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Sample records for human p53 p63

  1. p63 in Mytilus galloprovincialis and p53 family members in the phylum Mollusca.

    PubMed

    Stifanić, Mauro; Micić, Milena; Ramsak, Andreja; Blasković, Sanja; Ruso, Ana; Zahn, Rudolf K; Batel, Renato

    2009-11-01

    Genes of the p53 family are known to be critical regulators of the cell cycle. They have already been established as possible biomarkers. Elaborate regulation mechanisms result in numerous cDNA and protein isoforms being expressed from each gene of the p53 family. Their similarity caused an often misleading nomenclature in non-vertebrate species. The aim of the present work is a clarification of the nomenclature of molluscan p53 family sequences, an essential prerequisite for reliable interpretation of gene expression and protein function studies. Here, we report five partial cDNA and one partial genomic p63 sequences, all originating from two Mytilus galloprovincialis individuals. DNA, deduced protein sequences, and the exon/intron architecture were analyzed and compared to p53, p63 and p73 sequences from other organisms. Along with our sequences, we analyzed all similar molluscan sequences found in the GenBank database. The analysis showed our cDNA sequences code for the TAp63gamma isoform of the p63 protein, and identified all other molluscan p53 family sequences as p63 genes or their expression isoforms. Our results also indicate p63 as the ancestral gene of the p53 family as well as the only gene of the family present in non-chordate metazoan species. PMID:19563905

  2. Family matters: sibling rivalry and bonding between p53 and p63 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Romano, Rose-Anne; Sinha, Satrajit

    2014-04-01

    The p53 family (p53, p63 and p73) is intimately linked with an overwhelming number of cellular processes during normal physiological as well as pathological conditions including cancer. The fact that these proteins are expressed in myriad isoforms, each with unique biochemical properties and distinct effects on tumorigenesis, complicates their study. A case in point is Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) where p53 is often mutated and the ΔNp63 isoform is overexpressed. Given that p53 and p63 can hetero-dimerize, bind to quite similar DNA elements and share common co-factors, any alterations in their individual expression levels, activity and/or mutation can severely disrupt the family equilibrium. The burgeoning genomics data sets and new additions to the experimental toolbox are offering crucial insights into the complex role of the p53 family in SCC, but more mechanistic studies are needed. PMID:24690037

  3. p53/p63/p73 in the epidermis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Flores, Elsa R

    2014-08-01

    Although p53 has long been known as the "guardian of the genome" with a role in tumor suppression in many tissues, the discovery of two p53 ancestral genes, p63 and p73, more than a decade ago has triggered a considerable amount of research into the role of these genes in skin development and diseases. In this review, we primarily focus on mechanisms of action of p53 and p63, which are the best-studied p53 family members in the skin. The existence of multiple isoforms and their roles as transcriptional activators and repressors are key to their function in multiple biological processes including the control of skin morphogenesis, regeneration, tumorigenesis, and response to chemotherapy. Last, we provide directions for further research on this family of genes in skin biology and pathology. PMID:25085956

  4. p53/p63/p73 in the Epidermis in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A.; Flores, Elsa R.

    2014-01-01

    Although p53 has long been known as the “guardian of the genome” with a role in tumor suppression in many tissues, the discovery of two p53 ancestral genes, p63 and p73, more than a decade ago has triggered a considerable amount of research into the role of these genes in skin development and diseases. In this review, we primarily focus on mechanisms of action of p53 and p63, which are the best-studied p53 family members in the skin. The existence of multiple isoforms and their roles as transcriptional activators and repressors are key to their function in multiple biological processes including the control of skin morphogenesis, regeneration, tumorigenesis, and response to chemotherapy. Last, we provide directions for further research on this family of genes in skin biology and pathology. PMID:25085956

  5. The tumor suppressors p53, p63, and p73 are regulators of microRNA processing complex.

    PubMed

    Boominathan, Lakshmanane

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressors p53, p73, and p63 are known to function as transcription factors. They promote either growth arrest or apoptosis, depending upon the DNA damage. A number of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to function as transcriptional targets of p53 and they appear to aid p53 in promoting growth arrest and apoptosis. However, the question of p53/p63/p73 regulating the miRNA processing complex has not been addressed in depth so far. Comparative/computational genomic analysis was performed using Target scan, Mami, and Diana software to identify miRNAs that regulate the miRNA processing complex. Here, I present evidence for the first time that the tumor suppressors p53, p63, and p73 function as both positive and negative regulators of the miRNA processing components. Curated p53-dependent miRNA expression data was used to identify p53-miRs that target the components of the miRNA-processing complex. This analysis suggests that most of the components (mRNAs' 3'UTR) of the miRNA processing complex are targeted by p53-miRs. Remarkably, this data revealed the conserved nature of p53-miRs in targeting a number of components of the miRNA processing complex. p53/p73/p63 appears to regulate the major components of the miRNA processing, such as Drosha-DGCR8, Dicer-TRBP2, and Argonaute proteins. In particular, p53/p73/p63 appears to regulate the processing of miRNAs, such as let-7, miR-200c, miR-143, miR-107, miR-16, miR-145, miR-134, miR-449a, miR-503, and miR-21. Interestingly, there seems to be a phenotypic similarity between p63(-/-) and dicer(-/-) mice, suggesting that p63 and dicer could regulate each other. In addition, p63, p73, and the DGCR8 proteins contain a conserved interaction domain. Further, promoters of a number of components of the miRNA processing machinery, including dicer and P2P-R, contain p53-REs, suggesting that they could be direct transcriptional targets of p63/p73/p53. Together, this study provides mechanistic insights into how p53, p63, and

  6. p63 is an alternative p53 repressor in melanoma that confers chemoresistance and a poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Matin, Rubeta N.; Chikh, Anissa; Law Pak Chong, Stephanie; Mesher, David; Graf, Manuela; Sanza’, Paolo; Senatore, Valentina; Scatolini, Maria; Moretti, Francesca; Leigh, Irene M.; Proby, Charlotte M.; Costanzo, Antonio; Chiorino, Giovanna; Cerio, Rino; Harwood, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of apoptosis in melanoma pathogenesis and chemoresistance is poorly characterized. Mutations in TP53 occur infrequently, yet the TP53 apoptotic pathway is often abrogated. This may result from alterations in TP53 family members, including the TP53 homologue TP63. Here we demonstrate that TP63 has an antiapoptotic role in melanoma and is responsible for mediating chemoresistance. Although p63 was not expressed in primary melanocytes, up-regulation of p63 mRNA and protein was observed in melanoma cell lines and clinical samples, providing the first evidence of significant p63 expression in this lineage. Upon genotoxic stress, endogenous p63 isoforms were stabilized in both nuclear and mitochondrial subcellular compartments. Our data provide evidence of a physiological interaction between p63 with p53 whereby translocation of p63 to the mitochondria occurred through a codependent process with p53, whereas accumulation of p53 in the nucleus was prevented by p63. Using RNA interference technology, both isoforms of p63 (TA and ΔNp63) were demonstrated to confer chemoresistance, revealing a novel oncogenic role for p63 in melanoma cells. Furthermore, expression of p63 in both primary and metastatic melanoma clinical samples significantly correlated with melanoma-specific deaths in these patients. Ultimately, these observations provide a possible explanation for abrogation of the p53-mediated apoptotic pathway in melanoma, implicating novel approaches aimed at sensitizing melanoma to therapeutic agents. PMID:23420876

  7. Hdac1 and Hdac2 act redundantly to control p63 and p53 functions in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    LeBoeuf, Matthew; Terrell, Anne; Trivedi, Sohum; Sinha, Satrajit; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Olson, Eric N.; Morrisey, Edward E.; Millar, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidermal and hair follicle development from surface ectodermal progenitor cells require coordinated changes in gene expression. Histone deacetylases alter gene expression programs through modification of chromatin and transcription factors. We find that deletion of ectodermal Hdac1 and Hdac2 results in dramatic failure of hair follicle specification and epidermal proliferation and stratification, phenocopying loss of the key ectodermal transcription factor p63. While expression of p63 and its positively regulated basal cell targets is maintained in Hdac1/2 deficient ectoderm, targets of p63-mediated repression, including p21, 14-3-3σ and p16/INK4a, are ectopically expressed, and HDACs bind and are active at their promoter regions in normal undifferentiated keratinocytes. Mutant embryos display increased levels of acetylated p53, which opposes p63 functions, and p53 is required for HDAC inhibitor-mediated p21 expression in keratinocytes. Our data identify critical requirements for HDAC1/2 in epidermal development, and indicate that HDAC1/2 directly mediate repressive functions of p63, and suppress p53 activity. PMID:21093383

  8. p63 expression confers significantly better survival outcomes in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates p53-like and p53-independent tumor suppressor function

    PubMed Central

    Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Wang, Xiao-xiao; Xia, Yi; Visco, Carlo; Tzankov, Alexandar; Zhang, Li; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Dybkaer, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L.; Hsi, Eric D.; Choi, William W.L.; van Krieken, J. Han; Huh, Jooryung; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J.M.; Zhao, Xiaoying; Møller, Michael B.; Parsons, Ben M.; Winter, Jane N.; Piris, Miguel A.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Young, Ken H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of p53 family member, p63 in oncogenesis is the subject of controversy. Limited research has been done on the clinical implications of p63 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In this study, we assessed p63 expression in de novo DLBCL samples (n=795) by immunohistochemistry with a pan-p63-monoclonal antibody and correlated it with other clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. p63 expression was observed in 42.5% of DLBCL, did not correlate with p53 levels, but correlated with p21, MDM2, p16INK4A, Ki-67, Bcl-6, IRF4/MUM-1 and CD30 expression, REL gains, and BCL6 translocation. p63 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in DLBCL, which was most significant in patients with International Prognostic Index (IPI) >2, and in activated-B-cell–like DLBCL patients with wide-type TP53. The prognostic impact in germinal-center-B-cell–like DLBCL was not apparent, which was likely due to the association of p63 expression with high-risk IPI, and potential presence of ∆Np63 isoform in TP63 rearranged patients (a mere speculation). Gene expression profiling suggested that p63 has both overlapping and distinct functions compared with p53, and that p63 and mutated p53 antagonize each other. In summary, p63 has p53-like and p53-independent functions and favorable prognostic impact, however this protective effect can be abolished by TP53 mutations. PMID:26878872

  9. p63 expression confers significantly better survival outcomes in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates p53-like and p53-independent tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Zhang, Shanxiang; Li, Xin; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Xia, Yi; Visco, Carlo; Tzankov, Alexandar; Zhang, Li; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Dybkaer, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L; Hsi, Eric D; Choi, William W L; van Krieken, J Han; Huh, Jooryung; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Zhao, Xiaoying; Møller, Michael B; Parsons, Ben M; Winter, Jane N; Piris, Miguel A; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Young, Ken H

    2016-02-01

    The role of p53 family member p63 in oncogenesis is the subject of controversy. Limited research has been done on the clinical implications of p63 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In this study, we assessed p63 expression in de novo DLBCL samples (n=795) by immunohistochemistry with a pan-p63-monoclonal antibody and correlated it with other clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. p63 expression was observed in 42.5% of DLBCL, did not correlate with p53 levels, but correlated with p21, MDM2, p16INK4A, Ki-67, Bcl-6, IRF4/MUM-1 and CD30 expression, REL gains, and BCL6 translocation. p63 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in DLBCL, which was most significant in patients with International Prognostic Index (IPI) >2, and in activated-B-cell-like DLBCL patients with wide- type TP53. The prognostic impact in germinal-center-B-cell-like DLBCL was not apparent, which was likely due to the association of p63 expression with high-risk IPI, and potential presence of ∆Np63 isoform in TP63 rearranged patients (a mere speculation). Gene expression profiling suggested that p63 has both overlapping and distinct functions compared with p53, and that p63 and mutated p53 antagonize each other. In summary, p63 has p53-like and p53-independent functions and favorable prognostic impact, however this protective effect can be abolished by TP53 mutations. PMID:26878872

  10. Oncogenic Intra-p53 Family Member Interactions in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ferraiuolo, Maria; Di Agostino, Silvia; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The p53 gene family members p53, p73, and p63 display several isoforms derived from the presence of internal promoters and alternative splicing events. They are structural homologs but hold peculiar functional properties. p53, p73, and p63 are tumor suppressor genes that promote differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. p53, unlike p73 and p63, is frequently mutated in cancer often displaying oncogenic “gain of function” activities correlated with the induction of proliferation, invasion, chemoresistance, and genomic instability in cancer cells. These oncogenic functions are promoted either by the aberrant transcriptional cooperation of mutant p53 (mutp53) with transcription cofactors (e.g., NF-Y, E2F1, Vitamin D Receptor, Ets-1, NF-kB and YAP) or by the interaction with the p53 family members, p73 and p63, determining their functional inactivation. The instauration of these aberrant transcriptional networks leads to increased cell growth, low activation of DNA damage response pathways (DNA damage response and DNA double-strand breaks response), enhanced invasion, and high chemoresistance to different conventional chemotherapeutic treatments. Several studies have clearly shown that different cancers harboring mutant p53 proteins exhibit a poor prognosis when compared to those carrying wild-type p53 (wt-p53) protein. The interference of mutantp53/p73 and/or mutantp53/p63 interactions, thereby restoring p53, p73, and p63 tumor suppression functions, could be among the potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of mutant p53 human cancers. PMID:27066457

  11. The guardians of the genome (p53, TA-p73, and TA-p63) are regulators of tumor suppressor miRNAs network.

    PubMed

    Boominathan, Lakshmanane

    2010-12-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 homologues, TA-p73, and p63 have been shown to function as tumor suppressors. However, how they function as tumor suppressors remains elusive. Here, I propose a number of tumor suppressor pathways that illustrate how the TA-p73 and p63 could function as negative regulators of invasion, metastasis, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) proliferation. Furthermore, I provide molecular insights into how TA-p73 and p63 could function as tumor suppressors. Remarkably, the guardians--p53, p73, and p63--of the genome are in control of most of the known tumor suppressor miRNAs, tumor suppressor genes, and metastasis suppressors by suppressing c-myc through miR-145/let-7/miR-34/TRIM32/PTEN/FBXW7. In particular, p53 and TA-p73/p63 appear to upregulate the expression of (1) tumor suppressor miRNAs, such as let-7, miR-34, miR-15/16a, miR-145, miR-29, miR-26, miR-30, and miR-146a; (2) tumor suppressor genes, such as PTEN, RBs, CDKN1a/b/c, and CDKN2a/b/c/d; (3) metastasis suppressors, such as Raf kinase inhibitory protein, CycG2, and DEC2, and thereby they enlarge their tumor suppressor network to inhibit tumorigenesis, invasion, angiogenesis, migration, metastasis, and CSCs proliferation. PMID:20922462

  12. Functional Diversification after Gene Duplication: Paralog Specific Regions of Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation in p53, p63, and p73

    PubMed Central

    Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Conformational and functional flexibility promote protein evolvability. High evolvability allows related proteins to functionally diverge and perhaps to neostructuralize. p53 is a multifunctional protein frequently referred to as the Guardian of the Genome–a hub for e.g. incoming and outgoing signals in apoptosis and DNA repair. p53 has been found to be structurally disordered, an extreme form of conformational flexibility. Here, p53, and its paralogs p63 and p73, were studied for further insights into the evolutionary dynamics of structural disorder, secondary structure, and phosphorylation. This study is focused on the post gene duplication phase for the p53 family in vertebrates, but also visits the origin of the protein family and the early domain loss and gain events. Functional divergence, measured by rapid evolutionary dynamics of protein domains, structural properties, and phosphorylation propensity, is inferred across vertebrate p53 proteins, in p63 and p73 from fish, and between the three paralogs. In particular, structurally disordered regions are redistributed among paralogs, but within clades redistribution of structural disorder also appears to be an ongoing process. Despite its deemed importance as the Guardian of the Genome, p53 is indeed a protein with high evolvability as seen not only in rearranged structural disorder, but also in fluctuating domain sequence signatures among lineages. PMID:27003913

  13. Properties of the six isoforms of p63: p53-like regulation in response to genotoxic stress and cross talk with DeltaNp73.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, A; Ruptier, C; Tribollet, V; Hautefeuille, A; Chardon, F; Cavard, C; Puisieux, A; Hainaut, P; Caron de Fromentel, C

    2008-02-01

    TP63, a member of the TP53 gene family, encodes two groups of three isoforms (alpha, beta and gamma). The TAp63 isoforms act as transcription factors. The DeltaNp63 isoforms lack the main transcription activation domain and act as dominant-negative inhibitors of transactivation (TA) isoforms. To clarify the role of these isoforms and to better understand their functional overlap with p53, we ectopically expressed each p63 isoform in the p53-null hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep3B. All TA isoforms, as well as DeltaNp63alpha, had a half-life of <1 h when transiently expressed and were degraded by the proteasome pathway. The most stable form was DeltaNp63gamma, with a half-life of >8 h. As expected, TA isoforms differed in their transcriptional activities toward genes regulated by p53, TAp63gamma being the most active form. In contrast, DeltaNp63 isoforms were transcriptionally inactive on genes studied and inhibited TA isoforms in a dose-dependent manner. When stably expressed in polyclonal cell populations, TAp63beta and gamma isoforms were undetectable. However, when treated with doxorubicin (DOX), p63 proteins rapidly accumulated in the cells. This stabilization was associated with an increase in phosphorylation. Strikingly, in DOX-treated polyclonal populations, increase in TAp63 levels was accompanied by overexpression of DeltaNp73. This observation suggests complex regulatory cross talks between the different isoforms of the p53 family. In conclusion, p63 exhibits several transcriptional and stress-response properties similar to those of p53, suggesting that p63 activities should be taken into consideration in approaches to improve cancer therapies based on genotoxic agents. PMID:18048390

  14. In vitro expression of human p53 cDNA clones and characterization of the cloned human p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D; Laver-Rudich, Z; Rotter, V

    1985-08-01

    The human p53 gene was cloned and characterized by using a battery of p53 DNA clones. A series of human cDNA clones of various sizes and relative localizations to the mRNA molecule were isolated by using the human p53-H14 (2.35-kilobase) cDNA probe which we previously cloned. One such isolate, clone p53-H7 (2.65 kilobases), spans the entire human mature p53 mRNA molecule. Construction of the human cDNA clones in the pSP65 RNA transcription vector facilitated the generation of p53 transcripts by the SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase. The p53-specific RNA transcripts obtained without further processing were translated into p53 proteins in a cell-free system. By using this rapid in vitro transcription-translation assay, we found that whereas clone p53-H7 (2.65 kilobases) coded for a mature-sized p53 protein, a shorter cDNA clone, p53-H13 (1.8 kilobases), dictated the synthesis of a smaller-sized p53 protein (45 kilodaltons). The p53 proteins synthesized in vitro immunoprecipitated efficiently with human-specific anti-p53 antibodies. Genomic analysis of human DNA revealed the presence of a single p53 gene residing within two EcoRI fragments. Heteroduplex analysis between the full-length cDNA clone p53-H7 and the cloned p53 gene indicated the presence of seven major exons. PMID:3018534

  15. Transcriptional control of human p53-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd; Sontag, Eduardo; Chen, Patricia; Levine, Arnold

    2008-05-01

    The p53 protein regulates the transcription of many different genes in response to a wide variety of stress signals. Following DNA damage, p53 regulates key processes, including DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, in order to suppress cancer. This Analysis article provides an overview of the current knowledge of p53-regulated genes in these pathways and others, and the mechanisms of their regulation. In addition, we present the most comprehensive list so far of human p53-regulated genes and their experimentally validated, functional binding sites that confer p53 regulation. PMID:18431400

  16. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  17. P53 protein expression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Kusenda, J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of p53 protein overexpression in human leukemia and lymphoma cells. We examined PB and/or BM samples on a series of 111 patients with immunophenotypically defined hematological malignancies at diagnosis, in remission and in relapsed disease comparing to 20 control samples of healthy individuals. p53 protein has been studied by flow cytometry using three monoclonal antibodies specific for epitopes on N-terminus (Bp53-12, DO-1) and central region (DO-11) of p53 protein. Our findigs showed, that p53 expression may contribute to phenotype of leukemic cells and that overexpression of this protein is often associated with progression of disease. All samples of early B-ALL patients and samples of patients with immunophenotypically defined T- cell disorders examined at diagnosis of disease were p53 positive. Eleven of 19 patient samples from AML at diagnosis showed also increased expression of p53 protein. The cells of all patients who responded to therapy with complete immunophenotypically defined remission were p53 negative. Relapsed T-, B- ALL and AML develop p53 alteration. We reported positive p53 expression in cells of patients with advanced stages of CLL in comparison to them with initial stage of disease at examination. As well as in the group of B- cell lymphomas only samples of patients with generalized FCC lymphoma at diagnosis were p53 positive. We detected p53 positive cells in immunologically defined myeloid blast crisis of CML opposite to p53 negativity in chronic phase of disease. The finding of p53 positive BM cells without immunophenotypic blast markers in two of followed cases documented the contributing value of p53 detection in their characterization. On the basis of above findings we conclude, that cytofluorometric determination of p53 expression may contribute to the better definition of leukemic phenotype. Loss of the normal p53 function may be important in the genesis of some leukemias

  18. Regulation of P53 stability in p53 mutated human and mouse hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Jaworski, Maike; Marx-Stoelting, Philip; Wanke, Ines; Schwarz, Michael

    2007-04-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is frequently mutated in cancer. We have investigated the regulation of P53 in p53 wild type mouse hepatoma cells (line 55.1c), in p53 heterozygeously mutated cells (56.1b) and in p53 defective cells (lines 56.1d, 70.4 and HUH7) under various experimental settings. The basal levels of P53 were low in 55.1c cells, but nuclear accumulation occurred upon UV-irradiation. Similarly, UV-exposure induced stabilization of P53 in the heterozygeously p53 mutated 56.1b hepatoma cells. By contrast, the 3 hepatoma lines, which lack transcriptionally active P53, demonstrated high basal nuclear concentrations of P53 protein and, unexpectedly, showed loss of P53 upon UV-irradiation. Expression of p53 mRNA was also decreased in p53 defective cells after 24 hr post UV-irradiation, which may be linked to induction of apoptosis of the irradiated cells under these conditions. Other stressors like H2O2 also mediated a decrease in P53 concentration in p53 defective cells. This effect occurred at very low concentrations and was already detectable 1-2 hr after exposure of cells. There were no signs of apoptosis of H2O2-exposed cells at this time point and no significant changes in p53 mRNA or MDM2 level. These unexpected findings indicate a new aspect related to regulation of P53 stability in cells with a defect in the tumor suppressor protein. PMID:17205518

  19. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  20. Characterization of the human p53 gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, S.P.; Crawford, L.

    1989-05-01

    Transcriptional deregulation of the p53 gene may play an important part in the genesis of some tumors. The authors report here an accurate determination of the transcriptional start sites of the human p53 gene and show that the majority of p53 mRNA molecules do not contain a postulated stem-loop structure at their 5' ends. Recombinant plasmids of the human p53 promoter-leader region fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) were constructed. After transfection into rodent or human cells, a 350-base-pair fragment spanning the promoter region conferred 4% of the CAT activity mediated by the simian virus 40 early promoter/enhancer. They monitored the efficiency with which 15 3' and 5' promoter deletion constructs initiated transcription. Their results show that an 85-base-pair fragment, previously thought to have resided in exon 1, is that is required for full promoter activity.

  1. The p53 status of cultured human premalignant oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J. E.; Clark, L. J.; Yeudall, W. A.; Mitchell, R.; Mackenzie, K.; Chang, S. E.; Parkinson, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Around 60% of oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) have been shown to harbour p53 mutations, and other studies have demonstrated mutant p53 genes in normal and dysplastic squamous epithelium adjacent to these SCCs. In line with these earlier studies we show here that DOK, a keratinocyte cell line derived from a dysplasia, displays elevated levels of p53 protein and harbours a 12 bp in-frame deletion of the p53 gene spanning codons 188-191. In contrast, the coding region of the p53 gene was normal in a series of six benign recurrent laryngeal papillomas and a series of four premalignant oral erythroplakia biopsies and their cell cultures. All but one of these lesions were free of malignancy at the time of biopsy, in contrast to the premalignant lesions studied by previous investigators, but keratinocytes cultured from these lesions all displayed a partially transformed phenotype that was less pronounced than that of DOK. Since three out of four of the erythroplakia patients developed SCC within 1 year of biopsy, these lesions were by definition premalignant. The availability of strains of partially transformed keratinocytes from premalignant erythroplakias which possess normal p53 genes should enable us to test the role of mutant p53 in the progression of erythroplakia to SCC. The premalignant tissues and cultures were also tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV), which is known to inactivate p53 function in some cases. Only the benign papillomas were shown to contain high levels of either HPV 6 or HPV 11 E6 DNA, but not both, and none of the samples contained detectable levels of HPV 16, HPV 18 or HPV 33 E6 DNA or L1 DNA of several other HPV types. There was therefore no evidence to suggest that p53 was being inactivated by a highly oncogenic HPV in these samples. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7917902

  2. P63 in health and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonfloni, Stefania; Caputo, Valerio; Iannizzotto, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    TP63 is the most ancient member of the p53 gene family. The p53 family comprises three transcription factors (p53/p63/p73). They share a high degree of homology and similar domain structure. Yet, they can exist as truncated isoforms. Alternative promoters and splicing sites lead to the generation of several molecules. P53/p63/p73 are important to maintain cell homeostasis. P63 and p73 regulate many p53 target genes. This is due to their common structural features. Both proteins may compensate the loss of p53. This is a common event occurring in more than 50% of malignancies. Yet, p63 (or p73) has its own role. Studies from p63-null mice have shown the key role of p63 in embryo development. Several reports have supported the p63 role in epidermal development and in skin homeostasis. P63 involvement in heart development is currently being researched. Recent studies have found p63 to be "the guardian of human reproduction". In addition, p63 has an important, even controversial, role in cancer. Here, we provide a general overview of p63 regulation and activity. We discuss emerging concepts about its role in germ line protection, metabolism and cancer. PMID:26374530

  3. Transcriptional Network of p63 in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Silvia; Zambelli, Federico; Merico, Daniele; Pavesi, Giulio; Robert, Amélie; Maltère, Peggy; Gidrol, Xavier; Mantovani, Roberto; Vigano, M. Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    p63 is a transcription factor required for the development and maintenance of ectodermal tissues in general, and skin keratinocytes in particular. The identification of its target genes is fundamental for understanding the complex network of gene regulation governing the development of epithelia. We report a list of almost 1000 targets derived from ChIP on chip analysis on two platforms; all genes analyzed changed in expression during differentiation of human keratinocytes. Functional annotation highlighted unexpected GO terms enrichments and confirmed that genes involved in transcriptional regulation are the most significant. A detailed analysis of these transcriptional regulators in condition of perturbed p63 levels confirmed the role of p63 in the regulatory network. Rather than a rigid master-slave hierarchical model, our data indicate that p63 connects different hubs involved in the multiple specific functions of the skin. PMID:19390658

  4. Xenogeneic human p53 DNA vaccination by electroporation breaks immune tolerance to control murine tumors expressing mouse p53.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Trieu, Janson; Lee, Sung Yong; He, Liangmei; Tsai, Ya-Chea; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2013-01-01

    The pivotal role of p53 as a tumor suppressor protein is illustrated by the fact that this protein is found mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. In most cases, mutations in p53 greatly increase the otherwise short half-life of this protein in normal tissue and cause it to accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumors. The overexpression of mutated p53 in tumor cells makes p53 a potentially desirable target for the development of cancer immunotherapy. However, p53 protein represents an endogenous tumor-associated antigen (TAA). Immunization against a self-antigen is challenging because an antigen-specific immune response likely generates only low affinity antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells. This represents a bottleneck of tumor immunotherapy when targeting endogenous TAAs expressed by tumors. The objective of the current study is to develop a safe cancer immunotherapy using a naked DNA vaccine. The vaccine employs a xenogeneic p53 gene to break immune tolerance resulting in a potent therapeutic antitumor effect against tumors expressing mutated p53. Our study assessed the therapeutic antitumor effect after immunization with DNA encoding human p53 (hp53) or mouse p53 (mp53). Mice immunized with xenogeneic full length hp53 DNA plasmid intramuscularly followed by electroporation were protected against challenge with murine colon cancer MC38 while those immunized with mp53 DNA were not. In a therapeutic model, established MC38 tumors were also well controlled by treatment with hp53 DNA therapy in tumor bearing mice compared to mp53 DNA. Mice vaccinated with hp53 DNA plasmid also exhibited an increase in mp53-specific CD8(+) T-cell precursors compared to vaccination with mp53 DNA. Antibody depletion experiments also demonstrated that CD8(+) T-cells play crucial roles in the antitumor effects. This study showed intramuscular vaccination with xenogeneic p53 DNA vaccine followed by electroporation is capable of inducing potent antitumor effects against tumors expressing mutated

  5. Inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity by human cytomegalovirus UL44.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yejin; Kim, Mi-Na; Young Choi, Eun; Heon Kim, Jung; Hwang, Eung-Soo; Cha, Chang-Yong

    2012-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) stimulates cellular synthesis of DNA and proteins and induces transition of the cell cycle from G(1) to S and G(2) /M phase, in spite of increased amounts of p53 in the infected cells. The immediate early protein IE2-86  kDa (IE86) tethers a transcriptional repression domain to p53; however, its repression of p53 function is not enough to abrogate the G(1) checkpoint function of p53. Other HCMV proteins that suppress the activity of p53 were investigated in this study. Of the HCMV proteins that bind to p53 when assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis, HCMV UL44 was chosen as a candidate protein. It was found that reporter gene containing p53 consensus sequence was activated by transfection with wild type p53, but when plasmids of p53 with IE86 or UL44 were co-transfected, p53 transcriptional activity was decreased to 3-7% of the p53 control in a dose-dependent manner. When the deletion mutant of UL44 was co-transected with p53, the carboxyl one-third portion of UL44 had little effect on inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity. The amount of mRNA p21 was measured in H1299 by real time PCR after transfection of the combination of p53 and UL44 vectors and it was found that p21 transcription by p53 was inhibited dose-dependently by UL44. Increased G0/G1 and decreased S phases in p53 wild type-transfected H1299 cells were recovered to the level of p53 mutant type-transfected ones by the additional transfection of UL44 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the transcriptional activity of p53 is suppressed by UL44 as well as by IE86. PMID:22376288

  6. PPAR{gamma} ligands induce growth inhibition and apoptosis through p63 and p73 in human ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jae-Jung; Heo, Dae Seog

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands increased the rate of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in ovarian cancer cells. {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands induced p63 and p73 expression, but not p53. {yields} p63 and p73 leads to an increase in p21 expression and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells with treatment PPAR{gamma} ligands. {yields} These findings suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands suppressed growth of ovarian cancer cells through upregulation of p63 and p73. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists, including thiazolidinediones (TZDs), can induce anti-proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in various cancer cell types. This study investigated the mechanism of the anticancer effect of TZDs on human ovarian cancer. Six human ovarian cancer cell lines (NIH:OVCAR3, SKOV3, SNU-251, SNU-8, SNU-840, and 2774) were treated with the TZD, which induced dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Additionally, these cell lines exhibited various expression levels of PPAR{gamma} protein as revealed by Western blotting. Flow cytometry showed that the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase, as demonstrated by the appearance of a sub-G1 peak. This observation was corroborated by the finding of increased levels of Bax, p21, PARP, and cleaved caspase 3 in TGZ-treated cells. Interestingly, when we determined the effect of p53-induced growth inhibition in these three human ovarian cancer cells, we found that they either lacked p53 or contained a mutant form of p53. Furthermore, TGZ induced the expression of endogenous or exogenous p63 and p73 proteins and p63- or p73-directed short hairpin (si) RNAs inhibited the ability of TGZ to regulate expression of p21 in these cells. Thus, our results suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands can induce growth suppression of ovarian cancer cells and mediate p63 and p73 expression, leading to enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis. The tumor suppressive effects of PPAR{gamma} ligands

  7. Phosphorylation of p53: a Novel Pathway for p53 Inactivation in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Transformed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pise-Masison, Cynthia A.; Radonovich, Michael; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, Ettore; Brady, John N.

    1998-01-01

    Inhibition of p53 function, through either mutation or interaction with viral or cellular transforming proteins, correlates strongly with the oncogenic potential. Only a small percentage of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-transformed cells carry p53 mutations, and mutated p53 genes have been found in only one-fourth of adult T-cell leukemia cases. In previous studies, we demonstrated that wild-type p53 is stabilized and transcriptionally inactive in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Further, the viral transcriptional activator Tax plays a role in both the stabilization and inactivation of p53 through a mechanism involving the first 52 amino acids of p53. Here we show for the first time that phosphorylation of p53 inactivates p53 by blocking its interaction with basal transcription factors. Using two-dimensional peptide mapping, we demonstrate that peptides corresponding to amino acids 1 to 19 and 387 to 393 are hyperphosphorylated in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Moreover, using antibodies specific for phosphorylated Ser15 and Ser392, we demonstrate increased phosphorylation of these amino acids. Since HTLV-1 p53 binds DNA in a sequence-specific manner but fails to interact with TFIID, we tested whether phosphorylation of the N terminus of p53 affected p53-TFIID interaction. Using biotinylated peptides, we show that phosphorylation of Ser15 alone inhibits p53-TFIID interaction. In contrast, phosphorylation at Ser15 and -37 restores TFIID binding and blocks MDM2 binding. Our studies provide evidence that HTLV-1 utilizes the posttranslational modification of p53 in vivo to inactivate function of the tumor suppressor protein. PMID:9658074

  8. P53 dependent and independent apoptosis induced by lidamycin in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihui; Jiang, Jianming; Cheng, Chunlei; Yang, Ajing; He, Qiyang; Li, Diandong; Wang, Zhen

    2007-06-01

    Enediyne compound is one class of antibiotics with very potent anti-cancer activity. However, the role of p53 in enediyne antibiotic-induced cell killing remains elusive. Here we reported the involvement of p53 signaling pathway in apoptosis induction by lidamycin (LDM), a member of the enediyne antibiotic family. We found that LDM at low drug concentration of 10 nmol/L induces apoptotic cell death much more effectively in human colorectal cancer cells with wild type p53 than those with mutant or deleted p53. p53 is functionally activated as an early event in response to low dose LDM that precedes the significant apoptosis induction. The primarily activation of mitochondria as well as the activation of p53 transcriptional targets such as Puma, Bad and Bax in HCT116 p53 wild type cells further demonstrates the key role of p53 in mediating the compound-induced apoptosis. This is further supported by the observation that the absence of Bax or Puma decreases apoptosis dramatically while Bcl-2 overexpression confers partially resistance after drug treatment. Activation of p53 signaling pathway leads to activation of caspases and caspases inhibitor VAD-fmk completely blocks low dose LDM induced apoptosis through the inhibition of mitochondria pathway. In contrast, LDM at higher concentration causes rapid apoptosis through more direct DNA damaging mechanism that is independent of activation of p53 and caspases and cannot be blocked by caspase inhibitor. Taken together, LDM induces apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner when given at low doses, but in a p53-independent manner when given at high doses. This dosage-dependent regimen can be applied to cancer clinic based upon the p53 status of cancer patients. PMID:17534142

  9. Absence of p21 expression is associated with abnormal p53 in human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, P. A.; Lonning, P. E.; Borresen-Dale, A.; Aas, T.; Geisler, S.; Akslen, L. A.; Salter, I.; Smith, I. E.; Dowsett, M.

    1997-01-01

    The p53 tumour-suppressor gene is important in the regulation of cell growth and apoptosis, and loss of functional wild-type activity may be associated with tumour formation and resistance to therapy. Differentiation of functionally normal wild-type protein from mutant or abnormal protein remains difficult using either immunohistochemical assays or mutational DNA sequencing. p21(WAF1/CIP1) (p21) is induced by wild type p53 and plays an important role in promoting cell cycle arrest. To test the hypothesis that p21 protein expression may act as a downstream marker of tumours from patients with locally advanced breast cancer before treatment with doxorubicin, pretreatment p53 status had been characterized in 63 tumours by p53 protein immunostaining and DNA mutational analysis. There was a significant association between immunostaining for p53 and the presence of p53 mutations (P = 0.01). Of 56 patients available for determination of p21, 31 (55%) expressed p21 protein. Twenty-eight out of 31 patients (90%) positive for p21 had low negative p53 protein expression, whereas only 3 of 13 patients (23%) with high p53 expressed p21 (P = 0.009). No association was seen between p21 protein expression and p53 mutations (P = 0.24). The combination of p53 and p21 immunostaining results improved the specificity of the immunostaining but at a cost of significant reduction in sensitivity. Immunohistochemical assessment of p21 protein expression is inversely associated with abnormal p53 protein in human breast cancer. The detection of p21 protein expression in combination with p53 protein expression did not improve the ability of immunohistochemistry (IHC) to differentiate between normal and mutant p53 protein. Images Figure 1 PMID:9275025

  10. The p53 tumor suppressor protein protects against chemotherapeutic stress and apoptosis in human medulloblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Parasido, Erika; Tricoli, Lucas; Sivakumar, Angiela; Mikhaiel, John P.; Yenugonda, Venkata; Rodriguez, Olga C.; Karam, Sana D.; Rood, Brian R.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Albanese, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB), a primitive neuroectodermal tumor, is the most common malignant childhood brain tumor and remains incurable in about a third of patients. Currently, survivors carry a significant burden of late treatment effects. The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a crucial role in influencing cell survival in response to cellular stress and while the p53 pathway is considered a key determinant of anti-tumor responses in many tumors, its role in cell survival in MB is much less well defined. Herein, we report that the experimental drug VMY-1-103 acts through induction of a partial DNA damage-like response as well induction of non-survival autophagy. Surprisingly, the genetic or chemical silencing of p53 significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of both VMY and the DNA damaging drug, doxorubicin. The inhibition of p53 in the presence of VMY revealed increased late stage apoptosis, increased DNA fragmentation and increased expression of genes involved in apoptosis, including CAPN12 and TRPM8, p63, p73, BIK, EndoG, CIDEB, P27Kip1 and P21cip1. These data provide the groundwork for additional studies on VMY as a therapeutic drug and support further investigations into the intriguing possibility that targeting p53 function may be an effective means of enhancing clinical outcomes in MB. PMID:26540407

  11. p53 Response to Ultrasound: Preliminary Observations in MCF7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Janis M.; Campbell, Paul A.

    2011-09-01

    Mutated p53 can be found in approximately half of all human cancers. Strategies which seek to restore, or at least exercise a level of external control over, p53 functionality are thus potentially useful as adjuncts to therapy. Here, we report our preliminary measurements in this area, and demonstrate that short-burst pulsed ultrasound can indeed affect p53 activity. Specifically, we have observed that expression of the p53 protein can be regulated in the period immediately following low intensity short pulse (millisecond) ultrasound exposure, and that altered activity levels return to basal levels over a 24 hour period post-insonation.

  12. Human p53 is phosphorylated by p60-cdc2 and cyclin B-cdc2

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, J.R.; Marshak, D.R.; Beach, D. ); Friedman, P.N.; Prives, C. )

    1990-06-01

    The human anti-oncoprotein p53 is shown to be a substrate of cdc2. The primary site of phosphorylation is serine-315. Serine-315 is phosphorylated by both p60-cdc2 and cyclin B-cdc2 enzymes. The phosphorylation of p53 is cell cycle-dependent. The abundance of p53 also oscillates during the cell cycle. The protein is largely absent from cells that have just completed division but accumulates in cells during G{sub 1} phase. Phosphorylation by cdc2 might regulate the antiproliferative activity of p53.

  13. Genome-scale functional analysis of the human genes modulating p53 activity by regulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Min; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Yeom, Young Il; Min, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Il-Chul

    2016-09-16

    MDM2, a critical negative regulator of p53, is often overexpressed in leukemia, but few p53 mutations are found, suggesting that p53-independent MDM2 expression occurs due to alterations in MDM2 upstream regulators. In this study, a high MDM2 transcription level was observed (41.17%) regardless of p53 expression in patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, we performed genome-scale functional screening of the human genes modulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner. We searched co-expression profiles of genes showing a positive or negative pattern with MDM2 expression in a DNA microarray database, selected1089 links, and composed a screening library of 368 genes. Using MDM2 P1 and P2 promoter-reporter systems, we screened clones regulating MDM2 transcriptions in a p53-independent manner by overexpression. Nine clones from the screening library showed enhanced MDM2 promoter activity and MDM2 expression in p53-deficient HCT116 cells. Among them, six clones, including NTRK2, GNA15, SFRS2, EIF5A, ELAVL1, and YWHAB mediated MAPK signaling for expressing MDM2. These results indicate that p53-independent upregulation of MDM2 by increasing selected clones may lead to oncogenesis in AML and that MDM2-modulating genes are novel potential targets for AML treatment. PMID:27524244

  14. Immunohistoselective sequencing (IHSS) of p53 tumor suppressor gene in human oesophageal precancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Shi, S T; Feng, B; Yang, G Y; Wang, L D; Yang, C S

    1996-10-01

    Accumulation of p53 protein occurs in human oesophageal precancerous lesions and even in near-normal oesophageal epithelium. In some instances, p53 gene mutations have been detected. In many of the cases of p53 protein accumulation in early lesions, however, p53 mutations were not detected due to either the lack of mutation or the low abundance of cells with a mutation. In order to enrich p53 immunostain-positive cells for single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing, an immunohisto-selective sequencing (IHSS) method was developed. Anti-p53 antibody-peroxidase stained oesophageal tissue sections were subjected to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation to damage the DNA in p53 immunostain-negative cells. The immunostain protected p53 immunostain-positive cells from the UV light and thus preserved the DNA in those cells for PCR amplification. Comparison of the SSCP results from sections with and without UV treatment showed that the IHSS method selectively enriched p53 immunostain-positive cells. With this method, we could analyse mutations in samples with as few as 30 p53 immunostain-positive cells per tissue section. Analysis was carried out on tissues with precancerous lesions from six surgically-resected oesophageal specimens and 13 oesophageal biopsies from symptom-free subjects. The results of mutation analysis for some of the samples were confirmed by microdissection to enrich the p53-positive cells. The mutations in tissues with precancerous lesions were compared with those in the corresponding squamous cell carcinomas. The IHSS method is shown to be a simple and effective way to analyse mutations in p53 immunostain-positive cells. IHSS may also be a general method for molecular analysis of biological specimens after immunohistochemical staining. PMID:8895479

  15. Transduction of Recombinant M3-p53-R12 Protein Enhances Human Leukemia Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tsung Chi; Zhao, Guan- Hao; Chen, Yao Yun; Chien, Chia-Ying; Huang, Chi-Hung; Lin, Kwang Hui; Chen, Shen Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor protein p53 plays important roles in initiating cell cycle arrest and promoting tumor cell apoptosis. Previous studies have shown that p53 is either mutated or defective in approximately 50% of human cancers; therefore restoring normal p53 activity in cancer cells might be an effective anticancer therapeutic approach. Herein, we designed a chimeric p53 protein flanked with the MyoD N-terminal transcriptional activation domain (amino acids 1-62, called M3) and a poly-arginine (R12) cell penetrating signal in its N-and C-termini respectively. This chimeric protein, M3-p53-R12, can be expressed in E. coli and purified using immobilized metal ion chromatography followed by serial refolding dialysis. The purified M3-p53-R12 protein retains DNA-binding activity and gains of cell penetrating ability. Using MTT assay, we demonstrated that M3-p53-R12 inhibited the growth of K562, Jurkat as well as HL-60 leukemia cells carrying mutant p53 genes. Results from FACS analysis also demonstrated that transduction of M3-p53-R12 protein induced cell cycle arrest of these leukemia cells. Of special note, M3-p53-R12 has no apoptotic effect on normal mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and leukocytes, highlighting its differential effects on normal and tumor cells. To sum up, our results reveal that purified recombinant M3-p53-R12 protein has functions of suppressing the leukemia cell lines' proliferation and launching cell apoptosis, suggesting the feasibility of using M3-p53-R12 protein as an anticancer drug. In the future we will test whether this chimeric protein can preferentially trigger the death of malignant cancer cells without affecting normal cells in animals carrying endogenous or xenographic tumors. PMID:27390612

  16. Genetic and immunochemical analysis of mutant p53 in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bartek, J; Iggo, R; Gannon, J; Lane, D P

    1990-06-01

    The expression of the tumour suppressor gene p53 was analysed in 11 human breast cancer cell lines by immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and cDNA sequencing. We used a panel of anti-p53 monoclonal antibodies for cell staining and found abnormalities in every case. Eight of the cell lines produce a form of p53 which can be immunoprecipitated by the monoclonal antibody PAb240 but not by PAb1620. In the murine system PAb240 only immunoprecipitates mutant p53. We sequenced p53 cDNA directly from four of the PAb240 positive cell lines using asymmetric PCR templates. All four contained missense mutations in p53 RNA, with no detectable expression of the wild type sequence. Different residues were affected in each cell line, but all the mutations changed amino acids conserved from man to Xenopus. These results imply that as in the murine system, the PAb240 antibody reliably detects a wide variety of p53 mutations and that these mutations have a common effect on the structure of p53. Immunohistochemical data suggest that p53 mutation is the commonest genetic alteration so far detected in primary breast cancer. PMID:1694291

  17. Strategies for manipulating the p53 pathway in the treatment of human cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hupp, T R; Lane, D P; Ball, K L

    2000-01-01

    Human cancer progression is driven in part by the mutation of oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes which, under selective environmental pressures, give rise to evolving populations of biochemically altered cells with enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic potential. Given that human cancers are biologically and pathologically quite distinct, it has been quite surprising that a common event, perturbation of the p53 pathway, occurs in most if not all types of human cancers. The central role of p53 as a tumour-suppressor protein has fuelled interest in defining its mechanism of function and regulation, determining how its inactivation facilitates cancer progression, and exploring the possibility of restoring p53 function for therapeutic benefit. This review will highlight the key biochemical properties of p53 protein that affect its tumour-suppressor function and the experimental strategies that have been developed for the re-activation of the p53 pathway in cancers. PMID:11062053

  18. Modulation of cellular and viral promoters by mutant human p53 proteins found in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deb, S; Jackson, C T; Subler, M A; Martin, D W

    1992-01-01

    Wild-type p53 has recently been shown to repress transcription from several cellular and viral promoters. Since p53 mutations are the most frequently reported genetic defects in human cancers, it becomes important to study the effects of mutations of p53 on promoter functions. We, therefore, have studied the effects of wild-type and mutant human p53 on the human proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter and on several viral promoters, including the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL9 promoter, the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoter-enhancer, and the long terminal repeat promoters of Rous sarcoma virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. HeLa cells were cotransfected with a wild-type or mutant p53 expression vector and a plasmid containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene under viral (or cellular) promoter control. As expected, expression of the wild-type p53 inhibited promoter function. Expression of a p53 with a mutation at any one of the four amino acid positions 175, 248, 273, or 281, however, correlated with a significant increase of the PCNA promoter activity (2- to 11-fold). The viral promoters were also activated, although to a somewhat lesser extent. We also showed that activation by a mutant p53 requires a minimal promoter containing a lone TATA box. A more significant increase (25-fold) in activation occurs when the promoter contains a binding site for the activating transcription factor or cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Using Saos-2 cells that do not express p53, we showed that activation by a mutant p53 was a direct enhancement. The mutant forms of p53 used in this study are found in various cancer cells. The activation of PCNA by mutant p53s may indicate a way to increase cell proliferation by the mutant p53s. Thus, our data indicate a possible functional role for the mutants of p53 found in cancer cells in activating several important loci, including PCNA. Images PMID:1356162

  19. Analytical Validation of AmpliChip p53 Research Test for Archival Human Ovarian FFPE Sections.

    PubMed

    Marton, Matthew J; McNamara, Andrew R; Nikoloff, D Michele; Nakao, Aki; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is reported to be mutated in nearly half of all tumors and plays a central role in genome integrity. Detection of mutations in p53 can be accomplished by many assays, including the AmpliChip p53 Research Test. The AmpliChip p53 Research Test has been successfully used to determine p53 status in hematologic malignancies and fresh frozen solid tissues but there are few reports of using the assay with formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The objective of this study was to describe analytical performance characterization of the AmpliChip p53 Research Test to detect p53 mutations in genomic DNA isolated from archival FFPE human ovarian tumor tissues. Method correlation with sequencing showed 96% mutation-wise agreement and 99% chip-wise agreement. We furthermore observed 100% agreement (113/113) of the most prevalent TP53 mutations. Workflow reproducibility was 96.8% across 8 samples, with 2 operators, 2 reagent lots and 2 instruments. Section-to-section reproducibility was 100% for each sample across a 60 μm region of the FFPE block from ovarian tumors. These data indicate that the AmpliChip p53 Research Test is an accurate and reproducible method for detecting mutations in TP53 from archival FFPE human ovarian specimens. PMID:26125596

  20. Adenoviral-E2F-1 radiosensitizes p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh H.; Hachem, Paul; Khor, L.-Y.; Salem, Naji; Hunt, Kelly K.; Calkins, Peter R.; Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@fccc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: E2F-1 is a transcription factor that enhances the radiosensitivity of various cell lines by inducing apoptosis. However, there are conflicting data concerning whether this enhancement is mediated via p53 dependent pathways. Additionally, the role of E2F-1 in the response of human prostate cancer to radiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of Adenoviral-E2F-1 (Ad-E2F-1) on the radiosensitivity of p53{sup wild-type} (LNCaP) and p53{sup null} (PC3) prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: LNCaP and PC3 cells were transduced with Ad-E2F-1, Adenoviral-Luciferase (Ad-Luc) control vector, or Adenoviral-p53 (Ad-p53). Expression of E2F-1 and p53 was examined by Western blot analysis. Annexin V and caspase 3 + 7 assays were performed to estimate the levels of apoptosis. Clonogenic survival assays were used to determine overall cell death. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance, using the Bonferroni method to correct for multiple comparisons. Results: Western blot analysis confirmed the efficacy of transductions with Ad-E2F-1 and Ad-p53. Ad-E2F-1 transduction significantly enhanced apoptosis and decreased clonogenic survival in both cell lines. These effects were compounded by the addition of RT. Although E2F-1-mediated radiosensitization was independent of p53 status, this effect was more pronounced in p53{sup wild-type} LNCaP cells. When PC3 cells were treated with Ad-p53 in combination with RT and Ad-E2F-1, there was at least an additive reduction in clonogenic survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Ad-E2F-1 significantly enhances the response of p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy, although radiosensitization is more pronounced in the presence of p53. Ad-E2F-1 may be a useful adjunct to radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  2. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of deltaNp73.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-03-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of deltaNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. DeltaNp73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and deltaNp73 in human carcinogenesis. PMID:16397624

  3. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of ΔNp73

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of ΔNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. ΔNp73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and ΔNp73 in human carcinogenesis. PMID:16397624

  4. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  5. Uncovering the Basis of ATP Hydrolysis Activity in Purified Human p53 Protein: A Reinvestigation

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shalini; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2014-01-01

    p53 is one of the most well studied tumor suppressor proteins and regarded as the guardian of the genome. The protein mediates cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis in response to myriads of cellular stresses including DNA damage via its trascriptional as well as non-transcriptional roles. ATP binding/hydrolysis by p53 had been implicated in its DNA binding functions. However, till date, no ATP binding/hydrolysis domains have been mapped in p53. In the current study, we have reinvestigated the ATP hydrolysis activity associated with recombinant human p53 protein expressed and purified from E.coli. We confirmed the source of ATPase activity using various deletion constructs of p53 and an In-gel ATPase assay followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of the activity band. The activity was associated with Hsp70 homologue in E.coli, DnaK, a known interactor of p53. We clarify that wildtype human p53, expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain, carries no ATPase activity. PMID:24691158

  6. Cadmium Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aimola, Pierpaolo; Carmignani, Marco; Volpe, Anna Rita; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Claudio, Luigi; Waalkes, Michael P.; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Tokar, Erik J.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium, a widespread toxic pollutant of occupational and environmental concern, is a known human carcinogen. The prostate is a potential target for cadmium carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, cadmium may induce cell death by apoptosis in various cell types, and it has been hypothesized that a key factor in cadmium-induced malignant transformation is acquisition of apoptotic resistance. We investigated the in vitro effects produced by cadmium exposure in normal or tumor cells derived from human prostate epithelium, including RWPE-1 and its cadmium-transformed derivative CTPE, the primary adenocarcinoma 22Rv1 and CWR-R1 cells and LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 metastatic cancer cell lines. Cells were treated for 24 hours with different concentrations of CdCl2 and apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and expression of tumor suppressor proteins were analyzed. Subsequently, cellular response to cadmium was evaluated after siRNA-mediated p53 silencing in wild type p53-expressing RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, and after adenoviral p53 overexpression in p53-deficient DU145 and PC-3 cell lines. The cell lines exhibited different sensitivity to cadmium, and 24-hour exposure to different CdCl2 concentrations induced dose- and cell type-dependent apoptotic response and inhibition of cell proliferation that correlated with accumulation of functional p53 and overexpression of p21 in wild type p53-expressing cell lines. On the other hand, p53 silencing was able to suppress cadmium-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cadmium can induce p53-dependent apoptosis in human prostate epithelial cells and suggest p53 mutation as a possible contributing factor for the acquisition of apoptotic resistance in cadmium prostatic carcinogenesis. PMID:22448262

  7. Quantitative evaluation of p53 as a new indicator of DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Salvatore; Gentile, Tommaso; Cuomo, Felice; De Filippo, Stefania; Aprea, Gilda E.; Guida, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sperm DNA integrity is considered an important parameter to assess seminal fluid quality and can be used as a predictive test of potential fertility. Amongst the various tests to determine sperm DNA integrity, one is the Acridine Orange test. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of p53 in maintaining sperm DNA integrity. The aim of this study was to assess if a p53 ELISA assay could be a new indicator of DNA damage in human spermatozoa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 103 human semen samples were evaluated using both Acridine Orange test and p53 ELISA and results were compared. RESULTS: A clear correlation between the values measured by two methods was obtained. CONCLUSIONS: If this hypothesis will be confirmed by further studies, the p53 ELISA assay could become a new and more precise indicator of DNA damage in human spermatozoa. PMID:25395748

  8. Reciprocal modulations between p53 and Tat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C J; Wang, C; Friedman, D J; Pardee, A B

    1995-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) after a long clinical latency. This disease is associated with a spectrum of cancers. Here we report that wild-type p53 is a potent suppressor of Tat, a major transactivator of HIV-1. Reciprocally, Tat inhibits the transcription of p53. Downregulation of p53 by upregulated tat may be important for the establishment of productive viral infection in a cell and also may be involved in the development of AIDS-related malignancies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777531

  9. High-level expression of human tumour suppressor P53 in the methylotrophic yeast: Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Rekik, Leila; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2007-08-01

    The human tumour suppressor P53 is a key protein involved in tumour suppression. P53 acts as a "guardian of genome" by regulating many target genes involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and apoptosis. We report the P53 expression by the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the methanol inducible AOX1 promoter. We have produced the rP53 in intracellular form as well as secreted using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-mating factor prepro-leader sequence in two genetic contexts of Pichia, Mut(s) and Mut(+). The intracellular P53 was successfully produced by Mut(s) (KM71) as well as Mut(+) (X33) strains, however, the secreted form was mainly observed in the Mut(s) strain, despite a higher number of p53 copies integrated in the Mut(+) strain. Interestingly, in Mut(s) phenotype, the medium pH influences markedly the rP53 production since it was higher at pH 7 than 6. PMID:17482479

  10. Neocarzinostatin induces an effective p53-dependent response in human papillomavirus-positive cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Adriana; Reyes, Elba; Ocadiz, Rodolfo; Alvarez, Elizabeth; Moreno, Martha; Monroy, Alberto; Gariglio, Patricio

    2003-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 viral oncoprotein plays an important role during cervical carcinogenesis. This oncoprotein binds the tumor suppressor protein p53, leading to its degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Therefore, it is generally assumed that in HPV-positive cancer cells p53 function is completely abolished. Nevertheless, recent findings suggest that p53 activity can be recovered in cells expressing endogenous E6 protein. To investigate whether p53-dependent functions controlling genome integrity, cell proliferation, and apoptosis can be reactivated in cervical cancer cells, we examined the capacity of HeLa, INBL, CaSki, C33A, and ViBo cell lines to respond to neocarzinostatin (NCS), a natural product which induces single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. We found that NCS treatment inhibits cellular proliferation through G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. This effect was preceded by nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and by an increase of p21 transcripts. Although apoptosis was blocked in ViBo cells (HPV-negative), nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 and inhibition of cell proliferation are observed after NCS treatment. These results suggest that HPV-positive cervical cancer cells are capable of responding efficiently to DNA damage provoked by NCS treatment through a p53-dependent pathway in spite of the presence of E6 protein. PMID:12750435

  11. p53 mutations and human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma: correlation with apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, J. Y.; Cho, N. P.; Kong, G.; Lee, J. D.; Yoon, K.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were analysed for p53 mutations and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to examine the prevalency of these factors and correlation with apoptotic index (AI; number of apoptotic cells per 100 tumour cells) of the tumour tissue. In polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Southern blot analysis, HPV DNAs were detected from 22 out of 42 SCCs (52%) with predominance of HPV-16 (68%). p53 mutations in exons 5-8, screened by nested PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis, were observed in 16 of 42 tumours (38%). The state of the p53 gene did not show any correlation with HPV infection. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL) method was used for detection of apoptotic cells. The mean AI was 2.35, ranging from 0.31 to 6.63. SCCs associated with p53 mutation had significantly lower AI than those without p53 mutation (P < 0.01), whereas no difference in AI was found between SCCs with and without HPV infection. The results of this study confirmed that HPV infection and/or p53 mutations are implicated, but are not mutually exclusive events, in carcinogenesis of oral SCC and also showed that decrease in apoptosis is more closely related to p53 mutation than HPV infection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9703282

  12. The influence of SV40 immortalization of human fibroblasts on p53-dependent radiation responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohli, M.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    The simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (SV40 Tag) has been ascribed many functions critical to viral propagation, including binding to the mammalian tumor suppressor p53. Recent studies have demonstrated that SV40-transformed murine cells have functional p53. The status of p53 in SV40-immortalized human cells, however, has not been characterized. We have found that in response to ionizing radiation, p53-dependent p21 transactivation activity is present, albeit reduced, in SV40-immortalized cells and that this activity can be further reduced with either dominant negative p53 expression or higher SV40 Tag expression. Furthermore, overexpression of p53 in SV40-immortalized ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells restores p53-dependent p21 induction to typical A-T levels. All SV40-immortalized cell lines exhibited an absence of G1 arrest. Moreover, all SV40-immortalized cell lines exhibited increased apoptosis relative to primary cells in response to ionizing radiation, suggesting that SV40 immortalization results in a unique phenotype with regard to DNA damage responses. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  14. Zinc Induces Apoptosis of Human Melanoma Cells, Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species, p53 and FAS Ligand.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Mauro; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Bartozzi, Beatrice; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro effect of zinc on the apoptosis of human melanoma cells, by studying the zinc-dependent modulation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of p53 and FAS ligand proteins. We showed that zinc concentrations ranging from 33.7 μM to 75 μM Zn(2+) induced apoptosis in the human melanoma cell line WM 266-4. This apoptosis was associated with an increased production of intracellular ROS, and of p53 and FAS ligand protein. Treatment of tumor cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was able to prevent Zn(2+)-induced apoptosis, as well as the increase of p53 and FAS ligand protein induced by zinc. Zinc induces apoptosis in melanoma cells by increasing ROS and this effect may be mediated by the ROS-dependent induction of p53 and FAS/FAS ligand. PMID:26408691

  15. The state of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes in human cervical carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffner, M.; Muenger, K.; Byrne, J.C.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Human cervical carcinoma cell lines that were either positive or negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences were analyzed for evidence of mutation of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes. Each of five HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines expressed normal pRB and low levels of wild-type p53 proteins, which are presumed to be altered in function as a consequence of association with HPV E7 and E6 oncoproteins, respectively. In contrast, mutations were identified in the p53 and RB genes expressed in the C-33A and HT-3 cervical cancer cell lines, which lack HPV DNA sequences. Mutations in the p53 genes mapped to codon 273 and codon 245 in the C33-A and HT-3 cell lines, respectively, located in the highly conserved regions of p53, where mutations appear in a variety of human cancers. Mutations in RB occurred at splice junctions, resulting in in-frame deletions, affecting exons 13 and 20 in the HT-3 and C-33A cell lines, respectively. These mutations resulted in aberrant proteins that were not phosphorylated and were unable to complex with the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. These results support the hypothesis that the inactivation of the normal functions of the tumor-suppressor proteins pRB and p53 are important steps in human cervical carcinogenesis, either by mutation or from complex formation with the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

  16. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  17. Calpain-mediated Processing of p53-associated Parkin-like Cytoplasmic Protein (PARC) Affects Chemosensitivity of Human Ovarian Cancer Cells by Promoting p53 Subcellular Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Michael G.; Xue, Kai; Liu, Jiayin; McBride, Heidi; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to cisplatin (CDDP)-based therapy is a major hurdle to the successful treatment of human ovarian cancer (OVCA), and the chemoresistant phenotype in OVCA cells is associated with Akt-attenuated p53-mediated apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic functions of p53 involve both transcription-dependent and -independent signaling pathways, and dysfunctional localization and/or inactivation of p53 contribute to the development of chemoresistance. PARC is a cytoplasmic protein regulating p53 subcellular localization and subsequent function. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating PARC. Although PARC contains putative caspase-3 cleavage sites, and CDDP is known to induce the activation of caspases and calpains and induce proteasomal degradation of anti-apoptotic proteins, if and how PARC is regulated by CDDP in OVCA are unknown. Here, we present evidence that CDDP promotes calpain-mediated PARC down-regulation, mitochondrial and nuclear p53 accumulation, and apoptosis in chemosensitive but not resistant OVCA cells. Inhibition of Akt is required to sensitize chemoresistant cells to CDDP in a p53-dependent manner, an effect enhanced by PARC down-regulation. CDDP-induced PARC down-regulation is reversible by inhibition of calpain but not of caspases or the 26 S proteasome. Furthermore, in vitro experiments confirm the ability of calpain in mediating Ca2+-dependent PARC down-regulation. The role of Ca2+ in PARC down-regulation was further confirmed as ionomycin-induced PARC down-regulation in both chemosensitive and chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells. The data presented here implicate the regulation of p53 subcellular localization and apoptosis by PARC as a contributing factor in CDDP resistance in OVCA cells and Ca2+/calpain in PARC post-translational processing and chemosensitivity. PMID:22117079

  18. Marijuana smoke condensate induces p53-mediated apoptosis in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Ryong; Jung, Mi Hyun; Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2013-01-01

    Since the largely abused worldwide used of marijuana, there have been many ongoing debates regarding the adverse health effects of marijuana smoking. Marijuana smoking was recently proved to cause pulmonary toxicity by inducing genotoxic effects or generating reactive oxygen species. Because p53, a tumor suppressor gene, has an important pathophysiologic role in the regulation of lung epithelial cell DNA damage responses, we hypothesized that p53 may be involved in the oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by marijuana smoking. First, we confirmed that marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) induces oxidative stress in BEAS-2B cells. We observed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was increased by MSC in the DCFH-DA assay. Also, antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, catalase) activity and their mRNA expressions were up-regulated by MSC. Second, we investigated p53 involvement in the MSC-induced apoptotic pathway in BEAS-2B cells. The results showed that MSC increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation as markers of apoptosis. In addition, the mRNA levels of apoptosis-related genes (p53 and Bax) were increased by MSC and phospho-p53, along with the increase of Bax protein expression by MSC. Apoptosis and apoptosis-related gene expression were partially blocked by an inhibitor of p53-dependent transcriptional activation (pifithrin-α). The results indicate that p53 plays a role in MSC-induced apoptosis. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that MSC partially induces p53-mediated apoptosis through ROS generation in human lung epithelial cells and this may have broader implications for our understanding of pulmonary diseases. PMID:23665932

  19. Loss of p53 protein during radiation transformation of primary human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wazer, D.E.; Chu, Qiuming; Liu, Xiao Long; Gao, Qingshen; Safaii, H.; Band, V. )

    1994-04-01

    The causative factors leading to breast cancer are largely unknown. Increased incidence of breast cancer following diagnostic or therapeutic radiation suggests that radiation may contribute to mammary oncogenesis. This report describes the in vitro neoplastic transformation of a normal human mammary epithelial cell strain, 76N, by fractionated [gamma]-irradiation at a clinically used dose (30 Gy). The transformed cells (76R-30) were immortal, had reduced growth factor requirements, and produced tumors in nude mice. Remarkably, the 76R-30 cells completely lacked the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Loss of p53 was due to deletion of the gene on one allele and a 26-bp deletion within the third intron on the second allele which resulted in abnormal splicing out of either the third or fourth exon from the mRNA. PCR with a mutation-specific primer showed that intron 3 mutation was present in irradiated cells before selection for immortal phenotype. 76R-30 cells did not exhibit G[sub 1] arrest in response to radiation, indicating a loss of p53-mediated function. Expression of the wild-type p53 gene in 76R-30 cells led to their growth inhibition. Thus, loss of p53 protein appears to have contributed to neoplastic transformation of these cells. This unique model should facilitate analyses of molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced breast cancer and allow identification of p53-regulated cellular genes in breast cells. 44 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. p53/PUMA expression in human pulmonary fibroblasts mediates cell activation and migration in silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Haijun; Dai, Xiaoniu; Fang, Shencun; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yingming; Yao, Honghong; Zhang, Xilong; Chao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis of SiO2 into the lung causes an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration, followed by fibrosis. Clinical evidence has indicated that the activation of alveolar macrophages by SiO2 produces rapid and sustained inflammation characterized by the generation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1, which, in turn, induces fibrosis. However, the details of events downstream of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 activity in pulmonary fibroblasts remain unclear. Here, to elucidate the role of p53 in fibrosis induced by silica, both the upstream molecular mechanisms and the functional effects on cell proliferation and migration were investigated. Experiments using primary cultured adult human pulmonary fibroblasts led to the following results: 1) SiO2 treatment resulted in a rapid and sustained increase in p53 and PUMA protein levels; 2) the MAPK and PI3K pathways were involved in the SiO2-induced alteration of p53 and PUMA expression; and 3) RNA interference targeting p53 and PUMA prevented the SiO2-induced increases in fibroblast activation and migration. Our study elucidated a link between SiO2-induced p53/PUMA expression in fibroblasts and cell migration, thereby providing novel insight into the potential use of p53/PUMA in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for silicosis treatment. PMID:26576741

  1. Phenylbutyrate Sensitizes Human Glioblastoma Cells Lacking Wild-Type P53 Function to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Carlos A. Feng, Felix Y.; Herman, Joseph M.; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ljungman, Mats

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells. Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a HDAC inhibitor used clinically for treatment of urea cycle disorders. Because of its low cytotoxicity, cerebrospinal fluid penetration, and high oral bioavailability, we investigated PB as a potential radiation sensitizer in human glioblastoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: Four glioblastoma cell lines were selected for this study. Phenylbutyrate was used at a concentration of 2 mM, which is achievable in humans. Western blots were used to assess levels of acetylated histone H3 in tumor cells after treatment with PB. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed to assess the effect of PB on radiation sensitivity. We used shRNA against p53 to study the role of p53 in radiosensitization. Results: Treatment with PB alone resulted in hyperacetylation of histones, confirmed by Western blot analysis. The PB alone resulted in cytostatic effects in three cell lines. There was no evidence of G{sub 1} arrest, increase in sub-G{sub 1} fraction or p21 protein induction. Clonogenic assays showed radiosensitization in two lines harboring p53 mutations, with enhancement ratios ({+-} SE) of 1.5 ({+-} 0.2) and 1.3 ({+-} 0.1), respectively. There was no radiopotentiating effect in two cell lines with wild-type p53, but knockdown of wild-type p53 resulted in radiosensitization by PB. Conclusions: Phenylbutyrate can produce p21-independent cytostasis, and enhances radiation sensitivity in p53 mutant human glioblastoma cells in vitro. This suggests the potential application of combined PB and radiotherapy in glioblastoma harboring mutant p53.

  2. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  3. Modulation of Melanogenesis by Heme Oxygenase-1 via p53 in Normal Human Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Sun; Jin, Suna

    2016-01-01

    As a key regulator of melanogenesis, p53 controls microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expression. The anti-oxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced by various forms of cellular stress and diverse oxidative stimuli. However, few studies have examined the role of HO-1 in melanogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of HO-1 in melanogenesis and the mechanism underlying this relationship. Cultures of normal human melanocytes were treated with the HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP). We then measured the melanin content of the cells. Additional analyses consisted of Western blotting and RT-PCR. The results showed that the cellular melanin content was increased by CoPP and decreased by ZnPP. The Western blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that CoPP increased p53, MITF and tyrosinase levels, and ZnPP reduced all of them. The knockdown of p53 by siRNA transfection was followed by large decreases in the expression levels of p53, MITF and tyrosinase at 3 h of transfection. The presence of CoPP or ZnPP had no significant increased or decreased effects on MITF and tyrosinase levels from 15 h in the siRNA transfectants. Our results suggest that HO-1 modulates melanogenesis in human melanocytes via a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:26865999

  4. Quiescence does not affect p53 and stress response by irradiation in human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jiawen; Itahana, Koji; Baskar, Rajamanickam

    2015-02-27

    Cells in many organs exist in both proliferating and quiescent states. Proliferating cells are more radio-sensitive, DNA damage pathways including p53 pathway are activated to undergo either G{sub 1}/S or G{sub 2}/M arrest to avoid entering S and M phase with DNA damage. On the other hand, quiescent cells are already arrested in G{sub 0}, therefore there may be fundamental difference of irradiation response between proliferating and quiescent cells, and this difference may affect their radiosensitivity. To understand these differences, proliferating and quiescent human normal lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.10–1 Gy of γ-radiation. The response of key proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell death, and metabolism as well as histone H2AX phosphorylation were examined. Interestingly, p53 and p53 phosphorylation (Ser-15), as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27, were induced similarly in both proliferating and quiescent cells after irradiation. Furthermore, the p53 protein half-life, and expression of cyclin A, cyclin E, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bax, or cytochrome c expression as well as histone H2AX phosphorylation were comparable after irradiation in both phases of cells. The effect of radioprotection by a glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor on p53 pathway was also similar between proliferating and quiescent cells. Our results showed that quiescence does not affect irradiation response of key proteins involved in stress and DNA damage at least in normal fibroblasts, providing a better understanding of the radiation response in quiescent cells, which is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration. - Highlights: • p53 response by irradiation was similar between proliferating and quiescent cells. • Quiescent cells showed similar profiles of cell cycle proteins after irradiation. • Radioprotection of GSK-3β inhibitor caused similar effects between these cells. • Quiescence did not affect p53 response despite its

  5. Attenuating the p53 Pathway in Human Cancers: Many Means to the Same End.

    PubMed

    Wasylishen, Amanda R; Lozano, Guillermina

    2016-01-01

    The p53 pathway is perturbed in the majority of human cancers. Although this most frequently occurs through the direct mutation or deletion of p53 itself, there are a number of other alterations that can attenuate the pathway and contribute to tumorigenesis. For example, amplification of important negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, occurs in a number of cancers. In this work, we will review both the normal regulation of the p53 pathway and the different mechanisms of pathway inhibition in cancer, discuss these alterations in the context of the global genomic analyses that have been conducted across tumor types, and highlight the translational implications for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27329033

  6. Relative biological effectiveness of light ions in human tumoural cell lines: role of protein p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggio, L.; Cavinato, M.; Cherubini, R.; Conzato, M.; Cucinotta, F.; Favaretto, S.; Gerardi, S.; Lora, S.; Stoppa, P.; Williams, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Protons and alpha particles of high linear energy transfer (LET) have shown an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with respect to X/gamma rays for several cellular and molecular endpoints in different in vitro cell systems. To contribute to understanding the biochemical mechanisms involved in the increased effectiveness of high LET radiation, an extensive study has been designed. The present work reports the preliminary result of this study on two human tumoural cell lines, DLD1 and HCT116, (with different p53 status), which indicate that for these cell lines, p53 does not appear to take a part in the response to radiation induced DNA damage, suggesting an alternative p53-independent pathway and a cell biochemical mechanism dependent on the cell type.

  7. Aciculatin Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis via MDM2 Depletion in Human Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chin-Yu; Tsai, An-Chi; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Chang, Li-Hsun; Sun, Hui-Lung; Chang, Ya-Ling; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Aciculatin, a natural compound extracted from the medicinal herb Chrysopogon aciculatus, shows potent anti-cancer potency. This study is the first to prove that aciculatin induces cell death in human cancer cells and HCT116 mouse xenografts due to G1 arrest and subsequent apoptosis. The primary reason for cell cycle arrest and cell death was p53 accumulation followed by increased p21 level, dephosphorylation of Rb protein, PUMA expression, and induction of apoptotic signals such as cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP. We demonstrated that p53 allele-null (−/−) (p53-KO) HCT116 cells were more resistant to aciculatin than cells with wild-type p53 (+/+). The same result was achieved by knocking down p53 with siRNA in p53 wild-type cells, indicating that p53 plays a crucial role in aciculatin-induced apoptosis. Although DNA damage is the most common event leading to p53 activation, we found only weak evidence of DNA damage after aciculatin treatment. Interestingly, the aciculatin-induced downregulation of MDM2, an important negative regulator of p53, contributed to p53 accumulation. The anti-cancer activity and importance of p53 after aciculatin treatment were also confirmed in the HCT116 xenograft models. Collectively, these results indicate that aciculatin treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via inhibition of MDM2 expression, thereby inducing p53 accumulation without significant DNA damage and genome toxicity. PMID:22912688

  8. Transcriptional activation by p53 of the human type IV collagenase (gelatinase A or matrix metalloproteinase 2) promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bian, J; Sun, Y

    1997-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor and a transcription factor, has been shown to transcriptionally activate the expression of a number of important genes involved in the regulation of cell growth, DNA damage, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. In a computer search for other potential p53 target genes, we identified a perfect p53 binding site in the promoter of the human type IV collagenase (also called 72-kDa gelatinase or matrix metalloproteinase 2 [MMP-2]) gene. This p53 binding site was found to specifically bind to p53 protein in a gel shift assay. Transcription assays with luciferase reporters driven by the promoter or enhancer of the type IV collagenase gene revealed that (i) activation of the promoter activity is p53 binding site dependent in p53-positive cells but not in p53-negative cells and (ii) wild-type p53, but not p53 mutants commonly found in human cancers, transactivates luciferase expression driven by the type IV collagenase promoter as well as by a p53 site-containing enhancer element in the promoter. Significantly, expression of the endogenous type IV collagenase is also under the control of p53. Treatment of U2-OS cells, a wild-type p53-containing osteogenic sarcoma line, with a common p53 inducer, etoposide, induced p53 DNA binding and transactivation activities in a time-dependent manner. Induction of type IV collagenase expression followed the p53 activation pattern. No induction of type IV collagenase expression can be detected under the same experimental conditions in p53-negative Saos-2 cells. All these in vitro and in vivo assays strongly suggest that the type IV collagenase gene is a p53 target gene and that its expression is subject to p53 regulation. Our finding links p53 to a member of the MMP genes, a family of genes implicated in trophoblast implantation, wound healing, angiogenesis, arthritis, and tumor cell invasion. p53 may regulate these processes by upregulating expression of type IV collagenase. PMID:9343394

  9. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  10. Mitochondrially targeted wild-type p53 induces apoptosis in a solid human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Crawford, Howard C.; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic but also novel roles of p53 are becoming increasingly well characterized. We previously showed that ex vivo retroviral transfer of mitochondrially targeted wild type p53 (mitop53) in the Eμ-myc mouse lymphoma model efficiently induces tumor cell killing in vivo. In an effort to further explore the therapeutic potential of mitop53 for its pro-apoptotic effect in solid tumors, we generated replication-deficient recombinant human Adenovirus type 5 vectors. We show here that adenoviral delivery of mitop53 by intratumoral injection into HCT116 human colon carcinoma xenograft tumors in nude mice is surprisingly effective, resulting in tumor cell death of comparable potency to conventional p53. These apoptotic effects in vivo were confirmed by Ad5-mitop53 mediated cell death of HCT116 cells in culture. Together, these data provide encouragement to further explore the potential for novel mitop53 proteins in cancer therapy to execute the shortest known circuitry of p53 death signaling. PMID:18719383

  11. Activation of p53-Dependent Growth Suppression in Human Cells by Mutations in PTEN or PIK3CA▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Lee, Carolyn; Bonifant, Challice L.; Ressom, Habtom; Waldman, Todd

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to identify genes whose expression is regulated by activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, we performed microarray analysis and subsequent quantitative reverse transcription-PCR on an isogenic set of PTEN gene-targeted human cancer cells. Numerous p53 effectors were upregulated following PTEN deletion, including p21, GDF15, PIG3, NOXA, and PLK2. Stable depletion of p53 led to reversion of the gene expression program. Western blots revealed that p53 was stabilized in HCT116 PTEN−/− cells via an Akt1-dependent and p14ARF-independent mechanism. Stable depletion of PTEN in untransformed human fibroblasts and epithelial cells also led to upregulation of p53 and senescence-like growth arrest. Simultaneous depletion of p53 rescued this phenotype, enabling PTEN-depleted cells to continue proliferating. Next, we tested whether oncogenic PIK3CA, like inactivated PTEN, could activate p53. Retroviral expression of oncogenic human PIK3CA in MCF10A cells led to activation of p53 and upregulation of p53-regulated genes. Stable depletion of p53 reversed these PIK3CA-induced expression changes and synergized with oncogenic PIK3CA in inducing anchorage-independent growth. Finally, targeted deletion of an endogenous allele of oncogenic, but not wild-type, PIK3CA in a human cancer cell line led to a reduction in p53 levels and a decrease in the expression of p53-regulated genes. These studies demonstrate that activation of PI3K signaling by mutations in PTEN or PIK3CA can lead to activation of p53-mediated growth suppression in human cells, indicating that p53 can function as a brake on phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate-induced mitogenesis during human cancer pathogenesis. PMID:17060456

  12. SMC3 knockdown triggers genomic instability and p53-dependent apoptosis in human and zebrafish cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, Giancarlo

    2006-01-01

    Background The structural maintenance of chromosome 3 (SMC3) protein is a constituent of a number of nuclear multimeric protein complexes that are involved in DNA recombination and repair in addition to chromosomal segregation. Overexpression of SMC3 activates a tumorigenic cascade through which mammalian cells acquire a transformed phenotype. This has led us to examine in depth how SMC3 level affects cell growth and genomic stability. In this paper the effect of SMC3 knockdown has been investigated. Results Mammalian cells that are SMC3 deficient fail to expand in a clonal population. In order to shed light on the underlying mechanism, experiments were conducted in zebrafish embryos in which cell competence to undergo apoptosis is acquired at specific stages of development and affects tissue morphogenesis. Zebrafish Smc3 is 95% identical to the human protein, is maternally contributed, and is expressed ubiquitously at all developmental stages. Antisense-mediated loss of Smc3 function leads to increased apoptosis in Smc3 expressing cells of the developing tail and notocord causing morphological malformations. The apoptosis and the ensuing phenotype can be suppressed by injection of a p53-specific MO that blocks the generation of endogenous p53 protein. Results in human cells constitutively lacking p53 or BAX, confirmed that a p53-dependent pathway mediates apoptosis in SMC3-deficient cells. A population of aneuploid cells accumulated in zebrafish embryos following Smc3-knockdown whereas in human cells the transient downregulation of SMC3 level lead to the generation of cells with amplified centrosome number. Conclusion Smc3 is required for normal embryonic development. Its deficiency affects the morphogenesis of tissues with high mitotic index by triggering an apoptotic cascade involving p53 and the downstream p53 target gene bax. Cells with low SMC3 level display centrosome abnormalities that can lead to or are the consequence of dysfunctional mitosis and

  13. Hypoxia downregulates p53 but induces apoptosis and enhances expression of BAD in cultures of human syncytiotrophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baosheng; Longtine, Mark S; Sadovsky, Yoel; Nelson, D Michael

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxia is commonly assigned a role in the placental dysfunction characteristic of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. We previously showed that hypoxia upregulates p53 and enhances apoptosis in primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts. Here we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia also induces apoptosis in syncytiotrophoblasts by upregulation of p53. Primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts that had differentiated into syncytiotrophoblasts by 52 h were exposed for ≤24 h to 20% or <1% oxygen in the presence or absence of staurosporine or the p53 modulators nutlin-3, pifithrin-α, and pifithrin-μ. Proteins were detected by Western blot analysis or immunofluorescence. Compared with 20% oxygen, exposure of syncytiotrophoblasts to <1% oxygen upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and rapidly downregulated p53. Activity of p53 in hypoxic syncytiotrophoblasts was reduced by the higher expression of the negative p53 regulator MDMX and by the reduction of phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(392), which reduces p53 activity. Conversely, staurosporine, a kinase inhibitor, and nutlin-3, a drug that enhances p53 expression, both raised p53 levels and increased the rate of apoptosis in syncytiotrophoblasts compared with vehicle controls. Immunofluorescence staining showed p53 immunolocalized to both cytoplasm and nuclei of nutlin-3-exposed syncytiotrophoblasts. The hypoxia-induced apoptosis in syncytiotrophoblasts correlated with enhanced expression of the proapoptotic BAD and a reduced level of antiapoptotic BAD phosphorylated on Ser(112). We surmise that cell death induced by extreme hypoxia in syncytiotrophoblasts follows a non-p53-dependent pathway, unlike that of a nonhypoxic stimulus and unlike hypoxic cytotrophoblasts. We speculate that downregulation of p53 activity in response to hypoxia reduces or eliminates the apoptosis transduced by the p53 pathway in syncytiotrophoblasts, thereby limiting cell death and maintaining the integrity of this

  14. Hypoxia downregulates p53 but induces apoptosis and enhances expression of BAD in cultures of human syncytiotrophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baosheng; Longtine, Mark S.; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is commonly assigned a role in the placental dysfunction characteristic of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. We previously showed that hypoxia upregulates p53 and enhances apoptosis in primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts. Here we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia also induces apoptosis in syncytiotrophoblasts by upregulation of p53. Primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts that had differentiated into syncytiotrophoblasts by 52 h were exposed for ≤24 h to 20% or <1% oxygen in the presence or absence of staurosporine or the p53 modulators nutlin-3, pifithrin-α, and pifithrin-μ. Proteins were detected by Western blot analysis or immunofluorescence. Compared with 20% oxygen, exposure of syncytiotrophoblasts to <1% oxygen upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and rapidly downregulated p53. Activity of p53 in hypoxic syncytiotrophoblasts was reduced by the higher expression of the negative p53 regulator MDMX and by the reduction of phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392, which reduces p53 activity. Conversely, staurosporine, a kinase inhibitor, and nutlin-3, a drug that enhances p53 expression, both raised p53 levels and increased the rate of apoptosis in syncytiotrophoblasts compared with vehicle controls. Immunofluorescence staining showed p53 immunolocalized to both cytoplasm and nuclei of nutlin-3-exposed syncytiotrophoblasts. The hypoxia-induced apoptosis in syncytiotrophoblasts correlated with enhanced expression of the proapoptotic BAD and a reduced level of antiapoptotic BAD phosphorylated on Ser112. We surmise that cell death induced by extreme hypoxia in syncytiotrophoblasts follows a non-p53-dependent pathway, unlike that of a nonhypoxic stimulus and unlike hypoxic cytotrophoblasts. We speculate that downregulation of p53 activity in response to hypoxia reduces or eliminates the apoptosis transduced by the p53 pathway in syncytiotrophoblasts, thereby limiting cell death and maintaining the integrity of this critical

  15. Correlation between radiation dose and p53 protein expression levels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Mariana B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Silva, Edvane B; Amaral, Ademir

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein levels and absorbed doses from in vitro irradiated human lymphocytes. For this, samples of blood from 23 donors were irradiated with 0.5; 1; 2; and 4 Gy from a Cobalt-60 source, and the percentages of lymphocytes expressing p53 were scored using Flow Cytometry. The subjects were divided into 3 groups, in accordance with the p53 levels expressed per radiation dose: low (Group I), high (Group II), and excessive levels (Group III). For all groups, the analyses showed that the p53 expression levels increase with the absorbed dose. Particularly for groups I and II, the correlation between this protein expression and the dose follows the linear-quadratic model, such as for radioinduced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate possible applications of this approach in evaluating individual radiosensitivity prior to radiotherapeutical procedures as well as in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers. Furthermore, due to the rapidity of flow-cytometric analyses, the methodology here employed would play an important role in emergency responses to a large-scale radiation incident where many people may have been exposed. PMID:26312422

  16. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucleolar morphology. Remarkably, we find that uL5 (formerly RPL11) and uL18 (RPL5) are the strongest contributors to nucleolar integrity. Together with the 5S rRNA, they form the late-assembling central protuberance on mature 60S subunits, and act as an Hdm2 trap and p53 stabilizer. Other major contributors to p53 homeostasis are also strictly late-assembling large subunit r-proteins essential to nucleolar structure. The identification of the r-proteins that specifically contribute to maintaining nucleolar structure and p53 steady-state level provides insights into fundamental aspects of cell and cancer biology. PMID:27265389

  17. {sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Su Xiaoming; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  18. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucleolar morphology. Remarkably, we find that uL5 (formerly RPL11) and uL18 (RPL5) are the strongest contributors to nucleolar integrity. Together with the 5S rRNA, they form the late-assembling central protuberance on mature 60S subunits, and act as an Hdm2 trap and p53 stabilizer. Other major contributors to p53 homeostasis are also strictly late-assembling large subunit r-proteins essential to nucleolar structure. The identification of the r-proteins that specifically contribute to maintaining nucleolar structure and p53 steady-state level provides insights into fundamental aspects of cell and cancer biology. PMID:27265389

  19. Viral Single-Strand DNA Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Fagan, B. Matthew; Dumitru, Raluca; Bower, Jacquelyn J.; Yadav, Swati; Porteus, Matthew H.; Pevny, Larysa H.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication. PMID:22114676

  20. The p53 family and programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, E. Christine; Sykes, Stephen M.; McMahon, Steven B.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2008-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor continues to hold distinction as the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. The ability of p53 to induce programmed cell death, or apoptosis, of cells exposed to environmental or oncogenic stress constitutes a major pathway whereby p53 exerts its tumor suppressor function. In the past decade we have discovered that p53 is not alone in its mission to destroy damaged or aberrantly proliferating cells: it has two homologues, p63 and p73, that in various cellular contexts and stresses contribute to this process. In this review, the mechanisms whereby p53, and in some cases p63 and p73, induce apoptosis are discussed. Whereas other reviews have focused more extensively on the contribution of individual p53-regulated genes to apoptosis induction by this protein, in this review we focus more on those factors that mediate the decision between growth arrest and apoptosis by p53, p63 and p73, and on the post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions that influence this decision. PMID:18955976

  1. Mutations of the p53 gene in human functional adrenal neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Shiu-Ru Lin; Yau-Jiunn Lee; Juei-Hsiung Tsai

    1994-02-01

    To clarify gene alterations in functional human adrenal tumors, the authors performed molecular analysis for p53 abnormalities in 23 cases with adrenal neoplasms. The immunohistochemical study with anti-p53 monoclonal antibody pAb1801 demonstrated that 10 of 23 (43.5%) cases overexpressed p53 protein in the tumor cells. Using a polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism study, 5 of 6 (83.3%) pheochromocytoma tissues (1 malignant and 5 benign) and 11 of 15 (73.3%) adrenocortical adenomas (2 with Cushing`s syndrome and 13 with primary aldosteronism, all benign) showed an apparent electrophoretic mobility shift between the tumor and its paired adjacent normal adrenal tissue. Such differences were detected in exon 4 (12 cases), exon 5 (2 cases), and exon 7 (3 cases). The types of these mutations in exon 4 were a substitution from threonine (ACC) to isoleucine (ATC) at codon 102 in 5 cases, from glutamine (CAG) to histidine (CAC) at codon 104 in 1 case, from glycine (GGG) to alanine (CGG) at codon 117 in 1 case, from glutamate (GAG) to glutamine (CAG) at codon 68 in 1 case, and single base changes resulting in a premature stop codon at codon 100 in 2 cases. A 2-basepair deletion at codon 175 in exon 5 resulting in a frame shift was identified in 1 case. A single point mutation was identified, resulting in the substitution of glutamine (CAG) for arginine (CGG) at codon 248 of exon 7 in 1 case. A single basepair deletion at codon 249 resulted in a frame shift in 2 cases. There was 1 case with malignant pheochromocytoma that combined a single point mutation in exon 4 and a single base deletion in exon 7. Only 2 of 23 cases showed a loss of a normal allele encoding in the p53 gene. Northern blot analysis with 1.8-kilobase p53 cDNA revealed that p53 mRNA was overexpressed in 6 cases. The results indicate that high frequencies of p53 gene mutation, especially in exon 4, exist in functional adrenal tumors. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Quiescence does not affect p53 and stress response by irradiation in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiawen; Itahana, Koji; Baskar, Rajamanickam

    2015-02-27

    Cells in many organs exist in both proliferating and quiescent states. Proliferating cells are more radio-sensitive, DNA damage pathways including p53 pathway are activated to undergo either G1/S or G2/M arrest to avoid entering S and M phase with DNA damage. On the other hand, quiescent cells are already arrested in G0, therefore there may be fundamental difference of irradiation response between proliferating and quiescent cells, and this difference may affect their radiosensitivity. To understand these differences, proliferating and quiescent human normal lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.10-1 Gy of γ-radiation. The response of key proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell death, and metabolism as well as histone H2AX phosphorylation were examined. Interestingly, p53 and p53 phosphorylation (Ser-15), as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27, were induced similarly in both proliferating and quiescent cells after irradiation. Furthermore, the p53 protein half-life, and expression of cyclin A, cyclin E, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bax, or cytochrome c expression as well as histone H2AX phosphorylation were comparable after irradiation in both phases of cells. The effect of radioprotection by a glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor on p53 pathway was also similar between proliferating and quiescent cells. Our results showed that quiescence does not affect irradiation response of key proteins involved in stress and DNA damage at least in normal fibroblasts, providing a better understanding of the radiation response in quiescent cells, which is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:25637534

  3. p53 mutations in human lymphoid malignancies: Association with Burkitt lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidano, G.; Ballerini, P.; Gong, J.Z.; Inghirami, G.; Knowles, D.M.; Dalla-Favera, R. ); Neri, A, Centro Malattie del Sangue G. Marcora, Milan ); Newcomb, E.W. ); Magrath, I.T. )

    1991-06-15

    The authors have investigated the frequency of p53 mutations in B- and T-cell human lymphoid malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the major subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. p53 exons 5-9 were studied by using genomic DNA from 197 primary tumors and 27 cell lines by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and by direst sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Mutations were found associated with (i) Burkitt lymphoma (9/27 biopsoes; 17/27 cell lines) and its leukemic counterpart L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5/9), both of which also carry activated c-myc oncogenes, and (ii) B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (6/40) and, in particular, its stage of progression known as Richter's transformation (3/7). Mutations were not found at any significant frequency in other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In many cases, only the mutated allele was detectable, implying loss of the normal allele. These results suggest that (1) significant differences in the frequency of p53 mutations are present among subtypes of neoplasms derived from the same tissue; (2) p53 may play a role in tumor progression in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (3) the presence of both p53 loss/inactivation and c-myc oncogene activation may be important in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma and its leukemia form L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  4. IGFBP7 is a p53 target gene inactivated in human lung cancer by DNA hypermethylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Cui, Tiantian; Knösel, Thomas; Yang, Linlin; Zöller, Kristin; Petersen, Iver

    2011-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) was considered a tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. However, the mechanism responsible for the downregulation of this gene has not yet been fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the epigenetic inactivation of IGFBP7 expression in human lung cancer. We found that 14 out of 16 lung cancer cell lines showed decreased expression of IGFBP7 compared to control cells by real-time RT-PCR, and 42 out of 90 patients (46.7%) with primary lung tumor exhibited negative staining of IGFBP7 by immunohistochemistry analysis. The IGFBP7 expression could be restored by demethylation agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) in 7 cancer cell lines. Methylation status of IGFBP7 was further evaluated by bisulfite sequencing (BS) and methylation-specific-PCR (MSP). It turned out that low expression of IGFBP7 was associated with DNA methylation in lung cancer cell lines and in primary lung tumors (P=0.019). To explore the regulatory role of p53 on IGFBP7, we transfected a wild type p53 expression vector into lung cancer cell lines H1299, H2228, and H82. Forced expression of p53 increased IGFBP7 expression only in H82 harboring no IGFBP7 methylation, while transfection in combination with DAC induced the expression of IGFBP7 in H1299 and H2228, in which IGFBP7 was methylated. Additionally, treatment with p53 inducer adriamycin (ADR) alone or in combination with DAC increased the expression of IGFBP7 in the 3 cell lines. Our data suggest that IGFBP7 is inactivated in lung cancer by DNA hypermethylation in both lung cancer cell lines and primary lung tumors, and IGFBP7 might be regulated by p53 in lung cancer cells. PMID:21095038

  5. Human p53 is Inhibited by Glutathionylation of Cysteines Present in the Proximal DNA-Binding Domain During Oxidative Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Velu, Chinavenmeni S.; Niture, Suryakant K.; Doneanu, Catalin E.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.

    2008-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that modulate the redox state of p53 tumor suppressor remain unclear, although its DNA-binding function is known to be strongly inhibited by oxidative and nitrosative stresses. We show that human p53 is subjected to a new and reversible posttranslational modification, namely, S-glutathionylation in stressed states including DNA damage. First, a rapid and direct incorporation of biotinylated GSH or GSSG into the purified recombinant p53 protein was observed. The modified p53 had significantly decreased ability to bind its consensus DNA sequence. Reciprocal immunoprecipitations and a GST-overlay assay showed that p53 in tumor cells was marginally glutathionylated, however, the modification increased greatly after oxidant and DNA-damaging treatments. GSH-modification coexisted with the serine phophorylations in activated p53, and the thiol-conjugated protein was present in nuclei. When tumor cells treated with camptothecin or cisplatin were subsequently exposed to glutathione-enhancing agents, p53 underwent dethiolation accompanied by detectable increases in p21waf1 expression, relative to the DNA damaging drugs alone. Mass spectrometry of GSH-modified p53 protein identified the cysteines 124, 141 and 182, all present in the proximal DNA-binding domain, as the sites of glutathionylation. Biotinylated maleimide also reacted rapidly with Cys141, implying this to be the most reactive cysteine on p53 surface. The glutathionylatable cysteines were found to exist in a negatively-charged microenvironment in cellular p53. Molecular modeling studies located Cys124 and 141 to the dimer interface of p53 and showed glutathionylation of either residue would inhibit p53-DNA association, and also interfere with protein dimerization. These results show for the first time that shielding of reactive cysteines contributes to a negative regulation for human p53, and imply that such an inactivation of the transcription factor may represent an acute defensive

  6. Inhibitor or promoter? The performance of polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum on human tumor cells with different p53 statuses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jue; Chen, Jun-ming; Wang, Xiao-xia; Xia, Yong-mei; Cui, Steve W; Li, Jian; Ding, Zhong-yang

    2016-04-01

    Polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum (GLPs) have been taken as effective supplements by both healthy people and cancer patients for many years. However, this short survey indicates that instead of inhibiting cancer cell growth, both submerge-cultured intracellular GLP and fruiting body GLP can stimulate the growth of human carcinoma cell lines lacking functional p53, such as HCT-116 p53(-/-), Saos-2, H1299, HL-60, MDA-MB-157. Conversely, the two GLPs inhibit all other assayed cells with functional p53. These results could be an alert since mutational inactivation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 is the most frequent genetic alteration found in human tumors. PMID:26999513

  7. The Origins and Evolution of the p53 Family of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Belyi, Vladimir A.; Ak, Prashanth; Markert, Elke; Wang, Haijian; Hu, Wenwei; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Levine, Arnold J.

    2010-01-01

    A common ancestor to the three p53 family members of human genes p53, p63, and p73 is first detected in the evolution of modern‐day sea anemones, in which both structurally and functionally it acts to protect the germ line from genomic instabilities in response to stresses. This p63/p73 common ancestor gene is found in almost all invertebrates and first duplicates to produce a p53 gene and a p63/p73 ancestor in cartilaginous fish. Bony fish contain all three genes, p53, p63, and p73, and the functions of these three transcription factors diversify in the higher vertebrates. Thus, this gene family has preserved its structural features and functional activities for over one billion years of evolution. PMID:20516129

  8. A single-nucleotide variation in a p53-binding site affects nutrient-sensitive human SIRT1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Asma; Hoffman, Timothy A.; DeRicco, Jeremy; Kumar, Ajay; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Jung, Saet-Byel; Yamamori, Tohru; Kim, Young-Rae; Mehdi, Fardeen; Kumar, Santosh; Rankinen, Tuomo; Ravussin, Eric; Irani, Kaikobad

    2010-01-01

    The SIRTUIN1 (SIRT1) deacetylase responds to changes in nutrient availability and regulates mammalian physiology and metabolism. Human and mouse SIRT1 are transcriptionally repressed by p53 via p53 response elements in their proximal promoters. Here, we identify a novel p53-binding sequence in the distal human SIRT1 promoter that is required for nutrient-sensitive SIRT1 transcription. In addition, we show that a common single-nucleotide (C/T) variation in this sequence affects nutrient deprivation-induced SIRT1 transcription, and calorie restriction-induced SIRT1 expression. The p53-binding sequence lies in a region of the SIRT1 promoter that also binds the transcriptional repressor Hypermethylated-In-Cancer-1 (HIC1). Nutrient deprivation increases occupancy by p53, while decreasing occupancy by HIC1, of this region of the promoter. HIC1 and p53 compete with each other for promoter occupancy. In comparison with the T variation, the C variation disrupts the mirror image symmetry of the p53-binding sequence, resulting in decreased binding to p53, decreased nutrient sensitivity of the promoter and impaired calorie restriction-stimulated tissue expression of SIRT1 and SIRT1 target genes AMPKα2 and PGC-1β. Thus, a common SNP in a novel p53-binding sequence in the human SIRT1 promoter affects nutrient-sensitive SIRT1 expression, and could have a significant impact on calorie restriction-induced, SIRT1-mediated, changes in human metabolism and physiology. PMID:20693263

  9. Depression of p53-independent Akt survival signals in human oral cancer cells bearing mutated p53 gene after exposure to high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Yosuke; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kajihara, Atsuhisa; Yamakawa, Nobuhiro; Imai, Yuichiro; Ota, Ichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Mori, Eiichiro; Noda, Taichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kirita, Tadaaki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation induces efficiently apoptosis regardless of p53 gene status. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined whether high-LET radiation depresses the Akt-survival signals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation depresses of survival signals even in the mp53 cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation activates Caspase-9 through depression of survival signals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-LET radiation suppresses cell growth through depression of survival signals. -- Abstract: Although mutations and deletions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene lead to resistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, high-LET radiation efficiently induces cell lethality and apoptosis regardless of the p53 gene status in cancer cells. Recently, it has been suggested that the induction of p53-independent apoptosis takes place through the activation of Caspase-9 which results in the cleavage of Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). This study was designed to examine if high-LET radiation depresses serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) and Akt-related proteins. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) harboring a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays or Fe-ion beams. The cellular contents of Akt-related proteins participating in cell survival signaling were analyzed with Western Blotting 1, 2, 3 and 6 h after irradiation. Cell cycle distributions after irradiation were assayed with flow cytometric analysis. Akt-related protein levels decreased when cells were irradiated with high-LET radiation. High-LET radiation increased G{sub 2}/M phase arrests and suppressed the progression of the cell cycle much more efficiently when compared to low-LET radiation. These results suggest that high-LET radiation enhances apoptosis through the activation of Caspase-3 and Caspase-9, and suppresses cell growth by suppressing Akt-related signaling, even in mp

  10. Mutant p53 cooperates with ETS and selectively up-regulates human MDR1 not MRP1.

    PubMed

    Sampath, J; Sun, D; Kidd, V J; Grenet, J; Gandhi, A; Shapiro, L H; Wang, Q; Zambetti, G P; Schuetz, J D

    2001-10-19

    The most frequently expressed drug resistance genes, MDR1 and MRP1, occur in human tumors with mutant p53. However, it was unknown if mutant p53 transcriptionally regulated both MDR1 and MRP1. We demonstrated that mutant p53 did not activate either the MRP1 promoter or the endogenous gene. In contrast, mutant p53 strongly up-regulated the MDR1 promoter and expression of the endogenous MDR1 gene. Notably, cells that expressed either a transcriptionally inactive mutant p53 or the empty vector showed no endogenous MDR1 up-regulation. Transcriptional activation of the MDR1 promoter by mutant p53 required an Ets binding site, and mutant p53 and Ets-1 synergistically activated MDR1 transcription. Biochemical analysis revealed that Ets-1 interacted exclusively with mutant p53s in vivo but not with wild-type p53. These findings are the first to demonstrate the induction of endogenous MDR1 by mutant p53 and provide insight into the mechanism. PMID:11483599

  11. Enhanced sensitivity to irinotecan by Cdk1 inhibition in the p53-deficient HT29 human colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Abal, Miguel; Bras-Goncalves, Rui; Judde, Jean-Gabriel; Fsihi, Hafida; De Cremoux, Patricia; Louvard, Daniel; Magdelenat, Henri; Robine, Sylvie; Poupon, Marie-France

    2004-03-01

    Mutations in the tumor-suppressor gene p53 have been associated with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Irinotecan (CPT-11), a DNA topoisomerase 1 inhibitor, has been recently incorporated to the adjuvant therapy. Since the DNA-damage checkpoint depends on p53 activation, the status of p53 might critically influence the response to CPT-11. We analysed the sensitivity to CPT-11 in the human colon cancer cell line HT29 (mut p53) and its wild-type (wt)-p53 stably transfected subclone HT29-A4. Cell-cycle analysis in synchronised cells demonstrated the activation of transfected wt-p53 and a p21(WAF1/CIP1)-dependent cell-cycle blockage in the S phase. Activated wt-p53 increased apoptosis and enhanced sensitivity to CPT-11. In p53-deficient cells, cDNA-macroarray analysis and western blotting showed an accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1/cyclin B complex. Subsequent p53-independent activation of the cdk-inhibitor (cdk-I) p21(WAF1/CIP1) prevented cell-cycle progression. Cdk1 induction was exploited in vivo to improve the sensitivity to CPT-11 by additional treatment with the cdk-I CYC-202. We demonstrate a gain of sensitivity to CPT-11 in a p53-mutated colon cancer model either by restoring wild-type p53 function or by sequential treatment with cdk-Is. Considering that mutations in p53 are among the most common genetic alterations in CRC, a therapeutic approach specifically targeting p53-deficient tumors could greatly improve the treatment outcomes. PMID:15001986

  12. A Synthetic Interaction Screen Identifies Factors Selectively Required for Proliferation and TERT Transcription in p53-Deficient Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Mi; Zhu, Lihua J.; Debily, Marie-anne; Kittler, Ellen L. W.; Zapp, Maria L.; Lapointe, David; Gobeil, Stephane; Virbasius, Ching-Man; Green, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi)–based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53−) human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+) human cancer cell lines, diverse p53human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53− cells, RNAi–mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53− but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53− cancer cells. PMID:23284306

  13. p53 suppresses type II endometrial carcinomas in mice and governs endometrial tumour aggressiveness in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Peter J; Ikenberg, Kristian; Fuchs, Thomas J; Rechsteiner, Markus; Georgiev, Strahil; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Noske, Aurelia; Roessle, Matthias; Caduff, Rosmarie; Dellas, Athanassios; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Krek, Wilhelm; Frew, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas are a highly aggressive group of tumour subtypes that are frequently associated with inactivation of the TP53 tumour suppressor gene. We show that mice with endometrium-specific deletion of Trp53 initially exhibited histological changes that are identical to known precursor lesions of type II endometrial carcinomas in humans and later developed carcinomas representing all type II subtypes. The mTORC1 signalling pathway was frequently activated in these precursor lesions and tumours, suggesting a genetic cooperation between this pathway and Trp53 deficiency in tumour initiation. Consistent with this idea, analyses of 521 human endometrial carcinomas identified frequent mTORC1 pathway activation in type I as well as type II endometrial carcinoma subtypes. mTORC1 pathway activation and p53 expression or mutation status each independently predicted poor patient survival. We suggest that molecular alterations in p53 and the mTORC1 pathway play different roles in the initiation of the different endometrial cancer subtypes, but that combined p53 inactivation and mTORC1 pathway activation are unifying pathogenic features among histologically diverse subtypes of late stage aggressive endometrial tumours. PMID:22678923

  14. Interactions of nucleolin and ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) in translational control of human p53 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Guo, Kexiao; Kastan, Michael B

    2012-05-11

    Ribosomal protein RPL26 enhances p53 translation after DNA damage, and this regulation depends upon interactions between the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of human p53 mRNA (Takagi, M., Absalon, M. J., McLure, K. G., and Kastan, M. B. (2005) Cell 123, 49-63; Chen, J., and Kastan, M. B. (2010) Genes Dev. 24, 2146-2156). In contrast, nucleolin (NCL) suppresses the translation of p53 mRNA and its induction after DNA damage. We confirmed reports that RPL26 and NCL interact with each other and then explored the potential role of this interaction in the translational control of p53 after stress. NCL repression of p53 translation utilizes both the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of p53 mRNA, and NCL binds to the same 5'-3'-UTR interaction region that is critical for the recruitment of RPL26 to p53 mRNA after DNA damage. We also found that NCL is able to oligomerize, consistent with a model in which NCL stabilizes this double-stranded RNA structure. We found that the RNA-binding domain of NCL participates in binding to p53 mRNA, is required for both NCL dimerization and NCL-mediated translational repression, and is the domain of NCL that interacts with RPL26. Excessive RPL26 disrupts NCL dimerization, and point mutations in the NCL-interacting region of RPL26 reduce NCL-RPL26 interactions and attenuate both RPL26 binding to human p53 mRNA and p53 induction by RPL26. These observations suggest a model in which the base pairings in the p53 UTR interaction regions are critical for both translational repression and stress induction of p53 by NCL and RPL26, respectively, and that disruption of a NCL-NCL homodimer by RPL26 may be the switch between translational repression and activation after stress. PMID:22433872

  15. Matrine-induced autophagy regulated by p53 through AMP-activated protein kinase in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shan-Bu; He, Xing-Xing; Yao, Shu-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Matrine, one of the main extract components of Sophora flavescens, has been shown to exhibit inhibitory effects on some tumors through autophagy. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of matrine remains unclear. The cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and SMMC‑7721 were treated with matrine. Signal transduction and gene expression profile were determined. Matrine stimulated autophagy in SMMC‑7721 cells in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent manner, but in an mTOR-independent manner in HepG2 cells. Next, in HepG2 cells, autophagy induced by matrine was regulated by p53 inactivation through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling transduction, then AMPK suppression switched autophagy to apoptosis. Furthermore, the interferon (IFN)-inducible genes, including interferon α-inducible protein 27 (IFI27) and interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), which are downstream effector of p53, might be modulated by matrine-induced autophagy. In addition, we found that the p53 protein isoforms, p53β, p53γ, ∆133p53, and ∆133p53γ, due to alternative splicing of intron 9, might be regulated by the p53-mediated autophagy. These results show that matrine induces autophagy in human hepatoma cells through a novel mechanism, which is p53/AMPK signaling pathway involvement in matrine-promoted autophagy. PMID:26034977

  16. Human p53 oncogene contains one promoter upstream of exon 1 and a second, stronger promoter within intron 1

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D.; Greenberg, M.; Rotter, V. )

    1988-07-01

    To gain insight into how transcription of the human p53 oncogene is controlled, the authors characterized the regulatory regions of the gene. A 3.8-kilobase-pair (kbp) EcoRI restriction fragment encompassing the 5{prime} end of the human p53 gene, as well as subfragments generated by restriction digests, was cloned upstream of the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene and CAT activity was assayed in extracts of transfected cells. Two types of CAT vectors were used: Epstein-Barr virus oriP-derived constructs that were stably introduced into the human cell lines K562, Raji, and HL-60, and pSVO-CAT-derived constructs that were transiently introduced into the monkey cell line COS. By this approach they have identified two promoters for the human p53 gene. One promoter, p53P1, is located 100-250 bp upstream of the 218-bp noncoding first exon; a second, stronger promoter, p53P2, maps within the first intron. CAT activity and expression of CAT RNA indicate that p53P2 functions up to 50-fold more efficiently than p53P1. They conclude that the expression of the human p53 gene may be controlled by two promoters and that differential regulation of these promoters may play an important role in the altered expression of the gene in both normal and transformed cells.

  17. Liriodenine induces the apoptosis of human laryngocarcinoma cells via the upregulation of p53 expression

    PubMed Central

    LI, LIANG; XU, YING; WANG, BINQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Laryngocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive cancers that affects the head and neck region. The survival rate of patients with laryngocarcinoma is low due to late metastases and the resistance of the disease to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Liriodenine, an alkaloid extracted from a number of plant species, has demonstrated antitumor effects on multiple types of cancer. However, the effects of liriodenine upon laryngocarcinoma, and the underlying mechanisms, are yet to be elucidated. The present study therefore investigated the potential antitumor effects of liriodenine on HEp-2 human laryngocarcinoma cells in vitro and HEp-2-implanted nude mice in vivo. Liriodenine induced significant apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration in the HEp-2 cells. Furthermore, the rate of tumor growth in the HEp-2-implanted nude mice was inhibited by the administration of liriodenine. The potential mechanism underlying the antitumor effects of liriodenine may result from an upregulative effect upon p53 expression, which ultimately induces cellular apoptosis. By contrast, the downregulation of p53 significantly reduced the antitumor effects of liriodenine. Together, these results suggest that liriodenine exhibits potent antitumor activities in laryngocarcinoma HEp-2 cells, in vitro and in vivo, via the upregulation of p53 expression. Liriodenine may therefore be a potential therapy for the treatment of laryngocarcinoma. PMID:25663867

  18. Acute Endurance Exercise Induces Nuclear p53 Abundance in Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tachtsis, Bill; Smiles, William J.; Lane, Steven C.; Hawley, John A.; Camera, Donny M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor protein p53 may have regulatory roles in exercise response-adaptation processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy, although its cellular location largely governs its biological role. We investigated the subcellular localization of p53 and selected signaling targets in human skeletal muscle following a single bout of endurance exercise. Methods: Sixteen, untrained individuals were pair-matched for aerobic capacity (VO2peak) and allocated to either an exercise (EX, n = 8) or control (CON, n = 8) group. After a resting muscle biopsy, EX performed 60 min continuous cycling at ~70% of VO2peak during which time CON subjects rested. A further biopsy was obtained from both groups 3 h post-exercise (EX) or 4 h after the first biopsy (CON). Results: Nuclear p53 increased after 3 h recovery with EX only (~48%, p < 0.05) but was unchanged in the mitochondrial or cytoplasmic fractions in either group. Autophagy protein 5 (Atg-5) decreased in the mitochondrial protein fraction 3 h post-EX (~69%, P < 0.05) but remained unchanged in CON. There was an increase in cytoplasmic levels of the mitophagy marker PINK1 following 3 h of rest in CON only (~23%, P < 0.05). There were no changes in mitochondrial, nuclear, or cytoplasmic levels of PGC-1α post-exercise in either group. Conclusions: The selective increase in nuclear p53 abundance following endurance exercise suggests a potential pro-autophagy response to remove damaged proteins and organelles prior to initiating mitochondrial biogenesis and remodeling responses in untrained individuals. PMID:27199762

  19. Cross-triggered and cascaded recycling amplification for ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing of the mutant human p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiyun; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Based on an endonuclease-assisted, cross-triggered and cascaded recycling amplification strategy, the construction of a simple electrochemical sensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of the mutant p53 gene in human serum is described. Using this new signal amplification approach, the sub-femtomolar level of the mutant p53 gene can be selectively detected. PMID:27331773

  20. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Yen-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Husan-Wen; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Liang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  1. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of {gamma}-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  2. MDM2 small-molecule antagonist RG7112 activates p53 signaling and regresses human tumors in preclinical cancer models.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Christian; Graves, Bradford; Packman, Kathryn; Filipovic, Zoran; Higgins, Brian; Xia, Mingxuan; Tardell, Christine; Garrido, Rosario; Lee, Edmund; Kolinsky, Kenneth; To, Kwong-Him; Linn, Michael; Podlaski, Frank; Wovkulich, Peter; Vu, Binh; Vassilev, Lyubomir T

    2013-04-15

    MDM2 negatively regulates p53 stability and many human tumors overproduce MDM2 as a mechanism to restrict p53 function. Thus, inhibitors of p53-MDM2 binding that can reactivate p53 in cancer cells may offer an effective approach for cancer therapy. RG7112 is a potent and selective member of the nutlin family of MDM2 antagonists currently in phase I clinical studies. RG7112 binds MDM2 with high affinity (K(D) ~ 11 nmol/L), blocking its interactions with p53 in vitro. A crystal structure of the RG7112-MDM2 complex revealed that the small molecule binds in the p53 pocket of MDM2, mimicking the interactions of critical p53 amino acid residues. Treatment of cancer cells expressing wild-type p53 with RG7112 activated the p53 pathway, leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. RG7112 showed potent antitumor activity against a panel of solid tumor cell lines. However, its apoptotic activity varied widely with the best response observed in osteosarcoma cells with MDM2 gene amplification. Interestingly, inhibition of caspase activity did not change the kinetics of p53-induced cell death. Oral administration of RG7112 to human xenograft-bearing mice at nontoxic concentrations caused dose-dependent changes in proliferation/apoptosis biomarkers as well as tumor inhibition and regression. Notably, RG7112 was highly synergistic with androgen deprivation in LNCaP xenograft tumors. Our findings offer a preclinical proof-of-concept that RG7112 is effective in treatment of solid tumors expressing wild-type p53. PMID:23400593

  3. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shu-Jun; Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han; Shih, Wen-Ling; Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  4. Zinc deficiency induces apoptosis via mitochondrial p53- and caspase-dependent pathways in human neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S; Gower-Winter, Shannon D; Morgan, Thomas J; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent increases in the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein BAX leading to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential as demonstrated by a 25% decrease in JC-1 red:green fluorescence ratio. Disruption of mitochondrial membrane integrity was accompanied by efflux of the apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria and translocation to the nucleus with a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 24h of zinc deficiency. Measurement of caspase cleavage, mRNA, and treatment with caspase inhibitors revealed the involvement of caspases 2, 3, 6, and 7 in zinc deficiency-mediated apoptosis. Down-stream targets of caspase activation, including the nuclear structure protein lamin and polyADP ribose polymerase (PARP), which participates in DNA repair, were also cleaved. Transfection with a dominant-negative p53 construct and use of the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-μ, established that these alterations were largely dependent on p53. Together these data identify a cascade of events involving mitochondrial p53 as well as p53-dependent caspase-mediated mechanisms leading to apoptosis during zinc deficiency. PMID:25467851

  5. Lack of dependence on p53 for DNA double strand break repair of episomal vectors in human lymphoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohli, M.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene has been shown to be involved in a variety of repair processes, and recent findings have suggested that p53 may be involved in DNA double strand break repair in irradiated cells. The role of p53 in DNA double strand break repair, however, has not been fully investigated. In this study, we have constructed a novel Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-based shuttle vector, designated as pZEBNA, to explore the influence of p53 on DNA strand break repair in human lymphoblasts, since EBV-based vectors do not inactivate the p53 pathway. We have compared plasmid survival of irradiated, restriction enzyme linearized, and calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIP)-treated pZEBNA with a Simian virus 40 (SV40)-based shuttle vector, pZ189, in TK6 (wild-type p53) and WTK1 (mutant p53) lymphoblasts and determined that p53 does not modulate DNA double strand break repair in these cell lines. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Unequal prognostic potentials of p53 gain-of-function mutations in human cancers associate with drug-metabolizing activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Wang, J; Hu, Y; Qian, J; Xu, B; Chen, H; Zou, W; Fang, J-Y

    2014-01-01

    Mutation of p53 is the most common genetic change in human cancer, causing complex effects including not only loss of wild-type function but also gain of novel oncogenic functions (GOF). It is increasingly likely that p53-hotspot mutations may confer different types and magnitudes of GOF, but the evidences are mainly supported by cellular and transgenic animal models. Here we combine large-scale cancer genomic data to characterize the prognostic significance of different p53 mutations in human cancers. Unexpectedly, only mutations on the Arg248 and Arg282 positions displayed significant association with shorter patient survival, but such association was not evident for other hotspot GOF mutations. Gene set enrichment analysis on these mutations revealed higher activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes, including the CYP3A4 cytochrome P450. Ectopic expression of p53 mutant R282W in H1299 and SaOS2 cells significantly upregulated CYP3A4 mRNA and protein levels, and cancer cell lines bearing mortality-associated p53 mutations display higher CYP3A4 expression and resistance to several CYP3A4-metabolized chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results suggest that p53 mutations have unequal GOF activities in human cancers, and future evaluation of p53 as a cancer biomarker should consider which mutation is present in the tumor, rather than having comparison between wild-type and mutant genotypes. PMID:24603336

  7. Histone modifications and p53 binding poise the p21 promoter for activation in human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Itahana, Yoko; Zhang, Jinqiu; Göke, Jonathan; Vardy, Leah A.; Han, Rachel; Iwamoto, Kozue; Cukuroglu, Engin; Robson, Paul; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.; Colman, Alan; Itahana, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The high proliferation rate of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is thought to arise partly from very low expression of p21. However, how p21 is suppressed in ESCs has been unclear. We found that p53 binds to the p21 promoter in human ESCs (hESCs) as efficiently as in differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells, however it does not promote p21 transcription in hESCs. We observed an enrichment for both the repressive histone H3K27me3 and activating histone H3K4me3 chromatin marks at the p21 locus in hESCs, suggesting it is a suppressed, bivalent domain which overrides activation by p53. Reducing H3K27me3 methylation in hESCs rescued p21 expression, and ectopic expression of p21 in hESCs triggered their differentiation. Further, we uncovered a subset of bivalent promoters bound by p53 in hESCs that are similarly induced upon differentiation in a p53-dependent manner, whereas p53 promotes the transcription of other target genes which do not show an enrichment of H3K27me3 in ESCs. Our studies reveal a unique epigenetic strategy used by ESCs to poise undesired p53 target genes, thus balancing the maintenance of pluripotency in the undifferentiated state with a robust response to differentiation signals, while utilizing p53 activity to maintain genomic stability and homeostasis in ESCs. PMID:27346849

  8. Wild-type p53-mediated down-modulation of interleukin 15 and interleukin 15 receptors in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Giovanni, C.; Nanni, P.; Sacchi, A.; Soddu, S.; Manni, I.; D'Orazi, G.; Bulfone-Paus, S.; Pohl, T.; Landuzzi, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Frabetti, F.; Rossi, I.; Lollini, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    We recently reported that rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines express and secrete interleukin 15 (IL-15), a tightly regulated cytokine with IL-2-like activity. To test whether the p53-impaired function that is frequently found in this tumour type could play a role in the IL-15 production, wild-type p53 gene was transduced in the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line RD (which harbours a mutated p53 gene), and its effect on proliferation and expression of IL-15 was studied. Arrest of proliferation was induced by wild-type p53; increased proportions of G1-arrested cells and of apoptotic cells were observed. A marked down-modulation of IL-15 expression, at both the mRNA and protein level, was found in p53-transduced cells. Because a direct effect of IL-15 on normal muscle cells has been reported, the presence of IL-15 membrane receptors was studied by cytofluorometric analysis. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells showed IL-15 membrane receptors, which are down-modulated by wild-type p53 transfected gene. In conclusion, wild-type p53 transduction in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells induces the down-modulation of both IL-15 production and IL-15 receptor expression. Images Figure 3 PMID:9862562

  9. Histone modifications and p53 binding poise the p21 promoter for activation in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Itahana, Yoko; Zhang, Jinqiu; Göke, Jonathan; Vardy, Leah A; Han, Rachel; Iwamoto, Kozue; Cukuroglu, Engin; Robson, Paul; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Colman, Alan; Itahana, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The high proliferation rate of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is thought to arise partly from very low expression of p21. However, how p21 is suppressed in ESCs has been unclear. We found that p53 binds to the p21 promoter in human ESCs (hESCs) as efficiently as in differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells, however it does not promote p21 transcription in hESCs. We observed an enrichment for both the repressive histone H3K27me3 and activating histone H3K4me3 chromatin marks at the p21 locus in hESCs, suggesting it is a suppressed, bivalent domain which overrides activation by p53. Reducing H3K27me3 methylation in hESCs rescued p21 expression, and ectopic expression of p21 in hESCs triggered their differentiation. Further, we uncovered a subset of bivalent promoters bound by p53 in hESCs that are similarly induced upon differentiation in a p53-dependent manner, whereas p53 promotes the transcription of other target genes which do not show an enrichment of H3K27me3 in ESCs. Our studies reveal a unique epigenetic strategy used by ESCs to poise undesired p53 target genes, thus balancing the maintenance of pluripotency in the undifferentiated state with a robust response to differentiation signals, while utilizing p53 activity to maintain genomic stability and homeostasis in ESCs. PMID:27346849

  10. Negative growth regulation in a glioblastoma tumor cell line that conditionally expresses human wild-type p53

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, W.E.; Shields, M.T.; Amin, M.; Sauve, G.J. ); Appella, E.; Romano, J.W.; Ullrich, S.J. )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the effect that human wild-type p53 (wt-p53) expression has on cell proliferation the authors constructed a recombinant plasmid, pM47, in which wt-p53 cDNA is under transcriptional control of the hormone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter linked to the dominant biochemical selection marker gene Eco gpt. The pM47 plasmid was introduced into T98G cells derived from a human glioblastomas multiforme tumor, and a stable clonal cell line, GM47.23, was derived that conditionally expressed wt-p53 following exposure to dexamethasone. The authors show that induction of wt-p53 expression in exponentially growing cells inhibits cell cycle progression and that the inhibitory effect is reversible upon removal of the inducer or infection with simian virus 40. Moreover, when growth-arrested cells are stimulated to proliferate, induction of wt-p53 expression inhibits G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} progression into S phase and the cells accumulate with a DNA content equivalent to cells arrested in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Taken together, these studies suggest that wt-p53 may play a negative role in growth regulation.

  11. Reinitiation of DNA Synthesis and Cell Division in Senescent Human Fibroblasts by Microinjection of Anti-p53 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gire, Veronique; Wynford-Thomas, David

    1998-01-01

    In human fibroblasts, growth arrest at the end of the normal proliferative life span (induction of senescence) is dependent on the activity of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In contrast, once senescence has been established, it is generally accepted that reinitiation of DNA synthesis requires loss of multiple suppressor pathways, for example, by expression of Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen, and that even this will not induce complete cell cycle traverse. Here we have used microinjection of monoclonal antibodies to the N terminus of p53, PAb1801 and DO-1, to reinvestigate the effect of blocking p53 function in senescent human fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we found that both antibodies induce senescent cells to reenter S phase almost as efficiently as SV40, accompanied by a reversion to the “young” morphology. Furthermore, this is followed by completion of the cell division cycle, as shown by the appearance of mitoses, and by a four- to fivefold increase in cell number 9 days after injection. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that expression of the p53-inducible cyclin/kinase inhibitor p21sdi1/WAF1 was greatly diminished by targeting p53 with either PAb1801 or DO-1 but remained high and, moreover, still p53 dependent in cells expressing SV40 T antigen. As previously observed for induction, the maintenance of fibroblast senescence therefore appears to be critically dependent on functional p53. We suggest that the previous failure to observe this by using SV40 T-antigen mutants to target p53 was most probably due to incomplete abrogation of p53 function. PMID:9488478

  12. Oxidized LDL induces an oxidative stress and activates the tumor suppressor p53 in MRC5 human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mazière, C; Meignotte, A; Dantin, F; Conte, M A; Mazière, J C

    2000-09-24

    It is now well established that oxidized LDL (OxLDL) is involved in the progression of the atheromatous plaque via several mechanisms, including its cytotoxicity toward the arterial wall. Our study demonstrates that a 4-h incubation of cultured human fibroblasts with 25-75 microg/ml OxLDL induced a dose-dependent increase in the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation end products (TBARS). This effect was markedly prevented by the antioxidant vitamin E. The lipid extract of OxLDL partially reproduced the action of the LDL particle itself. Concomitantly, OxLDL enhanced the DNA binding activity of p53 measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and the intracellular protein level of p53 determined by immunoblot analysis. Cycloheximide prevented the OxLDL-induced augmentation in both p53 binding activity and intracellular level. Again, the lipid extract of OxLDL reproduced the effect of OxLDL on p53 binding activity, whereas vitamin E prevented it. These results indicate that OxLDL initiates an intracellular oxidative stress by means of its lipid peroxidation products, leading to the activation of the tumour suppressor p53 by enhancement of p53 protein synthesis. This effect might be related to the cytotoxic effect of OxLDL since the activation of p53 is known to lead to cell cycle arrest, necrosis or apoptosis. PMID:11027537

  13. New insights into the anticancer activity of carnosol: p53 reactivation in the U87MG human glioblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Natali, Letizia; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Daniele, Simona; Bertoli, Alessandra; Flamini, Guido; Braca, Alessandra; Martini, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumour with high resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. As such, increasing attention has focused on developing new therapeutic strategies to improve treatment responses. Recently, attention has been shifted to natural compounds that are able to halt tumour development. Among them, carnosol (CAR), a phenolic diterpene present in rosemary, has become a promising molecule that is able to prevent certain types of solid cancer. However, no data are available on the effects of CAR in GBM. Here, CAR activity decreased the proliferation of different human glioblastoma cell lines, particularly cells that express wild type p53. The p53 pathway is involved in the control of apoptosis and is often impaired in GBM. Notably, CAR, through the dissociation of p53 from its endogenous inhibitor MDM2, was able to increase the intracellular p53 levels in GBM cells. Accordingly, functional reactivation of p53 was demonstrated by the stimulation of p53 target genes' transcription, the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle blockade. Most importantly, CAR produced synergistic effects with temozolomide (TMZ) and reduced the restoration of the tumour cells' proliferation after drug removal. Thus, for the first time, these data highlighted the potential use of the diterpene in the sensitization of GBM cells to chemotherapy through a direct re-activation of p53 pathway. Furthermore, progress has been made in delineating the biochemical mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects of this molecule. PMID:26939786

  14. Species-specific mutual regulation of p53 and miR-138 between human, rat and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Xia, Wei; Su, Xueting; Qin, Xingliang; Chen, Ying; Li, Shaohua; Dong, Jie; Ding, Hongmei; Li, Hui; Huang, Aixue; Ge, Xingfeng; Hou, Lvbin; Wang, Chaonan; Sun, Leqiao; Bai, Chenjun; Shen, Xuelian; Fang, Tao; Liu, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Hongru; Zhang, Hongwen; Shao, Ningsheng

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, p53 was identified to regulate the expression of many miRNAs and was also regulated by miRNAs. In this paper, we found that miR-138 showed a pronounced increase after p53 activation in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, which is mediated by p53 binding sites in the promoter region of its host gene, but this did not happen with rat and mouse cells. More interestingly, we found that p53 could be also regulated by miR-138 in mouse and rat cells, but not in the human NSCLC cells. Our results suggest the existence of species-specific differences of the regulations of miRNA against its targets and the regulations of miRNA itself by other proteins. PMID:27183959

  15. Expression of Cell Competition Markers at the Interface between p53 Signature and Normal Epithelium in the Human Fallopian Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Masahiko; Maeda, Daichi; Kudo-Asabe, Yukitsugu; Sato, Naoki; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Terada, Yukihiro; Goto, Akiteru

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence regarding cell competition between normal and mutant mammalian cells, which suggest that it may play a defensive role in the early phase of carcinogenesis. In vitro study in the past has shown that overexpression of vimentin in normal epithelial cells at the contact surface with transformed cells is essential for the cell competition involved in epithelial defense against cancer. In this study, we attempted to examine cell competition in human tissue in vivo by investigating surgically resected human fallopian tubes that contain p53 signatures and serous tubal intraepithelial lesions (STILs), a linear expansion of p53-immunopositive/TP53 mutant tubal epithelial cells that are considered as precursors of pelvic high grade serous carcinoma. Immunofluorescence double staining for p53 and the cell competition marker vimentin was performed in 21 sections of human fallopian tube tissue containing 17 p53 signatures and 4 STILs. The intensities of vimentin expression at the interface between p53-positive cells at the end of the p53 signature/STIL and adjacent p53-negative normal tubal epithelial cells were compared with the background tubal epithelium. As a result, the average vimentin intensity at the interfaces relative to the background intensity was 1.076 (95% CI, 0.9412 – 1.211 for p53 signature and 0.9790 (95% CI, 0.7206 – 1.237) for STIL. Thus, it can be concluded that overexpression of the cell competition marker vimentin are not observed in human tissue with TP53 alterations. PMID:27258067

  16. Small-Molecule Inhibitor Which Reactivates p53 in Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Transformed Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Jin; Dasgupta, Arindam; Huang, Keven; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Pise-Masison, Cynthia; Gurova, Katerina V.; Brady, John N.

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of the aggressive and fatal disease adult T-cell leukemia. Previous studies have demonstrated that the HTLV-1-encoded Tax protein inhibits the function of tumor suppressor p53 through a Tax-induced NF-κB pathway. Given these attributes, we were interested in the activity of small-molecule inhibitor 9-aminoacridine (9AA), an anticancer drug that targets two important stress response pathways, NF-κB and p53. In the present study, we have examined the effects of 9AA on HTLV-1-transformed cells. Treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell viability. Consistent with these results, we observed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub-G1 and an increase in the number of cells positive by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling assay following treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA. In each assay, HTLV-1-transformed cells C8166, Hut102, and MT2 were more sensitive to treatment with 9AA than control CEM and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Analyzing p53 function, we demonstrate that treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA resulted in an increase in p53 protein and activation of p53 transcription activity. Of significance, 9AA-induced cell death could be blocked by introduction of a p53 small interfering RNA, linking p53 activity and cell death. These results suggest that Tax-repressed p53 function in HTLV-1-transformed cells is “druggable” and can be restored by treatment with 9AA. The fact that 9AA induces p53 and inhibits NF-κB suggests a promising strategy for the treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells. PMID:18550670

  17. Chemotherapy-induced Dkk-1 expression by primary human mesenchymal stem cells is p53 dependent.

    PubMed

    Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Moses, Blake; Piktel, Debbie; Slone, William; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are abundant throughout the body and regulate signaling within tumor microenvironments. Wnt signaling is an extrinsically regulated pathway that has been shown to regulate tumorigenesis in many types of cancer. After evaluating a panel of Wnt activating and inhibiting molecules, we show that primary human MSCs increase the expression of Dkk-1, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, into the extracellular environment following chemotherapy exposure in a p53-dependent manner. Dkk-1 has been shown to promote tumor growth in several models of malignancy, suggesting that MSC-derived Dkk-1 could counteract the intent of cytotoxic chemotherapy, and that pharmacologic inhibition of Dkk-1 in patients receiving chemotherapy treatment for certain malignancies may be warranted. PMID:27586146

  18. SIRT1 inhibition restores apoptotic sensitivity in p53-mutated human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Cook, Anthony L. Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2014-06-15

    Mutations to the p53 gene are common in UV-exposed keratinocytes and contribute to apoptotic resistance in skin cancer. P53-dependent activity is modulated, in part, by a complex, self-limiting feedback loop imposed by miR-34a-mediated regulation of the lysine deacetylase, SIRT1. Expression of numerous microRNAs is dysregulated in squamous and basal cell carcinomas; however the contribution of specific microRNAs to the pathogenesis of skin cancer remains untested. Through use of RNAi, miRNA target site blocking oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors, this study explored the influence of p53 mutational status, SIRT1 activity and miR-34a levels on apoptotic sensitivity in primary (NHEK) and p53-mutated (HaCaT) keratinocyte cell lines. SIRT1 and p53 are overexpressed in p53-mutated keratinocytes, whilst miR-34a levels are 90% less in HaCaT cells. HaCaTs have impaired responses to p53/SIRT1/miR-34a axis manipulation which enhanced survival during exposure to the chemotherapeutic agent, camptothecin. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity in this cell line increased p53 acetylation and doubled camptothecin-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that p53 mutations increase apoptotic resistance in keratinocytes by interfering with miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. Thus, SIRT1 inhibitors may have a therapeutic potential for overcoming apoptotic resistance during skin cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Impaired microRNA biogenesis promotes apoptotic resistance in HaCaT keratinocytes. • TP53 mutations suppress miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. • SIRT1 inhibition increases p53 acetylation in HaCaTs, restoring apoptosis.

  19. Endogenous Human MDM2-C Is Highly Expressed in Human Cancers and Functions as a p53-Independent Growth Activator

    PubMed Central

    Okoro, Danielle R.; Arva, Nicoleta; Gao, Chong; Polotskaia, Alla; Puente, Cindy; Rosso, Melissa; Bargonetti, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Human cancers over-expressing mdm2, through a T to G variation at a single nucleotide polymorphism at position 309 (mdm2 SNP309), have functionally inactivated p53 that is not effectively degraded. They also have high expression of the alternatively spliced transcript, mdm2-C. Alternatively spliced mdm2 transcripts are expressed in many forms of human cancer and when they are exogenously expressed they transform human cells. However no study to date has detected endogenous MDM2 protein isoforms. Studies with exogenous expression of splice variants have been carried out with mdm2-A and mdm2-B, but the mdm2-C isoform has remained virtually unexplored. We addressed the cellular influence of exogenously expressed MDM2-C, and asked if endogenous MDM2-C protein was present in human cancers. To detect endogenous MDM2-C protein, we created a human MDM2-C antibody to the splice junction epitope of exons four and ten (MDM2 C410) and validated the antibody with in vitro translated full length MDM2 compared to MDM2-C. Interestingly, we discovered that MDM2-C co-migrates with MDM2-FL at approximately 98 kDa. Using the validated C410 antibody, we detected high expression of endogenous MDM2-C in human cancer cell lines and human cancer tissues. In the estrogen receptor positive (ER+) mdm2 G/G SNP309 breast cancer cell line, T47D, we observed an increase in endogenous MDM2-C protein with estrogen treatment. MDM2-C localized to the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We examined the biological activity of MDM2-C by exogenously expressing the protein and observed that MDM2-C did not efficiently target p53 for degradation or reduce p53 transcriptional activity. Exogenous expression of MDM2-C in p53-null human cancer cells increased colony formation, indicating p53-independent tumorigenic properties. Our data indicate a role for MDM2-C that does not require the inhibition of p53 for increasing cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:24147044

  20. Characterisation of human fibroblasts as keratinocyte feeder layer using p63 isoforms status.

    PubMed

    Auxenfans, Céline; Thépot, Amélie; Justin, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Shahabeddin, Lili; Damour, Odile; Hainaut, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale culture of primary keratinocytes allows the production of large epidermal sheet surfaces for the treatment of extensive skin burns. This method is dependent upon the capacity to establish cultures of proliferating keratinocytes in conditions compatible with their clonal expansion while maintaining their capacity to differentiate into the typical squamous pattern of human epidermis. Feeder layers are critical in this process because the fibroblasts that compose this layer serve as a source of adhesion, growth and differentiation factors. In this report, we have characterise the expression patterns of p63 isoforms in primary keratinocytes cultured on two different feeder layer systems, murine 3T3 and human fibroblasts. We show that with the latter, keratinocytes express a higher ratio of Delta N to TAp63 isoform, in relation with higher clonogenic potential. These results indicate that human fibroblasts represent an adequate feeder layer system to support the culture of primary human keratinocytes. PMID:20042803

  1. Novel small molecule induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Eun; Min, Yong Ki; Ha, Jae Du; Kim, Bum Tae; Lee, Woo Ghil . E-mail: bigguy@krict.re.kr

    2007-07-06

    Using high-throughput screening with small-molecule libraries, we identified a compound, KCG165 [(2-(3-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)ethoxy)-1,10b-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c] quinazolin-5(6H)-one)], which strongly activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity. KCG165-induced phosphorylations of p53 at Ser{sup 6}, Ser{sup 15}, and Ser{sup 20}, which are all key residues involved in the activation and stabilization of p53. Consistent with these findings, KCG165 increased level of p53 protein and led to the accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 in the nucleus with the increased occupancy of p53 in the endogenous promoter region of its downstream target gene, p21{sup WAF1/CIP}. Notably, KCG165-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, we suggested topoisomerase II as the molecular target of KCG165. Together, these results indicate that KCG165 may have potential applications as an antitumor agent.

  2. Intratumor Cellular Heterogeneity and Alterations in ras Oncogene and p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Human Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Noboru; Hiasa, Yoshio; Matsuda, Hirofumi; Tao, Ming; Tsuzuki, Toshihide; Hayashi, Isao; Kitahori, Yoshiteru; Shiraishi, Taizo; Yatani, Ryuichi; Shimazaki, Jun; Lin, Jung-Chung

    1995-01-01

    To assess the potential role of ras oncogene activation and P53 tumor suppressor gene mutations in the development of human prostate carcinoma, nine cases of histologically heterogeneous prostate tumors obtained from total prostatectomies were probed for these specific events. Each tumor was divided into 5 to 10 areas according to different growth or histological patterns. Targeted DNA sequences coding for ras and p53 were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, analyzed by single-strand conformational polymorphisms, and confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Point mutations of the ras gene were found in three of the nine tumors. Two contained K-ras codon 13 and H-ras codon 61 mutations, found in only one and three areas of each lesion, respectively. The third tumor contained two different point mutations in K-ras codons 13 and 61 in different foci of the sample. Loss of heterozygosity at the polymorphic codon 72 in the p53 gene was detected in two of four informative cases (50%) showing fragment cleavage by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Mutations in p53, missense transversions, single base insertions, and two base deletions were also detected in three tumors. The present results reveal mutated ras and p53 occasionally occurring in small foci of the tumor and that genetic mutations in p53, as opposed to those in ras, are more closely associated with invasive growth of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:7573356

  3. Apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma and in liver cell dysplasia is correlated with p53 protein immunoreactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, M; Zimmermann, A

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) of different types and grades and in liver cell dysplasia, and to test whether the apoptotic rate is correlated with the p53 protein status. METHODS: 37 HCC and 66 six liver samples with liver cell dysplasia were analysed for apoptosis using in situ DNA end labelling (ISEL), and for p53 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. In HCCs, proliferative activity was quantitatively assessed using proliferating cell nuclear antigen labelling. RESULTS: The apoptotic index in HCC as based on ISEL ranged from 0.1 to 13.5 per 1000 cells analysed and was not related to type or grade. No nuclear staining was observed in multinuclear tumour cells. There was a significant correlation between the apoptotic rate and both the proliferative activity and p53 protein reactivity. In liver samples containing p53 protein positive liver cell dysplasia cells, there was a significantly higher apoptotic rate of these cells. CONCLUSIONS: Apoptosis is detectable in HCC, and is not related to type and grade. There is a highly significant positive correlation between the apoptotic rate in HCC and both the proliferative activity and p53 protein expression. A similar phenomenon occurs for putative cancer precursors. The findings support the role of p53 in regulating apoptosis in preneoplastic and neoplastic liver lesions. Images PMID:9215122

  4. p53-dependent global nucleotide excision repair of cisplatin-induced intrastrand cross links in human cells.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Sara; Hewer, Alan; Phillips, David H; Lloyd, Daniel R

    2008-03-01

    Cisplatin is an extremely effective chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of testicular and other solid tumours. It induces a variety of structural modifications in DNA, the most abundant being the GpG- and ApG-1,2-intrastrand cross links formed between adjacent purine bases. These cross links account for approximately 90% of cisplatin-induced DNA damage and are thought to be responsible for the cytotoxic activity of the drug. In human cells, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process removes the intrastrand cross links from the genome, the efficiency of which is likely to be an important determinant of cisplatin cytotoxicity. We have investigated whether the p53 tumour suppressor status affects global NER of cisplatin-induced intrastrand cross links in human cells. We have used a (32)P-postlabelling method to monitor the removal of GpG- and ApG-intrastrand cross links from two human cell models (the 041TR system, in which p53 is regulated by a tetracycline-inducible promoter, together with WI38 fibroblasts and the SV40-transformed derivative VA13) that each differ in p53 status. We demonstrate that the absence of functional p53 leads to persistence of both cisplatin-induced intrastrand cross links in the genome, suggesting that p53 regulates NER of these DNA lesions. This observation extends the role of p53 in NER beyond enhancing the removal of environmentally induced DNA lesions to include those of clinical origin. Given the frequency of p53 mutations in human tumours, these results may have implications for the use of cisplatin in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:18267949

  5. Selective induction of apoptosis through the FADD/caspase-8 pathway by a p53 c-terminal peptide in human pre-malignant and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Mao, Yuehua; Rosal, Ramon V; Dinnen, Richard D; Williams, Ann C; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W; Fine, Robert L

    2005-05-20

    A p53 C-terminal peptide (aa 361-382, p53p), fused at its C-terminus to the minimal carrier peptide of antennapedia (17 aa, Ant; p53p-Ant), induced rapid apoptosis in human cancer cells, via activation of the Fas pathway. We examined p53p-Ant mechanism of action, toxicity in various human normal, non-malignant, pre-malignant and malignant cancer cells and investigated its biophysical characteristics. p53p-Ant selectively induced cell death in only pre-malignant or malignant cells in a p53-dependent manner and was not toxic to normal and non-malignant cells. p53p-Ant was more toxic to the mutant p53 than wild-type p53 phenotype in H1299 lung cancer cells stably expressing human temperature-sensitive p53 mutant 143Ala. Surface plasmon resonance (BIACORE) analysis demonstrated that this peptide had higher binding affinity to mutant p53 as compared to wild-type p53. p53p-Ant induced-cell death had the classical morphological characteristics of apoptosis and had no features of necrosis. The mechanism of cell death by p53p-Ant was through the FADD/caspase-8-dependent pathway without the involvement of the TRAIL pathway, Bcl-2 family and cell cycle changes. Blocking Fas with antibody did not alter the peptide's effect, suggesting that Fas itself did not interact with the peptide. Transfection with a dominant-negative FADD with a deleted N-terminus inhibited p53p-Ant-induced apoptosis. Its mechanism of action is related to the FADD-induced pathway without restoration of other p53 functions. p53p-Ant is a novel anticancer agent with unique selectivity for human cancer cells and could be useful as a prototype for the development of new anti-cancer agents. PMID:15645452

  6. Roscovitine up-regulates p53 protein and induces apoptosis in human HeLaS(3) cervix carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Wandl, Stefanie; Kramer, Matthias P; Pickem, Christian; Krystof, Vladimir; Hajek, Susanne B

    2008-12-01

    Exposure of human HeLaS(3) cervix carcinoma cells to high doses of conventional cytostatic drugs, e.g. cisplatin (CP) strongly inhibits their proliferation. However, most cytostatic agents are genotoxic and may generate a secondary malignancy. Therefore, therapeutic strategy using alternative, not cytotoxic drugs would be beneficial. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) by pharmacological inhibitors became recently a promising therapeutic option. Roscovitine (ROSC), a selective CDK inhibitor, efficiently targets human malignant cells. ROSC induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ROSC also activates p53 protein. Activation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is essential for induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Considering the fact that in HeLaS(3) cells wt p53 is inactivated by the action of HPV-encoded E6 oncoprotein, we addressed the question whether ROSC would be able to reactivate p53 protein in them. Their exposure to ROSC for 24 h induced cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M and reduced the number of viable cells. Unlike CP, ROSC in the used doses did not induce DNA damage and was not directly cytotoxic. Despite lack of detectable DNA lesions, ROSC activated wt p53 protein. The increase of p53 levels was attributable to the ROSC-mediated protein stabilization. Further analyses revealed that ROSC induced site-specific phosphorylation of p53 protein at Ser46. After longer exposure, ROSC induced apoptosis in HeLaS(3) cells. These results indicate that therapy of HeLaS(3) cells by ROSC could offer an advantage over that by CP due to its increased selectivity and markedly reduced risk of generation of a secondary cancer. PMID:18846503

  7. [Mutation of P53 gene in a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line].

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Cui, W; Gao, Y

    1995-07-01

    PG cell line, derived from a lung giant cell carcinoma, has the characteristics of rapid growth and high tumorigenicity. When transplanted to nude mice, spontanious metastasis to lung and lymphnode is high in frequency and stable. To understand the molecular basis of PG's biological behaviors, expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 was studied. It was found that expression of p53 protein was increased as demonstrated by immunohistochemical stainning. A change in polymorphsim in exon 7 of p53 gene was detected by nonisotopic PCR-SSCP, suggesting a change in base composition. Thermal cycling sequencing of both strands of exon 7 demonstrated a transversion of CGG to CTT at codon 248. Similar study with the same methods on Ki-ras oncogene was done, but no mutation was found. The relationship between p53 gene mutation and the metastatic potential of PG cells needs further exploration. PMID:7587895

  8. A novel p53 mutant in human breast cancer revealed by multiple SSCP analysis.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Napolitano, M; Abbondanza, C; Medici, N; Puca, A A; Schiavulli, M; Armetta, I; Moncharmont, B; Puca, G A; Molinari, A M

    1994-04-29

    DNA from tumor tissue and peripheral blood lymphocytes of primary breast cancer patients was screened for the presence of p53 mutations. In DNA from one tumor we found that the histidine codon 193 (CAT) was somatically converted to arginine (CGT). This amino acid residue is highly conserved in many species, thus suggesting that such mutation plays an important role in the loss of wt-p53 function. PMID:8187056

  9. Evidence of reciprocity of bcl-2 and p53 expression in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A. J.; Merritt, A. J.; Jones, L. S.; Askew, J. N.; Anderson, E.; Becciolini, A.; Balzi, M.; Potten, C. S.; Hickman, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Evidence of accumulating for the failure of apoptosis as an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to adjuvant therapy. The proto-oncogene bcl-2 suppresses apoptosis. Its expression could provide an important survival advantage permitting the development of colorectal cancer. The expression of bcl-2 and p53 was determined by immunohistochemistry in 47 samples of histologically normal colonic mucosa, 19 adenomas and 53 adenocarcinomas. Expression of bcl-2 in colonic crypts > 5 cm from the tumours was confined to crypt bases but was more extensive and intense in normal crypts < 5 mm from cancers. A higher proportion of adenomas (63.2%) than carcinomas (36.5%) expressed bcl-2 (P < 0.05). A lower proportion of adenomas (31.6%) than carcinomas (62.3%) expressed p53 (P < 0.02). A total of 26.3% of adenomas and 22% of carcinomas expressed both bcl-2 and p53. To determine whether these samples contained cells which expressed both proteins, a dual staining technique for bcl-2 and p53 was used. Only 1/19 adenomas and 2/53 carcinomas contained cells immunopositive for both bcl-2 and p53. Moreover there was evidence of reciprocity of expression of bcl-2 and p53 in these three double staining neoplasms. We suggest that bcl-2 provides a survival advantage in the proliferative compartment of normal crypts and colorectal neoplasms. However, its expression is lost during the evolution from adenoma to carcinoma, whereas p53 expression is increased, an event generally coincident with the expression of stabilised p53, which we presume to represent the mutant form. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8611422

  10. Drug resistance to inhibitors of the human double minute-2 E3 ligase is mediated by point mutations of p53, but can be overcome with the p53 targeting agent RITA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard J; Bjorklund, Chad C; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Kuhn, Deborah J; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2012-10-01

    The human double minute (HDM)-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase plays a key role in p53 turnover and has been validated preclinically as a target in multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). HDM-2 inhibitors are entering clinical trials, and we therefore sought to understand potential mechanisms of resistance in lymphoid models. Wild-type p53 H929 MM and Granta-519 MCL cells resistant to MI-63 or Nutlin were generated by exposing them to increasing drug concentrations. MI-63-resistant H929 and Granta-519 cells were resistant to Nutlin, whereas Nutlin-resistant cells displayed cross-resistance to MI-63. These cells also showed cross-resistance to bortezomib, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and melphalan, but remained sensitive to the small molecule inhibitor RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis). HDM-2 inhibitor-resistant cells harbored increased p53 levels, but neither genotoxic nor nongenotoxic approaches to activate p53 induced HDM-2 or p21. Resequencing revealed wild-type HDM-2, but mutations were found in the p53 DNA binding and dimerization domains. In resistant cells, RITA induced a G(2)-M arrest, upregulation of p53 targets HDM-2, PUMA, and NOXA, and PARP cleavage. Combination regimens with RITA and MI-63 resulted in enhanced cell death compared with RITA alone. These findings support the possibility that p53 mutation could be a primary mechanism of acquired resistance to HDM-2 inhibitors in MCL and MM. Furthermore, they suggest that simultaneous restoration of p53 function and HDM-2 inhibition is a rational strategy for clinical translation. PMID:22933706

  11. Sirt 1 activator inhibits the AGE-induced apoptosis and p53 acetylation in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Lina; Zhou, Changyong; Lin, Nan; Liu, Aiguo

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by nonenzymatic glycation reactions are extremely accumulated in the diabetic vascular cells, neurons, and glia, and are confirmed to play important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus -induced cardiovascular complications. Sirt 1, known as mammalian sirtuin, has been recognized to regulate insulin secretion and protect cells against oxidative stress, which is promoted by the accumulated AGEs in cardiovascular cells. In the present study, we treated human endothelial Eahy926 cells with AGEs, and determined the apoptosis induction, caspase activation, the Sirt 1 activity, the expression and acetylation of p53. Then we manipulated Sirt 1 activity with a Sirt 1 activator, Resveratrol (RSV), and a Sirt 1 inhibitor, sirtinol, in the AGE-BSA-treated Eahy926 cells, and then re-evaluated the apoptosis induction, caspase activation, the expression and acetylation of p53. Results demonstrated that AGEs induced apoptosis in the human endothelial Eahy926 cells, by promoting the cytochrome c release, activation of caspase 9/3. Also, the AGE-BSA treatment promoted the total p53 level and acetylated (Ac) p53, but reduced the Sirt 1 level and activity. On the other hand, the Sirt 1 inhibitor/activator not only deteriorated/ameliorated the promotion to p53 level and Ac p53, but also aggravated/inhibited the AGE-induced apoptosis and the promotion to apoptosis-associated signaling molecules. In conclusion, the present study confirmed the apoptosis promotion by AGEs in endothelial Eahy926 cells, by regulating the Sirt 1 activity and p53 signaling, it also implies the protective role of Sirt 1 activator against the AGE-induced apoptosis. PMID:26354378

  12. p63 regulates glutaminase 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbe, Arianna; Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Bernassola, Francesca; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Markert, Elke Katrin; Levine, Arnold J.; Feng, Zhaohui; Agostini, Massimilano; Zolla, Lello; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Notterman, Daniel A.; Melino, Gerry; Peschiaroli, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 is critical for many biological processes, including development and maintenance of epidermal tissues and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the TAp63 isoforms regulate cell metabolism through the induction of the mitochondrial glutaminase 2 (GLS2) gene both in primary cells and tumor cell lines. By ChIP analysis and luciferase assay, we confirmed that TAp63 binds directly to the p53/p63 consensus DNA binding sequence within the GLS2 promoter region. Given the critical role of p63 in epidermal differentiation, we have investigated the regulation of GLS2 expression during this process. GLS2 and TAp63 expression increases during the in vitro differentiation of primary human keratinocytes, and depletion of GLS2 inhibits skin differentiation both at molecular and cellular levels. We found that GLS2 and TAp63 expression are concomitantly induced in cancer cells exposed to oxidative stresses. siRNA-mediated depletion of GLS2 sensitizes cells to ROS-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the TAp63/GLS2 axis can be functionally important as a cellular antioxidant pathway in the absence of p53. Accordingly, we found that GLS2 is upregulated in colon adenocarcinoma. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that GLS2 is a bona fide TAp63 target gene, and that the TAp63-dependent regulation of GLS2 is important for both physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23574722

  13. Activation of p53 contributes to pseudolaric acid B-induced senescence in human lung cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guo-dong; Yang, Jing; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Ye; Qi, Min; Fan, Si-miao; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Pseudolaric acid B (PAB), a diterpene acid isolated from the root bark of Pseudolarix kaempferi Gordon, has shown to exert anti-tumor effects via inducing cell cycle arrest followed by apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Here we reported that PAB induced a mitotic catastrophe in human lung cancer A549 cells, which resulted in senescence without apoptosis or necrosis. Methods: Three human lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460 and H1299 cells) were examined. Cell growth inhibition was assessed with MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution was determined using a flow cytometer. Cell nuclear morphology was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Senescent cells were detected using SA-β-Gal staining. Apoptotic and senescent protein expression was examined using Western blot analysis. The expression of p53 and p21 in the cells was downregulated by siRNAs. Results: Treatment with PAB (5–80 μmol/L) inhibited the growth of A549 cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Prolonged treatment with PAB (20 μmol/L) caused G2/M arrest at day 1 followed by mitotic catastrophe from day 2, which eventually resulted in cell senescence between days 3 and 4 without cell death (apoptosis or necrosis). Knockdown of p53 expression with siRNA significantly suppressed PAB-induced senescence in A549 cells (p53 wild). Furthermore, PAB-induced senescence was also observed in human lung cancer H460 cells (p53 wild), but not in human lung cancer H1299 cells (p53 null). Conclusion: The anti-tumor action of PAB against human lung cancer A549 cells in vitro involves the induction of senescence through activation of the p53 pathway. PMID:27041461

  14. Regulation of transcription of the human presenilin-1 gene by ets transcription factors and the p53 protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Pastorcic, M; Das, H K

    2000-11-10

    The expression of the human presenilin-1 cellular gene is suppressed by the p53 protooncogene. The rapid kinetic of the down-regulation has suggested that it may result from a primary mechanism. We show here that p53 also suppresses the transcription of a presenilin-1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter synthetic gene in transient infection assays in neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) and hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines. Only a minimum promoter including sequences from -35 to + 6 from the transcription initiation is sufficient to confer down-regulation. We have previously defined a crucial DNA element controlling 90% of the expression of the gene within the same short area, and the identification of the transcription factors involved should also provide insights into the regulation of PS1 by p53. This region contains an Ets transcription factor binding motif, and a 2-base pair alteration within the core sequence (GGAA to TTAA) of the Ets consensus also reduced transcription by more than 90%. We now show that Ets1 and Ets2 indeed transactivate a PS1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter including the (-35 to +6) fragment. Furthermore, in vitro translated Ets2 binds specifically to the -10 Ets motif in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Therefore, Ets1/2 factors bind specifically to the -10 Ets element and activate PS1 transcription. We also show that the coactivator p300 enhances the activation by Ets1 and Ets2 as well as the repression by p53. p300 is known to interact with p53 as well as with Ets1 and Ets2. We show that p53 does not bind directly to the PS1 promoter. Hence the repression of PS1 transcription by p53 is likely to be mediated through protein-protein interactions. PMID:10942770

  15. P16/p53 expression and telomerase activity in immortalized human dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    Egbuniwe, Obi; Idowu, Bernadine D; Funes, Juan M; Grant, Andrew D; Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Residing within human dental pulp are cells of an ectomesenchymal origin that have the potential to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells. These cells have a limited growth potential owing to the effects of cell senescence. This study examines the effects of immortalizing odontoblast-like cells on cell proliferation and mineralization by comparing transformed dental pulp stem cells (tDPSCs) and non-transformed dental pulp stem cells (nDPSCs). Results With the exogenous expression of hTERT, tDPSCs maintained a continued expression of odontogenic markers for cell proliferation and mineralization (ALP, COL-1, DMP-1, DSPP, OCN and OPN), as did nDPSCs. Oncoprotein expression was seen in both groups except for a noted absence of p16 in the tDPSCs. nDPSCs also showed lower levels of total ALP and DNA activity in comparison to tDPSCs when assayed, as well as low telomerase activity readings. Methods Using a retroviral vector, exogenous human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) was expressed in tDPSCs. Both cell groups were cultured, and their telomerase activities were determined using a telomerase quantification assay. Also examined, were the expression of genes involved in proliferation and mineralization, such as human alkaline phosphatase (ALP), β-actin, collagen I (col-1), core binding factor (cbfa)-1, dentin matrix protein (DMP-1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), GAPDH, hTERT, osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN) as well as oncoproteins involved in senescence (p16, p21 and p53) using RT-PCR. DNA and alkaline phosphate activity was also assayed in both cell groups. Conclusion These results indicate maintenance of odontoblast-like differentiation characteristics after retroviral transformation with hTERT and suggest a possible link with a reduced p16 expression. PMID:22067611

  16. Central role of mitochondria and p53 in PUVA-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes cell line NCTC-2544

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, Giampietro Fortunato, Elena; Cecconet, Laura; Del Giudice, Laura; Dall'Acqua, Francesco; Basso, Giuseppe

    2008-02-15

    Despite strong evidence concerning the high efficiency of PUVA therapy (psoralen plus UVA light), its mechanism of action has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we have evaluated in a cell line of human keratinocytes (NCTC-2544) the effects of two linear psoralen derivatives, 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP), that are widely used in PUVA therapy and two angular derivatives, Angelicin (ANG) and 4,6,4'-trymetyl angelicin (TMA). All derivatives photoinduce cellular death, TMA being the most active compound. The cell cycle analysis showed that the four derivatives induce, 24 h after irradiation, a cell cycle arrest in G1 phase later followed by massive apoptosis. The G1 arrest is correlated to an increase in the expression of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1}, a protein associated with the cell cycle block and apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of NCTC-2544 resulted in p53 activation by 5-MOP, 8-MOP, and ANG but not TMA and its phosphorylation at serine-15. The levels of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} paralleled p53 protein staining pattern suggesting that p53 activation correlated with p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction. Simultaneous to p53 activation, psoralens induced mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, as well as caspase-3 and -9 activation. Thus these results strongly indicate the necessity of p53 activation and the induction of the apoptotic machinery downstream of mitochondria.

  17. Drug Resistance to Inhibitors of the Human Double Minute-2 E3 Ligase is Mediated by Point Mutations of p53, but can be Overcome with the p53 Targeting Agent RITA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard J.; Bjorklund, Chad C.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Kuhn, Deborah J.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2012-01-01

    The human double minute (HDM)-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase plays a key role in p53 turnover, and has been validated pre-clinically as a target in multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). HDM-2 inhibitors are entering clinical trials, and we therefore sought to understand potential mechanisms of resistance in lymphoid models. Wild-type p53 H929 MM and Granta-519 MCL cells resistant to MI-63 or Nutlin were generated by exposing them to increasing drug concentrations. MI-63-resistant H929 and Granta-519 cells were resistant to Nutlin, while Nutlin-resistant cells displayed cross-resistance to MI-63. These cells also showed cross-resistance to bortezomib, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and melphalan, but remained sensitive to the small molecule inhibitor RITA. HDM-2 inhibitor-resistant cells harbored increased p53 levels, but neither genotoxic nor non-genotoxic approaches to activate p53 induced HDM-2 or p21. Resequencing revealed wild-type HDM-2, but mutations were found in the p53 DNA binding and dimerization domains. In resistant cells, RITA induced a G2/M arrest, up-regulation of p53 targets HDM-2, PUMA, and NOXA, and PARP cleavage. Combination regimens with RITA and MI-63 resulted in enhanced cell death compared to RITA alone. These findings support the possibility that p53 mutation could be a primary mechanism of acquired resistance to HDM-2 inhibitors in MCL and MM. Furthermore, they suggest that simultaneous restoration of p53 function and HDM-2 inhibition is a rational strategy for clinical translation. PMID:22933706

  18. Chromosome instability in human hepatocellular carcinoma depends on p53 status and aflatoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Pascal; Marchio, Agnès; Battiston, Carlo; Cordina, Emilie; Russo, Alessandro; Terris, Benoît; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Turlin, Bruno; Tang, Zhao-You; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Dejean, Anne

    2008-05-31

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous disease triggered by various risk factors and frequently characterized by chromosome instability. This instability is considered to be caused primarily by Hepatitis B virus (HBV), although aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a potent fungal mutagen is also suspected to influence chromosomal repair. We studied 90 HCCs from Italy, the country with the highest incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in Europe, 81 samples from France and 52 specimens from Shanghai, in a region where intake of AFB1 via the diet is known to be high. All 223 tumours were characterized for 15 different genomic targets, including allelic loss at 13 chromosome arms and mutations of beta-catenin and p53 genes. Despite disparity in risk-factor distribution, Italian and French cases did not significantly differ for 14 of the 15 targets tested. beta-Catenin and p53 displayed moderate and similar mutation rates (18-29% of cases) in European series. By contrast, tumours from Shanghai were significantly different, with a lower mutation rate for beta-catenin (4% vs. 26%, p<0.0003) and a higher mutation rate for p53 (48% vs. 22%, p<0.0001) when compared with tumours of European origin. The Arg249Ser mutation, hallmark of exposure to AFB1, represented half of the changes in p53 in Shanghai. Furthermore, when stratified for the presence of HBV or p53 mutations, chromosome instability was always higher in Chinese than in European patients. This difference was particularly strong in p53-wildtype tumours (fractional allelic loss, 29.4% vs. 16.7%, p<0.0001). We suggest that AFB1-associated mutagenesis represents a plausible cause for the higher chromosome instability observed in Chinese HCCs, when compared with European primary liver carcinomas. PMID:18467159

  19. Zinc Induced G2/M Blockage is p53 and p21 Dependent in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The involvement of the p53 and p21 signal pathway in the G2/M cell cycle progression of zinc supplemented normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells was examined using the siRNA approach. Cells were cultured for one passage in different concentrations of zinc: <0.4 microM (ZD) as zinc-deficient;...

  20. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  1. Effect of Mir-122 on Human Cholangiocarcinoma Proliferation, Invasion, and Apoptosis Through P53 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cuiping; Zhang, Jinmei; Cao, Xiangang; Yang, Qian; Xia, Dequan

    2016-01-01

    Background Bile duct carcinoma is a common digestive tract tumor with high morbidity and mortality. As a kind of important non-coding RNA, microRNA (miR) plays an important role in post-transcriptional regulation. MiR-122 is the most abundant miR in the liver. Multiple studies have shown that miR-122 level is reduced in a variety of liver tumors and can be used as a specific marker for liver injury. P53 is a classic tumor suppressor gene that can induce tumor cell apoptosis through various pathways. Whether miR-122 affects p53 in bile duct carcinoma still needs investigation. Material/Methods miR inhibitor or mimics was transfected to bile duct carcinoma cells to evaluate its function on proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and p53 expression. Results MiR-122 overexpression reduced cell invasion and migration ability, and inhibited cell apoptosis and p53 expression. Inhibiting miR-122 caused the opposite results. Conclusions Upregulating miR-122 can suppress bile duct carcinoma cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. MiR-122 could be used as a target for bile duct carcinoma treatment, which provides a new strategy for cholangiocarcinoma patients. PMID:27472451

  2. Misfolding, Aggregation, and Disordered Segments in c-Abl and p53 in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Rangel, Luciana P.; Costa, Danielly C.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2015-01-01

    The current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that lead to cancer is not sufficient to explain the loss or gain of function in proteins related to tumorigenic processes. Among them, more than 100 oncogenes, 20–30 tumor-suppressor genes, and hundreds of genes participating in DNA repair and replication have been found to play a role in the origins of cancer over the last 25 years. The phosphorylation of serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues is a critical step in cellular growth and development and is achieved through the tight regulation of protein kinases. Phosphorylation plays a major role in eukaryotic signaling as kinase domains are found in 2% of our genes. The deregulation of kinase control mechanisms has disastrous consequences, often leading to gains of function, cell transformation, and cancer. The c-Abl kinase protein is one of the most studied targets in the fight against cancer and is a hotspot for drug development because it participates in several solid tumors and is the hallmark of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Tumor suppressors have the opposite effects. Their fundamental role in the maintenance of genomic integrity has awarded them a role as the guardians of DNA. Among the tumor suppressors, p53 is the most studied. The p53 protein has been shown to be a transcription factor that recognizes and binds to specific DNA response elements and activates gene transcription. Stress triggered by ionizing radiation or other mutagenic events leads to p53 phosphorylation and cell-cycle arrest, senescence, or programed cell death. The p53 gene is the most frequently mutated gene in cancer. Mutations in the DNA-binding domain are classified as class I or class II depending on whether substitutions occur in the DNA contact sites or in the protein core, respectively. Tumor-associated p53 mutations often lead to the loss of protein function, but recent investigations have also indicated gain-of-function mutations. The prion-like aggregation of mutant p

  3. Upregulation of Acetylcholinesterase Mediated by p53 Contributes to Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaolei; Zhang, Changsong; Chen, Yichen; Zhou, Tianbao

    2015-01-01

    Background: The expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) could be induced during apoptosis in various cell types. And reduced AChE expression either by siRNA could prevent apoptosis. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the AChE regulation are largely unknown in human breast cancer cell. Material and methods: MCF-7 cells were cultured and treated by cisplatin in the absence or presence of p53 siRNA. Results: In this study, the regulation of AChE expression during apoptosis induced by cisplatin, a current used anticancer drug, was investigated in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Exposure of MCF-7 cells to cisplatin resulted in apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Meanwhile, the upregulated AChE and p53 were also observed during apoptosis. Silencing interfering RNA directed against p53 blocked the expression of AChE. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggested that AChE expression could be upregulated by the activation of p53 during apoptosis induced by cisplatin in MCF-7 cells. PMID:25553088

  4. AP-2α downregulation by cigarette smoke condensate is counteracted by p53 in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangjun; Meng, Cuida; Yang, Bing; Zhao, Li; Sun, Xuefei; Su, Yun; Liu, Hongyang; Fan, Feiyue; Liu, Xiaodong; Jia, Lili

    2014-10-01

    Cumulative findings have demonstrated that the dysregulation of tumor suppressor genes may be implicated in cigarette smoke-induced carcinogenesis. Activating enhancer-binding protein 2 (AP-2) is a eukaryotic transcriptional factor that plays a significant role in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. The vertebrate AP-2 family consists of AP-2α, AP-2β, AP-2γ, AP-2δ and AP-2ε. Previous studies have suggested that cigarette smoking disrupts AP-2 regulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on AP-2α expression in human lung cancer cell lines (NCI-H1299, NCI-H446 and A549), as well as the potential mechanisms involved. Using RT-qPCR, we found that CSC decreased AP-2α expression by suppressing its transcription in human lung cancer cell lines, particularly in p53-deficient NCI-H1299 cells. Western blotting and luciferase assays were implemented and we found that the restoration of p53 expression rescued the NCI-H1299 cells from CSC-induced AP-2α loss, while the silencing of p53 resulted in increased AP-2α loss induced by CSC, suggesting an antagonizing role of p53 in the regulation of AP-2α by CSC. Our results indicate that AP-2α downregulation may be involved in smoke-induced lung carcinogenesis. PMID:25050743

  5. Role of p53 gene mutations in human esophageal carcinogenesis: results from immunohistochemical and mutation analyses of carcinomas and nearby non-cancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Shi, S T; Yang, G Y; Wang, L D; Xue, Z; Feng, B; Ding, W; Xing, E P; Yang, C S

    1999-04-01

    In order to characterize p53 alterations in esophageal cancer and to study their roles in carcinogenesis, we performed gene mutation and immunohistochemical analysis on 43 surgically resected human esophageal specimens, which contain squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adjacent non-cancerous lesions, from a high-incidence area of Linzhou in Henan, China. A newly developed immunohisto-selective sequencing (IHSS) method was used to enrich the p53 immunostain-positive cells for mutation analysis. p53 gene mutations were detected in 30 out of 43 (70%) SCC cases. Among 29 SCC cases that were stained positive for p53 protein, 25 (86%) were found to contain p53 mutations. In five cases of SCC with homogeneous p53 staining, the same mutation was observed in samples taken from four different positions of each tumor. In a well differentiated cancer nest, p53 mutation was detected in only the peripheral p53-positive cells. In tumor areas with heterogeneous p53 staining, either the area stained positive for p53 had an additional mutation to the negatively stained area or both areas lacked any detectable p53 mutation. In the p53-positive non-cancerous lesions adjacent to cancer, p53 mutations were detected in seven out of 16 (47%) samples with basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), eight out of 12 (67%) samples with dysplasia (DYS), and six out of seven (86%) samples with carcinoma in situ (CIS). All mutations found in lesions with DYS and CIS were the same as those in the nearby SCC. In seven cases of BCH containing mutations, only three had the same mutations as the nearby SCC. The results suggest that p53 mutation is an early event in esophageal carcinogenesis occurring in most of the DYS and CIS lesions, and cells with such mutations will progress to carcinoma, whereas the role of p53 mutations in BCH is less clear. PMID:10223186

  6. The transduction of His-TAT-p53 fusion protein into the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line (Saos-2) and its influence on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Ma, Yushu; Wang, Jinzhi; Tao, Xinyi; Wei, Dongzhi

    2008-03-01

    The p53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene. It encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein p53 involved in the regulation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to maintain the genomic integrity of the cell. As mutations of p53 gene are found in most human cancers, p53 protein becomes a hot target in the research of anticancer therapy. In the present study, an 11-amino acid domain of TAT protein which has been demonstrated to be able to transduce across cell membranes was fused with p53. The result revealed that the fusion protein His-TAT-p53 accumulated in the nucleus and inhibited the growth of the Saos-2 cells. Besides apoptosis, an increased percentage of G2 phase suggested that the transduction of His-TAT-p53 into cells might be associated with a G2 arrest of cell cycle. PMID:17206471

  7. Differential response between the p53 ubiquitin-protein ligases Pirh2 and MdM2 following DNA damage in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Wenrui; Gao, Li; Wu Xin; Zhang Yang; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A. . E-mail: Miguel.villalona@osumc.edu

    2006-10-15

    Pirh2, a recently identified ubiquitin-protein ligase, has been reported to promote p53 degradation. Pirh2 physically interacts with p53 and promotes ubiquitination of p53 independently of MDM2. Like MDM2, Pirh2 is thought to participate in an autoregulatory feedback loop that controls p53 function. We have previously reported that Pirh2 was overexpressed in human and murine lung cancers as compared to uninvolved lung tissue. Pirh2 increase could potentially cause degradation of wildtype p53 and reduce its tumor suppression function in the lung tumor cells. Since Pirh2 has been reported to be transactivated by p53, however, the mechanisms by which a high level of Pirh2 expression is maintained in tumor cells despite low level of wildtype p53 protein are unclear. In order to evaluate p53 involvement in the transactivation of Pirh2, we evaluated Pirh2, MDM2, p53 and p21 expression with Western blot analysis and real time PCR after {gamma} irradiation or cisplatin DNA damage treatment using human cancer cell lines containing wildtype (A549, MCF-7), mutant (H719) and null (H1299) p53. Surprisingly, Pirh2 expression was not affected by the presence of wildtype p53 in the cancer cells. In contrast, MDM2 was upregulated by wildtype p53 in A549 and MCF-7 cells and was absent from the H1299 and the H719 cells. We conclude that Pirh2 operates in a distinct manner from MDM2 in response to DNA damage in cancer cells. Pirh2 elevation in p53 null cells indicates the existence of additional molecular mechanisms for Pirh2 upregulation and suggests that p53 is not the sole target of Pirh2 ubiquitin ligase activity.

  8. Structure of human MDM2 complexed with RPL11 reveals the molecular basis of p53 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiangge; Lang, Yue; Zhang, Qi; Cui, Di; Sun, Haili; Jiang, Lun; Chen, Zhenhang; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yina; Tian, Wenli; Wu, Wei; Tang, Jun; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-01

    The central region of MDM2 is critical for p53 activation and tumor suppression. Upon ribosomal stress, this region is bound by ribosomal proteins, particularly ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), leading to MDM2 inactivation and subsequent p53 activation. Here, we solved the complex structure of human MDM2–RPL11 at 2.4 Å. MDM2 extensively interacts with RPL11 through an acidic domain and two zinc fingers. Formation of the MDM2–RPL11 complex induces substantial conformational changes in both proteins. RPL11, unable to bind MDM2 mutants, fails to induce the activation of p53 in cells. MDM2 mimics 28S rRNA binding to RPL11. The C4 zinc finger determines RPL11 binding to MDM2 but not its homolog, MDMX. Our results highlight the essential role of the RPL11–MDM2 interaction in p53 activation and tumor suppression and provide a structural basis for potential new anti-tumor drug development. PMID:26220995

  9. p53 independent G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis induced by a novel retinoid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Z M; Dawson, M I; Li, X S; Rishi, A K; Sheikh, M S; Han, Q X; Ordonez, J V; Shroot, B; Fontana, J A

    1995-08-01

    The biological activity of a novel synthetic retinoid 6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalene carboxylic acid (AHPN) was investigated in human breast carcinoma (HBC) cells. Although capable of selective binding to the RAR gamma nuclear receptor, AHPN inhibited the growth of a number of HBC cell lines via RAR- or RXR-independent pathways. AHPN also inhibited the growth of the human leukemia cell line HL-60R which does not possess functional RARs. RA significantly inhibited AP-1 mediated gene activation in MCF-7 cells while AHPN displayed no such anti-AP-1 activity. Retinoids normally are cytostatic in their inhibition of breast carcinoma growth and permit cell proliferation upon their removal, wher as AHPN induced G0/G1 arrest within 6h followed by apoptosis. In MCF-7 cells that harbor wild type p53, AHPN-induced G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis was accompanied by p53-independent regulation of WAF1/CIP1 as well as bax mRNA levels while bcl-2 mRNA levels were decreased. In MDA-MB-231 cells which possess a mutant p53, AHPN-mediated G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis was also associated with a concomitant up regulation of WAF1/CIP1 mRNA while these cells did not express bax or bcl-2 messages. Thus AHPN represents a novel retinoid that induces G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis via a unique pathway which appears to involve activation of known downstream effectors of p53 in a p53-independent manner. PMID:7630633

  10. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  11. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  12. The mitochondrial p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vaseva, Angelina V.; Moll, Ute M.

    2010-01-01

    p53 is one of the most mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers and as such has been intensively studied for a long time. p53 is a major orchestrator of the cellular response to a broad array of stress types by regulating apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, senescence, DNA repair and genetic stability. For a long time it was thought that these functions of p53 solely rely on its function as a transcription factor, and numerous p53 target genes have been identified [1]. In the last 8 years however, a novel transcription-independent proapoptotic function mediated by the cytoplasmic pool of p53 has been revealed. p53 participates directly in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by interacting with the multidomain members of the Bcl-2 family to induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. Our review will discuss these studies, focusing on recent advances in the field. PMID:19007744

  13. Effect of boswellia thurifera gum methanol extract on cytotoxicity and p53 gene expression in human breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanahi, Nasrin; Behbahani, Mandana; Yektaeian, Afsaneh

    2014-01-01

    Boswellia has been widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of different diseases such as cancer in Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the gum methanol extract of Boswellia thurifera on the viability and P53 gene expression of cultured breast cancer cells. The gum methanol extract was obtained in various concentrations using the maceration method. Normal (HEK-293) and cancer (MDA-MB-231) human cells were cultured and treated with various concentrations of the extract. Then MTT assay was used for the study of cytotoxic effect of the extract and real time PCR method was also applied for the investigation of P53 gene expression in cancer cells. The IC50 of the extract against cancer cells was 80 µg/mL and had less cytotoxic effect in normal cells. The effect of the extract was dose dependent. Induction of P53 expression by extract was also significantly more in treated cancer cells than untreated cells. This inductive effect in cells was higher after 12 h treatment than it was after 6 h. The results of the current study show that gum methanol extract of Boswellia thurifera has probably anti-cancer effects and could induce P53 gene transcription and toxicity in the cultured breast cancer cell line. The increase of P53 gene specific mRNA may be a mechanism of gum methanol extract induced cytotoxicity. However, for a definitive conclusion, further studies on other cell lines as well as animal models and subsequent clinical studies are warranted. PMID:25237368

  14. Thyrocyte-specific inactivation of p53 and Pten results in anaplastic thyroid carcinomas faithfully recapitulating human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dima, Mariavittoria; Kang, Kristy S.; Dasrath, Florence; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Refetoff, Samuel; Montagna, Cristina; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most aggressive form of thyroid cancer, and often derives from pre-existing well-differentiated tumors. Despite a relatively low prevalence, it accounts for a disproportionate number of thyroid cancer-related deaths, due to its resistance to any therapeutic approach. Here we describe the first mouse model of ATC, obtained by combining in the mouse thyroid follicular cells two molecular hallmarks of human ATC: activation of PI3K (via Pten deletion) and inactivation of p53. By 9 months of age, over 75% of the compound mutant mice develop aggressive, undifferentiated thyroid tumors that evolve from pre-existing follicular hyperplasia and carcinoma. These tumors display all the features of their human counterpart, including pleomorphism, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, aneuploidy, local invasion, and distant metastases. Expression profiling of the murine ATCs reveals a significant overlap with genes found deregulated in human ATC, including genes involved in mitosis control. Furthermore, similar to the human tumors, [Pten, p53]thyr−/− tumors and cells are highly glycolytic and remarkably sensitive to glycolysis inhibitors, which synergize with standard chemotherapy. Taken together, our results show that combined PI3K activation and p53 loss faithfully reproduce the development of thyroid anaplastic carcinomas, and provide a compelling rationale for targeting glycolysis to increase chemotherapy response in ATC patients. PMID:22190384

  15. Mouse p53-Deficient Cancer Models as Platforms for Obtaining Genomic Predictors of Human Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, Marta; Santos, Mirentxu; Aranda, Juan F.; Bielza, Concha; Martínez-Cruz, Ana B.; Lorz, Corina; Taron, Miquel; Ciruelos, Eva M.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Martín, Miguel; Larrañaga, Pedro; Dahabreh, Jubrail; Stathopoulos, George P.; Rosell, Rafael; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene are very common in human cancers, and are associated with poor clinical outcome. Transgenic mouse models lacking the Trp53 gene or that express mutant Trp53 transgenes produce tumours with malignant features in many organs. We previously showed the transcriptome of a p53-deficient mouse skin carcinoma model to be similar to those of human cancers with TP53 mutations and associated with poor clinical outcomes. This report shows that much of the 682-gene signature of this murine skin carcinoma transcriptome is also present in breast and lung cancer mouse models in which p53 is inhibited. Further, we report validated gene-expression-based tests for predicting the clinical outcome of human breast and lung adenocarcinoma. It was found that human patients with cancer could be stratified based on the similarity of their transcriptome with the mouse skin carcinoma 682-gene signature. The results also provide new targets for the treatment of p53-defective tumours. PMID:22880004

  16. Anticancer Activity of γ-Bisabolene in Human Neuroblastoma Cells via Induction of p53-Mediated Mitochondrial Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jou, Yu-Jen; Hua, Chun-Hung; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Ying; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Huang, Su-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    γ-Bisabolene has demonstrated antiproliferative activities against several human cancer cell lines. This study first discloses the antiproliferative and apoptosis induction activities of γ-bisabolene to human neuroblastoma TE671 cells. A CC50 value of γ-bisabolene was 8.2 μM to TE671 cells. Cell cycle analysis with PI staining showed γ-bisabolene elevating the sub-G1 fractions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, annexin V-FITC/PI staining showed γ-bisabolene significantly triggering early (annexin-V positive/PI negative) and late (annexin-V positive/PI positive) apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. γ-Bisabolene induced caspase 3/8/9 activation, intracellular ROS increase, and mitochondrial membrane potential decrease in apoptosis of human neuro-blastoma cells. Moreover, γ-bisabolene increased p53 phosphorylation and up-regulated p53-mediated apoptotic genes Bim and PUMA, as well as decreased the mRNA and protein levels of CK2α. Notably, the results indicated the involvement of CK2α-p53 pathways in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of human neuroblastoma cells treated with γ-bisabolene. This study elucidated the apoptosis induction pathways of γ-bisabolene-treated neuroblastoma cells, in which could be useful for developing anti-neuroblastoma drugs. PMID:27164076

  17. p53 activation by Ni(II) is a HIF-1α independent response causing caspases 9/3-mediated apoptosis in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Victor C.; Morse, Jessica L.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-06-15

    Hypoxia mimic nickel(II) is a human respiratory carcinogen with a suspected epigenetic mode of action. We examined whether Ni(II) elicits a toxicologically significant activation of the tumor suppressor p53, which is typically associated with genotoxic responses. We found that treatments of H460 human lung epithelial cells with NiCl{sub 2} caused activating phosphorylation at p53-Ser15, accumulation of p53 protein and depletion of its inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Confirming the activation of p53, its knockdown suppressed the ability of Ni(II) to upregulate MDM2 and p21 (CDKN1A). Unlike DNA damage, induction of GADD45A by Ni(II) was p53-independent. Ni(II) also increased p53-Ser15 phosphorylation and p21 expression in normal human lung fibroblasts. Although Ni(II)-induced stabilization of HIF-1α occurred earlier, it had no effect on p53 accumulation and Ser15 phosphorylation. Ni(II)-treated H460 cells showed no evidence of necrosis and their apoptosis and clonogenic death were suppressed by p53 knockdown. The apoptotic role of p53 involved a transcription-dependent program triggering the initiator caspase 9 and its downstream executioner caspase 3. Two most prominently upregulated proapoptotic genes by Ni(II) were PUMA and NOXA but only PUMA induction required p53. Knockdown of p53 also led to derepression of antiapoptotic MCL1 in Ni(II)-treated cells. Overall, our results indicate that p53 plays a major role in apoptotic death of human lung cells by Ni(II). Chronic exposure to Ni(II) may promote selection of resistant cells with inactivated p53, providing an explanation for the origin of p53 mutations by this epigenetic carcinogen. - Highlights: • Ni(II) is a strong activator of the transcription factor p53. • Apoptosis is a principal form of death by Ni(II) in human lung epithelial cells. • Ni(II)-activated p53 triggers caspases 9/3-mediated apoptotic program. • NOXA and PUMA are two main proapoptotic genes induced by Ni(II). • HIF-1α and p53 are independent

  18. A human papillomavirus type 18 E6/E7 transgene sensitizes mouse lens cells to human wild-type p53-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Williams-Simons, L; Westphal, H

    1997-06-26

    We have studied the concerted action of factors that influence the balance between cell proliferation and cell death in the developing lens of transgenic mice. We show that a human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6/E7 transgene that predominantly expresses the viral E7 gene product triggers apoptosis in a dose dependent manner, and causes retardation of lens growth or microphakia. E7 is known to inactivate pRB, the product of the retinoblastoma gene, and to enhance the action of p53. Our earlier work had demonstrated that over-expression of p53 itself can cause apoptosis of lens cells, and that a mutant p53 allele can interfere with this process. In the present study, we examined lenses that simultaneously express different constellations of the HPV18 E6/E7, wild-type and mutant human p53, and wild-type human pRB transgenes. We observed that lens cells expressing the HPV18 transgene are more sensitive to wild-type human p53 action than normal lens cells. As a result, there is severe microphakia in lenses that express both the HPV18 and the wild-type p53 transgenes. By contrast, apoptosis was reduced in lenses that co-expressed the HPV18 and either the pRB or the mutant p53 transgene. We conclude that levels of wild-type p53 are critical, and that any excess of p53 or suppression of pRB can cause cell death. Our results encourage attempts to counteract the deleterious action of human papillomaviruses in cervical cancer by a combination of measures that decrease cell proliferation and enhance apoptosis. PMID:9223662

  19. Oroxylin A modulates mitochondrial function and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by inducing mitochondrial translocation of wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuxin; Ni, Ting; Dai, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Wei, Libin

    2016-01-01

    Oroxylin A is a flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. We previously demonstrated that oroxylin A induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms responsible for the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway triggered by oroxylin A. p53 regulates mitochondrial survival, mitochondrial DNA integrity, and protection from oxidative stress. We determined that oroxylin A induces p53 mitochondrial translocation and inhibits SOD2 activity. Additionally, our studies demonstrate that oroxylin A promotes the formation and mitochondrial translocation of the p53-Recql4 complex in HCT-116 cells. Finally, we showed that oroxylin A triggers cytosolic p53 activation, thereby promoting apoptosis. Mitochondrial translocation of p53 was also validated in vivo. Thus, oroxylin A induces mitochondrial translocation of p53 and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in human colon cancer cells. PMID:26958937

  20. Oroxylin A modulates mitochondrial function and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by inducing mitochondrial translocation of wild-type p53.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chen; Lu, Na; Zhou, Yuxin; Ni, Ting; Dai, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Wei, Libin

    2016-03-29

    Oroxylin A is a flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. We previously demonstrated that oroxylin A induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms responsible for the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway triggered by oroxylin A. p53 regulates mitochondrial survival, mitochondrial DNA integrity, and protection from oxidative stress. We determined that oroxylin A induces p53 mitochondrial translocation and inhibits SOD2 activity. Additionally, our studies demonstrate that oroxylin A promotes the formation and mitochondrial translocation of the p53-Recql4 complex in HCT-116 cells. Finally, we showed that oroxylin A triggers cytosolic p53 activation, thereby promoting apoptosis. Mitochondrial translocation of p53 was also validated in vivo. Thus, oroxylin A induces mitochondrial translocation of p53 and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in human colon cancer cells. PMID:26958937

  1. A mutant p53/let-7i-axis-regulated gene network drives cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, M; Francis, P; Bilke, S; Li, XL; Hara, T; Lu, X; Jones, MF; Walker, RL; Zhu, Y; Pineda, M; Lee, C; Varanasi, L; Yang, Y; Martinez, LA; Luo, J; Ambs, S; Sharma, S; Wakefield, LM; Meltzer, PS; Lal, A

    2015-01-01

    Most p53 mutations in human cancers are missense mutations resulting in a full-length mutant p53 protein. Besides losing tumor suppressor activity, some hotspot p53 mutants gain oncogenic functions. This effect is mediated in part, through gene expression changes due to inhibition of p63 and p73 by mutant p53 at their target gene promoters. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor microRNA let-7i is downregulated by mutant p53 in multiple cell lines expressing endogenous mutant p53. In breast cancer patients, significantly decreased let-7i levels were associated with missense mutations in p53. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter luciferase assays established let-7i as a transcriptional target of mutant p53 through p63. Introduction of let-7i to mutant p53 cells significantly inhibited migration, invasion and metastasis by repressing a network of oncogenes including E2F5, LIN28B, MYC and NRAS. Our findings demonstrate that repression of let-7i expression by mutant p53 has a key role in enhancing migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:24662829

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1-encoded protein HBZ represses p53 function by inhibiting the acetyltransferase activity of p300/CBP and HBO1

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Kimson; Ankney, John A.; Nguyen, Stephanie T.; Rushing, Amanda W.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Miotto, Benoit; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an often fatal malignancy caused by infection with the complex retrovirus, human T-cell Leukemia Virus, type 1 (HTLV-1). In ATL patient samples, the tumor suppressor, p53, is infrequently mutated; however, it has been shown to be inactivated by the viral protein, Tax. Here, we show that another HTLV-1 protein, HBZ, represses p53 activity. In HCT116 p53+/+ cells treated with the DNA-damaging agent, etoposide, HBZ reduced p53-mediated activation of p21/CDKN1A and GADD45A expression, which was associated with a delay in G2 phase-arrest. These effects were attributed to direct inhibition of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300/CBP by HBZ, causing a reduction in p53 acetylation, which has be linked to decreased p53 activity. In addition, HBZ bound to, and inhibited the HAT activity of HBO1. Although HBO1 did not acetylate p53, it acted as a coactivator for p53 at the p21/CDKN1A promoter. Therefore, through interactions with two separate HAT proteins, HBZ impairs the ability of p53 to activate transcription. This mechanism may explain how p53 activity is restricted in ATL cells that do not express Tax due to modifications of the HTLV-1 provirus, which accounts for a majority of patient samples. PMID:26625199

  3. Paeoniflorin attenuates ultraviolet B-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes by inhibiting the ROS-p38-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingwen; Wang, Shangshang; Wu, Xiao; Zuo, Fuguo; Qin, Haihong; Wu, Jinfeng

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the most harmful environmental factors that contribute to skin damage. Exposure to UV induces extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and results in photoaging and skin cancer development. One approach to protecting human skin against UV radiation is the use of antioxidants. In recent years, naturally occurring herbal compounds have gained considerable attention as protective agents for UV exposure. Paeoniflorin (PF) is a novel natural antioxidant, which is isolated from peony root (Radix Paeoniae Alba). The present study evaluated the protective effects of PF on UV‑induced skin damage in vitro, and demonstrated that the effects were mediated via the ROS‑p38‑p53 pathway. The results of the present study demonstrated that treatment with PF (25, 50, and 100 µM) significantly increased the percentage of viable keratinocytes after UV‑B exposure. In addition, cell death analysis indicated that PF treatment markedly reduced UV‑B‑radiation‑induced apoptosis in keratinocytes, which was accompanied by increased procaspase 3 expression and decreased cleaved caspase 3 expression. Treatment with PF markedly reduced the production of ROS, and inhibited the activation of p38 and p53 in human keratinocytes, thus suggesting that the ROS‑p38‑p53 pathway has a role in UV‑B‑induced skin damage. In conclusion, the present study reported that PF was able to attenuate UV‑B‑induced cell damage in human keratinocytes. Notably, these effects were shown to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of the ROS-p38-p53 pathway. PMID:26936104

  4. P53 in human melanoma fails to regulate target genes associated with apoptosis and the cell cycle and may contribute to proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastatic melanoma represents a major clinical problem. Its incidence continues to rise in western countries and there are currently no curative treatments. While mutation of the P53 tumour suppressor gene is a common feature of many types of cancer, mutational inactivation of P53 in melanoma is uncommon; however, its function often appears abnormal. Methods In this study whole genome bead arrays were used to examine the transcript expression of P53 target genes in extracts from 82 melanoma metastases and 6 melanoma cell lines, to provide a global assessment of aberrant P53 function. The expression of these genes was also examined in extracts derived from diploid human melanocytes and fibroblasts. Results The results indicated that P53 target transcripts involved in apoptosis were under-expressed in melanoma metastases and melanoma cell lines, while those involved in the cell cycle were over-expressed in melanoma cell lines. There was little difference in the transcript expression of P53 target genes between cell lines with null/mutant P53 compared to those with wild-type P53, suggesting that altered expression in melanoma was not related to P53 status. Similarly, down-regulation of P53 by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) had limited effect on P53 target gene expression in melanoma cells, whereas there were a large number of P53 target genes whose mRNA expression was significantly altered by P53 inhibition in melanocytes. Analysis of whole genome gene expression profiles indicated that the ability of P53 to regulate genes involved in the cell cycle was significantly reduced in melanoma cells. Moreover, inhibition of P53 in melanocytes induced changes in gene expression profiles that were characteristic of melanoma cells and resulted in increased proliferation. Conversely, knockdown of P53 in melanoma cells resulted in decreased proliferation. Conclusions These results indicate that P53 target genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle regulation are aberrantly

  5. Nogo-B receptor promotes the chemoresistance of human hepatocellular carcinoma via the ubiquitination of p53 protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, Fei; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhenzhen; Li, Song; Yang, Xuejun; Sun, Deguang; Wang, Haibo; Liu, Qinlong; Liang, Rui; Li, Yan; Gao, Zhenming; Shao, Shujuan; Miao, Qing Robert; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Nogo-B receptor (NgBR), a type I single transmembrane domain receptor is the specific receptor for Nogo-B. Our previous work demonstrated that NgBR is highly expressed in breast cancer cells, where it promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), an important step in metastasis. Here, we show that both in vitro and in vivo increased expression of NgBR contributes to the increased chemoresistance of Bel7402/5FU cells, a stable 5-FU (5-Fluorouracil) resistant cell line related Bel7402 cells. NgBR knockdown abrogates S-phase arrest in Bel7402/5FU cells, which correlates with a reduction in G1/S phase checkpoint proteins p53 and p21. In addition, NgBR suppresses p53 protein levels through activation of the PI3K/Akt/MDM2 pathway, which promotes p53 degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and thus increases the resistance of human hepatocellular cancer cells to 5-FU. Furthermore, we found that NgBR expression is associated with a poor prognosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. These results suggest that targeting NgBR in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-FU, could improve the efficacy of current anticancer treatments. PMID:26840457

  6. Expression and purification of human TAT-p53 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris and its influence on HepG2 cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haowei; Liu, Nan; Zhao, Zhenghong; Zhang, Xinmin; Xu, Hao; Shao, Bing; Yan, Weiqun

    2012-07-01

    P53 is an attractive target in molecular cancer therapeutics because of its critical role in regulating cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The limitations in the development of p53-based cancer therapeutic strategy include its inefficient transmission through cell membrane of tumor cells and low protein yields in the expression system. In the present study, p53 was fused with HIV TAT protein, which can cross cell membranes, and expressed by Pichia pastoris. Stable production of Tat-p53 was achieved. After being transduced with Tat-p53 protein, the growth of cancer cell line, HepG2, was inhibited by increased apoptosis in culture. This expression system could thus be utilized to produce human Tat-p53 fusion protein. PMID:22426841

  7. Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro by inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Soo A; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetics (LAs) is a common procedure for therapeutic purposes. However, LAs have been found toxic to articular cartilage, and hyaluronan may attenuate this toxicity. In this study we investigated whether hyaluronan attenuated lidocaine-induced chondrotoxicity, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and newly isolated murine chondrocytes were incubated in culture medium containing hyaluronan and/or lidocaine for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected with DAPI staining, caspase 3/7 activity assay and flow cytometry. Cell cycle distributions, ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined using flow cytometry. The expression of p53 and p53-regulated gene products was measured with Western blotting. Results: Lidocaine (0.005%−0.03%) dose-dependently decreased the viability of SW1353 cells. This local anesthetic (0.015%, 0.025%) induced apoptosis, G2/M phase arrest and loss of ΔΨm, and markedly increased ROS production in SW1353 cells. Hyaluronan (50−800 μg/mL) alone did not affect the cell viability, but co-treatment with hyaluronan (200 μg/mL) significantly attenuated lidocaine-induced apoptosis and other abnormalities in SW1353 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with lidocaine and hyaluronan significantly decreased the levels of p53 and its transcription targets Bax and p21 in SW1353 cells, although treatment with lidocaine alone did not significantly change these proteins. Similar results were obtained in ex vivo cultured murine chondrocytes. Conclusion: Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro through inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:27041463

  8. The tumor suppressor p53 induces expression of the pregnancy-supporting human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) CGB7 gene

    PubMed Central

    Sohr, Sindy

    2011-01-01

    Successful pregnancy requires a functionally normal blastocyst encountering a receptive maternal endometrium. Interestingly, the cell cycle regulator and tumor suppressor p53 has been reported to support reproduction in mice by regulating the expression of the leukemia inhibitory factor gene in the maternal endometrium. However, in humans the hormonal system orchestrating successful pregnancy is considerably different from rodents. Particularly, the primatespecific dimeric glycoprotein hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is essential for blastocyst implantation and maintenance of early human pregnancy. Here we provide evidence that p53 selectively induces expression of the hCGβ7 (CGB7) gene. None of the other CGB genes was found to be regulated by p53. We show that expression of the CGB7 gene is upregulated upon p53 induction in human HFF, HCT116 and DLD1 cells as well as in cell preparations enriched in human primary first-trimester trophoblasts. The increase in CGB7 levels upon doxorubicin treatment is lost after siRNA-directed knockdown of p53. Furthermore, we describe CGB7 as a direct transcriptional target gene of p53 by identifying a p53-responsive element in the CGB7 promoter using reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitations. With these results we provide a new link between p53 transcriptional activity and human reproduction. PMID:22032922

  9. p53-related apoptosis resistance and tumor suppression activity in UVB-induced premature senescent human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenqi; Kang, Jian; Xia, Jiping; Li, Yanhua; Yang, Bo; Chen, Bin; Sun, Weiling; Song, Xiuzu; Xiang, Wenzhong; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Fei; Wan, Yinsheng; Bi, Zhigang

    2008-05-01

    Chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation leads to photoaging, immunosuppression, and ultimately carcinogenesis. Cellular senescence is thought to play an important role in tumor suppression and apoptosis resistance. However, the relationships among stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), tumorigenesis and apoptosis induced by UVB remain unknown. We developed a model of UVB-induced premature senescence in human skin fibroblasts (HSFs). After five repeated subcytotoxic UVB exposures at a dose of 10 mJ/cm2, the following biomarkers of senescence were markedly present: senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA beta-gal) activity, growth arrest, and the overexpression of senescence-associated genes. Firstly, there was an increase in the proportion of cells positive for SA beta-gal activity. Secondly, there was a loss of replicative potential as assessed by MTT assay. FACS analysis showed that UVB-stressed HSFs were blocked mostly in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and replicative senescence, and protein expression of p53, p21(WAF-1) and p16(INK-4a) increased significantly. Thirdly, the mRNA levels of three senescence-associated genes, fibronectin, osteonectin and SM22, also increased. A real time PCR array to investigate the mRNA expression of p53-related genes involved in growth arrest, apoptosis and tumorigenesis indicated that p53, p21, p19, Hdm2, and Bax were up-regulated, and bcl, HIF-1alpha and VEGF were down-regulated. Collectively, our data suggest that UVB-induced SIPS plays an important role in p53-related apoptosis resistance and tumor suppression activity. PMID:18425358

  10. Quantitative analysis of p53 expression in human normal and cancer tissue microarray with global normalization method

    PubMed Central

    Idikio, Halliday A

    2011-01-01

    Tissue microarray based immunohistochemical staining and proteomics are important tools to create and validate clinically relevant cancer biomarkers. Immunohistochemical stains using formalin-fixed tissue microarray sections for protein expression are scored manually and semi-quantitatively. Digital image analysis methods remove some of the drawbacks of manual scoring but may need other methods such as normalization to provide across the board utility. In the present study, quantitative proteomics-based global normalization method was used to evaluate its utility in the analysis of p53 protein expression in mixed human normal and cancer tissue microarray. Global normalization used the mean or median of β-actin to calculate ratios of individual core stain intensities, then log transformed the ratios, calculate a mean or median and subtracted the value from the log of ratios. In the absence of global normalization of p53 protein expression, 44% (42 of 95) of tissue cores were positive using the median of intensity values and 40% (38 of 95) using the mean of intensities as cut-off points. With global normalization, p53 positive cores changed to 20% (19 of 95) when using median of intensities and 15.8%(15 of 95) when the mean of intensities were used. In conclusion, the global normalization method helped to define positive p53 staining in the tissue microarray set used. The method used helped to define clear cut-off points and confirmed all negatively stained tissue cores. Such normalization methods should help to better define clinically useful biomarkers. PMID:21738821

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor and nitric oxide synthase expression in human lung cancer and the relation to p53.

    PubMed Central

    Ambs, S.; Bennett, W. P.; Merriam, W. G.; Ogunfusika, M. O.; Oser, S. M.; Khan, M. A.; Jones, R. T.; Harris, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and mutations of cancer-related genes increase with cancer progression. This correlation suggests the hypothesis that oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulate VEGF, and a significant correlation between p53 alteration and increased VEGF expression in human lung cancer was reported recently. To further examine this hypothesis, we analysed VEGF protein expression and mutations in p53 and K-ras in 27 non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC): 16 squamous cell, six adenocarcinomas, one large cell, two carcinoids and two undifferentiated tumours. VEGF was expressed in 50% of the squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and carcinoids but none of the others. p53 mutations occurred in 14 tumours (52%), and K-ras mutations were found in two adenocarcinomas and one SCC; there was no correlation between the mutations and VEGF expression. As nitric oxide also regulates angiogenesis, we examined NOS expression in NSCLC. The Ca2+-dependent NOS activity, which indicates NOS1 and NOS3 expression, was significantly reduced in lung carcinomas compared with adjacent non-tumour tissue (P < 0.004). Although the Ca2+-independent NOS activity, which indicates NOS2 expression, was low or undetectable in non-tumour tissues and most carcinomas, significant activity occurred in three SCC. In summary, our data do not show a direct regulation of VEGF by p53 in NSCLC. Finally, we did not find the up-regulation of NOS isoforms during NSCLC progression that has been suggested for gynaecological and breast cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9683299

  12. p53 is involved in clearance of ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci in a human colon cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Orre, Lukas M. . E-mail: Lukas.Orre@ki.se; Stenerloew, Bo; Dhar, Sumeer; Larsson, Rolf; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lehtioe, Janne

    2006-04-21

    We have investigated p53-related differences in cellular response to DNA damaging agents, focusing on p53s effects on RAD51 protein level and sub-cellular localization post exposure to ionizing radiation. In a human colon cancer cell line, HCT116 and its isogenic p53-/- subcell line we show here p53-independent RAD51 foci formation but interestingly the resolution of RAD51 foci showed clear p53 dependence. In p53 wt cells, but not in p53-/- cells, RAD51 protein level decreased 48 h post irradiation and fluorescence immunostaining showed resolution of RAD51 foci and relocalization of RAD51 to nucleoli at time points corresponding to the decrease in RAD51 protein level. Both cell lines rejoined DNA double strand breaks efficiently with similar kinetics and p53 status did not influence sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We suggest that p53 has a role in RAD51 clearance post DSB repair and that nucleoli might be sites of RAD51 protein degradation.

  13. Comparison of p53 and the PDZ domain containing protein MAGI-3 regulation by the E6 protein from high-risk human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Julia; Thomas, Miranda; Banks, Lawrence; Coutlee, Francois; Matlashewski, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Central to cellular transformation caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the ability of E6 proteins to target cellular p53 and proteins containing PDZ domains, including MAGI-3, for degradation. The aim of this study was to compare E6-mediated degradation of p53 and MAGI-3 under parallel experimental conditions and further with respect to the involvement of proteasomes and ubiquitination. We also compared the degradation of p53 and MAGI-3 by E6 from several HPV types including different variants from HPV-33. All of the E6 genes from different HPV types displayed similar abilities to mediate the degradation of both p53 and MAGI-3 although there may be subtle differences observed with the different 33E6 variants. There were however differences in E6 mediated degradation of p53 and MAGI-3. Proteasome inhibition assays partially protected p53 from E6 mediated degradation, but did not protect MAGI-3. In addition, under conditions where p53 was ubiquitinated by E6 and MDM2 in vivo, ubiquitination of MAGI-3 was not detected. These results imply that although both p53 and MAGI-3 represent effective targets for oncogenic E6, the mechanisms by which E6 mediates p53 and MAGI-3 degradation are distinct with respect to the involvement of ubiquitination prior to proteasomal degradation. PMID:18518978

  14. p53-dependent but ATM-independent inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest in cadmium-treated human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Feng |; Zhou Tong; Simpson, Dennis; Zhou Yingchun; Boyer, Jayne; Chen Bo |; Jin Taiyi; Cordeiro-Stone, Marila; Kaufmann, William . E-mail: wkarlk@med.unc.edu

    2007-01-15

    This study focused on the activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses in diploid human fibroblasts that were treated with cadmium chloride and the potential roles of ATM and p53 signaling pathways in cadmium-induced responses. The alkaline comet assay indicated that cadmium caused a dose-dependent increase in DNA damage. Cells that were rendered p53-defective by expression of a dominant-negative p53 allele or knockdown of p53 mRNA were more resistant to cadmium-induced inactivation of colony formation than normal and ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells. Synchronized fibroblasts in S were more sensitive to cadmium toxicity than cells in G1, suggesting that cadmium may target some element of DNA replication. Cadmium produced a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis. An immediate inhibition was associated with severe delay in progression through S phase and a delayed inhibition seen 24 h after treatment was associated with accumulation of cells in G2. AT and normal cells displayed similar patterns of inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 delay after treatment with cadmium, while p53-defective cells displayed significantly less of the delayed inhibition of DNA synthesis and accumulation in G2 post-treatment. Total p53 protein and ser15-phosphorylated p53 were induced by cadmium in normal and AT cells. The p53 transactivation target Gadd45{alpha} was induced in both p53-effective and p53-defective cells after 4 h cadmium treatment, and this was associated with an acute inhibition of mitosis. Cadmium produced a very unusual pattern of toxicity in human fibroblasts, inhibiting DNA replication and inducing p53-dependent growth arrest but without induction of p21{sup Cip1/Waf1} or activation of Chk1.

  15. Of humans and canines: Immunohistochemical analysis of PCNA, Bcl-2, p53, cytokeratin and ER in mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Prathiba, D; Nagini, S

    2006-10-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in humans and canines. Human and canine mammary tumours share several important epidemiological, clinicopathological and biochemical features. Development of mammary tumours involves accumulation of mutant cells caused by excessive proliferation and insufficient apoptosis or dysregulation of cellular differentiation. The present study was therefore designed to investigate the expression of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis associated proteins together with expression of estrogen receptors (ER) in both human and canine mammary tumours. Thirty breast cancer patients categorized as pre- and postmenopausal, and 30 mammary gland tumours obtained from bitches were included in this study. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bcl-2, p53, cytokeratin and ER in tumour tissues and adjacent tissues were investigated using immunohistochemical staining. While the expression of PCNA, Bcl-2, p53 and ER was significantly increased, expression of cytokeratin was significantly lower in both human as well as canine mammary tumours compared to corresponding adjacent tissues. The magnitude of the changes was however more pronounced in premenopausal patients compared to postmenopausal patients. The changes in proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation associated proteins in human and canine mammary tumours validate use of the canine model to understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:16740286

  16. APR-246/PRIMA-1(MET) rescues epidermal differentiation in skin keratinocytes derived from EEC syndrome patients with p63 mutations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinfeng; van den Bogaard, Ellen H; Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N; Bykov, Vladimir J N; Rinne, Tuula; Zhang, Qiang; Tjabringa, Geuranne S; Gilissen, Christian; van Heeringen, Simon J; Schalkwijk, Joost; van Bokhoven, Hans; Wiman, Klas G; Zhou, Huiqing

    2013-02-01

    p53 and p63 share extensive sequence and structure homology. p53 is frequently mutated in cancer, whereas mutations in p63 cause developmental disorders manifested in ectodermal dysplasia, limb defects, and orofacial clefting. We have established primary adult skin keratinocytes from ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate (EEC) syndrome patients with p63 mutations as an in vitro human model to study the disease mechanism in the skin of EEC patients. We show that these patient keratinocytes cultured either in submerged 2D cultures or in 3D skin equivalents have impaired epidermal differentiation and stratification. Treatment of these patient keratinocytes with the mutant p53-targeting compound APR-246/PRIMA-1(MET) (p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis) that has been successfully tested in a phase I/II clinical trial in cancer patients partially but consistently rescued morphological features and gene expression during epidermal stratification in both 2D and 3D models. This rescue coincides with restoration of p63 target-gene expression. Our data show that EEC patient keratinocytes with p63 mutations can be used for characterization of the abnormal molecular circuitry in patient skin and may open possibilities for the design of novel pharmacological treatment strategies for patients with mutant p63-associated developmental abnormalities. PMID:23355676

  17. Three-dimensional Structure and Enzymatic Function of Proapoptotic Human p53-inducible Quinone Oxidoreductase PIG3*

    PubMed Central

    Porté, Sergio; Valencia, Eva; Yakovtseva, Evgenia A.; Borràs, Emma; Shafqat, Naeem; Debreczeny, Judit É.; Pike, Ashley C. W.; Oppermann, Udo; Farrés, Jaume; Fita, Ignacio; Parés, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 regulates the expression of p53-induced genes (PIG) that trigger apoptosis. PIG3 or TP53I3 is the only known member of the medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily induced by p53 and is used as a proapoptotic marker. Although the participation of PIG3 in the apoptotic pathway is proven, the protein and its mechanism of action were never characterized. We analyzed human PIG3 enzymatic function and found NADPH-dependent reductase activity with ortho-quinones, which is consistent with the classification of PIG3 in the quinone oxidoreductase family. However, the activity is much lower than that of ζ-crystallin, a better known quinone oxidoreductase. In addition, we report the crystallographic structure of PIG3, which allowed the identification of substrate- and cofactor-binding sites, with residues fully conserved from bacteria to human. Tyr-59 in ζ-crystallin (Tyr-51 in PIG3) was suggested to participate in the catalysis of quinone reduction. However, kinetics of Tyr/Phe and Tyr/Ala mutants of both enzymes demonstrated that the active site Tyr is not catalytic but may participate in substrate binding, consistent with a mechanism based on propinquity effects. It has been proposed that PIG3 contribution to apoptosis would be through oxidative stress generation. We found that in vitro activity and in vivo overexpression of PIG3 accumulate reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, an inactive PIG3 mutant (S151V) did not produce reactive oxygen species in cells, indicating that enzymatically active protein is necessary for this function. This supports that PIG3 action is through oxidative stress produced by its enzymatic activity and provides essential knowledge for eventual control of apoptosis. PMID:19349281

  18. para-Phenylenediamine-induced autophagy in human uroepithelial cell line mediated mutant p53 and activation of ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Hung, Wen-Chun; Chye, Soi-Moi; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2011-12-01

    para-Phenylenediamine (p-PD) is a major aromatic amine that is a widely used commercial oxidative-type hair dye. Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the use of p-PD-based hair dyes might be related to increased risk of human malignant tumors including bladder cancer. However, the effects of p-PD on autophagy in human uroepithelial cells (SV-HUC-1) is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that p-PD can activate the extracellular signaling-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway in SV-HUC-1 cells. In addition, we observed that autophagosomes increased in p-PD-treated SV-HUC-1 cells as shown by electron microscopy. Our results showed incremental increase of the concentrations, Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3B), which are important regulators of autophagosomes. In contrast, the MEK inhibitor (U0126) was suppressed autophagy and the effect of p-PD on ERK1/2, Beclin-1 and LC3B proteins expression, except for mutant p53. In this study, we demonstrated that inactivation of p53 induces a potent autophagy response. Finally, our results suggest that p-PD can activate the ERK1/2 signaling pathway and mutant p53, leading to the stimulation of autophagy in SV-HUC-1 cells. These results provide us with new insights for the understanding of the mechanism of p-PD-induced cell death in urothelial cells. PMID:21741467

  19. Depletion of Securin Induces Senescence After Irradiation and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Cancer Cells Regardless of Functional p53 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Yu Yichu; Lee Yijang; Chen, J.-H.; Hsu, H.-Y.; Chiu, S.-J.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is one of the best choices for cancer treatment. However, various tumor cells exhibit resistance to irradiation-induced apoptosis. The development of new strategies to trigger cancer cell death besides apoptosis is necessary. This study investigated the role of securin in radiation-induced apoptosis and senescence in human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. Western blot analysis was used to analyze levels of securin, caspase-3, PARP, p53, p21, Rb, gamma-H2AX, and phospho-Chk2. Senescent cells were analyzed using a beta-galactosidase staining assay. A securin-expressed vector (pcDNA-securin) was stably transfected into securin-null HCT116 cells. Securin gene knockdown was performed by small interfering RNA and small hairpin RNA in HCT116 and MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively. Results: Radiation was found to induce apoptosis in securin wild type HCT116 cells but induced senescence in securin-null cells. Restoration of securin reduced senescence and increased cell survival in securin-null HCT116 cells after irradiation. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX and Chk2 phosphorylation were induced transiently in securin-wild-type cells but exhibited sustained activation in securin-null cells. Securin gene knockdown switches irradiation-induced apoptosis to senescence in both HCT116 p53-null and MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that the level of securin expression plays a determining role in the radiosensitivity and fate of cells. Depletion of securin impairs DNA repair after irradiation, increasing DNA damage and promoting senescence in the residual surviving cells regardless of functional p53 expression. The knockdown of securin may contribute to a novel radiotherapy protocol for the treatment of human cancer cells that are resistant to irradiation.

  20. Expression of p53-regulated genes in human cultured lymphoblastoid TSCE5 and WTK1 cell lines after spaceflight in a frozen state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Suzuki, H.; Omori, K.; Seki, M.; Hashizume, T.; Shimazu, T.; Ishioka, N.; Ohnishi, T.

    2011-03-01

    The 53 kDa tumor suppressor protein p53 is generally thought to contribute to the genetic stability of cells and to protect cells from DNA damage through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. To clarify the effect of space radiation on the expression of p53-dependent regulated genes, gene expression profiles were compared between two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one line (TSCE5) has a wild-type p53 gene status, and the other line (WTK1) has a mutated p53 gene status. Frozen human lymphoblastoid cells were stored in a freezer in the International Space Station (ISS) for 133 days. Gene expression was analyzed using DNA chips after culturing the space samples for 6 h on the ground after their return from space. Ground control samples were also cultured for 6 h after being stored in a frozen state on the ground for the same time period that the frozen cells were in space. p53-Dependent gene expression was calculated from the ratio of the gene expression values in wild-type p53 cells and in mutated p53 cells. The expression of 50 p53-dependent genes was up-regulated, and the expression of 94 p53-dependent genes was down-regulated after spaceflight. These expression data identified genes which could be useful in advancing studies in basic space radiation biology. The biological meaning of these results is discussed from the aspect of gene functions in the up- and down-regulated genes after exposure to low doses of space radiation.

  1. Kaempferol induces ATM/p53-mediated death receptor and mitochondrial apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiu-Fang; Yang, Jai-Sing; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chiang, Ni-Na; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Syuan; Chen, Chun; Chen, Fu-An

    2016-05-01

    Kaempferol is a member of the flavonoid compounds found in vegetables and fruits. It is shown to exhibit biological impact and anticancer activity, but no report exists on the angiogenic effect of kaempferol and induction of cell apoptosis in vitro. In this study, we investigated the role of kaempferol on anti-angiogenic property and the apoptotic mechanism of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our results demonstrated that kaempferol decreased HUVEC viability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Kaempferol also induced morphological changes and sub-G1 phase cell population (apoptotic cells). Kaempferol triggered apoptosis of HUVECs as detecting by DNA fragmentation, comet assay and immunofluorescent staining for activated caspase-3. The caspase signals, including caspase-8, -9 and -3, were time-dependently activated in HUVECs after kaempferol exposure. Furthermore, pre-treatment with a specific inhibitor of caspase-8 (Z-IETD-FMK) significantly reduced the activity of caspase-8, -9 and -3, indicating that extrinsic pathway is a major signaling pathway in kaempferol-treated HUVECs. Importantly, kaempferol promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) evaluated using flow cytometric assay in HUVECs. We further investigated the upstream extrinsic pathway and showed that kaempferol stimulated death receptor signals [Fas/CD95, death receptor 4 (DR4) and DR5] through increasing the levels of phosphorylated p53 and phosphorylated ATM pathways in HUVECs, which can be individually confirmed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), ATM specific inhibitor (caffeine) and p53 siRNA. Based on these results, kaempferol-induced HUVEC apoptosis was involved in an ROS-mediated p53/ATM/death receptor signaling. Kaempferol might possess therapeutic effects on cancer treatment in anti-vascular targeting. PMID:26984266

  2. Estradiol agonists inhibit human LoVo colorectal-cancer cell proliferation and migration through p53

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ju, Da-Tong; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Tsai, Ying-Lan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Chang, Sheng-Huang; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of 17β-estradiol via estrogen receptors (ER) or direct administration of ER agonists on human colorectal cancer. METHODS: LoVo cells were established from the Bioresource Collection and Research Center and cultured in phenol red-free DMEM (Sigma, United States). To investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cellular proliferation, LoVo colorectal cells were treated with E2 or ER-selective agonists for 24 h and 48 h and subjected to the MTT (Sigma) assay to find the concentration. And investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cell used western immunoblotting to find out the diversification of signaling pathways. In order to observe motility and migration the wound healing assay and a transwell chamber (Neuro Probe) plate were tased. For a quantitative measure, we counted the number of migrating cells to the wound area post-wounding for 24 h. We further examined the cellular migration-regulating factors urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in human LoVo cells so gelatin zymography that we used and gelatinolytic activity was visualized by Coomassie blue staining. And these results are presented as means ± SE, and statistical comparisons were made using Student’s t-test. RESULTS: The structure was first compared with E2 and ER agonists. We then treated the LoVo cells with E2 and ER agonists (10-8 mol/L) for 24 h and 48 h and subsequently measured the cell viability using MTT assay. Our results showed that treatment with 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists in human LoVo colorectal cancer cells activated p53 and then up-regulated p21 and p27 protein levels, subsequently inhibiting the downstream target gene, cyclin D1, which regulates cell proliferation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the anti-tumorigenesis effects of 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists and suggest that these compounds may prove to be a

  3. Volatile Oil of Acori Graminei Rhizoma-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy are dependent on p53 Status in Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Jiang, Zhuyun; Ma, Hui; Ning, Ling; Chen, Hongdan; Li, Li; Qi, Hongyi

    2016-01-01

    Acori Graminei Rhizoma is well known for the beneficial effects on CNS disorders in traditional medicine. Though it is frequently prescribed in formulations for brain tumors, the anti-glioma effect has not been examined. We used volatile oil of Acori Graminei Rhizoma (VOA) and human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells in this study. We found that VOA exhibited greater growth suppression in p53 wild-type cells than p53 mutant cells and very low effect on fibroblasts and human glial HEB cells. Apoptosis was triggered by VOA with a caspase-dependent way in p53 wild-type A172 cells, while a caspase-independent way in p53 mutant U251 cells. Meanwhile, both A172 and U251 cells treated by VOA displayed autophagic features. Furthermore, p53 decrease was observed along with VOA-induced apoptosis and autophagy in A172 cells. VOA-induced autophagy was mediated through a p53/AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in A172 cells, while an mTOR-independent signaling pathway in U251 cells. Finally, blockage of autophagy potentiated the proapoptotic effect in both A172 and U251 cells, indicating a protective role of autophagy in VOA-induced cell death. Together, VOA exhibited anti-tumor activity in human GBM cells and induced apoptotic cell death and protective autophagy, which is cell type specific and dependent on p53 status. PMID:26892186

  4. Human papillomavirus infection and P53 codon 72 genotypes in a Hispanic population at high-risk for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Andrea L Fuessel; Woeber, Sabine; Gomez, Miroslava; Garza, Noe; Gomez, Yvonne; Rady, Peter; He, Qin; Zhang, Lifang; Grady, James J; McCormick, Joseph B; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; Tyring, Stephen K

    2005-10-01

    Cervical cancer mortality is high in Texas, especially among Hispanic women living in south Texas and adjacent Mexico. Though human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has a causal role in the development of cervical cancer, there are no published data on the prevalence of HPV genotypes in this underscreened region. We studied 398 Hispanic women on both sides of the border along the lower Rio Grande River to determine the prevalence of HPV genotypes and risk factors for cervical cancer. Using a nested PCR system HPV was detected in 62% of cervical specimens, including all the known high-risk HPV genotypes, with HPV16 and HPV18 the most frequent (30.6% and 23.0%, respectively). Multiple infections were common (29.4% of the infected specimens), and where this occurred we were more likely to find high-risk HPV genotypes. We examined host p53 codon 72 genotype frequencies and found that patients with cervical abnormalities and women with HPV16 and HPV18 infections had a lower genotype frequency of the homozygous (AA) previously reported to be associated with cervical cancer, than uninfected women with no abnormalities. In this US/Mexico border population high rates of potentially oncogenic HPV viruses and multiple infections are consistent with observed elevated cervical cancer rates. These data are further evidence that in this underserved population HPV infections are associated with high rates of malignancy, but that host p53 genotypic variations are unlikely to be primary factors in oncogenesis. PMID:16121365

  5. Antiproliferation and apoptosis induced by tamoxifen in human bile duct carcinoma QBC939 cells via upregulated p53 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Peng; Kang, Jin-He; Li, Hua-Liang; Hu, Su-Xian; Lian, Hui-Hui; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Jian; Li, Wen-Gang; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2009-07-24

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is a nonsteroidal antiestrogen that has been used in the treatment of breast cancer for over 30 years. Recently, it was shown that TAM also has efficacy on gastrointestinal neoplasms such as hepatocarcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma, and that the chemopreventive activities of TAM might be due to its abilities to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of tamoxifen on growth and apoptosis in the human bile duct carcinoma (BDC) cell line QBC939 using MTT assay, inverted microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, classic DNA fragmentation agarose gel electrophoresis assay, PI single- and FITC/PI double-staining flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Our data revealed that TAM could significantly inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in QBC939 cells. Increased expression of p53 was observed in TAM-treated cells, indicating that p53 might play an important role in TAM-induced apoptosis in QBC939 cells. These results provide significant insight into the anticarcinogenic action of TAM on BDC.

  6. CLCA2, a target of the p53 family, negatively regulates cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Koyama, Ryota; Maruyama, Reo; Hirano, Takehiro; Tamura, Miyuki; Sugisaka, Jun; Suzuki, Hiromu; Idogawa, Masashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Tokino, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 transcriptionally regulates a number of genes that are involved in cell-cycle inhibition, apoptosis and the maintenance of genetic stability. Recent studies suggest that p53 also contributes to the regulation of cell migration and invasion. Here, we show that human chloride channel accessory-2 (CLCA2) is a target gene of the p53 family (p53, p73 and p63). CLCA2 is induced by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. The p53 family proteins activate the CLCA2 promoter by binding directly to the conserved consensus p53-binding site present in the CLCA2 promoter. In terms of function, ectopic expression of CLCA2 inhibited cancer cell migration. In contrast, silencing CLCA2 with siRNA stimulated cancer cell migration and invasion. We also found that inactivation of CLCA2 enhanced the expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), as well as its promoter activation. A small-molecule FAK inhibitor reduced the effect of CLCA2 siRNA on cell migration and invasion, suggesting that CLCA2 inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion through suppression of the FAK signaling pathway. Furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between CLCA2 and FAK expression in 251 human breast cancer tissues. These results strongly suggest that CLCA2 is involved in the p53 tumor suppressor network and has a significant effect on cell migration and invasion. PMID:22990203

  7. Roscovitine-activated HIP2 kinase induces phosphorylation of wt p53 at Ser-46 in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Ranftler, Carmen

    2007-03-01

    Human MCF-7 breast cancer cells are relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy due to the lack of caspase-3 activity. We reported recently that roscovitine (ROSC), a potent cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor, arrests human MCF-7 breast cancer cells in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle and concomitantly induces apoptosis. Exposure of MCF-7 cells to ROSC also strongly activates the wt p53 tumor suppressor protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The p53 level increased despite upregulation of Hdm-2 protein and was attributable to the site-specific phosphorylation at Ser-46. The p53 protein phosphorylated at serine 46 causes the up-regulation of the p53AIP1 protein, a component of mitochondria. In the present study we identified the pathway mediating ROSC-induced p53 activation. Exposure of MCF-7 cells to ROSC activated homeodomain-intereacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2). The overexpression of wild-type but not kinase inactive HIPK2 increased the basal and ROSC-induced level of p53 phosphorylation at Ser-46 and strongly enhanced the rate of apoptosis in cells exposed to ROSC. We show that HIPK2 is activated by ROSC and mediates ROSC-induced P-Ser-46-p53, thereby stabilizing wt p53 and increasing the efficacy of drug-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. These results identify HIPK2 as a component of the ROSC-induced signaling pathway leading to the stabilization and activation of wt p53 protein. PMID:17203463

  8. The Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Oncoprotein Can Down-Regulate p53 Activity by Targeting the Transcriptional Coactivator CBP/p300

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Holger; Degenkolbe, Roland; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich; O’Connor, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    The transforming proteins of the small DNA tumor viruses, simian virus 40 (SV40), adenovirus, and human papillomavirus (HPV) target a number of identical cellular regulators whose functional abrogation is required for transformation. However, while both adenovirus E1A and SV40 large T transforming properties also depend on the targeting of the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300, no such interaction has been described for the HPV oncoprotein E6 or E7. Here, we demonstrate that the HPV-16 E6 protein, previously shown to facilitate the degradation of p53 in a complex with E6-associated protein (E6AP), also targets CBP/p300 in an interaction involving the C-terminal zinc finger of E6 and CBP residues 1808 to 1826. Furthermore, this interaction is limited to E6 proteins of high-risk HPVs associated with cervical cancer that have the capacity to repress p53-dependent transcription. An HPV-16 E6 mutant (L50G) that binds CBP/p300, but not E6AP, is still capable of down-regulating p53 transcriptional activity. Thus, HPV E6 proteins possess two distinct mechanisms by which to abrogate p53 function: the repression of p53 transcriptional activity by targeting the p53 coactivator CBP/p300, and the removal of cellular p53 protein through the proteosome degradation pathway. PMID:10400710

  9. Senescence Regulation by the p53 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yingjuan; Chen, Xinbin

    2013-01-01

    p53, a guardian of the genome, exerts its tumor suppression activity by regulating a large number of downstream targets involved in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Although p53-mediated apoptosis is able to kill cancer cells, a role for cellular senescence in p53-dependent tumor suppression is becoming clear. Mouse studies showed that activation of p53-induced premature senescence promotes tumor regression in vivo. However, p53-mediated cellular senescence also leads to aging-related phenotypes, such as tissue atrophy, stem cell depletion, and impaired wound healing. In addition, several p53 isoforms and two p53 homologs, p63 and p73, have been shown to play a role in cellular senescence and/or aging. Importantly, p53, p63, and p73 are necessary for the maintenance of adult stem cells. Therefore, understanding the dual role the p53 protein family in cancer and aging is critical to solve cancer and longevity in the future. In this chapter, we provide an overview on how p53, p63, p73, and their isoforms regulate cellular senescence and aging. PMID:23296650

  10. Regulation of p53 activity by HIPK2: molecular mechanisms and therapeutical implications in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Puca, R; Nardinocchi, L; Givol, D; D'Orazi, G

    2010-08-01

    The p53 protein is the most studied tumor suppressor and the p53 pathway has been shown to mediate cellular stress responses that are disrupted when cancer develops. After DNA damage, p53 is activated as transcription factor to directly induce the expression of target genes involved in cell-cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence and, importantly, apoptosis. Post-translational modifications of p53 are essential for the activation of p53 and for selection of target genes. The tumor suppressor homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a crucial regulator of p53 apoptotic function by phosphorylating its N-terminal serine 46 (Ser46) and facilitating Lys382 acetylation at the C-terminus. HIPK2 is activated by numerous genotoxic agents and can be deregulated in tumors by several conditions including hypoxia. Recent findings suggest that HIPK2 active/inactive protein can affect p53 function in multiple and unexpected ways. This makes p53 as well as HIPK2 interesting targets for cancer therapy. Hence, understanding the role of HIPK2 as p53 activator may provide important insights in the process of tumor progression, and may also serve as the crucial point in the diagnostic and therapeutical aspects of cancer. PMID:20514025

  11. Relationships between p53 status, apoptosis and induction of micronuclei in different human and mouse cell lines in vitro: Implications for improving existing assays.

    PubMed

    Whitwell, James; Smith, Robert; Jenner, Karen; Lyon, Heather; Wood, Deborah; Clements, Julie; Aschcroft-Hawley, Kelly; Gollapudi, Bhaskar; Kirkland, David; Lorge, Elisabeth; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanir, Jennifer Y; Thybaud, Veronique

    2015-08-01

    Accumulated evidence has shown that in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity assays produce high frequencies of "misleading" positive results, i.e. predicted hazard is not confirmed in in vivo and/or carcinogenicity studies [1], raising the question of relevance to human risk assessment. A recent study of micronucleus (MN) induction [2] showed that commonly used p53-deficient rodent cell lines (CHL, CHO and V79) gave a higher frequency of "misleading" positive results with 9 non-DNA reactive, Ames-negative and in vivo negative chemicals [3] than human p53-competent cells (blood lymphocytes, TK6 and HepG2 cell lines). This raised the question of whether these differences were due to p53 status or species origin. This present study compared human versus mouse and p53-competent versus p53-mutated function. The same 9 chemicals were tested for induction of MN in mouse lymphoma L5178Y (mutated p53), human TK6 (functional p53) and WIL2-NS (TK6 related, with mutated p53) cells. Six chemicals provided clear positive increases in MN frequency in at least one cell type. L5178Y cells yielded clear positive responses with more chemicals than either TK6 or WIL2-NS, indicating origin rather than p53 functionality was most relevant. Apoptosis induction (measured via caspase-3/7) was also investigated with clear differences in the timing and extent of apoptosis induction between mouse and human cells noted. With curcumin in TK6 cells, induction of caspase-3/7 activity coincided with MN induction, whereas for L5178Y cells, MN induction occurred in the absence of increased caspase activity. By contrast, with MMS in TK6 cells, MN induction preceded increased caspase-3/7 activity. These data suggest that MN induction by "misleading positive" genotoxins in p53-competent human cell lines may result from apoptosis, whereas in p53-defective rodent cells such as L5178Y, MN induction may be independent of apoptosis. PMID:26232254

  12. Synergistic anticancer effect of exogenous wild-type p53 gene combined with 5-FU in human colon cancer resistant to 5-FU in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Min-Yi; Zhang, Ding-Xuan; Yang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Bao-Shuai; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Jin; Zhong, Wei-De; Hu, Jia-Ni

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the anticancer effect of a recombinant adenovirus-mediated p53 (rAd-p53) combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human colon cancer resistant to 5-FU in vivo and the mechanism of rAd-p53 in reversal of 5-FU resistance. METHODS Nude mice bearing human colon cancer SW480/5-FU (5-FU resistant) were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 25 each): control group, 5-FU group, rAd-p53 group, and rAd-p53 + 5-FU group. At 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 120 h and 168 h after treatment, 5 mice were randomly selected from each group and sacrificed using an overdose of anesthetics. The tumors were removed and the protein expressions of p53, protein kinase C (PKC), permeability-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) (Western blot) and apoptosis (TUNEL) were determined. RESULTS The area ratios of tumor cell apoptosis were larger in the rAd/p53 + 5-FU group than that in the control, 5-FU and rAd/p53 groups (P < 0.05), and were larger in the rAd/p53 group than that of the control group (P < 0.05) and the 5-FU group at more than 48 h (P < 0.05). The p53 expression was higher in the rAd/p53 and the rAd/p53 + 5-FU groups than that of the control and 5-FU groups (P < 0.05), and were higher in the rAd/p53 + 5-FU group than that of the rAd/p53 group (P < 0.05). Overexpression of PKC, P-gp and MRP1 was observed in the 5-FU and control groups. In the rAd/p53 + 5-FU group, the expression of P-gp and MRP1 was lower that of the control and 5-FU groups (P < 0.05), and the expression of PKC was lower than that of the control, 5-FU and rAd/p53 groups at more than 48 h (P < 0.05). In the rAd/p53 group, the expression of P-gp and MRP1 was lower that of the control and 5-FU groups at more than 48 h (P < 0.05), and the expression of PKC was lower than that of the control and 5-FU groups at more than 120 h (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION 5-FU combined with rAd-p53 has a synergistic anticancer effect in SW480/5-FU (5-FU resistance), which contributes to reversal of 5-FU

  13. p53 protein expression in human breast carcinoma: relationship to expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, c-erbB-2 protein overexpression, and oestrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Poller, D. N.; Hutchings, C. E.; Galea, M.; Bell, J. A.; Nicholson, R. A.; Elston, C. W.; Blamey, R. W.; Ellis, I. O.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of p53 protein, oestrogen receptor protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and overexpression of the c-erbB-2 oncoprotein was examined in a series of 149 primary symptomatic breast carcinomas. Expression of p53 was present in 62 of 146 cases (42.5%) of the invasive carcinoma and one of three cases (33.3%) of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) examined. Statistical associations of tumour oestrogen receptor positivity and lack of p53 protein expression, chi 2 = 19.78 (d.f. = 1), P less than 0.001, positive tumour p53 status and poor tumour grade; chi 2 = 14.1 (d.f. = 2), P less than 0.001, EGFR expression chi 2 = 7.07, (d.f. = 1), P less than 0.01 and tumour c-erbB-2 protein overexpression; chi 2 = 4.61 (d.f. = 1), P = 0.032 were identified. Expression of p53 is rare in invasive lobular carcinoma of classical type (8.3% of cases examined) in contrast to other common types of mammary carcinoma. Non-significant trends of p53 protein expression and increased regional tumour recurrence; chi 2 = 3.20 (d.f. = 1), P = 0.074 and also poorer patient survival; chi 2 = 3.76 (d.f. = 1), P = 0.053 were identified. p53 protein expression is a common event in human breast cancer and is present in both DCIS and invasive mammary carcinoma. Abnormal expression of p53 protein is a feature of both in situ and invasive breast carcinoma, implying that the abnormal p53 protein expression may be implicated in the early stages of mammary carcinoma progression. Images Figure 1 PMID:1355662

  14. Preventive Effects of Epigallocatechin-3-O-Gallate against Replicative Senescence Associated with p53 Acetylation in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dong-Wook; Lee, Mi Hee; Kim, Bongju; Lee, Jun Jae; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Considering the various pharmacological activities of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) including anticancer, and anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and so forth, relatively less attention has been paid to the antiaging effect of EGCG on primary cells. In this study, the preventive effects of EGCG against serial passage-induced senescence were investigated in primary cells including rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs), human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), and human articular chondrocytes (HACs). The involvement of Sirt1 and acetylated p53 was examined as an underlying mechanism for the senescence preventive activity of EGCG in HDFs. All cells were employed with the initial passage number (PN) between 3 and 7. For inducing senescence, the cells were serially passaged at the predetermined times and intervals in the absence or presence of EGCG (50 or 100 μM). Serial passage-induced senescence in RVSMCs and HACs was able to be significantly prevented at 50 μM EGCG, while in HDFs, 100 μM EGCG could significantly prevent senescence and recover their cell cycle progression close to the normal level. Furthermore, EGCG was found to prevent serial passage- and H2O2-induced senescence in HDFs by suppressing p53 acetylation, but the Sirt1 activity was unaffected. In addition, proliferating HDFs showed similar cellular uptake of FITC-conjugated EGCG into the cytoplasm with their senescent counterparts but different nuclear translocation of it from them, which would partly account for the differential responses to EGCG in proliferating versus senescent cells. Taking these results into consideration, it is suggested that EGCG may be exploited to craft strategies for the development of an antiaging or age-delaying agent. PMID:23259030

  15. p53 controls global nucleotide excision repair of low levels of structurally diverse benzo(g)chrysene-DNA adducts in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Daniel R; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2002-09-15

    Benzo(g)chrysene is a widespread environmental contaminant and potent carcinogen. We have measured the formation and nucleotide excision repair of covalent DNA adducts formed by the DNA-reactive metabolite of this compound in human fibroblasts, in which expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene could be controlled by a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Cells were exposed for 1 h to 0.01, 0.1, or 1.2 microM (+/-)-anti-benzo(g)chrysene diol-epoxide, and DNA adducts were assessed at various post-treatment times by subjecting isolated DNA to (32)P-postlabeling analysis. Four major DNA adducts were detected, corresponding to the reaction of either the (+)- or (-)-anti-benzo(g)chrysene diol-epoxide stereoisomer with adenine or guanine. Treatment with 1.2 microM resulted in a level of 1100 total adducts/10(8) nucleotides for both p53-proficient and -deficient cells; removal of adducts was not observed in either case. In cells treated with 0.1 microM, the maximum level of total adducts at 24 h was 150/10(8) nucleotides in p53-proficient cells and 210 adducts/10(8) nucleotides in p53-deficient cells. A concentration of 0.01 microM resulted in a maximum of 20 adducts/10(8) nucleotides in p53-proficient cells at 4 h, but 40 adducts/10(8) nucleotides persisted in p53-deficient cells at 24 h. Whereas there were clear differences in the time course of adduct levels in p53-proficient compared with p53-deficient cells treated with 0.1 microM or 0.01 microM, these levels did not decrease extensively over 3 days. This is likely because of the stabilization of the diol-epoxide in cells, and consequent exposure and formation of adducts for many hours after the initial treatment. Furthermore, despite minor quantitative differences, all 4 of the adducts behaved similarly with respect to the effect of p53 expression on their removal. p53 appears to minimize the appearance of benzo(g)chrysene adducts in human cells by up-regulating global nucleotide excision repair and reducing the

  16. Cooperative interactions between RB and p53 regulate cell proliferation, cell senescence, and apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells from atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R; Macdonald, K; Chan, S W; Boyle, J J; Weissberg, P L

    1998-04-01

    Compared with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from normal vessels, VSMCs from human atherosclerotic plaques proliferate more slowly, undergo earlier senescence, and demonstrate higher levels of apoptosis in culture. The tumor suppressor genes p105RB (retinoblastoma, acting through the E2F transcription factor family) and p53 regulate cell proliferation, cell senescence, and apoptosis in many cell types. We have therefore determined whether these stable growth properties of plaque VSMCs reflect altered activity of RB and/or p53. VSMCs were derived from coronary atherectomies or from normal coronary arteries from transplant recipients. Compared with normal VSMCs, plaque VSMCs showed a higher ratio of the active (hypophosphorylated) to the inactive (phosphorylated) form of RB and a lower level of E2F transcriptional activity. Cells were stably transfected with retrovirus constructs that inhibited RB or p53 alone or in combination. Suppression of RB alone increased rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis and inhibited cell senescence in normal VSMCs. Suppression of p53 and RB together had similar effects but, additionally, resulted in immortalization of normal VSMC cultures. In contrast, inhibition of RB binding to E2F or ectopic expression of E2F-1 in plaque VSMCs induced massive apoptosis, which required suppression of p53 to rescue cells. Suppression of RB and p53 together increased cell proliferation and delayed senescence but failed to immortalize plaque VSMCs. Inhibition of p53 alone had minimal effects on plaque VSMCs but increased the lifespan of normal VSMCs. We conclude that human plaque VSMCs have slower rates of cell proliferation and earlier senescence than do cells from normal vessels because of a defect in phosphorylation of RB. Furthermore, both disruption of RB/E2F and inhibition of p53 are required for plaque VSMCs to proliferate without apoptosis. This observation may explain the relatively low level of cell proliferation and high level of

  17. Chromium oxide nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity and p53-dependent apoptosis in human lung alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Jain, Abhishek Kumar; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-10-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2 O3 ) nanoparticles (NPs) are being increasingly used as a catalyst for aromatic compound manufacture, abrading agents and as pigments (e.g., Viridian). Owing to increased applications, it is important to study the biological effects of Cr2 O3 NPs on human health. The lung is one of the main exposure routes to nanomaterials; therefore, the present study was designed to determine the genotoxic and apoptotic effect of Cr2 O3 NPs in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The study also elucidated the molecular mechanism of its toxicity. Cr2 O3 NPs led to DNA damage, which was deduced by comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. The damage could be mediated by the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. Further, the oxygen species led to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the ratio of BAX/Bcl-2 leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis induced by Cr2 O3 NPs, which ultimately leads to cell death. Hence, there is a need of regulations to be imposed in NP usage. The study provided insight into the caspase-dependent mechanistic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26086747

  18. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase increases p53 levels in alloreactive human T cells, and both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and p53 suppress glucose uptake, glycolysis and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Spanoulis, Aginor; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) suppresses adaptive immunity by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and altering glucose metabolism. The tumor suppressor p53 also alters these cellular processes with similar results. The effect of IDO on p53 and on glucose metabolism was evaluated in alloreactive T cells. Mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) were performed in the presence or not of the IDO inhibitor, 1-dl-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) and/or the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α (PFT). Cell proliferation, glucose consumption and lactate production were assessed. 1-MT increased cell proliferation, glucose influx and lactate production, whereas PFT enhanced cell proliferation and glucose influx, leaving lactate production unaffected. In MLR-derived T cells, protein analysis revealed that IDO activated general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and induced p53, p-p53 (p53 phosphorylated at serine 15) and p21. In addition, both IDO and p53 decreased glucose transporter 1 and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator and increased synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2. IDO also reduced lactate dehydrogenase-A and glutaminase 2 levels, whereas p53 left them unaffected. Neither 1-MT nor PFT affected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. In conclusion, in alloreactive T cells, IDO increases p53 levels, and both IDO and p53 inhibit cell proliferation, glucose consumption and glycolysis. Lactate production and glutaminolysis are also suppressed by IDO, but not by p53. PMID:25064493

  19. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 regulates pokemon gene transcription through p53 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Shengnan; Liu, Feng; Xie, Zhenhua; Zu, Xuyu; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2010-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy. PMID:20957096

  20. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 Regulates Pokemon Gene Transcription Through p53 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Shengnan; Liu, Feng; Xie, Zhenhua; Zu, Xuyu; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2010-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy. PMID:20957096

  1. The extract of Hibiscus syriacus inducing apoptosis by activating p53 and AIF in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yeung-Leung; Lee, Shih-Chun; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Huang, Hsin-Chieh; Chang, Wen-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Natural products including plants, microorganisms and marine life provide rich resources for anticancer drug discovery. The root bark of Hibiscus syriacus has been used as an antipyretic, anthelmintic and antifungal agent in Asia. The antiproliferative effects of H. syriacus on human lung cancer cells were evaluated with bio-assays. The apoptotic activity was detected by Hoechst 33342 DNA staining and annexin V staining. The expression of caspases, p53, apoptosis induced factor (AIF), Bcl-2 and Bax were evaluated with Western blotting. The in vivo anticancer activity was evaluated using A549-xenograft model. The acetone extract of H. syriacus (HS-AE) exhibited a better cytotoxic effect on lung cancer cells than its methanol extract (HS-ME) or water extract (HS-WE). The IC(50) values of HS-AE on A549 (adenocarcinoma), H209 (squamous cell carcinoma) or H661 (large cell carcinoma) lung cancer cells ranged from 14 to 22 microg/ml after 48 hours of treatment. After 48 hours of exposure, HS-AE (15 microg/ml) induced A549 cell apoptosis to 48 +/- 3.6% of the control. Using Western blotting, HS-AE appears to suppress the expression of p53 and AIF. The results of the in vivo study showed that HS-AE suppresses growth in A549 subcutaneous xenograft tumors. These results indicate that HS-AE exerts significant and dose-dependent antiproliferative effects on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which prompts us to further evaluate and elucidate the bioactive component(s) of H. syriacus. PMID:18306460

  2. Fangchinoline induces autophagic cell death via p53/sestrin2/AMPK signalling in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Pan, Weidong; Zhu, Meifen; Zhang, Maosheng; Hao, Xiaojian; Liang, Guangyi; Feng, Yibin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Fangchinoline is a novel anti-tumour agent with little known of its cellular and molecular mechanisms of action. Here we have investigated the mode of cell death induced by fangchinoline and its underlying mechanism in two human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Apoptosis and autophagy were monitored in fangchinoline-treated HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells by histological methods. The signal transduction pathways involved in activation of autophagy were examined, using immunoblotting, real-time PCR and siRNA techniques. KEY RESULTS Fangchinoline did not induce apoptosis in HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells but triggered, dose-dependently, autophagy, an alternative mode of cell death which may contribute to fangchinoline's anti-tumour action. Nuclear translocation of p53 was involved in induction of autophagy by fangchinoline, followed by selective transactivation of the autophagy-related gene sestrin2 and initiation of the autophagic process. Signalling by the AMP-activated protein kinase was also involved as a downstream target of sestrin2 and induced mTOR-independent autophagic cell death in both cell lines. siRNA for Atg 5 or pharmacological block of p53 abolished fangchinoline-induced autophagy and inhibition of autophagy switched cell death to apoptosis in these cells, suggesting that cell death is irreversible once autophagy is induced by fangchinoline. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Fangchinoline is a highly specific agent inducing autophagic cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with a novel mechanism, which elucidates the potential of fangchinoline to potentiate programmed cell death in cancer cells. PMID:21418191

  3. Critical roles of DMP1 in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu-Arf-p53 signaling and breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Pankaj; Maglic, Dejan; Kai, Fumitake; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Kendig, Robert D; Frazier, Donna P; Willingham, Mark C; Inoue, Kazushi

    2010-11-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression stimulates cell growth in p53-mutated cells while it inhibits cell proliferation in those with wild-type p53, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. The Dmp1 promoter was activated by HER2/neu through the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase-Akt-NF-κB pathway, which in turn stimulated Arf transcription. Binding of p65 and p52 subunits of NF-κB was shown to the Dmp1 promoter and that of Dmp1 to the Arf promoter on HER2/neu overexpression. Both Dmp1 and p53 were induced in premalignant lesions from mouse mammary tumor virus-neu mice, and mammary tumorigenesis was significantly accelerated in both Dmp1+/- and Dmp1-/- mice. Selective deletion of Dmp1 and/or overexpression of Tbx2/Pokemon was found in >50% of wild-type HER2/neu carcinomas, although the involvement of Arf, Mdm2, or p53 was rare. Tumors from Dmp1+/-, Dmp1-/-, and wild-type neu mice with hemizygous Dmp1 deletion showed significant downregulation of Arf and p21Cip1/WAF1, showing p53 inactivity and more aggressive phenotypes than tumors without Dmp1 deletion. Notably, endogenous hDMP1 mRNA decreased when HER2 was depleted in human breast cancer cells. Our study shows the pivotal roles of Dmp1 in HER2/neu-p53 signaling and breast carcinogenesis. PMID:21062982

  4. Wild-type p53 reactivation by small-molecule Minnelide™ in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo-Granados, Emiro; Lin, Rui; Clements-Green, Caitlin; Yueh, Bevan; Sangwan, Veena; Saluja, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) continues to increase, particularly oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) cases. The inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene promotes a chain of molecular events, including cell cycle progression and apoptosis resistance. Reactivation of wild-type p53 function is an intriguing therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a novel compound derived from diterpene triepoxide (Minnelide™) can reactivate wild-type p53 function in HPV-positive HNSCC. Materials and Methods For all of our in vitro experiments, we used 2 HPV-positive HNSCC cell lines, University of Michigan squamous cell carcinoma (UM-SCC) 47 and 93-VU-147, and 2 HPV-positive human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and CaSki. Cells were treated with different concentrations of triptolide and analyzed for p53 activation. Mice bearing UM-SCC 47 subcutaneous xenografts and HPV-positive patient-derived tumor xenografts were treated with Minnelide and evaluated for tumor growth and p53 activation. Results In HPV-positive HNSCC, Minnelide reactivated p53 by suppressing E6 oncoprotein. Activation of apoptosis followed, both in vitro and in vivo. In 2 preclinical HNSCC animal models (a subcutaneous xenograft model and a patient-derived tumor xenograft model), Minnelide reactivated p53 function and significantly decreased tumor progression and tumor volume. Conclusion Triptolide and Minnelide caused cell death in vitro and in vivo in HPV-positive HNSCC by reactivating wild-type p53 and thus inducing apoptosis. In addition, in 2 HPV-positive HNSCC animal models, Minnelide decreased tumor progression and induced apoptosis. PMID:25311433

  5. Simulated sunlight and benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide induced mutagenesis in the human p53 gene evaluated by the yeast functional assay: lack of correspondence to tumor mutation spectra.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Chong-Soon; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2003-01-01

    Many mutations in the p53 gene destroy the transcriptional transactivation function of the p53 protein. This function of p53 can be determined in a yeast assay using a p53 responsive reporter gene. The yeast assay could hold promise for the identification of mutagens implicated in human cancer if the p53 mutational spectra obtained with this assay would match human tumor mutation data. Ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzo[a]pyrene, are strongly implicated in the spectrum of p53 mutations found in human non-melanoma skin cancers and smoking-associated lung cancers, respectively. We have used these two model mutagens to assess the feasibility of using the p53 yeast assay in cancer epidemiology. After treatment of CpG methylated p53 DNA with a solar UV simulator or with benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE), the modified p53 sequences were assayed in yeast for mutational outcome. As expected, BPDE produced predominantly G to T transversions and simulated sunlight produced mostly C to T transitions at dipyrimidine sites in the p53 coding sequence. However, the preferentially mutated p53 sequences (hotspots) in the yeast assay were completely different from those in the mutational spectra found in human lung and skin cancers. The data indicate that this assay is not a reliable measurement of p53 mutagenesis in human tissues and that, perhaps, transcriptional activation is not the primary function of p53 in tumor suppression. PMID:12538356

  6. Liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 DNA into human prostate cancer cells is improved by low-frequency ultrasound combined with microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    BAI, WEN-KUN; ZHANG, WEI; HU, BING; YING, TAO

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common type of cancer in elderly men. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound exposure in combination with SonoVue microbubbles on liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 genes into human prostate cancer cells. PC-3 human prostate cancer cells were exposed to ultrasound; duty cycle was controlled at 20% (2 sec on, 8 sec off) for 5 min with and without SonoVue microbubble echo-contrast agent using a digital sonifier (frequency, 21 kHz; intensity, 46 mW/cm2). The cells were divided into eight groups, as follows: Group A (SonoVue + wild-type P53), group B (ultrasound + wild-type P53), group C (SonoVue + ultrasound + wild-type P53), group D (liposome + wild-type P53), group E (liposome + SonoVue + wild-type P53), group F (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound), group G (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound + SonoVue) and the control group (wild-type P53). Following treatment, a hemocytometer was used to measure cell lysis, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed to detect P53 gene transfection efficiency, Cell Counting Kit-8 was employed to reveal cell proliferation and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining was used to determine cell apoptosis. Cell lysis was minimal in each group. Wild-type P53 gene and protein expression were significantly increased in the PC-3 cells in group G compared with the control and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed in group G compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis levels in group G were significantly improved compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Thus, the results of the present study indicate that the use of low-frequency and low-energy ultrasound in combination with SonoVue microbubbles may be a potent physical method for increasing liposome gene delivery efficiency. PMID:27313702

  7. UBE2Q1 in a Human Breast Carcinoma Cell Line: Overexpression and Interaction with p53.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Sayed Mohammad; Rasti, Mozhgan; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Azimi, Tayebeh; Owji, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a principal mediator of growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis in response to a broad array of cellular damage. p53 is a substrate for the ubiquitin-proteasome system, however, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) involved in p53 ubiquitination have not been well studied. UBE2Q1 is a novel E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme gene. Here, we investigated the effect of UBE2Q1 overexpression on the level of p53 in the MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell line as well as the interaction between UBE2Q1 and p53. By using a lipofection method, the p53 mutated breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-468, was transfected with the vector pCMV6-AN-GFP, containing UBE2Q1 ORF. Western blot analysis was employed to verify the overexpression of UBE2Q1 in MDA-MB-468 cells and to evaluate the expression level of p53 before and after cell transfection. Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down protocols were used to investigate the binding of UBE2Q1 to p53. We established MDA-MB-468 cells that transiently expressed a GFP fusion proteins containing UBE2Q1 (GFP-UBE2Q1). Western blot analysis revealed that levels of p53 were markedly lower in UBE2Q1 transfected MDA-MB-468 cells as compared with control MDA-MB-468 cells. Both in vivo and in vitro data showed that UBE2Q1 co-precipitated with p53 protein. Our data for the first time showed that overexpression of UBE2Q1can lead to the repression of p53 in MDA-MB-468 cells. This repression of p53 may be due to its UBE2Q1 mediated ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome degradation, a process that may involve direct interaction of UBE2Q1with p53. PMID:25987028

  8. Combined modality doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and chitosan-mediated p53 gene therapy using double-walled microspheres for treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingxing; Leong, Jiayu; Chua, Qi Yi; Chi, Yu Tse; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Pack, Daniel W; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-07-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of combined chemotherapy and gene therapy on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells was investigated using double-walled microspheres that consisted of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) shell layer and fabricated via the precision particle fabrication (PPF) technique. Here, double-walled microspheres were used to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and/or chitosan-DNA nanoparticles containing the gene encoding the p53 tumor suppressor protein (chi-p53), loaded in the core and shell phases, respectively. Preliminary studies on chi-DNA nanoparticles were performed to optimize gene transfer to HepG2 cells. The transfection efficiency of chi-DNA nanoparticles was optimal at an N/P ratio of 7. In comparison to the 25-kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), chitosan showed no inherent toxicity towards the cells. Next, the therapeutic efficiencies of Dox and/or chi-p53 in microsphere formulations were compared to free drug(s) and evaluated in terms of growth inhibition, and cellular expression of tumor suppressor p53 and apoptotic caspase 3 proteins. Overall, the combined Dox and chi-p53 treatment exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity as compared to either Dox or chi-p53 treatments alone. Moreover, the antiproliferative effect was more substantial when cells were treated with microspheres than those treated with free drugs. High p53 expression was maintained during a five-day period, and was largely due to the controlled and sustained release of the microspheres. Moreover, increased activation of caspase 3 was observed, and was likely to have been facilitated by high levels of p53 expression. Overall, double-walled microspheres present a promising dual anticancer delivery system for combined chemotherapy and gene therapy. PMID:23578555

  9. Combined modality doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and chitosan-mediated p53 gene therapy using double-walled microspheres for treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingxing; Leong, Jiayu; Chua, Qi Yi; Chi, Yu Tse; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Pack, Daniel W.; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of combined chemotherapy and gene therapy on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells was investigated using double-walled microspheres that consisted of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) shell layer and fabricated via the precision particle fabrication (PPF) technique. Here, double-walled microspheres were used to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and/or chitosan-DNA nanoparticles containing the gene encoding the p53 tumor suppressor protein (chi-p53), loaded in the core and shell phases, respectively. Preliminary studies on chi-DNA nanoparticles were performed to optimize gene transfer to HepG2 cells. The transfection efficiency of chi-DNA nanoparticles was optimal at an N/P ratio of 7. In comparison to the 25-kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), chitosan showed no inherent toxicity towards the cells. Next, the therapeutic efficiencies of Dox and/or chi-p53 in microsphere formulations were compared to free drug(s) and evaluated in terms of growth inhibition, and cellular expression of tumor suppressor p53 and apoptotic caspase 3 proteins. Overall, the combined Dox and chi-p53 treatment exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity as compared to either Dox or chi-p53 treatments alone. Moreover, the antiproliferative effect was more substantial when cells were treated with microspheres than those treated with free drugs. High p53 expression was maintained during a five-day period, and was largely due to the controlled and sustained release of the microspheres. Moreover, increased activation of caspase 3 was observed, and was likely to have been facilitated by high levels of p53 expression. Overall, double-walled microspheres present a promising dual anticancer delivery system for combined chemotherapy and gene therapy. PMID:23578555

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals γ-bisabolene inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma via HDAC2 inhibition and ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Jou, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Way, Tzong-Der; Lai, Chih-Ho; Hua, Chun-Hung; Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, Su-Hua; Kao, Jung-Yie; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-10-01

    γ-Bisabolene, one of main components in cardamom, showed potent in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative activities against human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). γ-Bisabolene activated caspases-3/9 and decreased mitochondrial memebrane potential, leading to apoptosis of OSCC cell lines (Ca9-22 and SAS), but not normal oral fibroblast cells. Phosphoproteome profiling of OSCC cells treated with γ-bisabolene was identified using TiO2-PDMS plate and LC-MS/MS, then confirmed using Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR assays. Phosphoproteome profiling revealed that γ-bisabolene increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, protein phosphatases 1 (PP1), and p53, as well as decreased the phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the process of apoptosis induction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis proposed the involvement of PP1-HDAC2-p53 and ERK1/2-p53 pathways in γ-bisabolene-induced apoptosis. Subsequent assays indicated γ-bisabolene eliciting p53 acetylation that enhanced the expression of p53-regulated apoptotic genes. PP1 inhibitor-2 restored the status of HDAC2 phosphorylation, reducing p53 acetylation and PUMA mRNA expression in γ-bisabolene-treated Ca9-22 and SAS cells. Meanwhile, MEK and ERK inhibitors significantly decreased γ-bisabolene-induced PUMA expression in both cancer cell lines. Notably, the results ascertained the involvement of PP1-HDAC2-p53 and ERK1/2-p53 pathways in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of γ-bisabolene-treated cells. This study demonstrated γ-bisabolene displaying potent anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities against OSCC in vitro and in vivo, elucidating molecular mechanisms of γ-bisabolene-induced apoptosis. The novel insight could be useful for developing anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26194454

  11. Induction of p53, p21 and apoptosis by silencing the NF90/NF45 complex in human papilloma virus-transformed cervical carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Hoque, Mainul; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    The heterodimeric nuclear factor 90/nuclear factor 45 complex (NF90/NF45) binds nucleic acids and is a multifunctional regulator of gene expression. Here we report that depletion of NF90/NF45 restores the expression of the p53 and p21 proteins in cervical carcinoma cells infected with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV). Knockdown of either NF90 or NF45 by RNA interference led to greatly elevated levels of p53 and p21 proteins in HPV-derived HeLa and SiHa cells, but not in other cancerous or normal cell lines. In HeLa cells, p21 mRNA increased concomitantly but the level of p53 mRNA was unaffected. RNA interference directed against p53 prevented the induction of both proteins. These results indicated that the up-regulation of p21 is due to p53-dependent transcription, whereas p53 is regulated post-transcriptionally. Proteasome-mediated turnover of p53 is accelerated by the HPV E6 and cellular E6AP proteins. We therefore examined the hypothesis that this pathway is regulated by NF90/NF45. Indeed, depletion of NF90 attenuated the expression of E6 RNA and inhibited transcription from the HPV early promoter, revealing a new role for NF90/NF45 in HPV gene expression. The transcription inhibition was largely independent of the reduction of P-TEFb levels caused by NF90 depletion. Consistent with p53 derepression, NF90/NF45-depleted HeLa cells displayed elevated PARP cleavage and susceptibility to camptothecin-induced apoptosis. We conclude that high-risk strains of HPV utilize the cellular NF90/NF45 complex for viral E6 expression in infected cervical carcinoma cell lines. Interference with NF90/NF45 function could assist in controlling cervical carcinoma. PMID:23208500

  12. Gallotannin is a DNA damaging compound that induces senescence independently of p53 and p21 in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Halabi, Racha; Abou Merhi, Raghida; Chakilam, Saritha; El-Baba, Chirine; Hamade, Eva; Di Fazio, Pietro; Ocker, Matthias; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala

    2015-10-01

    The plant secondary metabolite gallotannin (GT) is the simplest hydrolyzable tannin shown to have anti-carcinogenic properties in several cell lines and to inhibit tumor development in different animal models. Here, we determined if GT induces senescence and DNA damage and investigated the involvement of p53 and p21 in this response. Using HCT116 human colon cancer cells wildtype for p53(+/+) /p21(+/+) and null for p53(+/+) /p21(-/-) or p53(-/-) /p21(+/+) , we found that GT induces senescence independently of p21 and p53. GT was found to increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by altering the redox balance in the cell, mainly by reducing the levels of glutathione and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Using the key antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine, dithiothreitol, SOD, and catalase, we showed that ROS were partially involved in the senescence response. Furthermore, GT-induced cell cycle arrest in S-phase in all HCT116 cell lines. At later time points, we noticed that p53 and p21 null cells escaped complete arrest and re-entered cell cycle provoking higher rates of multinucleation. The senescence induction by GT was irreversible and was accompanied by significant DNA damage as evidenced by p-H2AX staining. Our findings indicate that GT is an interesting anti colon cancer agent which warrants further study. PMID:24798519

  13. From Sea Anemone to Homo Sapiens: The Evolution of the p53 Family of Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Arnold

    2009-09-14

    The human genome contains three transcription factors termed p53, p63 and p73 which are related orthologues. The function of the p53 protein is to respond to a wide variety of stresses which can disrupt the fidelity of DNA replication and cell division in somatic cells of the body. These stress signals, such as DNA damage, increase the mutation rate during DNA duplication and so an active p53 protein responds by eliminating clones of cells with mutations employing apoptosis, senescence or cell cycle arrest. In this way the p53 protein acts as a tumor suppressor preventing the mutations that can lead to cancers. The p63 and p73 proteins act in a similar fashion to protect the germ line cells in females (eggs). In addition the p63 protein plays a central role in the formation of epithelial cell layers and p73 plays a critical role in the formation of several structures in the central nervous system. Based upon their amino acid sequences and structural considerations the oldest organisms that contain an ancestor of the p53/p63/p73 gene are the sea anemone or hydra. The present day representatives of these animals contain a p63/p73 like ancestor gene and the protein functions in germ cells of this animal to enforce the fidelity of DNA replication after exposure to ultraviolet light. Thus the structure and functions of this gene family have been preserved for over one billion years of evolution. Other invertebrates such as the worm, the fly and the clam contain a very similar ancestor gene with a similar set of functions. The withdrawal of a food source from a worm results in the p63/p73 mediated apoptosis of the eggs so that new organisms will not be hatched into a poor environment. A similar response is thought to occur in humans. Thus this ancestor gene ensures the fidelity of the next generation of organisms. The first time a clearly distinct new p53 gene arises is in the cartilaginous fish and in the bony fish a separation of the p

  14. From Sea Anemone to Homo sapiens: The Evolution of the p53 Family of Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Arnold

    2009-09-14

    The human genome contains three transcription factors termed p53, p63 and p73 which are related orthologues. The function of the p53 protein is to respond to a wide variety of stresses which can disrupt the fidelity of DNA replication and cell division in somatic cells of the body. These stress signals, such as DNA damage, increase the mutation rate during DNA duplication and so an active p53 protein responds by eliminating clones of cells with mutations employing apoptosis, senescence or cell cycle arrest. In this way the p53 protein acts as a tumor suppressor preventing the mutations that can lead to cancers. The p63 and p73 proteins act in a similar fashion to protect the germ line cells in females (eggs). In addition the p63 protein plays a central role in the formation of epithelial cell layers and p73 plays a critical role in the formation of several structures in the central nervous system. Based upon their amino acid sequences and structural considerations the oldest organisms that contain an ancestor of the p53/p63/p73 gene are the sea anemone or hydra. The present day representatives of these animals contain a p63/p73 like ancestor gene and the protein functions in germ cells of this animal to enforce the fidelity of DNA replication after exposure to ultraviolet light. Thus the structure and functions of this gene family have been preserved for over one billion years of evolution. Other invertebrates such as the worm, the fly and the clam contain a very similar ancestor gene with a similar set of functions. The withdrawal of a food source from a worm results in the p63/p73 mediated apoptosis of the eggs so that new organisms will not be hatched into a poor environment. A similar response is thought to occur in humans. Thus this ancestor gene ensures the fidelity of the next generation of organisms. The first time a clearly distinct new p53 gene arises is in the cartilaginous fish and in the bony fish a separation of the p

  15. The p53-Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans.

    PubMed

    Coffill, Cynthia R; Lee, Alison P; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M; Joseph, Thomas L; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S; Ghadessy, Farid J; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P

    2016-02-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family--Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73--as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53-Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway. PMID:26798135

  16. The p53–Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans

    PubMed Central

    Coffill, Cynthia R.; Lee, Alison P.; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M.; Joseph, Thomas L.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S.; Ghadessy, Farid J.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family—Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73—as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53–Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway. PMID:26798135

  17. Disruption of the p53-mediated G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint results in elevated rates of spontaneous genetic recombination in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Strasfeld, L.; Brainerd, E.; Meyn, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    A key feature of the cancer-prone inherited disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is genetic instability. We recently demonstrated that one aspect of genetic instability in A-T is a marked elevation in the spontaneous rates of intrachromosomal mitotic recombination. We have proposed a model for A-T that attributes these high recombination rates to a lack of DNA damage-sensitive cell cycle checkpoints. One prediction of this model is that disrupting p53 function in normal cells should increase their spontaneous rates of recombination by interfering with their p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. To test this prediction, we transfected control and A-T fibroblast lines that each harbor a single integrated copy of lacZ-based recombination vector (pLrec) with derivatives of a eukaryotic expression vector (pRep5) that contain either a dominant-negative p53 mutant (143{sup val{yields}ala}) or a human papilloma virus E6 gene (HPV18 E6). Expression of either of these genes results in loss of p53 function and abolition of the G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. Four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the control line showed 25-80 fold elevations in spontaneous recombination rates when compared to their parent cell line. Elevations in spontaneous recombination rates were also detected following transfection with the HPV18 E6 gene. In contrast, four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the A-T cell line showed no significant changes in their already high spontaneous recombination rates. We are now extending these observations to additional normal human fibroblast lines and carrying out molecular analyses of the products of these recombinational events. Our results support our hypothesis that the lack of a p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint contributes to the hyperrecombination seen in A-T.

  18. Potential therapeutic role of Tridham in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line through induction of p53 independent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer deaths reported worldwide. The incidence is higher in Asia and Africa, where there is greater endemic prevalence of hepatitis B and C. The devastating outcome of cancer can be minimized only by the use of potent therapeutic agents. Tridham (TD) has been acknowledged since olden days for its wide spectrum of biological properties and was used by traditional practitioners of Siddha and other indigenous systems of medicine. The present study aims at investigating the mechanistic action of TD by assessing the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Huh7). Methods Cell viability and apoptosis assay using MTT analysis and trypan blue staining, DAPI staining, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle analysis, mitochondrial membrane potential, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were determined in Huh7 cells. Results Viability studies of TD treated Huh7 cells showed an inhibition in cell growth in time and dose dependent manner. Chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and apoptotic bodies, which are structural changes characteristic of apoptosis, were found following TD treatment of Huh7 cells. DAPI staining and agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed the induction of apoptosis by TD. Cell cycle analysis of Huh7 cells treated with TD exhibited a marked accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle in a dose dependent manner. Immunofluorescent staining for Ki-67 showed a higher level of expression in untreated cells as compared to TD treated cells. We observed a significant loss in the mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol in TD treated cells. Down regulation of Bcl-2, up regulation of Bax and Bad as well as activation of caspases-3 and 9 were also observed. The p53 gene expression was found to be unaltered in TD treated cells

  19. Enhanced Gadd45 expression and delayed G2/M progression are p53 dependent in zinc-supplemented human bronchial epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for humans; however, this study demonstrated for the first time that an elevated zinc status, created by culturing cells at optimal plasma zinc concentration attainable by oral zinc supplementation, is cytotoxic for normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. p53 p...

  20. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα/ESR1) mediates the p53-independent overexpression of MDM4/MDMX and MDM2 in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swetzig, Wendy M.; Wang, Jianmin; Das, Gokul M.

    2016-01-01

    MDM2 and MDM4 are heterodimeric, non-redundant oncoproteins that potently inhibit the p53 tumor suppressor protein. MDM2 and MDM4 also enhance the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells in in vitro and in vivo models and are overexpressed in primary human breast cancers. Prior studies have characterized Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα/ESR1) as a regulator of MDM2 expression and an MDM2- and p53-interacting protein. However, similar crosstalk between ERα and MDM4 has not been investigated. Moreover, signaling pathways that mediate the overexpression of MDM4 in human breast cancer remain to be elucidated. Using the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast invasive carcinoma patient cohort, we have analyzed correlations between ERα status and MDM4 and MDM2 expression in primary, treatment-naïve, invasive breast carcinoma samples. We report that the expression of MDM4 and MDM2 is elevated in primary human breast cancers of luminal A/B subtypes and associates with ERα-positive disease, independently of p53 mutation status. Furthermore, in cell culture models, ERα positively regulates MDM4 and MDM2 expression via p53-independent mechanisms, and these effects can be blocked by the clinically-relevant endocrine therapies fulvestrant and tamoxifen. Additionally, ERα also positively regulates p53 expression. Lastly, we report that endogenous MDM4 negatively regulates ERα expression and forms a protein complex with ERα in breast cancer cell lines and primary human breast tumor tissue. This suggests direct signaling crosstalk and negative feedback loops between ERα and MDM4 expression in breast cancer cells. Collectively, these novel findings implicate ERα as a central component of the p53-MDM2-MDM4 signaling axis in human breast cancer. PMID:26909605

  1. p-Phenylenediamine induced DNA damage in SV-40 immortalized human uroepithelial cells and expression of mutant p53 and COX-2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Hung, Wen-Chun; Kang, Wan-Yi; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2007-04-25

    p-Phenylenediamine (p-PD) is the main aromatic amine used in the formulation of hair dyes. Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the use of p-PD-based hair dyes might be related to increased risk of human malignant tumors including bladder cancer and hematopoietic cancers. However, the toxicity and genotoxicity of p-PD on urothelial cells has not been reported yet. Therefore, we investigated the genotoxicity of p-PD on human urothelial cells and study its association with the expression of oncoproteins p53 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Our results revealed that p-PD was able to induce DNA damage determined by Comet assay. In addition, our immunocytochemical and Western blotting results showed that p-PD induced overexpression of mutant p53 and COX-2 in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between mutant p53 and COX-2 expression shows strong correlation. Furthermore, the accumulation of mutant p53 was linearly correlated with Comet scores. These results suggest that p-PD can induce DNA damage and accumulation of mutant p53 and COX-2 proteins; this may be one of the possible mechanisms that cause genotoxic carcinogenesis in the urothelial cells. PMID:17403587

  2. High-throughput sequencing identifies STAT3 as the DNA-associated factor for p53-NF-κB-complex-dependent gene expression in human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide maps of DNA regulatory elements and their interaction with transcription factors may form a framework for understanding regulatory circuits and gene expression control in human disease, but how these networks, comprising transcription factors and DNA-binding proteins, form complexes, interact with DNA and modulate gene expression remains largely unknown. Methods Using microRNA-21 (mir-21), which is an example of genes that are regulated in heart failure, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to determine the occupancy of transcription factors at this genetic locus. Tissue ChIP was further performed using human hearts and genome-wide occupancies of these transcription factors were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing. Results We show that the transcription factor p53 piggy-backs onto NF-κB/RELA and utilizes the κB-motif at a cis-regulatory region to control mir-21 expression. p53 behaves as a co-factor in this complex because despite a mutation in its DNA binding domain, mutant p53 was still capable of binding RELA and the cis-element, and inducing mir-21 expression. In dilated human hearts where mir-21 upregulation was previously demonstrated, the p53-RELA complex was also associated with this cis-element. Using high-throughput sequencing, we analyzed genome-wide binding sites for the p53-RELA complex in diseased and control human hearts and found a significant overrepresentation of the STAT3 motif. We further determined that STAT3 was necessary for the p53-RELA complex to associate with this cis-element and for mir-21 expression. Conclusions Our results uncover a mechanism by which transcription factors cooperate in a multi-molecular complex at a cis-regulatory element to control gene expression. PMID:20546595

  3. DNA-mediated oxidation of p53.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Kathryn N; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-06-01

    Transcription factor p53 is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer. As a redox-active protein in direct contact with DNA, p53 can directly sense oxidative stress through DNA-mediated charge transport. Electron hole transport occurs over long distances through the π-stacked bases and leads to the oxidative dissociation of p53. The extent of protein dissociation depends upon the redox potential of the DNA in direct contact with each p53 monomer. The DNA sequence dependence of p53 oxidative dissociation was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using oligonucleotides containing both synthetic and human p53 consensus sequences with an appended photooxidant, anthraquinone. Greater p53 dissociation is observed from sequences containing low-redox potential purine regions, particularly guanine triplets. Using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of irradiated anthraquinone-modified DNA, the DNA damage sites corresponding to sites of preferred electron hole localization were determined. The resulting DNA damage preferentially localizes to guanine doublets and triplets. Oxidative DNA damage is inhibited in the presence of p53, but only at sites in direct contact with p53. From these data, predictions about the sensitivity of human p53-binding sites to oxidative stress as well as possible biological implications have been made. On the basis of our data, the guanine pattern within the purine region of each p53-binding site determines the response of p53 to DNA oxidation, yielding for some sequences the oxidative dissociation of p53 from a distance and thereby providing another potential role for DNA charge transport chemistry within the cell. PMID:24853816

  4. Shikonin Induces Apoptotic Cell Death via Regulation of p53 and Nrf2 in AGS Human Stomach Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyeonseok; Kim, Sun-Joong; Shim, So Hee; Chang, HyoIhl; Ha, Chang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Shikonin, which derives from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been traditionally used against a variety of diseases, including cancer, in Eastern Asia. Here we determined that shikonin inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. Shikonin’s biological activity was validated by observing cell viability, caspase 3 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptotic marker expressions in AGS stomach cancer cells. The concentration range of shikonin was 35–250 nM with the incubation time of 6 h. Protein levels of Nrf2 and p53 were evaluated by western blotting and confirmed by real-time PCR. Our results revealed that shikonin induced the generation of ROS as well as caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) activity was significantly elevated in shikonin-treated cells, thereby linking JNK to apoptosis. Furthermore, our results revealed that shikonin induced p53 expression but repressed Nrf2 expression. Moreover, our results suggested that there may be a co-regulation between p53 and Nrf2, in which transfection with siNrf2 induced the p53 expression. We demonstrated for the first time that shikonin activated cell apoptosis in AGS cells via caspase 3- and JNK-dependent pathways, as well as through the p53-Nrf2 mediated signal pathway. Our study validates in partly the contribution of shikonin as a new therapeutic approaches/ agent for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27257011

  5. Arsenite induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of tumor suppressor P53 in human skin keratinocytes as a possible mechanism for carcinogenesis associated with arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarova, Elena V.; Rossman, Toby G.

    2010-03-15

    Arsenite is an environmental pollutant. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with elevated cancer risk, especially in skin. Arsenite alone does not cause skin cancer in animals, but arsenite can enhance the carcinogenicity of solar UV. Arsenite is not a significant mutagen at non-toxic concentrations, but it enhances the mutagenicity of other carcinogens. The tumor suppressor protein P53 and nuclear enzyme PARP-1 are both key players in DNA damage response. This laboratory demonstrated earlier that in cells treated with arsenite, the P53-dependent increase in p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression, normally a block to cell cycle progression after DNA damage, is deficient. Here we show that although long-term exposure of human keratinocytes (HaCaT) to a nontoxic concentration (0.1 muM) of arsenite decreases the level of global protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, it increases poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 protein and PARP-1 protein abundance. We also demonstrate that exposure to 0.1 muM arsenite depresses the constitutive expression of p21 mRNA and P21 protein in HaCaT cells. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 is reported to block its activation, DNA binding and its functioning as a transcription factor. Our results suggest that arsenite's interference with activation of P53 via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation may play a role in the comutagenic and cocarcinogenic effects of arsenite.

  6. Uptake, p53 Pathway Activation, and Cytotoxic Responses for Co(II) and Ni(II) in Human Lung Cells: Implications for Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt(II) and nickel(II) ions display similar chemical properties and act as hypoxia mimics in cells. However, only soluble Co(II) but not soluble Ni(II) is carcinogenic by inhalation. To explore potential reasons for these differences, we examined responses of human lung cells to both metals. We found that Co(II) showed almost 8 times higher accumulation than Ni(II) in H460 cells but caused a less efficient activation of the transcriptional factor p53 as measured by its accumulation, Ser15 phosphorylation, and target gene expression. Unlike Ni(II), Co(II) was ineffective in downregulating the p53 inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Co(II)-treated cells continued DNA replication at internal doses that caused massive apoptosis by Ni(II). Apoptosis and the overall cell death by Co(II) were delayed and weaker than by Ni(II). Inhibition of caspases but not programmed necrosis pathways suppressed Co(II)-induced cell death. Knockdown of p53 produced 50%–60% decreases in activation of caspases 3/7 and expression of 2 most highly upregulated proapoptotic genes PUMA and NOXA by Co(II). Overall, p53-mediated apoptosis accounted for 55% cell death by Co(II), p53-independent apoptosis for 20%, and p53/caspase-independent mechanisms for 25%. Similar to H460, normal human lung fibroblasts and primary human bronchial epithelial cells had several times higher accumulation of Co(II) than Ni(II) and showed a delayed and weaker caspase activation by Co(II). Thus, carcinogenicity of soluble Co(II) could be related to high survival of metal-loaded cells, which permits accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. High cytotoxicity of soluble Ni(II) causes early elimination of damaged cells and is expected to be cancer suppressive. PMID:24068677

  7. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana; Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto; Pereira, Clara; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73.

  8. A Symphony of Regulations Centered on p63 to Control Development of Ectoderm-Derived Structures

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, Luisa; Costanzo, Antonio; Merlo, Giorgio R.

    2011-01-01

    The p53-related transcription factor p63 is critically important for basic cellular functions during development of the ectoderm and derived structure and tissues, including skin, limb, palate, and hair. On the one side, p63 is required to sustain the proliferation of keratinocyte progenitors, while on the other side it is required for cell stratification, commitment to differentiate, cell adhesion, and epithelial-mesenchymal signaling. Molecules that are components or regulators of the p63 pathway(s) are rapidly being identified, and it comes with no surprise that alterations in the p63 pathway lead to congenital conditions in which the skin and other ectoderm-derived structures are affected. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular regulations centered on p63, derived from the comprehension of p63-linked human diseases and the corresponding animal models, as well as from cellular models and high-throughput molecular approaches. We point out common themes and features, that allow to speculate on the possible role of p63 downstream events and their potential exploitation in future attempts to correct the congenital defect in preclinical studies. PMID:21716671

  9. P63 regulates tubular formation via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Yan, W; Chen, X

    2016-01-01

    P63, a p53 family member, is expressed as TA and ΔN isoforms. Interestingly, both TAp63 and ΔNp63 are transcription factors, and regulate both common and distinct sets of target genes. p63 is required for survival of some epithelial cell lineages, and lack of p63 leads to loss of epidermis and other epithelia in humans and mice. Here, we explored the role of p63 isoforms in cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis by using Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) tubular epithelial cells in two- or three-dimensional (2-D or 3-D) culture. We found that like downregulation of p53, downregulation of p63 and TAp63 decreases expression of growth-suppressing genes, including p21, PUMA and MIC-1, and consequently promotes cell proliferation and migration in 2-D culture. However, in 3-D culture, downregulation of p63, especially TAp63, but not p53, decapacitates MDCK cells to form a cyst structure through enhanced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In contrast, downregulation of ΔNp63 inhibits MDCK cell proliferation and migration in 2-D culture, and delays but does not block MDCK cell cyst formation and tubulogenesis in 3-D culture. Consistent with this, downregulation of ΔNp63 markedly upregulates growth-suppressing genes, including p21, PUMA and MIC-1. Taken together, these data suggest that TAp63 is the major isoform required for tubulogenesis by maintaining an appropriate level of EMT, whereas ΔNp63 fine-tunes the rate of cyst formation and tubulogenesis by maintaining an appropriate expression level of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:23542170

  10. A p53-like protein from a freshwater mollusc Lamellidens corrianus.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, B P

    2006-08-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated protein in human cancers and the accumulation of its high levels is a potential novel marker for malignancy. Recently, its homologues such as p63 and p73 have been reported in human, mice and fish. Environmentally induced alterations in p53 protein have been reported to contribute to pathogenesis of leukemia in soft-shell clam Mya arenaria inhabiting polluted water, suggesting that p53 proteins can also be used as pollution markers. In the present study, the presence of p53 protein or its homologues was investigated in tissues of bivalve molluscs Lamellidens corrianus that are predominant in the freshwater riverine environment and are well suited to act as test organisms for evaluation of habitat degradation. The molluscs were collected live from the river Ganga at three sampling sites viz., Kanpur, Allahabad and Varanasi and different tissues (foot, gill and mantle) were collected. Proteins were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). On immunoblot analysis, a 45 kDa protein (p45) was recognized by the monoclonal anti-p53 antibody in the molluscan tissues. The p45 showed immunoreactivity in all the three tissues of molluscs collected at Kanpur, in foot and gill tissues in those collected at Allahabad, and in foot tissue only, in those collected at Varanasi. Since monoclonal anti-p53 recognizes a denaturation-resistant epitope on the p53 (53 kDa) nuclear protein and does not react with other cellular proteins, the molluscan p45 is a p53-homologue or p53-like protein. Further, the differential expression of p45 in the different organs might serve as a useful biomarker that would help in establishing pollution gradient for environmental monitoring in the large aquatic ecosystems. PMID:17133770

  11. UVB-induced Senescence in Human Keratinocytes Requires a Functional Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor and p53

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Davina A.; Yi, Qiaofang; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    To cope with the frequent exposure to carcinogenic UV B (UVB) wavelengths found in sunlight, keratinocytes have acquired extensive protective measures to handle UVB-induced DNA damage. Recent in vitro and epidemiological data suggest one these protective mechanisms is dependent on the functional status of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling network in keratinocytes. During the normal UVB response, ligand-activated IGF-1Rs protect keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis; however, as a consequence, these keratinocytes fail to proliferate. This adaptive response of keratinocytes to UVB exposure maintains the protective barrier function of the epidermis while ensuring that UVB-damaged keratinocytes do not replicate DNA mutations. In contrast, when keratinocytes are exposed to UVB in the absence of IGF-1R activation, the keratinocytes are more sensitive to UVB-induced apoptosis, but the surviving keratinocytes retain the capacity to proliferate. This aberrant UVB response represents flawed protection from UVB damage potentially resulting in the malignant transformation of keratinocytes. Using normal human keratinocytes grown in vitro, we have demonstrated that activation of the IGF-1R promotes the premature senescence of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes through increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by maintaining the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21CDKN1A. Furthermore, IGF-1R–dependent UVB-induced premature senescence required the phosphorylation of p53 serine 46. These data suggest one mechanism of keratinocyte resistance to UVB-induced carcinogenesis involves the induction of IGF-1R–dependent premature senescence. PMID:18216278

  12. p53 mutation heterogeneity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soussi, T. . E-mail: thierry.soussi@free.fr; Lozano, G.

    2005-06-10

    The p53 gene is inactivated in about 50% of human cancers and the p53 protein is an essential component of the cell response induced by genotoxic stresses such as those generated by radiotherapy or chemotherapy. It is therefore highly likely that these alterations are an important component in tumor resistance to therapy. The particular characteristics of these alterations, 80% of which are missense mutations leading to functionally heterogeneous proteins, make p53 a unique gene in the class of tumor suppressor genes. A considerable number of mutant p53 proteins probably have an oncogenic activity per se and therefore actively participate in cell transformation. The fact that the apoptotic and antiproliferative functions of p53 can be dissociated in certain mutants also suggests another level of complexity in the relationships between p53 inactivation and neoplasia.

  13. Leptin reduces apoptosis triggered by high temperature in human placental villous explants: The role of the p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Toro, Ayelén R; Vilarino-Garcia, Teresa; Guadix, Pilar; Maymó, Julieta L; Dueñas, José L; Varone, Cecilia L; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2016-06-01

    Maternal fever is common during pregnancy and has for many years been suspected to harm the developing fetus. Whether increased maternal temperature produces exaggerated apoptosis in trophoblast cells remains unclear. Since p53 is a critical regulator of apoptosis we hypothesized that increased temperature in placenta produces abnormal expression of proteins in the p53 pathway and finally caspase-3 activation. Moreover, leptin, produced by placenta, is known to promote the proliferation and survival of trophoblastic cells. Thus, we aimed to study the possible role of leptin preventing apoptosis triggered by high temperature, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. Fresh placental tissue was collected from normal pregnancies. Explants of placental villi were exposed to 37 °C, 40 °C and 42 °C during 3 h in the presence or absence of 10 nM leptin in DMEM-F12 medium. Western blotting and qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of p53 and downstream effector, P53AIP1, Mdm2, p21, BAX and BCL-2 as well as the activated cleaved form of caspase-3 and the fragment of cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) cleaved at Asp396 (neoepitope M30). Phosphorylation of the Ser 46 residue on p53, the expression of P53AIP1, Mdm2, p21, as well as caspase-3 and CK-18 were significantly increased in explants at 40 °C and 42 °C. Conversely, these effects were significantly attenuated by leptin 10 nM at both 40 °C and 42 °C. The BCL2/BAX ratio was also significantly decreased in explants at 40 °C and 42 °C compared with explants incubated at 37 °C, which was prevented by leptin stimulation. These data illustrate the potential role of leptin for reducing apoptosis in trophoblast explants, including trophoblastic cells, triggered by high temperature, by preventing the activation of p53 signaling. PMID:27238720

  14. Dihydroptychantol A, a macrocyclic bisbibenzyl derivative, induces autophagy and following apoptosis associated with p53 pathway in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xia; Wu, William K.K.; Sun Bin; Cui Min; Liu Shanshan; Gao Jian; Lou Hongxiang

    2011-03-01

    Dihydroptychantol A (DHA), a novel macrocyclic bisbibenzyl compound extracted from liverwort Asterella angusta, has antifungal and multi-drug resistance reversal properties. Here, the chemically synthesized DHA was employed to test its anti-cancer activities in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Our results demonstrated that DHA induced autophagy followed by apoptotic cell death accompanied with G{sub 2}/M-phase cell cycle arrest in U2OS cells. DHA-induced autophagy was morphologically characterized by the formation of double membrane-bound autophagic vacuoles recognizable at the ultrastructural level. DHA also increased the levels of LC3-II, a marker of autophagy. Surprisingly, DHA-mediated apoptotic cell death was potentiated by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, suggesting that autophagy may play a protective role that impedes the eventual cell death. Furthermore, p53 was shown to be involved in DHA-meditated autophagy and apoptosis. In this connection, DHA increased nuclear expression of p53, induced p53 phosphorylation, and upregulated p53 target gene p21{sup Waf1/Cip1}. In contrast, cytoplasmic p53 was reduced by DHA, which contributed to the stimulation of autophagy. In relation to the cell cycle, DHA decreased the expression of cyclin B{sub 1}, a cyclin required for progression through the G{sub 2}/M phase. Taken together, DHA induces G{sub 2}/M-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U2OS cells. DHA-induced apoptosis was preceded by the induction of protective autophagy. DHA-mediated autophagy and apoptosis are associated with the cytoplasmic and nuclear functions of p53.

  15. Glucocorticoids induce senescence in primary human tenocytes by inhibition of sirtuin 1 and activation of the p53/p21 pathway: in vivo and in vitro evidence

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Raewyn C; Watts, Anna C; Murphy, Richard J; Snelling, Sarah J; Carr, Andrew J; Hulley, Philippa A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible side effect of some pharmaceuticals which can contribute to tissue degeneration. Objective To determine whether pharmaceutical glucocorticoids induce senescence in tenocytes. Methods Features of senescence (β-galactosidase activity at pH 6 (SA-β-gal) and active mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in cell cycle arrest) as well as the activity of the two main pathways leading to cell senescence were examined in glucocorticoid-treated primary human tenocytes. Evidence of senescence-inducing pathway induction in vivo was obtained using immunohistochemistry on tendon biopsy specimens taken before and 7 weeks after subacromial Depo-Medrone injection. Results Dexamethasone treatment of tenocytes resulted in an increased percentage of SA-βgal-positive cells. Levels of phosphorylated p70S6K did not decrease with glucocorticoid treatment indicating mTOR remained active. Increased levels of acetylated p53 as well as increased RNA levels of its pro-senescence effector p21 were evident in dexamethasone-treated tenocytes. Levels of the p53 deacetylase sirtuin 1 were lower in dexamethasone-treated cells compared with controls. Knockdown of p53 or inhibition of p53 activity prevented dexamethasone-induced senescence. Activation of sirtuin 1 either by exogenous overexpression or by treatment with resveratrol or low glucose prevented dexamethasone-induced senescence. Immunohistochemical analysis of tendon biopsies taken before and after glucocorticoid injection revealed a significant increase in the percentage of p53-positive cells (p=0.03). The percentage of p21-positive cells also tended to be higher post-injection (p=0.06) suggesting glucocorticoids activate the p53/p21 senescence-inducing pathway in vivo as well as in vitro. Conclusion As cell senescence is irreversible in vivo, glucocorticoid-induced senescence may result in long-term degenerative changes in tendon tissue. PMID:23727633

  16. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  17. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  18. FGFR2 signaling underlies p63 oncogenic function in squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Matthew R.; Wilson, Catherine; Ory, Benjamin; Rothenberg, S. Michael; Faquin, William; Mills, Alea A.; Ellisen, Leif W.

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors drive many human cancers, yet identifying and therapeutically targeting the resulting deregulated pathways has proven difficult. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common and lethal human cancer, and relatively little progress has been made in improving outcomes for SCC due to a poor understanding of its underlying molecular pathogenesis. While SCCs typically lack somatic oncogene-activating mutations, they exhibit frequent overexpression of the p53-related transcription factor p63. We developed an in vivo murine tumor model to investigate the function and key transcriptional programs of p63 in SCC. Here, we show that established SCCs are exquisitely dependent on p63, as acute genetic ablation of p63 in advanced, invasive SCC induced rapid and dramatic apoptosis and tumor regression. In vivo genome-wide gene expression analysis identified a tumor-survival program involving p63-regulated FGFR2 signaling that was activated by ligand emanating from abundant tumor-associated stroma. Correspondingly, we demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of extinguishing this signaling axis in endogenous SCCs using the clinical FGFR2 inhibitor AZD4547. Collectively, these results reveal an unanticipated role for p63-driven paracrine FGFR2 signaling as an addicting pathway in human cancer and suggest a new approach for the treatment of SCC. PMID:23867503

  19. Safety of intravenous administration of a canarypox virus encoding the human wild-type p53 gene in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Menon, Anand G; Kuppen, Peter J K; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Offringa, Rienk; Bonnet, Marie Claude; Harinck, Bert I J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Redeker, Anke; Putter, Hein; Moingeon, Philippe; Morreau, Hans; Melief, Cornelis J M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2003-07-01

    Overexpression of p53 occurs in more than 50% of colorectal cancers. Therefore, p53 represents an attractive target antigen for immunotherapy. We assessed the safety of a canarypox virus encoding the human wild-type p53 gene given intravenously to end-stage colorectal cancer patients in a three-step dose escalation study aimed at inducing p53 immune responses. Patients with metastatic disease of p53-overexpressing colorectal cancers were vaccinated three times at 3-week intervals, each time with 10(6.5) CCID(50) (CCID(50)=cell culture infectious dose 50%; group 1, n=5), 10(7.0) CCID(50) (group 2, n=5) or 10(7.5) CCID(50) (group 3, n=6). Vital signs and the occurrence of adverse events were monitored and blood was analyzed for biochemical and hematological parameters as well as signs of auto-immune safety. In all, 16 patients were enrolled and 15 patients completed three vaccinations. No anaphylactic reaction or unwanted auto-immune reactions were observed. A total of 16 serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred: 10 in group 1, three in group 2 and three in group 3. All SAEs were tumor-related complications. There was no difference in the frequency of adverse events between the three groups, except for fever. Fever was the only vaccination-related adverse event consistently observed and was most frequent and outspoken in the group 3 patients. The majority was a grade 1 or 2 fever (93%) and grade 3 fever (7%) was observed in three patients of group 3. Some patients showed humoral and cellular responses against p53, following vaccinations. After having completed his initial treatment cycle, one patient (group 2) received a second treatment cycle of three doses of 10(7.5) CCID(50) and subsequently showed stable disease. All other patients showed progressive disease. We conclude that ALVAC-p53 can be administered intravenously to colorectal cancer patients without serious toxicity or pathological autoimmunity and can induce immune responses against p53. PMID:12833131

  20. Suppression of tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells by transfer of human chromosome 17 does not require transferred BRCA1 and p53 genes.

    PubMed

    Theile, M; Hartmann, S; Scherthan, H; Arnold, W; Deppert, W; Frege, R; Glaab, F; Haensch, W; Scherneck, S

    1995-02-01

    A number of candidate tumor suppressor genes located on the human chromosome 17 are thought to have a role to play in the development of breast cancer. In addition to the p53 gene on 17p13.1 and the BRCA1 gene mapped to 17q12-21, other chromosomal regions for tumor suppressor genes have been suggested to exist on 17p13.3 and both the central and the distal parts of 17q, although definitive functional proof of their involvement in breast cancer tumorigenesis is still lacking. In this report we show that microcell transfer of a human chromosome 17 into wild-type p53 breast cancer cells CAL51 results in loss of tumorigenicity and anchorage-independent growth, changes in cell morphology and a reduction of cell growth rates of the neo-selected microcell hybrids. In the hybrid cells, which express the p53 wild-type protein, only the p- and the distal parts of the q arm of donor chromosome 17 are transferred. Thus, our results provide functional evidence for the presence of one or more tumor suppressor gene(s) on chromosome 17, which are distinct from the p53 and the BRCA1 genes. PMID:7845668

  1. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  2. p53 Superfamily proteins in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Charles W; Van Beneden, Rebecca J; Muttray, Annette F; Böttger, S Anne; Kelley, Melissa L; Tucker, Abraham E; Thomas, W Kelley

    2011-01-01

    The human p53 tumour suppressor protein is inactivated in many cancers and is also a major player in apoptotic responses to cellular stress. The p53 protein and the two other members of this protein family (p63, p73) are encoded by distinct genes and their functions have been extensively documented for humans and some other vertebrates. The structure and relative expression levels for members of the p53 superfamily have also been reported for most major invertebrate taxa. The functions of homologous proteins have been investigated for only a few invertebrates (specifically, p53 in flies, nematodes and recently a sea anemone). These studies of classical model organisms all suggest that the gene family originally evolved to mediate apoptosis of damaged germ cells or to protect germ cells from genotoxic stress. Here, we have correlated data from a number of molluscan and other invertebrate sequencing projects to provide a framework for understanding p53 signalling pathways in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology. These data suggest that (a) the two identified p53 and p63/73-like proteins in soft shell clam (Mya arenaria), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Northern European squid (Loligo forbesi) have identical core sequences and may be splice variants of a single gene, while some molluscs and most other invertebrates have two or more distinct genes expressing different p53 family members; (b) transcriptional activation domains (TADs) in bivalve p53 and p63/73-like protein sequences are 67-69% conserved with human p53, while those in ecdysozoan, cnidarian, placozoan and choanozoan eukaryotes are ≤33% conserved; (c) the Mdm2 binding site in the transcriptional activation domain is 100% conserved in all sequenced bivalve p53 proteins (e.g. Mya, Mytilus, Crassostrea and Spisula) but is not present in other non-deuterostome invertebrates; (d) an Mdm2 homologue has been cloned for Mytilus trossulus; (e) homologues for both human p53 upstream regulatory and

  3. Mimulone-Induced Autophagy through p53-Mediated AMPK/mTOR Pathway Increases Caspase-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  4. Mimulone-induced autophagy through p53-mediated AMPK/mTOR pathway increases caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun-Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  5. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  6. p63 and p73 Transcriptionally Regulate Genes Involved in DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gurdziel, Katherine; Bell, George W.; Jacks, Tyler; Flores, Elsa R.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 family activates many of the same genes in response to DNA damage. Because p63 and p73 have structural differences from p53 and play distinct biological functions in development and metastasis, it is likely that they activate a unique transcriptional network. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide analysis using cells lacking the p53 family members after treatment with DNA damage. We identified over 100 genes involved in multiple pathways that were uniquely regulated by p63 or p73, and not p53. Further validation indicated that BRCA2, Rad51, and mre11 are direct transcriptional targets of p63 and p73. Additionally, cells deficient for p63 and p73 are impaired in DNA repair and p63+/−;p73+/− mice develop mammary tumors suggesting a novel mechanism whereby p63 and p73 suppress tumorigenesis. PMID:19816568

  7. Human p53 with a mutation in codone 273 facilitates the amplification of the gene dhfr in rat-1 and LIM1215 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Il`inskaya, G.V.; Sokova, O.I.; Kopnin, B.P.

    1995-05-01

    The effect of the expression of the exogenous human mutant p53 (Arg {yields} His in codone 273) on the amplification rate of the gene dhfr in permissive Rat-1 and LIM1215 cells was studied. It was shown that introduction of a retroviral construct with p53His273 resulted in the accumulation of methotrexate-resistant variants with an increased number of dhfr copies in populations of recipient cells. Luria-Delbruck fluctuation analysis revealed a four- to six-fold increase in the rate of appearance of new methotrexate-resistant cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated an extrachromosomal location of amplified DNA in cells containing p53His273, as was the case for control sublines. The data obtained indicate that modifications of p53 may induce gene amplification not only via removing the proliferation block of cells with amplified genes in selective medium, but also via some other mechanisms that seem to increase the chromosomal recombination rate. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Cellular Stress and p53-Associated Apoptosis by Juniperus communis L. Berry Extract Treatment in the Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lantto, Tiina A.; Laakso, Into; Dorman, H. J. Damien; Mauriala, Timo; Hiltunen, Raimo; Kõks, Sulev; Raasmaja, Atso

    2016-01-01

    Plant phenolics have shown to activate apoptotic cell death in different tumourigenic cell lines. In this study, we evaluated the effects of juniper berry extract (Juniperus communis L.) on p53 protein, gene expression and DNA fragmentation in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, we analyzed the phenolic composition of the extract. We found that juniper berry extract activated cellular relocalization of p53 and DNA fragmentation-dependent cell death. Differentially expressed genes between treated and non-treated cells were evaluated with the cDNA-RDA (representational difference analysis) method at the early time point of apoptotic process when p53 started to be activated and no caspase activity was detected. Twenty one overexpressed genes related to cellular stress, protein synthesis, cell survival and death were detected. Interestingly, they included endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer and sensor HSPA5 and other ER stress-related genes CALM2 and YKT6 indicating that ER stress response was involved in juniper berry extract mediated cell death. In composition analysis, we identified and quantified low concentrations of fifteen phenolic compounds. The main groups of them were flavones, flavonols, phenolic acids, flavanol and biflavonoid including glycosides of quercetin, apigenin, isoscutellarein and hypolaetin. It is suggested that juniper berry extract induced the p53-associated apoptosis through the potentiation and synergism by several phenolic compounds. PMID:27420050

  9. Cellular Stress and p53-Associated Apoptosis by Juniperus communis L. Berry Extract Treatment in the Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Tiina A; Laakso, Into; Dorman, H J Damien; Mauriala, Timo; Hiltunen, Raimo; Kõks, Sulev; Raasmaja, Atso

    2016-01-01

    Plant phenolics have shown to activate apoptotic cell death in different tumourigenic cell lines. In this study, we evaluated the effects of juniper berry extract (Juniperus communis L.) on p53 protein, gene expression and DNA fragmentation in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, we analyzed the phenolic composition of the extract. We found that juniper berry extract activated cellular relocalization of p53 and DNA fragmentation-dependent cell death. Differentially expressed genes between treated and non-treated cells were evaluated with the cDNA-RDA (representational difference analysis) method at the early time point of apoptotic process when p53 started to be activated and no caspase activity was detected. Twenty one overexpressed genes related to cellular stress, protein synthesis, cell survival and death were detected. Interestingly, they included endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer and sensor HSPA5 and other ER stress-related genes CALM2 and YKT6 indicating that ER stress response was involved in juniper berry extract mediated cell death. In composition analysis, we identified and quantified low concentrations of fifteen phenolic compounds. The main groups of them were flavones, flavonols, phenolic acids, flavanol and biflavonoid including glycosides of quercetin, apigenin, isoscutellarein and hypolaetin. It is suggested that juniper berry extract induced the p53-associated apoptosis through the potentiation and synergism by several phenolic compounds. PMID:27420050

  10. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human oral squamous cell carcinoma: its association with tumour progression and p53 gene status.

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, T; Matsumura, S; Hiranuma, H; Jikko, A; Furukawa, S; Ishida, T; Fuchihata, H

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To correlate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma with the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis; and to assess whether p53 gene status is associated with VEGF expression in human cancers. METHODS: Tumour specimens from 45 patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas were examined. Expression of VEGF was determined using an immunohistochemical method, and a tumour was considered positive when more than 5% of the neoplastic cells showed VEGF immunoreactivity. The p53 gene status was screened using a polymerase chain reaction--single strand conformation polymorphism analysis. RESULTS: VEGF positive staining was detected in 19 (42.2%) of the 45 cases. VEGF immunoreactivity did not correlate with the histological degree of tumour differentiation, clinical stages, or lymph node metastasis. The patients with VEGF positive tumours had a significantly worse prognosis than those with VEGF negative tumours. The five year overall survival rate of the VEGF negative patients was 76.5%, as compared with 48.8% for the VEGF positive patients. No significant association between VEGF expression and the p53 gene status of the tumours was found. CONCLUSIONS: VEGF is a good prognostic indicator of the survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. The p53 gene status does not seem to be associated with VEGF expression in these cancers. Images PMID:10023341