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Sample records for human papillomavirus oncogene

  1. Oncogenic Activities of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Münger, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Infectious etiologies for certain human cancers have long been suggested by epidemiological studies and studies with animals. Important support for this concept came from the discovery by Harald zur Hausen’s group that human cervical carcinoma almost universally contains certain “high-risk” human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Over the years, much has been learned about the carcinogenic activities of high-risk HPVs. These studies have revealed that two viral proteins, E6 and E7, that are consistently expressed in HPV-associated carcinomas, are necessary for induction and maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Hence, HPV-associated tumors are unique amongst human solid tumors in that they are universally caused by exposure to the same, molecularly defined oncogenic agents, and the molecular signal transduction pathways subverted by these viral transforming agents are frequently disrupted in other, non-virus associated human cancers. PMID:19540281

  2. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    SciTech Connect

    Sichero, Laura; Simao Sobrinho, Joao; Lina Villa, Luisa

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  4. Individual and Complementary Effects of Human Papillomavirus Oncogenes on Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Sven; Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Aubin, François; Alonso, Angel; Auvinen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 protein functions have established the oncogenic nature of three viral proteins: E5, E6 and E7. Here we have studied the functions of these proteins by functional deletion of the individual E5, E6 or E7, or both E6 and E7 oncogenes in the context of the whole viral genome. These mutants, or the intact wild-type genome, were expressed from the natural viral promoters along with differentiation of epithelial HaCaT cells in three-dimensional collagen raft cultures. High episomal viral copy numbers were obtained using a transfection-based loxp-HPV16-eGFP-N1 vector system. All epithelial equivalents carrying the different HPV type 16 genomes showed pronounced hyperplastic and dysplastic morphology. Particularly the E7 oncogene, with contribution of E6, was shown to enhance cell proliferation. Specifically, the crucial role of E7 in HPV-associated hyperproliferation was clearly manifested. Based on morphological characteristics, immunohistochemical staining for differentiation and proliferation markers, and low expression of E1^E4, we propose that our raft culture models produce cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1 and CIN2-like tissue. Our experimental setting provides an alternative tool to study concerted functions of HPV proteins in the development of epithelial dysplasia. PMID:26636751

  5. Development of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for oncogenic human papillomavirus types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

    PubMed

    Brown, Martha J; Seitz, Hanna; Towne, Victoria; Müller, Martin; Finnefrock, Adam C

    2014-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for all cervical cancers, a significant number of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Two licensed vaccines offer protection against the most prevalent oncogenic types, 16 and 18, responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and one of these also offers protection against types 6 and 11, responsible for 90% of genital warts. The vaccines are comprised of recombinantly expressed major capsid proteins that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) and prevent infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies. Adding the other frequently identified oncogenic types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 to a vaccine would increase the coverage against HPV-induced cancers to approximately 90%. We describe the generation and characterization of panels of monoclonal antibodies to these five additional oncogenic HPV types, and the selection of antibody pairs that were high affinity and type specific and recognized conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. Such characteristics make these antibodies useful tools for monitoring the production and potency of a prototype vaccine as well as monitoring vaccine-induced immune responses in the clinic. PMID:24574536

  6. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792

  7. Determination of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotypes in Anogenital Cancers in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Mu Mu Shwe; Hlaing Myat Thu; Khin Saw Aye; Aye Aye Myint; Mya Thida; Khin Shwe Mar; Khin Khin Oo; Khin Sandar Aye; Okada, Shigeru; Kyaw Zin Thant

    2016-04-01

    Molecular and epidemiologic investigations suggest a causal role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital cancers. This study identified oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in a 2013 cross-sectional descriptive study in Myanmar. In total, 100 biopsy tissues of histologically confirmed anogenital cancers collected in 2008-2012 were studied, including 30 penile and 9 anal cancers from Yangon General Hospital and 61 vulvar cancers from Central Women's Hospital, Yangon. HPV-DNA testing and genotyping were performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Overall, 34% of anogenital cancers were HPV-positive. HPV was found in 44.4% of anal (4/9), 36.1% of vulvar (22/61), and 26.7% of penile (8/30) cancers. The most frequent genotypes in anal cancers were HPV 16 (75% ) and 18 (25% ). In vulvar cancers, HPV 33 was most common (40.9% ), followed by 16 (31.8% ), 31 (22.7% ), and 18 (4.6% ). In penile cancers, HPV 16 (62.5% ) was most common, followed by 33 (25% ) and 18 (12.5% ). This is the first report of evidencebased oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in Myanmar. This research provides valuable information for understanding the burden of HPV-associated cancers of the anus, penis, and vulva and considering the effectiveness of prophylactic HPV vaccination. PMID:27094835

  8. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  9. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-08-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  10. Role of Cdc6 in re-replication in cells expressing human papillomavirus E7 oncogene.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xueli; Zhou, Yunying; Chen, Jason J

    2016-08-01

    The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types induces DNA re-replication that contributes to carcinogenesis; however, the mechanism is not fully understood. To better understand the mechanism by which E7 induces re-replication, we investigated the expression and function of cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6) in E7-expressing cells. Cdc6 is a DNA replication initiation factor and exhibits oncogenic activities when overexpressed. We found that in E7-expressing cells, the steady-state level of Cdc6 protein was upregulated and its half-life was increased. Cdc6 was localized to the nucleus and associated with chromatin, especially upon DNA damage. Importantly, downregulation of Cdc6 reduced E7-induced re-replication. Interestingly, the level of Cdc6 phosphorylation at serine 54 (S54P) was increased in E7-expressing cells. S54P was associated with an increase in the total amount of Cdc6 and chromatin-bound Cdc6. DNA damage-enhanced upregulation and chromatin binding of Cdc6 appeared to be due to downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) as Cdk1 knockdown increased Cdc6 levels. Furthermore, Cdk1 knockdown or inhibition led to re-replication. These findings shed light on the mechanism by which HPV induces genomic instability and may help identify potential targets for drug development. PMID:27207654

  11. Direct benefit of vaccinating boys along with girls against oncogenic human papillomavirus: bayesian evidence synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wallinga, Jacco; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berkhof, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the reduction in the vaccine preventable burden of cancer in men if boys are vaccinated along with girls against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV). Design Bayesian evidence synthesis approach used to evaluate the impact of vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18 on the burden of anal, penile, and oropharyngeal carcinomas among heterosexual men and men who have sex with men. The reduced transmission of vaccine-type HPV from vaccination of girls was assumed to lower the risk of HPV associated cancer in all men but not to affect the excess risk of HPV associated cancers among men who have sex with men. Setting General population in the Netherlands. Intervention Inclusion of boys aged 12 into HPV vaccination programmes. Main outcome measures Quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and numbers needed to vaccinate. Results Before HPV vaccination, 14.9 (95% credible interval 12.2 to 18.1) QALYs per thousand men were lost to vaccine preventable cancers associated with HPV in the Netherlands. This burden would be reduced by 37% (28% to 48%) if the vaccine uptake among girls remains at the current level of 60%. To prevent one additional case of cancer among men, 795 boys (660 to 987) would need to be vaccinated; with tumour specific numbers for anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancer of 2162, 3486, and 1975, respectively. The burden of HPV related cancer in men would be reduced by 66% (53% to 805) if vaccine uptake among girls increases to 90%. In that case, 1735 boys (1240 to 2900) would need to be vaccinated to prevent an additional case; with tumour specific numbers for anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancer of 2593, 29107, and 6484, respectively. Conclusions Men will benefit indirectly from vaccination of girls but remain at risk of cancers associated with HPV. The incremental benefit of vaccinating boys when vaccine uptake among girls is high is driven by the prevention of anal carcinomas, which underscores the relevance of HPV prevention efforts for

  12. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  13. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D.; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A.; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking. PMID:27578500

  14. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking. PMID:27578500

  15. Different mechanisms contribute to the E2-mediated transcriptional repression of human papillomavirus type 18 viral oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Demeret, C; Desaintes, C; Yaniv, M; Thierry, F

    1997-12-01

    Transcription of the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 oncogenes is repressed by the viral E2 protein. In C33 cells, we have previously shown that of the four E2 binding sites (E2 BS) present in the HPV18 long control region (LCR), only the binding site adjacent to the TATA box (E2 BS 1) was involved in E2-mediated repression. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this phenomenon was conserved in other cell lines. We first showed that all three E2 BS proximal to the P105 promoter were required for full repression of its activity in HeLa and HaCaT cells. Repression by E2 at E2 BS 2 occurred through the displacement of Sp1. Second, a truncated E2 product, lacking the N-terminal transactivation domain, repressed transcription more efficiently than the full-length protein. Repression was abolished when the N-terminal domain of E2 was replaced by the activation domain of VP16. The VP16-E2 chimeric protein could activate transcription from an LCR mutated in its TATA box. DNA-protein binding studies showed that E2 associates with its four binding sites in the LCR with similar affinities. However, challenge of such complexes with excess binding sites demonstrated that interaction with E2 BS 4 was the most stable while interaction with E2 BS 1 was the least stable. Furthermore, complexes with the full-length E2 were less stable than those formed with the N-terminally truncated protein. PMID:9371593

  16. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. Importance   Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an

  17. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. IMPORTANCE  : Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an accumulation of DNA

  18. Induction of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) oncogenic domains (PODs) by papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Tomomi; Lambert, Paul F.

    2007-09-30

    Promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs), also called nuclear domain 10 (ND10), are subnuclear structures that have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes as well as the life cycle of DNA viruses including papillomaviruses. In order to investigate the interplay between papillomaviruses and PODs, we analyzed the status of PODs in organotypic raft cultures of human keratinocytes harboring HPV genome that support the differentiation-dependent HPV life cycle. The number of PODs per nucleus was increased in the presence of HPV genomes selectively within the poorly differentiated layers but was absent in the terminally differentiated layers of the stratified epithelium. This increase in PODs was correlated with an increase in abundance of post-translationally modified PML protein. Neither the E2-dependent transcription nor viral DNA replication was reliant upon the presence of PML. Implications of these findings in terms of HPV's interaction with its host are discussed.

  19. Characterization of Intra-Type Variants of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing of the E6/E7 Region.

    PubMed

    Lavezzo, Enrico; Masi, Giulia; Toppo, Stefano; Franchin, Elisa; Gazzola, Valentina; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Masiero, Serena; Trevisan, Marta; Pagni, Silvana; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Different human papillomavirus (HPV) types are characterized by differences in tissue tropism and ability to promote cell proliferation and transformation. In addition, clinical and experimental studies have shown that some genetic variants/lineages of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) types are characterized by increased oncogenic activity and probability to induce cancer. In this study, we designed and validated a new method based on multiplex PCR-deep sequencing of the E6/E7 region of HR-HPV types to characterize HPV intra-type variants in clinical specimens. Validation experiments demonstrated that this method allowed reliable identification of the different lineages of oncogenic HPV types. Advantages of this method over other published methods were represented by its ability to detect variants of all HR-HPV types in a single reaction, to detect variants of HR-HPV types in clinical specimens with multiple infections, and, being based on sequencing of the full E6/E7 region, to detect amino acid changes in these oncogenes potentially associated with increased transforming activity. PMID:26985902

  20. Characterization of Intra-Type Variants of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing of the E6/E7 Region

    PubMed Central

    Lavezzo, Enrico; Masi, Giulia; Toppo, Stefano; Franchin, Elisa; Gazzola, Valentina; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Masiero, Serena; Trevisan, Marta; Pagni, Silvana; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Different human papillomavirus (HPV) types are characterized by differences in tissue tropism and ability to promote cell proliferation and transformation. In addition, clinical and experimental studies have shown that some genetic variants/lineages of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) types are characterized by increased oncogenic activity and probability to induce cancer. In this study, we designed and validated a new method based on multiplex PCR-deep sequencing of the E6/E7 region of HR-HPV types to characterize HPV intra-type variants in clinical specimens. Validation experiments demonstrated that this method allowed reliable identification of the different lineages of oncogenic HPV types. Advantages of this method over other published methods were represented by its ability to detect variants of all HR-HPV types in a single reaction, to detect variants of HR-HPV types in clinical specimens with multiple infections, and, being based on sequencing of the full E6/E7 region, to detect amino acid changes in these oncogenes potentially associated with increased transforming activity. PMID:26985902

  1. [Human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes. PMID:14610898

  2. Reactive Carbon Nano-Onion Modified Glassy Carbon Surfaces as DNA Sensors for Human Papillomavirus Oncogene Detection with Enhanced Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bartolome, Joanne P; Echegoyen, Luis; Fragoso, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were modified with small carbon nano-onions (CNOs) and activated by electrografting of diazonium salts bearing terminal carboxylic acid and maleimide groups. The CNO-modified surfaces were characterized by ESEM and AFM microscopy as well as by electrochemical techniques. The modified electrodes were used for the amperometric detection of a model DNA target sequence associated with the human papillomavirus by immobilizing short recognition sequences by amidation or thiol-maleimide reactions. The analytical parameters of the developed biosensors were compared with glassy carbon electrodes without CNOs. In both cases, the incorporation of CNOs resulted in an enhancement in sensitivity and a decrease in detection limits ascribed to a combination of large surface areas and enhanced electron transfer properties of the CNO-modified electrodes. These results offer promise for the construction of other CNO-based biomolecule detection platforms with enhanced sensitivities. PMID:26067834

  3. Tobacco exposure results in increased E6 and E7 oncogene expression, DNA damage and mutation rates in cells maintaining episomal human papillomavirus 16 genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lanlan; Griego, Anastacia M.; Chu, Ming; Ozbun, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections are necessary but insufficient agents of cervical and other epithelial cancers. Epidemiological studies support a causal, but ill-defined, relationship between tobacco smoking and cervical malignancies. In this study, we used mainstream tobacco smoke condensate (MSTS-C) treatments of cervical cell lines that maintain either episomal or integrated HPV16 or HPV31 genomes to model tobacco smoke exposure to the cervical epithelium of the smoker. MSTS-C exposure caused a dose-dependent increase in viral genome replication and correspondingly higher early gene transcription in cells with episomal HPV genomes. However, MSTS-C exposure in cells with integrated HR-HPV genomes had no effect on genome copy number or early gene transcription. In cells with episomal HPV genomes, the MSTS-C-induced increases in E6 oncogene transcription led to decreased p53 protein levels and activity. As expected from loss of p53 activity in tobacco-exposed cells, DNA strand breaks were significantly higher but apoptosis was minimal compared with cells containing integrated viral genomes. Furthermore, DNA mutation frequencies were higher in surviving cells with HPV episomes. These findings provide increased understanding of tobacco smoke exposure risk in HPV infection and indicate tobacco smoking acts more directly to alter HR-HPV oncogene expression in cells that maintain episomal viral genomes. This suggests a more prominent role for tobacco smoke in earlier stages of HPV-related cancer progression. PMID:25064354

  4. Papillomavirus sequences integrate near cellular oncogenes in some cervical carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Duerst, M.; Croce, C.M.; Gissmann, L.; Schwarz, E.; Huebner, K.

    1987-02-01

    The chromosomal locations of cellular sequences flanking integrated papillomavirus DNA in four cervical cell lines and a primary cervical carcinoma have been determined. The two human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 flanking sequences derived from the tumor were localized to chromosomes regions 20pter..-->..20q13 and 3p25..-->..3qter, regions that also contain the protooncogenes c-src-1 and c-raf-1, respectively. The HPV 16 integration site in the SiHa cervical carcinoma-derived cell line is in chromosome region 13q14..-->..13q32. The HPV 18 integration site in SW756 cervical carcinoma cells is in chromosome 12 but is not closely linked to the Ki-ras2 gene. Finally, in two cervical carcinoma cell lines, HeLa and C4-I, HPV 18 DNA is integrated in chromosome 8, 5' of the c-myc gene. The HeLaHPV 18 integration site is within 40 kilobases 5' of the c-myc gene, inside the HL60 amplification unit surrounding and including the c-myc gene. Additionally, steady-state levels of c-myc mRNA are elevated in HeLa and C4-I cells relative to other cervical carcinoma cell lines. Thus, in at least some genital tumors, cis-activation of cellular oncogenes by HPV may be involved in malignant transformation of cervical cells.

  5. Systemic delivery of siRNA by actively targeted polyion complex micelles for silencing the E6 and E7 human papillomavirus oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Haruka; Matsumoto, Yoko; Kawana, Kei; Christie, R James; Naito, Mitsuru; Kim, Beob Soo; Toh, Kazuko; Min, Hyun Su; Yi, Yu; Matsumoto, Yu; Kim, Hyun Jin; Miyata, Kanjiro; Taguchi, Ayumi; Tomio, Kensuke; Yamashita, Aki; Inoue, Tomoko; Nakamura, Hiroe; Fujimoto, Asaha; Sato, Masakazu; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Arimoto, Takahide; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-06-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes are essential for the immortalization and maintenance of HPV-associated cancer and are ubiquitously expressed in cervical cancer lesions. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) coding for E6 and E7 oncogenes is a promising approach for precise treatment of cervical cancer, yet a delivery system is required for systemic delivery to solid tumors. Here, an actively targeted polyion complex (PIC) micelle was applied to deliver siRNAs coding for HPV E6/E7 to HPV cervical cancer cell tumors in immune-incompetent tumor-bearing mice. A cell viability assay revealed that both HPV type 16 and 18 E6/E7 siRNAs (si16E6/E7 and si18E6/E7, respectively) interfered with proliferation of cervical cancer cell lines in an HPV type-specific manner. A fluorescence imaging biodistribution analysis further revealed that fluorescence dye-labeled siRNA-loaded PIC micelles efficiently accumulated within the tumor mass after systemic administration. Ultimately, intravenous injection of si16E6/E7 and si18E6/E7-loaded PIC micelles was found to significantly suppress the growth of subcutaneous SiHa and HeLa tumors, respectively. The specific activity of siRNA treatment was confirmed by the observation that p53 protein expression was restored in the tumors excised from the mice treated with si16E6/E7- and si18E6/E7-loaded PIC micelles for SiHa and HeLa tumors, respectively. Therefore, the actively targeted PIC micelle incorporating HPV E6/E7-coding siRNAs demonstrated its therapeutic potential against HPV-associated cancer. PMID:26979870

  6. Codon optimization of the human papillomavirus E7 oncogene induces a CD8+ T cell response to a cryptic epitope not harbored by wild-type E7.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Felix K M; Wilde, Susanne; Voigt, Katrin; Kieback, Elisa; Mosetter, Barbara; Schendel, Dolores J; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine. PMID:25799237

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You Human Papillomavirus Vaccine HPV Information in Other Languages Women ...

  8. E2F-Rb Complexes Assemble and Inhibit cdc25A Transcription in Cervical Carcinoma Cells following Repression of Human Papillomavirus Oncogene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingling; Goodwin, Edward C.; Naeger, Lisa Kay; Vigo, Elena; Galaktionov, Konstantin; Helin, Kristian; DiMaio, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in cervical carcinoma cells represses expression of integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes, followed by repression of the cdc25A gene and other cellular genes required for cell cycle progression, resulting in dramatic growth arrest. To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F binding sites and a consensus E2 binding site. The wild-type E2 protein inhibited expression of a luciferase gene linked to the cdc25A promoter in HT-3 cervical carcinoma cells. Mutation of the distal E2F binding site in the cdc25A promoter abolished E2-induced repression, whereas mutation of the proximal E2F site or the E2 site had no effect. None of these mutations affected the activity of the promoter in the absence of E2 expression. Expression of the E2 protein also led to posttranscriptional increase in the level of E2F4, p105Rb, and p130 and induced the formation of nuclear E2F4-p130 and E2F4-p105Rb complexes. This resulted in marked rearrangement of the protein complexes that formed at the distal E2F site in the cdc25A promoter, including the replacement of free E2F complexes with E2F4-p105Rb complexes. These experiments indicated that repression of E2F-responsive promoters following HPV E6/E7 repression was mediated by activation of the Rb tumor suppressor pathway and the assembly of repressing E2F4-Rb DNA binding complexes. Importantly, these experiments revealed that HPV-induced alterations in E2F transcription complexes that occur during cervical carcinogenesis are reversed by repression of HPV E6/E7 expression. PMID:10982822

  9. A Chimeric 18L1-45RG1 Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Cross-Protects against Oncogenic Alpha-7 Human Papillomavirus Types

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Bettina; Schellenbacher, Christina; Jindra, Christoph; Fink, Dieter; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr) mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC), a subset of cervical cancer (CxC). Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP) screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent) HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP) of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7) includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18) targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1) of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1). Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent vaccine

  10. Complementation of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 by Jagged1-specific Notch1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling involves pleiotropic oncogenic functions independent of CBF1;Su(H);Lag-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavalu, Karthikeyan; Subbaiah, Vanitha K; Srivastava, Sweta; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Syal, Ruchi; Krishna, Sudhir

    2005-06-01

    We have analyzed the induction and role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) by Notch signaling in human papillomavirus (HPV)-derived cancers. Jagged1, in contrast to Delta1, is preferentially upregulated in human cervical tumors. Jagged1 and not Delta1 expression sustained in vivo tumors by HPV16 oncogenes in HaCaT cells. Further, Jagged1 expression correlates with the rapid induction of PI3K-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in both HaCaT cells and a human cervical tumor-derived cell line, suggestive of Delta1;Serrate/Jagged;Lag2 ligand-specific roles. Microarray analysis and dominant-negatives reveal that Notch-PI3K oncogenic functions can be independent of CBF1;Su(H);Lag-1 activation and instead relies on Deltex1, an alternative Notch effector. PMID:15919944

  11. Complementation of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 and E7 by Jagged1-Specific Notch1-Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Signaling Involves Pleiotropic Oncogenic Functions Independent of CBF1;Su(H);Lag-1 Activation†

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavalu, Karthikeyan; Subbaiah, Vanitha K.; Srivastava, Sweta; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Syal, Ruchi; Krishna, Sudhir

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the induction and role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) by Notch signaling in human papillomavirus (HPV)-derived cancers. Jagged1, in contrast to Delta1, is preferentially upregulated in human cervical tumors. Jagged1 and not Delta1 expression sustained in vivo tumors by HPV16 oncogenes in HaCaT cells. Further, Jagged1 expression correlates with the rapid induction of PI3K-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in both HaCaT cells and a human cervical tumor-derived cell line, suggestive of Delta1;Serrate/Jagged;Lag2 ligand-specific roles. Microarray analysis and dominant-negatives reveal that Notch-PI3K oncogenic functions can be independent of CBF1;Su(H);Lag-1 activation and instead relies on Deltex1, an alternative Notch effector. PMID:15919944

  12. Two less common human microRNAs miR-875 and miR-3144 target a conserved site of E6 oncogene in most high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Cai, Qingqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhong, Yang; Xu, Congjian; Li, Yanyun

    2015-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) including high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) subtypes have distinguishable variation on both genotypes and phenotypes. The co-infection of multiple HR-HPVs, headed by HPV16, is common in cervical cancer in female. Recently accumulating reports have focused on the interaction between virus and host, particularly the role of human microRNAs (miRNAs) in anti-viral defense by targeting viral genome. Here, we found a well-conserved target site of miRNAs in the genomes of most HR-HPVs, not LR-HPVs, by scanning all potential target sites of human miRNAs on 24 HPVs of unambiguous subtypes of risk. The site is targeted by two less common human miRNAs, miR-875 and miR-3144, and is located in E6 oncogene open reading frame (ORF) and overlap with the first alternative splice exon of viral early transcripts. In validation tests, miR-875 and miR-3144 were identified to suppress the target reporter activity markedly and inhibit the expression of both synthetically exogenous E6 and endogenous E6 oncogene. High level of two miRNAs can inhibit cell growth and promote apoptosis in HPV16-positive cervical cancer cells. This study provides a promising common target of miRNAs for most HR-HPVs and highlights the effects of two low expressed human miRNAs on tumour suppression. PMID:25913515

  13. Papillomaviruses and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjanen, K.; Gissman, L.; Koss, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Papillomaviruses: particles, genome organization and proteins; Physical state of papillomavirus DNA in tumors; Transforming and regulatory functions of bovine papillomavirus Type 1; and Transcription of papillomavirus genomes.

  14. [Network Research on Human Papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Paniagua, Ramón; Furuya, María ElenaYuriko

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the research in important health questions at a national and institutional levels, the Human Papillomavirus Research Network of the Health Research Coordination of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social offers this supplement with the purpose of assisting patients that daily look for attention due to the human papillomavirus or to cervical cancer. PMID:26462505

  15. Nongenital human papillomavirus disease.

    PubMed

    Mayeaux, E J; Khan, Michelle J

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral cause of cancer, and is responsible for 5% of cancers worldwide. Following demonstration of the causative link between HPV and cervical cancer, HPV has been shown to be associated with several anogenital malignancies and with oral pharyngeal cancers. HPV-related anal and oral pharyngeal disease is rising in incidence and includes anal warts and neoplasia, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and oral pharyngeal neoplasia. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongenital HPV-related disease. PMID:23732034

  16. Targeted expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes of human papillomavirus type 16 in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits generalized epidermal hyperplasia involving autocrine factors.

    PubMed Central

    Auewarakul, P; Gissmann, L; Cid-Arregui, A

    1994-01-01

    The E6 and E7 early genes of human papillomavirus type 16 have been shown in vitro to play a central role in the transforming capability of this virus. To explore their effects on differentiating epithelial cells in vivo, we used a bovine cytokeratin 10 (K10) promoter to target the expression of E6 and E7 to the suprabasal layers of the epidermis of transgenic mice. In two different lines of mice efficiently expressing the transgene, animals displayed generalized epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis in the skin and the forestomach, both known to be sites of K10 expression. Northern (RNA) blot analysis revealed high levels of E6 and E7 transcripts, and in situ hybridizations localized these transcripts to the suprabasal strata of epidermis. In vivo labeling of proliferating cells showed two distinct effects of E6 and E7 expression in the epidermis: (i) an increase in the number of growing cells in the undifferentiated basal layer and (ii) abnormal proliferation of differentiated cells in the suprabasal strata. The expression of c-myc in the skin of transgenics was higher than that in control animals. The induction of c-myc transcription by topical application of tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate was prevented by simultaneous treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 in nontransgenic skin but not in transgenic skin. In addition, transforming growth factor alpha was found to be overexpressed in the suprabasal layers of the transgenic epidermis. These findings suggest that autocrine mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of epidermal hyperplasia. Animals of both lines developed papillomas in skin sites exposed to mechanical irritation and wounding, suggesting that secondary events are necessary for progression to neoplasia. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the tumor promoter activities of human papillomavirus type 16 in epithelial cells in vivo. Images PMID:7969162

  17. Durable immunity to oncogenic human papillomaviruses elicited by adjuvanted recombinant Adeno-associated virus-like particle immunogen displaying L2 17-36 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balusubramanyam; Wang, Joshua W; Zayed, Hatem; Weghofer, Margit; Brendle, Sarah A; Balogh, Karla K; Tossi, Kerstin Pino; Roden, Richard B S; Christensen, Neil D

    2015-10-13

    Vaccination with the minor capsid protein L2, notably the 17-36 neutralizing epitope, induces broadly protective antibodies, although the neutralizing titers attained in serum are substantially lower than for the licensed L1 VLP vaccines. Here we examine the impact of other less reactogenic adjuvants upon the induction of durable neutralizing serum antibody responses and protective immunity after vaccination with HPV16 and HPV31 L2 amino acids 17-36 inserted at positions 587 and 453 of VP3, respectively, for surface display on Adeno-Associated Virus 2-like particles [AAVLP (HPV16/31L2)]. Mice were vaccinated three times subcutaneously with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) at two week intervals at several doses either alone or formulated with alum, alum and MPL, RIBI adjuvant or Cervarix. The use of adjuvant with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) was necessary in mice for the induction of L2-specific neutralizing antibody and protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16. While use of alum was sufficient to elicit durable protection (>3 months after the final immunization), antibody titers were increased by addition of MPL and RIBI adjuvants. To determine the breadth of immunity, rabbits were immunized three times with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) either alone, formulated with alum±MPL, or RIBI adjuvants, and after serum collection, the animals were concurrently challenged with HPV16/31/35/39/45/58/59 quasivirions or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) at 6 or 12 months post-immunization. Strong protection against all HPV types was observed at both 6 and 12 months post-immunization, including robust protection in rabbits receiving the vaccine without adjuvant. In summary, vaccination with AAVLP presenting HPV L2 17-36 epitopes at two sites on their surface induced cross-neutralizing serum antibody, immunity against HPV16 in the genital tract, and long-term protection against skin challenge with the 7 most common oncogenic HPV types when using a clinically relevant adjuvant. PMID:26382603

  18. Durable immunity to oncogenic human papillomaviruses elicited by adjuvanted recombinant Adeno-associated virus-like particle immunogen displaying L2 17–36 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balusubramanyam; Wang, Joshua W.; Zayed, Hatem; Weghofer, Margit; Brendle, Sarah A.; Balogh, Karla K.; Tossi, Kerstin Pino; Roden, Richard B.S.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination with the minor capsid protein L2, notably the 17–36 neutralizing epitope, induces broadly protective antibodies, although the neutralizing titers attained in serum are substantially lower than for the licensed L1 VLP vaccines. Here we examine the impact of other less reactogenic adjuvants upon the induction of durable neutralizing serum antibody responses and protective immunity after vaccination with HPV16 and HPV31 L2 amino acids 17–36 inserted at positions 587 and 453 of VP3, respectively, for surface display on Adeno-Associated Virus 2-like particles [AAVLP (HPV16/31L2)]. Mice were vaccinated three times subcutaneously with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) at two week intervals at several doses either alone or formulated with alum, alum and MPL, RIBI adjuvant or Cervarix. The use of adjuvant with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) was necessary in mice for the induction of L2-specific neutralizing antibody and protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16. While use of alum was sufficient to elicit durable protection (>3 months after the final immunization), antibody titers were increased by addition of MPL and RIBI adjuvants. To determine the breadth of immunity, rabbits were immunized three times with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) either alone, formulated with alum ± MPL, or RIBI adjuvants, and after serum collection, the animals were concurrently challenged with HPV16/31/35/39/45/58/59 quasivirions or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) at 6 or 12 months post-immunization. Strong protection against all HPV types was observed at both 6 and 12 months post-immunization, including robust protection in rabbits receiving the vaccine without adjuvant. In summary, vaccination with AAVLP presenting HPV L2 17–36 epitopes at two sites on their surface induced cross-neutralizing serum antibody, immunity against HPV16 in the genital tract, and long-term protection against skin challenge with the 7 most common oncogenic HPV types when using a clinically relevant adjuvant. PMID:26382603

  19. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Identification of precancerous lesions has been primarily by cytologic screening of cervical cells. Cellular abnormalities, however, may be missed or may not be sufficiently distinct, and a portion of patients with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic cytomorphology will have higher-grade disease identified by subsequent colposcopy and biopsy. Sensitive and specific molecular techniques that detect HPV DNA and distinguish high-risk HPV types from low-risk HPV types have been introduced as an adjunct to cytology. Earlier detection of high-risk HPV types may improve triage, treatment, and follow-up in infected patients. Currently, the clearest role for HPV DNA testing is to improve diagnostic accuracy and limit unnecessary colposcopy in patients with borderline or mildly abnormal cytologic test results. PMID:12525422

  20. Modulation of therapeutic sensitivity by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Swick, Adam D; Chatterjee, Anirban; De Costa, Anna-Maria A; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that pose significant public health concerns as the causative agent of approximately 5% of worldwide cancers. The HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 play key roles in carcinogenesis. In the last 15years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of HPV-related head and neck cancers arising primarily in the oropharynx. Patients with HPV-positive head and neck cancers (HNCs) have a significantly improved prognosis compared to those with HPV-negative disease. In this review we will discuss data suggesting how HPV oncogenes modulate both the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of HNCs and also have important effects upon the tumor microenvironment. Together, these findings contribute to the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC. PMID:26364887

  1. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix® and Gardasil® human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Storgaard, Merete; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix® (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil® (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix® or Gardasil®. The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross-reactive antibody responses against HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 were evaluated for up to 12 months using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) were compared among vaccine groups and genders at 7 and 12 months. Both vaccines induced anti-HPV-31, -33, and -45 neutralizing antibodies in participants who were seronegative and HPV-DNA negative for those types at study entry. Geometric mean antibody titers were comparable between vaccine groups. Interestingly, anti-HPV-31 and -33 antibody titers were higher among women compared with men at 7 and 12 months. In conclusion, both licensed HPV-vaccines induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against frequent oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults, and women had greater serological responses against HPV-31 and -33 compared with men. PMID:24553190

  2. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  3. Pathogenesis of infection by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Brendle, Sarah A; Bywaters, Stephanie M; Christensen, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with benign lesions known as warts and several cancer types including cancer of the cervix, penis, anus and oral cavity. HPVs are classified by their oncogenic potential and are divided into high-risk oncogenic HPVs and low-risk HPVs. Tissue tropism is used as another means of classifying the virus, and HPVs are divided into types that infect mucosal or cutaneous tissues. Several risk factors have been identified that elevate an individual's likelihood of becoming infected with HPV including cigarette smoking, a large number of lifetime sexual partners and immunosuppression. Most HPV infections are cleared naturally, although persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to the cancers mentioned above. HPV has employed several mechanisms to avoid detection by the host immune system. Virus is released along with shedding skin cells in a nonlytic manner, and the virus has an altered codon usage leading to reduced expression of viral proteins. Infections from high-risk oncogenic HPV types that progress cause neoplasias that are defined as CIN1-CIN3 depending on the amount of abnormal cell growth and the level of cellular differentiation. PMID:24643177

  4. Human papillomavirus vaccination in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Russell, Michelle; Raheja, Vinita; Jaiyesimi, Rotimi

    2013-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It remains the highest ranking preventable cancer affecting women in developing countries. Cervical cancer is caused by sexual transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV). It is estimated that more than 80% of sexually active women will be infected with HPV in their lifetime, usually in their mid to late teens, 20s and early 30s. Persistence of high-risk oncogenic subtypes can lead to the development of precancerous change (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)), which can ultimately lead to cervical cancer. Progression from CIN to cancer is slow in most cases, and it is believed that progression from CIN 3 to cancer at 10, 20 and 30 years is 16%, 25% and 31.3%, respectively. The cervical screening programme has been successful in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer by recognising early precancerous changes and treating them. A promising advance in women's health has been the development of a vaccine targeting high-risk oncogenic subtypes 16 and 18, which are responsible for 70% of all cervical cancers. Two HPV vaccines are available: Merck & Co.'s Gardasil(®) and GlaxoSmithKline's Cervarix(®). The aim of this programme is to provide three doses prior to sexual debut with the hope that it will reduce the rates of cervical cancer in the future. Women who are already sexually active can still be vaccinated, but, the vaccine has been shown to be less effective in them. Uptake remains a challenge for public health, and efforts should focus on educating parents about the association between HPV and cervical cancer. Routine vaccination of young men is a debatable issue and has been found to be less cost-effective, as the burden of disease such as anal and penile cancers in males is less than cervical cancers in women. Current evidence suggests that the HPV vaccination programme should focus on increasing and maintaining high coverage of vaccination in girls. There may, however, be some benefit in

  5. [The first vaccine against cancer: the human papillomavirus vaccine].

    PubMed

    Bősze, Péter

    2013-04-21

    The last 20 years is one of the most remarkable periods in the fight against cancer, with the realization that some human papillomaviruses are causally related to cancer and with the development of the vaccine against human papillomavirus infections. This is a historical event in medicine and the prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines have provided powerful tools for primary prevention of cervical cancer and other human papillomavirus-associated diseases. This is very important as human papillomavirus infection is probably the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide, and over one million women develop associated cancer yearly, which is about 5% of all female cancers, and half of them die of their disease. Cancers associated with oncogenic human papillomaviruses, mostly HPV16 and 18, include cervical cancer (100%), anal cancer (95%), vulvar cancer (40%), vaginal cancer (60%), penile cancer (40%), and oro-pharingeal cancers (65%). In addition, pre-cancers such as genital warts and the rare recurrent respiratory papillomatosis are also preventable by vaccination. Currently, the human papillomavirus vaccines have the potential to significantly reduce the burden of human papillomavirus associated conditions, including prevention of up to 70% of cervical cancers. Two prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines are currently available worldwide: a bivalent vaccine (types 16 and 18), and a quadrivalent vaccine (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Randomized controlled trials conducted on several continents during the last 10 years have demonstrated that these vaccines are safe without serious side effects; they are highly immunogenic and efficacious in preventing incident and persistent vaccine-type human papillomavirus infections, high grade cervical, vulvar and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and so on. In addition, the quadrivalent vaccine has been shown to prevent genital warts in women and men. The vaccine is most effective when given to human papillomavirus

  6. [General aspects of structure, classification and replication of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Santos-López, Gerardo; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) refers to a group of viruses which belongs to a larger group, commonly referred to as papillomaviruses. These viruses are taxonomically located in the Papillomaviridae family. Papillomaviruses are small, non-enveloped with a genome of double-stranded DNA and they have affinity for epithelial tissue. Many of them are associated with human infection; they induce benign lesions of the skin (warts) and mucous membranes (condylomas), but they are also associated with some epithelial malignancies, such as cervical cancer and other tumors of the urogenital tract. Papillomaviridae contains 16 genera, which are named with a Greek letter prefix and the termination papillomavirus, e.g., Alphapapillomavirus, Betapapillomavirus, etcetera. From the clinical point of view, human papillomaviruses infecting the genital tract (which are located in the genus Alphapapilomavirus) have been divided into two groups: those of low risk, associated with benign genital warts, and those of high risk, with oncogenic potential, which are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. In this paper we review some relevant aspects of the structure, replication cycle and classification of human papillomaviruses. PMID:26462512

  7. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsen, Eric; Lambert, Paul F.

    2013-10-15

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq.

  8. Oncogenic Papillomavirus and Polyomavirus in Water Environments: Is There a Potential for Waterborne Transmission?

    PubMed

    Fratini, M; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses through contact with sewage-contaminated water environments can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses. Gastrointestinal symptoms are the most commonly encountered manifestations of waterborne viral illness. Respiratory diseases, neurological diseases and paralysis can also occur. Whether viral infections resulting in health outcomes like cancer might also be transmitted by the waterborne route is unknown. Recently, viruses belonging to two oncogenic groups-Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) and Human Polyomaviruses (HPyVs)-have been detected in urban sewages worldwide. The latter have also been identified in other water environments. HPVs are epitheliotropic viruses responsible for several diseases of skin and mucosae, from common warts to squamous intraepithelial lesions that can either heal or progress to invasive carcinoma of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus or oropharynx. Human PyVs infect different tissues and organs, causing infections that are usually subclinical in immunocompetent individuals but can be serious in immunocompromised hosts. These pathogens belong to a family of DNA tumour viruses. Merkel cell polyomavirus, a HPyV identified in recent years, has attracted much attention due to its link with a rare and aggressive form of human cancer. Merkel cell carcinoma, the incidence of which has tripled over the past two decades. JC polyomavirus and BK polyomavirus are also potentially oncogenic. The observed abundance and wide dissemination of HPVs and HPyVs in water environments strongly suggest the need to shed light on the fate of these viruses in water environments and to elucidate their potential for waterborne transmission. Such information is essential for the improvement of wastewater management programs in terms of both sewage treatment and water quality surveillance. PMID:24293168

  9. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  10. [Human papillomavirus infection and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Sam Soto, Selene; de la Peña y Carranza, Alejandro Ortiz; Plascencia, Josefina Lira

    2011-04-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus has increased dramatically in recent years. The highest prevalence rates are among adolescents and young women, reflecting changes in sexual behavior associated with biological factors in adolescent development. Adolescents who begin sexual activity early are at greater risk of precursor lesions and cervical cancer. There are adolescents with special circumstances, where no early decision should be delayed cervical cytology and in whom it is important to initiate consultations and periodic reviews with a preventive approach. Cervical cancer can be avoided when the diagnosis and treatment of precursor lesions is early. Despite efforts at sex education based on "safe sex" with the correct use of condoms has not been able to reduce the incidence of infections with human papillomavirus in adolescents. While better than nothing, condom use is not 100% reliable. Studies show that consistent and correct use provides protection against the human papillomavirus only 70%. In Mexico, reported an overall ratio of actual use of condoms from 24.6%. It is clear that the physician who provides care for adolescents plays a fundamental role in sex education. The key to future prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions could be the vaccination. PMID:21966809

  11. Human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA prevalence and association with cervical cytological abnormalities in the Irish HIV population.

    PubMed

    Loy, Aisling; McInerney, Jamie; Pilkington, Loretto; Keegan, Helen; Delamere, Sandra; Martin, Cara M; Sheils, Orla; O'Leary, John J; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    The complex interplay between HIV and human papillomavirus and its link to cervical dysplasia is poorly understood. This is the first study to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus mRNA in HIV-positive women, its relationship to HIV and its potential use in the triage of cervical cancer screening in HIV-positive women. In this cross-sectional study, we included 321 HIV-positive women. In all, 28.7% had abnormal cervical cytology, 51.1% were human papillomavirus DNA-positive and 21.8% tested positive for human papillomavirus mRNA. Women with a CD4 count of <200 × 10(6)/L were more likely to test positive for human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA. Virally suppressed women were less likely to be human papillomavirus DNA-positive; however, the same did not hold true for human papillomavirus mRNA. We found the human papillomavirus mRNA screening to be more specific when screening for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion than human papillomavirus DNA at 84.53% compared to 57.36%. However, the sensitivity was less at 51.59% versus 91.07% for human papillomavirus DNA. It may be possible in the future to use human papillomavirus mRNA/DNA testing within a triage algorithm for the screening and management of cervical cancer in the HIV-positive patient. PMID:25258395

  12. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Băbţan, Anida Maria; Mesaros, Anca; Crişan, Bogdan; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-02-01

    Oral human papillomavirus infection is rare in children, but the presence of a villous lesion with slow but continuous growth concerns parents, who need information and therapeutic solutions from the physician. All these aspects are discussed based on a case report of a 9-year-old child with an oral human papillomavirus infection. PMID:26588443

  13. Activated Notch1 signaling cooperates with papillomavirus oncogenes in transformation and generates resistance to apoptosis on matrix withdrawal through PKB/Akt.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, A; Syal, R; Selvarajah, S; Chakrabarti, O; Sarin, A; Krishna, S

    2001-07-20

    Invasive cervical tumors, a major subset of human epithelial neoplasms, are characterized by the consistent presence of papillomavirus oncogenes 16 or 18 E6 and E7 products. Cervical tumors also consistently exhibit cytosolic and nuclear forms of Notch1, suggesting the possible persistent activation of the Notch pathway. Here we show that activated Notch1 synergizes with papillomavirus oncogenes in transformation of immortalized epithelial cells and leads to the generation of resistance to anoikis, an apoptotic response induced on matrix withdrawal. This resistance to anoikis by activated Notch1 is mediated through the activation of PKB/Akt, a key effector of activated Ras in transformation. We suggest that activated Notch signaling may serve to substitute for the lack of activated Ras mutations in the majority of human cervical neoplasms. PMID:11448155

  14. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated?Gardasil-9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females ... 9) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National ...

  15. Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. PMID:25634317

  16. Anorectal Human Papillomavirus: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Roland; Reddy, Vikram; Einarsdottir, Hulda; Longo, Walter E.

    2014-01-01

    Increased anorectal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is related to the recent trends in sexual behavior in both homosexual and heterosexual groups and prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Clinical presentation and natural history depend on the serotype involved. HPV 6 and 11 are found in the benign wart. Local control can be achieved with a wide selection of surgical and topical techniques. HPV 16, 18, and 31 are found in dysplastic lesions and have the potential to progress to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. Recognition and early management of dysplastic lesions is crucial to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with anal cancer. While low-grade lesions can be closely observed, high-grade lesions should be eradicated. Different strategies can be used to eradicate the disease while preserving anorectal function. Studies on the efficacy of vaccination on anorectal HPV showed promising results in select population groups and led to the recent expansion of current vaccination recommendations. PMID:25506286

  17. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study. PMID:27522713

  18. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females vaginal and ... Gardasil-9 can prevent most of these cancers. HPV infection usually comes from sexual contact, and most ...

  19. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  20. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  1. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  2. Adolescent Male Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Nanagas, Vivian C.; Stolfi, Adrienne; Nanagas, Maria T.; Eberhart, Gregory M.; Alter, Sherman J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine male vaccination rates with quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) before and after the October 2011 national recommendation to routinely immunize adolescent males. Methods. We reviewed HPV4 dose 1 (HPV4-1) uptake in 292 adolescent males in our urban clinic prior to national recommendations and followed-up for HPV4 series completion rates. After national recommendation, 248 urban clinic and 247 suburban clinic males were reviewed for HPV4-1 uptake. Factors associated with HPV4-1 refusal were determined with multiple logistic regression. Results. Of the initial 292 males, 78% received HPV4-1 and 38% received the 3-dose series. After recommendation, HPV4-1 uptake was 59% and 7% in urban and suburban clinics, respectively. Variables associated with HPV4-1 uptake/refusal included time period, race, type of insurance, and receipt of concurrent vaccines. Conclusions. HPV4-1 vaccination rates in our urban clinic were high before and after routine HPV vaccine recommendations for adolescent males. Our vaccination rates were much higher than in a suburban practice. PMID:27336012

  3. Biology and pathological associations of the human papillomaviruses: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheah, P L; Looi, L M

    1998-06-01

    Historical cottontail rabbit papillomavirus studies raised early indications of a mammalian DNA oncogenic virus. Today, molecular cloning recognises numerous animal and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and the development of in vitro transformation assays has escalated oncological research in HPVs. Currently, their detection and typing in tissues is usually by Southern blotting, in-situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction methods. The complete papillomavirus virion constitutes a protein coat (capsid) surrounding a circular, double-stranded DNA organised into coding and non-coding regions. 8 early (E1-E8) open reading frames (ORFs) and 2 late (L1, L2) ORFs have been identified in the coding region of all papillomaviruses. The early ORFs encode proteins which interact with the host genome to produce new viral DNA while late ORFs are activated only after viral DNA replication and encode for viral capsid proteins. All papillomaviruses are obligatory intranuclear organisms with specific tropism for keratinocytes. Three possible courses of events can follow papillomaviruses entry into cells: (1) viral DNA are maintained as intranuclear, extrachromosomal, circular DNA episomes, which replicates synchronously with the host cell, establishing a latent infection; (2) conversion from latent into productive infection with assembly of complete infective virions; (3) integration of viral DNA into host cellular genome, a phenomenon seen in HPV infections associated with malignant transformation. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) essentially induce skin and mucosal epithelial lesions. Various skin warts are well known to be HPV-associated (HPVs 1, 2, 3, 7 and 10). Besides HPVs 3 and 10, HPVs 5, 8, 17 and 20 have been recovered from Epidermodysplasia verruciformis lesions. Anogenital condyloma acuminatum, strongly linked with HPVs 6 and 11 are probably sexually transmitted. The same HPVs, demonstrable in recurrent juvenile laryngeal papillomas, are probably transmitted by passage

  4. Cellular transformation by human papillomaviruses: Lessons learned by comparing high- and low-risk viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Roman, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses (PVs) has been appreciated since the 1930s yet the mechanisms of virally-mediated cellular transformation are still being revealed. Reasons for this include: a) the oncoproteins are multifunctional, b) there is an ever-growing list of cellular interacting proteins, c) more than one cellular protein may bind to a given region of the oncoprotein, and d) there is only limited information on the proteins encoded by the corresponding non-oncogenic PVs. The perspective of this review will be to contrast the activities of the viral E6 and E7 proteins encoded by the oncogenic human PVs (termed high-risk HPVs) to those encoded by their non-oncogenic counterparts (termed low-risk HPVs) in an attempt to sort out viral life cycle-related functions from oncogenic functions. The review will emphasize lessons learned from the cell culture studies of the HPVs causing mucosal/genital tract cancers. PMID:22284986

  5. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing) of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening. PMID:21718495

  6. The biology of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Harrison P; Ramírez-Fort, Marigdalia K; Rady, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that cause lesions in cutaneous and mucosal tissue and are responsible for carcinomas of the cervix, vagina, vulva and penis. HPVs sort into 5 genera with a total of approximately 150 species that have been sequenced. Its genome is comprised of an early (E) region encoding the viral regulatory proteins, a late (L) region encoding the viral structural proteins and a noncoding region that is essential to the viral life cycle. For infection to occur, the virus must access the basal epidermal layer where, following endocytosis and viral capsid disassembly, the L2 protein mediates viral genome transfer to the nuclei of mitotic keratinocytes. The viral genome is maintained in episomal form during the normal life cycle and replicates in synchrony with the host cell DNA under the mediation of E1, E2, E4 and E5 viral proteins. In most high-grade cervical neoplasms, however, the viral DNA is integrated into the host genome through the disruption of the E2 open reading frame. The oncoproteins E6 and E7, which were previously suppressed by E2, are then free to inhibit the Rb and p53 tumor suppressor pathways. The viral life cycle concludes with the packaging of the viral genome and virus release, which entails the E2-mediated recruitment of L2 to regions of replication, the expression of L1 and the assembly of the icosahedral capsid in the nucleus. Overall, the complex biology of HPV continues to be an important area of research with substantial implications for public health. PMID:24643175

  7. Human Papillomavirus: A Catalyst to a Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most prevalent and widespread sexually transmitted disease and is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. However, HPV has received little public health attention, is not a reportable STD, and often is absent from the repertoire of STDs. In addition, there is pervasive misinformation…

  8. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  9. Post Hoc Analysis of the PATRICIA Randomized Trial of the Efficacy of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-Adjuvanted Vaccine against Incident and Persistent Infection with Nonvaccine Oncogenic HPV Types Using an Alternative Multiplex Type-Specific PCR Assay for HPV DNA

    PubMed Central

    Colau, Brigitte; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Naud, Paulo; Garland, Suzanne; Quint, Wim; Chow, Song-Nan; Salmerón, Jorge; Lehtinen, Matti; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M. Rowena; Paavonen, Jorma; Teixeira, Júlio C.; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Skinner, S. Rachel; Limson, Genara; Castellsagué, Xavier; Poppe, Willy A. J.; Ramjattan, Brian; Klein, Terry D.; Schwarz, Tino F.; Chatterjee, Archana; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Lewis, David J. M.; Harper, Diane M.; Molijn, Anco; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; David, Marie-Pierre; Dubin, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infections with HPV in the Papilloma Trial against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA) was evaluated using a combination of the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/line probe assay (LiPA25) system with type-specific PCRs for HPV-16 and -18. Broad-spectrum PCR assays may underestimate the presence of HPV genotypes present at relatively low concentrations in multiple infections, due to competition between genotypes. Therefore, samples were retrospectively reanalyzed using a testing algorithm incorporating the SPF10 PCR-DEIA/LiPA25 plus a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific PCR and reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA), which permits detection of a panel of nine oncogenic HPV genotypes (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). For the vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, there was no major impact on estimates of vaccine efficacy (VE) for incident or 6-month or 12-month persistent infections when the MPTS12 RHA was included in the testing algorithm versus estimates with the protocol-specified algorithm. However, the alternative testing algorithm showed greater sensitivity than the protocol-specified algorithm for detection of some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types. More cases were gained in the control group than in the vaccine group, leading to higher point estimates of VE for 6-month and 12-month persistent infections for the nonvaccine oncogenic types included in the MPTS12 RHA assay (types 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). This post hoc analysis indicates that the per-protocol testing algorithm used in PATRICIA underestimated the VE against some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types and that the choice of the HPV DNA testing methodology is important for the evaluation of VE in clinical trials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00122681.) PMID:25540273

  10. Post hoc analysis of the PATRICIA randomized trial of the efficacy of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against incident and persistent infection with nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types using an alternative multiplex type-specific PCR assay for HPV DNA.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Frank; Colau, Brigitte; Wheeler, Cosette M; Naud, Paulo; Garland, Suzanne; Quint, Wim; Chow, Song-Nan; Salmerón, Jorge; Lehtinen, Matti; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M Rowena; Paavonen, Jorma; Teixeira, Júlio C; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Skinner, S Rachel; Limson, Genara; Castellsagué, Xavier; Poppe, Willy A J; Ramjattan, Brian; Klein, Terry D; Schwarz, Tino F; Chatterjee, Archana; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Lewis, David J M; Harper, Diane M; Molijn, Anco; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; David, Marie-Pierre; Dubin, Gary

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infections with HPV in the Papilloma Trial against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA) was evaluated using a combination of the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/line probe assay (LiPA25) system with type-specific PCRs for HPV-16 and -18. Broad-spectrum PCR assays may underestimate the presence of HPV genotypes present at relatively low concentrations in multiple infections, due to competition between genotypes. Therefore, samples were retrospectively reanalyzed using a testing algorithm incorporating the SPF10 PCR-DEIA/LiPA25 plus a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific PCR and reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA), which permits detection of a panel of nine oncogenic HPV genotypes (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). For the vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, there was no major impact on estimates of vaccine efficacy (VE) for incident or 6-month or 12-month persistent infections when the MPTS12 RHA was included in the testing algorithm versus estimates with the protocol-specified algorithm. However, the alternative testing algorithm showed greater sensitivity than the protocol-specified algorithm for detection of some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types. More cases were gained in the control group than in the vaccine group, leading to higher point estimates of VE for 6-month and 12-month persistent infections for the nonvaccine oncogenic types included in the MPTS12 RHA assay (types 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). This post hoc analysis indicates that the per-protocol testing algorithm used in PATRICIA underestimated the VE against some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types and that the choice of the HPV DNA testing methodology is important for the evaluation of VE in clinical trials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00122681.). PMID:25540273

  11. Human papillomavirus vaccine trials and tribulations: Clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Handler, Marc Z; Handler, Nancy S; Majewski, Slawomir; Schwartz, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms in men and women. It is a double-stranded DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid. Forty HPV types are known to infect mucosal keratinocytes. If not cured by the immune system, the infection can lead to genital warts, mucosal dysplasia, or cancer. The most common oncogenic types are 16 and 18. The vaccine to prevent HPV and its associated morbidity and mortality has existed since 2006. Several variations protect against an increasing number of HPV types. The recommended vaccination age is before sexual exposure; administration of the vaccine to children has been controversial. This continuing medical education review evaluates the current HPV vaccines available to clinicians. Part I focuses on the debate over who should be vaccinated, at what age, and in which populations. PMID:26475534

  12. Human Papillomaviruses As Therapeutic Targets in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hellner, Karin; Münger, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Cervical carcinomas are almost universally associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and are a leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. HPV oncoproteins contribute to cancer initiation and progression and their expression is necessary for the maintenance of the transformed state. The fact that the initiating oncogenic insult, infection with a high-risk HPV and viral oncoprotein expression, is common to almost all cervical cancers offers unique opportunities for prevention, early detection, and therapy. The potential for prevention has been realized by introduction of prophylactic vaccines that are to prevent transmission of specific high-risk HPVs. Given, however, that these vaccines have no therapeutic efficacy and HPV-associated cervical cancers arise years if not decades after the initial infection, it has been estimated that there will be no measurable decline of HPV-associated tumors before 2040. Cervical cancer alone will be diagnosed in more than 375,000 US women between now and 2040. Other HPV-associated anogenital and head and neck cancers are predicted to afflict another 700,000 men and women over this time period. Hence, therapeutic efforts to combat high-risk HPV-associated disease remain of critical importance. PMID:21220591

  13. Genitoanal human papillomavirus infection and associated neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Gross, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus infection; about 40 out of 150 known HPV genotypes have been associated with genitoanal lesions in the female and male. They have been divided into low-risk (LR) and high-risk (HR) HPV types according to the association of each HPV genotype with genitoanal benign warts, genitoanal cancer and precursor lesions. For the most part, genitoanal HPV infection is equally common in men and in women. Genitoanal HPVs are predominantly transmitted by sexual intercourse. In a minor number of individuals where HR HPV infection has persisted, malignant squamous-cell tumors may develop. There are 15 mucosal oncogenic HPV types which are the etiological factor of cervical cancer and other genitoanal cancers. DNAs of HR HPV types are present in 100% of all cervical carcinomas and in 100% of the precursor lesions, the cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 2 and 3. HPV-16 and -18 alone account for 70% of the oncogenic mucosal HPV types identified. HR HPV types, mostly HPV-16 and -18, are the causes of vaginal and vulvar cancers in females, anal cancers in both genders and cancer of the penis in men. While anal cancers are linked to HR HPVs in more than 80% of cases, only 40% of vulvar cancers and 50% of penile cancers are HPV positive. Genitoanal cancers have a similar anatomy, histology and similar risk factors as well as natural histories. About 60% of vulvar and 50% of penile cancers are HPV negative, but associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, mainly lichen sclerosus. Clinical manifestations of LR HPVs in both sexes are genitoanal warts (condylomata acuminata), which are benign highly infectious tumors. The highest rate of warts is observed in females 16-24 years of age. In males the peak is at the age of 20-24 years. Diagnosis of genitoanal warts should exclude other sexually transmitted infections and diseases. A high number of genitoanal dermatoses, benign tumors, malignant squamous

  14. TARGETING ONCOGENIC BRAF IN HUMAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine; Xing, Feng; Solit, David

    2012-01-01

    MAPK pathway activation is a frequent event in human cancer and is often the result of activating mutations in the BRAF and RAS oncogenes. BRAF missense kinase domain mutations, the vast majority of which are V600E, occur in approximately 8% of human tumors. These mutations, which are non-overlapping in distribution with RAS mutations, are observed most frequently in melanoma but also in tumors arising in the colon, thyroid, lung and other sites. Supporting its classification as an oncogene, V600EBRAF stimulates ERK signaling, induces proliferation and is capable of promoting transformation. Given the frequent occurrence of BRAF mutations in human cancer and the continued requirement for BRAF activity in the tumors in which it is mutated, efforts are underway to develop targeted inhibitors of BRAF and its downstream effectors. These agents offer the possibility of greater efficacy and less toxicity than the systemic therapies currently available for tumors driven by activating mutations in the MAPK pathway. Early clinical results with the BRAF-selective inhibitors PLX4032 and GSK2118436 suggest that this strategy will prove successful in a select group of patients whose tumors are driven by oncogenic BRAF. PMID:21818706

  15. Epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Christine H.; Bagheri, Ashley; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is known to cause a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. Data regarding oral HPV infection is limited but emerging. HPV infection of the genital tract has been more thoroughly researched and helps inform our understanding of oral HPV infection. In this article we review current data on HPV prevalence, natural history, mode of acquisition, and risk factors for oral HPV infection. PMID:24080455

  16. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  17. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  18. Comparison of the immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine for oncogenic non-vaccine types HPV-31 and HPV-45 in healthy women aged 18–45 years

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Lebacq, Marie; van der Most, Robbert; Moris, Philippe; Giannini, Sandra L; Schuind, Anne; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Protection against oncogenic non-vaccine types (cross-protection) offered by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines may provide a significant medical benefit. Available clinical efficacy data suggest the two licensed vaccines [HPV-16/18 vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK), and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine, Merck and Co., Inc.,] differ in terms of protection against oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45. The immune responses induced by the two vaccines against these two non-vaccine HPV types (cross-reactivity) was compared in an observer-blind study up to Month 24 (18 mo postvaccination), in women HPV DNA-negative and seronegative prior to vaccination for the HPV type analyzed [HPV-010 (NCT00423046)]. Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA ) were similar between vaccines for HPV-31/45. Seropositivity rates for HPV-31 were also similar between vaccines; however, there was a trend for higher seropositivity with the HPV-16/18 vaccine (13.0–16.7%) vs. the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (0.0–5.0%) for HPV-45 with PBNA, but not ELISA . HPV-31/45 cross-reactive memory B-cell responses were comparable between vaccines. Circulating antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies were higher for the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine {HPV-31 [geometric mean ratio (GMR) = 2.0; p = 0.0002] and HPV-45 [GMR = 2.6; p = 0.0092]}, as were the proportion of T-cell responders (HPV-31, p = 0.0009; HPV-45, p = 0.0793). In conclusion, immune response to oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45 was generally similar for both vaccines with the exception of T-cell response which was higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine. Considering the differences in cross-protective efficacy between the two vaccines, the results might provide insights into the underlying mechanism(s) of protection. PMID:22048172

  19. Sensitivity of APTIMA HPV E6/E7 mRNA test in comparison with hybrid capture 2 HPV DNA test for detection of high risk oncogenic human papillomavirus in 396 biopsy confirmed cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Basu, Partha; Banerjee, Dipanwita; Mittal, Srabani; Dutta, Sankhadeep; Ghosh, Ishita; Chowdhury, Nilarun; Abraham, Priya; Chandna, Puneet; Ratnam, Sam

    2016-07-01

    The sensitivity of E6/E7 mRNA-based Aptima HPV test (AHPV; Hologic, Inc.) for detection of cervical cancer has been reported based on only a small number of cases. We determined the sensitivity of AHPV in comparison with the DNA-based Hybrid Capture 2 HPV test (HC2; Qiagen) for the detection of oncogenic HPV in a large number of cervical cancers at the time of diagnosis using cervical samples obtained in ThinPrep (Hologic). Samples yielding discordant results were genotyped using Linear Array assay (LA; Roche). Of 396 cases tested, AHPV detected 377 (sensitivity, 95.2%; 95%CI: 93.1-97.3), and HC2 376 (sensitivity, 94.9%; 95%CI: 92.7-97.1) with an agreement of 97.2% (kappa 0.7; 95%CI: 0.54-0.87). Among six AHPV+/HC2- cases, LA identified oncogenic HPV types in four including a type 73 and was negative in two. Among five AHPV-/HC2+ cases, LA detected oncogenic HPV types in two including a type 73 and was negative in three. Of 14 AHPV-/HC2- cases, 13 were genotyped. LA detected oncogenic HPV types in six, non-oncogenic types in three, and was negative in four. This is the largest study to demonstrate the sensitivity of AHPV for the detection of invasive cervical cancer and this assay showed equal sensitivity to HC2. J. Med. Virol. 88:1271-1278, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26693677

  20. Risk Factors for Anogenital Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, Carrie M.; Harris, Robin B.; Dunne, Eileen F.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Flores, Roberto; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strongly associated with cervical and other anogenital cancers. Identification of risk factors for HPV infection in men may improve our understanding of HPV transmission and prevention. Methods HPV testing for 37 types was conducted in 463 men 18–40 years old recruited from 2 US cities. The entire anogenital region and semen were sampled. A self-administered questionnaire was completed. Multivariate logistic regression aided the identification of independent risk factors for any HPV type, oncogenic HPV types, and nononcogenic HPV types. Results Prevalence was 65.4% for any HPV, 29.2% for oncogenic HPV, and 36.3% for nononcogenic HPV. Factors significantly associated with any HPV were smoking ≥10 cigarettes per day (odds ratio [OR], 2.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.0–5.3]) and lifetime number of female sex partners (FSPs) (OR for ≥21, 2.5 [95% CI, 1.3–4.6]), and factors significantly associated with oncogenic HPV were lifetime number of FSPs (OR for ≥21, 7.4 [95% CI, 3.4–16.3]) and condom use during the past 3 months (OR for more than half the time, 0.5 [95% CI, 0.3–0.8]). For nononcogenic HPV, a significant association was found for number of FSPs during the past 3 months (OR for ≥2, 2.9 [95% CI, 1.4–6.3]). Conclusions Lifetime and recent number of FSPs, condom use, and smoking were modifiable risk factors associated with HPV infection in men. PMID:17955431

  1. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil Vaccine - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www. ... WHAT IS HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men ...

  2. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/ ... What is HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men ...

  3. Identification of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Cancer Tissue by Targeted Next-generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Nathan D; Parker, Joel S; Eberhard, David A; Patel, Nirali M; Weck, Karen E; Sharpless, Norman E; Hu, Zhiyuan; Hayes, David Neil; Gulley, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are oncogenic DNA viruses implicated in squamous cell carcinomas of several anatomic sites, as well as endocervical adenocarcinomas. Identification of HPV is an actionable finding in some carcinomas, potentially influencing tumor classification, prognosis, and management. We incorporated capture probes for oncogenic HPV strains 16 and 18 into a broader next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel designed to identify actionable mutations in solid malignancies. A total of 21 head and neck, genitourinary, and gynecologic squamous cell carcinomas and endocervical adenocarcinomas were sequenced as part of the UNCSeq project. Using p16 immunohistochemical results as the gold standard, we set a cutoff for proportion of aligned HPV reads that maximized performance of our NGS assay (92% sensitive, 100% specific for HPV). These results suggest that sequencing of oncogenic pathogens can be incorporated into targeted NGS panels, extending the clinical utility of genomic assays. PMID:26371432

  4. Human papillomavirus testing in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Castle, Philip E; Cremer, Miriam

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more reliable and sensitive but less specific than Papanicolaou (Pap) testing/cervical cytology for the detection of cervical precancer and cancer. HPV-negative women are at lower risk of cervical cancer than Pap-negative women. In high-resource settings, HPV testing can be used to make cervical cancer prevention programs more efficient by focusing clinical attention on women who have HPV. In lower-resource settings, where Pap testing has not been sustained or widespread, new, lower-cost HPV tests may make cervical cancer screening feasible. PMID:23732037

  5. Global Delivery of Human Papillomavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Jannah; Fontenot, Holly B; Zimet, Gregory D

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, if broadly implemented, has the potential to significantly reduce global rates of morbidity and mortality associated with cervical and other HPV-related cancers. More than 100 countries around the world have licensed HPV vaccines. As of February, 2015, there were an estimated 80 national HPV immunization programs and 37 pilot programs. This article discusses global implementation of HPV vaccination programs and issues such as vaccine financing and different approaches to HPV vaccine delivery. PMID:26613690

  6. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E. Muenger, Karl

    2009-02-20

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncoprotein shares functional similarities with such proteins as adenovirus E1A and SV40 large tumor antigen. As one of only two viral proteins always expressed in HPV-associated cancers, E7 plays a central role in both the viral life cycle and carcinogenic transformation. In the HPV viral life cycle, E7 disrupts the intimate association between cellular differentiation and proliferation in normal epithelium, allowing for viral replication in cells that would no longer be in the dividing population. This function is directly reflected in the transforming activities of E7, including tumor initiation and induction of genomic instability.

  7. [Infection therapeutic modalities in human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Pacheco, Adia; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino; Hernández Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genital it can infect any mucous of the body and to cause cancer of the uterine cervix. Until recently specific treatments did not exist on this infection, for what had to destroy or to remove the injured tissue by diverse procedures, what could have obstetric repercussions in young women. Recently some surgical modalities and topical drugs have arisen, as well as of systemic employment that allow to arrive to the lesions difficult to approach, and have demonstrated good effectiveness to cure the infection for HPV, for what an analysis of the medical treatment of this infection type is made. PMID:23427640

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Cervarix)

    MedlinePlus

    ... std/hpv and http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines HPV Vaccine (Cervarix) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Immunization Program. 5/3/2011.

  9. Vaccines and immunization against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Neil D; Budgeon, Lynn R

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic immunization strategies are an effective method to control human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases and cancers. Current protective virus-like particle and capsid-based vaccines are highly protective against vaccine-matched HPV types, and continued improvements in second-generation vaccines will lead to broader protection and cross-protection against the cancer-associated types. Increasing the effectiveness of broadly cross-protective L2-based immunogens will require adjuvants that activate innate immunity to thus enhance adaptive immunity. Therapeutic immunization strategies are needed to control and cure clinical disease and HPV-associated cancers. Significant advances in strategies to improve induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV early (and capsid) proteins have been pretested in preclinical animal papillomavirus models. Several of these effective protocols have translated into successful therapeutic immune-mediated clearance of clinical lesions. Nevertheless, there are significant challenges in activating immunity to cancer-associated lesions due to various immune downregulatory events that are triggered by persistent HPV infections. A better understanding of immune responses to HPV lesions in situ is needed to optimize immune effector T cells that efficiently locate to sites of infection and which should lead to an effective immunotherapeutic management of this important human viral pathogen. The most effective immunization strategy may well require combination antiviral and immunotherapeutic treatments to achieve complete clearance of HPV infections and associated cancers. PMID:24643192

  10. Human papillomaviruses and cervical cancer in Bangkok. III. The role of husbands and commercial sex workers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D B; Ray, R M; Kuypers, J; Kiviat, N; Koetsawang, A; Ashley, R L; Qin, Q; Koetsawang, S

    2001-04-15

    Between September 1991 and September 1993, husbands of women with and without cervical neoplasia and commercial sex workers in one brothel and one massage parlor in Bangkok, Thailand, were interviewed; serologic tests for sexually transmitted infections were performed; and cervical and penile scrapings were tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. The risks of cervical carcinoma in monogamous women and of oncogenic HPV in their husbands were associated with the men's having unprotected intercourse with prostitutes. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV was higher in commercial sex workers than in women attending gynecologic and family planning clinics. Oncogenic HPV prevalence declined with age in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative, but not in healthy HIV-positive, commercial sex workers and was weakly associated with hepatitis B antigenemia, suggesting that persistence of HPV infection is due to subtle changes in immunity. Associations of HPV with recent pregnancy and oral contraceptive use suggest that hormonal factors may increase the risk of cervical neoplasia by enhancing persistence of HPV infection. The prevalence of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions was strongly related to oncogenic HPV types and weakly to HIV infection only in their presence. Commercial sex workers in Bangkok are reservoirs of oncogenic HPV, and cervical cancer in monogamous Thai women develops in part as a result of transmission of these viruses to them by their husbands from prostitutes. PMID:11296145

  11. Transplacental transmission of Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

    2008-01-01

    This paper aimed at studying the transplacental transmission of HPV and looking at the epidemiological factors involved in maternal viral infection. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, (a) genital; (b) peripheral blood; (2) in the newborn, (a) oral cavity, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the placenta. The HPV DNA was identified using two methods: multiplex PCR of human β-globin and of HPV using the PGMY09 and PGMY11 primers; and nested-PCR, which combines degenerated primers of the E6/E7 regions of the HPV virus, that allowed the identification of genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58. Transplacental transmission was considered when type-specific HPV concordance was found between the mother, the placenta and the newborn or the mother and cord blood. The study included 49 HPV DNA-positive pregnant women at delivery. Twelve placentas (24.5%, n = 12/49) had a positive result for HPV DNA. Eleven newborn were HPV DNA positive in samples from the nasopharyngeal or buccal and body or cord blood. In 5 cases (10.2%, n = 5/49) there was HPV type-specific agreement between genital/placenta/newborn samples. In one case (2%, n = 1/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between genital/cord blood and also suggested transplacental transmission. A positive and significant correlation was observed between transplacental transmission of HPV infection and the maternal variables of immunodepression history (HIV, p = 0.011). In conclusion the study suggests placental infection in 23.3% of the cases studied and transplacental transmission in 12.2%. It is suggested that in future HPV DNA be researched in the normal endometrium of women of reproductive age. The possible consequence of fetal exposure to HPV should be observed. PMID:18817577

  12. Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancers - United States, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Viens, Laura J; Henley, S Jane; Watson, Meg; Markowitz, Lauri E; Thomas, Cheryll C; Thompson, Trevor D; Razzaghi, Hilda; Saraiya, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical cancers, as well as some vulvar, vaginal, penile, oropharyngeal, anal, and rectal cancers (1,2). Although most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously, persistent infections with one of 13 oncogenic HPV types can progress to precancer or cancer. To assess the incidence of HPV-associated cancers, CDC analyzed 2008-2012 high-quality data from the CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. During 2008-2012, an average of 38,793 HPV-associated cancers were diagnosed annually, including 23,000 (59%) among females and 15,793 (41%) among males. By multiplying these counts by the percentages attributable to HPV (3), CDC estimated that approximately 30,700 new cancers were attributable to HPV, including 19,200 among females and 11,600 among males. Cervical precancers can be detected through screening, and treatment can prevent progression to cancer; HPV vaccination can prevent infection with HPV types that cause cancer at cervical and other sites (3). Vaccines are available for HPV types 16 and 18, which cause 63% of all HPV-associated cancers in the United States, and for HPV types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, which cause an additional 10% (3). Among the oncogenic HPV types, HPV 16 is the most likely to both persist and to progress to cancer (3). The impact of these primary and secondary prevention interventions can be monitored using surveillance data from population-based cancer registries. PMID:27387669

  13. Human Papillomaviruses and the Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Beglin, Melanie; Melar-New, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small DNA viruses that target stratified keratinocytes for infection. A subset of HPV types infect epithelia in the genital tract and are the causative agents of cervical as well as other anogenital cancers. Interferon treatment of existing genital HPV lesions has had mixed results. While HPV proteins down-regulate the expression of interferon-inducible genes, interferon treatment ultimately induces their high-level transcription after a delay. Cells containing complete HPV genomes that are able to undergo productive replication upon differentiation are sensitive to interferon-induced growth arrest, while cells from high-grade cancers that only express E6 and E7 are resistant. Recent studies indicate this sensitivity is dependent upon the binding of the interferon-inducible factor, p56, to the E1 replication protein. The response to interferon by HPV proteins is complex and results from the action of multiple viral proteins. PMID:19715460

  14. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: a Mozambique overview.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Damiano; Putoto, Giovanni; Chhaganlal, Kajal D

    2016-06-01

    Human Papillomavirus is agent of the most common sexually transmitted disease which is able to infect mucosal and cutaneous membranes of the anogenital region, upper aerodigestive tract, and other head and neck mucosal regions. Although mainly HPV infection can be asymptomatic and transient, it may persist and give rise to various lesions such as warts, condyloma dysplasia and cancers depending on low or high risk type of HPV infection. Moreover, growing recent evidence suggests a role of this virus in male and female fertility. To date no effective prevention, test, treatment and control strategies are provided for people in developing countries despite the reported high incidence of HPV both in women and men. This paper reviews the more recent literature about HPV infection highlighting epidemiology, related pathologies and possible fertility effects of HPV in male and female with particular attention to the Mozambique context. PMID:27366761

  15. Clinical significance of human papillomavirus genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main causative agent for its development. HPV is a heterogeneous virus, and a persistent infection with a high-risk HPV contributes to the development of cancer. In recent decades, great advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of HPV, and HPV’s significance in cervical cancer prevention and management has received increased attention. In this review, we discuss the role of HPV genotyping in cervical cancer by addressing: clinically important issues in HPV virology; the current application of HPV genotyping in clinical medicine; and potential future uses for HPV genotyping. PMID:26768784

  16. New treatments for human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Santos, C; Pigem, R; Alsina, M

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is very common. In this article, we review the latest developments in the treatment of lesions caused by this virus, with a particular focus on anogenital warts. Sinecatechins and new imiquimod formulations are among the most significant new developments. Others include photodynamic therapy and intralesional immunotherapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use. Finally, while therapeutic vaccines and inhibitory molecules appear to hold great promise, they are still in the early phases of investigation. More studies are needed, and these should have similar designs, larger samples, and sufficiently long follow-up periods to enable the direct comparison of the short-term and long-term effectiveness of different treatment options. PMID:23706272

  17. Human papillomavirus vaccines--immune responses.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret; Pinto, Ligia A; Trimble, Connie

    2012-11-20

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are highly effective. The available evidence suggests that neutralising antibody is the mechanism of protection. However, despite the robust humoral response elicited by VLP vaccines, there is no immune correlate, no minimum level of antibody, or any other immune parameter, that predicts protection against infection or disease. The durability of the antibody response and the importance of antibody isotype, affinity and avidity for vaccine effectiveness are discussed. Once infection and disease are established, then cellular immune responses are essential to kill infected cells. These are complex processes and understanding the local mucosal immune response is a prerequisite for the rational design of therapeutic HPV vaccines. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:23199968

  18. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  19. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J. ); Pedemonte, B.M. )

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  20. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  1. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil Vaccine - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil.html . CDC review information for HPV Gardasil® ...

  2. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-cervarix.html . CDC review information for HPV Cervarix® ...

  3. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. )

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  4. Next generation prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schiller, John T; Müller, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The two licensed bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 (the major papillomavirus virion protein) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are regarded as safe, effective, and well established prophylactic vaccines. However, they have some inherent limitations, including a fairly high production and delivery cost, virus-type restricted protection, and no reported therapeutic activity, which might be addressed with the development of alternative dosing schedules and vaccine products. A change from a three-dose to a two-dose protocol for the licensed HPV vaccines, especially in younger adolescents (aged 9-13 years), is underway in several countries and is likely to become the future norm. Preliminary evidence suggests that recipients of HPV vaccines might derive prophylactic benefits from one dose of the bivalent vaccine. Substantial interest exists in both the academic and industrial sectors in the development of second-generation L1 VLP vaccines in terms of cost reduction-eg, by production in Escherichia coli or alternative types of yeast. However, Merck's nonavalent vaccine, produced via the Saccharomyces cerevisiae production system that is also used for their quadrivalent vaccine, is the first second-generation HPV VLP vaccine to be available on the market. By contrast, other pharmaceutical companies are developing microbial vectors that deliver L1 genes. These two approaches would add an HPV component to existing live attenuated vaccines for measles and typhoid fever. Prophylactic vaccines that are based on induction of broadly cross-neutralising antibodies to L2, the minor HPV capsid protein, are also being developed both as simple monomeric fusion proteins and as virus-like display vaccines. The strong interest in developing the next generation of vaccines, particularly by manufacturers in middle-to-high income countries, increases the likelihood that vaccine production will become decentralised with the hope that effective HPV vaccines will be

  5. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ozbun, Michelle A.; Patterson, Nicole A.

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol for growing differentiating epithelial tissues, whose structure and function mimics many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique, pioneered by Asslineau and Pruniéras (Asselineau and Prunieras 1984) and modified by Kopan et al. (Kopan et al. 1987), involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname “raft” cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, as well as keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single step virus growth

  6. Immunoprevention of human papillomavirus-associated malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang1, Joshua W.; Hung, Chein-fu; Huh, Warner K.; Trimble, Cornelia L.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent infection by one of fifteen high risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types is a necessary but not sufficient cause of 5% of all human cancers. This provides a remarkable opportunity for cancer prevention via immunization. Since Harald zur Hausen’s pioneering identification of hrHPV types 16 and 18, found in ~50% and ~20% of cervical cancers respectively, two prophylactic HPV vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLP) of each genotype have been widely licensed. These vaccines are beginning to impact infection and HPV-associated neoplasia rates after immunization campaigns in adolescents. Here we review recent progress and opportunities to better prevent HPV-associated cancers, including: broadening immune-protection to cover all hrHPV types, reducing the cost of HPV vaccines especially for developing countries that have the highest rates of cervical cancer, and immune-based treatment of established HPV infections. Screening based upon George Papanicolaou’s cervical cytology testing, and more recently detection of hrHPV DNA/RNA, followed by ablative treatment of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) have substantially reduced cervical cancer rates, and we examine their interplay with immune-based modalities for the prevention and eventual elimination of cervical cancer and other HPV-related malignancies. PMID:25488410

  7. Immunoprevention of human papillomavirus-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joshua W; Hung, Chein-Fu; Huh, Warner K; Trimble, Cornelia L; Roden, Richard B S

    2015-02-01

    Persistent infection by one of 15 high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types is a necessary but not sufficient cause of 5% of all human cancers. This provides a remarkable opportunity for cancer prevention via immunization. Since Harald zur Hausen's pioneering identification of hrHPV types 16 and 18, found in approximately 50% and 20% of cervical cancers, respectively, two prophylactic HPV vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLP) of each genotype have been widely licensed. These vaccines are beginning to affect infection and HPV-associated neoplasia rates after immunization campaigns in adolescents. Here, we review recent progress and opportunities to better prevent HPV-associated cancers, including broadening immune protection to cover all hrHPV types, reducing the cost of HPV vaccines especially for developing countries that have the highest rates of cervical cancer, and immune-based treatment of established HPV infections. Screening based upon George Papanicolaou's cervical cytology testing, and more recently detection of hrHPV DNA/RNA, followed by ablative treatment of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) have substantially reduced cervical cancer rates, and we examine their interplay with immune-based modalities for the prevention and eventual elimination of cervical cancer and other HPV-related malignancies. PMID:25488410

  8. Searching for antiviral drugs for human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Underwood, M R; Shewchuk, L M; Hassell, A M; Phelps, W C

    2000-12-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide variety of benign and pre-malignant epithelial tumours. Of the almost 100 different types of HPV that have been characterized to date, approximately two dozen specifically infect genital and oral mucosa. Mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted and, with an incidence roughly twice that of herpes simplex virus infection, are considered one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. A subset of genital HPVs, termed 'high-risk' HPVs, is highly associated with the development of genital cancers including cervical carcinoma. The absence of a simple monolayer cell culture system for analysis and propagation of the virus has substantially retarded progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HPV infection. In spite of these difficulties, great progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular controls of virus gene expression, replication and pathogenesis. With this knowledge and some important new tools, there is great potential for the development of improved diagnostic and prognostic tests, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and traditional antiviral medicines. PMID:11142617

  9. A novel dithiocarbamate derivative induces cell apoptosis through p53-dependent intrinsic pathway and suppresses the expression of the E6 oncogene of human papillomavirus 18 in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Qi, Hongxue; Li, Xiaobo; Hou, Xueling; Lu, Xueying; Xiao, Xiangwen

    2015-06-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) exhibit a broad spectrum of antitumor activities, however, their molecular mechanisms of antitumor have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have synthesized a series of novel dithiocarbamate derivatives. These DTCs were examined for cytotoxic activities against five human cancer cell lines. In this study, one of dithiocarbamate (DTC1) with higher potential for HeLa cells was chosen to investigate molecular mechanisms for its anti-tumor activities. DTC1 could inhibit proliferation, and highly induce apoptosis in HeLa cells by activating caspase-3, -6 and -9; moreover, activities of caspase-3, -6 and -9 were inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, DTC1 decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased expression of cytosol cytochrome c, Bak, Bax and p53 in a time-dependent manner but had no effect on the level of Rb. It was shown that DTC1 induced HeLa cells apoptosis through a p53-dependent pathway as tested by the wild type p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α. Additionally, the relative expression of E6 and E7 were evaluated in HPV18-positive (HeLa cells) by real-time PCR and western blotting. The results firstly demonstrated that DTC1 suppressed both expression of E6 mRNA and E6 oncoprotein, but had no effect on the expression of E7 mRNA and protein in HPV18. Our results suggested that DTC1 may serve as novel chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cervical cancer and potential anti-HPV virus candidates that merit further studies. PMID:25772545

  10. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know [Gardasil®-9

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil-9 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www. ... WHY GET VACCINATED? Gardasil-9 prevents human papillomavirus (HPV) ... Vaginal and vulvar cancers in females, and Anal cancer in ...

  11. [Human papillomavirus vaccine. Efficacy and safety].

    PubMed

    Bruni, Laia; Serrano, Beatriz; Bosch, Xavier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prophylactic vaccines have been recognized as the most effective intervention to control for HPV-related diseases. This article reviews the major phaseii/iii trials of the bivalent (HPVs16/18), quadrivalent (HPVs6/11/16/18), and the recently approved 9-valent vaccine (HPVs6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Large trials have been conducted showing the safety, immunogenicity and high efficacy of the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in the prevention of pre-invasive lesions and infection, especially when administered at young ages before exposure to HPV. Trials of the 9-valent vaccine have also demonstrated the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine in the prevention of infection and disease associated with the vaccine types, and its potential to substantially increase the overall prevention of HPV-related diseases. Post-licensure country reports have shown the recent and early impact of these vaccines at population level after the implementation of established HPV vaccination programs, including decreases in the prevalence of vaccine HPV types, the incidence of genital warts, and the incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities. If widely implemented, current HPV vaccines may drastically reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers and diseases. PMID:25937455

  12. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011-2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  13. Human papillomavirus vaccine and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Mariele; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Soriano, Alessandra; Manna, Raffaele; Maoz-Segal, Ramit; Kivity, Shaye; Doria, Andrea; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and autoimmune manifestations compatible with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or SLE-like disease, the medical history of six women who presented with SLE or SLE-like disease following HPV immunization was collected. Data regarding type of vaccine, number of immunization, family and personal, clinical and serological features, as well as response to treatments were analyzed. In the reported cases, several common features were observed, such as personal or familial susceptibility to autoimmunity or adverse response to a prior dose of the vaccine, both of which may be associated with a higher risk of post-vaccination autoimmunity. Favorable response to immunosuppressant was observed in all patients. In the current study, a temporal association between immunization with HPV vaccine and the appearance of a spectrum of SLE-like conditions is reported. Additionally, among the patients described, several common features were observed that may enable better identification of subjects at risk. Further studies are required to assess the safety of immunization with the HPV vaccine in patients with autoimmune-rheumatic diseases or in subject at risk of autoimmunity as well as the potential beneficial effect of preventive immunosuppressants. PMID:23624585

  14. Safety of human papillomavirus vaccines: a review

    PubMed Central

    Stillo, Michela; Carrillo Santisteve, Paloma; Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Between 2006 and 2009, two different human papillomavirus virus (HPV) vaccines were licensed for use: a quadrivalent (qHPVv) and a bivalent (bHPVv) vaccine. Since 2008, HPV vaccination programmes have been implemented in the majority of the industrialized countries. Since 2013, HPV vaccination has been part of the national programs of 66 countries including almost all countries in North America and Western Europe. Despite all the efforts made by individual countries, coverage rates are lower than expected. Vaccine safety represents one of the main concerns associated with the lack of acceptance of HPV vaccination both in the European Union/European Economic Area and elsewhere. Areas covered: Safety data published on bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines, both in pre-licensure and post-licensure phase, are reviewed. Expert opinion: Based on the latest scientific evidence, both HPV vaccines seem to be safe. Nevertheless, public concern and rumors about adverse events (AE) represent an important barrier to overcome in order to increase vaccine coverage. Passive surveillance of AEs is an important tool for detecting safety signals, but it should be complemented by activities aimed at assessing the real cause of all suspect AEs. Improved vaccine safety surveillance is the first step for effective communication based on scientific evidence. PMID:25689872

  15. Current status of human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Seokjae

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a malignant neoplasm arising from cells that originate in the cervix uteri. It is the second most prevalent cancer among women. It can have several causes; an infection with some type of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the greatest risk factor for cervical cancer. Over 100 types of HPVs have been identified, and more than 40 types of HPVs are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region. Among these, a number of HPVs types, containing types 16 and 18, are classified as "high-risk" HPVs that can cause cervical cancer. The HPVs vaccine prevents infection with certain species of HPVs associated with the development of cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers. Two HPVs vaccines are currently on the global market: quadrivalent HPVs vaccine and bivalent HPV vaccine that use virus-like particles as a vaccine antigen. This review discusses the current status of HPVs vaccines on the global market, clinical trials, and the future of HPVs vaccine development. PMID:25003090

  16. [Uterine cervical carcinoma and human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Sugase, M

    1992-06-01

    For many years it has been thought that a significant proportion of cervical cancer could be attributed to sexually transmitted agents, such as sperm, smegma, Treponema pallidum, Gonococcus and herpes simplexvirus type 2. Recent advances of molecular biology, however, have revealed that human papillomavirus (HPV) might be the most causative virus of the disease. Since HPV type 16 DNA was found in a patient with cervical cancer in 1983, many HPV types have been cloned from cervical cancers, also from premalignant lesions (intraepithelial neoplasias). In Japan, we have found 6 new types of HPV (HPV 58, 59, 61, 62, 64, 67) in the female genital tract so far. Especially, HPV 58, which was cloned from a patient with cervical squamous cell carcinoma and was already fully sequenced, is thought to be an important agent for the development of cervical cancer as well as HPV 16. Now we are investigating extensively to clarify the real relationship between genital HPV infection and cervical cancer. PMID:1327090

  17. Therapeutic Vaccine Strategies against Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Khallouf, Hadeel; Grabowska, Agnieszka K.; Riemer, Angelika B.

    2014-01-01

    High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause over 500,000 cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancer cases per year. The transforming potential of HPVs is mediated by viral oncoproteins. These are essential for the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Thus, HPV-mediated malignancies pose the unique opportunity in cancer vaccination to target immunologically foreign epitopes. Therapeutic HPV vaccination is therefore an ideal scenario for proof-of-concept studies of cancer immunotherapy. This is reflected by the fact that a multitude of approaches has been utilized in therapeutic HPV vaccination design: protein and peptide vaccination, DNA vaccination, nanoparticle- and cell-based vaccines, and live viral and bacterial vectors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of completed and ongoing clinical trials in therapeutic HPV vaccination (summarized in tables), and also highlights selected promising preclinical studies. Special emphasis is given to adjuvant science and the potential impact of novel developments in vaccinology research, such as combination therapies to overcome tumor immune suppression, the use of novel materials and mouse models, as well as systems vaccinology and immunogenetics approaches. PMID:26344626

  18. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Burd, Eileen M

    2016-04-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  19. An update on oral human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Ankit H; Chotaliya, Kiran; Marfatia, Y S

    2013-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) constitutes the majority of newly acquired sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in United States as per the centers for disease control factsheet 2013. Genital HPV is the most common STI with incidence of about 5.5 million world-wide, nearly 75% of sexually active men and women have been exposed to HPV at some point in their lives. Oral Sexual behavior is an important contributor to infection of HPV in the oral mucosa especially in cases known to practice high risk behavior and initiating the same at an early age. HPV infection of the oral mucosa currents is believed to affect 1-50% of the general population, depending on the method used for diagnosis. The immune system clears most HPV naturally within 2 years (about 90%), but the ones that persist can cause serious diseases. HPV is an essential carcinogen being implicated increasingly in association with cancers occurring at numerous sites in the body. Though there does not occur any specific treatment for the HPV infection, the diseases it causes are treatable such as genital warts, cervical and other cancers. PMID:24339456

  20. Optimal control with multiple human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Malik, Tufail; Imran, Mudassar; Jayaraman, Raja

    2016-03-21

    A two-sex, deterministic ordinary differential equations model for human papillomavirus (HPV) is constructed and analyzed for optimal control strategies in a vaccination program administering three types of vaccines in the female population: a bivalent vaccine that targets two HPV types and provides longer duration of protection and cross-protection against some non-target types, a quadrivalent vaccine which targets an additional two HPV types, and a nonavalent vaccine which targets nine HPV types (including those covered by the quadrivalent vaccine), but with lesser type-specific efficacy. Considering constant vaccination controls, the disease-free equilibrium and the effective reproduction number Rv for the autonomous model are computed in terms of the model parameters. Local-asymptotic stability of the disease-free equilibrium is established in terms of Rv. Uncertainty and Sensitivity analyses are carried out to study the influence of various important model parameters on the HPV infection prevalence. Assuming the HPV infection prevalence in the population under the constant control, optimal control theory is used to devise optimal vaccination strategies for the associated non-autonomous model when the vaccination rates are functions of time. The impact of these strategies on the number of infected individuals and the accumulated cost is assessed and compared with the constant control case. Switch times from one vaccine combination to a different combination including the nonavalent vaccine are assessed during an optimally designed HPV immunization program. PMID:26796222

  1. Lung adenocarcinoma and human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ching; Chen, Jen-Hau; Richard, Kradin; Chen, Pao-Yang; Christiani, David C

    2004-09-15

    Over the past three decades, the incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has increased worldwide. Most individuals with lung adenocarcinoma (especially women) are nonsmokers. Reported risk factors for the development of lung adenocarcinoma include cigarette smoking; exposure to cooking fumes, air pollution, second-hand smoke, asbestos, and radon; nutritional status; genetic susceptibility; immunologic dysfunction; tuberculosis infection; and asthma. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a known risk factor for the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), but it has not been thoroughly assessed as a potential risk factor for the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. More than 50% of people are infected with HPV during their lifetimes, either via intrauterine or postnatal infection. Recent studies involving Taiwanese patients have demonstrated a possible association between HPV infection and the risk of developing pulmonary adenocarcinoma. HPV transmission pathways have not yet been conclusively identified. The observation of certain types of HPV in association with cervical and oral SCC raises the possibility of sexual transmission of HPV from the cervix to the oral cavity, with subsequent transmission to the larynx and then to the lung. HPV infection and metaplasia in lung tissue may increase an individual's susceptibility to the tumorigenesis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Further epidemiologic and pathologic investigations will be necessary to establish a causal relation. PMID:15368331

  2. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011–2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  3. Knowledge about human papillomavirus and the human papillomavirus vaccine in Belgian students

    PubMed Central

    Deriemaeker, Hanne; Reichman, Gina; Devroey, Dirk; Cammu, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the knowledge of Belgian university students about the human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV–vaccination. Material and methods During a period of two months we administered an online questionnaire, which contained 29 questions, to 3332 students of the Free University of Brussels. Of the 433 completed questionnaires, 346 were included by age (18–30 years) and completeness of responded questionnaires. These formed the study group. Results Of the 346 included questionnaires (76% female), 48% were completed by medical students. The majority (65%) knew that both genders could be infected with HPV. Ninety–five percent of all medical students were aware of the existence of HPV, while 92% knew of the possibility to be vaccinated against the virus. Ninety percent of them were aware of the causal relationship between HPV infection and cervical cancer. 46% of the medical students were aware that HPV can cause anogenital cancers, and only 28% knew that HPV–vaccination could protect them against genital warts. Sixty percent of all female students were fully vaccinated against HPV, without any difference between medical and non–medical students. A very small part of all students (3%) believed that vaccination against HPV could enhance a promiscuous lifestyle. Conclusions Almost 80% of respondents were aware of the existence of the human papillomavirus, its morbid potential and the HPV–vaccination. PMID:25667765

  4. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L.; Bellone, Stefania; Prevatt, Edward G.; Santin, Alessandro D.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  5. A prospective analysis of smoking and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schabath, Matthew B.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    At present it is unknown whether the higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among smokers in men is attributed to a higher probability of acquiring an infection or because of longer infection persistence. Thus, we investigated the role of smoking on the (acquisition) and clearance (persistence) of genital HPV infections among 4,026 men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genital HPV infections were grouped any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections and smoking status was categorized as current-, former, and never smokers. The incidence of any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections was significantly higher among current smokers compared to former- and never smokers (P < 0.01). In multivariable analyses adjusting for sexual behavior and potential confounders, when compared to never smokers, current smokers exhibited significantly higher probability of acquiring any- (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02 – 1.50) and non-oncogenic (HR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.00 – 1.45) infections and a borderline significant probability for oncogenic infections (HR = 1.18; 95% CI 0.98 – 1.41). Although the median duration of HPV infection was generally longer among current smokers, we found no statistically significant associations in the multivariable analyses. Overall, these results demonstrated that current smoking exhibited the highest incidence and highest probability of acquiring genital HPV infections. PMID:24222514

  6. Human Oncogenic Herpesvirus and Post-translational Modifications – Phosphorylation and SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Campbell, Mel; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, especially viruses, evolve abilities to utilize cellular machineries to facilitate their survival and propagation. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially phosphorylation and SUMOylation, that reversibly modulate the function and interactions of target proteins are among the most important features in cell signaling pathways. PTM-dependent events also serve as one of the favorite targets for viruses. Among the seven unambiguous human oncogenic viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), human papillomavirus (HPV), Human T lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), two are herpesviruses. The life cycle of herpesviruses consists of latent and lytic phases and the rapid switch between these states includes global remodeling of the viral genome from heterochromatin-to-euchromatin. The balance between lytic replication and latency is essential for herpesvirus to maintain a persistent infection through a combination of viral propagation and evasion of the host immune response, which consequently may contribute to tumorigenesis. It is no surprise that the swift reversibility of PTMs, especially SUMOylation, a modification that epigenetically regulates chromatin structure, is a major hijack target of the host for oncogenic herpesviruses. In this brief review, we summarize the varied ways in which herpesviruses engage the host immune components through PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation and SUMOylation. PMID:27379086

  7. Human Oncogenic Herpesvirus and Post-translational Modifications - Phosphorylation and SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Campbell, Mel; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, especially viruses, evolve abilities to utilize cellular machineries to facilitate their survival and propagation. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially phosphorylation and SUMOylation, that reversibly modulate the function and interactions of target proteins are among the most important features in cell signaling pathways. PTM-dependent events also serve as one of the favorite targets for viruses. Among the seven unambiguous human oncogenic viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), human papillomavirus (HPV), Human T lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), two are herpesviruses. The life cycle of herpesviruses consists of latent and lytic phases and the rapid switch between these states includes global remodeling of the viral genome from heterochromatin-to-euchromatin. The balance between lytic replication and latency is essential for herpesvirus to maintain a persistent infection through a combination of viral propagation and evasion of the host immune response, which consequently may contribute to tumorigenesis. It is no surprise that the swift reversibility of PTMs, especially SUMOylation, a modification that epigenetically regulates chromatin structure, is a major hijack target of the host for oncogenic herpesviruses. In this brief review, we summarize the varied ways in which herpesviruses engage the host immune components through PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation and SUMOylation. PMID:27379086

  8. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease. PMID:26456009

  9. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genome status & cervical cancer outcome - A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Poulami; Thomas, Asha; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Mulherkar, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Persistent infections with high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses such as HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 have been identified as the major aetiological factor for cervical cancer. The clinical outcome of the disease is often determined by viral factors such as viral load, physical status and oncogene expression. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of such factors on clinical outcome in HPV16 positive, locally advanced cervical cancer cases. Methods: One hundred and thirty two pretreatment cervical tumour biopsies were selected from patients undergoing radiotherapy alone (n=63) or concomitant chemo-radiation (n=69). All the samples were positive for HPV 16. Quantitative real time-PCR was carried out to determine viral load and oncogene expression. Physical status of the virus was determined for all the samples by the ratio of E2copies/E7copies; while in 73 cases, the status was reanalyzed by more sensitive APOT (amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts) assay. Univariate analysis of recurrence free survival was carried out using Kaplan-Meier method and for multivariate analysis the Cox proportional hazard model was used. Results: The median viral load was 19.4 (IQR, 1.9- 69.3), with viral integration observed in 86 per cent cases by combination of the two methodologies. Both univariate and multivariate analyses identified viral physical status as a good predictor of clinical outcome following radiation treatment, with episomal form being associated with increased recurrence free survival. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study results showed that viral physical status might act as an important prognostic factor in cervical cancer. PMID:26658585

  10. No evidence for human papillomavirus in the etiology of colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Galloway, Denise A.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Makar, Karen W.; Potter, John D.; Schwartz, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background While some studies have reported detection of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal tumors, others have not. Methods We examined the association between oncogenic HPV infection and colorectal polyps in a case-control study of individuals with colorectal adenomas (n=167), hyperplastic polyps (n=87), and polyp-free controls (n=250). We performed real-time PCR for HPV-16 /18 DNA, and SPF PCR covering 43 HPV types, on lesional and normal colorectal tissue samples. Plasma antibodies for oncogenic HPV types were assessed via a bead-based multiplex Luminex assay. Results HPV DNA was not found in any of the 609 successfully assayed colorectal tissue samples from adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, normal biopsies adjacent to polyps, or normal biopsies of the rectum of disease-free controls. Also, there was no association between HPV seropositivity for all oncogenic HPV types combined, for either polyp type, and for men or women. When analyses were restricted to participants without a previous history of polyps, among men [adenomas (n=31), hyperplastic polyps (n=28), and controls (n=68)], there was an association between seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps when all oncogenic HPV types were combined (odds ratio=3.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–7.9). Conclusions Overall, our findings do not support an etiologic relationship between HPV and colorectal adenomas or hyperplastic polyps; however, our finding suggesting an association between HPV seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps in men may warrant further investigations. Impact After stringent controls for contamination and three methods to assess HPV infection, we report no evidence for HPV in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia for either men or women. PMID:21817125

  11. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  12. Comparative transforming potential of different human papillomaviruses associated with non-melanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Massimi, Paola; Thomas, Miranda; Bouvard, Veronique; Ruberto, Irene; Campo, M. Saveria; Tommasino, Massimo; Banks, Lawrence

    2008-02-20

    It is well established that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that infect mucosal epithelia are the causative agents of cervical cancer. In contrast, the association of cutaneo-tropic HPV types with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is less well defined. In this study, we have analysed the in vitro transforming potential of various cutaneous HPV types. Using oncogene cooperation assays with activated ras, we have shown that diverse cutaneous types, including 12, 14, 15, 24, 36 and 49, have significant transforming potential. Interestingly, most of this activity appears to be encoded by the E6 gene product. In contrast, the common HPV-10 exhibits no significant transforming potential in these assays. This difference may be a reflection of different patterns of cellular localization, with transforming E6s being nuclear and non-transforming being cytoplasmic. These results provide molecular support for a role of these viruses in the development of certain human malignancies.

  13. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity. PMID:27179345

  14. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced neoplasia in the urinary bladder: a missing link?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Riley E; Wang, Lisha; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Emerson, Robert E; Montironi, Rodolfo; Pedrosa, Jose A; Kaimakliotis, Hristos Z; Koch, Michael O; Cheng, Liang

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that the role human papillomavirus (HPV) plays in the induction of human cancer represents an important achievement in oncologic research. It has taken on even greater importance since the development of vaccines, which promise the hope of preventing these cancers from ever occurring. Because of these important implications, many have attempted to determine a possible role for the virus in cancers of the urinary bladder-an organ in close anatomic proximity to the primary sites of HPV-induced neoplasia and one which already has an established oncogenic infectious agent in Schistosoma haematobium. Here we review the current literature exploring this possible role in the most common subtype of cancer of the urinary bladder, urothelial carcinoma, and two much more rare histologic subtypes that have well established roles for HPV-induced neoplasia in other anatomic sites-squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. PMID:26687533

  15. The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F X; Lorincz, A; Muñoz, N; Meijer, C J L M; Shah, K V

    2002-01-01

    The causal role of human papillomavirus infections in cervical cancer has been documented beyond reasonable doubt. The association is present in virtually all cervical cancer cases worldwide. It is the right time for medical societies and public health regulators to consider this evidence and to define its preventive and clinical implications. A comprehensive review of key studies and results is presented. PMID:11919208

  16. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intent and Uptake among Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Divya A.; Zochowski, Melissa; Peterman, Stephanie; Dempsey, Amanda F.; Ernst, Susan; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine intent and the effect of an educational intervention on vaccine uptake among female college students. Participants: Females aged 18 to 26 attending a university health service gynecology clinic (n = 256). Methods: Participants were randomized to receive either HPV-specific education with a…

  17. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers: A growing global problem

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anshuma; Singh, Mini P; Rai, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is linked with several cancers such as cancer cervix, vagina, vulva, head and neck, anal, and penile carcinomas. Although there is a proven association of HPV with these cancers, questions regarding HPV testing, vaccination, and treatment of HPV-related cancers continue to remain unanswered. The present article provides an overview of the HPV-associated cancers. PMID:27127735

  18. Maternal acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccine in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sam, I-Ching; Wong, Li-Ping; Rampal, Sanjay; Leong, Yin-Hui; Pang, Chan-Fu; Tai, Yong-Ting; Tee, Hwee-Ching; Kahar-Bador, Maria

    2009-06-01

    Acceptability rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination by 362 Malaysian mothers were 65.7% and 55.8% for daughters and sons, respectively. Younger mothers, and those who knew someone with cancer, were more willing to vaccinate their daughters. If the vaccine was routine and cost free, acceptability rate was 97.8%. PMID:19465327

  19. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers: A growing global problem.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Anshuma; Singh, Mini P; Rai, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is linked with several cancers such as cancer cervix, vagina, vulva, head and neck, anal, and penile carcinomas. Although there is a proven association of HPV with these cancers, questions regarding HPV testing, vaccination, and treatment of HPV-related cancers continue to remain unanswered. The present article provides an overview of the HPV-associated cancers. PMID:27127735

  20. Human papillomaviruses and cervical cancer in Bangkok. I. Risk factors for invasive cervical carcinomas with human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 DNA.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D B; Ray, R M; Koetsawang, A; Kiviat, N; Kuypers, J; Qin, Q; Ashley, R L; Koetsawang, S

    2001-04-15

    Personal interviews, tests for antibodies to herpes simplex virus type 2, Treponema pallidum, and hepatitis B, tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and polymerase chain reaction-based assays for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cervical scrapings were obtained from 190 women with squamous cell and 42 women with adenomatous cervical carcinoma and from 291 hospitalized controls diagnosed in Bangkok, Thailand, between September 1991 and September 1993. Risk was strongly associated with oncogenic HPV types, with types 16 and 18 predominating in squamous and adenomatous lesions, respectively. The 126 cases with HPV-16 and the 42 cases with HPV-18 were compared with 250 controls with no evidence of any HPV. The risk of both viral tumor types increased with decreasing age at first intercourse in this predominantly monogamous population, which may be explained by more visits to prostitutes by the husbands of cases with early than late age at first intercourse. HPV-16 tumors were weakly associated with HBsAg carrier state and smoking. The risk of tumors of both viral types increased with parity and use of oral contraceptives but not with injectable progestogens. Factors that may predispose to persistent, oncogenic HPV-16 or -18 infection may include estrogens or progestins in the presence of estrogens, immunosuppression, and smoking, but other factors related to low socioeconomic status are also involved. PMID:11296143

  1. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  2. First Detection of Human Papillomaviruses and Human Polyomaviruses in River Waters in Italy.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, M; Petricca, S; Libera, S Della; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2015-12-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses is possible through contact with contaminated water environments and can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses, including gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, ocular, and skin infections. Recently, the occurrence in water environments of two groups of human viruses-both known with oncogenic potential, human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) and papillomaviruses (HPVs)-has been reported worldwide. These viruses, responsible for highly prevalent infections worldwide, have recently been proposed as potentially emerging waterborne pathogens. The objective of the present study was to examine the occurrence of HPyVs and HPVs in surface waters, by monitoring two rivers in Northwestern Italy, by nested PCR assays and sequencing. HPyVs (JC, BK, and Merkel cell polyomavirus) were detected in 10/25 (40%) samples. HPVs (HPV8, 17, 21, 25, 32, 80, 99, 105, and putative new HPVs) were identified in 14/25 (56%) river samples. The number of HPV DNA copies in waters was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first detection and quantification of HPVs in surface waters. The possibility that HPyVs and HPVs can be transmitted by the waterborne route deserves to be explored in future studies. PMID:26049729

  3. Induction of human papillomavirus type 16-specific immunologic responses in a normal and an human papillomavirus-infected populations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wen-Fang; Lee, Chien-Nan; Su, Yi-Ning; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Hsiao, Wen-Chun; Chen, Chi-An; Hsieh, Chang-Yao

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, especially with the oncogenic genotypes, is the most important risk factor for developing cervical cancer. We focused on generating HPV16 E7-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes and evaluating HPV16 E7-specific immune responses in HPV16-infected and uninfected populations. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were first collected from an uninfected group with an human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) A2 haplotype (four volunteers). Mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were generated from the PBMCs and pulsed with one of two HLA-A2-restricted E7 peptides, aa 11–20 [YMLDLQPETT] and aa 86–93 [TLGIVCPI], as antigen presenting cells. The autologous naïve or cultured PBMCs were then cultured with peptide-pulsed DCs to detect the HPV16 E7-specific immune responses by a variety of techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) from E7-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes stimulated with the respective peptide was detected by ELISA. Using ELISPOT analysis, a marked increase in the number of IFN-γ-secreting CD8+ E7-specific lymphocytes was observed following peptide stimulation. Cultured CD8+ T lymphocytes were highly cytotoxic against the CaSki cells. PBMCs were then colleted from an HPV16-infected population of the HLA-A2 haplotype, including four persons of HPV16 infection only, four with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions, and four cervical cancer patients. We then compared the immunologic responses to E7 between HPV16-infected and uninfected populations by ELISA and ELISPOT assay. The E7-specific immunologic responses of the HPV16-infected populations were significantly higher than those of the uninfected population. In addition, persons with an HPV16 infection only or those with CIN lesions generated higher E7-specific immunologic responses than cervical cancer patients. Our results

  4. Genital human papillomavirus infection in women from the Zagreb region.

    PubMed

    Marijan, Tatjana; Vranes, Jasmina; Mlinarić-Dzepina, Ana; Leskovar, Vladimira; Knezević, Jasna; Kvaternik, Matea

    2007-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection, especially among young, sexually active individuals. As persistent infection with oncogenic types may lead to cervical cancer, HPV testing is a useful tool to screen for women at risk for subsequent development of cervical cancer. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) infection in different age groups of cytologically selected women from the Zagreb region, and to evaluate the frequency and results of repeat hrHPV testing. During a one-year study period (November 2005 to November 2006), a total of 3,440 cervical samples from women attending gynecological services of public and private health care systems were received. They were tested for 13 hrHPV genotypes by the polymerase chain reaction based AMPLICOR HPV test (Roche Molecular Systems). The overall prevalence of hrHPV was 34.6%. Most samples were obtained from women aged 21-30 years (44.2%), followed by the 31-40 (27.6%), 41-50 (15.7%), 51-60 (5.3%) and 261 (2.4%) age groups. Out of 3,227 cervical samples obtained from women of known age, 4.9% were obtained from the group of girls younger than 21, in which the highest prevalence of hrHPV (49.4%) was found. A similar prevalence was observed in women aged 21-30 (45.1%). The prevalence gradually decreased with age. During the study period, repeat hrHPV testing was performed in samples from 66 women at different intervals. Out of 28 women that were hrHPV negative on initial testing, only five women turned positive on repeat testing. Out of 38 women that were positive on initial testing, in one-third hrHPV could not be detected on repeat testing. As expected, hrHPV infection was highly prevalent in female adolescents and young women. Further investigation on repeat hrHPV testing is needed to assess virus clearance and rate of newly acquired infection. PMID:17600936

  5. Is human papillomavirus vaccination likely to be a useful strategy in India?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudeep; Kerkar, Rajendra A.; Dikshit, Rajesh; Badwe, Rajendra A.

    2013-01-01

    Two vaccines that protect against infection by some of the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes have recently been licensed for use in population-based vaccination strategies in many countries. However, these products are being promoted as ‘cervical cancer vaccines’ based on inadequate data. Specifically, there remain several concerns about the duration of immunogenicity, length of follow-up of trial subjects, endpoints chosen in vaccine trials, applicability of trial results to real populations, the safety of these products, and their cost-effectiveness as public health interventions. Furthermore, it is unlikely that vaccination will obviate the need for setting up robust and cost-effective screening programs in countries like India. This article will discuss various aspects of HPV vaccination from a public health perspective, especially from the point of view of its relevance to India and other South Asian countries. PMID:24455622

  6. Transformation of human cells by oncogenic viruses supports permissiveness for parvovirus H-1 propagation.

    PubMed Central

    Faisst, S; Schlehofer, J R; zur Hausen, H

    1989-01-01

    Parvovirus H-1 has been shown to suppress spontaneous and chemically or virally induced tumorigenesis in hamsters. In human cell culture systems propagation of H-1 is restricted to transformed cells, which are killed by H-1 infection, in contrast to normal diploid cells, which are nonpermissive for H-1. By analyzing the permissiveness of a variety of human cells for H-1, it was determined that the majority of tested transformed or immortalized cells which were permissive for H-1 contained the DNA of oncogenic viruses (human papillomavirus, simian virus 40, adenovirus, hepatitis B virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I). Of six transformed cell lines negative for persisting tumor virus DNA, only two were permissive for H-1, while two were semipermissive and two were nonpermissive. Thus, persistence and expression of tumor virus functions appears to promote full permissiveness for H-1 in human cells. However, neither expression of genes of specific viral genomes nor the transformed state of apparently virus-free cells alone was sufficient to render human cells permissive for H-1. Therefore, the effect of tumor virus functions on H-1 in transformed cells seems to be indirect, probably mediated by cellular factors which are induced or switched off during the transformation process. It appears that similar factors are induced or switched off by 5-azacytidine or calcium phosphate, both known inducers of cellular gene expression. Images PMID:2495371

  7. The association of human papillomavirus vaccination with sexual behaviours and human papillomavirus knowledge: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Coles, Victoria A H; Patel, Ajay S; Allen, Felicity L; Keeping, Sam T; Carroll, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Since the 2008 introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme for adolescent girls in the UK, parents and other groups have expressed fears that immunisation condones sexual activity, promotes promiscuity and encourages risky sexual behaviour. This study aimed to explore whether HPV vaccination programmes have increased knowledge surrounding HPV and associated disease and whether uptake has influenced sexual behaviour. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO electronic databases were interrogated. Studies of behaviour, attitudes and knowledge associated with HPV vaccination (or vaccination intent) in subjects of any age and gender in programmes reflective of UK practice were included in the review (n = 58). The evidence regarding the association of HPV vaccination with high-risk sexual behaviour was varied, primarily due to the heterogeneous nature of the included studies. Young females typically exhibited better knowledge than males, and vaccinated respondents (or those with vaccination intent) had higher levels of knowledge than the unvaccinated. However, knowledge surrounding HPV and genital warts was generally poor. This review highlights the need to provide effective education regarding the HPV vaccine and HPV-associated disease to adolescents of vaccination age, nurses, teachers, parents and guardians to ultimately allow informed decisions to be made regarding receipt of the HPV vaccine. PMID:25300588

  8. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, C.D.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  9. Using Organotypic Epithelial Tissue Culture to Study the Human Papillomavirus Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denis; Norby, Kathryn; Hayes, Mitchell; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Sugden, Bill; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are associated with greater than 95% of cervical cancers and 20% of head and neck cancers. These cancers arise from persistent infections in which there is continued expression of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, often as a consequence of integration of HPV DNA into the host genome. Such cancers represent "dead ends" for the virus as integration disrupts the viral genome and because the cancers are defective in normal epithelial differentiation, which is required for production of progeny papillomavirus. In order to study the full viral life cycle, from the establishment to maintenance to productive stages, our lab makes use of the organotypic epithelial tissue culture system. This system allows us to mimic the three-dimensional structure of epithelia whose differentiation is tightly linked to the completion of the HPV viral life cycle. In this chapter we describe how various aspects of the HPV life cycle are monitored in raft cultures making use of an immortalized keratinocyte cell line. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153383

  10. Recent advances in the search for antiviral agents against human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) is extremely common and associated with the development of benign warts or malignant lesions of the skin and mucosa. Infection by a high-risk (oncogenic) anogenital HPV type, most often through sexual contacts, is the starting point of virtually all cases of cervical cancers and the majority of anal cancers. The same viral types are also increasingly being linked with a subset of head-and-neck and non-melanoma skin cancers. Although prophylactic vaccines are now available to protect against the four types most commonly found in cervical and anal cancers (HPV16 and HPV18) and anogenital warts (HPV6 and HPV11), these neither protect against all genital HPVs nor are of therapeutic utility for already infected patients. Thus, the need for antiviral agents to treat HPV-associated diseases remains great, but none currently exist. This article reviews the recent progress made towards the development of antiviral agents to treat HPV infections, from target identification and validation to the discovery of lead compounds with therapeutic potential. Emphasis has been placed on novel low-molecular-weight compounds that antagonize HPV proteins or, alternatively, inhibit cellular proteins which have been usurped by papillomaviruses and are mediating their pathogenic effects. PMID:17668552

  11. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  12. Oncogenic long noncoding RNA FAL1 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaomin; Hu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are defined as RNA transcripts larger than 200 nucleotides that do not appear to have protein-coding potential. Accumulating evidence indicates that lncRNAs are involved in tumorigenesis. Our work reveals that lncRNA FAL1 (focally amplified lncRNA on chromosome 1) is frequently and focally amplified in human cancers and mediates oncogenic functions. PMID:27308441

  13. Papillomaviruses: Molecular and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Howley, P.M.; Broker, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are : Papillomaviruses and Human Genital Tract Diseases;Papillomaviruses and Human Cutaneous Diseases, Papillomaviruses and Human Oral and Laryngeal Diseases;Therapeutic Approaches to Papillomavirus Infections;Animal Papillomaviruses;Molecular Biology;Transcription, Replication, and Genome Organization;Epithelial Cell Culture;Papillomavirus Transformation;and Viral Vectors.

  14. Incidence and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection in men: the HIM cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Hildesheim, Allan; Villa, Luisa L.; Salmerón, Jorge J.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers disproportionately affect men, are increasing in incidence, and have no proven prevention methods. We aimed to establish the natural history of oral HPV infection in men. Methods To estimate incidence and clearance of HPV infections, men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA who were HIV negative and reported no history of anogenital cancer were recruited into the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) cohort study. A subset of the cohort who provided two or more oral rinse-and-gargle samples with valid HPV results and who completed a minimum of 2 weeks of follow-up were included in this analysis. Oral rinse-and-gargle samples and questionnaire data were obtained every 6 months for up to 4 years. Samples were analysed for the presence of oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV infections by the linear array method. Findings 1626 men aged 18–73 years and with a median follow-up of 12·7 months (IQR 12·1–14·7) were included in the analysis. During the first 12 months of follow-up, 4·4% (95% CI 3·5–5·6; n=115 incident infections) of men acquired an incident oral HPV infection, 1·7% (1·2–2·5; n=53 incident infections) an oral oncogenic HPV infection, and 0·6% (0·3–1·1; n=18 incident infections) an oral HPV 16 infection. Acquisition of oral oncogenic HPV was significantly associated with smoking and not being married or cohabiting, but was similar across countries, age groups, and reported sexual behaviours. Median duration of infection was 6·9 months (95 % CI 6·2–9·3; n=45 cleared infections) for any HPV, 6·3 months (6·0–9·9; n=18 cleared infections) for oncogenic HPV, and 7·3 months (6·0–not estimable; n=5 cleared infections) for HPV 16. Eight of the 18 incident oral HPV 16 infections persisted for two or more study visits. Interpretation Newly acquired oral oncogenic HPV infections in healthy men were rare and most were cleared within 1 year

  15. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    DeCaprio, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. While much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al. demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F and MuvB) complex at two distinct phases of the cell cycle (1). Consistent with earlier work, HPV16 E7 can bind to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) family member p130 (RBL2) protein and promote its proteasome-mediated destruction thereby disrupting the DREAM complex and prevent exit from the cell cycle into quiescence. In addition, they demonstrate that HPV16 E7 can bind to MuvB core complex in association with BMYB and FOXM1 and activate gene expression during the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, HPV16 E7 acts to prevent exit from the cell cycle entry and promotes mitotic proliferation and may account for the high levels of FOXM1 often observed in poor risk cervical cancers. PMID:24166507

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    DeCaprio, J A

    2014-07-31

    The study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. Although much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al., doi:10.1038/onc.2013.426, demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F and MuvB) complex at two distinct phases of the cell cycle. Consistent with earlier work, HPV16 E7 can bind to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) family member p130 (RBL2) protein and promote its proteasome-mediated destruction thereby disrupting the DREAM complex and can prevent exit from the cell cycle into quiescence. In addition, they demonstrate that HPV16 E7 can bind to MuvB core complex in association with BMYB and FOXM1 and activate gene expression during the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, HPV16 E7 acts to prevent exit from the cell cycle entry and promotes mitotic proliferation and may account for the high levels of FOXM1 often observed in poor-risk cervical cancers. PMID:24166507

  17. Male Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Association With Condom Use in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Repp, Kimberly K.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Fu, Rongwei; Schafer, Sean; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Villa, Luisa L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Reported associations of condom use and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have been inconsistent. We investigated self-reported frequency of condom use and detection of genital HPV among men. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in men aged 18–70 years from Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Men completed questionnaires on sexual history, condom use, and sociodemographic characteristics. Among 2621 men reporting recent vaginal sex, prevalence of any HPV, any oncogenic type, and nononcogenic types only was estimated by frequency of condom use (“always” or “not always”). Multivariable models were used to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) for HPV according to frequency of condom use. Results. The prevalence of any HPV was 70.5%; any oncogenic type, 34%, and nononcogenic types only, 22.2%. The adjusted PR for always vs not always using condoms was 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], .77–.97) for all countries combined. The association was stronger in the United States (PR, 0.70; CI, .55–.90) than in Brazil (PR, 0.84; CI, .71–1.01) or Mexico (PR, 1.05; CI, .89–1.25) (P for interaction = .025). Conclusions. HPV prevalence was high even among those who reported always using condoms, and its associations with always using condoms varied among countries. PMID:22396601

  18. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Soon; Rajasekaran, Nirmal; Ju, Woong; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi) based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings. PMID:26239469

  19. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted. PMID:27194871

  20. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Oncoprotein Causes a Delay in Repair of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Nickel, Kwangok P.; Torres, Alexandra D.; Lee, Denis; Lambert, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with Human papillomavirus related (HPV+) head and neck cancers (HNCs) demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to traditional HPV negative (HPV−) HNC patients. We have recently shown that HPV+ HNC cells are more sensitive to radiation than HPV− HNC cells. However, roles of HPV oncogenes in regulating the response of DNA damage repair remain unknown. Material and Methods Using immortalized normal oral epithelial cell lines, HPV+ HNC derived cell lines, and HPV16 E7-transgenic mice we assessed the repair of DNA damage using γ-H2AX foci, single and split dose clonogenic survival assays, and immunoblot. The ability of E7 to modulate expression of proteins associated with DNA repair pathways was assessed by immunoblot. Results HPV16 E7 increased retention of γ-H2AX nuclear foci and significantly decreased sublethal DNA damage repair. While phospho-ATM, phospho-ATR, Ku70, and Ku80 expressions were not altered by E7, Rad51 was induced by E7. Correspondingly, HPV+ HNC cell lines showed retention of Rad51 after γ-radiation. Conclusions Our findings provide further understanding as to how HPV16 E7 manipulates cellular DNA damage responses that may underlie its oncogenic potential and influence the altered sensitivity to radiation seen in HPV+ HNC as compared to HPV− HNC. PMID:25216575

  1. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein–Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted. PMID:27194871

  2. The human minisatellite consensus at breakpoints of oncogene translocations.

    PubMed Central

    Krowczynska, A M; Rudders, R A; Krontiris, T G

    1990-01-01

    A reexamination of human minisatellite (hypervariable) regions following the cloning and sequencing of the new minisatellite, VTR1.1, revealed that many of these structures possessed a strongly conserved copy of the chi-like octamer, GC[A/T]GG[A/T]GG. In oncogene translocations apparently created by aberrant VDJ recombinase activity, this VTR octamer was often found within a few bases of the breakpoint (p less than 10(-10)). Three bcl2 rearrangements which occurred within 2 bp of one another were located precisely adjacent to this consensus; it defined the 5' border of that oncogene's major breakpoint cluster. Several c-myc translocations also occurred within 2 bp of this sequence. While the appearance of a chi-like element in polymorphic minisatellite sequences is consistent with a role promoting either recombination or replication slippage, the existence of such elements at sites of somatic translocations suggests chi function in site-specific recombination, perhaps as a subsidiary recognition signal in immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. We discuss the implications of these observations for mechanisms by which oncogene translocations and minisatellite sequences are generated. Images PMID:1969618

  3. Progressive squamous epithelial neoplasia in K14-human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M; Münger, K; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1994-01-01

    To model human papillomavirus-induced neoplastic progression, expression of the early region of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was targeted to the basal cells of the squamous epithelium in transgenic mice, using a human keratin 14 (K14) enhancer/promoter. Twenty-one transgenic founder mice were produced, and eight lines carrying either wild-type or mutant HPV16 early regions that did not express the E1 or E2 genes were established. As is characteristic of human cancers, the E6 and E7 genes remained intact in these mutants. The absence of E1 or E2 function did not influence the severity of the phenotype that eventually developed in the transgenic mice. Hyperplasia, papillomatosis, and dysplasia appeared at multiple epidermal and squamous mucosal sites, including ear and truncal skin, face, snout and eyelids, and anus. The ears were the most consistently affected site, with pathology being present in all lines with 100% penetrance. This phenotype also progressed through discernible stages. An initial mild hyperplasia was followed by hyperplasia, which further progressed to dysplasia and papillomatosis. During histopathological progression, there was an incremental increase in cellular DNA synthesis, determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, and a profound perturbation in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, as revealed by immunohistochemistry to K5, K14, and K10 and filaggrin. These K14-HPV16 transgenic mice present an opportunity to study the role of the HPV16 oncogenes in the neoplastic progression of squamous epithelium and provide a model with which to identify genetic and epigenetic factors necessary for carcinogenesis. Images PMID:7515971

  4. Comparison of liver oncogenic potential among human RAS isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook In; Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Kim, Dae Yeong; Cho, Kyung Joo; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Calvisi, Diego F.; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in one of three RAS genes (i.e., HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) leading to constitutive activation of RAS signaling pathways is considered a key oncogenic event in human carcinogenesis. Whether activated RAS isoforms possess different oncogenic potentials remains an unresolved question. Here, we compared oncogenic properties among RAS isoforms using liver-specific transgenesis in mice. Hydrodynamic transfection was performed using transposons expressing short hairpin RNA downregulating p53 and an activated RAS isoform, and livers were harvested at 23 days after gene delivery. No differences were found in the hepatocarcinogenic potential among RAS isoforms, as determined by both gross examination of livers and liver weight per body weight ratio (LW/BW) of mice expressing HRASQ61L, KRAS4BG12V and NRASQ61K. However, the tumorigenic potential differed significantly between KRAS splicing variants. The LW/BW ratio in KRAS4AG12V mice was significantly lower than in KRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.001), and KRAS4AG12V mice lived significantly longer than KRRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.0001). Notably, tumors from KRAS4AG12V mice displayed higher expression of the p16INK4A tumor suppressor when compared with KRAS4BG12V tumors. Forced overexpression of p16INK4A significantly reduced tumor growth in KRAS4BG12V mice, suggesting that upregulation of p16INK4A by KRAS4AG12V presumably delays tumor development driven by the latter oncogene. PMID:26799184

  5. A risk for non-sexual transmission of human papillomavirus?

    PubMed

    Ryndock, Eric J; Meyers, Craig

    2014-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are estimated to be the most common sexually transmitted virus in humans. The virus is of great interest as it is the etiological agent of cervical cancer. Sexual transmission of HPV is generally accepted, however, non-sexual transmission of the virus is often debated. Here, we review the evidence from basic research and clinical studies that show HPV can survive well outside of its host to potentially be transmitted by non-sexual means. In doing so, we hope to discover problems in current prevention practices and show a need for better disinfectants to combat the spread of HPV. PMID:25199987

  6. Associations of health behaviors with human papillomavirus vaccine uptake, completion, and intentions among female undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Winger, Joseph G; Christy, Shannon M; Mosher, Catherine E

    2016-09-01

    This study explored associations between health behaviors and human papillomavirus vaccine receipt/intentions among female undergraduates. Participants (N = 286) completed a survey assessing human papillomavirus vaccine uptake (receiving 1-3 shots vs no shots), completion (receiving 3 shots vs 1-2 shots), and intentions as well as various health behaviors. Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake and completion were associated with receipt of other preventive medical care; completion was associated with having a regular healthcare provider. Among unvaccinated students (n = 115), increased human papillomavirus vaccine intentions were associated with flu shot and human immunodeficiency virus test receipt. Findings suggest promoting human papillomavirus vaccination with other preventive medical care might improve vaccine receipt. PMID:25649428

  7. The role of human cervical cancer oncogene in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR) was identified by differential display RT-PCR by screened abnormally expressed genes in cervical human cancers. The overexpressed gene is not only identified in cervical tissues, but also in various human cancers as leukemia/lymphoma, breast, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and ovarian cancer. For its special sensitivities and specificities in human breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, it is expected to be a new biomarker to replace or combine with the existing biomarkers in the diagnose. The HCCR manifests as a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, and its expression is regulated by the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, modulated by TCF/β-catenin, it also participates in induction of the c-kit proto-oncogene, in activation of PKC and telomerase activities, but the accurate biochemical mechanisms of how HCCR contributes to the malignancies is still unknown. The aim of this review is to summarize the roles of HCCR in cancer progression and the molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:26309489

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Genital Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... page. Skip Navigation U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • National Institutes of Health Temas de Salud ... RELATED GOVERNMENT SITES U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov

  9. Abnormal structure of the canine oncogene, related to the human c-yes-1 oncogene, in canine mammary tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, N; Tateyama, S; Ogawa, K; Yamaguchi, R; Kuroda, H; Yasuda, N; Shimizu, T

    1991-12-01

    Cellular oncogenes of genomic DNA in 6 canine primary mammary tumors were screened by Southern blot analysis, using 7 oncogene probes. A canine genomic oncogene related to the human c-yes-1 oncogene was detected as abnormal bands in solid carcinoma genomic DNA digested with EcoRI, HindIII, HindIII-EcoRI, or HindIII-BamHI. Comparison was made between other tumor specimens and control specimens obtained from 4 clinically normal dogs--1 mixed breed and 3 Shiba Inu dogs (the same breed as the dog from which the solid carcinoma was obtained). These abnormal bands were 0.1 to 1 kilobase shorter than the normal gene. However, digestion of genomic DNA obtained from normal WBC of this dog also produced all of the abnormal bands as observed in digested DNA from the solid carcinoma tissue. Therefore, in this dog, the genomic DNA of all somatic cells from the ontogenic stage still had the abnormal sequences related to the human c-yes-1 oncogene, and it is possible that this abnormal structure may have some role (eg, as an initiator) in tumorigenesis or the progression of this tumor. PMID:1789521

  10. Porokeratoma: A Possible Association with Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Caseiro Silverio, Patricia; Pham, Xuan-Cuong; Kaya, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratoma is a rare, relatively newly described and still unclear entity. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old male patient who presented with four well-defined, verrucous and hyperkeratotic lesions. Microscopically, one of the lesions showed acanthopapillomatosis overlying compact orthokeratosis. Prominent broad and confluent cornoid lamellae were present, with no granular layer and some dyskeratotic keratinocytes. PCR sequencing and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 in the lesion. The association of porokeratoma and HPV infection has not previously been reported. PMID:27047933

  11. Porokeratoma: A Possible Association with Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Caseiro Silverio, Patricia; Pham, Xuan-Cuong; Kaya, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratoma is a rare, relatively newly described and still unclear entity. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old male patient who presented with four well-defined, verrucous and hyperkeratotic lesions. Microscopically, one of the lesions showed acanthopapillomatosis overlying compact orthokeratosis. Prominent broad and confluent cornoid lamellae were present, with no granular layer and some dyskeratotic keratinocytes. PCR sequencing and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 in the lesion. The association of porokeratoma and HPV infection has not previously been reported. PMID:27047933

  12. The Moral Justification for a Compulsory Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Program

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Compulsory human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of young girls has been proposed as a public health intervention to reduce the threat of the disease. Such a program would entail a symbiotic relationship between scientific interests in reducing mortality and morbidity and philosophical interests in promoting morality. This proposal raises the issue of whether government should use its police powers to restrict liberty and parental autonomy for the purpose of preventing harm to young people. I reviewed the scientific literature that questions the value of a HPV vaccination. Applying a principle-based approach to moral reasoning, I concluded that compulsory HPV vaccinations can be justified on moral, scientific, and public health grounds. PMID:19197085

  13. Concomitant anal and cervical human papillomavirusV infections and intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected and uninfected women

    PubMed Central

    Hessol, Nancy A.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Minkoff, Howard; Weber, Kathleen M.; Darragh, Teresa M.; Burk, Robert D.; Strickler, Howard D.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess factors associated with concomitant anal and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in HIV-infected and at-risk women. Design A study nested within the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), a multi-center longitudinal study of HIV-1 infection in women conducted in six centers within the United States. Methods Four hundred and seventy HIV-infected and 185 HIV-uninfected WIHS participants were interviewed and examined with anal and cervical cytology testing. Exfoliated cervical and anal specimens were assessed for HPV using PCR and type-specific HPV testing. Women with abnormal cytologic results had colposcopy or anoscopy-guided biopsy of visible lesions. Logistic regression analyses were performed and odds ratios (ORs) measured the association for concomitant anal and cervical HPV infection. Results One hundred and sixty-three (42%) HIV-infected women had detectable anal and cervical HPV infection compared with 12 (8%) of the HIV-uninfected women (P <0.001). HIV-infected women were more likely to have the same human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype in the anus and cervix than HIV-uninfected women (18 vs. 3%, P <0.001). This was true for both oncogenic (9 vs. 2%, P = 0.003) and nononcogenic (12 vs. 1%, P <0.001) HPV types. In multivariable analysis, the strongest factor associated with both oncogenic and nononcogenic concomitant HPV infection was being HIV-infected (OR = 4.6 and OR = 16.9, respectively). In multivariable analysis of HIV-infected women, CD4+ cell count of less than 200 was the strongest factor associated with concomitant oncogenic (OR = 4.2) and nononcogenic (OR = 16.5) HPV infection. Conclusion HIV-infected women, particularly those women with low CD4+ cell counts, may be good candidates for HPV screening and monitoring for both cervical and anal disease PMID:23803793

  14. Effects of telomerase and viral oncogene expression on the in vitro growth of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; Mitchell, Calista J; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2002-02-01

    Senescent chondrocytes accumulate with aging in articular cartilage, a process that interferes with cartilage homeostasis and increases the risk of cartilage degeneration. We showed previously that chondrocyte telomere length declines with donor age, which suggests that the aging process is telomere dependent. From these results we hypothesized that telomerase should delay the onset of senescence in cultured chondrocytes. Population doubling limits (PDL) were determined for chondrocytes expressing telomerase. We found that telomerase alone did not extend PDL beyond controls that senesced after 25 population doublings. The human papillomavirus 16 oncogenes E6 and E7 were transduced into the same cell population to investigate this telomere-independent form of senescence further. Chondrocytes expressing E6 and E7 grew longer than the telomerase cDNA (hTERT) cells but still senesced at 55 population doublings. In contrast, chondrocytes expressing telomerase with E6 and E7 grew vigorously past 100 population doublings. We conclude that although telomerase is necessary for the indefinite extension of chondrocyte life span, telomere-independent senescence limits PDL in vitro and may play a role in the age-related accumulation of senescent chondrocytes in vivo. PMID:11818423

  15. Human papillomavirus and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, C A; McGregor, J M; Proby, C M; Breuer, J

    1999-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are increasingly recognised as important human carcinogens. The best established association with human malignancy is that of high-risk mucosal HPV types and anogenital cancer. HPV-induced transformation of anogenital epithelia has been the subject of intense research which has identified the cellular tumour suppressor gene products, p53 and pRB, as important targets for the viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 respectively. Certain HPV types are also strongly associated with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer in the inherited disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). However, in contrast with anogenital malignancy the oncogenic mechanisms of EV-HPV types remain uncertain, and there appears to be a crucial additional requirement for ultraviolet radiation. Cutaneous HPV types in the general population are predominantly associated with benign viral warts, but a role in non-melanoma skin cancer has recently been postulated. Polymerase chain reaction based HPV detection techniques have shown a high prevalence of HPV DNA, particularly in skin cancers from immunosuppressed patients and to a lesser extent in malignancies from otherwise immunocompetent individuals. No particular HPV type has yet emerged as predominant, and the role of HPV in cutaneous malignancy is unclear at present. It remains to be established whether HPV plays an active or purely a passenger role in the evolution of non-melanoma skin cancer. PMID:10474513

  16. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W S; Dick, Ian M; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  17. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    PubMed Central

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  18. In vitro and in vivo growth suppression of human papillomavirus 16-positive cervical cancer cells by CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shuai; Hua, Ling; Takahashi, Y; Narita, S; Liu, Yun-Hui; Li, Yan

    2014-08-01

    Deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes (E6 and E7) is a pivotal event for pathogenesis and progression in cervical cancer. Both viral oncogenes are therefore regarded as ideal therapeutic targets. In the hope of developing a gene-specific therapy for HPV-related cancer, we established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 E6/E7 and targeting E6, E7 transcript, transduced the CRISPR/Cas9 into cervical HPV-16-positive cell line SiHa. The results showed that CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter, as well as targeting E6 and E7 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21 protein, and consequently remarkably reduced the abilities of proliferation of cervical cancer cells in vitro. Then we inoculated subcutaneously cells into nude mice to establish the transplanted tumor animal models, and found dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9 targeting (promoter+E6+E7)-transcript. Our results may provide evidence for application of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting HR-HPV key oncogenes, as a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy. PMID:25044113

  19. Stranglehold on the spindle assembly checkpoint: the human papillomavirus E2 protein provokes BUBR1-dependent aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chye Ling; Teissier, Sébastien; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Quek, Ling Shih; Bellanger, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein, which inhibits the E6 and E7 viral oncogenes, is believed to have anti-oncogenic properties. Here, we challenge this view and show that HPV-18 E2 over-activates the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) and induces DNA breaks in mitosis followed by aneuploidy. This phenotype is associated with interaction of E2 with the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) proteins Cdc20, MAD2 and BUBR1. While BUBR1 silencing rescues the mitotic phenotype induced by E2, p53 silencing or presence of E6/E7 (inactivating p53 and increasing BUBR1 levels respectively) both amplify it. This work pinpoints E2 as a key protein in the initiation of HPV-induced cervical cancer and identifies the SAC as a target for oncogenic pathogens. Moreover, our results suggest a role of p53 in regulating the mitotic process itself and highlight SAC over-activation in a p53-negative context as a highly pathogenic event. PMID:25789401

  20. Stranglehold on the spindle assembly checkpoint: the human papillomavirus E2 protein provokes BUBR1-dependent aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chye Ling; Teissier, Sébastien; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Quek, Ling Shih; Bellanger, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein, which inhibits the E6 and E7 viral oncogenes, is believed to have anti-oncogenic properties. Here, we challenge this view and show that HPV-18 E2 over-activates the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) and induces DNA breaks in mitosis followed by aneuploidy. This phenotype is associated with interaction of E2 with the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) proteins Cdc20, MAD2 and BUBR1. While BUBR1 silencing rescues the mitotic phenotype induced by E2, p53 silencing or presence of E6/E7 (inactivating p53 and increasing BUBR1 levels respectively) both amplify it. This work pinpoints E2 as a key protein in the initiation of HPV-induced cervical cancer and identifies the SAC as a target for oncogenic pathogens. Moreover, our results suggest a role of p53 in regulating the mitotic process itself and highlight SAC over-activation in a p53-negative context as a highly pathogenic event. PMID:25789401

  1. Human papillomavirus in the HIV-infected host: epidemiology and pathogenesis in the antiretroviral era.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Cristina; Palefsky, Joel M

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with essentially all cervical cancers, 80-90 % of anal cancers, and a high proportion of oropharyngeal, vaginal, penile, and vulvar cancers. Malignancy is preceded by the development of precancerous lesions termed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk of HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of anal cancer in particular has markedly risen during the antiretroviral era due to the increased longevity of patients with HIV and the absence of anal malignancy screening programs. HIV infection may facilitate initial HPV infection by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions. Once infection is established, HIV may promote HSIL development via the up-regulation of HPV oncogene expression and impairment of the immune response needed to clear the lesion. HIV-infected women should be screened for cervical HSIL and cancer, and HIV-infected men and women should be considered for anal screening programs. PMID:25644977

  2. Deregulation of the miRNAs Expression in Cervical Cancer: Human Papillomavirus Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gariglio, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non coding RNAs of 18–25 nucleotides in length. The temporal or short-lived expression of the miRNAs modulates gene expression post transcriptionally. Studies have revealed that miRNAs deregulation correlates and is involved with the initiation and progression of human tumors. Cervical cancer (CC) displays notably increased or decreased expression of a large number of cellular oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs, respectively. However, understanding the potential role of miRNAs in CC is still limited. In CC, the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) infection can affect the miRNAs expression through oncoprotein E6 and E7 that contribute to viral pathogenesis, although other viral proteins might also be involved. This deregulation in the miRNAs expression has an important role in the hallmarks of CC. Interestingly, the miRNA expression profile in CC can discriminate between normal and tumor tissue and the extraordinary stability of miRNAs makes it suitable to serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of cancer. In this review, we will summarize the role of the HR-HPVs in miRNA expression, the role of miRNAs in the hallmarks of CC, and the use of miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in CC. PMID:24490161

  3. Transcriptional regulation of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation by human papillomavirus 16 oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Eszter; Szalmás, Anita; Ferenczi, Annamária; Póliska, Szilárd; Kónya, József; Veress, György

    2015-02-01

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is strictly linked to the differentiation of their natural host cells. The HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins can delay the normal differentiation program of keratinocytes; however, the exact mechanisms responsible for this have not yet been identified. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of HPV16 oncoproteins on the expression of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Primary human keratinocytes transduced by LXSN (control) retroviruses or virus vectors expressing HPV16 E6, E7 or E6/E7 genes were subjected to gene expression profiling. The results of microarray analysis showed that HPV 16 E6 and E7 have the capacity to downregulate the expression of several genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays were performed to confirm the microarray data. To investigate the effects of the HPV oncoproteins on the promoters of selected keratinocyte differentiation genes, luciferase reporter assays were performed. Our results suggest that the HPV 16 E6 and/or E7 oncogenes are able to downregulate the expression of several genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation (such as desmocollin 1, keratin 4, S100 calcium-binding protein A8 and small proline-rich protein 1A), at least partially by downregulating their promoter activity. This activity of the HPV oncoproteins may have a role in the productive virus life cycle, and also in virus-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25488293

  4. Rat embryo fibroblast cells expressing human papillomavirus 1a genes exhibit altered growth properties and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Loewenstein, P M

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 1a (HPV1a) induces benign tumors (papillomas or warts) in humans under natural conditions of infection but has not been found to replicate significantly in cell culture or in experimental animals. To establish model systems to study the oncogenic properties and expression of HPV genes, we established cell lines by cotransfecting the 3Y1 rat fibroblast cell line with HPV1a DNA constructs containing an intact early gene region and the Tn5 neomycin resistance gene. Most cell lines selected for expression of the neomycin resistance gene by treatment with the antibiotic G-418 contained viral DNA in a high-molecular-weight form. The growth characteristics of several cell lines containing high copy numbers of HPV1a DNA were studied further. They were shown to differ from the parental cell line and from G-418-resistant cell lines that did not incorporate viral DNA in the following properties: morphological alteration, increased cell density at confluence, growth in 0.5% serum, efficient anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and rapid formation of tumors in nude mice. Those cell lines that possessed altered growth properties and tumorigenicity were found to express abundant quantities of polyadenylated virus-specific RNA species in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3023676

  5. Requirement for Estrogen Receptor Alpha in a Mouse Model for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Wiedmeyer, Kerri; Shai, Anny; Korach, Kenneth S.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. Upon prolonged treatment with physiological levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of tumors in this mouse model. In the current study we investigated whether estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is required for the development of cervical cancer in K14E7 transgenic mice. We demonstrate that exogenous estrogen fails to promote either dysplasia or cervical cancer in K14E7/ERα−/− mice despite the continued presence of the presumed cervical cancer precursor cell type, reserve cells, and evidence for E7 expression therein. We also observed that cervical cancers in our mouse models are strictly associated with atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM), which is believed to be the precursor for cervical cancer in women. Consistently, E7 and exogenous estrogen failed to promote ASM in the absence of ERα. We conclude that ERα plays a crucial role at an early stage of cervical carcinogenesis in this mouse model. PMID:19047174

  6. Human papillomavirus vaccine: A boon or curse

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sumit; Singh, Inderjeet; Jain, Rambilas; Mehta, Bharti; Kumari, Sneh; Sahoo, Soumya Swaroop

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with about 493,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Of 274,000 deaths due to cervical cancer each year, more than 80% occur in developing countries, and this proportion is expected to increase to 90% by 2020. Up to 70% of sexually active women will become infected with human papilloma virus (HPV) during their lifetime. Even though screening reduces the risk of cervical cancer, it does not prevent HPV infection or development of precancerous lesions which need careful follow-up and often need excision. It was observed in a study, pre-adolescent vaccination alone reduced cancer incidence by 44% and was more effective than screening alone. A combined approach of pre-adolescent vaccination and screening of adult women was more effective than either alone. The high probability of acquiring HPV infection once, one has become sexually active raises the question of whether the vaccine will be effective if given to girls who have already been infected with HPV type 16 or 18. In April 2010, The Indian parliament's Standing Committee on Health, began probing the use of HPV vaccines in 2 states after the reported deaths of 7 girls, and concluded that “safety and rights of children were highly compromised and violated.” Though the question of immunization of older girls and women deserves attention, from a public health perspective, the first priority in resource-poor settings would be to vaccinate young adolescent girls. PMID:25668662

  7. Novel Functions of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Galloway, Denise A

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the epidermis as well as mucous membranes of humans. They are the causative agents of anogenital tract and some oropharyngeal cancers. Infections begin in the basal epithelia, where the viral genome replicates slowly along with its host cell. As infected cells begin to differentiate and progress toward the periphery, the virus drives proliferation in cells that would otherwise be quiescent. To uncouple differentiation from continued cellular propagation, HPVs express two oncoproteins, HPV E6 and E7. This review focuses on high-risk α-HPV E6, which in addition to supporting viral replication has transforming properties. HPV E6 promotes p53 degradation and activates telomerase, but the multifaceted oncoprotein has numerous other functions that are highlighted here. PMID:26958922

  8. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-02-20

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition.

  9. Human papillomavirus tumor infection in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ludmir, Ethan B.; Stephens, Sarah J.; Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been recognized for over three decades. Recently, multiple meta-analyses have drawn upon existing literature to assess the strength of the HPV-ESCC linkage. Here, we review these analyses and attempt to provide a clinically-relevant overview of HPV infection in ESCC. HPV-ESCC detection rates are highly variable across studies. Geographic location likely accounts for a majority of the variation in HPV prevalence, with high-incidence regions including Asia reporting significantly higher HPV-ESCC infection rates compared with low-incidence regions such as Europe, North America, and Oceania. Based on our examination of existing data, the current literature does not support the notion that HPV is a prominent carcinogen in ESCC. We conclude that there is no basis to change the current clinical approach to ESCC patients with respect to tumor HPV status. PMID:26029456

  10. Progress and prospects for L2-based human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rosie T; Schellenbacher, Christina; Chackerian, Bryce; Roden, Richard B S

    2016-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a worldwide public health problem, particularly in resource-limited countries. Fifteen high-risk genital HPV types are sexually transmitted and cause 5% of all cancers worldwide, primarily cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Skin HPV types are generally associated with benign disease, but a subset is linked to non-melanoma skin cancer. Licensed HPV vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from L1 major capsid antigen of key high risk HPVs are effective at preventing these infections but do not cover cutaneous types and are not therapeutic. Vaccines targeting L2 minor capsid antigen, some using capsid display, adjuvant and fusions with early HPV antigens or Toll-like receptor agonists, are in development to fill these gaps. Progress and challenges with L2-based vaccines are summarized. PMID:26901354

  11. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells. PMID:24800179

  12. Human papillomavirus vaccine trials and tribulations: Vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Handler, Nancy S; Handler, Marc Z; Majewski, Slawomir; Schwartz, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    As of December 2014, there were 3 approved vaccines for human papillomavirus (HPV): bivalent Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, New York, NY), quadrivalent Gardasil (Merck and Co, Kenilworth, NJ), and 9-valent Gardasil-9 (Merck and Co). The average cost per dose is $120, with a recommended 3-dose course. The quadrivalent vaccine is the most widely administered worldwide. As with the bivalent and 9-valent vaccines, the vaccine is considered safe, although concerns have been raised. In addition to immunization against the targeted HPV types, there is evidence that there is cross protection against other types of HPV. This continuing medical education review evaluates the differences in vaccines that are currently on the market; part II focuses on the cost-effectiveness of vaccination, the HPV vaccination programs currently instituted around the globe, efficacy, and safety. PMID:26475535

  13. Human papillomavirus status in extragenital nonmelanoma skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Drvar, Daniela Ledic; Lipozenčić, Jasna; Sabol, Ivan; Mokos, Zrinka Bukvic; Ilic, Ivana; Grce, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    About 5% of all cancers worldwide can be attributed to human papillomaviruses (HPVs); namely, six sites are strongly associated with HPV infections: cervix, penis, vulva, vagina, anus, and oropharynx. Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common malignancies in Caucasians. In fact, there is an intense connection between sunlight exposure, fair skin, HPV, and development of NMSC. We have conducted a pilot study that included tissue samples from 26 carcinoma patients, of which there were 13 BCC and 13 SCC. HPV detection and typing was done with DNA amplification and sequencing, respectively. In total, 23.1% of SCC samples (3/13) and 7.7% of BCC samples (1/13) were positive for HPV DNA. The importance of understanding all aspects of NMSC carcinogenesis may be to reveal novel therapeutic options or preventive measures for HPV containing NMSC patients. PMID:24559560

  14. Optical detection of nanoparticle-enhanced human papillomavirus genotyping microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue Zhe; Kim, Sookyung; Cho, Wonhyung; Lee, Seung-Yop

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we propose a new detection method of nanoparticle-enhanced human papillomavirus genotyping microarrays using a DVD optical pick-up with a photodiode. The HPV genotyping DNA chip was labeled using Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, prepared on a treatment glass substrate. Then, the bio information of the HPV genotyping target DNA was detected by measuring the difference of the optical signals between the DNA spots and the background parts for cervical cancer diagnosis. Moreover the approximate linear relationship between the concentration of the HPV genotyping target DNA and the optical signal depending on the density of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles was obtained by performing a spot finding algorithm. It is shown that the nanoparticle-labeled HPV genotyping target DNA can be measured and quantified by collecting the low-cost photodiode signal on the treatment glass chip, replacing high-cost fluorescence microarray scanners using a photomultiplier tube. PMID:23413051

  15. Recent advances in managing human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Stefano; Colombo, Sarah; Pompilio, Madia; Formillo, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is detected in a subset of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, most frequently in tumors in the Waldeyer's ring (palatine tonsil and base of tongue). Several studies suggest that patients with HPV-positive tumors have better survival with either concurrent chemoradiation therapy or surgery followed by radiation compared with HPV-negative patients. However, some possible confounding clinicopathologic variables may challenge the validity of this statement, for example, some authors used the TNM (tumor, node, metastasis) grouping stage while others used the primary tumor (T stage), and other studies have demonstrated that tumors with advanced T stage were less likely to be infected with HPV. A large clinical trial with stratification of patients according to all known tumor prognostic factors is crucial to solve the question. PMID:20948869

  16. Overview: Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Prakrankamanant, Preeda; Wongsena, Metee

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually-transmitted virus and it is known that persistent infection by high-risk HPV is a necessary factor for cervical carcinogenesis. Although cytological screening has decreased the incidence of cervical cancer, the sensitivity and specificity of testing is limited. To date, HPV-driven molecular techniques have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in clinical management. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancers leading to non-surgical therapy. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression of cervical cancer. PMID:26817243

  17. Malakoplakia of the esophagus caused by human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Li; Xie, Yu-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Jing; Sun, Tao; Tang, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare granulomatous disease probably caused by infection and characterized histologically by Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. We report a more rarely seen case esophageal malakoplakia in a 54-year-old woman. She presented with coughing while eating and drinking. Gastroscopy showed yellow nodules in the esophagus, and endoscopic ultrasonography showed a space-occupying lesion in the substratum of the esophageal mucosa. All findings highly resembled esophageal cancer. Histopathological examination finally indentified this space-occupying lesion as malakoplakia and not cancer. Immunohistochemistry showed that she had human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the esophagus, which indicates that infection was responsible for the malakoplakia. This is believed to be the first case of malakoplakia in the esophagus, and more importantly, we established that HPV infection was the initiator of esophageal malakoplakia. PMID:23236248

  18. Social representations of human papillomavirus in Bogotá, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Carolina; Acosta, Jesús; Díaz Del Castillo, Adriana; Tovar, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Identifying DNA of Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been proposed as a new screening method for cervical cancer control. Conventionally, health education for screening programs is based on scientific information without considering any community cognitive processes. We examine HPV social representations of 124 men and women from diverse educational status living in Bogotá, Colombia. The social representation of HPV involves a series of figurative nuclei derived from meanings linked to scientific information. While women focused on symbols associated to contagion, men focused on its venereal character. Figurative nuclei also included long-term uncertainty, need or urgent treatment, and feelings of imminent death associated with cancer and chronic sexually transmitted infections. The social representation of HPV impeded many participants from clearly understanding written information about HPV transmission, clearance, and cancer risk; they are built into a framework of values, which must be deconstructed to allow women full participation in HPV screening programs. PMID:22288472

  19. Young Hispanic Men and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Choices.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tami L; Stephens, Dionne P; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Higgins, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    This exploratory descriptive study examined perceived vulnerabilities to human papillomavirus (HPV) and the correlation to factors influencing vaccine beliefs and vaccine decision making in young Hispanic males attending a large public urban university. Only 24% of participants believed that the HPV vaccine could prevent future problems, and 53% said they would not be vaccinated. The best predictors of HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men were agreement with doctor recommendations and belief in the vaccine's efficacy. Machismo cultural norms influence young Hispanic men's HPV-related decision making, their perceptions of the vaccine, and how they attitudinally act on what little HPV information they have access to. This study provides culturally relevant information for the development of targeted health education strategies aimed at increasing HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men. PMID:24841473

  20. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination. PMID:20484987

  1. Human papillomavirus as a target for management, prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Kitchener, Henry C

    2012-01-01

    The discovery that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary causal factor in cervical carcinogenesis has made it a target for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, as well as a diagnostic tool in cervical screening. Whilst prophylactic vaccination has proven very effective in terms of preventing cervical cancer precursor lesions, therapeutic strategies have presented far greater challenges. HPV testing has shown itself to be extremely valuable in the triage of low grade cytological abnormalities, test of cure following treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and will, over the next 10 years, gradually replace cytology as the mainstay of primary cervical screening. In this review, the latest evidence supporting HPV as both a biomarker of risk for cervical cancer and a target for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination is presented. PMID:22690976

  2. Molecular analysis of human papillomavirus in never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ISA, SHUN-ICHI; KURAHARA, YU; YAMAMOTO, SATOMI; TAMIYA, AKIHIRO; OMACHI, NAOKI; ASAMI, KAZUHIRO; OKISHIO, KYOICHI; UTSUMI, TOMOKI; ITO, NORIMASA; YOON, HYUNG-EUN; MATSUMURA, AKIHIDE; ATAGI, SHINJI; KAWAGUCHI, TOMOYA

    2015-01-01

    The causes of lung cancer in never-smokers remain unclear. The potential contribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) to the carcinogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been reported. In 2008, a prospective registry of never-smokers with NSCLC was established at the Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, Sakai, Osaka, Japan. Never-smokers with NSCLC were consecutively enrolled onto the registry. Of these patients, 114 with large tumor specimens, the majority of which were surgical tissues, were selected. In total, 23 of the most clinically relevant HPV types were assayed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of the viral genome. Following exclusion of samples with suboptimal quality, DNA was extracted from 96 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. These 96 cases consisted of 82 females (85.4%) and 14 males (14.6%), with a median age of 67 years (range, 29–83). Almost all cases (93.8%) were of the adenocarcinoma histological subtype. Despite confirmation of the quality and amount of DNA, HPV type 6 was detected in only one case (1.1%). Furthermore, no other samples examined were positive for any other HPV types. The results therefore suggest that HPV does not play a major role as the driving oncogenic event in never-smokers with NSCLC. PMID:25621070

  3. YY1 represses human papillomavirus type 16 transcription by quenching AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, M J; Tan, S H; Tan, C H; Bernard, H U

    1996-01-01

    YY1 is a multifunctional transcription factor that has been shown to regulate the expression of a number of cellular and viral genes, including the human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7. In this study, we have analyzed the YY1-mediated repression of the HPV type 16 (HPV-16) E6-E7 promoter. A systematic analysis to identify YY1 sites present in the HPV-16 long control region showed that of 30 potential YY1 binding motifs, 24 bound purified recombinant YY1 protein, but only 10 of these were able to bind YY1 when nuclear extracts of HeLa cells were used. Of these, only a cluster of five sites, located in the vicinity of an AP-1 motif, were found to be responsible for repressing the HPV-16 P97 promoter. All five sites were required for repression, the mutation of any one site giving rise to a four- to sixfold increase in transcriptional activity. The target for YY1-mediated repression was identified as being a highly conserved AP-1 site, and we propose that AP-1 may represent a common target for YY1 repression. We also provide data demonstrating that YY1 can bind the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein and propose a potentially novel mechanism by which YY1 represses AP-1 activity as a result of this YY1-CREB-binding protein interaction. PMID:8794287

  4. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ‘HPV’, ‘cervical’, ‘CIN’, ‘polymorphism(s)’, ‘cervical’+ *the name of the gene* and ‘HPV’+ *the name of the gene*. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals. PMID:22345983

  5. Hypermutation in the E2 gene of human papillomavirus type 16 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kukimoto, Iwao; Mori, Seiichiro; Aoyama, Satoru; Wakae, Kousho; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kondo, Kazunari

    2015-10-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer. However, viral genetic changes during cervical carcinogenesis are not fully understood. Recent studies have revealed the presence of adenine/thymine-clustered hypermutation in the long control region of the HPV16 genome in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions, and suggested that apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) proteins, which play a key role in innate immunity against retroviral infection, potentially introduce such hypermutation. This study reports for the first time the detection of adenine/thymine-clustered hypermutation in the E2 gene of HPV16 isolated from clinical specimens with low- and high-grade CIN lesions (CIN1/3). Differential DNA denaturation PCR, which utilizes lower denaturation temperatures to selectively amplify adenine/thymine-rich DNA, identified clusters of adenine/thymine mutations in the E2 gene in 4 of 11 CIN1 (36.4%), and 6 of 27 CIN3 (22.2%) samples. Interestingly, the number of mutations per sample was higher in CIN3 than in CIN1. Although the relevance of E2 hypermutation in cervical carcinogenesis remains unclear, the observed hypermutation patterns strongly imply involvement of APOBEC3 proteins in editing the HPV16 genome during natural viral infection. PMID:25914233

  6. Transcriptional Repression of E-Cadherin by Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, Zarina J.; Jolly, Carol; Androphy, Elliot J.; Mercer, Andrew; Matthews, Charles M.; Hibma, Merilyn H.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence supporting DNA virus regulation of the cell adhesion and tumour suppressor protein, E-cadherin. We previously reported that loss of E-cadherin in human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16-infected epidermis is contributed to by the major viral proto-oncogene E6 and is associated with reduced Langerhans cells density, potentially regulating the immune response. The focus of this study is determining how the HPV16 E6 protein mediates E-cadherin repression. We found that the E-cadherin promoter is repressed in cells expressing E6, resulting in fewer E-cadherin transcripts. On exploring the mechanism for this, repression by increased histone deacetylase activity or by increased binding of trans-repressors to the E-cadherin promoter Epal element was discounted. In contrast, DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity was increased in E6 expressing cells. Upon inhibiting DNMT activity using 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine, E-cadherin transcription was restored in the presence of HPV16 E6. The E-cadherin promoter was not directly methylated, however a mutational analysis showed general promoter repression and reduced binding of the transactivators Sp1 and AML1 and the repressor Slug. Expression of E7 with E6 resulted in a further reduction in surface E-cadherin levels. This is the first report of HPV16 E6-mediated transcriptional repression of this adhesion molecule and tumour suppressor protein. PMID:23189137

  7. A Low Density Microarray Method for the Identification of Human Papillomavirus Type 18 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Williams, John; Rodríguez-Estrada, Rocío B.; García-Bravo, Aracely; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; López-Monteon, Aracely; Zepeda, Rossana C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel microarray based-method for the screening of oncogenic human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18) molecular variants. Due to the fact that sequencing methodology may underestimate samples containing more than one variant we designed a specific and sensitive stacking DNA hybridization assay. This technology can be used to discriminate between three possible phylogenetic branches of HPV-18. Probes were attached covalently on glass slides and hybridized with single-stranded DNA targets. Prior to hybridization with the probes, the target strands were pre-annealed with the three auxiliary contiguous oligonucleotides flanking the target sequences. Screening HPV-18 positive cell lines and cervical samples were used to evaluate the performance of this HPV DNA microarray. Our results demonstrate that the HPV-18's variants hybridized specifically to probes, with no detection of unspecific signals. Specific probes successfully reveal detectable point mutations in these variants. The present DNA oligoarray system can be used as a reliable, sensitive and specific method for HPV-18 variant screening. Furthermore, this simple assay allows the use of inexpensive equipment, making it accessible in resource-poor settings. PMID:24077317

  8. Epidemiologic Approaches to Evaluating the Potential for Human Papillomavirus Type Replacement Postvaccination

    PubMed Central

    Tota, Joseph E.; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V.; Jiang, Mengzhu; Dillner, Joakim; Walter, Stephen D.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Coutlée, François; Villa, Luisa L.; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, 2 vaccines exist that prevent infection by the genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide. Although vaccination is expected to reduce the prevalence of these HPV types, there is concern about the effect this could have on the distribution of other oncogenic types. According to basic ecological principles, if competition exists between ≥2 different HPV types for niche occupation during natural infection, elimination of 1 type may lead to an increase in other type(s). Here, we discuss this issue of “type replacement” and present different epidemiologic approaches for evaluation of HPV type competition. Briefly, these approaches involve: 1) calculation of the expected frequency of coinfection under independence between HPV types for comparison with observed frequency; 2) construction of hierarchical logistic regression models for each vaccine-targeted type; and 3) construction of Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox models to evaluate sequential acquisition and clearance of HPV types according to baseline HPV status. We also discuss a related issue concerning diagnostic artifacts arising when multiple HPV types are present in specific samples (due to the inability of broad-spectrum assays to detect certain types present in lower concentrations). This may result in an apparent increase in previously undetected types postvaccination. PMID:23660798

  9. Activation of miR-9 by human papillomavirus in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Schwarz, Julie K.; Chen, Jason J.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, leading to about 300,000 deaths each year. Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, persistent transcriptional activity of HPV oncogenes, which indicates active roles of HPV in cervical cancer maintenance and progression, has not been well characterized. Using our recently developed assays for comprehensive profiling of HPV E6/E7 transcripts, we have detected transcriptional activities of 10 high-risk HPV strains from 87 of the 101 cervical tumors included in the analysis. These HPV-positive patients had significantly better survival outcome compared with HPV-negative patients, indicating HPV transcriptional activity as a favorable prognostic marker for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we have determined microRNA (miRNA) expression changes that were correlated with tumor HPV status. Our profiling and functional analyses identified miR-9 as the most activated miRNA by HPV E6 in a p53-independent manner. Further target validation and functional studies showed that HPV-induced miR-9 activation led to significantly increased cell motility by downregulating multiple gene targets involved in cell migration. Thus, our work helps to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as identify potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer and other HPV-induced cancers. PMID:25344913

  10. Incidence and clinical management of oral human papillomavirus infection in men: a series of key short messages.

    PubMed

    Videla, Sebastián; Darwich, Laila; Cañadas, MariPaz; Clotet, Bonaventura; Sirera, Guillem

    2014-08-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are less prevalent than genital and anal infections. However, the incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas has increased significantly over the last 2 decades in several countries. At least 90% of these cancers are associated with oncogenic type HPV16. Oral HPV infections are notably more frequent in men than in women, and the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas has increased, predominantly among mid-adult men. Nevertheless, little is known about the progression of oral HPV infection to cancer, and it remains unclear which medical interventions should be applied to modify the natural history of the disease. This narrative review aimed at non-experts in HPV infection provides an update on oral HPV infection and its clinical management in men. Furthermore, using the cervix as a reference anatomical site, the lessons learned from investigations on cervical HPV infection are also addressed. PMID:24865412

  11. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know [Gardasil®-9

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil-9 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil-9.html . CDC review information for HPV ...

  12. Home-Based or Clinic-Based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2/3; Health Status Unknown; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Low Grade Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

  13. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  14. Laboratory production in vivo of infectious human papillomavirus type 11

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Leure-Dupree, A.E.; Zaino, R.J.; Weber, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) induce among patients natural lesions which produce small amounts of virus. Infection of human cell cultures does not lead to the multiplication of virus, which also does not replicate in experimental animals. The authors have developed a unique system for the laboratory production of HPV type 11 (HPV-11). Fragments of human neonatal foreskin were infected with an extract of naturally occurring human vulvar condylomata and grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Later (3 to 5 months), condylomatous cysts developed from those grafts. Nuclei of koilocytotic cells contained large amounts of capsid antigen and intranuclear virions. The experimentally induced condylomata were homogenized, and the virions were extracted and used to infect another generation of human foreskin grafts in athymic mice. The HPV-11 DNA content and infectivity of the natural and experimental condylomata were similar. Extracts of experimental condylomata were subjected to differential ultracentrifugation and sedimentation in CsCl density gradients. A single, opalescent band was visible at a density of 1.34 g/ml. It contained HPV virions with HPV-11 DNA. This report is the first demonstration of the laboratory production of an HPV.

  15. GENES FOR TUMOR MARKERS ARE CLUSTERED WITH CELLULAR PROTO-ONCOGENES ON HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative mapping positions of genes for polypeptides expressed abnormally in tumors (tumor markers) and cellular proto-oncogenes were analyzed and a remarkable degree of co-mapping of tumor marker genes with oncogenes in the human karyotype were found. It is proposed that abe...

  16. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  17. Use of human papillomavirus vaccine in HIV-infected men for the prevention of anal dysplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There are two commercially available vaccines licensed worldwide for the prevention of cervical cancer and other human papillomavirus-associated cancers such as anal cancer. However, only two countries have implemented healthcare programs that include human papillomavirus vaccination for boys and men. Although most of the human papillomavirus-related cancers in the world are attributable to cervical cancer, in developed countries anal cancer accounts for a larger proportion of human papillomavirus-related cancers. Most cases of anal cancer occur in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. In this review, we discuss the burden of human papillomavirus-related cancers in men, the most plausible immune mechanism associated with the high efficacy of the human papillomavirus vaccine, and address key issues of vaccination for HIV-infected men. Finally, we review cost-effectiveness considerations for the use of the vaccine in boys and recent guidelines for vaccination in boys, with attention to HIV-infected men. PMID:24818632

  18. Human papillomavirus alters microRNA profiles in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Abigail I.; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Wells, Susanne I.; Ferris, Robert L.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) positive cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) have a much better disease outcome compared to SCCHN cases lacking HPVs. Differences in microRNA (miRNA) expression may affect their clinical outcomes. Methods miRNA expression was studied using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR in HPV-16 positive and HPV-negative SCCHN cell lines. The role of HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes in altering miRNA expression was investigated using human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). Results MiRNAs miR-363, miR-33 and miR-497 were upregulated while miR-155, miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-29a, miR-218, miR-222, miR-221 and miR-142-5p were downregulated in HPV-positive cells compared to both HPV-negative SCCHN and normal oral keratinocytes. HPV-16 E6 oncogene altered miRNA expression in HFKs and in an HPV-16 positive cell line with E6 knockdown using siRNA. Conclusions MiRNAs differentially expressed in the presence of HPV-16 may provide biomarkers for SCCHN and identify cellular pathways targeted by this virus. PMID:20652977

  19. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Gennaro; Corteggio, Annunziata; Pacini, Laura; Conte, Andrea; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Tommasino, Massimo; Accardi, Rosita; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. PMID:27236740

  20. Epidemiology of mucosal human papillomavirus infection and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Helen; Burchell, Ann N

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the epidemiology of mucosal human papillomavirs (HPV) in adults and children, its mode of transmission and its associated diseases. Over 40 genotypes of HPV infect the epithelial lining of the anogenital tract and other mucosal areas of the body. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection globally, with high prevalences found in both females and males. The predominant route of transmission is via sexual contact, although mother-to-child transmission is also possible. HPV infection may exist asymptomatically or may induce the formation of benign or malignant tumours in the genital, oral or conjunctival mucosa. Although most infections clear spontaneously, those that persist result in substantial morbidity and invoke high costs associated with the treatment of clinically relevant lesions. Some 13-18 mucosal HPV types are considered to have high oncogenic potential. HPV is recognized unequivocally as the main causal factor for cervical cancer, and is further responsible for a substantial proportion of many other anogenital neoplasms and head and neck cancers. Infections with HPV types that have low oncogenic risk, such as HPV-6 and 11, are associated with benign lesions of the anogenital areas known as condylomata acuminata (genital warts), oral papillomas, conjunctival papillomas, as well as low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions of the cervix. Perinatally acquired HPV can also cause recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in infants and young children. The implementation of HPV vaccination therefore has the potential to prevent a substantial proportion of HPV-related disease in the future. PMID:19684442

  1. Cancerl cells 5. Papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, B.M.; Brandsma, J.L. ); Taichman, L.B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Elements that Control the Transcription of Genital Human Papillomavirus Type 18; Human Paillomavirus Gene Expression; RNA Probes to Analyze Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression in Squamous Papilloma of the Respiratory Tract; Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 E4 Gene Products in Warts; and Underreplication of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 DNA in Cultures of Foreskin Keratinocytes.

  2. CpG methylation in human papillomavirus (HPV) type 31 long control region (LCR) in cervical infections associated with cytological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    László, Brigitta; Ferenczi, Annamária; Madar, László; Gyöngyösi, Eszter; Szalmás, Anita; Szakács, Levente; Veress, György; Kónya, József

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms that regulate papillomavirus gene expression include DNA methylation. The transcription of papillomavirus oncogenes E6 and E7 is controlled by certain regulatory elements in the LCR, which include binding sites for the E2 protein, a viral regulator of oncogene expression. In HPV-31-infected exfoliated cervical cells, the CpG methylation of the entire LCR was determined by next-generation sequencing after bisulfite modification. Six of the 22 cases had methylated CpG sites in the HPV-31 LCR, including position 7479 and/or 7485, at the promoter distal E2 binding site, thus suggesting a potential regulatory mechanism for papillomavirus transcription. PMID:27098644

  3. Oncogenic roles of carbonic anhydrase 8 in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tze-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ming; Lo, Che-Min; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Chao, Wei-Ting; Wu, Min Huan; Liu, Chin-San; Hsieh, Mingli

    2016-06-01

    Carbonic anhydrase 8 (CA8), a member of the carbonic anhydrase family, is one of the three isozymes that do not catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide due to the lack of one important histidine. In the present study, we observed increased expression of CA8 in more aggressive types of human osteosarcoma (OS) cells and found that CA8 expression is correlated with disease stages, such that more intense expression occurs in the disease late stage. We also demonstrated that overexpression of CA8 in human OS (HOS) cells significantly increased cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Downregulated CA8 sensitized cells to apoptotic stress induced by staurosporine and cisplatin, suggesting a specific role of CA8 to protect cells from stresses. In addition, downregulation of CA8 in HOS cells reduced cell invasion and colony formation ability in soft agar and further decreased matrix metalloproteinase 9 and focal adhesion kinase expression, indicating that CA8 might facilitate cancer cell invasion via the activation of FAK-MMP9 signaling. Interestingly, HOS cells with CA8 knockdown showed a significant decrease in glycolytic activity and cell death under glucose withdrawal, further indicating that CA8 may be involved in regulating aerobic glycolysis and enhancing cell viability. Knockdown of CA8 significantly decreased phosphorylated Akt expression suggesting that the oncogenic role of CA8 may be mediated by the regulation of Akt activation through p-Akt induction. Importantly, the inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose sensitized CA8 HOS-CA8-myc cells to cisplatin treatment under low glucose condition, highlighting a new therapeutic option for OS cancer. PMID:26711783

  4. [Natural history of the infection for human papillomavirus: an actualization].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gerardo González; Troconis, José Núñez

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in our understanding of the biology and natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Most papillomavirus infections are transmitted by close contact of either skin to skin or mucosa to mucosa. Sexual intercourse is not a requirement for genital HPV infection. Digital-oral infections occur and there is evidence that digital-genital and oral-genital contacts can result in the transmission of HPV, although in a relatively low percentage. Vertical transmission from mother to fetus is a common route of infection; in fact, it is recognized that more than 80% of infants born from mothers infected with genital HPV will be positive for HPV DNA determination in the nasal-pharyngeal region and oral mucosa. Women with transient infections often develop cytological abnormalities that take place while there is active HPV replication. This occurs because productive HPV infections result in cytological abnormalities in infected epithelial cells. The strong association between the risk of HPV infection and increased immune suppression, supports a direct biological effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection on the natural history of HPV. PMID:24758104

  5. Prevalence and concordance of human papillomavirus infection at multiple anatomic sites among HIV-infected women from Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Lynette J; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tommasino, Massimo; Lin, Hui-Yi; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Fisher, Kate J; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Gheit, Tarik; Ezhilarasi, Chandrasekaran; Jeeva, Arumugham; Lu, Beibei; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection at the cervix, anus and oropharynx has been rarely concurrently estimated among HIV-infected women. Using multiplex polymerase chain reaction testing, we prospectively evaluated HPV genotype distribution across three anatomic sites among 50 eligible HIV-infected women from Chennai, India, who provided biological specimens and answered a sexual behaviour questionnaire. We also assessed clinical and behavioural factors related to HPV prevalence. Oncogenic HPV prevalence was comparable between the anus and cervix at 52.2% and 52.0% and lower at the oropharynx at 13.2%; 78% of women with a cervical HPV infection had the same type in the anus. Newly acquired oncogenic HPV infections were lower at cervix (24%) than anus (35%) at three months. 'Any type' cervical HPV prevalence was higher among women with low education and less than five years since HIV diagnosis. CD4+ count and antiretroviral therapy status were not associated with HPV prevalence at the three anatomic sites; however, enrolment cervical HPV16 prevalence was elevated among women with nadir CD4+ <200 cells/µL and enrolment CD4+ <350 cells/µL. Regular cervical screening is essential in HIV-infected Indian women irrespective of CD4+ count and antiretroviral therapy status. Additional research clarifying the natural history of anal HPV infection is also needed in this population. PMID:26002318

  6. Prevalence of and risk factors for anal human papillomavirus in men having sex with women: A cross–national study

    PubMed Central

    Nyitray, Alan G.; Smith, Dan’elle; Villa, Luisa; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    Background While the primary cause of anal cancer is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the anal canal, little attention has been paid to the epidemiology of anal HPV in men having sex with women (MSW). Methods Anal canal exfoliated cells from 903 MSW in Brazil (São Paulo), Mexico (Cuernavaca) and the United States (Tampa) were tested for HPV DNA. Results HPV prevalence in the anal canal (12.0%) was similar in MSW in each city (P=0.77) while 7.0% had oncogenic types. Men in Tampa had a four–fold higher prevalence of HPV 16 than men in São Paulo or Cuernavaca (P<0.001). Duration of relationship with a primary sex partner and ever having oral or anal sex with a man was associated with any HPV type and any oncogenic type while lifetime number of female sex partners was associated with any HPV type. Conclusions Anal canal HPV is commonly found in MSW and the prevalence of HPV 16 may differ substantially by geography. Men with a larger number of female sex partners, in a sexual relationship of <1 year duration, and with a history of oral or anal sex with men were most likely to have an anal HPV infection. PMID:20367457

  7. Association between Toll-like Receptors expression and Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Ibrahim I.; Scott, Mark E.; Ma, Yifei; Shiboski, Stephen; Farhat, Sepideh; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in mucosal immune control of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection remain ill-defined. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key players in innate immune responses, we investigated the association between TLR expression and viral persistence or clearance in young women with incident infections with oncogenic HPV types 16 or 51. Messenger RNA expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR using human endocervical specimens, collected before and following viral acquisition, in a cohort well characterized for HPV infections. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the change seen from pre-infection to incident infection between women who subsequently cleared infection with those who did not. HPV 16 infections that cleared were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with an increase in expression of the four viral nucleic acid-sensing TLRs (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8 and TLR9) as well as TLR2 upon viral acquisition. Similar associations were not observed for HPV 51. In women who subsequently cleared their HPV 16 infection, changes in TLR1, TLR3, TLR7, and TLR8 expression levels between pre-incident and incident visits were significantly correlated with parallel changes in the levels of interferon-α2, measured by immunoassay in cervical lavage specimens. This study suggests that dampened TLR expression in the cervical mucosa is a type-specific mechanism by which HPV 16 interferes with innate immune responses, contributing to viral persistence, and that TLR upregulation and resultant cytokine induction is important in subsequent viral clearance. PMID:20473890

  8. Risk of human papillomavirus-related cancers among kidney transplant recipients and patients receiving chronic dialysis - an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have excess risk of various cancer types. However, the total burden of human papillomavirus-related cancers remains unknown. Methods We performed a nationwide observational cohort study during 1994–2010. For each person with ESRD, we sampled 19 population controls (without ESRD) matched on age, gender and municipality. Participants were followed until first diagnosis of human papillomavirus-related cancer, death, emigration, or 31 December 2010, whichever came first. Human papillomavirus-related cancers were extracted from Danish medical administrative databases. We considered cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and subsets of head and neck cancers as human papillomavirus-related. We calculated incidence rates of human papillomavirus-related cancer and used Poisson regression to identify risk factors for human papillomavirus-related cancer. Results Among 12,293 persons with ESRD and 229,524 population controls we identified 62 and 798 human papillomavirus-related cancers, respectively. Incidence rates of human papillomavirus-related- cancer were 102 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]; 79.5-131) among persons with ESRD and 40.8 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI; 38.1-43.7) among population controls. ESRD patients had 4.54 (95% CI, 2.48-8.31) fold increased risk of anal cancer and 5.81 fold (95% CI; 3.36-10.1) increased risk of vulvovaginal cancer. Adjusted for age, comorbidity, and sex, ESRD patients had 2.41 (95% CI; 1.83-3.16) fold increased risk of any human papillomavirus-related cancer compared with population controls. Compared with dialysis patients renal transplant recipients had an age-adjusted non-significant 1.53 (95% CI, 0.91-2.58) fold higher risk of human papillomavirus-related cancer. Conclusions Persons with ESRD have excess risk of potentially vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus-related cancers. PMID:23834996

  9. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep protein inhibits human papillomavirus type 16 E2 recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Marcello, A; Massimi, P; Banks, L; Giacca, M

    2000-10-01

    Infection by human adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is a possible protective factor in the development of cervical carcinomas associated with human papillomaviruses (HPV). The replicative proteins of AAV2 (Rep) have been implicated in the inhibition of papillomavirus replication and transforming activities, although the molecular events underlying these effects are poorly understood. We observed that each of the four forms of AAV2 Rep inhibited the E1- and E2-driven replication of oncogenic HPV type 16 (HPV16). Rep40, corresponding to the C-terminal domain of all Rep proteins, inhibited both HPV DNA replication and HPV16 E2-mediated transactivation. Rep40 specifically bound the N-terminal transactivation domain of HPV16 E2 both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction was found to specifically disrupt the binding of E2 to the cellular transcriptional coactivator p300. Accordingly, the inhibitory effect of Rep on HPV16 E2 transactivation was rescued by the overexpression of p300. These data indicate a novel role of Rep in the down-regulation of papillomaviruses through inhibition of complex formation between the HPV16 E2 transcriptional activator and its cellular coactivator, p300. PMID:10982355

  10. Trials and projects on cervical cancer and human papillomavirus prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Adefuye, Peter O; Broutet, Nathalie J; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Denny, Lynette A

    2013-12-29

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), accounting for about 50,000 deaths annually. Until recently, cytology was the gold standard for screening and prevention of cervical cancer. This method of screening has not been successful in SSA due to a lack of human, financial and material resources and poor health care infrastructure. It is estimated that less than 5% of at risk women have ever being screened. In the past two decades alternative approaches to cytology for cervical cancer screening have been evaluated in low- and medium-income countries. Visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and/or Lugol's iodine (VILI) have been shown to have adequate sensitivity, although low specificity, in a number of cross-sectional research and demonstration projects. Visual inspection methods require minimal resources, are technologically accessible, and are feasible for screening for precancerous lesions. Linking screening with VIA/VILI to treatment with cryotherapy may enable screening and treatment to take place in one visit, but this is likely to result in large numbers of women being subjected to unnecessary treatment. A number of studies have shown that cryotherapy is not associated with significant side effects or complications and is well tolerated. Creating the infrastructure for screening of older women is considered desirable, despite the limitations of visual inspection methods as screening tests. Understanding the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the etiology of cervical cancer and the discovery of HPV rapid test kits, as well as the development of vaccines against the HPV oncogenic types, have created new opportunities for prevention of cervical cancer. Trials and projects have established (and are still ongoing) the feasibility of using these molecular tests for screening. The ultimate in prevention method is primary prevention, offered by the advent of prophylactic vaccines

  11. Human Papillomavirus Type 18 E6 and E7 Genes Integrate into Human Hepatoma Derived Cell Line Hep G2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tianzhong; Su, Zhongjing; Chen, Ling; Liu, Shuyan; Zhu, Ningxia; Wen, Lifeng; Yuan, Yan; Lv, Leili; Chen, Xiancai; Huang, Jianmin; Chen, Haibin

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Human papillomaviruses have been linked causally to some human cancers such as cervical carcinoma, but there is very little research addressing the effect of HPV infection on human liver cells. We chose the human hepatoma derived cell line Hep G2 to investigate whether HPV gene integration took place in liver cells as well. Methods We applied PCR to detect the possible integration of HPV genes in Hep G2 cells. We also investigated the expression of the integrated E6 and E7 genes by using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Then, we silenced E6 and E7 expression and checked the cell proliferation and apoptosis in Hep G2 cells. Furthermore, we analyzed the potential genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory pathways. Finally, we used in situ hybridization to detect HPV 16/18 in hepatocellular carcinoma samples. Results Hep G2 cell line contains integrated HPV 18 DNA, leading to the expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenic proteins. Knockdown of the E7 and E6 genes expression reduced cell proliferation, caused the cell cycle arrest at the S phase, and increased apoptosis. The human cell cycle and apoptosis real-time PCR arrays analysis demonstrated E6 and E7-mediated regulation of some genes such as Cyclin H, UBA1, E2F4, p53, p107, FASLG, NOL3 and CASP14. HPV16/18 was found in only 9% (9/100) of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusion Our investigations showed that HPV 18 E6 and E7 genes can be integrated into the Hep G2, and we observed a low prevalence of HPV 16/18 in hepatocellular carcinoma samples. However, the precise risk of HPV as causative agent of hepatocellular carcinoma needs further study. PMID:22655088

  12. Development of a highly thermostable, adjuvanted human papillomavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Kimberly J; Meinerz, Natalie M; Semmelmann, Florian; Cousins, Megan C; Garcea, Robert L; Randolph, Theodore W

    2015-08-01

    A major impediment to economical, worldwide vaccine distribution is the requirement for a "cold chain" to preserve antigenicity. We addressed this problem using a model human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine stabilized by immobilizing HPV16 L1 capsomeres, i.e., pentameric subunits of the virus capsid, within organic glasses formed by lyophilization. Lyophilized glass and liquid vaccine formulations were incubated at 50°C for 12weeks, and then analyzed for retention of capsomere conformational integrity and the ability to elicit neutralizing antibody responses after immunization of BALB/c mice. Capsomeres in glassy-state vaccines retained tertiary and quaternary structure, and critical conformational epitopes. Moreover, glassy formulations adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide and glycopyranoside lipid A were not only as immunogenic as the commercially available HPV vaccine Cervarix®, but also retained complete neutralizing immunogenicity after high-temperature storage. The thermal stability of such adjuvanted vaccine powder preparations may thus eliminate the need for the cold chain. PMID:25998700

  13. Human papillomavirus variants among Inuit women in northern Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Barbara; Coutlée, Francois; Franco, Eduardo L.; Brassard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Inuit communities in northern Quebec have high rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, cervical cancer and cervical cancer–related mortality as compared to the Canadian population. HPV types can be further classified as intratypic variants based on the extent of homology in their nucleotide sequences. There is limited information on the distribution of intratypic variants in circumpolar areas. Objective Our goal was to describe the HPV intratypic variants and associated baseline characteristics. Design We collected cervical cell samples in 2002–2006 from 676 Inuit women between the ages of 15 and 69 years in Nunavik. DNA isolates from high-risk HPVs were sequenced to determine the intratypic variant. Results There were 149 women that were positive for HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 56 or 58 during follow-up. There were 5 different HPV16 variants, all of European lineage, among the 57 women positive for this type. There were 8 different variants of HPV18 present and all were of European lineage (n=21). The majority of samples of HPV31 (n=52) were of lineage B. The number of isolates and diversity of the other HPV types was low. Age was the only covariate associated with HPV16 variant category. Conclusions These frequencies are similar to what was seen in another circumpolar region of Canada, although there appears to be less diversity as only European variants were detected. This study shows that most variants were clustered in one lineage for each HPV type. PMID:26653084

  14. [Cervical infection epidemiology of human papillomavirus in Ushuaia, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Sijvarger, C C; González, J V; Prieto, A; Messmer, A G; Mallimaci, M C; Alonio, V L; Teyssié, A R; Picconi, M A

    2006-01-01

    Genital infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is decisive in the causation of cervical cancer. In order to evaluate the epidemiology of HPV infection in Ushuaia, Province of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, 132 endocervical cytobrushes from preneoplastic and neoplastic cases and controls were studied. Detection and typing of the viral genome was performed by polymerase chain reaction, combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay or hybridization. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 41% in the population examined, with a frequency of 26% in the controls and 71% in the cases under study. The 14-24 age group showed the highest HPV prevalence. The most common viral types in the infected population were HPV 16 (23%), HPV 18 (11%), HPV 33 (8%) and HPV 35 (8%), while high risk viral types were detected in 30% of the samples, 16% of the controls and 60% of the cases. This study provides the first data on the predominant viral types in Ushuaia. Our results show lower levels of infection than in regions with a high incidence of cervical cancer, HPV 16 being the most prevalent viral type. This research may be useful for selecting a specific vaccine targeting the population examined. PMID:16784128

  15. Immunogenicity of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Unger, E R; Panicker, G; Medvedev, P; Wilson, L; Humar, A

    2013-09-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at risk of morbidity from human papillomavirus (HPV)-related diseases. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine is recommended for posttransplant patients but there are no data on vaccine immunogenicity. We determined the immunogenicity of HPV vaccine in a cohort of young adult transplant patients. Patients were immunized with three doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine containing viral types 6, 11, 16 and 18. Immunogenicity was determined by type-specific viral-like protein ELISA. Four weeks after the last dose of vaccine, a vaccine response was seen in 63.2%, 68.4%, 63.2% and 52.6% for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18, respectively. Factors that led to reduced immunogenicity were vaccination early after transplant (p = 0.019), having a lung transplant (p = 0.007) and having higher tacrolimus levels (p = 0.048). At 12 months, there were significant declines in antibody titer for all HPV types although the number of patients who remained seropositive did not significantly differ. The vaccine was safe and well tolerated. We show suboptimal immunogenicity of HPV vaccine in transplant patients. This is important for counseling patients who choose to receive this vaccine. Further studies are needed to determine an optimal HPV vaccine type and schedule for this population. PMID:23837399

  16. Argentina's Successful Implementation Of A National Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Program.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hannah; Wilson, Ellen; Vizzotti, Carla; Parston, Greg; Prestt, Jessica; Darzi, Ara

    2016-02-01

    Every year around fourteen million people globally are infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), the sexually transmitted virus that is the cause of most cervical cancers. A number of vaccines have been developed to protect against HPV, but in many countries, HPV vaccination rates have been low compared with rates for other recommended vaccines. Parental concerns, cost, and lack of information and awareness among both health professionals and parents are cited as important barriers to HPV vaccination. In Argentina the HPV vaccine has been provided to all eleven-year-old girls since 2011 as part of a comprehensive national program to prevent cervical cancer. Coverage increased from negligible levels before 2011 to a national average of 87.9 percent for the first dose, 71.6 percent for the second dose, and 52.2 percent for the third dose in 2013. There was a large variance in HPV vaccine coverage across the country's provinces. This article describes key strategies to overcome barriers to implementation of HPV vaccination and provides recommendations for policy makers. PMID:26858384

  17. Human Papillomavirus in Brazilian women with and without cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) high-risk (HR) types are the causal factor for cervical cancer and premalignant dysplasia. Data on frequency of HPV types provide a basis to design and evaluate HPV prevention programs. Taking into account the heterogeneity of HPV types across and within populations this study aims to access the HPV frequency in Brazilian women. Results We identified 24 different types of HPV, including a Betapapillomavirus and a likely new type, previously reported, from 132 women positive for the virus analysed by Hybrid Capture II assay. These women were infected by a single or multiple HPV types and 142 HPV strains were identified. HR types were found in 75% of women and HPV types 16, 18, 45, 58, and 66 had the highest frequency. Significant differences in frequency of HR HPV types were found for presence of cervical lesions, and for different HPV species and women age. Conclusions Compared with previous studies in Brazil, our data indicated differences in frequency and HPV type diversity, a significant association of other HR-types but HPV16 and 18 and cervical lesions, and a trend for distinct distribution of HPV types by age. PMID:21208414

  18. Gnathic and peripheral ameloblastomas lack human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Verduin, Lindsey; Bishop, Justin; Mills, Stacey E

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with a variety of head and neck neoplasms, including squamous cell carcinomas and Schneiderian papillomas. Ameloblastomas can arise from either the gnathic bones or peripheral soft tissues. Peripheral sinonasal ameloblastomas share clinical features with Schneiderian papillomas. A small number of reports have described detection of HPV DNA within ameloblastomas. However, Most of these cases was reported in the 1990s, used the polymerase chain reaction technique, and only examined gnathic tumors. The current study was designed to determine whether low- or high-risk HPV DNA could be detected in gnathic or peripheral ameloblastomas using in situ hybridization. Twenty-nine examples of gnathic osseous and peripheral head and neck ameloblastomas were obtained from the authors' archives (University of Virginia and the Johns Hopkins Hospital). High-risk HPV DNA was not detected in any of the 29 tumors analyzed. Low-risk HPV DNA was identified in only 1 tumor, which was peripheral in origin, and from an immunocompromised patient. We believe that the HPV in this case represents a background "passenger" infection. This study demonstrates that HPV of either high- or low-risk subtypes is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of sinonasal ameloblastomas. PMID:26190154

  19. Human papillomavirus and breast cancer in Iran: a meta- analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Mousavi, Tahoora; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Afshari, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aims to investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and breast cancer using meta- analysis. Materials and Methods: Relevant studies were identified reviewing the national and international databases. We also increased the search sensitivity by investigating the references as well as interview with research centers and experts. Finally, quality assessment and implementation of inclusion/exclusion criteria determined the eligible articles for meta-analysis. Based on the heterogeneity observed among the results of the primary studies, random effects model was used to estimate the pooled prevalence of HPV infection and also pooled odds ratio between HPV and developing breast cancer using Stata SE V. 11 software. Results: This meta- analysis included 11 primary studies investigating the HPV infection prevalence among 1539 Iranian women. Pooled prevalence (95% confidence interval) of HPV infection among Iranian women with breast cancer was estimated as of 23.6% (6.7- 40.5), while, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) between HPV infection and developing breast cancer was estimated as of 5.7% (0.7- 46.8). Conclusion: This meta- analysis showed a high prevalence of HPV infection among women with breast cancer. We also found that the odds of developing breast cancer among women with breast cancer was more than that of women without breast cancer. PMID:27114791

  20. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: State of the Art and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Tramalloni, Daniela; Valle, Ivana; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a widely distributed and common virus, that causes benign lesions (such as warts and papillomas) but, if not cleared, can lead to malignant lesions as well, such as intraepithelial lesions and neoplasia. An extensive body of researches has demonstrated that E1 and E2 are involved in viral transcription and replication, E5, E6, and E7 act as oncoproteins, whilst L1 and L2 contribute to the formation of the capsid. However, this view has been recently challenged, since also E2 could play a role in HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Therefore, a complex picture is emerging, opening new ways and perspectives. The present article provides an overview of the biology of HPV, paying particular attention to its structural details and molecular mechanisms. The article also shows how this knowledge has been exploited for developing effective vaccines, both prophilactic/preventive and therapeutic ones. L1-based prophylactic vaccines, like Gardasil, Cervarix, and Gardasil 9, have been already licensed, whilst L2-based second generation preventive vaccines are still under clinical trials. New, highly immunogenic and effective vaccines can be further developed thanks to computer-aided design and bioinformatics/computational biology. The optimization of combinational therapies is another promising opportunity. PMID:26572981

  1. Variants of human papillomavirus type 16 predispose toward persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Hong; Yang, Binlie; Geffre, Christopher P; Zhang, Ai; Zhou, Aizhi; Cao, Huimin; Wang, Jieru; Zhang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    A cohort study of 292 Chinese women was conducted to determine the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 variants and persistent viral infection. Enrolled patients were HPV16 positive and had both normal cytology and histology. Flow-through hybridization and gene chip technology was used to identify the HPV type. A PCR sequencing assay was performed to find HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 gene variants. The associations between these variants and HPV16 persistent infection was analyzed by Fisher's exact test. It was found that the variants T178G, T350G and A442C in the E6 gene, as well as C3158A and G3248A variants in the E2 gene were associated with persistent HPV16 infection. No link was observed between E7 variants and persistent viral infection. Our findings suggest that detection of specific HPV variants would help identify patients who are at high risk for viral persistence and development of cervical neoplasia. PMID:26339417

  2. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Targets Crossroads in Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, Bart; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infections with a high-risk type human papillomavirus (hrHPV) can progress to cancer. High-risk HPVs infect keratinocytes (KCs) and successfully suppress host immunity for up to two years despite the fact that KCs are well equipped to detect and initiate immune responses to invading pathogens. Viral persistence is achieved by active interference with KCs innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. To this end hrHPV utilizes proteins encoded by its viral genome, as well as exploits cellular proteins to interfere with signaling of innate and adaptive immune pathways. This results in impairment of interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine production and subsequent immune cell attraction, as well as resistance to incoming signals from the immune system. Furthermore, hrHPV avoids the killing of infected cells by interfering with antigen presentation to antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, hrHPV has evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid detection and clearance by both the innate and adaptive immune system, the molecular mechanisms of which will be dealt with in detail in this review. PMID:26008697

  3. Detection and typing of common human papillomaviruses among Jordanian patients.

    PubMed

    Al Bdour, Suzan; Akkash, Laith; Shehabi, Asem A

    2013-06-01

    The epidemiology of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) genotype distribution of cutaneous warts in Jordanian patients were studied. A total of 200 samples were collected using skin swabs from patients with warts attending the dermatology clinic at the Jordan University Hospital over the period of June 2010 to October 2010. Another 100 control samples were taken from healthy Jordanian individuals with no current or previous history of warts. DNA extraction and sequencing was carried out using PCR with the FAP primer pair to detect HPV DNA, followed by multiple-type-specific (Multiplex) PCR combined with DNA sequencing. The prevalence of HPV among Jordanian patients tested with warts diagnosed clinically was 82% (157/192); of these 45% (87/192) were detected by FAP PCR method, and 37% (70/192) were detected by multiplex PCR method. Sequencing of the FAP positive samples shows that HPV 2 was associated with the highest prevalence (36%), followed by HPV 27 (28%) and HPV 57 (21%). A total of 6% of healthy persons were positive for HPV DNA. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that alpha HPV types (HPV 2, HPV 27, and HPV 57) are associated with the most prevalent cutaneous warts in Jordanian patients. PMID:23588732

  4. Amplification of human papillomavirus DNA sequences by using conserved primers.

    PubMed Central

    Gregoire, L; Arella, M; Campione-Piccardo, J; Lancaster, W D

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction has potential for use in the detection of small amounts of human papillomavirus (HPV) viral nucleic acids present in clinical specimens. However, new HPV types for which no probes exist would remain undetected by using type-specific primers for the polymerase chain reaction before hybridization. Primers corresponding to highly conserved HPV sequences may be useful for detecting low amounts of known HPV DNA as well as new HPV types. Here we analyze a pair of primers derived from conserved sequences within the E1 open reading frame for HPV sequence amplification by using the polymerase chain reaction. The longest perfect homology among HPV sequences is a 12-mer within the first exon of E1M. A region of conserved amino acids coded by the E1 open reading frame allowed the detection of another highly conserved region about 850 base pairs downstream. Two 21-mers derived from these conserved regions were used to amplify sequences from all HPV DNAs used as templates. The amplified DNA was shown to be specific for HPV sequences within the E1 open reading frame. DNA from HPVs whose sequences were not available were amplified by using these two primers. HPV DNA sequences in clinical specimens could also be amplified with the primers. Images PMID:2556429

  5. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  6. Target Cell Cyclophilins Facilitate Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV–induced diseases. PMID:19629175

  7. A review of methods for detect human Papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus. Worldwide, the most common high-risk (HR)-HPV are -16/18, and approximately 70% of cervical cancers (CC) are due to infection by these genotypes. Persistent infection by HR-HPV is a necessary but not sufficient cause of this cancer, which develops over a long period through precursor lesions, which can be detected by cytological screening. Although this screening has decreased the incidence of CC, HPV-related cervical disease, including premalignant and malignant lesions, continues to be a major burden on health-care systems. Although not completely elucidated, the HPV-driven molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cervical lesions have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in the clinical management of women with HPV-related cervical disease, and these biomarkers can also be used to increase the positive predictive value of current screening methods. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancer and thus lead to the development of nonsurgical therapies. Considering the importance of detecting HPV and related biomarkers, a variety of methods are being developed for these purposes. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV, and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression to CC. PMID:23131123

  8. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Kucharczyk, Katherine M.; Estes, Jaclyn L.; Gerber, Rachel S.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Elias, Rony T.; Spandorfer, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage. PMID:26609434

  9. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. ); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); Zitelli, J.A. )

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  10. The association between human papillomavirus infection and female lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Huang, Jing-Yang; Tsai, Stella Ching-Shao; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Chou, Ming-Chih; Wu, Ming-Fang; Lee, Chun-Te; Jan, Cheng-Feng; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among Taiwanese women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been detected in lung cancer tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HPV infection and lung cancer among the Taiwanese women. The analytical data were collected from the longitudinal health insurance databases (LHID 2005 and 2010) of the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The study participants were 30 years and older and included 24,162 individuals who were identified with HPV infection from 2001 to 2004 and 1,026,986 uninfected individuals. Lung cancer incidence among infected and uninfected individuals was compared using the univariate and multivariate regression models. Among the total participants, 24,162 individuals were diagnosed with HPV. After adjusting for age, gender, low income, residential area, and comorbidity, the risk of lung cancer was higher in women (hazard ratio [HR] 1.263, 95% CI 1.015–1.571), while all cancer risks were high in both men and women with corresponding hazard ratios (HR) of 1.161 (95% CI 1.083–1.245) and HR 1.240 (95% CI 1.154–1.331), respectively. This study showed a significant increase in lung cancer risk among Taiwanese women who were exposed to HPV infection. PMID:27281096