA within nanomicelles. In vivo studies were conducted in New Zealand White albino rabbits with topical drop instillation. Results: Average size of CsA-loaded nanomicelles was approximately 22.4 nm. Ocular tissue CsA quantification with single and multiple dosing revealed that CsA levels followed as cornea → iris-ciliary body → aqueous humor → lens. Cyclosporine levels were also found to be in the following order: conjunctiva → sclera → retina/choroid → vitreous humor. High CsA level was detected in retina/choroid (53.7 ng/g tissue). Conclusions: Ocular tissue CsA distribution studies revealed high CsA concentrations in anterior ocular tissues. Moreover, it appears that nanomicelles are transported through a conjunctival–scleral pathway and deliver CsA to the retina/choroid. Results suggest polymeric blend to be a safe carrier for anterior and posterior ocular tissues. Translational Relevance: This study has significant translational relevance, disclosing results that suggest that aqueous nanomicellar approach can provide high corneal and conjunctival CsA concentrations. Aqueous nanomicelles can deliver high drug concentrations not only to anterior but also to back of the eye tissues, including retina. This article provides a platform for noninvasive back of the eye drug delivery with topical eye drops. Aqueous CsA nanomicelles have no perceptible toxicity such as cell membrane damage or cytotoxicity to corneal and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Clear aqueous nanomicellar solution can be translated to human conditions for keratoconjunctivitis sicca and other anti-inflammatory conditions. PMID:25964868

  18. Dendrimer based nanotherapeutics for ocular drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambhampati, Siva Pramodh

    PAMAM dendrimers are a class of well-defined, hyperbranched polymeric nanocarriers that are being investigated for ocular drug and gene delivery. Their favorable properties such as small size, multivalency and water solubility can provide significant opportunities for many biologically unstable drugs and allows potentially favorable ocular biodistribution. This work exploits hydroxyl terminated dendrimers (G4-OH) as drug/gene delivery vehicles that can target retinal microglia and pigment epithelium via systemic delivery with improved efficacy at much lower concentrations without any side effects. Two different drugs Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) and N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) conjugated to G4-OH dendrimers showed tailorable sustained release in physiological relevant solutions and were evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Dendrimer-TA conjugates enhanced the solubility of TA and were 100 fold more effective at lower concentrations than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity in activated microglia and in suppressing VEGF production in hypoxic RPE cells. Dendrimers targeted activated microglia/macrophages and RPE and retained for a period of 21 days in I/R mice model. The relative retention of intravitreal and intravenous dendrimers was comparable, if a 30-fold intravenous dose is used; suggesting intravenous route targeting retinal diseases are possible with dendrimers. D-NAC when injected intravenously attenuated retinal and choroidal inflammation, significantly reduced (˜73%) CNV growth at early stage of AMD in rat model of CNV. A combination therapy of D-NAC + D-TA significantly suppressed microglial activation and promoted CNV regression in late stages of AMD without causing side-effects. G4-OH was modified with linker having minimal amine groups and incorporation of TA as a nuclear localization enhancer resulted in compact gene vectors with favorable safety profile and achieved high levels of transgene expression in hard to transfect human retinal pigment

  19. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  20. Correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Bruno P; Cronemberger, Sebastião; Kanadani, Fabio N

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes. Methods Ninety eyes from 90 patients were included. Thirty patients had been recently diagnosed with glaucoma and had no previous history of treatment for ocular hypotension, 30 had elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) without evidence of glaucoma, and 30 had normal IOP (<21 mmHg) with no detectable glaucomatous damage. Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT), dynamic contour tonometry (DCT), blood pressure measurement, pachymetry, Humphrey visual field, and routine ophthalmic examination was performed in each patient. Ocular perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and IOP. The ocular pulse amplitude was given by DCT. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to compare the glaucomatous and ocular hypertensive groups, and comparisons with the normal IOP group were done using the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results Mean IOP by DCT was 22.7 ± 4.3 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 22.3 ± 2.8 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 14.3 ± 1.6 mmHg in the control group. Mean IOP by GAT was 19.0 ± 5.1 mmHg for glaucoma, 22.4 ± 2.1 mmHg for ocular hypertension, and 12.9 ± 2.2 mmHg for controls. Mean ocular pulse amplitude was 3.4 ± 1.2 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 3.5 ± 1.2 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 2.6 ± 0.9 mmHg in the control group. Mean ocular perfusion pressure was 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 50.2 ± 7.0 mmHg in controls. No significant correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude was found in any of the groups (P = 0.865 and r = −0.032, P = 0.403 and r = −0.156, P = 0.082 and ρ = −0.307 for glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes, respectively). Conclusion There is no significant correlation between

  1. Caveolin-1 Associated Adenovirus Entry into Human Corneal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Santanu; Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V.; Lee, Jeong Yoon; Ramke, Mirja; Chodosh, James; Rajaiya, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    The cellular entry of viruses represents a critical area of study, not only for viral tropism, but also because viral entry dictates the nature of the immune response elicited upon infection. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), caused by viruses within human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D), is a severe, ocular surface infection associated with corneal inflammation. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis has previously been shown to play a critical role in entry of other HAdV species into many host cell types. However, HAdV-D endocytosis into corneal cells has not been extensively studied. Herein, we show an essential role for cholesterol rich, lipid raft microdomains and caveolin-1, in the entry of HAdV-D37 into primary human corneal fibroblasts. Cholesterol depletion using methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) profoundly reduced viral infection. When replenished with soluble cholesterol, the effect of MβCD was reversed, allowing productive viral infection. HAdV-D37 DNA was identified in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection. Src kinase activity was also increased in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection, and Src phosphorylation and CXCL1 induction were both decreased in caveolin-1-/- mice corneas compared to wild type mice. siRNA knock down of caveolin-1 in corneal cells reduced chemokine induction upon viral infection, and caveolin-1-/- mouse corneas showed reduced cellular entry of HAdV-D37. As a control, HAdV-C2, a non-corneal pathogen, appeared to utilize the caveolar pathway for entry into A549 cells, but failed to infect corneal cells entirely, indicating virus and cell specific tropism. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the presence of caveolin-1 in HAdV-D37-containing vesicles during the earliest stages of viral entry. Collectively, these experiments indicate for the first time that HAdV-D37 uses a lipid raft mediated caveolin-1 associated pathway for entry into corneal cells, and connects the processes of viral entry with downstream

  2. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Susana; Calado, Sofia; Bitoque, Diogo; Oliveira, Ana Vanessa; Øpstad, Christer L.; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Sliwka, Hans-Richard; Partali, Vassilia; Pungente, Michael D.; Silva, Gabriela A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol (Chol). Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy. PMID:25147812

  3. Ocular Surface Cytotoxicity and Safety Evaluation of Tafluprost, a Recently Developed Anti-Glaucoma Prostaglandin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Niwano, Yoshimi; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Ayaki, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity of tafluprost, which is the most recently developed anti-glaucoma prostaglandin (PG) analog, in ocular surface cells is addressed in comparison with other PG analogs. Irrespective of cell lines and models, the cytotoxicity of anti-glaucoma PG eyedrops was primarily related to the concentration of benzalkonium chloride (BAK) contained in the eyedrops as a preservative. Accordingly, preservative-free tafluprost was apparently less cytotoxic than BAK-preserved PG analogs. Furthermore, our study for cytotoxicity assays on ocular cells, conducted by comprehensive investigations covering a variety of concentrations and treatment times, which is termed the cell viability score (CVS) system, demonstrated that 0.001% BAK-preserved tafluprost was not cytotoxic, and suggested that tafluprost may even reduce the cytotoxic effect of BAK. It has been reported that adverse reactions associated with tafluprost in healthy human volunteers and patients with glaucoma include conjunctival hyperemia, eyelid pigmentation, eyelash bristles, and deepening of upper eyelid sulcus. Nonetheless, most clinical studies have demonstrated that not only preservative-free tafluprost but also BAK-preserved tafluprost is well tolerated and safe in patients with glaucoma and ocular hypertension. PMID:24558301

  4. Ocular Tolerability of Preservative-Free Tafluprost and Latanoprost: in vitro and in vivo Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Esaki, Yoshihiko; Shimazaki, Atsushi; Pellinen, Pertti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Detrimental effects of the preserved prostaglandin analogs (PGAs) have been thoroughly documented in the published literature. The current work studied two preservative-free (PF) prostaglandin eye drops: PF tafluprost and PF latanoprost. The aim of the study was to compare these two PF formulations in vitro for viability of the human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells and in vivo for ocular tolerability of the rabbit eye. Method: Viability of the HCE-T cells was measured by the MTS assay. The SV40-immortalized HCE-T cells were exposed to 100 µL of the drug solutions (at their commercial concentrations) or the culture medium. Ocular irritation was evaluated after repeated instillation of the drug solutions in Japanese white rabbits (Kbl:JW). Results: A significant loss of HCE-T cell viability was observed in vitro immediately after the exposure to PF latanoprost formulation but not immediately after the exposure to PF tafluprost formulation. Congruently, PF latanoprost induced in vivo more irritation on the rabbit eye than PF tafluprost. Conclusion: Comparing these two PF formulations in vitro and in vivo, it is considered that ocular tolerability of PF tafluprost is better than PF latanoprost. Taking into account the composition of these two PF PGA formulations, the solubilizing agent macrogolglycerol hydroxystearate 40 (MGHS40) contained in PF latanoprost formulation is a plausible cause for the negative effects. PMID:27347250

  5. Multimodal analysis of ocular inflammation using the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Colin J.; Gardner, Peter J.; Copland, David A.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Gonzalez-Cordero, Anai; kleine Holthaus, Sophia-Martha; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Smith, Alexander J.; Ali, Robin R.; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rodents is a model of acute Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated organ inflammation, and has been used to model human anterior uveitis, examine leukocyte trafficking and test novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Wider adoption has been limited by the requirement for manual, non-specific, cell-count scoring of histological sections from each eye as a measure of disease severity. Here, we describe a comprehensive and efficient technique that uses ocular dissection and multimodal tissue analysis. This allows matched disease scoring by multicolour flow cytometric analysis of the inflammatory infiltrate, protein analysis on ocular supernatants and qPCR on remnant tissues of the same eye. Dynamic changes in cell populations could be identified and mapped to chemokine and cytokine changes over the course of the model. To validate the technique, dose-responsive suppression of leukocyte infiltration by recombinant interleukin-10 was demonstrated, as well as selective suppression of the monocyte (CD11b+Ly6C+) infiltrate, in mice deficient for either Ccl2 or Ccr2. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used for the first time in this model to allow in vivo imaging of infiltrating vitreous cells, and correlated with CD11b+Ly6G+ counts to provide another unique measure of cell populations in the ocular tissue. Multimodal tissue analysis of EIU is proposed as a new standard to improve and broaden the application of this model. PMID:26794131

  6. Multimodal analysis of ocular inflammation using the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Colin J; Gardner, Peter J; Copland, David A; Liyanage, Sidath E; Gonzalez-Cordero, Anai; Kleine Holthaus, Sophia-Martha; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Smith, Alexander J; Ali, Robin R; Dick, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rodents is a model of acute Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated organ inflammation, and has been used to model human anterior uveitis, examine leukocyte trafficking and test novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Wider adoption has been limited by the requirement for manual, non-specific, cell-count scoring of histological sections from each eye as a measure of disease severity. Here, we describe a comprehensive and efficient technique that uses ocular dissection and multimodal tissue analysis. This allows matched disease scoring by multicolour flow cytometric analysis of the inflammatory infiltrate, protein analysis on ocular supernatants and qPCR on remnant tissues of the same eye. Dynamic changes in cell populations could be identified and mapped to chemokine and cytokine changes over the course of the model. To validate the technique, dose-responsive suppression of leukocyte infiltration by recombinant interleukin-10 was demonstrated, as well as selective suppression of the monocyte (CD11b+Ly6C+) infiltrate, in mice deficient for eitherCcl2orCcr2 Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used for the first time in this model to allowin vivoimaging of infiltrating vitreous cells, and correlated with CD11b+Ly6G+ counts to provide another unique measure of cell populations in the ocular tissue. Multimodal tissue analysis of EIU is proposed as a new standard to improve and broaden the application of this model. PMID:26794131

  7. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  8. Symmetry breaking in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a characteristic of cancer stem cells, which exhibit high malignant potential. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate symmetric (self-renewal) and asymmetric cell divisions are mostly unknown. Using human neuroblastoma cells, we found that the oncosuppressor protein tripartite motif containing 32 (TRIM32) positively regulates ACD. PMID:27308367

  9. Symmetry breaking in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a characteristic of cancer stem cells, which exhibit high malignant potential. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate symmetric (self-renewal) and asymmetric cell divisions are mostly unknown. Using human neuroblastoma cells, we found that the oncosuppressor protein tripartite motif containing 32 (TRIM32) positively regulates ACD. PMID:27308367

  10. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wielgus, Albert R.; Zhao, Baozhong; Chignell, Colin F.; Hu, Dan-Ning; Roberts, Joan E.

    2010-01-01

    The water-soluble nanoparticle hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26}] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have previously found that fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3) and that the endogenous antioxidant lutein blocked some of this phototoxicity. In the present study we have found that fullerol induces cytotoxic and phototoxic damage to human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Accumulation of nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm, and cell viability, cell metabolism and membrane permeability were estimated using trypan blue, MTS and LDH assays, respectively. Fullerol was cytotoxic toward hRPE cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 10 muM. Exposure to an 8.5 J.cm{sup -2} dose of visible light in the presence of > 5 muM fullerol induced TBARS formation and early apoptosis, indicating phototoxic damage in the form of lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with 10 and 20 muM lutein offered some protection against fullerol photodamage. Using time resolved photophysical techniques, we have now confirmed that fullerol produces singlet oxygen with a quantum yield of PHI = 0.05 in D{sub 2}O and with a range of 0.002-0.139 in various solvents. As our previous studies have shown that fullerol also produces superoxide in the presence of light, retinal phototoxic damage may occur through both type I (free radical) and type II (singlet oxygen) mechanisms. In conclusion, ocular exposure to fullerol, particularly in the presence of sunlight, may lead to retinal damage.

  11. Ocular sparganosis from Assam

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Reema; Gogoi, Rajendra Nath

    2015-01-01

    Sparganosis is caused by plerocercoid larvae of the Pseudophyllidea tapeworms of the genus Spirometra. Though prevalent in East Asian and south east Asian countries like China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand; yet very few cases are reported from India. We report a case of migrating sub-conjunctival ocular sparganosis mimicking scleritis which later on developed into orbital cellulitis from Dibrugarh, Assam, North-eastern part of India. This case is reported for its rarity. PMID:25709957

  12. An ocular motility conundrum.

    PubMed

    McElnea, Elizabeth Margaret; Stephenson, Kirk; Lanigan, Bernie; Flitcroft, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Two siblings, an 11-year-old boy and a 7-year-old girl presented with bilateral symmetrical ptosis and limited eye movements. Having already been reviewed on a number of occasions by a variety of specialists in multiple hospital settings a diagnosis of their ocular motility disorder had remained elusive. We describe their cases, outline the differential diagnosis and review the investigations performed which were influential in finally making a diagnosis. PMID:25349186

  13. Ocular Proton Therapy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacperek, Andrzej

    This chapter describes a review of proton therapy (PT) centers and the techniques used for the treatment of ocular lesions. The role of ion beam therapy (IBT) for eye treatments, principally choroidal melanomas, has become well established among the competing treatment modalities. More national centers now offer PT for these lesions, but not necessarily in a hospital environment. Significant improvements in eye treatment planning, patient positioning, and QA dosimetry have been realized, to the benefit of treatment efficiency and accuracy of dose delivery.

  14. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  15. Human B-1 cells take the stage

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Thomas L.; Griffin, Daniel O.; Holodick, Nichol E.; Quach, Tam D.; Kaku, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    B-1cells play critical roles in defending against microbial invasion and in housekeeping removal of cellular debris. B-1cells secrete natural antibody and manifest functions that influence T cell expansion and differentiation and in these and other ways differ from conventional B-2 cells. B-1-cells were originally studied in mice where they are easily distinguished from B-2cells, but their identity in the human system remained poorly defined for many years. Recently, functional criteria for human B-1cells were established on the basis of murine findings, and reverse engineering resulted in identification of the phenotypic profile, CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70−, for B-1cells found in both umbilical cord blood and adult peripheral blood. Human B-1cells may contribute to multiple disease states through production of autoantibody and stimulation/modulation of T cell activity. Human B-1cells could be a rich source of antibodies useful in treating diseases present in elderly populations where natural antibody protection may have eroded. Manipulation of human B-1cell numbers and/or activity may be a new avenue for altering T cell function and treating immune dyscrasias. PMID:23692567

  16. Ocular Filariasis in US Residents, Returning Travelers, and Expatriates.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2015-01-01

    Several factors acting in concert now place US residents, returning travelers, and expatriates at risks of contracting ocular filariasis including increasing seroprevalence rates of zoonotic filariasis, international travel bringing tourists to and expatriates from filariasis-endemic regions, and warming temperatures extending distribution ranges of arthropod vectors. To describe the epidemiology and outcomes of ocular filariasis and to recommend strategies for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of ocular filariasis, internet search engines were queried with the key words in order to examine case reports and series of ocular filariasis in the US and elsewhere. Descriptive epidemiological, morphological, and molecular evidence now support increasing cases of ocular filariasis in domestic and wild animals and humans, with most cases caused by filarial worms including Dirofilaria repens and other zoonotic Dirofilaria species and Onchocerca lupi and other zoonotic Onchocerca species. Clinicians should maintain early suspicion of ocular filariasis in US residents, returning travelers, and expatriates who complain of combinations of red eye, eye pain, foreign body sensation, reduced visual acuity, and migrating ocular worms, even without significant peripheral eosinophilia or microfilaremia. Microfilariae of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and O. volvulus may traverse the eye, but can usually be treated medically. Mobile adult worms trapped in the subconjunctiva or anterior chamber should be removed by ophthalmologists to permit species identification, prevent posterior uveitis and iritis, and stop worm migration into the posterior chamber which could require lens removal and vitrectomy for worm extraction causing further eye damage. PMID:27159510

  17. Transcription, Translation, and Function of Lubricin, a Boundary Lubricant, at the Ocular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Tannin A.; Sullivan, David A.; Knop, Erich; Richards, Stephen M.; Knop, Nadja; Liu, Shaohui; Sahin, Afsun; Darabad, Raheleh Rahimi; Morrison, Sheila; Kam, Wendy R.; Sullivan, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Lubricin may be an important barrier to the development of corneal and conjunctival epitheliopathies that may occur in dry eye disease and contact lens wear. Objective To test the hypotheses that lubricin (ie, proteoglycan 4 [PRG4]), a boundary lubricant, is produced by ocular surface epithelia and acts to protect the cornea and conjunctiva against significant shear forces generated during an eyelid blink and that lubricin deficiency increases shear stress on the ocular surface and promotes corneal damage. Design, Setting, and Participants Human, porcine, and mouse tissues and cells were processed for molecular biological, immunohistochemical, and tribological studies, and wild-type and PRG4 knockout mice were evaluated for corneal damage. Results Our findings demonstrate that lubricin is transcribed and translated by corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. Lubricin messenger RNA is also present in lacrimal and meibomian glands, as well as in a number of other tissues. Absence of lubricin in PRG4 knockout mice is associated with a significant increase in corneal fluorescein staining. Our studies also show that lubricin functions as an effective friction-lowering boundary lubricant at the human cornea-eyelid interface. This effect is specific and cannot be duplicated by the use of hyaluronate or bovine serum albumin solutions. Conclusions and Relevance Our results show that lubricin is transcribed, translated, and expressed by ocular surface epithelia. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that lubricin presence significantly reduces friction between the cornea and conjunctiva and that lubricin deficiency may play a role in promoting corneal damage. PMID:23599181

  18. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. HIV-1 propagates in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shapshak, P; Sun, N C; Resnick, L; Thornthwaite, J T; Schiller, P; Yoshioka, M; Svenningsson, A; Tourtellotte, W W; Imagawa, D T

    1991-01-01

    A major question in the pathogenesis of AIDS encephalopathy and dementia is whether HIV-1 directly infects cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The propagation of HIV was attempted in six cell lines: three related and three unrelated to the nervous system. HIV was able to propagate in two human neuroblastoma cell lines and a lymphocytic cell line control but did not result in infections of African green monkey kidney cells, human cervix carcinoma cells, and one human brain astrocytoma cell line. Neuroblastoma cell lines infected with HIV showed peaks of reverse transcriptase activity at 10-14 days postinfection. After prolonged growth in cell cultures, one of the neuroblastoma cell lines showed multiphasic virus production, additional high peaks of reverse transcriptase activity, 20-fold greater than the first, lasting from 36 to 74 days and 110 to 140 days postinfection. The presence of HIV was confirmed by p24 antigen capture. The neuroblastoma cell lines had weak but detectable levels of CD4 immunoreactivity by immunoperoxidase and flow immunocytometric analysis. Although no T4-specific RNA sequences were detected by hybridization of Northern blots of total and poly A-selected RNA extracted from the two neuroblastoma cell lines by using a T4 specific complimentary DNA probe, monoclonal antibodies to the CD4 receptor blocked HIV infection in both neuroblastoma cell lines. Thus, the infection of neuroblastoma cells by HIV occurs in part by a CD4-dependent mechanism. Passaging the neuroblastoma cell lines weekly and bimonthly resulted in similar cell cycle-DNA content patterns for the more permissive cell line and with significant numbers of cells in the S phase. HIV-infected neuroblastoma cell lines provide an in vitro model for the evaluation of virus-host cell interactions and may be useful in addressing the issue of the persistence of HIV in the human CNS. PMID:1704060

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of hinokitiol on human corneal epithelial cells: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J; Xu, Y-F; Lou, L-X; Jin, K; Miao, Q; Ye, X; Xi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of hinokitiol in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. Methods HCE cells were incubated with different concentrations of hinokitiol or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which served as a vehicle control. Cell viability was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. After polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) stimulus, cells with or without hinokitiol were evaluated for the mRNA and protein levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) using real-time PCR analysis and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Nuclear and cytoplasmic levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein and an inhibitor of NF-κB α (IκBα) were evaluated using western blotting. Results There were no significant differences among the treatment concentrations of hinokitiol compared with cells incubated in medium only. Incubating with 100 μM hinokitiol significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IL-8 to 58.77±10.41% (P<0.01), IL-6 to 64.64±12.71% (P<0.01), and IL-1β to 54.19±8.10% (P<0.01) compared with cells stimulated with poly(I:C) alone. The protein levels of IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β had similar trend. Further analysis revealed that hinokitiol maintained the levels of IκBα and significantly reduced NF-κB p65 subunit translocation to the nucleus which significantly inhibiting the activation of the NF-κB signal pathway. Conclusion Hinokitiol showed a significant protective effect against ocular surface inflammation through inhibiting the NF-κB pathway, which may indicate the possibility to relieve the ocular surface inflammation of dry eye syndrome (DES). PMID:25952949

  1. Human Pulmonary Endothelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alice R.

    1980-01-01

    Endothelial cells were cultured from various different human vessels, including aortas, pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical arteries, and pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical veins. The cultured cells were identified as endothelial cells by the presence of Factor VIII antigen and antiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II). They retained these markers for at least five passages in culture, and some cells had them for seven passages or more. Endothelial cells from the various vessels were compared with respect to their ability to metabolize angiotensins I and II and bradykinin. Cells from arteries had three to five times the angiotensin I converting enzyme activity as cells from veins. The activity of angiotensinase A (aspartyl aminopeptidase) had a similar distribution, and cells from arteries were consistently more active than cells from veins. Cultures of endothelial cells from pulmonary and umbilical vessels formed prostacyclin in response to mechanical stimulation. Media from cell monolayers that were subjected to a change of medium and gentle agitation inhibited aggregation of human platelets. This inhibitory activity was generated within 2-5 min, and it was not formed by cells that were treated with indomethacin or tranylcypromine. Addition of prostaglandin (PG)H2 to indomethacin-treated cells restored the ability to form the inhibitor, but cells treated with tranylcypromine were not responsive to PGH2. In experiments where [14C]arachidonic acid was added to the cells before stimulation, the major metabolite identified by thin-layer chromatography was 6-keto PGF1α. Thus, it appears that pulmonary endothelial cells, as well as umbilical cord cells, can form prostacyclin. In experiments comparing the ability of arterial and venous cells to form prostacyclin, arterial cells were more active than venous cells. These studies of cells from various human vessels suggest that the vascular origin of cultured endothelial cells determines how they metabolize vasoactive

  2. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind’s limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Methods Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm), reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles <120 μm; median particle diameter = 50.9 ± 19.8 μm). Results In vitro testing indicated minimal irritancy potential based on the time required to reduce cell viability by 50% (ET50). Follow-up testing using the Draize standard protocol confirmed that the lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Conclusions Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance. PMID:22817808

  3. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies. PMID:25417065

  4. Ocular manifestation of lymphoma in newly diagnosed cats.

    PubMed

    Nerschbach, V; Eule, J C; Eberle, N; Höinghaus, R; Betz, D

    2016-03-01

    Ocular manifestations of lymphoma are described in humans and dogs but rarely in cats. In this prospective study, cats with newly diagnosed and treatment-naïve lymphoma were evaluated concerning clinical stage and ophthalmologic findings. Twenty-six cats were included. In 12 cats (48%), ocular changes were documented. Uveitis anterior and posterior were predominant findings, being present in 58% of affected individuals. Other findings included exophthalmos, corneal surface lesions and chemosis. Eight cats received chemotherapy, two of which had ocular involvement. In these two cats, a complete remission of an anterior and a partial remission of a posterior uveitis were documented. Due to the detection of ocular involvement, a stage migration from stage IV to V occurred in four patients. In the light of these findings, an opthalmological examination may be considered as an important part of staging in feline lymphoma as well as of follow-up examination in affected cats. PMID:24102737

  5. In Vivo and Impression Cytology Study on the Effect of Compatible Solutes Eye Drops on the Ocular Surface Epithelial Cell Quality in Dry Eye Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanzini, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Colabelli-Gisoldi, Rossella Annamaria; Mastropasqua, Alessandra; Calienno, Roberta; Agnifili, Luca; Nubile, Mario; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate in vivo and ex vivo ocular surface alterations induced by dry eye disease and modification after osmoprotective therapy. Forty-eight eyes of 24 patients suffering from dry eye have been recruited. All patients received Optive (compatible solutes) eye drops in one randomly selected eye and Hylogel (sodium hyaluronate 0,2%) in the other. Follow-up included a baseline visit and further examination 30-, 60-, and 90-day intervals (which comprises clinical evaluation, in vivo confocal microscopy—IVCM—of the ocular surface, and conjunctival impression cytology). No significant difference in Schirmer I Test, TBUT, and vital staining results was observed during the follow-up period in both groups. IVCM showed in all patients an improvement of ocular surface epithelial morphology and signs of inflammation (oedema and keratocyte activation). However, these modifications were more evident in patients treated with Optive therapy. A significant reduction of the expression of MMP9 and IL6 in Optive group was observed during the follow-up period in comparison to Hylogel treatment. Our results show that in dry eye disease therapy based on osmoprotective eye drops determines a reduction of inflammatory activation of ocular surface, with consequent improvement of the quality of corneal and conjunctival epithelium. PMID:26221061

  6. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L.; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state. PMID:23683578

  7. Human neuroepithelial cells express NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christopher D; Fowler, M; Jackson, T H; Houghton, J; Warren, A; Nanda, A; Chandler, I; Cappell, B; Long, A; Minagar, A; Alexander, J S

    2003-11-13

    L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1) cerebral endothelial barrier and 2) cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells) have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR) expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1) were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease. PMID:14614784

  8. Ocular examination and diagnosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gariano, R F; Rickman, L S; Freeman, W R

    1993-01-01

    Ocular involvement is seen frequently and is an important source of morbidity in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We outline here the general skills of physical diagnosis valuable to primary care physicians or infectious diseases specialists in recognizing and evaluating ocular complaints in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. We provide an overview of common ocular diseases in these patients, with an emphasis on signs and symptoms that aid in the differential diagnosis. Images PMID:8384763

  9. Vascular Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Ionela; Vats, Archana; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathologic processes is an essential part of the paradigm in enabling us to achieve a reduction in related deaths. Both human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising sources of cells for clinical cardiovascular therapies. Additional in vitro studies are needed, however, to understand their relative phenotypes and molecular regulation toward cardiovascular cell fates. Further studies in translational animal models are also needed to gain insights into the potential and function of both human ES- and iPS-derived cardiovascular cells, and enable translation from experimental and pre-clinical studies to human trials. PMID:20453170

  10. Ocular Surface as Barrier of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Navas, Alejandro; López-Lizárraga, Erika Paulina; de Ribot, Francesc March; Peña, Alexandra; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O; Garfias, Yonathan

    2015-01-01

    Sight is one of the most important senses that human beings possess. The ocular system is a complex structure equipped with mechanisms that prevent or limit damage caused by physical, chemical, infectious and environmental factors. These mechanisms include a series of anatomical, cellular and humoral factors that have been a matter of study. The cornea is not only the most powerful and important lens of the optical system, but also, it has been involved in many other physiological and pathological processes apart from its refractive nature; the morphological and histological properties of the cornea have been thoroughly studied for the last fifty years; drawing attention in its molecular characteristics of immune response. This paper will review the anatomical and physiological aspects of the cornea, conjunctiva and lacrimal apparatus, as well as the innate immunity at the ocular surface. PMID:26161163

  11. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  12. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  13. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  14. Infranuclear ocular motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Lueck, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter covers the very large number of possible disorders that can affect the three ocular motor nerves, the neuromuscular junction, or the extraocular muscles. Conditions affecting the nerves are discussed under two major headings: those in which the site of damage can be anatomically localized (e.g., fascicular lesions and lesions occurring in the subarachnoid space, the cavernous sinus, the superior orbital fissure, or the orbit) and those in which the site of the lesion is either nonspecific or variable (e.g., vascular lesions, tumors, "ophthalmoplegic migraine," and congenital disorders). Specific comments on the diagnosis and management of disorders of each of the three nerves follow. Ocular motor synkineses (including Duane's retraction syndrome and aberrant regeneration) and disorders resulting in paroxysms of excess activity (e.g., neuromyotonia) are then covered, followed by myasthenia gravis and other disorders that affect the neuromuscular junction. A final section discusses disorders of the extraocular muscles themselves, including thyroid disease, orbital myositis, mitochondrial disease, and the muscular dystrophies. PMID:21601071

  15. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shakarchi, Faiz I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications. PMID:26648690

  16. Toxicity of diuron in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Marjo; Loikkanen, Jarkko; Naarala, Jonne; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2015-10-01

    Diuron is a substituted phenylurea used as a herbicide to control broadleaf and grass weeds and as a biocidal antifouling agent. Diuron is carcinogenic in rat urinary bladder and toxic to the reproductive system of oysters, sea urchins and lizards. The few studies carried out in human cells do not include the genotoxicity of diuron. We have investigated the toxicity of diuron in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human placental choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was statistically significantly increased in both cell lines but only at the highest 200 μM concentration. Diuron clearly reduced the viability of BeWo, but not MCF-7 cells. The relative cell number was decreased in both cell lines indicative of inhibition of cell proliferation. In the Comet assay, diuron increased DNA fragmentation in MCF-7 but not in BeWo cells. The expressions of p53 protein, a marker for cell stress, and p21 protein, a transcriptional target of p53, were increased, but only in MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that diuron is cytotoxic and potentially genotoxic in a tissue-specific manner and that ROS play a role in its toxicity. Thus, exposure to diuron may exert harmful effects on fetal development and damage human health. PMID:26086120

  17. Benign Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Human Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexei; Downey, Robert J.; Healey, John; Moreira, Andre L.; Lou, Emil; Leung, Roland; Edgar, Mark; Singer, Samuel; LaQuaglia, Michael; Maki, Robert G.; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that at least some sarcomas arise through aberrant differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), but MSCs have never been isolated directly from human sarcoma specimens. Experimental Design We examined human sarcoma cell lines and primary adherent cultures derived from human sarcoma surgical samples for features of MSCs. We further characterized primary cultures as either benign or malignant by the presence of tumor-defining genetic lesions and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. Results We show that a dedifferentiated liposarcoma cell line DDLS8817 demonstrates fat, bone and cartilage trilineage differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Primary sarcoma cultures have the morphology, surface immunophenotype and differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Surprisingly, many of these cultures are benign as they do not form tumors in mice and lack sarcoma-defining genetic lesions. Consistent with the recently proposed pericyte origin of MSCs in normal human tissues, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs express markers of pericytes and cooperate with endothelial cells in tube formation assays. In human sarcoma specimens, a subset of CD146-positive microvascular pericytes express CD105, an MSC marker, while malignant cells largely do not. In an in vitro co-culture model, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs as well as normal human pericytes markedly stimulate the growth of sarcoma cell lines. Conclusions Sarcoma-derived benign MSCs/pericytes represent a previously undescribed stromal cell type in sarcoma which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:21138865

  18. HMGB1 in the pathogenesis of ultraviolet-induced ocular surface inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Han, S J; Min, H J; Yoon, S C; Ko, E A; Park, S J; Yoon, J-H; Shin, J-S; Seo, K Y

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) functions as a transcription-enhancing nuclear protein as well as a crucial cytokine that regulates inflammation. This study demonstrated that secretion of HMGB1 due to ultraviolet (UV) radiation inducing ocular surface inflammation-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. After treating conjunctival epithelial cells with UV radiation, HMGB1 was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and then eventually to the extracellular space. HMGB1 played a crucial role in UV-induced conjunctival neutrophil infiltration, which subsided when mice were pretreated with the HMGB1 inhibitors soluble receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGEs) and HMGB1 A box protein. In case of using ROS quencher, there was decrease in UV-induced HMGB1 secretion in conjunctival epithelial cells and mice. Considering that UV-induced chronic inflammation causes ocular surface change as pterygium, we have confirmed high HMGB1 translocation and ROS expression in human pterygium. Our findings therefore revealed a previously unknown mechanism of UV-induced ocular inflammation related to ROS and HMGB1 suggesting a new medical therapeutic target. PMID:26313914

  19. HMGB1 in the pathogenesis of ultraviolet-induced ocular surface inflammation.

    PubMed

    Han, S J; Min, H J; Yoon, S C; Ko, E A; Park, S J; Yoon, J-H; Shin, J-S; Seo, K Y

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) functions as a transcription-enhancing nuclear protein as well as a crucial cytokine that regulates inflammation. This study demonstrated that secretion of HMGB1 due to ultraviolet (UV) radiation inducing ocular surface inflammation-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. After treating conjunctival epithelial cells with UV radiation, HMGB1 was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and then eventually to the extracellular space. HMGB1 played a crucial role in UV-induced conjunctival neutrophil infiltration, which subsided when mice were pretreated with the HMGB1 inhibitors soluble receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGEs) and HMGB1 A box protein. In case of using ROS quencher, there was decrease in UV-induced HMGB1 secretion in conjunctival epithelial cells and mice. Considering that UV-induced chronic inflammation causes ocular surface change as pterygium, we have confirmed high HMGB1 translocation and ROS expression in human pterygium. Our findings therefore revealed a previously unknown mechanism of UV-induced ocular inflammation related to ROS and HMGB1 suggesting a new medical therapeutic target. PMID:26313914

  20. Immortalisation of human urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, J L; Leigh, I M; Duffy, P G; Sexton, C; Masters, J R

    1995-01-01

    A cell line derived from the urothelium lining the ureter of a 12-year-old girl was immortalised using a temperature-sensitive SV40 large T-antigen gene construct, and designated UROtsa. Following immortalisation, UROtsa cells expressed SV40 large T-antigen, but did not acquire characteristics of neoplastic transformation, including growth in soft agar or the development of tumours in nude mice. Metaphase spreads had a normal chromosomal appearance and number. UROtsa cells remained permissive for cell growth at 39 degrees C, indicating that they did not retain temperature sensitivity. UROtsa provides an in vitro model of "normal" urothelium. PMID:8788275

  1. Reprogramming of human somatic cells by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naofumi; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-05-01

    In general, it had been believed that the cell fate restriction of terminally differentiated somatic cells was irreversible. In 1952, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was introduced to study early embryonic development in frogs. So far, various mammalian species have been successfully cloned using the SCNT technique, though its efficiency is very low. Embryonic stem (ES) cells were the first pluripotent cells to be isolated from an embryo and have a powerful potential to differentiate into more than 260 types of cells. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells was a breakthrough in stem cell research, and the use of these iPS cells has solved problems such as low efficiency and cell fate restriction. These cells have since been used for clinical application, disease investigation, and drug selection. As it is widely accepted that the endosymbiosis of Archaea into eukaryotic ancestors resulted in the generation of eukaryotic cells, we examined whether bacterial infection could alter host cell fate. We previously showed that when human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells were incorporated with lactic acid bacteria (LAB), the LAB-incorporated HDF cells formed clusters and expressed a subset of common pluripotent markers. Moreover, LAB-incorporated cell clusters could differentiate into cells derived from each of the three germinal layers both in vivo and in vitro, indicating successful reprogramming of host HDF cells by LAB. In the current review, we introduce the existing examples of cellular reprogramming by bacteria and discuss their nuclear reprogramming mechanisms. PMID:25866152

  2. Ocular Pathology: Role of Emerging Viruses in the Asia-Pacific Region-A Review.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ratnesh; Ranjan, Shikha

    2014-01-01

    The role of viral infections in ocular pathology varies greatly, involving all the components of the eye. Some viruses like herpes simplex, herpes zoster, adenovirus, enterovirus 70, influenza virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and cytomegalovirus are well-known for their role in ocular pathology. In recent years, emerging and resurging viral infections represent an important public health problem. The Asia-Pacific region has witnessed a number of pandemic and epidemic outbreaks caused by these viruses during the last 2 decades. The number of ocular complications being reported in patients of these viral infections has also increased significantly during this period. Ophthalmologists and physicians should be aware of ocular manifestations of newly emerging or resurging viral diseases. We conducted a review of the literature published during the last 20 years with the objectives of finding out outbreaks of emerging and reemerging viruses in the Asia-Pacific region and finding out any ocular involvement in these viral infections. An iterative search of the MEDLINE and the Google databases was made using the search terms emerging virus, ocular manifestations, ocular complications, Chikungunya, Dengue, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile fever, Kyasanur forest disease, Rift valley fever, Hantavirus, Henipavirus, Influenza virus, Enterovirus 71, and Asia-Pacific region, separately and with reported ocular involvement in combination. This review article discusses the epidemiology and the systemic and ocular manifestations of all emerging viral infections with reported ocular involvement in the Asia-Pacific region. PMID:26107917

  3. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  4. The fate of human Treg cells.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Manuela; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2009-06-19

    In this issue of Immunity, Miyara et al. (2009) demonstrate that FoxP3(+) cells in human peripheral blood are heterogeneous in function, and CD45RA expression defines their different stages of differentiation. PMID:19538927

  5. Germ cell quantitation in human testicular biopsy.

    PubMed

    Sinha Hikim, A P; Chakraborty, J; Jhunjhunwala, J S

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of human seminiferous epithelium was carried out using an improved method of glutaraldehyde and osmium fixation with plastic embedding. Part of each biopsy specimen was fixed in Bouin's fixative and embedded in paraffin for comparison. Epon embedded tissue had very little artifactual damage compared with paraffin embedded tissue sections. The germ cell to Sertoli cell ratios were determined by counting the various germ cells per "unit" tubular area. Data obtained by this method reflect a remarkable stability of Sertoli cell number and germ cell-Sertoli cell ratios both between biopsies from different individuals and between biopsies from right and left testes from the same individual. Agreement between the present results and those of earlier studies based on paraffin embedded testicular specimens supports the validity of this method of germ cell quantitation of human testicular biopsy samples. PMID:3927550

  6. Paracellular and passive transcellular permeability in immortalized human corneal epithelial cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Toropainen, Elisa; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Palmgrén, Joni; Talvitie, Anu; Laavola, Mirka; Suhonen, Pekka; Hämäläinen, Kaisa Mari; Auriola, Seppo; Urtti, Arto

    2003-09-01

    A cell culture model of human corneal epithelium (HCE-model) was recently introduced [Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 42 (2001) 2942] as a tool for ocular drug permeation studies. In this study, passive permeability and esterase activity of the HCE-model were characterised. Immortalised human corneal epithelial cells were grown on collagen coated filters under air-lift. The sensitivity of transcellular permeability to lipophilicity was tested in studies using nine beta-blockers. The size selectivity of the paracellular route was investigated using 16 polyethylene glycol oligomers (PEG). An effusion-like approach was used to estimate porosity and pore sizes of the paracellular space in HCE membrane. Permeability and degradation of fluorescein diacetate to fluorescein in HCE-cells was used to probe the esterase activity of the HCE-model. Drug concentrations were analyzed using HPLC (beta-blockers), LC-MS (PEGs), and fluorometry (fluorescein). Permeabilities were compared to those in the excised rabbit cornea. Penetration of beta-blockers increased with lipophilicity according to a sigmoidal relationship. This was almost similar to the profile in excised cornea. No apical to basolateral directionality was seen in the permeation of beta-blockers. Paracellular permeability of the HCE-model was generally slightly higher than that of the excised rabbit cornea. The HCE-model has larger paracellular pores, but lower pore density than the excised cornea, but the overall paracellular space was fairly similar in both models. The HCE-model shows significant esterase activity (i.e. fluorescein diacetate was converted to free fluorescein). These data on permeability of 27 compounds demonstrate that the barrier of the HCE-model closely resembles that of the excised rabbit cornea. Therefore, the HCE-model is a promising alternative corneal substitute for ocular drug delivery studies. PMID:13678798

  7. Treatment options for ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL)

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Victoria Mary Lendrum

    2009-01-01

    Most lymphomas that involve the ocular adnexal structure are low grade, B cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The treatment depends upon the grade and stage of the disease. High grade lymhoma requires treatment with systemic chemotherapy whereas the localized low grade (extranodal marginal zone lymphoma) can be successfully managed with local radiotherapy. Chlamydia psittaci infection is associated with low grade ocular lymphoma; however there is wide geographic variation in the strength of this association. Blanket antibiotic therapy is not advised unless there is proof of an infective agent. The monoclonal antibody, rituximab, may be successful for CD20 positive lymphoma, although it is likely that rituximab will have better long-term results when used in combination with systemic chemotherapy. PMID:20054418

  8. Ocular tissue engineering: current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Karamichos, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) is a concept that was first emerged in the early 1990s to provide solutions to severe injured tissues and/or organs [1]. The dream was to be able to restore and replace the damaged tissue with an engineered version which would ultimately help overcome problems such as donor shortages, graft rejections, and inflammatory responses following transplantation. While an incredible amount of progress has been made, suggesting that TE concept is viable, we are still not able to overcome major obstacles. In TE, there are two main strategies that researchers have adopted: (1) cell-based, where cells are been manipulated to create their own environment before transplanted to the host, and (2) scaffold-based, where an extracellular matrix is created to mimic in vivo structures. TE approaches for ocular tissues are available and have indeed come a long way, over the last decades; however more clinically relevant ocular tissue substitutes are needed. Figure 1 highlights the importance of TE in ocular applications and indicates the avenues available based on each tissue.[...]. PMID:25695336

  9. REPLICATIVE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Hiroyuki; Kakuda, Harumi; Imai, Chihaya; Mullighan, Charles G.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The replicative potential of human CD56+ CD3− natural killer (NK) cells is unknown. We found that by exposing NK cells to the leukemic cell line K562 genetically modified to express 4-1BB ligand and interleukin 15 (K562-mb15-41BBL), they expanded for up to 30 population doublings, achieving numbers that ranged from 1.6 × 105 to 1.2 × 1011 percent (median, 5.9 × 106 percent; n = 7) of those originally seeded. However, NK cells eventually became unresponsive to stimulation and died. Their demise could be suppressed by enforcing the expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. TERT-overexpressing NK cells continued to proliferate in response to K562-mb15-41BBL stimulation for more than 1 year of culture, while maintaining a normal karyotype and genotype. Long-lived NK cells had high cytotoxicity against myeloid and T-lineage leukemic cells. They remained susceptible to genetic manipulation, becoming highly cytotoxic to B-lineage leukemic cells after expression of anti-CD19 signaling receptors. Thus, human NK cells have a replicative potential similar to that of T lymphocytes and their lifespan can be significantly prolonged by an increase in TERT activity. We suggest that the methods described here should have many applications in studies of NK cell biology and NK cell-based therapies. PMID:19344420

  10. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  11. Human progenitor cells for bone engineering applications.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C; Strehl, R; Lindahl, A; Hyllner, J

    2013-06-01

    In this report, the authors review the human skeleton and the increasing burden of bone deficiencies, the limitations encountered with the current treatments and the opportunities provided by the emerging field of cell-based bone engineering. Special emphasis is placed on different sources of human progenitor cells, as well as their pros and cons in relation to their utilization for the large-scale construction of functional bone-engineered substitutes for clinical applications. It is concluded that, human pluripotent stem cells represent a valuable source for the derivation of progenitor cells, which combine the advantages of both embryonic and adult stem cells, and indeed display high potential for the construction of functional substitutes for bone replacement therapies. PMID:23642054

  12. Derivation of Human Skin Fibroblast Lines for Feeder Cells of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Unger, Christian; Felldin, Ulrika; Rodin, Sergey; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Dilber, Sirac; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-01-01

    After the first derivations of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines on fetal mouse feeder cell layers, the idea of using human cells instead of mouse cells as feeder cells soon arose. Mouse cells bear a risk of microbial contamination, and nonhuman immunogenic proteins are absorbed from the feeders to hESCs. Human skin fibroblasts can be effectively used as feeder cells for hESCs. The same primary cell line, which can be safely used for up to 15 passages after stock preparations, can be expanded and used for large numbers of hESC derivations and cultures. These cells are relatively easy to handle and maintain. No animal facilities or animal work is needed. Here, we describe the derivation, culture, and cryopreservation procedures for research-grade human skin fibroblast lines. We also describe how to make feeder layers for hESCs using these fibroblasts. PMID:26840224

  13. Rabbit Models of Ocular Diseases: New Relevance for Classical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Zernii, Evgeni Y; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Iomdina, Elena N; Averina, Olga A; Permyakov, Sergei E; Philippov, Pavel P; Zamyatnin, Andrey A; Senin, Ivan I

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 million individuals are affected by irreversible visual impairments and blindness worldwide, while ocular diseases remain a challenging problem despite significant advances in modern ophthalmology. Development of novel drugs and drug delivery mechanisms, as well as advanced ophthalmological techniques requires experimental models including animals, capable of developing ocular diseases with similar etiology and pathology, suitable for future trials of new therapeutic approaches. Although experimental ophthalmology and visual research are traditionally performed on rodent models, these animals are often unsuitable for pre-clinical drug efficacy and safety studies, as well as for testing novel drug delivery approaches, e.g. controlled release of pharmaceuticals using intra-ocular implants. Therefore, rabbit models of ocular diseases are particularly useful in this context, since rabbits can be easily handled, while sharing more common anatomical and biochemical features with humans compared to rodents, including longer life span and larger eye size. This review provides a brief description of clinical, morphological and mechanistic aspects of the most common ocular diseases (dry eye syndrome, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, light-induced retinopathies, cataract and uveitis) and summarizes the diversity of current strategies for their experimental modeling in rabbits. Several applications of some of these models in ocular pharmacology and eye care strategies are also discussed. PMID:26553163

  14. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients. PMID:26828436

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  16. Growth of gold nanoparticles in human cells.

    PubMed

    Anshup, Anshup; Venkataraman, J Sai; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Kumar, R Rajeev; Priya, Suma; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Omkumar, R V; John, Annie; Pradeep, T

    2005-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 20-100 nm diameter were synthesized within HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney), HeLa (human cervical cancer), SiHa (human cervical cancer), and SKNSH (human neuroblastoma) cells. Incubation of 1 mM tetrachloroaurate solution, prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, with human cells grown to approximately 80% confluency yielded systematic growth of nanoparticles over a period of 96 h. The cells, stained due to nanoparticle growth, were adherent to the bottom of the wells of the tissue culture plates, with their morphology preserved, indicating that the cell membrane was intact. Transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections showed the presence of nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, the latter being much smaller in dimension. Scanning near field microscopic images confirmed the growth of large particles within the cytoplasm. Normal cells gave UV-visible signatures of higher intensity than the cancer cells. Differences in the cellular metabolism of cancer and noncancer cells were manifested, presumably in their ability to carry out the reduction process. PMID:16316080

  17. Bioinformatics construction of the human cell surfaceome

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, J. P. C.; Galante, P. A. F.; de Souza, J. E.; de Souza, R. F.; Carvalho, P. M.; Ohara, D. T.; Moura, R. P.; Oba-Shinja, S. M.; Marie, S. K. N.; Silva, W. A.; Perez, R. O.; Stransky, B.; Pieprzyk, M.; Moore, J.; Caballero, O.; Gama-Rodrigues, J.; Habr-Gama, A.; Kuo, W. P.; Simpson, A. J.; Camargo, A. A.; Old, Lloyd J.; de Souza, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are excellent targets for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. By using bioinformatics tools, we generated a catalog of 3,702 transmembrane proteins located at the surface of human cells (human cell surfaceome). We explored the genetic diversity of the human cell surfaceome at different levels, including the distribution of polymorphisms, conservation among eukaryotic species, and patterns of gene expression. By integrating expression information from a variety of sources, we were able to identify surfaceome genes with a restricted expression in normal tissues and/or differential expression in tumors, important characteristics for putative tumor targets. A high-throughput and efficient quantitative real-time PCR approach was used to validate 593 surfaceome genes selected on the basis of their expression pattern in normal and tumor samples. A number of candidates were identified as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for colorectal tumors and glioblastoma. Several candidate genes were also identified as coding for cell surface cancer/testis antigens. The human cell surfaceome will serve as a reference for further studies aimed at characterizing tumor targets at the surface of human cells. PMID:19805368

  18. Human stem cells for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Morteza; Kirkpatrick, William Niall Alexander; Cameron, Malcolm Gregor; Pauklin, Siim; Vallier, Ludovic

    2014-07-01

    Human stem cell research represents an exceptional opportunity for regenerative medicine and the surgical reconstruction of the craniomaxillofacial complex. The correct architecture and function of the vastly diverse tissues of this important anatomical region are critical for life supportive processes, the delivery of senses, social interaction, and aesthetics. Craniomaxillofacial tissue loss is commonly associated with inflammatory responses of the surrounding tissue, significant scarring, disfigurement, and psychological sequelae as an inevitable consequence. The in vitro production of fully functional cells for skin, muscle, cartilage, bone, and neurovascular tissue formation from human stem cells, may one day provide novel materials for the reconstructive surgeon operating on patients with both hard and soft tissue deficit due to cancer, congenital disease, or trauma. However, the clinical translation of human stem cell technology, including the application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in novel regenerative therapies, faces several hurdles that must be solved to permit safe and effective use in patients. The basic biology of hPSCs remains to be fully elucidated and concerns of tumorigenicity need to be addressed, prior to the development of cell transplantation treatments. Furthermore, functional comparison of in vitro generated tissue to their in vivo counterparts will be necessary for confirmation of maturity and suitability for application in reconstructive surgery. Here, we provide an overview of human stem cells in disease modeling, drug screening, and therapeutics, while also discussing the application of regenerative medicine for craniomaxillofacial tissue deficit and surgical reconstruction. PMID:24564584

  19. Human Stem Cells for Craniomaxillofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William Niall Alexander; Cameron, Malcolm Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Human stem cell research represents an exceptional opportunity for regenerative medicine and the surgical reconstruction of the craniomaxillofacial complex. The correct architecture and function of the vastly diverse tissues of this important anatomical region are critical for life supportive processes, the delivery of senses, social interaction, and aesthetics. Craniomaxillofacial tissue loss is commonly associated with inflammatory responses of the surrounding tissue, significant scarring, disfigurement, and psychological sequelae as an inevitable consequence. The in vitro production of fully functional cells for skin, muscle, cartilage, bone, and neurovascular tissue formation from human stem cells, may one day provide novel materials for the reconstructive surgeon operating on patients with both hard and soft tissue deficit due to cancer, congenital disease, or trauma. However, the clinical translation of human stem cell technology, including the application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in novel regenerative therapies, faces several hurdles that must be solved to permit safe and effective use in patients. The basic biology of hPSCs remains to be fully elucidated and concerns of tumorigenicity need to be addressed, prior to the development of cell transplantation treatments. Furthermore, functional comparison of in vitro generated tissue to their in vivo counterparts will be necessary for confirmation of maturity and suitability for application in reconstructive surgery. Here, we provide an overview of human stem cells in disease modeling, drug screening, and therapeutics, while also discussing the application of regenerative medicine for craniomaxillofacial tissue deficit and surgical reconstruction. PMID:24564584

  20. First report of canine ocular thelaziosis in the Muntenia Region, Romania.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Poliana; Bădicu, Adina; Mateescu, Romaniţa; Tudor, Niculae; Mateescu, Cosmin; Ionaşcu, Iuliana

    2016-04-01

    Ocular thelaziosis by Thelazia callipaeda is a vector-borne disease that infects domestic and wild carnivores as well as humans. In this paper, we present two cases of ocular thelaziosis in dogs that had never traveled outside Romania. Both presented with moderate conjunctivitis and ocular discharge. In total, 41 adult nematodes were removed from the conjunctival sacs of both dogs; these were identified via morphology as T. callipaeda. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of canine ocular thelaziosis caused by T. callipaeda from the Muntenia Region of Romania. PMID:26898833

  1. Paracrine effects of haematopoietic cells on human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuanhu

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell function decline during ageing can involve both cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Bone and blood formation are intertwined in bone marrow, therefore haematopoietic cells and bone cells could be extrinsic factors for each other. In this study, we assessed the paracrine effects of extrinsic factors from haematopoietic cells on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Our data showed that haematopoietic cells stimulate proliferation, osteoblast differentiation and inhibit senescence of MSCs; TNF-α, PDGF-β, Wnt1, 4, 6, 7a and 10a, sFRP-3 and sFRP-5 are dominantly expressed in haematopoietic cells; the age-related increase of TNF-α in haematopoietic cells may perform as a negative factor in the interactions of haematopoietic cells on MSCs via TNF-α receptors and then activating NF-κB signaling or Wnt/β-catenin signaling to induce senescence and reduce osteoblast differentiation in MSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that there are paracrine interactions of haematopoietic cells on human MSCs; immunosenescence may be one of the extrinsic mechanisms by which skeletal stem cell function decline during human skeletal ageing. PMID:26030407

  2. Long-term result of autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation for severe ocular surface disease.

    PubMed

    Prabhasawat, Pinnita; Ekpo, Pattama; Uiprasertkul, Mongkol; Chotikavanich, Suksri; Tesavibul, Nattaporn; Pornpanich, Kanograt; Luemsamran, Panitee

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET) on human amniotic membrane (AM) for corneal limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). In this prospective, noncomparative case series, 20 eyes (18 patients) with bilateral severe ocular surface disease were chosen to undergo COMET on human AM. The primary outcome was clinical success, and the secondary outcomes were the best-corrected visual acuity difference, corneal opacification, symblepharon formation, and complications. The mean patient age was 48.2 ± 15.5 years. The mean follow-up time was 31.9 ± 12.1 months (range 8-50 months). All except one eye exhibited complete epithelialization within the first postoperative week. A successful clinical outcome, defined as a stable ocular surface without epithelial defects, a clear cornea without fibrovascular tissue invasion at the pupillary area, and no or mild ocular surface inflammation, was obtained in 15 of 20 eyes (75 %). The clinical success rate at 1 year was 79.3 %, and that at 4 years (end of follow-up) was 70.5 %. Fourteen of 20 (70 %) eyes exhibited improvement in visual acuity after COMET, and some required subsequent cataract surgery (2 eyes), penetrating keratoplasty (3 eyes), or keratoprosthesis implantation (1 eye). Preoperative symblepharon was eliminated in most eyes (8 of 13, 61.5 %) after COMET combined with eyelid reconstruction when needed. The only complication was corneal perforation (1 eye) induced by a severe eyelid abnormality; treatment with a tectonic corneal graft was successful. COMET can successfully restore ocular surface damage in most eyes with corneal LSCD. PMID:27507558

  3. Endocrine Cell Clustering During Human Pancreas Development

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Ricordi, Camillo; Edlund, Helena; Diez, Juan A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of efficient, reproducible protocols for directed in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells into insulin-producing β cells will benefit greatly from increased knowledge regarding the spatiotemporal expression profile of key instructive factors involved in human endocrine cell generation. Human fetal pancreases 7 to 21 weeks of gestational age, were collected following consent immediately after pregnancy termination and processed for immunostaining, in situ hybridization, and real-time RT-PCR expression analyses. Islet-like structures appear from approximately week 12 and, unlike the mixed architecture observed in adult islets, fetal islets are initially formed predominantly by aggregated insulin- or glucagon-expressing cells. The period studied (7–22 weeks) coincides with a decrease in the proliferation and an increase in the differentiation of the progenitor cells, the initiation of NGN3 expression, and the appearance of differentiated endocrine cells. The present study provides a detailed characterization of islet formation and expression profiles of key intrinsic and extrinsic factors during human pancreas development. This information is beneficial for the development of efficient protocols that will allow guided in vitro differentiation of hES cells into insulin-producing cells. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:811–824, 2009) PMID:19365093

  4. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  5. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Varanou, A; Page, C P; Minger, S L

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac pathology, retinal dysfunction and lung and liver disease. The overall aim is to develop methods of application either of pure cell populations or of whole tissue parts to the diseased organ under investigation. In the field of pulmonary research, studies using human embryonic stem cells have succeeded in generating enriched cultures of type II pneumocytes in vitro. On account of their potential of indefinite proliferation in vitro, embryonic stem cells could be a source of an unlimited supply of cells available for transplantation and for use in gene therapy. Uncovering the ability to generate such cell types will expand our understanding of biological processes to such a degree that disease understanding and management could change dramatically. PMID:18724383

  6. Corticosteroids for ocular toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Smitha; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; John, Sheeja S; Horo, Saban; Sepah, Yasir J; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Background Ocular infestation with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite, may result in inflammation in the retina, choroid, and uvea and consequently lead to complications such as glaucoma, cataract, and posterior synechiae. Objectives The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effects of adjunctive use of corticosteroids for ocular toxoplasmosis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We searched the reference lists of included studies for any additional studies not identified by the electronic searches. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 October 2012. Selection criteria We planned to include randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Eligible trials would have enrolled participants of any age who were immunocompetent and were diagnosed with active ocular toxoplasmosis. Included trials would have compared anti-parasitic therapy plus corticosteroids versus anti-parasitic therapy alone, or different doses or times of initiation of corticosteroids. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts retrieved from the electronic searches. We retrieved full-text articles of studies categorized as ‘unsure’ or ‘include’ after review of the abstracts. Two authors independently reviewed each full-text article. Discrepancies were

  7. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  8. Ocular myasthenia gravis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Venkatramani, Devendra V; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disease that affects the neuro-muscular junction resulting in classical symptoms of variable muscle weakness and fatigability. It is called the great masquerader owing to its varied clinical presentations. Very often, a patient of MG may present to the ophthalmologist given that a large proportion of patients with systemic myasthenia have ocular involvement either at presentation or during the later course of the disease. The treatment of ocular MG involves both the neurologist and ophthalmologist. Thus, the aim of this review was to highlight the current diagnosis, investigations, and treatment of ocular MG. PMID:25449931

  9. Ocular neuromyotonia after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lessell, S.; Lessell, I.M.; Rizzo, J.F. III

    1986-12-15

    Ocular neuromyotonia is a paroxysmal monocular deviation that results from spasm of eye muscles secondary to spontaneous discharges from third, fourth, or sixth nerve axons. We observed this rare disorder in four patients who had been treated with radiation for tumors in the region of the sella turcica and cavernous sinus. Based on these cases and four others identified in the literature it would appear that radiation predisposes to a cranial neuropathy in which ocular neuromyotonia may be the major manifestation. Radiation appears to be the most common cause of ocular neuromyotonia.

  10. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world's most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  11. Ocular Blood Flow Autoregulation Mechanisms and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xue; Shen, Yu-meng; Jiang, Meng-nan; Lou, Xiang-feng; Shen, Yin

    2015-01-01

    The main function of ocular blood flow is to supply sufficient oxygen and nutrients to the eye. Local blood vessels resistance regulates overall blood distribution to the eye and can vary rapidly over time depending on ocular need. Under normal conditions, the relation between blood flow and perfusion pressure in the eye is autoregulated. Basically, autoregulation is a capacity to maintain a relatively constant level of blood flow in the presence of changes in ocular perfusion pressure and varied metabolic demand. In addition, ocular blood flow dysregulation has been demonstrated as an independent risk factor to many ocular diseases. For instance, ocular perfusion pressure plays key role in the progression of retinopathy such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this review, different direct and indirect techniques to measure ocular blood flow and the effect of myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms on ocular blood flow are discussed. Moreover, ocular blood flow regulation in ocular disease will be described. PMID:26576295

  12. Control of ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, D A

    1990-05-01

    Although both topical and systemic anti-inflammatory agents have a place in veterinary ophthalmology, they play only a small role in overall patient management. They must be used appropriately to prevent ocular damage and loss of vision from inflammation and are not a replacement for a complete ophthalmic examination and specific treatment directed at the etiology of the problem. If used indiscriminately, they can result in local or systemic side effects or toxicities, many of which are worse than the initial problem for which they were selected. Just as topical corticosteroids are contraindicated with infectious keratitis, so are systemic corticosteroids contraindicated in patients with ocular inflammation resulting from a systemic infectious process. Anti-inflammatories must be used at the appropriate dosage and frequency. Use of corticosteroids that have low intraocular penetration for intraocular disease or corticosteroids with low potency is a waste of time and money. The most expensive medication is one that does not work. Avoid combination therapies when only a single medication is required. These do not save time or money and have the potential to result in the development of drug-related diseases. Diseases for which anti-inflammatory therapy has little or no indication include corneal scars, corneal edema, corneal pigmentation, corneal dystrophy, cataracts without inflammation, glaucoma, and retinal atrophy and degeneration. Last, remember that all commercially available ophthalmic medications are specifically formulated for use in the eye. Their pH, concentration, osmolality, and melting temperature all are designed to facilitate penetration. The use of dermal and otic preparations to treat ophthalmic problems is contraindicated. PMID:2194354

  13. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. PMID:27217403

  14. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2015-02-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform.Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE

  15. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A. . E-mail: joseph-buckwalter@uiowa.edu

    2006-07-28

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16{sup ink4a}, one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16{sup ink4a} contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16{sup ink4a} expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16{sup ink4a} expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16{sup ink4a} expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16{sup ink4a} transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16{sup ink4a} plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas.

  16. Engineering tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, CM; Azarin, SM; Ji, L; De Pablo, JJ; Palecek, SP

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) biology now offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineers, as these cells are capable of proliferating indefinitely and differentiating to many clinically relevant cell types. Novel culture methods capable of exerting spatial and temporal control over the stem cell microenvironment allow for more efficient expansion of hESCs, and significant advances have been made toward improving our understanding of the biophysical and biochemical cues that direct stem cell fate choices. Effective production of lineage specific progenitors or terminally differentiated cells enables researchers to incorporate hESC derivatives into engineered tissue constructs. Here, we describe current efforts using hESCs as a cell source for tissue engineering applications, highlighting potential advantages of hESCs over current practices as well as challenges which must be overcome. PMID:18194458

  17. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ning; Wang, Pei; Tang, Li; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP) does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer's disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26558263

  18. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ning; Wang, Pei; Tang, Li; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP) does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer's disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26558263

  19. Co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells in NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Wege, Anja K; Schmidt, Marcus; Ueberham, Elke; Ponnath, Marvin; Ortmann, Olaf; Brockhoff, Gero; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Humanized tumor mice (HTM) were generated by the co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 into neonatal NOD-scid IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. These mice are characterized by the development of a human immune system in combination with human breast cancer growth. Due to concurrent transplantation into newborn mice, transfer of MHC-mismatched tumor cells resulted in solid coexistence and immune cell activation (CD4+ T cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells), but without evidence for rejection. Histological staining of the spleen of HTM revealed co-localization of human antigen-presenting cells together with human T and B cells allowing MHC-dependent interaction, and thereby the generation of T cell-dependent antibody production. Here, we investigated the capability of these mice to generate human tumor-specific antibodies and correlated immunoglobulin titers with tumor outgrowth. We found detectable IgM and also IgG amounts in the serum of HTM, which apparently controlled tumor development when IgG serum concentrations were above 10 µg/ml. Western blot analyses revealed that the tumor-specific antibodies generated in HTM did not recognize HER2/neu antigens, but different, possibly relevant antigens for breast cancer therapy. In conclusion, HTM offer a novel approach to generate complete human monoclonal antibodies that do not require further genetic manipulation (e. g., humanization) for a potential application in humans. In addition, efficacy and safety of the generated antibodies can be tested in the same mouse model under human-like conditions. This might be of particular interest for cancer subtypes with no currently available antibody therapy. PMID:24870377

  20. Gene-environment interactions in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sacca, S C; Bolognesi, C; Battistella, A; Bagnis, A; Izzotti, A

    2009-07-10

    Degenerative ocular diseases are widespread in the population and represent a major cause of reversible and irreversible blindness. Scientific evidences have been accumulating supporting the role of genotoxic damage and gene environment interactions in the pathogenesis of these diseases mainly including glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract. Glaucoma, in its degenerative form, is characterized by the degeneration of the trabecular meshwork, the tissue of the anterior chamber of the eye devoted to aqueous-humour outflow. Such a degenerative process results in intra-ocular pressure increase and progressive damage of optic nerve head. Oxidative stress and DNA damage play an important role in inducing the degeneration of these well differentiated target tissues in which DNA damage results in a progressive cell loss. Macular degeneration is a common age-related disease affecting the central regions of the retina inducing progressive accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins and neovascularization. Environmental genotoxic risk factors include diet, light, and cigarette smoke paralleled by individual susceptibility as determined by adverse genetic assets. Cataract is a progressive opacity of the crystalline lens resulting from molecular damages induced by various risk factors including UV-containing light. This disease has been related to a failure in antioxidant defences. Experimental study provides evidence that cataract patients possess higher basal level of DNA damage, as evaluated by Comet test, in lymphocytes than controls. This finding is paralleled by the higher susceptibility to oxidative stress observed in the same patients. These novel experimental data further support the role of DNA damage as a main factor contributing to cataract onset. In conclusion, the examined degenerative ocular diseases recognise environmental risk factors often displaying genotoxic attitudes. Whenever these factors target individuals who are susceptible due their

  1. Clinical translation of human neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Human neural stem cell transplants have potential as therapeutic candidates to treat a vast number of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). StemCells, Inc. has purified human neural stem cells and developed culture conditions for expansion and banking that preserve their unique biological properties. The biological activity of these human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC®) has been analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. When formulated for transplantation, the expanded and cryopreserved banked cells maintain their stem cell phenotype, self-renew and generate mature oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes, cells normally found in the CNS. In this overview, the rationale and supporting data for pursuing neuroprotective strategies and clinical translation in the three components of the CNS (brain, spinal cord and eye) are described. A phase I trial for a rare myelin disorder and phase I/II trial for spinal cord injury are providing intriguing data relevant to the biological properties of neural stem cells, and the early clinical outcomes compel further development. PMID:23987648

  2. Clinical translation of human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Ann; Uchida, Nobuko; Capela, Alexandra; Gorba, Thorsten; Huhn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Human neural stem cell transplants have potential as therapeutic candidates to treat a vast number of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). StemCells, Inc. has purified human neural stem cells and developed culture conditions for expansion and banking that preserve their unique biological properties. The biological activity of these human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC®) has been analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. When formulated for transplantation, the expanded and cryopreserved banked cells maintain their stem cell phenotype, self-renew and generate mature oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes, cells normally found in the CNS. In this overview, the rationale and supporting data for pursuing neuroprotective strategies and clinical translation in the three components of the CNS (brain, spinal cord and eye) are described. A phase I trial for a rare myelin disorder and phase I/II trial for spinal cord injury are providing intriguing data relevant to the biological properties of neural stem cells, and the early clinical outcomes compel further development. PMID:23987648

  3. Phenylboronic-Acid-Based Polymeric Micelles for Mucoadhesive Anterior Segment Ocular Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Prosperi-Porta, Graeme; Kedzior, Stephanie; Muirhead, Benjamin; Sheardown, Heather

    2016-04-11

    Topical drug delivery to the front of the eye is extremely inefficient due to effective natural protection mechanisms such as precorneal tear turnover and the relative impermeability of the cornea and sclera tissues. This causes low ocular drug bioavailability, requiring large frequent doses that result in high systemic exposure and side effects. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems have the potential to improve topical drug delivery by increasing pharmaceutical bioavailability on the anterior eye surface. We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of poly(l-lactide)-b-poly(methacrylic acid-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) block copolymer micelles for use as mucoadhesive drug delivery vehicles. Micelle properties, drug release rates, and mucoadhesion were shown to depend on phenylboronic acid content. The micelles showed low in vitro cytotoxicity against human corneal epithelial cells and undetectable acute in vivo ocular irritation in Sprague-Dawley rats, suggesting good biocompatibility with the corneal surface. The micelles show the potential to significantly improve the bioavailability of topically applied ophthalmic drugs, which could reduce dosage, frequency of administration, and unintentional systemic exposure. This would greatly improve the delivery of the ocular drugs such as the potent immunosuppressive cyclosporine A used in the treatment of severe dry eye disease. PMID:26963738

  4. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    PubMed

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  5. Cell mechanics and human disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Subra

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will provide summary of our very recent studies exploring the effects of biochemical factors, influenced by foreign organisms or in vivo processes, on intracellular structural reorganization, single-cell mechanical response and motility of a population of cells in the context of two human diseases: malaria induced by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites that invade red blood cells, and gastrointestinal cancer metastasis involving epithelial cells. In both cases, particular attention will be devoted to systematic changes induced in specific molecular species in response to controlled alterations in disease state. The role of critical proteins in influencing the mechanical response of human red bloods during the intra-erythrocytic development of P. falciparum merozoites has also been assessed quantitatively using specific protein knock-out experiments by recourse to gene inactivation methods. Single-cell mechanical response characterization entails such tools as optical tweezers and mechanical plate stretchers whereas cell motility assays and cell-population biorheology characterization involves microfluidic channels. The experimental studies are accompanied by three-dimensional computational simulations at the continuum and mesoscopic scales of cell deformation. An outcome of such combined experimental and computational biophysical studies is the realization of how chemical factors influence single-cell mechanical response, cytoadherence, the biorheology of a large population of cells through microchannels representative of in vivo conditions, and the onset and progression of disease states.

  6. Gammaherpesvirus Infection of Human Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem Chandra; Mehta, Devan; Lu, Jie; El-Naccache, Darine; Shukla, Sanket K.; Kovacsics, Colleen; Kolson, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses human herpesvirus 4 (HHV4) and HHV8 are two prominent members of the herpesvirus family associated with a number of human cancers. HHV4, also known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus prevalent in 90 to 95% of the human population, is clinically associated with various neurological diseases such as primary central nervous system lymphoma, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebellar ataxia, and encephalitis. However, the possibility that EBV and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can directly infect neurons has been largely overlooked. This study has, for the first time, characterized EBV infection in neural cell backgrounds by using the Sh-Sy5y neuroblastoma cell line, teratocarcinoma Ntera2 neurons, and primary human fetal neurons. Furthermore, we also demonstrated KSHV infection of neural Sh-Sy5y cells. These neuronal cells were infected with green fluorescent protein-expressing recombinant EBV or KSHV. Microscopy, genetic analysis, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analyses for specific viral antigens supported and validated the infection of these cells by EBV and KSHV and showed that the infection was efficient and productive. Progeny virus produced from infected neuronal cells efficiently infected fresh neuronal cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, acyclovir was effective at inhibiting the production of virus from neuronal cells similar to lymphoblastoid cell lines; this suggests active lytic replication in infected neurons in vitro. These studies represent a potentially new in vitro model of EBV- and KSHV-associated neuronal disease development and pathogenesis. PMID:26628726

  7. Drosophila as a Potential Model for Ocular Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Daimark; Lyulcheva, Ekaterina; Cobbe, Neville

    2015-04-01

    Drosophila has made many contributions to our understanding of cancer genes and mechanisms that have subsequently been validated in mammals. Despite anatomical differences between fly and human eyes, flies offer a tractable genetic model in which to dissect the functional importance of genetic lesions found to be affected in human ocular tumors. Here, we discuss different approaches for using Drosophila as a model for ocular cancer and how studies on ocular cancer genes in flies have begun to reveal potential strategies for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss recent developments in the use of Drosophila for drug discovery, which is coming to the fore as Drosophila models are becoming tailored to study tumor types found in the clinic. PMID:27172095

  8. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  9. Impact of Ocular Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Chen; Chai, Xiaoyu; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Pidala, Joseph; Martin, Paul J; Flowers, Mary E D; Shen, Tueng T; Lee, Stephanie J; Jagasia, Madan

    2015-09-01

    Ocular involvement can be quite symptomatic in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The prevalence of and risk factors for ocular GVHD and its impact on quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic GVHD were studied in a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal, observational study. This study enrolled 342 patients with 1483 follow-up visits after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. All patients in this analysis were diagnosed with chronic GVHD requiring systemic treatment and enrolled within 3 months of chronic GVHD diagnosis. The symptom burden of ocular GVHD was based on the degree of dry eye symptoms, frequency of artificial tear usage, and impact on activities of daily living. Patients' QOL was measured by self-administered questionnaires. Variables associated with ocular GVHD at enrollment and subsequent new-onset ocular GVHD and the associations with QOL were studied. Of the 284 chronic GVHD patients, 116 (41%) had ocular GVHD within 3 months of chronic GVHD diagnosis ("early ocular GVHD"). Late ocular GVHD (new onset > 3 months after chronic GVHD diagnosis) occurred in 64 patients. Overall cumulative incidence at 2 years was 57%. Female gender (P = .005), higher acute GVHD grade (P = .04), and higher prednisone dose at study entry (P = .04) were associated with early ocular GVHD. For patients who did not have ocular GVHD within 3 months of chronic GVHD diagnosis, presence of prior grades I to IV acute GVHD (HR 1.78, P = .04) was associated with shorter time to late ocular GVHD, whereas female donor-male recipient (HR .53, P = .05) was associated with longer time to late ocular GVHD onset. Using all visit data, patients with ocular GVHD had worse QOL, as measured by Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Bone Marrow Transplantation (P = .002), and greater chronic GVHD symptom burden, as measured by the Lee symptom overall score excluding the eye component (P < .001), compared with patients without ocular GVHD. In conclusion

  10. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  11. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  12. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  13. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  14. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  15. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of ocular syphilis, co-infection, and therapy response

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ozlem; Ziaei, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical presentation of patients diagnosed with presumed latent ocular syphilis and congenital ocular syphilis at tertiary referral center in Turkey, and to compare the clinical findings with patients described in other studies, specifically focusing on demographics and co-infections. Methods This is a retrospective study reviewing the medical records of patients diagnosed with ocular inflammation between January 2012 and June 2014 at a tertiary referral center in Turkey. Ocular syphilis was diagnosed on the basis of non-treponemal and treponemal antibody tests, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. All the patients diagnosed with ocular syphilis were tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Toxoplasma gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes. Results A total of 1,115 patients were evaluated between January 2012 and June 2014, and 12 patients (1.07%) were diagnosed with ocular syphilis based on the inclusion criteria. None of the patients were seropositive for HIV. Two patients were seropositive for T. gondii-specific IgG. Clinical presentations include non-necrotizing anterior scleritis, non-necrotizing sclerokeratitis, anterior uveitis, intermediate uveitis, posterior uveitis, panuveitis, and optic neuritis. All of the patients showed clinical improvement in the level of ocular inflammation with intravenous penicillin 24 million U/day for 10 days. Three patients received additional oral methotrexate as an adjunctive therapy. Two cases received low-dose trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole. Conclusion Ocular syphilis is an uncommon cause of ocular inflammation in HIV-negative patients. Central retinochoroiditis is the most common ocular manifestation, and it is the most common cause of visual impairment. Ocular syphilis might present associated with co-infections such as T. gondii in developing countries. Oral methotrexate might be beneficial as an adjunctive therapy for ocular syphilis in resolving the residual intraocular inflammation

  16. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  17. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins.

    PubMed

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  18. Induced pluripotency of human prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Sun, Ning; Young, Sarah R; Nolley, Rosalie; Santos, Jennifer; Wu, Joseph C; Peehl, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a valuable resource for discovery of epigenetic changes critical to cell type-specific differentiation. Although iPS cells have been generated from other terminally differentiated cells, the reprogramming of normal adult human basal prostatic epithelial (E-PZ) cells to a pluripotent state has not been reported. Here, we attempted to reprogram E-PZ cells by forced expression of Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4 using lentiviral vectors and obtained embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies at a frequency of 0.01%. These E-PZ-iPS-like cells with normal karyotype gained expression of pluripotent genes typical of iPS cells (Tra-1-81, SSEA-3, Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4) and lost gene expression characteristic of basal prostatic epithelial cells (CK5, CK14, and p63). E-PZ-iPS-like cells demonstrated pluripotency by differentiating into ectodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal cells in vitro, although lack of teratoma formation in vivo and incomplete demethylation of pluripotency genes suggested only partial reprogramming. Importantly, E-PZ-iPS-like cells re-expressed basal epithelial cell markers (CD44, p63, MAO-A) in response to prostate-specific medium in spheroid culture. Androgen induced expression of androgen receptor (AR), and co-culture with rat urogenital sinus further induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a hallmark of secretory cells, suggesting that E-PZ-iPS-like cells have the capacity to differentiate into prostatic basal and secretory epithelial cells. Finally, when injected into mice, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed basal epithelial cell markers including CD44 and p63. When co-injected with rat urogenital mesenchyme, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed AR and expression of p63 and CD44 was repressed. DNA methylation profiling identified epigenetic changes in key pathways and genes involved in prostatic differentiation as E-PZ-iPS-like cells converted to differentiated AR- and PSA-expressing cells. Our results suggest that

  19. The initial torsional Ocular Following Response (tOFR) in humans: a response to the total motion energy in the stimulus?

    PubMed Central

    Sheliga, B. M.; FitzGibbon, E. J.; Miles, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    We recorded the initial torsional Ocular Following Responses (tOFRs) elicited at short latency by visual images that occupied the frontal plane and rotated about the lines of sight. Using 1-D radial gratings, the local spatio-temporal characteristics of these tOFRs closely resembled those we previously reported for the hOFRs to horizontal motion with 1-D vertical gratings. When the 1-D radial grating was subdivided into a number of concentric annuli, each with the same radial thickness, tOFRs were less than predicted from the sum of the responses to the individual annuli: spatial normalization. However, the normalization was much weaker than that which we previously reported for the hOFRs. Further, when the number, thickness and contrast of these concentric annuli were varied systematically, the latency and magnitude of the tOFRs were well described by single monotonic functions when plotted against the product of the Total Area of the Annuli and the Square of their Michelson Contrast (“A*C 2”), consistent with the hypothesis that the onset and magnitude of the initial tOFR are determined by the Total Motion Energy in the stimulus. When our previously published hOFR data were plotted against A*C 2, a single monotonic function sufficed to describe the latency but not the magnitude. PMID:20053093

  20. Cell-in-cell structures are involved in the competition between cells in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Huang, Hongyan; Overholtzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The engulfment of live cells may represent a mechanism of cell death. We reported that E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin) expression in human cancer cells favors the formation of cell-in-cell structures through the mechanism known as entosis, and that entosis contributes to a form of cellular competition in heterogeneous cancer cell populations. PMID:27308493

  1. Cell-in-cell structures are involved in the competition between cells in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Huang, Hongyan; Overholtzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The engulfment of live cells may represent a mechanism of cell death. We reported that E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin) expression in human cancer cells favors the formation of cell-in-cell structures through the mechanism known as entosis, and that entosis contributes to a form of cellular competition in heterogeneous cancer cell populations. PMID:27308493

  2. Phospholipid composition of cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E J; Joseph, L; Stephens, R; Horrocks, L A

    1992-02-01

    Detailed analyses of the phospholipid compositions of cultured human endothelial cells are reported here. No significant differences were found between the phospholipid compositions of cells from human artery, saphenous and umbilical vein. However, due to the small sample sizes, relatively large standard deviations for some of the phospholipid classes were observed. A representative composition of endothelial cells is: phosphatidylcholine 36.6%, choline plasmalogen 3.7%, phosphatidylethanolamine 10.2%, ethanolamine plasmalogen 7.6%, sphingomyelin 10.8%, phosphatidylserine 7.1%, lysophosphatidylcholine 7.5%, phosphatidylinositol 3.1%, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 3.6%, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 1.8%, phosphatidic acid 1.9%, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 1.5%, and cardiolipin 1.9%. The cells possess high choline plasmalogen and lysophosphatidylethanolamine contents. The other phospholipids are within the normal biological ranges expected. Phospholipids were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and quantified by lipid phosphorus assay. PMID:1315902

  3. CLOSTRIDIUM SPORE ATTACHMENT TO HUMAN CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    PANESSA-WARREN,B.; TORTORA,G.; WARREN,J.

    1997-08-10

    This paper uses high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with a LaB6 gun and the newest commercial field emission guns, to obtain high magnification images of intact clostridial spores throughout the activation/germination/outgrowth process. By high resolution SEM, the clostridial exosporial membrane can be seen to produce numerous delicate projections (following activation), that extend from the exosporial surface to a nutritive substrate (agar), or cell surface when anaerobically incubated in the presence of human cells (embryonic fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells). Magnifications of 20,000 to 200,000Xs at accelerating voltages low enough to minimize or eliminate specimen damage (1--5 kV) have permitted the entire surface of C.sporogenes and C.difficile endospores to be examined during all stages of germination. The relationships between the spore and the agar or human cell surface were also clearly visible.

  4. An Unusual Ocular Emergency in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Kalpana Badami; Jayadev, Chaitra; Yajmaan, Soumya; Prakash, Savitha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue, one of the most common mosquito-borne flavivirus diseases affecting humans, is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Most people infected with dengue virus are asymptomatic or only have mild symptoms such as an uncomplicated fever; few have more severe features, while in a small proportion it is life-threatening. Severe dengue is defined as that associated with severe bleeding, severe organ dysfunction, or severe plasma leakage. Ophthalmic manifestations can involve both the anterior and posterior segment. We report an ocular emergency of proptosis and globe rupture in a patient with severe dengue. PMID:25371643

  5. A human gallbladder adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R T; Woods, L K; Moore, G E; McGavran, L; Quinn, L A; Semple, T U

    1981-06-01

    A continuous cell line, COLO 346, was established from a liver metastasis in a patient with adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. COLO 346 grew as an adherent monolayer of pleomorphic epithelioid cells. COLO 346 cells produced esterone, but no estradiol, progesterone, or cortisol. No adrenocorticotropic hormones, beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin, carcinoembryonic antigen, or alpha-fetoprotein production by the cells was detected. Cell doubling time was 36 h. Seven allelic isozymes were assayed. COLO 346 had a chromosome mode of 74 at 21 months postestablishment with 6 marker chromosomes present in 100% of the cells analyzed. COLO 346 has been in continuous culture for over 2 yr and is available to other investigators for their studies. PMID:7262900

  6. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  7. Neutron irradiation of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Mountford, M H; Allen, B J; Mishima, Y; Ichihashi, M; Parsons, P

    1989-01-01

    The biological characteristics and in vitro radiosensitivity of melanoma cells to thermal neutrons were investigated as a guide to the effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy. Plateau phase cultures of three human malignant melanoma-established cell lines were examined for cell density at confluence, doubling time, cell cycle parameters, chromosome constitution, and melanin content. Cell survival dose-response curves, for cells preincubated in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine. HCl (10B1-BPA), were measured over the dose range 0.6-8.0 Gy (N + gamma). The neutron fluence rate was 2.6 x 10(9) n/cm2/s and the total dose rate 3.7 Gy/h (31% gamma). Considerable differences were observed in the morphology and cellular properties of the cell lines. Two cell lines (96E and 96L) were amelanotic, and one was melanotic (418). An enhanced killing for neutron irradiation was found only for the melanotic cells after 20 h preincubation with 10 micrograms/ml 10B1-BPA. In view of the doubling times of the cell lines of about 23 h (96E and 96L) or of 36 h (418), it seems likely that an increased boron uptake, and hence increased radiosensitivity, might result if the preincubation period with 10B1-BPA is extended to several hours longer than the respective cell cycle times. PMID:2798324

  8. Cornea-infiltrating and lymph node dendritic cells contribute to CD4+ T cell expansion after herpes simplex virus-1 ocular infection.

    PubMed

    Buela, Kristine-Ann G; Hendricks, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    After HSV type 1 corneal infection, CD4(+) T cells are expanded in the draining lymph nodes (DLNs) and restimulated in the infected cornea to regulate the destructive inflammatory disease herpes stromal keratitis (HSK). The contribution of cornea resident, cornea-infiltrating, and DLN resident dendritic cells (DC) to CD4(+) T cell expansion in DLNs and restimulation in corneas is unknown. Cornea resident and cornea-infiltrating DCs were selectively depleted by timed local (subconjunctival) injection of diphtheria toxin (DT) into mice that express high-affinity DT receptors from the CD11c promoter. Corneal and DLN DCs were depleted by systemic (i.p.) DT treatment. We found that: 1) DCs that were resident in the cornea and DLNs at the time of infection or that migrate into the tissues during the first 24 h postinfection were not required for CD4(+) T cell expansion; 2) DCs that infiltrated the cornea >24 h postinfection were responsible for most of the CD4(+) T cell expansion measured in the DLNs at 3 and 7 d postinfection (dpi); 3) non-cornea-derived DCs that infiltrate the DLNs >24 h postinfection made a modest contribution to CD4(+) T cell expansion at 3 dpi but did not contribute at 7 dpi; and 4) surprisingly, HSK development between 7 and 21 dpi did not require corneal DCs. DC-independent HSK development appears to reflect close interactions of CD4(+) T cells with MHC class II(+) corneal epithelial cells and macrophages in infected DC-depleted corneas. PMID:25422507

  9. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:25520283

  10. Looking into the future: Using induced pluripotent stem cells to build two and three dimensional ocular tissue for cell therapy and disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Jae; Bharti, Kapil

    2016-05-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. In many cases the diseases originate in the homeostatic unit in the back of the eye that contains the retina, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choriocapillaris. RPE is a central and a critical component of this homeostatic unit, maintaining photoreceptor function and survival on the apical side and choriocapillaris health on the basal side. In diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD), it is thought that RPE dysfunctions cause disease-initiating events and as the RPE degenerates photoreceptors begin to die and patients start loosing vision. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived RPE provides direct access to a patient׳s genetics and allow the possibility of identifying the initiating events of RPE-associated degenerative diseases. Furthermore, iPS cell-derived RPE cells are being tested as a potential cell replacement in disease stages with RPE atrophy. In this article we summarize the recent progress in the field of iPS cell-derived RPE "disease modeling" and cell therapies and also discuss the possibilities of developing a model of the entire homeostatic unit to aid in studying disease processes in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: PSC and the brain. PMID:26706569

  11. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  12. The preservative polyquaternium-1 increases cytoxicity and NF-kappaB linked inflammation in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Paimela, Tuomas; Ryhänen, Tuomas; Kauppinen, Anu; Marttila, Liisa; Salminen, Antero

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In numerous clinical and experimental studies, preservatives present in eye drops have had detrimental effects on ocular epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to compare the cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of the preservative polyquaternium-1 (PQ-1) containing Travatan (travoprost 0.004%) and Systane Ultra eye drops with benzalkonium chloride (BAK) alone or BAK-preserved Xalatan (0.005% latanoprost) eye drops in HCE-2 human corneal epithelial cell culture. Methods HCE-2 cells were exposed to the commercial eye drops Travatan, Systane Ultra, Xalatan, and the preservative BAK. Cell viability was determined using colorimetric MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and by release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Induction of apoptosis was measured with a using a colorimetric caspase-3 assay kit. DNA binding of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor, and productions of the proinflammatory cytokines, interleukins IL-6 and IL-8, were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results Cell viability, as measured by the MTT assay, declined by up to 50% after exposure to Travatan or Systane Ultra solutions which contain 0.001% PQ-1. BAK at 0.02% rather than at 0.001% concentration evoked total cell death signs on HCE-2 cells. In addition, cell membrane permeability, as measured by LDH release, was elevated by sixfold with Travatan and by a maximum threefold with Systane Ultra. Interestingly, Travatan and Systane Ultra activated NF-κB and elevated the secretion of inflammation markers IL-6 by 3 to eightfold and IL-8 by 1.5 to 3.5 fold, respectively, as analyzed with ELISA. Conclusions Eye drops containing PQ-1 evoke cytotoxicity and enhance the NF-κB driven inflammation reaction in cultured HCE-2 cells. Our results indicate that these harmful effects of ocular solutions preserved with PQ-1 should be further evaluated in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22605930

  13. Ocular Metastatic Renal Carcinoma Presenting With Proptosis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ruju; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Fay, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic renal carcinoma is the third most common source of ocular and second most common source of orbital metastases. This is the first published case of von Hippel-Lindau (vHL) disease that developed renal cell carcinoma metastatic to an eye with a retinal hemangioblastoma. A 73-year-old woman had a history of vHL disease that included prior retinal hemangioblastomas, 2 cerebellar hemangioblastomas, and bilateral renal cell carcinomas with sacral metastasis. After presenting with progressive, painful proptosis secondary to a large mass observable by ocular CT, an enucleation-orbitotomy was performed, and the surgical specimen was sent for histopathological analysis. The ophthalmic renal metastatic tumor, like the primary tumor, was a clear cell variant that involved both the eyeball and orbit in continuity. The intraocular component was larger than the extraocular portion, which was interpreted as an outward extension of an initial retinal metastasis that probably first settled within a hemangioblastoma. Clusters of ectatic ghost vessels with thickened walls produced by periodic acid Schiff-positive, redundant basement membrane material were partially infiltrated by tumor cells at their periphery, thereby lending some support for this hypothesis. Immunohistochemical positivity for the biomarkers cytokeratin 18, vimentin, carbonic anhydrase IX, PAX2, and PAX 8 confirmed the diagnosis. The patient has refused further treatment. Her anophthalmic socket has comfortably retained a porous polyethylene implant without clinical evidence of local recurrence during 5 months of follow up. PMID:24828963

  14. Silk film biomaterials for ocular surface repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Brian David

    Current biomaterial approaches for repairing the cornea's ocular surface upon injury are partially effective due to inherent material limitations. As a result there is a need to expand the biomaterial options available for use in the eye, which in turn will help to expand new clinical innovations and technology development. The studies illustrated here are a collection of work to further characterize silk film biomaterials for use on the ocular surface. Silk films were produced from regenerated fibroin protein solution derived from the Bombyx mori silkworm cocoon. Methods of silk film processing and production were developed to produce consistent biomaterials for in vitro and in vivo evaluation. A wide range of experiments was undertaken that spanned from in vitro silk film material characterization to in vivo evaluation. It was found that a variety of silk film properties could be controlled through a water-annealing process. Silk films were then generated that could be use in vitro to produce stratified corneal epithelial cell sheets comparable to tissue grown on the clinical standard substrate of amniotic membrane. This understanding was translated to produce a silk film design that enhanced corneal healing in vivo on a rabbit injury model. Further work produced silk films with varying surface topographies that were used as a simplified analog to the corneal basement membrane surface in vitro. These studies demonstrated that silk film surface topography is capable of directing corneal epithelial cell attachment, growth, and migration response. Most notably epithelial tissue development was controllably directed by the presence of the silk surface topography through increasing cell sheet migration efficiency at the individual cellular level. Taken together, the presented findings represent a comprehensive characterization of silk film biomaterials for use in ocular surface reconstruction, and indicate their utility as a potential material choice in the

  15. Control of ocular torsion in the rotational vestibulo-ocular reflexes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard J M

    2008-01-01

    Visual stabilization of the retina during rotational head movements requires that in far vision the eyes rotate about the same axis as the head but in opposite direction with a gain close to unity (optimal strategy). To achieve this goal the vestibulo-oculomotor system must be able to independently control all three rotational degrees of freedom of the eye. Studies of the human rotational vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) have shown that its spatial characteristics are best explained by a strategy that lies halfway between the optimal image stabilization and perfect compliance with Listing's law. Here we argue that these spatial characteristics are fully compatible with an optimal strategy under the condition of a restrained gain of the torsional velocity-to-position integration. One implication of this finding is that the rotational VORs must override the default operation mode of the ocular plant that, according to recent findings, mechanically favours movements obeying Listing's law. PMID:18718301

  16. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  17. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  18. Expression Profiling of Human Schlemm's Canal Endothelial Cells From Eyes With and Without Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jingwen; Perkumas, Kristin M.; Qin, Xuejun; Hauser, Michael A.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Liu, Yutao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ocular hypertension is a major risk factor for glaucoma and the inner wall of Schlemm's canal (SC) endothelia participates in the regulation of aqueous humor outflow resistance. This study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes in primary cultures of SC cells from glaucoma patients. Methods This study examined SC samples from three glaucoma cases and four controls. Schlemm's canal cells were isolated from eight different postmortem human eyes. Total RNA was extracted, labeled, and hybridized to Illumina HumanWG-6 BeadChips containing probes for approximately 47,000 human transcripts. After extracting the data using Illumina GenomeStudio software, the data were normalized and analyzed using the R package limma in Bioconductor. Using Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER) software, gene ontology analysis of highly expressed genes was executed in controls and glaucoma groups separately. Pathway analysis was performed with differentially expressed genes using WebGestalt (WEB-based GEne SeT AnaLysis Toolkit). Selected genes were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Results Gene ontology analysis indicated similar functional categories in cases and controls. Differential analysis identified a total of 113 genes with at least 2-fold expression changes in cases. Pathway analysis indicated significant enrichment of genes in cell adhesion, heparin binding, glycosaminoglycan binding, filopodium, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Eighteen selected genes with differential expression were successfully validated using ddPCR. Conclusions This study represents the first genome-wide expression study of human primary SC cells from glaucoma patients and provides a potential list of targets regulating SC cell stiffness and pore formation, eventually the outflow resistance in glaucoma individuals. PMID:26567786

  19. Comparison of diagnostic capability of macular ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer among primary open angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal population using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and determining their functional correlation in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Nabanita; Sitaraman, Chitra; Goel, Sonu; Chakraborti, Chandana; Mukherjee, Sonai; Parashar, Hemandra

    2016-01-01

    Context: Analysis of diagnostic ability of macular ganglionic cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in glaucoma. Aim: To correlate functional and structural parameters and comparing predictive value of each of the structural parameters using Fourier-domain (FD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) among primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and ocular hypertension (OHT) versus normal population. Setting and Design: Single centric, cross-sectional study done in 234 eyes. Materials and Methods: Patients were enrolled in three groups: POAG, ocular hypertensive and normal (40 patients in each group). After comprehensive ophthalmological examination, patients underwent standard automated perimetry and FD-OCT scan in optic nerve head and ganglion cell mode. The relationship was assessed by correlating ganglion cell complex (GCC) parameters with mean deviation. Results were compared with RNFL parameters. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed with SPSS, analysis of variance, t-test, Pearson's coefficient, and receiver operating curve. Results: All parameters showed strong correlation with visual field (P < 0.001). Inferior GCC had highest area under curve (AUC) for detecting glaucoma (0.827) in POAG from normal population. However, the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.5) when compared with other parameters. None of the parameters showed significant diagnostic capability to detect OHT from normal population. In diagnosing early glaucoma from OHT and normal population, only inferior GCC had statistically significant AUC value (0.715). Conclusion: In this study, GCC and RNFL parameters showed equal predictive capability in perimetric versus normal group. In early stage, inferior GCC was the best parameter. In OHT population, single day cross-sectional imaging was not valuable. PMID:27221682

  20. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-21

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues. PMID:24002053

  1. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  2. Human embryonic stem cells: preclinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Kaushik Dilip; Sarda, Kanchan

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been extensively discussed in public and scientific communities for their potential in treating diseases and injuries. However, not much has been achieved in turning them into safe therapeutic agents. The hurdles in transforming hESCs to therapies start right with the way these cells are derived and maintained in the laboratory, and goes up-to clinical complications related to need for patient specific cell lines, gender specific aspects, age of the cells, and several post transplantation uncertainties. The different types of cells derived through directed differentiation of hESC and used successfully in animal disease and injury models are described briefly. This review gives a brief outlook on the present and the future of hESC based therapies, and talks about the technological advances required for a safe transition from laboratory to clinic. PMID:18230169

  3. PEDIATRIC OCULAR TOXOCARIASIS IN JIANGSU PROVINCE, EASTERN CHINA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Fang; Hua, Hai-Yong; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ocular toxocariasis is caused by migration of a Toxocara larva through the posterior eye. We report the first case of pediatric ocular toxocariasis caused by T. canis in Jiangsu Province, eastern China. A 6-year-old girl presented to Suzhou Municipal Children's Hospital with a complaint of right eye redness, minimal white discharge, no photophobia, eye pain, visual impairment, fever or arthralgia. She was initially diagnosed as having conjunctivitis; however, a 2-month treatment with lomefloxacin 0.3% eye drops gave no improvements. The diagnosis was made based on medical history (contact with dogs), clinical features and detection of T. canis IgG antibodies with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Anthelmintic therapy with albendazole in combination with prednisolone resulted in improvement of the ocular symptoms. Ocular toxocariasis is rarely reported in China. However, the rapid economic development in China, could mean an increase in pet dogs with the potential increased risk of contracting toxocariasis if no control measures are taken. Disposal of pet litter, deworming of infected pets, complete cooking of meats, thorough rinsing of fruits and vegetables, and good hand-washing may help prevent human infections. Ocular toxocariasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with conjunctivitis that does not resolve with treatment. PMID:26513899

  4. Ocular Dirofilariasis: A Case Series of 8 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeropoulos, Chris D.; Stefaniotou, Maria I.; Gorgoli, Konstantina E.; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy V.; Pappa, Chrysavgi N.; Paschidis, Costas A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dirofilaria repens is an endemic parasite in Mediterranean countries that mostly affects animals. Rarely, however, it can infect humans. This case series presents patients with ocular infections due to D. repens. Materials and Methods: A chart review was performed of patients with ocular dirofilariasis after the year 2000, treated at a tertiary referral centre in Greece. Data were collected on the ocular, microbiological, or/and histopathological aspects and treatment. Results: Eight cases of unilateral ocular dirofilariasis were identified, of which 5 were subconjunctival (1 masquerading as nodular scleritis) and were removed through a conjunctival incision, 2 cases were intravitreal and were removed with vitrectomy, and 1 was intraorbital (adjacent to the roof of the orbit). The latter appeared as an encapsulated mass and subsequent histological examination revealed the presence of the parasite. Of the 8 cases recorded after the year 2000, 7 appeared within the last 6 years (4 cases within the last 3 years). The majority of cases involved residents of the Ionian Islands (7 of 8 cases). Conclusions: D. repens can affect various ocular and periocular tissues. A progressive increase in the incidence of dirofilariasis was observed, which is potentially associated with climate changes in warm and moist areas where this parasite is endemic. PMID:25371636

  5. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h. PMID:26513671

  6. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  7. Statins impair glucose uptake in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowis, Dominika; Malenda, Agata; Furs, Karolina; Oleszczak, Bozenna; Sadowski, Radoslaw; Chlebowska, Justyna; Firczuk, Malgorzata; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Staruch, Adam D; Zagozdzon, Radoslaw; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Szablewski, Leszek; Golab, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the increasing number of clinical observations indicating hyperglycemic effects of statins, this study was designed to measure the influence of statins on the uptake of glucose analogs by human cells derived from liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. Design Flow cytometry and scintillation counting were used to measure the uptake of fluorescently labeled or tritiated glucose analogs by differentiated visceral preadipocytes, skeletal muscle cells, skeletal muscle myoblasts, and contact-inhibited human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A bioinformatics approach was used to predict the structure of human glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and to identify the presence of putative cholesterol-binding (cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC)) motifs within this transporter. Mutagenesis of CRAC motifs in SLC2A1 gene and limited proteolysis of membrane GLUT1 were used to determine the molecular effects of statins. Results Statins significantly inhibit the uptake of glucose analogs in all cell types. Similar effects are induced by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which removes membrane cholesterol. Statin effects can be rescued by addition of mevalonic acid, or supplementation with exogenous cholesterol. Limited proteolysis of GLUT1 and mutagenesis of CRAC motifs revealed that statins induce conformational changes in GLUTs. Conclusions Statins impair glucose uptake by cells involved in regulation of glucose homeostasis by inducing cholesterol-dependent conformational changes in GLUTs. This molecular mechanism might explain hyperglycemic effects of statins observed in clinical trials. PMID:25452863

  8. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  9. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-02-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25-30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  10. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-01-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25–30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  11. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  12. Blood-derived topical therapy for ocular surface diseases.

    PubMed

    Soni, Nishant G; Jeng, Bennie H

    2016-01-01

    Human serum-derived and plasma-derived therapies have become increasingly popular in the treatment of ocular surface disorders, with mounting clinical and scientific evidence suggesting good safety and efficacy profiles. These therapies may be considered for various ocular surface conditions, such as dry eye syndrome and persistent epithelial defect, when conservative management does not suffice. The costly and inconvenient process of obtaining the blood-derived products is the barrier to their more widespread use. Some blood-derived therapies, such as umbilical cord serum-derived and platelet-derived plasma preparations, may be more viable options since these therapies can be made readily available to patients. In this review, the existing literature on the safety and efficacy of blood-derived products, such as autologous serum tears, in the treatment of ocular surface diseases is discussed. Issues relevant to the production of autologous serum tears are also described. PMID:26178904

  13. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  14. Henipavirus pathogenesis in human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  15. Anterior eye development and ocular mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Cvekl, Aleš; Tamm, Ernst R.

    2007-01-01

    Summary During development of the anterior eye segment, cells that originate from the surface epithelium or the neuroepithelium need to interact with mesenchymal cells, which predominantly originate from the neural crest. Failures of proper interaction result in a complex of developmental disorders such Peters’ anomaly, Axenfeld-Rieger’s syndrome or aniridia. Here we review the role of transcription factors that have been identified to be involved in the coordination of anterior eye development. Among these factors is PAX6, which is active in both epithelial and mesenchymal cells during ocular development, albeit at different doses and times. We propose that PAX6 is a key element that synchronizes the complex interaction of cell types of different origin, which are all needed for proper morphogenesis of the anterior eye. We discuss several molecular mechanisms that might explain the effects of haploinsufficiency of PAX6 and other transcription factors, and the broad variation of the resulting phenotypes. PMID:15057935

  16. Clusterin in the eye: An old dog with new tricks at the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Fini, M Elizabeth; Bauskar, Aditi; Jeong, Shinwu; Wilson, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    The multifunctional protein clusterin (CLU) was first described in 1983 as a secreted glycoprotein present in ram rete testis fluid that enhanced aggregation ('clustering') of a variety of cells in vitro. It was also independently discovered in a number of other systems. By the early 1990s, CLU was known under many names and its expression had been demonstrated throughout the body, including in the eye. Its homeostatic activities in proteostasis, cytoprotection, and anti-inflammation have been well documented, however its roles in health and disease are still not well understood. CLU is prominent at fluid-tissue interfaces, and in 1996 it was demonstrated to be the most highly expressed transcript in the human cornea, the protein product being localized to the apical layers of the mucosal epithelia of the cornea and conjunctiva. CLU protein is also present in human tears. Using a preclinical mouse model for desiccating stress that mimics human dry eye disease, the authors recently demonstrated that CLU prevents and ameliorates ocular surface barrier disruption by a remarkable sealing mechanism dependent on attainment of a critical all-or-none concentration in the tears. When the CLU level drops below the critical all-or-none threshold, the barrier becomes vulnerable to desiccating stress. CLU binds selectively to the ocular surface subjected to desiccating stress in vivo, and in vitro to LGALS3 (galectin-3), a key barrier component. Positioned in this way, CLU not only physically seals the ocular surface barrier, but it also protects the barrier cells and prevents further damage to barrier structure. CLU depletion from the ocular surface epithelia is seen in a variety of inflammatory conditions in humans and mice that lead to squamous metaplasia and a keratinized epithelium. This suggests that CLU might have a specific role in maintaining mucosal epithelial differentiation, an idea that can now be tested using the mouse model for desiccating stress. Most

  17. Mutations in MAB21L2 Result in Ocular Coloboma, Microcornea and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Deml, Brett; Kariminejad, Ariana; Borujerdi, Razieh H. R.; Muheisen, Sanaa; Reis, Linda M.; Semina, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Ocular coloboma results from abnormal embryonic development and is often associated with additional ocular and systemic features. Coloboma is a highly heterogeneous disorder with many cases remaining unexplained. Whole exome sequencing from two cousins affected with dominant coloboma with microcornea, cataracts, and skeletal dysplasia identified a novel heterozygous allele in MAB21L2, c.151 C>G, p.(Arg51Gly); the mutation was present in all five family members with the disease and appeared de novo in the first affected generation of the three-generational pedigree. MAB21L2 encodes a protein similar to C. elegans mab-21 cell fate-determining factor; the molecular function of MAB21L2 is largely unknown. To further evaluate the role of MAB21L2, zebrafish mutants carrying a p.(Gln48Serfs*5) frameshift truncation (mab21l2Q48Sfs*5) and a p.(Arg51_Phe52del) in-frame deletion (mab21l2R51_F52del) were developed with TALEN technology. Homozygous zebrafish embryos from both lines developed variable lens and coloboma phenotypes: mab21l2Q48Sfs*5 embryos demonstrated severe lens and retinal defects with complete lethality while mab21l2R51_F52del mutants displayed a milder lens phenotype and severe coloboma with a small number of fish surviving to adulthood. Protein studies showed decreased stability for the human p.(Arg51Gly) and zebrafish p.(Arg51_Phe52del) mutant proteins and predicted a complete loss-of-function for the zebrafish p.(Gln48Serfs*5) frameshift truncation. Additionally, in contrast to wild-type human MAB21L2 transcript, mutant p.(Arg51Gly) mRNA failed to efficiently rescue the ocular phenotype when injected into mab21l2Q48Sfs*5 embryos, suggesting this allele is functionally deficient. Histology, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization experiments identified retinal invagination defects, an increase in cell death, abnormal proliferation patterns, and altered expression of several ocular markers in the mab21l2 mutants. These findings support the

  18. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1040 Ocular esthesiometer. (a) Identification. An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  19. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1040 Ocular esthesiometer. (a) Identification. An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  20. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1040 Ocular esthesiometer. (a) Identification. An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  1. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1040 Ocular esthesiometer. (a) Identification. An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  2. Diabetes Impairs Stem Cell and Proangiogenic Cell Mobilization in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Fadini, Gian Paolo; Albiero, Mattia; Vigili de Kreutzenberg, Saula; Boscaro, Elisa; Cappellari, Roberta; Marescotti, Mariacristina; Poncina, Nicol; Agostini, Carlo; Avogaro, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases cardiovascular risk, at least in part, through shortage of vascular regenerative cells derived from the bone marrow (BM). In experimental models, DM causes morphological and functional BM alterations, but information on BM function in human DM is missing. Herein, we sought to assay mobilization of stem and proangiogenic cells in subjects with and without DM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a prospective trial (NCT01102699), we tested BM responsiveness to 5 μg/kg human recombinant granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (hrG-CSF) in 24 individuals with DM (10 type 1 and 14 type 2) and 14 individuals without DM. Before and 24 h after hrG-CSF, we quantified circulating stem/progenitor cells and total and differential white blood cell counts. We also evaluated in vivo the proangiogenic capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the Matrigel plug assay. RESULTS In response to hrG-CSF, levels of CD34+ cells and other progenitor cell phenotypes increased in subjects without DM. Patients with DM had significantly impaired mobilization of CD34+, CD133+, and CD34+CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells and CD133+KDR+ endothelial progenitors, independently of potential confounders. The in vivo angiogenic capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells significantly increased after hrG-CSF in control subjects without DM, but not in patients with DM. DM was also associated with the inability to upregulate CD26/DPP-4 on CD34+ cells, which is required for the mobilizing effect of granulocyte colony–stimulating factor. CONCLUSIONS Stem and proangiogenic cell mobilization in response to hrG-CSF is impaired in DM, possibly because of maladaptive CD26/DPP-4 regulation. These alterations may hamper tissue repair and favor the development of cardiovascular complications. PMID:23111057

  3. Ocular and systemic adverse effects of ophthalmic and non ophthalmic medications.

    PubMed

    Izazola-Conde, C; Zamora-de la Cruz, D; Tenorio-Guajardo, G

    2011-01-01

    Information related to adverse drug effects caused by ocular medications and ocular adverse effects of systemically administered drugs has increased over the last several decades. Here we review the medical literature over the last four decades to both quantitatively and qualitatively determine the adverse effects of ocular drugs and ocular toxicity of non-ocular drugs. A systematic bibliographic review of the literature was performed with the following terms: "drug treatment", "drug therapy", "ocular adverse effects", "ocular side effects", "ocular toxicity", "systemic side effects", "systemic adverse effects", "systemic toxicity", "ocular drug" and "ophthalmic drug" using the Boolean operators or, and, not. Searches focused on: (1) Ocular side/adverse effects of ophthalmic drugs; (2) Ocular side/adverse effects of systemic drugs; (3) Systemic side/adverse effects of ophthalmic drugs. PubMed was used to perform searches. Limits included: species, human and field tag, abstract/title, dates from 01/01/1971 to 31/12/2010. A sub-selection of references was made by discarding articles that were irrelevant for the topics listed above. Adverse effects of alpha2-adrenergic agonists, beta-adrenergic antagonists, quinine derivatives and antituberculosis agents appear in the literature throughout the period of the review. Adverse effects of newer drugs such as amiodarone, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, antiepileptics, tamoxifen, and its interactions have been published principally in the last two decades. It is imperative for patient safety that knowledge of the adverse effects of drugs on the eye whether topically or systemically administered, and the possible systemic effects of drugs given as ophthalmic medications be emphasized to clinicians. PMID:22423585

  4. Primary Bioassay of Human Myeloma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, Anne; Salmon, Sydney E.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to clone primary tumors in soft agar has proven useful in the study of the kinetics and biological properties of tumor stem cells. We report the development of an in vitro assay which permits formation of colonies of human monoclonal plasma cells in soft agar. Colony growth has been observed from bone marrow aspirates from 75% of the 70 patients with multiple myeloma or related monoclonal disorders studied. Growth was induced with either 0.02 ml of human type O erythrocytes or 0.25 ml of medium conditioned by the adherent spleen cells of mineral oil-primed BALB/c mice. 5-500 colonies appeared after 2-3 wk in culture yielding a plating efficiency of 0.001-0.1%. The number of myeloma colonies was proportional to the number of cells plated between concentrations of 105-106 and back-extrapolated through zero, suggesting that colonies were clones derived from single myeloma stem cells. Morphological, histochemical, and functional criteria showed the colonies to consist of immature plasmablasts and mature plasma cells. 60-80% of cells picked from colonies contained intracytoplasmic monoclonal immunoglobulin. Colony growth was most easily achieved from the bone marrow cells of untreated patients or those in relapse. Only 50% of bone marrow samples from patients in remission were successfully cultured. Tritiated thymidine suicide studies provided evidence that for most myeloma patients, a very high proportion of myeloma colony-forming cells was actively in transit through the cell cycle. Velocity sedimentation at 1 g showed myeloma stem cells sedimented in a broad band with a peak at 13 mm/h. Antibody to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not reduce the number or size of the colonies. Increased numbers of myeloma colonies were seen when the marrow was depleted of colony-stimulating factor elaborating adherent cells before plating. This bioassay should prove useful in studying the in vitro biological behavior of certain bone marrow-derived (B)-cell

  5. How to make a human germ cell.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Paul S; Nanjappa, Manjunatha K

    2015-01-01

    How the primordial germ cell (PGC) lineage, which eventually gives rise to spermatozoa in males and oocytes in females, is established in the developing mammalian embryo has been a critical topic in both developmental and reproductive biology for many years. There have been significant breakthroughs over the past two decades in establishing both the source of PGCs and the factors that regulate the specification of this lineage in mice, [1] but our understanding of the factors that control PGC development in the human is rudimentary. The SRY-related HMG-box (SOX) family of transcription factors consists of 20 genes in humans and mice that are involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, male sexual development, and other processes. A recent paper in Cell has identified one member of this family, SOX17, as an essential factor for inducing the PGC lineage in humans. [2] Surprisingly, this protein does not appear to have a role in PGC specification in mice. This work not only introduces a new and important player to the field of germ cell specification, but also emphasizes the uniqueness of human PGC development compared to more extensively studied mouse models. PMID:25791734

  6. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  7. Hypercholesterolemia-induced ocular disorder: Ameliorating role of phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I H; Elmansi, Ahmed A; Bakr, Eman H M

    2015-01-01

    The ocular region is a complex structure that allows conscious light perception and vision. It is of ecto-mesodermal origin. Cholesterol and polyunsaturated fatty acids are involved in retinal cell function; however, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes impair its function. Retinal damage, neovascularization, and cataracts are the main complications of cholesterol overload. Dietary supplementation of selected plant products can lead to the scavenging of free reactive oxygen species, thereby protecting the ocular regions from the damage of hypercholesterolemia. This review illustrates the dramatic effects of increased cholesterol levels on the ocular regions. The effect of phytotherapy is discussed in relation to the different regions of the eye, including the retina, cornea, and lens. PMID:26429651

  8. Liposomes as a potential ocular delivery system of distamycin A.

    PubMed

    Chetoni, Patrizia; Monti, Daniela; Tampucci, Silvia; Matteoli, Barbara; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca; Subissi, Alessando; Burgalassi, Susi

    2015-08-15

    Liposomes containing Distamycin A (DA) may be clinically useful in the treatment of ocular HSV infections, especially in acyclovir-resistant HSV keratitis. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo performance of a topical controlled release liposomal formulation containing DA (DA-Lipo) aimed at reducing the toxicity of the encapsulated active agent and improving drug uptake by ocular tissues. The bioavailability of DA in the tear fluid and the DA uptake into the cornea were increased after instillation of DA-Lipo in rabbits, reaching the DA corneal concentration corresponding to IC50 values against HSV without any sign of transcorneal permeation of drug. DA-Lipo was definitely less cytotoxic then plain DA in rabbit corneal epithelial cells. These results provide new insights into the correlation between the in vitro data and the drug kinetics following ocular applications of liposomal vesicles. PMID:26183332

  9. Air bags and ocular injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, J D; Jaeger, E A; Jeffers, J B

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: This investigation retrospectively examined ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment to gain a better appreciation of potential risk factors in motor vehicle accidents. National statistics regarding the efficacy of air bags were reviewed. METHODS: Review of the literature from 1991 to 1998 identified 44 articles describing 97 patients with air-bag-induced ocular injuries. Variables extracted from each case were age, sex, height, position in the car, eye wear, vehicle impact speed, visual acuity, and specific ocular injuries. RESULTS: Corneal abrasions occurred in 49% of occupants, hyphemas in 43%, vitreous or retinal hemorrhages in 25%, and retinal tears or detachments in 15%. The globe was ruptured in 10 patients. Patients involved in higher-speed accidents (over 30 mph) sustained a greater percentage of vitreous or retinal hemorrhages and traumatic cataracts, while those at slower speeds were more prone to retinal tears or detachments. In a subset of 14 patients with serious ocular injuries, the impact speed of 11 patients was recorded at 30 mph or less. Slower speed may be a risk factor for some ocular injuries. Occupant height was not a significant factor. National statistics confirm that air bags reduce fatalities in motor vehicle accidents. However, children sitting in the front seat without a seat belt and infants in passenger-side rear-facing car seats are at risk for fatal injury. CONCLUSION: Air bags combined with seat belts are an effective means of reducing injury and death in adults during motor vehicle accidents. However, this study has documented a wide variety of ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment. It is hoped that researchers can develop modifications that continue to save lives while minimizing additional harm. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C FIGURE 2D FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:10703118

  10. Genome Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cory; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), defined by their capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into all cell types, are an integral tool for basic biological research and disease modeling. However, full use of PSCs for research and regenerative medicine requires the ability to precisely edit their DNA to correct disease-causing mutations and for functional analysis of genetic variations. Recent advances in DNA editing of human stem cells (including PSCs) have benefited from the use of designer nucleases capable of making double-strand breaks (DSBs) at specific sequences that stimulate endogenous DNA repair. The clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has become the preferred designer nuclease for genome editing in human PSCs and other cell types. Here we describe the principles for designing a single guide RNA to uniquely target a gene of interest and describe strategies for disrupting, inserting, or replacing a specific DNA sequence in human PSCs. The improvements in efficiency and ease provided by these techniques allow individuals to precisely engineer PSCs in a way previously limited to large institutes and core facilities. PMID:27037079

  11. [Lymphoma of Ocular and Periocular Tissues - Clinicopathological Correlations].

    PubMed

    Schmack, I; Grossniklaus, H E; Hartmann, S

    2016-07-01

    Lymphomas of the ocular adnexa and intraocular tissue include a wide range of lymphoproliferative neoplastic disorders. They are predominantly extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of lymphoid neoplasm and individual morphological, immunophenotypical, and molecular genetic features, indicate that they may be divided into B-cell (approximately 80 % of all NHL) and T-cell lymphomas (approximately 10-20 % of all NHL). The most common forms of ocular NHL are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (EMZL) of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT-type), follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and mantel cell lymphoma. The clinical signs and symptoms are usually very unspecific and depend on the location, size, and extent of the underlying lymphoma subtype. Typical low grade lymphomas have an indolent clinical course and often remain unrecognized for many years. On the other hand, high grade NHLs, such as DLBCL or MCL, are frequently aggressive, with rapid tumour growth and poor prognosis, despite early detection. Histopathology is still the gold standard in the diagnosis of ocular lymphomas. Basic understanding of the principal pathophysiological and clinical aspects of the development and progression of orbital and ocular lymphomas seems to be mandatory for optimal diagnosis and treatment and for improving survival and prognosis. Both residents in training and board certified ophthalmologists should be aware of these problems. PMID:27468099

  12. Identification of novel molecular markers through transcriptomic analysis in human fetal and adult corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinyin; Huang, Kevin; Nakatsu, Martin N; Xue, Zhigang; Deng, Sophie X; Fan, Guoping

    2013-04-01

    The corneal endothelium is composed of a monolayer of corneal endothelial cells (CECs), which is essential for maintaining corneal transparency. To better characterize CECs in different developmental stages, we profiled mRNA transcriptomes in human fetal and adult corneal endothelium with the goal to identify novel molecular markers in these cells. By comparing CECs with 12 other tissue types, we identified 245 and 284 signature genes that are highly expressed in fetal and adult CECs, respectively. Functionally, these genes are enriched in pathways characteristic of CECs, including inorganic anion transmembrane transporter, extracellular matrix structural constituent and cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor activity. Importantly, several of these genes are disease target genes in hereditary corneal dystrophies, consistent with their functional significance in CEC physiology. We also identified stage-specific markers associated with CEC development, such as specific members in the transforming growth factor beta and Wnt signaling pathways only expressed in fetal, but not in adult CECs. Lastly, by the immunohistochemistry of ocular tissues, we demonstrated the unique protein localization for Wnt5a, S100A4, S100A6 and IER3, the four novel markers for fetal and adult CECs. The identification of a new panel of stage-specific markers for CECs would be very useful for characterizing CECs derived from stem cells or ex vivo expansion for cell replacement therapy. PMID:23257286

  13. Gemcitabine induces cell senescence in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-26

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) commonly require chemotherapy because they frequently develop metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors. Gemcitabine, an analogue of cytosine arabinoside, is commonly used for PDAC treatment. We observed that gemcitabine induced senescence phenotypes characterized by enhanced senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal) staining and increased expression of senescence-associated molecules in two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, Miapaca-2 and Panc-1, which exhibit resistance to gemcitabine but not L3.pl cells with a high sensitivity to gemcitabine. Gemcitabine-induced cell senescence can be inhibited by reactive oxygen species inhibitor, N-acetyl cysteine. Although gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression, anti-CXCL8 antibody failed to reduce gemcitabine-induced increases in SA β-Gal-positive cell numbers. These observations would indicate that cell senescence can proceed independently of CXCL8 expression, a characteristic feature of senescence-associated secretion phenotype. PMID:27311854

  14. Excipients of preservative-free latanoprost induced inflammatory response and cytotoxicity in immortalized human HCE-2 corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Smedowski, Adrian; Paterno, Jussi J.; Toropainen, Elisa; Sinha, Debasish; Wylegala, Edward; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Various preservative-free eye drop formulations for glaucoma treatment have been marketed intending to decrease ocular surface side effects and improve tolerability. However, preservative-free eye drops including different solubilizers to dissolve the antiglaucoma drugs may induce detrimental effects in the eye. In this study, we exposed human corneal epithelial cells (HCE-2) for 1, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours to the first preservative-free (PF) tafluprost (Taflotan®), the recently-launched preservative-free (PF) latanoprost (Monoprost®), preservative benzalkonium chloride (BAK) and the excipient macrogolglycerol hydroxystearate 40 (MGHS40) using dilutions 0.1%, 0.3%, 1.0%, 3.0% and 10.0% of the original products. The cells also were exposed to undiluted PF tafluprost and PF latanoprost once a day for 9 days. Cellular morphology was examined by light microscopy and cell proliferation by Ki-67 fluorescent staining with cell viability being determined by erythrosine staining and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Mitochondrial metabolic activity was evaluated with the colorimetric MTT assay. The secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) was measured with ELISA. HCE-2 cells displayed no significant morphological changes after PF tafluprost treatment, but PF latanoprost caused clear cell loss. Moreover, PF latanoprost, BAK and MGHS40 evoked cellular damage and inflammation with increasing concentrations and time. Furthermore, undiluted daily PF latanoprost application significantly increased LDH release and IL-6 secretion as compared to PF tafluprost. MGHS40 was observed to be associated with the toxicity of PF latanoprost. Excipients in ocular drops should receive more attention in the future, since they seem to trigger similar detrimental effects in cells as preservatives. PMID:25530926

  15. Topical administration of a suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) mimetic peptide inhibits ocular inflammation and mitigates ocular pathology during mouse uveitis.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Sun, Lin; Mahdi, Rashid M; Larkin, Joseph; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2015-08-01

    Uveitis is a diverse group of potentially sight-threatening intraocular inflammatory diseases and pathology derives from sustained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the optical axis. Although topical or systemic steroids are effective therapies, their adverse effects preclude prolonged usage and are impetus for seeking alternative immunosuppressive agents, particularly for patients with refractory uveitis. In this study, we synthesized a 16 amino acid membrane-penetrating lipophilic suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 peptide (SOCS1-KIR) that inhibits JAK/STAT signaling pathways and show that it suppresses and ameliorates experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), the mouse model of human uveitis. Fundus images, histological and optical coherence tomography analysis of eyes showed significant suppression of clinical disease, with average clinical score of 0.5 compared to 2.0 observed in control mice treated with scrambled peptide. We further show that SOCS1-KIR conferred protection from ocular pathology by inhibiting the expansion of pathogenic Th17 cells and inhibiting trafficking of inflammatory cells into the neuroretina during EAU. Dark-adapted scotopic and photopic electroretinograms further reveal that SOCS1-KIR prevented decrement of retinal function, underscoring potential neuroprotective effects of SOCS1-KIR in uveitis. Importantly, SOCS1-KIR is non-toxic, suggesting that topical administration of SOCS1-Mimetics can be exploited as a non-invasive treatment for uveitis and for limiting cytokine-mediated pathology in other ocular inflammatory diseases including scleritis. PMID:26094775

  16. N-3-pyridylmethyl-N'-p-nitrophenylurea ocular toxicity in man and rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Mindel, J S; Kharlamb, A B; Friedman, A H; Karam, J H; Stone, R D; Siegel, I M

    1988-01-01

    Ingestion of the rat poison N-3-pyridylmethyl-N'-p-nitrophenylurea (PNU) produced ocular toxicity in three humans and in an animal model, the Dutch Belted rabbit. The electroretinogram b wave was especially susceptible to the effects of the rodenticide, and the target tissue appeared to be the retinal pigment epithelium. Injection of PNU itself did not produce ocular toxicity. The poison had to be administered orally. Gentamicin administered orally with PNU prevented the ocular toxicity. Presumably this antibiotic killed those gastrointestinal bacteria responsible for PNU's metabolism into an ocular toxin. L-tryptophan, a known antidote for the lethal effects of PNU, was an antidote for the ocular toxicity when administered orally but not when administered parenterally. Images PMID:3415952

  17. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects. PMID:27357302

  18. Cloning of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Walls, G. A.; Twentyman, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    We have carried out a comparison of two different methods for cloning human lung cancer cells. The method of Courtenay & Mills (1978) generally gave higher plating efficiencies (PE) than the method of Carney et al. (1980). The number of colonies increased with incubation time in both methods and the weekly medium replenishment in the Courtenay method was advantageous for longer incubation times of several weeks. In the Courtenay method, the use of August rat red blood cells (RBC) and low oxygen tension were both found to be necessary factors for maximum plating efficiency. The usefulness of heavily irradiated feeder cells in improving PE is less certain; each cell type may have its own requirement. PMID:3904799

  19. Differentiation of human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs).

    PubMed

    Juelke, Kerstin; Romagnani, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    During the last years, a high complexity in innate lymphoid lineages now collectively referred to as innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) has been revealed. ILCs can be grouped according to their effector functions and transcriptional requirements into three main groups, termed group 1, 2 and 3 ILCs. The differentiation of ILC lineages from hematopoietic precursors and the molecular switches guiding their developmental fate have started to be characterized both in mice and humans. In this review, we discuss the origin, differentiation stages and plasticity of human ILC subsets as well as the signals that drive ILC lineage commitment and acquisition of their unique effector programs. PMID:26707651

  20. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ocular esthesiometer. 886.1040 Section 886.1040...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1040 Ocular esthesiometer. (a) Identification. An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  1. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  2. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  3. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  4. Asymptomatic HLA-A*02:01–Restricted Epitopes from Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells from Seropositive Asymptomatic Individuals and Protect HLA Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Dervillez, Xavier; Qureshi, Huma; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Khan, Arif A.; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Yu, David C.; Diaz, Oscar R.; Gottimukkala, Chetan; Kalantari, Mina; Villacres, Maria C.; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; McKinney, Denise M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from C57BL/6 mice suggests that CD8+ T cells, specific to the immunodominant HSV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) H-2b–restricted epitope (gB498–505), protect against ocular herpes infection and disease. However, the possible role of CD8+ T cells, specific to HLA-restricted gB epitopes, in protective immunity seen in HSV-1–seropositive asymptomatic (ASYMP) healthy individuals (who have never had clinical herpes) remains to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01–restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes from the HSV-1 gB amino acid sequence. Six of these epitopes exhibited high-affinity binding to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In 10 sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01–positive, HSV-1–seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust, and polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer, IFN-γ-ELISPOT, CFSE proliferation, CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation, and multiplex cytokine assays, were directed mainly against epitopes gB342–350 and gB561–569. In contrast, in 10 HLA-A*02:01–positive, HSV-1–seropositive symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent clinical herpes disease) frequent, but less robust, CD8+ T cell responses were directed mainly against nonoverlapping epitopes (gB183–191 and gB441–449). ASYMP individuals had a significantly higher proportion of HSV-gB–specific CD8+ T cells expressing CD107a/b degranulation marker and producing effector cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α than did SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of a novel herpes-susceptible HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model with ASYMP epitopes, but not with SYMP epitopes, induced strong CD8+ T cell–dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. These findings should guide the development of a safe and effective T cell–based herpes vaccine. PMID:24101547

  5. Effects of Sex Hormones on Ocular Surface Epithelia: Lessons Learned From Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Moretti, Costanzo; Macchi, Ilaria; Massaro-Giordano, Giacomina; Cozzupoli, Grazia Maria; Lambiase, Alessandro; Bonini, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality in women of reproductive age. Although its clinical consequences have been known for a long time to extend beyond the reproductive system, with type-2 diabetes and obesity being the most common, the involvement of the ocular surface in PCOS has been described only more recently. The ocular surface is a morphofunctional unit comprising eyelid margin, tear film, cornea, and conjunctiva. Increasing evidence indicates that these structures are under a sex hormone control and relevant diseases such as ocular allergy and dry eye are often caused by alterations in circulating or local steroid hormones levels. Novel treatments targeting sex hormone receptors on ocular surface epithelial cells are also being developed. In this review we aim to describe the current knowledge on the effects of sex hormones at the ocular surface, with a special focus on the effects of androgen imbalance in PCOS. PMID:26491950

  6. Development of a Curved, Stratified, In Vitro Model to Assess Ocular Biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Postnikoff, Cameron K.; Pintwala, Robert; Williams, Sara; Wright, Ann M.; Hileeto, Denise; Gorbet, Maud B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To further improve in vitro models of the cornea, this study focused on the creation of a three-dimensional, stratified, curved epithelium; and the subsequent characterization and evaluation of its suitability as a model for biocompatibility testing. Methods Immortalized human corneal epithelial cells were grown to confluency on curved cellulose filters for seven days, and were then differentiated and stratified using an air-liquid interface for seven days before testing. Varying concentrations of a commercial ophthalmic solution containing benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a known cytotoxic agent, and two relevant ocular surfactants were tested on the model. A whole balafilcon A lens soaked in phosphate buffered saline (BA PBS) was also used to assess biocompatibility and verify the validity of the model. Viability assays as well as flow cytometry were performed on the cells to investigate changes in cell death and integrin expression. Results The reconstructed curved corneal epithelium was composed of 3–5 layers of cells. Increasing concentrations of BAK showed dose-dependent decreased cell viability and increased integrin expression and cell death. No significant change in viability was observed in the presence of the surfactants. As expected, the BA PBS combination appeared to be very biocompatible with no adverse change in cell viability or integrin expression. Conclusions The stratified, curved, epithelial model proved to be sensitive to distinct changes in cytotoxicity and is suitable for continued assessment for biocompatibility testing of contact lenses. Our results showed that flow cytometry can provide a quantitative measure of the cell response to biomaterials or cytotoxic compounds for both the supernatant and adherent cell populations. As a specifically designed in vitro model of the corneal epithelium, this quantitative model for biocompatibility at the ocular surface may help improve our understanding of cell-material interactions and reduce

  7. The first recombinant human coagulation factor VIII of human origin: human cell line and manufacturing characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Casademunt, Elisabeth; Martinelle, Kristina; Jernberg, Mats; Winge, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Maya; Biesert, Lothar; Knaub, Sigurd; Walter, Olaf; Schröder, Carola

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Since the early 1990s, recombinant human clotting factor VIII (rhFVIII) produced in hamster cells has been available for haemophilia A treatment. However, the post-translational modifications of these proteins are not identical to those of native human FVIII, which may lead to immunogenic reactions and the development of inhibitors against rhFVIII. For the first time, rhFVIII produced in a human host cell line is available. Aim We describe here the establishment of the first human production cell line for rhFVIII and the manufacturing process of this novel product. Methods and results A human cell line expressing rhFVIII was derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 F cells transfected with an FVIII expression plasmid. No virus or virus-like particles could be detected following extensive testing. The stringently controlled production process is completely free from added materials of animal or human origin. Multistep purification employing a combination of filtration and chromatography steps ensures the efficient removal of impurities. Solvent/detergent treatment and a 20 nm pore size nanofiltration step, used for the first time in rhFVIII manufacturing, efficiently eliminate any hypothetically present viruses. In contrast to hamster cell-derived products, this rhFVIII product does not contain hamster-like epitopes, which might be expected to be immunogenic. Conclusions HEK 293 F cells, whose parental cell line HEK 293 has been used by researchers for decades, are a suitable production cell line for rhFVIII and will help avoid immunogenic epitopes. A modern manufacturing process has been developed to ensure the highest level of purity and pathogen safety. PMID:22690791

  8. Characterization of Human Astrovirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Ernesto; Muñoz-Yañez, Claudia; Sánchez-San Martín, Claudia; Aguirre-Crespo, Gabriela; Baños-Lara, M. del Rocio; Gutierrez, Michelle; Espinosa, Rafaela; Acevedo, Yunuén; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Human astroviruses (HAstV) are a frequent cause of gastroenteritis in young children and immunocompromised patients. To understand the early steps of HAstV infection in the highly permissive Caco-2 cell line, the binding and entry processes of the virus were characterized. The half-time of virus binding to the cell surface was about 10 min, while virus decapsidation took around 130 min. Drugs affecting clathrin-mediated endocytosis, endosome acidification, and actin filament polymerization, as well as those that reduce the presence of cholesterol in the cell membrane, decreased the infectivity of the virus. The infection was also reduced by silencing the expression of the clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by RNA interference or by overexpression of dominant-negative mutants of dynamin 2 and Eps15. Furthermore, the entry of HAstV apparently depends on the maturation of endosomes, since the infection was reduced by silencing the expression of Rab7, a small GTPase involved in the early- to late-endosome maturation. Altogether, our results suggest that HAstV enters Caco-2 cells using a clathrin-dependent pathway and reaches late endosomes to enter cells. Here, we have characterized the mechanism used by human astroviruses, important agents of gastroenteritis in children, to gain entry into their host cells. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic tools, we found that these viruses enter Caco-2 cells using a clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway, where they most likely need to travel to late endosomes to reach the cytoplasm and begin their replication cycle. PMID:24335315

  9. Inner Ear Hair Cell-Like Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  10. Inner ear hair cell-like cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo; Heller, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  11. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  12. Immortalization of human myogenic progenitor cell clone retaining multipotentiality

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Naohiro . E-mail: nao@nils.go.jp; Kiyono, Tohru; Wada, Michiko R.; Shimizu, Shirabe; Yasumoto, Shigeru; Inagawa, Masayo

    2006-10-06

    Human myogenic cells have limited ability to proliferate in culture. Although forced expression of telomerase can immortalize some cell types, telomerase alone delays senescence of human primary cultured myogenic cells, but fails to immortalize them. In contrast, constitutive expression of both telomerase and the E7 gene from human papillomavirus type 16 immortalizes primary human myogenic cells. We have established an immortalized primary human myogenic cell line preserving multipotentiality by ectopic expression of telomerase and E7. The immortalized human myogenic cells exhibit the phenotypic characteristics of their primary parent, including an ability to undergo myogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic terminal differentiation under appropriate culture conditions. The immortalized cells will be useful for both basic and applied studies aimed at human muscle disorders. Furthermore, immortalization by transduction of telomerase and E7 represents a useful method by which to expand human myogenic cells in vitro without compromising their ability to differentiate.

  13. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for rosmarinic acid ocular delivery--In vitro tests.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sara Baptista; Ferreira, Domingos; Pintado, Manuela; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    In this study, chitosan nanoparticles were used to encapsulate antioxidant rosmarinic acid, Salvia officinalis (sage) and Satureja montana (savory) extracts as rosmarinic acid natural vehicles. The nanoparticles were prepared by ionic gelation using chitosan and sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) in a mass ratio of 7:1, at pH 5.8. Particle size distribution analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the size ranging from 200 to 300 nm, while surface charge of nanoparticles ranged from 20 to 30 mV. Nanoparticles demonstrate to be safe without relevant cytotoxicity against retina pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) and human cornea cell line (HCE-T). The permeability study in HCE monolayer cell line showed an apparent permeability coefficient Papp of 3.41±0.99×10(-5) and 3.24±0.79×10(-5) cm/s for rosmarinic acid loaded chitosan nanoparticles and free in solution, respectively. In ARPE-19 monolayer cell line the Papp was 3.39±0.18×10(-5) and 3.60±0.05×10(-5) cm/s for rosmarinic acid loaded chitosan nanoparticles and free in solution, respectively. Considering the mucin interaction method, nanoparticles indicate mucoadhesive proprieties suggesting an increased retention time over the ocular mucosa after instillation. These nanoparticles may be promising drug delivery systems for ocular application in oxidative eye conditions. PMID:26645149

  14. Therapeutical Management for Ocular Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    López-Valverde, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Pablo-Júlvez, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a case of ocular rosacea with a very complex evolution. Rosacea is a chronic dermatological disease that may affect the ocular structures up to 6-72% of all cases. This form is often misdiagnosed, which may lead to long inflammatory processes with important visual consequences for affected patients. Therefore, an early diagnosis and an adequate treatment are important. Methods We report the case of a 43-year-old patient who had several relapses of what seemed an episode of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Two weeks later, he developed a corneal ulcer with a torpid evolution including abundant intrastromal infiltrators and calcium deposits. He was diagnosed with ocular rosacea and treated with systemic doxycycline and topical protopic. Results A coating with amniotic membrane was placed in order to heal the ulcer, but a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty to restore the patient's vision because of the corneal transparency loss was necessary. Conclusions Ocular rosacea includes multiple ophthalmic manifestations ranging from inflammation of the eyelid margin and blepharitis to serious corneal affectations. A delayed diagnosis can result in chronic inflammatory conditions including keratinization and loss of corneal transparency, which lead to important visual sequelae for affected patients. PMID:27462249

  15. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Lessons from Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    • A new attention to post-natally acquired infections. Previously, most attention was focused on infection during pregnancy, and the risk of congenital disease, with the feeling that infection in older individuals was benign, without a substantial risk of disease morbidity, such as ocular involvemen...

  16. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  17. Ocular manifestations of feline viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Feline viral diseases are common and cats can be presented with a variety of clinical manifestations. Ocular disease associated with viral pathogens is not unusual, particularly with viruses causing upper respiratory tract disease in cats, such as feline herpesvirus type 1 and feline calicivirus. These agents mainly cause ocular surface disease. Other viruses, such as feline immunodeficiency virus and feline coronavirus, can cause uveitis, while feline leukemia virus can induce ocular lymphosarcoma. This review covers the most common viral pathogens of cats that cause ocular manifestations, the specific features of the ocular diseases caused by these viruses and therapeutic recommendations. PMID:24461645

  18. Proteoglycans from human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Griesmacher, A; Hennes, R; Keller, R; Greiling, H

    1987-10-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with [35S]sulphate and investigated for their proteoglycan production. By gel chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and CsCl density-gradient centrifugation we obtained preparative amounts of the endothelial proteoheparan sulphate HSI and of proteochondroitin sulphate from the conditioned medium of mass-cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Approximately 90% of the 35S-labeled material in the endothelial cell conditioned medium was proteochondroitin sulphate. This molecule, with a molecular mass of 180-200 kDa, contains four side-chains of 35-40 kDa and a core protein of 35-40 kDa. Two proteoheparan sulphate forms (HSI and HSII) from the conditioned medium were distinguished by molecular mass and transport kinetics from the cell layer to the medium in pulse-chase experiments. One major form (HSI), with an approximate molecular mass of 160-200 kDa a core protein of 55-60 kDa and three to four polysaccharide side-chains of 35 kDa each, was found enriched in the cellular membrane pellet. Another proteoheparan sulphate (HSII), with polysaccharide moieties of 20 kDa, is enriched in the subendothelial matrix (substratum). PMID:2959475

  19. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: adjuvants for human cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Robb; Betancur, Monica; Boissel, Laurent; Tuncer, Hande; Cetrulo, Curtis; Klingemann, Hans

    2007-12-01

    The Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord is rich in mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) that fulfill the criteria for MSCs. Here we describe a novel, simple method of obtaining and cryopreserving UC-MSCs by extracting the Wharton's jelly from a small piece of cord, followed by mincing the tissue and cryopreserving it in autologous cord plasma to prevent exposure to allogeneic or animal serum. This direct freezing of cord microparticles without previous culture expansion allows the processing and freezing of umbilical cord blood (UCB) and UC-MSCs from the same individual on the same day on arrival in the laboratory. UC-MSCs produce significant concentrations of hematopoietic growth factors in culture and augment hematopoietic colony formation when co-cultured with UCB mononuclear cells. Mice undergoing transplantation with limited numbers of human UCB cells or CD34(+) selected cells demonstrated augmented engraftment when UC-MSCs were co-transplanted. We also explored whether UC-MSCs could be further manipulated by transfection with plasmid-based vectors. Electroporation was used to introduce cDNA and mRNA constructs for GFP into the UC-MSCs. Transfection efficiency was 31% for cDNA and 90% for mRNA. These data show that UC-MSCs represent a reliable, easily accessible, noncontroversial source of MSCs. They can be prepared and cryopreserved under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions and are able to enhance human hematopoietic engraftment in SCID mice. Considering their cytokine production and their ability to be easily transfected with plasmid-based vectors, these cells should have broad applicability in human cell-based therapies. PMID:18022578

  20. Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Hauch, Kip; Xu, Chunhui; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The muscle lost after a myocardial infarction is replaced with non-contractile scar tissue, often initiating heart failure. Whole-organ cardiac transplantation is the only currently available clinical means of replacing the lost muscle, but this option is limited by the inadequate supply of donor hearts. Thus, cell-based cardiac repair has attracted considerable interest as an alternative means of ameliorating cardiac injury. Because of their tremendous capacity for expansion and unquestioned cardiac potential, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an attractive candidate cell source for obtaining cardiomyocytes and other useful mesenchymal cell types for such therapies. hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) exhibit a committed cardiac phenotype and robust proliferative capacity, and recent testing in rodent infarct models indicates that they can partially remuscularize injured hearts and improve contractile function. Although the latter successes give good reason for optimism, considerable challenges remain to the successful application of hESCs to cardiac repair, including the need for preparations of high cardiac purity, improved methods of delivery, and approaches to overcome immune rejection and other causes of graft cell death. This review will describe the phenotype of hESC-CMs and preclinical experience with these cells and will consider strategies to overcoming the aforementioned challenges. PMID:18657407

  1. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  2. Imaging human retinal pigment epithelium cells using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, but are often compromised in ageing and major ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, and while biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. We present a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with adaptive optics (AO) that overcomes the associated technical obstacles. The method takes advantage of the 3D resolution of AO-OCT, but more critically sub-cellular segmentation and registration that permit organelle motility to be used as a novel contrast mechanism. With this method, we successfully visualized RPE cells and characterized their 3D reflectance profile in every subject and retinal location (3° and 7° temporal to the fovea) imaged to date. We have quantified RPE packing geometry in terms of cell density, cone-to-RPE ratio, and number of nearest neighbors using Voronoi and power spectra analyses. RPE cell density (cells/mm2) showed no significant difference between 3° (4,892+/-691) and 7° (4,780+/-354). In contrast, cone-to- RPE ratio was significantly higher at 3° (3.88+/-0.52:1) than 7° (2.31+/- 0.23:1). Voronoi analysis also showed most RPE cells have six nearest neighbors, which was significantly larger than the next two most prevalent associations: five and seven. Averaged across the five subjects, prevalence of cells with six neighbors was 51.4+/-3.58% at 3°, and 54.58+/-3.01% at 7°. These results are consistent with histology and in vivo studies using other imaging modalities.

  3. Eye movements between saccades: Measuring ocular drift and tremor.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hee-Kyoung; Snodderly, D Max; Poletti, Martina

    2016-05-01

    Intersaccadic periods of fixation are characterized by incessant retinal motion due to small eye movements. While these movements are often disregarded as noise, the temporal modulations they introduce to retinal receptors are significant. However, analysis of these input modulations is challenging because the intersaccadic eye motion is close to the resolution limits of most eyetrackers, including widespread pupil-based video systems. Here, we analyzed in depth the limits of two high-precision eyetrackers, the Dual-Purkinje Image and the scleral search coil, and compared the intersaccadic eye movements of humans to those of a non-human primate. By means of a model eye we determined that the resolution of both techniques is sufficient to reliably measure intersaccadic ocular activity up to approximately 80Hz. Our results show that the characteristics of ocular drift are remarkably similar in the two species; a clear deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum occurs in the range between 50 and 100Hz, generally attributed to ocular tremor, leading to intersaccadic retinal speeds as high as 1.5deg/s. The amplitude of this deviation differs on the two axes of motion. In addition to our experimental observations, we suggest basic guidelines to evaluate the performance of eyetrackers and to optimize experimental conditions for the measurement of ocular drift and tremor. PMID:27068415

  4. Human proximal tubule cells form functional microtissues.

    PubMed

    Prange, Jenny A; Bieri, Manuela; Segerer, Stephan; Burger, Charlotte; Kaech, Andres; Moritz, Wolfgang; Devuyst, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial cells lining the proximal tubules of the kidney mediate complex transport processes and are particularly vulnerable to drug toxicity. Drug toxicity studies are classically based on two-dimensional cultures of immortalized proximal tubular cells. Such immortalized cells are dedifferentiated, and lose transport properties (including saturable endocytic uptake) encountered in vivo. Generating differentiated, organotypic human microtissues would potentially alleviate these limitations and facilitate drug toxicity studies. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of kidney microtissues from immortalized (HK-2) and primary (HRPTEpiC) human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells under well-defined conditions. Microtissue cultures were done in hanging drop GravityPLUS™ culture plates and were characterized for morphology, proliferation and differentiation markers, and by monitoring the endocytic uptake of albumin. Kidney microtissues were successfully obtained by co-culturing HK-2 or HRPTEpiC cells with fibroblasts. The HK-2 microtissues formed highly proliferative, but dedifferentiated microtissues within 10 days of culture, while co-culture with fibroblasts yielded spherical structures already after 2 days. Low passage HRPTEpiC microtissues (mono- and co-culture) were less proliferative and expressed tissue-specific differentiation markers. Electron microscopy evidenced epithelial differentiation markers including microvilli, tight junctions, endosomes, and lysosomes in the co-cultured HRPTEpiC microtissues. The co-cultured HRPTEpiC microtissues showed specific uptake of albumin that could be inhibited by cadmium and gentamycin. In conclusion, we established a reliable hanging drop protocol to obtain functional kidney microtissues with proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. These microtissues could be used for high-throughput drug and toxicology screenings, with endocytosis as a functional readout. PMID:26676951

  5. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVC)

    PubMed Central

    Zebardast, Nazlee; Lickorish, David

    2010-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) have recently been employed in the clinical treatment of challenging skin defects. We have described an MSC population that can be easily harvested from human umbilical cord perivascular tissue, human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVC), which exhibit a higher proliferative rate and frequency than hBM-MSC. Our objective was to establish whether HUCPVC could promote healing of full thickness murine skin defects, and thus find utility as a cell source for dermal repair. To this end, bilateral full thickness defects were created on the dorsum of Balb/c nude mice. Fibrin was used as delivery vehicle for 1 × 106 PKH67-labeled HUCPVC with contralateral controls receiving fibrin only. Epifluorescent and brightfield microscopic evaluation of the wound site was carried out at 3 and 7 days while mechanical testing of wounds was carried out at 3, 7 and 10 days. Our results show that by 3 days, marked contraction of the wound was observed in the fibrin controls whilst the HUCPVC samples exhibited neither collapse nor contraction of the defect, and the dermal repair tissue was considerably thicker and more organized. By 7 days, complete re-epithelialization of the HUCPVC wounds was observed whilst in the controls re-epithelialization was limited to the wound margins. Wound strength was significantly increased in the HUCPVC treatment group by 3 and 7 days but no statistical difference was seen at 10 days. We conclude that HUCPVCs accelerate early wound healing in full thickness skin defects and thus represent a putative source of human MSCs for use in dermal tissue engineering. PMID:21220956

  6. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Guidelines apply to the expenditure of NIH funds for research using human embryonic stem cells and certain uses of human induced pluripotent stem cells. The Guidelines are based on the principles that responsible research with human embryonic stem cells has the potential to improve our understanding of...

  7. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well.

    PubMed

    Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-06-01

    In this issue, Chung et al. (2014) generate human embryonic stem cells by fusing an adult somatic cell to a previously enucleated human oocyte, in agreement with recent reports by the Mitalipov and Egli groups. We can now safely say that human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well. PMID:24905159

  8. Haploinsufficient Bmp4 ocular phenotypes include anterior segment dysgenesis with elevated intraocular pressure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo; Smith, Richard S; Peters, Maureen; Savinova, Olga V; Hawes, Norman L; Zabaleta, Adriana; Nusinowitz, Steven; Martin, Janice E; Davisson, Muriel L; Cepko, Constance L; Hogan, Brigid LM; John, Simon WM

    2001-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a blinding disease usually associated with high intraocular pressure (IOP). In some families, abnormal anterior segment development contributes to glaucoma. The genes causing anterior segment dysgenesis and glaucoma in most of these families are not identified and the affected developmental processes are poorly understood. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) participate in various developmental processes. We tested the importance of Bmp4 gene dosage for ocular development and developmental glaucoma. Results Bmp4+/- mice have anterior segment abnormalities including malformed, absent or blocked trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal drainage structures. Mice with severe drainage structure abnormalities, over 80% or more of their angle's extent, have elevated IOP. The penetrance and severity of abnormalities is strongly influenced by genetic background, being most severe on the C57BL/6J background and absent on some other backgrounds. On the C57BL/6J background there is also persistence of the hyaloid vasculature, diminished numbers of inner retinal cells, and absence of the optic nerve. Conclusions We demonstrate that heterozygous deficiency of BMP4 results in anterior segment dysgenesis and elevated IOP. The abnormalities are similar to those in human patients with developmental glaucoma. Thus, BMP4 is a strong candidate to contribute to Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly and other developmental conditions associated with human glaucoma. BMP4 also participates in posterior segment development and wild-type levels are usually critical for optic nerve development on the C57BL/6J background. Bmp4+/- mice are useful for studying various components of ocular development, and may allow identification of strain specific modifiers affecting a variety of ocular phenotypes. PMID:11722794

  9. Cabergoline: Pharmacology, ocular hypotensive studies in multiple species, and aqueous humor dynamic modulation in the Cynomolgus monkey eyes.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Najam A; McLaughlin, Marsha A; Kelly, Curtis R; Katoli, Parvaneh; Drace, Colene; Husain, Shahid; Crosson, Craig; Toris, Carol; Zhan, Gui-Lin; Camras, Carl

    2009-03-01

    The aims of the current studies were to determine the in vitro and in vivo ocular and non-ocular pharmacological properties of cabergoline using well documented receptor binding, cell-based functional assays, and in vivo models. Cabergoline bound to native and/or human cloned serotonin-2A/B/C (5HT(2A/B/C)), 5HT(1A), 5HT(7), alpha(2B), and dopamine-2/3 (D(2/3)) receptor subtypes with nanomolar affinity. Cabergoline was an agonist at human recombinant 5HT(2), 5HT(1A) and D(2/3) receptors but an antagonist at 5HT(7) and alpha(2) receptors. In primary human ciliary muscle (h-CM) and trabecular meshwork (h-TM) cells, cabergoline stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis (EC(50)=19+/-7 nM in TM; 76 nM in h-CM) and intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) mobilization (EC(50)=570+/-83 nM in h-TM; EC(50)=900+/-320 nM in h-CM). Cabergoline-induced [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization in h-TM and h-CM cells was potently antagonized by a 5HT(2A)-selective antagonist (M-100907, K(i)=0.29-0.53 nM). Cabergoline also stimulated [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization more potently via human cloned 5HT(2A) (EC(50)=63.4+/-10.3 nM) than via 5HT(2B) and 5HT(2C) receptors. In h-CM cells, cabergoline (1 microM) stimulated production of pro-matrix metalloproteinases-1 and -3 and synergized with forskolin to enhance cAMP production. Cabergoline (1 microM) perfused through anterior segments of porcine eyes caused a significant (27%) increase in outflow facility. Topically administered cabergoline (300-500 microg) in Dutch-belted rabbit eyes yielded 4.5 microMM and 1.97 microM levels in the aqueous humor 30 min and 90 min post-dose but failed to modulate intraocular pressure (IOP). However, cabergoline was an efficacious IOP-lowering agent in normotensive Brown Norway rats (25% IOP decrease with 6 microg at 4h post-dose) and in conscious ocular hypertensive cynomolgus monkeys (peak reduction of 30.6+/-3.6% with 50 microg at 3h post-dose; 30.4+/-4.5% with 500 microg at 7h post-dose). In ketamine-sedated monkeys, IOP was

  10. Efficient Generation Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Somatic Cells with Sendai-virus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In Young; Lim, HoTae; Lee, Gabsang

    2014-01-01

    A few years ago, the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) ushered in a new era in biomedicine. Potential uses of human iPSCs include modeling pathogenesis of human genetic diseases, autologous cell therapy after gene correction, and personalized drug screening by providing a source of patient-specific and symptom relevant cells. However, there are several hurdles to overcome, such as eliminating the remaining reprogramming factor transgene expression after human iPSCs production. More importantly, residual transgene expression in undifferentiated human iPSCs could hamper proper differentiations and misguide the interpretation of disease-relevant in vitro phenotypes. With this reason, integration-free and/or transgene-free human iPSCs have been developed using several methods, such as adenovirus, the piggyBac system, minicircle vector, episomal vectors, direct protein delivery and synthesized mRNA. However, efficiency of reprogramming using integration-free methods is quite low in most cases. Here, we present a method to isolate human iPSCs by using Sendai-virus (RNA virus) based reprogramming system. This reprogramming method shows consistent results and high efficiency in cost-effective manner. PMID:24798302

  11. Cytogenetic analysis of human somatic cell haploidization.

    PubMed

    Galat, V; Ozen, S; Rechitsky, S; Kuliev, A; Verlinsky, Y

    2005-02-01

    Despite recent interest in the derivation of female and male gametes through somatic cell nuclear transfer, there is still insufficient data on chromosomal analysis of these gametes resulting from haploidization, especially involving a human nuclear donor and recipient oocytes. The objective of this study was to investigate the fidelity of chromosomal separation during haploidization of human cumulus cells by in-vitro matured human enucleated MII oocytes. A total of 129 oocytes were tested 4-7, 8-14, or 15-21 h after nuclear transfer (NT) followed by electro-stimulation, resulting in 71.3% activation efficiency on average. Haploidization was documented by the formation of two separate groups of chromosomes, originating from either polar body/pronucleus (PB/PN), or only 2PN, which were tested by 5-colour FISH, or DNA analysis for copy number of chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21, 22 and X. Two PN were formed more frequently than PB/PN, irrespective of incubation time. In agreement with recent reports on mouse oocytes, as many as 90.2% of the resulting haploid sets tested showed abnormal chromosome segregation, suggesting unsuitability of the resulting artificial gametes for practical application at the present time. PMID:15823223

  12. Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived Directly from Isolated Cells of the Human Inner Cell Mass.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ge; von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Santos, Fatima; Chen, Yaoyao; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin; Nichols, Jennifer

    2016-04-12

    Conventional generation of stem cells from human blastocysts produces a developmentally advanced, or primed, stage of pluripotency. In vitro resetting to a more naive phenotype has been reported. However, whether the reset culture conditions of selective kinase inhibition can enable capture of naive epiblast cells directly from the embryo has not been determined. Here, we show that in these specific conditions individual inner cell mass cells grow into colonies that may then be expanded over multiple passages while retaining a diploid karyotype and naive properties. The cells express hallmark naive pluripotency factors and additionally display features of mitochondrial respiration, global gene expression, and genome-wide hypomethylation distinct from primed cells. They transition through primed pluripotency into somatic lineage differentiation. Collectively these attributes suggest classification as human naive embryonic stem cells. Human counterparts of canonical mouse embryonic stem cells would argue for conservation in the phased progression of pluripotency in mammals. PMID:26947977

  13. Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived Directly from Isolated Cells of the Human Inner Cell Mass

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ge; von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Santos, Fatima; Chen, Yaoyao; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin; Nichols, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Conventional generation of stem cells from human blastocysts produces a developmentally advanced, or primed, stage of pluripotency. In vitro resetting to a more naive phenotype has been reported. However, whether the reset culture conditions of selective kinase inhibition can enable capture of naive epiblast cells directly from the embryo has not been determined. Here, we show that in these specific conditions individual inner cell mass cells grow into colonies that may then be expanded over multiple passages while retaining a diploid karyotype and naive properties. The cells express hallmark naive pluripotency factors and additionally display features of mitochondrial respiration, global gene expression, and genome-wide hypomethylation distinct from primed cells. They transition through primed pluripotency into somatic lineage differentiation. Collectively these attributes suggest classification as human naive embryonic stem cells. Human counterparts of canonical mouse embryonic stem cells would argue for conservation in the phased progression of pluripotency in mammals. PMID:26947977

  14. Ocular surface foreign bodies: novel findings mimicking ocular malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maudgil, A; Wagner, B E; Rundle, P; Rennie, I G; Mudhar, H S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Malignant melanoma of the eye is an uncommon condition that is important to recognise. We describe three cases in which ocular foreign bodies have masqueraded as ocular malignant melanoma. Methods Interventional case reports. Results Case 1 describes diathermy-induced carbon particle implantation, during plaque therapy for the treatment of uveal melanoma, mimicking recurrence with extra-scleral invasion. Case 2 shows a foreign body called ‘mullite' mimicking conjunctival melanoma. Case 3 demonstrates a conjunctival foreign body called ‘illite' that mimicked a limbal melanocytic lesion, clinically thought to be either melanocytoma or melanoma. Conclusion This report highlights the importance of careful history taking, examination, and appropriate biopsy in cases of suspected malignant melanoma, to prevent unnecessary and potentially radical treatment. PMID:25104745

  15. Updates in the treatment of ocular allergies.

    PubMed

    Kari, Osmo; Saari, K Matti

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases have greatly increased in industrialized countries. About 30% of people suffer from allergic symptoms and 40%-80% of them have symptoms in the eyes. Atopic conjunctivitis can be divided into seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) and perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC). The treatment of SAC is simple; antihistamines, anti-inflammatory agents, or chromoglycate. In severe cases of SAC, subcutaneous or sublingual immunotherapy is helpful. PAC needs longer therapy, often year round, with mast cell stabilizers, antihistamines, and sometimes local steroids. Atopic keratoconjunctivitis is a more severe disease showing chronic blepharitis often connected with severe keratitis. It needs, in many cases, continuous treatment of the lid eczema and keratoconjunctivitis. Blepharitis is treated with tacrolimus or pimecrolimus ointment. Conjunctivitis additionally needs corticosteroids and, if needed, cyclosporine A (CsA) drops are administered for longer periods. Basic conjunctival treatment is with mast cell-stabilizing agents and in addition, antihistamines are administered. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is another chronic and serious allergic disease that mainly affects children and young people. It is a long-lasting disease which commonly subsides in puberty. It demands intensive therapy often for many years to avoid serious complicating corneal ulcers. Treatment is mast cell-stabilizing drops and additionally antihistamines. In relapses, corticosteroids are needed. When the use of corticosteroids is continuous, CsA drops should be used, and in relapses, corticosteroids should be used additionally. Nonallergic eosinophilic conjunctivitis (NAEC) is a less known, but rather common, ocular disease. It affects mostly middle-aged and older women. The eye symptoms of NAEC are largely similar to those seen in chronic allergic conjunctivitis. Basic therapy is mast cell-stabilizing drops. Eosinophilic inflammation needs additional corticosteroids. In severe cases

  16. Updates in the treatment of ocular allergies

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Osmo; Saari, K Matti

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases have greatly increased in industrialized countries. About 30% of people suffer from allergic symptoms and 40%–80% of them have symptoms in the eyes. Atopic conjunctivitis can be divided into seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) and perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC). The treatment of SAC is simple; antihistamines, anti-inflammatory agents, or chromoglycate. In severe cases of SAC, subcutaneous or sublingual immunotherapy is helpful. PAC needs longer therapy, often year round, with mast cell stabilizers, antihistamines, and sometimes local steroids. Atopic keratoconjunctivitis is a more severe disease showing chronic blepharitis often connected with severe keratitis. It needs, in many cases, continuous treatment of the lid eczema and keratoconjunctivitis. Blepharitis is treated with tacrolimus or pimecrolimus ointment. Conjunctivitis additionally needs corticosteroids and, if needed, cyclosporine A (CsA) drops are administered for longer periods. Basic conjunctival treatment is with mast cell-stabilizing agents and in addition, antihistamines are administered. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is another chronic and serious allergic disease that mainly affects children and young people. It is a long-lasting disease which commonly subsides in puberty. It demands intensive therapy often for many years to avoid serious complicating corneal ulcers. Treatment is mast cell-stabilizing drops and additionally antihistamines. In relapses, corticosteroids are needed. When the use of corticosteroids is continuous, CsA drops should be used, and in relapses, corticosteroids should be used additionally. Nonallergic eosinophilic conjunctivitis (NAEC) is a less known, but rather common, ocular disease. It affects mostly middle-aged and older women. The eye symptoms of NAEC are largely similar to those seen in chronic allergic conjunctivitis. Basic therapy is mast cell-stabilizing drops. Eosinophilic inflammation needs additional corticosteroids. In severe cases

  17. Landscape of transcription in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Djebali, Sarah; Davis, Carrie A.; Merkel, Angelika; Dobin, Alex; Lassmann, Timo; Mortazavi, Ali M.; Tanzer, Andrea; Lagarde, Julien; Lin, Wei; Schlesinger, Felix; Xue, Chenghai; Marinov, Georgi K.; Khatun, Jainab; Williams, Brian A.; Zaleski, Chris; Rozowsky, Joel; Röder, Maik; Kokocinski, Felix; Abdelhamid, Rehab F.; Alioto, Tyler; Antoshechkin, Igor; Baer, Michael T.; Bar, Nadav S.; Batut, Philippe; Bell, Kimberly; Bell, Ian; Chakrabortty, Sudipto; Chen, Xian; Chrast, Jacqueline; Curado, Joao; Derrien, Thomas; Drenkow, Jorg; Dumais, Erica; Dumais, Jacqueline; Duttagupta, Radha; Falconnet, Emilie; Fastuca, Meagan; Fejes-Toth, Kata; Ferreira, Pedro; Foissac, Sylvain; Fullwood, Melissa J.; Gao, Hui; Gonzalez, David; Gordon, Assaf; Gunawardena, Harsha; Howald, Cedric; Jha, Sonali; Johnson, Rory; Kapranov, Philipp; King, Brandon; Kingswood, Colin; Luo, Oscar J.; Park, Eddie; Persaud, Kimberly; Preall, Jonathan B.; Ribeca, Paolo; Risk, Brian; Robyr, Daniel; Sammeth, Michael; Schaffer, Lorian; See, Lei-Hoon; Shahab, Atif; Skancke, Jorgen; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Takahashi, Hazuki; Tilgner, Hagen; Trout, Diane; Walters, Nathalie; Wang, Huaien; Wrobel, John; Yu, Yanbao; Ruan, Xiaoan; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Harrow, Jennifer; Gerstein, Mark; Hubbard, Tim; Reymond, Alexandre; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Hannon, Gregory; Giddings, Morgan C.; Ruan, Yijun; Wold, Barbara; Carninci, Piero; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells make many types of primary and processed RNAs that are found either in specific sub-cellular compartments or throughout the cells. A complete catalogue of these RNAs is not yet available and their characteristic sub-cellular localizations are also poorly understood. Since RNA represents the direct output of the genetic information encoded by genomes and a significant proportion of a cell’s regulatory capabilities are focused on its synthesis, processing, transport, modifications and translation, the generation of such a catalogue is crucial for understanding genome function. Here we report evidence that three quarters of the human genome is capable of being transcribed, as well as observations about the range and levels of expression, localization, processing fates, regulatory regions and modifications of almost all currently annotated and thousands of previously unannotated RNAs. These observations taken together prompt to a redefinition of the concept of a gene. PMID:22955620

  18. Novel bioadhesive hyaluronan-itaconic acid crosslinked films for ocular therapy.

    PubMed

    Calles, J A; Tártara, L I; Lopez-García, A; Diebold, Y; Palma, S D; Vallés, E M

    2013-10-15

    New hyaluronic acid (HA)-itaconic acid (IT) films have been previously synthesized and used as potential topical drug delivery systems (DDS) for ocular administration. In this study we explored homogeneous and heterogeneous crosslinking reactions of HA using glutaraldehyde (GTA) and polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDE) in the presence of IT, a naturally occurring compound that is non-toxic and readily biodegradable. We have studied the morphology, mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility between these new materials and ocular surface cells (human corneal epithelial cell line) and evaluated the biopharmaceutical performance of the designed formulations. Although all the synthesized materials exhibited good mechanical properties, the PEGDE modified films exhibited the best biocompatibility, with in vivo assays showing good adhesive performance and minimal irritation. PEGDE films were also tested for their effects in the treatment of intraocular pressure (IOP) in rabbits using timolol maleate (TM) as the model drug. These results may be useful for further design of novel bioadhesive matrix containing drugs by topical application in ophthalmology. PMID:23911915

  19. Epigenetic modulations in early endothelial cells and DNA hypermethylation in human skin after sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Simons, Thilo; Striepling, Enno; Bölck, Birgit; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-02-26

    Victims that were exposed to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) suffer from chronic dermal and ocular lesions, severe pulmonary problems and cancer development. It has been proposed that epigenetic perturbations might be involved in that process but this has not been investigated so far. In this study, we investigated epigenetic modulations in vitro using early endothelial cells (EEC) that were exposed to different SM concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 23.5 and 50μM). A comprehensive analysis of 78 genes related to epigenetic pathways (i.e., DNA-methylation and post-translational histone modifications) was performed. Moreover, we analyzed global DNA methylation in vitro in EEC after SM exposure as a maker for epigenetic modulations and in vivo using human skin samples that were obtained from a patient 1 year after an accidently exposure to pure SM. SM exposure resulted in a complex regulation pattern of epigenetic modulators which was accompanied by a global increase of DNA methylation in vitro. Examination of the SM exposed human skin samples also revealed a significant increase of global DNA methylation in vivo, underlining the biological relevance of our findings. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that SM affects epigenetic pathways and causes epigenetic modulations both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26392148

  20. Effects of induction and inhibition of matrix cross-linking on remodeling of the aqueous outflow resistance by ocular trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Feng; Sun, Ying Ying; Acott, Ted S.; Keller, Kate E.

    2016-01-01

    The trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue controls drainage of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye primarily by regulating extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Glaucomatous TM tissue is stiffer than age-matched controls, which may be due to alterations in ECM cross-linking. In this study, we used genipin or beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) agents to induce or inhibit matrix cross-linking, respectively, to investigate the effects on outflow resistance and ECM remodeling. Treatment with BAPN increased outflow rates in perfused human and porcine anterior segments, whereas genipin reduced outflow. Using a fluorogenic peptide assay, MMP activity was increased with BAPN treatment, but reduced with genipin treatment. In genipin-treated TM cells, Western immunoblotting showed a reduction of active MMP2 and MMP14 species and the presence of TIMP2-MMP14 higher molecular weight complexes. BAPN treatment increased collagen type I mRNA and protein levels, but genipin reduced the levels of collagen type I, tenascin C, elastin and versican. CD44 and fibronectin levels were unaffected by either treatment. Collectively, our results show that matrix cross-linking has profound effects on outflow resistance and ECM composition and are consistent with the emerging paradigm that the stiffer the ECM, the lower the aqueous outflow facility through the TM. PMID:27465745