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Sample records for human peripheral benzodiazepine

  1. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human skin: the relationship with epidermal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, P E; Carayon, P; Penarier, G; Fréchin, N; Barnéon, G; Casellas, P; Cano, J P; Meynadier, J; Meunier, L

    1999-06-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands. PBR is part of a heteromeric receptor complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and in the early events of apoptosis. PBR may function as an oxygen-dependent signal generator; recent data indicate that these receptors may preserve the mitochondria of haematopoietic cell lines from damage caused by oxygen radicals. To identify PBRs in human skin, we used a specific monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus fragment of the human receptor. PBR immunoreactivity was found in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, hair follicles and dermal vascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, confocal microscopic examination of skin sections revealed that PBR expression was strongly upregulated in the superficial differentiated layers of the epidermis. Ultrastructurally, PBRs were distributed throughout the cytoplasm but were selectively expressed on the mitochondrial membranes of epidermal cells. The elevated level of PBRs in the spinous layer was not associated with an increased number of mitochondria nor with an increased amount of mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization on microautoradiographed skin sections. The present work provides, for the first time, evidence of PBR immunoreactivity in human skin. This mitochondrial receptor may modulate apoptosis in the epidermis; its increased expression in differentiated epidermal layers may represent a novel mechanism of natural skin protection against free radical damage generated by ultraviolet exposure. PMID:10354064

  2. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  3. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in repeated stress

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, D.E.; Bidder, M.; Gavish, M. ); Weizman, A.; Karp, L.; Tyano, S. ); Grinshpoon, A.; Bleich, A.

    1991-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to platelet membranes and plasma stress hormones were studied in soldiers at the beginning of a parachute training course, following 6 days of preparatory exercises, and after the fourth actual parachute jump. A slight reduction (15%; NS) in the number of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) was detected at the end of the exercise period, prior to the first jump. Reduced density of PBR was observed immediately after the repeated actual jumps. Equilibrium dissociation constants were not affected by the stressful situation. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels remained unaltered during the entire study period.

  4. The human peripheral benzodiazepine receptor gene: Cloning and characterization of alternative splicing in normal tissues and in a patient with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Miller, W.L. ); Chang, Y.J.; Strauss, J.F. III )

    1993-12-01

    The mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor (mBzR) appears to be a key factor in the flow of cholesterol into mitochondia to permit the initiation of steroid hormone synthesis. The mBzR consists of three components; the 18-kDa component on the outer mitochondrial membrane appears to contain the benzodiazepine binding site, and is hence often termed the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Using a cloned human PBR cDNA as probe, the authors have cloned the human PBR gene. The 13-kb gene is divided into four exons, with exon 1 encoding only a short 5[prime] untranslated segment. The 5[prime] flanking DNA lacks TATA and CAAT boxes but contains a cluster of SP-1 binding sites, typical of [open quotes]housekeeping[close quotes] genes. The encoded PBR mRNA is alternately spliced into two forms: [open quotes]authentic[close quotes] PBR mRNA retains all four exons, while a short form termed PBR-S lacks exon 2. While PBR-S contains a 102-codon open reading frame with a typical initiator sequence, the reading frame differs from that of PBR, so that the encoded protein is unrelated to PBR. RT-PCR and RNase protection experiments confirm that both PBR and PBR-S are expressed in all tissues examined and that expression of PBR-S is about 10 times the level of PBR. Expression of PBR cDNA in pCMV5 vectors transfected into COS-1 cells resulted in increased binding of [[sup 3]H]PK11195, but expression of PBR-S did not. It has been speculated that patients with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, who cannot make any steroids, might have a genetic lesion in mBzR. RT-PCR analysis of testicular RNA from such a patient, sequencing of the cDNA, and blotting analysis of genomic DNA all indicate that the gene and mRNA for the PBR component of mBzR are normal in this disease. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  5. The bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: A receptor with low affinity for benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.L.; Laird, H.E. II )

    1991-01-01

    The density of bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in four tissues was highest in adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex PBR cofractionated with a mitochondrial membrane marker enzyme and could be solubilized with intact ligand binding properties using digitonin. The membrane bound and soluble mitochondrial receptors were pharmacologically characterized and showed the rank order of potency to inhibit ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding was PK 11195 > protoporphyrin IX > benzodiazepines. ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to bovine adrenal mitochondria was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine residue modifying reagent that decreased binding to rat liver mitochondria by 70%. ({sup 3}H)PK 14105 photolabeled the bovine PBR and the Mr was estimated under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions. These results demonstrate the bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is pharmacologically and biochemically distinct from the rat receptor, but the receptor component photolabeled by an isoquinoline ligand has a similar molecular weight.

  6. PET study of carbon-11-PK 11195 binding to peripheral type benzodiazepine sites in glioblastoma: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Pappata, S.; Cornu, P.; Samson, Y.; Prenant, C.; Benavides, J.; Scatton, B.; Crouzel, C.; Hauw, J.J.; Syrota, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The utility of the peripheral type benzodiazepine site ligand 11C-PK 11195, for imaging human glioma in conjunction with Positron Emission Tomography, relies on a high specific binding of the tracer to tumoral peripheral type benzodiazepines sites. In a patient with glioblastoma, the authors found that 11C-PK 11195 binding was two-fold higher in the tumor than in normal gray matter and that 30% of tumoral binding could be displaced by a large excess of unlabeled drug. These findings suggest that tumoral retention of the ligand is due, in part, to specific binding.

  7. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors are decreased in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonuccelli, U.; Nuti, A.; Del Dotto, P.; Piccini, P.; Martini, C.; Giannacccini, G.; Lucacchini, A.; Muratorio, A. )

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors are located in a variety of tissues, including platelets, in the nuclear and/or mitochondrial membranes. The authors studied the density of peripheral BDZ receptors in platelets of 10 de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, 18 PD patients treated with a levodopa/carbidopa combination, and in 15 healthy subjects matched for sex and age. The binding assay was conducted using ({sup 3}H)PK 11195, a specific ligand for peripheral BDZ receptors. A significant decrease in the density of ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding sites has been observed in PD patients with respect to controls but not between de novo and treated PD patients. No correlation has been found between the decrease in density of ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding sites in platelets and either the duration or severity of PD. Peripheral BDZ receptors are implicated in the regulation of mitochondrial respiratory function. Thus, their decrease in PD might parallel the abnormalities in mitochondrial function recently found in this neurologic disease.

  8. Benzodiazepines - Effects on Human Performance and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Drummer, O H

    2002-02-01

    There exist a large number of drugs belonging to the benzodiazepine family. These include the 1,4-benzodiazepines such as diazepam, temazepam and oxazepam, the often more potent diazolo- and triazolo-groups represented by alprazolam, midazolam, triazolam etc. These drugs represent a large range of potencies from submilligram doses to over 100 mg and a range of polarities. Consequently, blood or plasma concentrations associated with prescribed use range from sub-nanogram per mL to near-microgram per mL. Their medical use varies, but they are predominantly used as hypnotics and sedatives. Some members are also used in the treatment of post-traumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders, alcohol withdrawal, muscle spasm, and seizures. Recreationally, drug users favor these drugs to reduce the symptoms of withdrawal and unpleasant effects of heroin and cocaine. They are also commonly used as "date-rape" drugs to render a victim incapable of resisting an attack. Benzodiazepines elicit a large number of physiological and psychological responses in humans that often can lead to significant behavioral changes and adverse effects on skills required for safe driving. These include reduced lane control, increased reaction times, reduced hand-eye coordination and cognitive impairment. Impairment can exceed that seen with 0.05 g% ethanol. In high doses benzodiazepines can cause persons to exhibit classical features of CNS-depressant drugs such as nystagmus, ataxia, slurred speech, and impaired divided attention skills. As one would expect with hypnotics and sedatives, any sleep deprivation, or situations involving monotonous driving can lead to a reduced ability to concentrate and maintain vigilance. Adverse effects on REM and NREM sleep patterns will exacerbate fatigue-related components to driving. Persons with sleep abnormalities, e.g., sleep apnea, may be more likely to be affected by benzodiazepines than those with normal sleep patterns. Ethanol and narcotic

  9. Benzodiazepines

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescription drugs Valium ® , Xanax ® , Halcion ® , Ativan ® , and Klonopin ® . Tolerance can develop, although at variable rates and to ... high. Abuse is particularly high among heroin and cocaine abusers. Affect on mind Benzodiazepines are associated with ...

  10. Benzodiazepines

    MedlinePlus

    ... with amnesia, hostility, irritability, and vivid or disturbing dreams. Affect on body Benzodiazepines slow down the central nervous system and may cause sleepiness. Drugs causing similar effects Alcohol, barbiturates, sleeping pills, and GHB Overdose effects Effects of overdose ...

  11. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  12. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Rocca, P; Ferrero, P; Gualerzi, A; Zanalda, E; Maina, G; Bergamasco, B; Ravizza, L

    1991-12-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (pBDZr) were analyzed in lymphocyte membranes from patients with anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), n = 15; panic disorder (PD), n = 10; obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), n = 18), other mental disorders (n = 40) and 50 healthy controls, by the specific binding of 3H-PK11195. The number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly decreased in groups with both GAD and OCD as compared with age-matched controls, by 45% and 25% respectively, whereas the binding affinity (Kd) was the same in all disorder and control groups. Conversely, no changes in binding capacity was observed in the other disorder groups and particularly in the one with PD. The abnormality in pBDZr observed in patients with GAD was restored to a normal value after long-term treatment with 2'-chloro-N-desmethyldiazepam, which also coincided with their recovery from anxiety. Our data suggest that the clinical heterogeneity in anxiety disorders might be related to different biological mechanisms and that lymphocyte pBDZr might be useful in demonstrating these differences. PMID:1686517

  13. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  14. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.H.; Verma, A.; Trifiletti, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a site identified by its nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)diazepam, similar to the affinity of diazepam for the central-type benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor occurs in many peripheral tissues but has discrete localizations as indicated by autoradiographic studies showing uniquely high densities of the receptors in the adrenal cortex and in Leydig cells of the testes. Subcellular localization studies reveal a selective association of the receptors with the outer membrane of mitochondria. Photoaffinity labeling of the mitochondrial receptor with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam reveals two discrete labeled protein bands of 30 and 35 kDa, respectively. The 35-kDa band appears to be identical with the voltage-dependent anion channel protein porin. Fractionation of numerous peripheral tissues reveals a single principal endogenous ligand for the receptor, consisting of porphyrins, which display nanomolar affinity. Interactions of porphyrins with the mitochondrial receptor may clarify its physiological role and account for many pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines.

  15. Synthesis, structure and affinity of novel 3-alkoxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-ones for CNS central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Andronati, Sergey; Semenishyna, Ekaterina; Pavlovsky, Victor; Simonov, Yuriy; Makan, Svetlana; Boyko, Irina; Burenkova, Natalya; Gdaniec, Maria; Cardinael, Pascal; Bouillon, Jean-Philippe; Mazepa, Alexander

    2010-04-01

    A series of novel 3-alkoxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-ones (7-15) was synthesized and their in vitro affinity for both the central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR) and the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) of rat brain was studied. Racemic mixture of 7-bromo-3-(2-methoxy)ethoxy-5-phenyl-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one (13) was separated into enantiomers 14, 15 by chiral HPLC. Absolute configuration of R-enantiomer 15 was determined by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis. The affinity of S-enantiomer 14 for CBR ( IC50)=245 nM) is 20-fold higher than the affinity of R-enantiomer 15 (IC50)=4,930 nM). A high selectivity for CBR versus PBR (IC50) (PBR)>10,000 nM) was shown by all reported compounds. Compound 12 was revealed as a potent (IC50)=9 nM) and selective CBR ligand among the synthesized 3-alkoxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-ones. PMID:20061068

  16. Studies of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in mussels: comparison between a polluted and a nonpolluted site.

    PubMed

    Betti, Laura; Giannaccini, Gino; Nigro, Marco; Dianda, Sabina; Gremigni, Vittorio; Lucacchini, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in soft tissue membranes of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis from both polluted and nonpolluted seawater populations, using a radioligand specific for this receptor, [3H]PK11195. Mussels were dissected into four body parts--mantle, gills, digestive gland, and muscles-to determine the distribution of tissue-specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs). The specific binding was saturable and reversible. A statistically significant increase (muscle, 537% and mantle, 201%, as absolute percentages) in the maximal number of binding sites (B(max)) was found in mussels from the polluted site, compared with mussels from the nonpolluted site. By contrast, the value of the dissociation constant (K(d)) at equilibrium does not show a statistically significant variation between the two groups. In competitive experiments of the compounds clonazepam, flumazenil, flunitrazepam, Ro5-4864, PK11195, and protoporphyrin IX, only PK11195 and protoporphyrin IX displaced [3H]PK11195 specifically bound to soft tissue membranes, revealing that the binding sites of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors of mussels have pharmacological properties comparable to those of low vertebrates such as trout. M. galloprovincialis was also tested as an indicator of heavy metal exposure, and metal accumulation in the digestive gland was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The contents of Pb, Mn, and Zn in mussels collected off the polluted site were higher than those in mussels from the nonpolluted site. These data suggest that PBRs are present in the soft tissues of the mussel M. galloprovincialis. Here we report preliminary evidence of biochemical alterations in mussels from the polluted site. PMID:12547633

  17. [11C]vinpocetine: a prospective peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand for primate PET studies.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Vas, Adám; Banati, Richard B; Shchukin, Evgeny; Finnema, Sjoerd; Tarkainen, Jari; Tihanyi, Károly; Szilágyi, Géza; Farde, Lars

    2005-03-15

    Vinpocetine, a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, is a widely used drug in neurological practice. We tested the hypothesis that vinpocetine binds to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS) and is therefore a potential ligand of PBBS. Positron emission tomography (PET) measurements in two cynomolgous monkeys showed that pretreatment with vinpocetine markedly reduced the brain uptake of [11C]PK11195, a known PBBS radioligand. On the other hand, whereas pretreatment with PK11195 increased the brain uptake of [11C]vinpocetine due to the blockade of PBBS in the periphery, it significantly reduced the binding potential (BP) values of [11C]vinpocetine in the whole brain and in individual brain structures to PK11195. These findings indicate that, whereas the two ligands have different affinities to PBBS, vinpocetine is a potent ligand of PBBS, which in turn suggests that the pharmacological activity of vinpocetine may involve the regulation of glial functions. PMID:15760643

  18. Tissue specific regulation of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor density after chemical sympathectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues were examined after chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). One week after the intracisternal administration of 6-OHDA, the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding sites (Bmax) in the hypothalamus and striatum increased 41 and 50% respectively, concurrent with significant reductions in catecholamine content. An increase (34%) in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac ventricle was observed one week after parenteral 6-OHDA administration. In contrast, the B/sub max/ of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4684 to pineal gland decreased 48% after 6-OHDA induced reduction in norepinephrine content. The Bmax values for (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to other tissues (including lung, kidney, spleen, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and olfactory bulbs) were unaffected by 6-OHDA administration. The density of pineal, but not cardiac PBR was also reduced after reserpine treatment, an effect reversed by isoproterenol administration. These findings demonstrate that alterations in sympathetic input may regulate the density of PBR in both the central nervous system and periphery in a tissue specific fashion. 33 references, 4 tables.

  19. Interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with GABA sub A and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Devaud, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are potent proconvulsants in the rat. All pyrethroids evincing proconvulsant activity elicited a similar 25-30% maximal reduction of seizure threshold. The Type II pyrethroids were the most potent proconvulsants with 1R{alpha}S, cis cypermethrin having an ED{sub 50} value of 6.3 nmol/kg. The proconvulsant activity of both Type I and Type II pyrenthroids was blocked by pretreatment with PK 11195, the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR) antagonist. In contrast, phenytoin did not antagonize the proconvulsant activity of either deltamethrin or permethrin. Pyrethroids displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 to rat brain membranes with a significant correlation between the log EC{sub 50} values for their activities as proconvulsants and the log IC{sub 50} values for their inhibition of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 binding. Both Ro5-4864 and pyrethroid insecticides were found to influence specific ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding in a GABA-dependent manner. PK 11195 and the Type II pyrethroid, deltamethrin antagonized the Ro5-4864-induced modulation of ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding. Pyrethroid insecticides, Ro5-4864 and veratridine influenced GABA-gated {sup 36}Chloride influx. Moreover, the Type II pyrethroids elicited an increase in {sup 36}chloride influx in the absence of GABA-stimulation. Both of these actions were antagonized by PK 11195 and tetrodotoxin.

  20. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors are highly concentrated in mitochondrial membranes of rat testicular interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Calvo, D J; Ritta, M N; Calandra, R S; Medina, J H

    1990-10-01

    The binding of 3H-RO 5-4864 to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBZDR) in rat testicular interstitial cells (TIC) was characterized. The binding was saturable, reversible and showed a single high-affinity (Kd = 5.02 +/- 0.86 nM) class of binding sites. The maximal binding capacity (Bmax) in crude mitochondrial fractions (77.6 +/- 9.1 pmol/mg protein) represents the highest density of PBZDR in tissues thus far studied. In comparison with the crude mitochondrial fraction the subcellular fractionation of TIC revealed a 2-fold enrichment of 3H-RO 5-4864 binding sites to the purified mitochondria (Bmax = 140 +/- 23 pmol/mg protein). The ability of various drugs to displace 3H-RO 5-4864 from TIC binding sites was examined and the inhibition constants (Ki) for RO 5-4864, PK 11195, diazepam and flunitrazepam were 3.5, 4.4, 159, and 353 nM, respectively, whereas clonazepam and RO 15-1788 were inefficient in displacing 3H-RO 5-4864 (Ki greater than 10 microM). This pharmacological profile is characteristic of PBZDR described in other tissues. In conclusion, rat TIC possess a very high concentration of PBZDR primarily associated with mitochondrial membranes. PMID:2175849

  1. Development of a monoclonal anitbody to immuno-cytochemical analysis of the cellular localization of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Dussossoy, D.; Carayon, P.; Feraut, D.

    1996-05-01

    Based on the amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned human peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) gene, monoclonal antibody (Mab 8D7) was produced against the C-terminal fragment of the receptor. Immunoblot experiments, performed against purified PBR, indicated that the antipeptide antibody recognized, under denaturing conditions, the corresponding amino acid sequence of the PBR. When mitochondrial membranes form PBR transfected yeast or from THP1 and U937 cells were used on immunoblot analysis, a high level of immunoreactivity was observed at 18 kDa, the PBR molecular mass deduced from cDNA, establishing the specificity of the antibody for the receptor. Moreover, binding experiments realized with intact mitochondria demonstrated that the immunogenic sequence was accessible to the antibody indicating that the C-terminal fragment of the PBR faces the cytosol. Using this Mab we developed a technique which allowed precise quantification of PBR density per cell. Furthermore, cellular localization studies by flow cytometric analysis and confocal microscopy on cell lines displaying different levels of PBR showed that Mab 8D7 was entirely colocalized with an antimitochondria Mab. 34 refs., 7 figs.

  2. PET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor: monitoring disease progression and therapy response in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Doorduin, Janine; de Vries, Erik F J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Klein, Hans C

    2008-01-01

    It is important to gain more insight into neurodegenerative diseases, because these debilitating diseases can not be cured. A common characteristic of many neurological diseases is neuroinflammation, which is accompanied by the presence of activated microglia cells. In activated microglia cells, an increase in the expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) can be found. The PBR was suggested as a target for monitoring disease progression and therapy efficacy with positron emission tomograpy (PET). The PET tracer [(11)C]PK11195 has been widely used for PBR imaging, but the tracer has a high lipophilicity and high non-specific binding which makes it difficult to quantify uptake. Therefore, efforts are being made to develop more sensitive radioligands for the PBR. Animal studies have yielded several promising new tracers for PBR imaging, such as [(11)C]DAA1106, [(18)F]FEDAA1106, [(11)C]PBR28, [(11)C]DPA713 and [(11)C]CLINME. However, the potential of these new PBR ligands is still under investigation and as a consequence [(11)C]PK11195 is used so far to image activated microglia cells in neurological disorders. With [(11)C]PK11195, distinct neuroinflammation was detected in multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, encephalitis and other neurological diseases. Because neuroinflammation plays a central role in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, anti-inflammatory drugs have been investigated for therapeutic intervention. Especially minocycline and cyclooxygenase inhibitors have shown in vivo anti-inflammatory, hence neuroprotective properties, that could be detected by PET imaging of the PBR with [(11)C]PK11195. The imaging studies published so far showed that the PBR can be an important target for monitoring disease progression, therapy response and determining the optimal drug dose. PMID:19075709

  3. PET imaging of brain macrophages using the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in a macaque model of neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Venneti, Sriram; Lopresti, Brian J.; Wang, Guoji; Bissel, Stephanie J.; Mathis, Chester A.; Meltzer, Carolyn C.; Boada, Fernando; Capuano, Saverio; Kress, Geraldine J.; Davis, Denise K.; Ruszkiewicz, James; Reynolds, Ian J.; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Trichel, Anita M.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Wiley, Clayton A.

    2004-01-01

    HIV infection in humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in macaques result in encephalitis in approximately one-quarter of infected individuals and is characterized by infiltration of the brain with infected and activated macrophages. 1-(2-chlorphenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline-carboxamide (PK11195) is a ligand specific for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor abundant on macrophages and is expressed in low levels in the noninfected brain. We hypothesized that positron-emission tomography (PET) with the carbon-11–labeled, R-enantiomer form of PK11195 ([11C](R)-PK11195) could image brain macrophages and hence the development of encephalitis in vivo. [11C](R)-PK11195 binding was assessed in the brain using PET in 11 SIV infected macaques, six of which showed increased binding in vivo. Postmortem examination of the brain in these six macaques demonstrated encephalitis, while macaques that did not show an increase in [11C](R)-PK11195 binding did not develop SIV encephalitis. Brain tissue from SIV encephalitic macaques also showed increased [3H](R)-PK11195 binding compared with binding in nonencephalitic macaques. Increased PK11195 binding in vivo and in postmortem brain tissue correlated with abundance of macrophages but not astrocytes. Our results suggest that PET [11C](R)-PK11195 imaging can detect the presence of macrophages in SIV encephalitis in vivo and may be useful to predict the development of HIV encephalitis and in studies of the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV dementia. PMID:15057304

  4. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein global knock-out mice are viable with no effects on steroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R; Pelton, Susanne H; Butler, W Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-10-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo(-/-)) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo(-/-) mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo(-/-) mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  5. 1,4-Benzodiazepine peripheral cholecystokinin (CCK-A) receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, R G; Berman, J M; Birkemo, L; Croom, D K; Dezube, M; Ervin, G N; Grizzle, M K; James, M K; Johnson, M F; Queen, K L; Rimele, T J; Vanmiddlesworth, F; Sugg, E E

    2001-05-01

    A series of 1,4-benzodiazepines, N-1-substituted with an N-isopropyl-N-phenylacetamide moiety, was synthesized and screened for CCK-A agonist activity. In vitro agonist activity on isolated guinea pig gallbladder along with in vivo induction of satiety following intraperitoneal administration in a rat feeding assay was demonstrated. PMID:11354363

  6. Downregulation of (3H)Ro5-4864 binding sites after exposure to peripheral-type benzodiazepines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.D.; Wang, J.K.; Morgan, J.I.; Spector, S.

    1986-09-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine (BZD) binding sites undergo a rapid and pronounced downregulation after exposure to these compounds in vitro. Friend erythroleukemia cells were incubated with micromolar concentrations of BZD after which they were washed thoroughly and the binding of the specific peripheral-type BZD radioligand (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 was determined. Exposure to the peripheral-type BZD Ro7-3351 decreased the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 binding sites from 324 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells with no change in affinity. Downregulation appears to require active cellular processes because it is blocked when exposure to BZD is at 4/sup 0/C rather than at 37/sup 0/C. Furthermore, whereas (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 binding is decreased substantially in membrane preparations made from downregulated cells, it is not altered when membrane preparations from control cells are exposed to BZD. The time course of downregulation is quite rapid, as it occurs within minutes. In contrast, the return of sites requires days and there is a close relationship between return of sites and growth of new cells. The ability of BZDs to downregulate correlates more closely with affinity for the peripheral-type site than with biological activity. The ability to undergo downregulation is characteristic of receptors and its occurrence suggests that peripheral-type BZD binding sites are functional receptors.

  7. Differential effects of in vitro peroxidation on peripheral- and central-type benzodiazepine receptors. Protection by diverse antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Courtiere, A; Molard, F; Reybaud, J

    1995-11-27

    The influence of various concentrations of ferrous iron and ascorbate on in vitro peroxidation and drug binding of diverse membrane preparations (cerebral cortex and liver) was studied. Peroxidation was not simply dose-related to ascorbate and ferrous iron, but a complex relationship between iron and ascorbate when added in association was established. Under our conditions 0.01 mM Fe2+ and 0.5 mM ascorbate was the most peroxidative combination for cerebral and liver membranes. Under the same conditions, cerebral membranes were more peroxidated than liver membranes. Considering the consequences of drug binding, peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) of liver were more affected by peroxidative events than central-type benzodiazepine receptors (CBRs) of the cerebral cortex. The degree of binding disturbance was generally inversely correlated to the degree of peroxidation and this was more significant for liver PBRs than for cerebral CBRs. The liver membrane model was retained for testing in vitro protection by diverse putative antioxidants. Under our conditions desferrioxamine, ethylene diamine tetra acetate (EDTA), trolox, and rutin were good protective antioxidants, whereas phenyl-butyl-nitrone (PBN) and tocopherol were not effective. PMID:8615860

  8. DMT1 (IRE) expression in intestinal and erythroid cells is regulated by peripheral benzodiazepine receptor-associated protein 7

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Ma, Yuxiang; Yeh, Mary; Yin, Hong; Li, Zhen; Yeh, Kwo-yih

    2012-01-01

    The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is essential for cellular uptake of iron, mediating iron absorption across the duodenal brush border membrane. We have previously shown that with iron feeding DMT1 in the brush border membrane undergoes endocytosis into the subapical compartment of enterocytes. To understand the mechanisms of iron-induced endocytosis of DMT1, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to find proteins that interact with DMT1 and isolated from a rat duodenal cDNA library a protein that interacts specifically with the IRE containing isoform of DMT1 {DMT1 [iron-responsive element (IRE)]}. The protein (Genbank AY336075) is 97.5% identical with peripheral benzodiazepine receptor-associated protein 7 (PAP7), a protein that interacts with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor. PAP7 is ubiquitously expressed in the rat and in multiple cell lines with consensus sequences including a nuclear localization signal and a Golgi dynamic domain. PAP7, expressed on the brush border of rat duodenum, copurified with DMT1 in brush border membrane vesicles, and following iron feeding, was internalized in parallel with the internalization of DMT1. To determine if PAP7 plays a role in cellular iron metabolism, we downregulated PAP7 expression in K562 cells with small interfering RNA. Following the decrease in PAP7 protein, DMT1 (IRE) protein but not mRNA was significantly downregulated but without effect on DMT1 (non-IRE), transferin (Tf)R1, or ferritin expression. Lowered levels of PAP7 resulted also in decreased cell proliferation and G1 cell cycle arrest. These data are consistent with PAP7 interacting with DMT1 (IRE) and regulating DMT1 (IRE) expression in K562 cells by modulating expression of DMT1 (IRE) protein. PMID:22383495

  9. Preservation of "peripheral" benzodiazepine receptors: differential effects of freezing on [3H]Ro 5-4864 and [3H]PK 11195 binding.

    PubMed

    Basile, A S; Skolnick, P

    1987-04-01

    The equilibrium binding constants of [3H]Ro 5-4864 (a "peripheral" benzodiazepine receptor ligand) to renal membranes preserved by various freezing techniques were investigated. The Bmax for [3H]Ro 5-4864 binding to membranes from kidneys preserved as unwashed homogenates stored at -80, -20, or 5 degrees C, whole kidneys stores at -20 or 5 degrees C or as washed homogenate stored at -20 degrees C was significantly decreased (approximately 35%). Only when kidneys were frozen intact (using a dry-ice/acetone slurry) and stored at -80 degrees C was the density of [3H]Ro 5-4864 binding unchanged. However, the Bmax of [3H]PK 11195 (a putative "peripheral" benzodiazepine receptor antagonist) binding to renal membranes was unchanged following storage techniques that reduced the density of [3H]Ro 5-4864 binding 38%. No change was observed in the Kd values for [3H]Ro 5-4864 and [3H]PK 11195 binding to renal membranes preserved under any condition tested. These results demonstrate a method for the preservation of [3H]Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes, and suggests that [3H]Ro 5-4864 and [3H]PK 11195 bind to unique sites on or near the "peripheral" benzodiazepine receptor. [corrected] PMID:3035290

  10. The radiosynthesis of [18F]PK 14105 as an alternative radioligand for peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Pascali, C; Luthra, S K; Pike, V W; Price, G W; Ahier, R G; Hume, S P; Myers, R; Manjil, L; Cremer, J E

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed for labelling PK 14105 [N-methyl-N-(1-methyl-propyl)-1(2-fluoro-5-nitrophenyl)isoquinoline-3- carboxamide], a ligand that has high affinity and selectivity for peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS), with NCA fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.8 min, beta + = 96.9%). The method involves treating the 2-chloro-analogue with cyclotron-produced NCA [18F]fluoride in dimethyl sulphoxide, with rubidium carbonate as base, at 140 degrees C for 20 min. Purification is achieved by separation on a reverse phase Sep-Pak followed by PHLC on a silica gel column, to give chemically and radiochemically pure product with a specific activity of ca 7.4 GBq/mumol (200 mCi/mumol), decay-corrected to the end of radionuclide production (EOB). The radiosynthesis requires 210 min. giving a radiochemical yield of 10-20%, decay-corrected to EOB. [18F]PK 14105 was found to bind avidly to sites associated with kainic acid-induced unilateral lesions of rat striata. Such binding was blocked by pre-dosing the rat with PK 11195, so providing evidence for specific binding to PBBS. These results suggest that [18F]PK 14105 has potential for studying phenomena associated with PBBS in man by PET. PMID:2166014

  11. Human biodistribution and dosimetry of the SPECT benzodiazepine receptor radioligand iodine-123-iomazenil

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Seibyl, J.P.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1994-03-01

    SPECT imaging of the brain with [{sup 123}I]iomazenil has shown avid uptake of the radioligand in a distribution consistent with benzodiazepine receptor binding. The purposes of this study were to measure the whole-body distribution of activity following i.v. adminstration of [{sup 123}I]iomazenil and to evaluate the resulting organ radiation burdens. Serial total body scans were obtained in healthy volunteers after thyroid blockade and demonstrated avid brain uptake of radioligand. Abdominal imaging showed significant activity retention within the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts consistent with excretion via these routes. Absorbed dose to the urinary bladder was calculated to be 0.19 mGy/MBq, to the lower large intestine 0.079 mGy/MBq, to the upper large intestine 0.066 mGy/MBq, and to the thyroid 0.063 mGy/MBq. Thyroid uptake may in part have represented binding to benzodiazepine receptors, since radioligand binding to tissue homogenates prepared from human thyroid showed the presence of benzodiazepine binding sites. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Biodistribution and dosimetry of [123I]iodo-PK 11195: a potential agent for SPET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed

    Versijpt, J; Dumont, F; Thierens, H; Jansen, H; De Vos, F; Slegers, G; Santens, P; Dierckx, R A; Korf, J

    2000-09-01

    The highest concentrations of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) are found in the kidneys and heart. In addition, the PBR has been reported to reflect neuro-inflammatory damage by co-localisation with activated microglia. PK 11195 is a high-affinity ligand for the PBR. The aim of this study was to investigate in humans the biodistribution and dosimetry of [123I]iodoPK 11195, a potential single-photon emission tomography tracer for the PBR. Five healthy volunteers were injected with 112 MBq of [123I]iodo-PK 11195. Sequential whole-body scans were performed up to 72 h post injection. Multiple blood samples were taken, and urine was collected to measure the fraction voided by the renal system. Decay-corrected regions of interest of the whole-body images were analysed, and geometric mean count rates were used to determine organ activity. Organ absorbed doses and effective dose were calculated using the MIRD method. [123I]iodo-PK 11195 was rapidly cleared from the blood, mainly by the hepatobiliary system. Approximately 22% was voided in urine after 48 h. Average organ residence times were 0.74, 0.44 and 0.29 h for the liver, upper large intestine and lower large intestine, respectively. The testes received the highest dose, 109.4 microGy/MBq. All other organs investigated received doses of less than 50 microGy/MBq. The effective dose was 40.3 microSv/MBq. In conclusion, [123I]iodo-PK 11195 is a suitable agent for the visualisation of the PBR and indirectly for the imaging of neuro-inflammatory lesions. Taking into account the radiation burden of 7.46 mSv following an administration of 185 MBq, a [123I]iodo-PK 11195 investigation has to be considered an ICRP risk category IIb investigation. PMID:11007514

  13. Snorting benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, M F; Sheehan, D V; Torres, A; Coppola, A; Francis, E

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of intranasal benzodiazepine use are presented. The methods of preparation and administration of the powder and accounts of the pharmacological effects of the drugs used are described. The pattern of development and progress of the habit and its associated features are delineated. Snorting benzodiazepines appears to be more common than is currently appreciated, and the clinical complications and implications of this habit are discussed. PMID:1684083

  14. The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is involved in control of Ca2+-induced permeability transition pore opening in rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Azarashvili, Tamara; Grachev, Dmitry; Krestinina, Olga; Evtodienko, Youri; Yurkov, Igor; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Reiser, Georg

    2007-07-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is an 18 kDa mitochondrial membrane protein with still elusive function in cell death. Here, we studied whether PBR is involved in Ca2+-induced permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated rat brain mitochondria (RBM). PTP opening is important in mitochondrial events leading to programmed cell death. Immunoblots revealed a single 18 kDa anti-PBR antibody-immunoreactive band in purified RBM. Adenine nucleotide transporter, a key PTP component, was found in the PBR-immunoprecipitate. In isolated intact RBM, addition of a specific anti-PBR antibody [H. Li, Z. Yao, B. Degenhardt, G. Teper, V. Papadopoulos, Cholesterol binding at the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor and inhibition of steroidogenesis by an HIV TAT-CRAC peptide, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98 (2001) 1267-1272] delayed Ca2+-induced dissipation of membrane potential (psi(m)) and diminished cyclosporine A-sensitive Ca2+ efflux, which are both indicative for the suppression of PTP opening. Moreover, anti-PBR antibody caused partial retention of Ca2+ in the mitochondrial matrix in spite of psi(m) dissipation, and reduced activation of respiratory rate at Ca2+-induced PTP opening. A release of pro-apoptotic factors, AIF and cytochrome c, from RBM was shown at threshold Ca2+ load. Anti-PBR antibody blocked the release of AIF but did not affect the cytochrome c release. Addition of ATP was able to initiate PTP closing, associated with psi(m) restoration and Ca2+ re-accumulation. At the same time mitochondrial protein phosphorylation (incorporation of 32P from [gamma-32P]ATP) occurred and anti-PBR antibody was able to inhibit phosphorylation of these proteins. The endogenous PBR ligand, protoporphyrin IX, facilitated PTP opening and phosphorylation of the mitochondrial proteins, thus, inducing effects opposite to anti-PBR antibody. This study provides evidence for PBR

  15. Administration of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist MRK-016 rescues acquisition and memory consolidation following peripheral administration of bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Eimerbrink, M J; White, J D; Pendry, R J; Hodges, S L; Sadler, L N; Wiles, J D; Weintraub, M K; Chumley, M J; Boehm, G W

    2015-07-15

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation-induced decrements in cognitive function can be mitigated via manipulation of excitatory or inhibitory transmission. We tested the ability of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, MRK-016 (MRK) to protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, using a contextual fear conditioning (CFC) paradigm. In Experiment One, mice received lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or MRK injections prior to CFC training, and were then tested 24h after training. In Experiment Two, animals received similar treatment injections immediately after training, and were tested 24h later. Additionally, hippocampal samples were collected 4h after LPS injections and immediately after testing, to evaluate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression. Results indicate that MRK can protect against LPS-induced learning/memory decrements in both paradigms. We also found, in both paradigms, that animals treated with LPS/Saline expressed significantly less BDNF mRNA when compared to Saline/Saline-treated animals 4h after LPS administration, but that MRK did not restore BDNF expression levels. Further, treatment administrations had no effect on IGF-1 mRNA expression at any collection time-point. In summary, MRK-016 can protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, in this hippocampus-dependent paradigm, though this protection occurs independently of recovery of BDNF expression. PMID:25823763

  16. Increase in peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and loss of glutamate NMDA receptors in a mouse model of closed head injury: a quantitative autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Grossman, R; Shohami, E; Alexandrovich, A; Yatsiv, I; Kloog, Y; Biegon, A

    2003-12-01

    Increases in peripheral type benzodiazepine receptors (PTBR) have been utilized for the detection of neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity in the brain. We have investigated the relationship between PTBR and NMDA receptor binding density in mice with closed head injury (CHI) using quantitative autoradiography. CHI was induced by a weight drop in nine mice, four of which received a single injection of the rat sarcoma (Ras) inhibitor famesyl thiosalicylate (FTS) 1 h after the insult. Sham controls received anesthesia but no contusion. The neurological status of the mice was evaluated at 1 h, and hence up to 7 days using a neurological severity score (NSS). Animals were killed 7 days after CHI and consecutive brain sections were incubated with [3H]PK11195, a PTBR antagonist, or [3H]MK801, an n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) use-dependent antagonist. CHI produced large (two- to threefold), widespread increases in PK11195 binding in the traumatized hemisphere and a significant decrease (20%-40%) in NMDAR binding limited to regions at close proximity to the lesion. Histologically, these regions were characterized by glial proliferation and neuronal loss. Significant increases in PTBR binding, but no concomitant decrease in NMDAR, were identified in several regions remote from the lesion, including the contralateral ventrolateral striatum and the ipsilateral ventral thalamus. Drug treatment significantly improved the neurological deficits but had only a marginal effect on PTBR. These results support a complex role for glial activation and PTBR increases in the context of CHI. PMID:14683703

  17. Pilot study of PK 11195, a selective ligand for the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites, in inpatients with anxious or depressive symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Ansseau, M; von Frenckell, R; Cerfontaine, J L; Papart, P

    1991-01-01

    PK 11195 is a selective ligand for the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites which exhibits anti-conflict activity in animals. In a pilot open study, PK 11195 was administered to 10 psychiatric inpatients characterized by a rating of at least "moderate" for the item "felt loss of vitality" and a rating of at least "moderate" for the items "anxiety" and/or "inhibition of drive" from the psychopathological scale of the system developed by the Association for Methodology and Documentation in Psychiatry (AMDP). The duration of the study was two weeks, with an initial daily dose of 200 mg of PK 11195 which could be increased up to 400 mg. Patients were assessed weekly using the psychopathological and somatic AMDP scales and at days 0, 4, 7, and 14 using the Hamilton anxiety scale and a checklist of symptoms and side-effects. The results showed significant improvement in the AMDP factor scores related to somatic complaints, depression, anxiety, apathy-retardation, and psycho-organic symptoms. However, anxiolytic activity, confirmed on the Hamilton anxiety scale, remained moderate and reached maximum effect after one week. No side-effects, drowsiness in particular, were reported. This study therefore suggests a potential beneficial activity of PK 11195 on anxiety and inhibition, which merits further investigation in controlled studies. PMID:1849286

  18. Human locus coeruleus neurons express the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit gene and produce benzodiazepine binding.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Kati S; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Särkioja, Terttu; Maksimow, Anu; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2010-06-21

    Noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus project throughout the cerebral cortex and multiple subcortical structures. Alterations in the locus coeruleus firing are associated with vigilance states and with fear and anxiety disorders. Brain ionotropic type A receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) serve as targets for anxiolytic and sedative drugs, and play an essential regulatory role in the locus coeruleus. GABA(A) receptors are composed of a variable array of subunits forming heteropentameric chloride channels with different pharmacological properties. The gamma2 subunit is essential for the formation of the binding site for benzodiazepines, allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors that are clinically often used as sedatives/hypnotics and anxiolytics. There are contradictory reports in regard to the gamma2 subunit's expression and participation in the functional GABA(A) receptors in the mammalian locus coeruleus. We report here that the gamma2 subunit is transcribed and participates in the assembly of functional GABA(A) receptors in the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuromelanin-containing neurons within postmortem human locus coeruleus as demonstrated by in situ hybridization with specific gamma2 subunit oligonucleotides and autoradiographic assay for flumazenil-sensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 binding to benzodiazepine sites. These sites were also sensitive to the alpha1 subunit-preferring agonist zolpidem. Our data suggest a species difference in the expression profiles of the alpha1 and gamma2 subunits in the locus coeruleus, with the sedation-related benzodiazepine sites being more important in man than rodents. This may explain the repeated failures in the transition of novel drugs with a promising neuropharmacological profile in rodents to human clinical usage, due to intolerable sedative effects. PMID:20417252

  19. Genetic Markers of a Munc13 Protein Family Member, BAIAP3, Are Gender Specifically Associated with Anxiety and Benzodiazepine Abuse in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Sonja M; Tantra, Martesa; Stepniak, Beata; Man, Kwun-nok M; Müller-Ribbe, Katja; Begemann, Martin; Ju, Anes; Papiol, Sergi; Ronnenberg, Anja; Gurvich, Artem; Shin, Yong; Augustin, Iris; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance abuse, including benzodiazepine use disorder, frequently occur together. Unfortunately, treatment of anxiety disorders still includes benzodiazepines, and patients with an existing comorbid benzodiazepine use disorder or a genetic susceptibility for benzodiazepine use disorder may be at risk of adverse treatment outcomes. The identification of genetic predictors for anxiety disorders, and especially for benzodiazepine use disorder, could aid the selection of the best treatment option and improve clinical outcomes. The brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor I–associated protein 3 (Baiap3) is a member of the mammalian uncoordinated 13 (Munc13) protein family of synaptic regulators of neurotransmitter exocytosis, with a striking expression pattern in amygdalae, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray. Deletion of Baiap3 in mice leads to enhanced seizure propensity and increased anxiety, with the latter being more pronounced in female than in male animals. We hypothesized that genetic variation in human BAIAP3 may also be associated with anxiety. By using a phenotype-based genetic association study, we identified two human BAIAP3 single-nucleotide polymorphism risk genotypes (AA for rs2235632, TT for rs1132358) that show a significant association with anxiety in women and, surprisingly, with benzodiazepine abuse in men. Returning to mice, we found that male, but not female, Baiap3 knockout (KO) mice develop tolerance to diazepam more quickly than control animals. Analysis of cultured Baiap3 KO hypothalamus slices revealed an increase in basal network activity and an altered response to diazepam withdrawal. Thus, Baiap3/BAIAP3 is gender specifically associated with anxiety and benzodiazepine use disorder, and the analysis of Baiap3/BAIAP3-related functions may help elucidate mechanisms underlying the development of both disorders. PMID:23698091

  20. Genetic markers of a Munc13 protein family member, BAIAP3, are gender specifically associated with anxiety and benzodiazepine abuse in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Sonja M; Tantra, Martesa; Stepniak, Beata; Man, Kwun-Nok M; Müller-Ribbe, Katja; Begemann, Martin; Ju, Anes; Papiol, Sergi; Ronnenberg, Anja; Gurvich, Artem; Shin, Yong; Augustin, Iris; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance abuse, including benzodiazepine use disorder, frequently occur together. Unfortunately, treatment of anxiety disorders still includes benzodiazepines, and patients with an existing comorbid benzodiazepine use disorder or a genetic susceptibility for benzodiazepine use disorder may be at risk of adverse treatment outcomes. The identification of genetic predictors for anxiety disorders, and especially for benzodiazepine use disorder, could aid the selection of the best treatment option and improve clinical outcomes. The brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor I-associated protein 3 (Baiap3) is a member of the mammalian uncoordinated 13 (Munc13) protein family of synaptic regulators of neurotransmitter exocytosis, with a striking expression pattern in amygdalae, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray. Deletion of Baiap3 in mice leads to enhanced seizure propensity and increased anxiety, with the latter being more pronounced in female than in male animals. We hypothesized that genetic variation in human BAIAP3 may also be associated with anxiety. By using a phenotype-based genetic association study, we identified two human BAIAP3 single-nucleotide polymorphism risk genotypes (AA for rs2235632, TT for rs1132358) that show a significant association with anxiety in women and, surprisingly, with benzodiazepine abuse in men. Returning to mice, we found that male, but not female, Baiap3 knockout (KO) mice develop tolerance to diazepam more quickly than control animals. Analysis of cultured Baiap3 KO hypothalamus slices revealed an increase in basal network activity and an altered response to diazepam withdrawal. Thus, Baiap3/BAIAP3 is gender specifically associated with anxiety and benzodiazepine use disorder, and the analysis of Baiap3/BAIAP3-related functions may help elucidate mechanisms underlying the development of both disorders. PMID:23698091

  1. Increase in omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine) binding sites in the rat cortex and striatum after local injection of interleukin-1, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Bourdiol, F; Toulmond, S; Serrano, A; Benavides, J; Scatton, B

    1991-03-15

    The possible involvement of lymphokines in the glial reaction/proliferation that follows brain injury has been investigated by measuring the density of omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine) binding sites associated to glial cells and macrophages after local injection of lymphokines in the rat cerebral cortex and striatum. omega 3 Site densities were measured either by quantitative autoradiography in brain sections or by conventional binding in membrane using [3H]PK 14105 or [3H]PK 11195 as ligands. Intracortical or intrastriatal infusion of interleukin-1 (10 and 20 units) caused a marked increase in the density of omega 3 sites (+83% and +80%, respectively, when compared to saline-infused animals) around the injection site at 7 days postinjection. There was a good spatial correspondence between the autoradiographic distribution of omega 3 sites and the distribution of reactive astrocytes (as assessed by GFAP immunostaining) or acid phosphatase rich cells (phagocytes). Significant increases in omega 3 site densities were also observed in striatal homogenates 1 week after local administration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The maximal increase (+80%) was observed after the administration of 3 units, higher and lower doses resulting in smaller increases. Intrastriatal injection of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin known to stimulate interleukin-1 and TNF-alpha production by microglial cells in culture, also resulted in significant increases in omega 3 site densities in striatal homogenates (maximal increase, +170% 1 week after the injection of 200 ng).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1647831

  2. Omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) site distribution in the rat immune system: an autoradiographic study with the photoaffinity ligand (/sup 3/H)PK 14105

    SciTech Connect

    Benavides, J.; Dubois, A.; Dennis, T.; Hamel, E.; Scatton, B.

    1989-04-01

    The anatomical distribution of omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) sites in the immune system organs of the rat has been studied autoradiographically at both macroscopic and microscopic levels of resolution using either reversible or irreversible (UV irradiation) labeling with (/sup 3/H)PK 14105. In thymus sections, (/sup 3/H)PK 14105 labeled with high affinity (Kd, derived from saturation experiments = 10.8 nM) a single population of sites which possessed the pharmacological characteristics of omega 3 sites. In the thymus gland, higher omega 3 site densities were detected in the cortex than in the medulla; in these subregions, silver grains were associated to small (10-18 microns diameter) cells. In the spleen, omega 3 sites were more abundant in the white than in the red pulp. In the white pulp, silver grains were denser in the marginal zone than in the vicinity of the central artery and labeling was, as in the thymus, associated to small cytoplasm-poor cells. In the red pulp, omega 3 site associated silver grains were observed mainly in the Bilroth cords. In the lymph nodes, the medullary region showed a higher labeling than the surrounding follicles and paracortex. A significant accumulation of silver grains was observed in the lymph node medullary cords. In the intestine, Peyer patches were particularly enriched in omega 3 sites (especially in the periphery of the follicles). The distribution of omega 3 sites in the immune system organs suggests a preferential labeling of cells of T and monocytic lineages. This is consistent with the proposed immunoregulatory properties of some omega 3 site ligands.

  3. Changes of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in the penumbra area after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury and effects of astragaloside IV on rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y L; Chen, C F; Wang, A W; Feng, Y B; Cheng, H X; Zhang, W W; Xin, W

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) in the penumbra after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, and examined the effects of astragaloside IV (AST) on PBRs in rats. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a sham operation group, a model group, and three AST treatment groups. Cerebral ischemic models were induced by the clue-blocked method. Neurological deficits were examined. The animals were sacrificed after 2 h of ischemia and 24 h of reperfusion, and mitochondria from the penumbra were purified. PBR density (Bmax) and affinity were measured by radioligand assays. Mitochondrial [(3)H]PK11195 binding was correlated with neurological deficits in rats. Compared to the model group, the 10 mg/kg AST group, 40 mg/kg AST group, and 100 mg/kg AST group had fewer neurological deficits. The effects in the 40 mg/ kg group did not significantly differ from the effects in the 100 mg/ kg group. Compared to the model group, the 10 mg/kg AST group, 40 mg/kg group, and 100 mg/kg group had a decreased Bmax in the penumbra. The Bmax decreased in the 40 mg/kg AST group and in the 100 mg/kg AST group compared with the 10 mg/kg group. The Bmax and neurological deficits in the 40 mg/kg did not significantly differ from those in the 100 mg/kg group. By contrast, the AST-treated rats showed no significant changes in the binding parameter equilibrium dissociation constant compared with those in the sham operation group and the model group. AST protects ischemic brain tissue by inhibiting PBR expression after cerebral ischemia. PMID:25729960

  4. Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]PBR111 and [18F]PBR102 using the Tracerlab FXFN and Tracerlab MXFDG module for imaging the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor with PET.

    PubMed

    Bourdier, Thomas; Pham, Tien Q; Henderson, David; Jackson, Timothy; Lam, Peter; Izard, Michael; Katsifis, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    [(18)F]PBR111 and [(18)F]PBR102 are selective radioligands for imaging of the Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor (PBR). We have developed a fully automated method for the radiosynthesis of [(18)F]PBR111 and [(18)F]PBR102 in the Tracerlab FX(FN) (30±2% radiochemical yield non-decay-corrected for both tracers) and Tracerlab MX(FDG) (25±2% radiochemical yield non-decay-corrected for both tracers) from the corresponding p-toluenesulfonyl precursors. For all tracers, radiochemical purity was >99% and specific activity was >150GBq/μmol after less than 60min of preparation time. PMID:21852142

  5. Stress-related changes of benzodiazepine binding inhibitory activity (B.B.I.A.) in humans.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, D; Michelini, S; Giannaccini, G; Martini, C; Castrogiovanni, P; Cassano, G B; Lucacchini, A

    1990-01-01

    The presence of benzodiazepine binding inhibitory activity (B.B.I.A.) in sera from 44 psychiatric patients and from 14 healthy volunteers, prompted us to investigate whether or not this activity underwent changes in stressful situations. We measured the inhibitory units (IU) of deproteinized sera of 12 subjects, immediately before and 2 weeks after sitting for a difficult university exam. Our results showed significantly higher IU values (i.e., higher B.B.I.A. concentrations) in the samples taken just before the exam. This preliminary finding clearly suggests the involvement of B.B.I.A. in anxiety mechanisms. PMID:2362542

  6. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, A.G.; Papadopoulos, V.; Costa, E.; Krueger, K.E. )

    1989-12-01

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4{prime}-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit {sup 3}H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations.

  7. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25310406

  8. Probing the Peripheral Site of Human Butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) catalyze the hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and, thereby, function as coregulators of cholinergic neurotransmission. For both enzymes, hydrolysis takes place near the bottom of a 20 Å deep active site gorge. A number of amino acid residues within the gorge have been identified as important in facilitating efficient catalysis and inhibitor binding. Of particular interest is the catalytic triad, consisting of serine, histidine, and glutamate residues, that mediates hydrolysis. Another site influencing the catalytic process is located above the catalytic triad toward the periphery of the active site gorge. This peripheral site (P-site) contains a number of aromatic amino acid residues as well as an aspartate residue that is able to interact with cationic substrates and guide them down the gorge to the catalytic triad. In human AChE, certain aryl residues in the vicinity of the anionic aspartate residue (D74), such as W286, have been implicated in ligand binding and have therefore been considered part of the P-site of the enzyme. The present study was undertaken to explore the P-site of human BuChE and determine whether, like AChE, aromatic side chains near the peripheral aspartate (D70) of this enzyme contribute to ligand binding. Results obtained, utilizing inhibitor competition studies and BuChE mutant species, indicate the participation of aryl residues (F329 and Y332) in the E-helix component of the BuChE active site gorge, along with the anionic aspartate residue (D70), in binding ligands to the P-site of the enzyme. PMID:22901043

  9. A radioreceptor assay to study the affinity of benzodiazepines and their receptor binding activity in human plasma including their active metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Dorow, R G; Seidler, J; Schneider, H H

    1982-01-01

    1 A radioreceptor assay has been established to measure the receptor affinities of numerous benzodiazepines in clinical use. 2 The time course of receptor binding activity was studied by this method in the plasma of eight healthy subjects randomly treated with 1 mg lormetazepam (Noctamid, 2 mg flunitrazepam (Rohypnol, and 10 mg diazepam (Valium, and placebo on a cross-over basis. Blood samples were collected up to 154 h after treatment. 3 Receptor affinities of numerous benzodiazepines on vitro show good correlation with therapeutic human doses (r = 0.96) and may be predictive of drug potency in man. 4 Mean peak plasma levels of lormetazepam binding equivalents were 4.8 +/- 1 ng/ml at 2 h after lormetazepam, 7.2 +/- 1.8 ng/ml at 8 h after flunitrazepam, and 17.9 +/- 2.7 ng/ml at 15 h after diazepam. Plasma elimination half-lives of benzodiazepine binding equivalents were 9.3, 23 and 63 h, respectively. 5 Slow elimination of benzodiazepine binding equivalents following flunitrazepam and diazepam may be due to persistent active metabolites. PMID:6121579

  10. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes α1β2γ(2S), α2β2γ(2S), α3β2γ(2S), α5β2γ(2S) and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) GABA(A)Rs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold) as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(A)R than at the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non-selective modulation

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of substituted [18F]imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines and [18F]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines for the study of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Fookes, Christopher J R; Pham, Tien Q; Mattner, Filomena; Greguric, Ivan; Loc'h, Christian; Liu, Xiang; Berghofer, Paula; Shepherd, Rachael; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Katsifis, Andrew

    2008-07-10

    The fluoroethoxy and fluoropropoxy substituted 2-(6-chloro-2-phenyl)imidazo[1,2- a]pyridin-3-yl)- N, N-diethylacetamides 8 (PBR102) and 12 (PBR111) and 2-phenyl-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidin-3-yl)- N, N-diethylacetamides 15 (PBR099) and 18 (PBR146) were synthesized and found to have high in vitro affinity and selectivity for the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) when compared with the central benzodiazepine receptors (CBRs). The corresponding radiolabeled compounds [ (18)F] 8 [ (18)F] 12, [ (18)F] 15, and [ (18)F] 18 were prepared from their p-toluenesulfonyl precursors in 50-85% radiochemical yield. In biodistribution studies in rats, the distribution of radioactivity of the [ (18)F]PBR compounds paralleled the known localization of PBRs. In the olfactory bulbs, where the uptake of radioactivity was higher than in the rest of the brain, PK11195 and Ro 5-4864 were able to significantly inhibit [ (18)F] 12, while little or no pharmacological action of these established PBR drugs were observed on the uptake of [ (18)F] 8, [ (18)F] 15, and [ (18)F] 18 compared to control animals. Hence, [ (18)F] 12 appeared to be the best candidate for evaluation as an imaging agent for PBR expression in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:18557607

  12. Preferential affinity of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quazepam for type I benzodiazepine recognition sites in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, M.G.; Giorgi, O.; Longoni, B.; Ongini, E.; Montaldo, S.; Biggio, G.

    1988-01-01

    The hypnotic drug quazepam and its active metabolite 2-oxo-quazepam (2-oxo-quaz) are two benzodiazepines (BZ) containing a trifluoroethyl moiety on the ring nitrogen at position 1, characterized by their preferential affinity for Type I BZ recognition sites. In the present study we characterized the binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz in discrete areas of the human brain. Saturation analysis demonstrated specific and saturable binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz to membrane preparations from human cerebellum. Hill plot analysis of displacement curves of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding by 2-oxo-quaz yielded Hill coefficients of approximately 1 in the cerebellum and significantly less than 1 in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and pons. Self and cross displacement curves for /sup 3/H-FNT and /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz binding in these brain areas indicated that 2-oxo-quaz binds with different affinities to two populations of binding sites. High affinity binding sites were more abundant in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus, whereas low affinity sites were predominant in the caudate nucleus and pons. Competition studies of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz and /sup 3/H-FNT using unlabelled ligands indicated that compounds which preferentially bind to Type I sites are more potent at displacing /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz than /sup 3/H-FNT from cerebral cortex membrane preparations. 26 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Human peripheral blood eosinophils induce angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puxeddu, Ilaria; Alian, Akram; Piliponsky, Adrian Martin; Ribatti, Domenico; Panet, Amos; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2005-03-01

    Eosinophils play a crucial role in allergic reactions and asthma. They are also involved in responses against parasites, in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and in fibroses. There is increasing evidence that angiogenesis plays an important role in these processes. Since eosinophils are known to produce angiogenic mediators, we have hypothesized a direct contribution of these cells to angiogenesis. The effect of human peripheral blood eosinophil sonicates on rat aortic endothelial cell proliferation (in vitro), rat aorta sprouting (ex vivo) and angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (in vivo) have been investigated. To determine whether eosinophil-derived vascular endothelial growth factor influences the eosinophil pro-angiogenic activity, eosinophil sonicates were incubated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies and then added to the chorioallantoic membrane. Vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor density on the endothelial cells were also evaluated. Eosinophils were found to enhance endothelial cell proliferation and to induce a strong angiogenic response both in the aorta rings and in the chorioallantoic membrane assays. Pre-incubation of eosinophil sonicates with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies partially reduced the angiogenic response of these cells in the chorioallantoic membrane. Eosinophils also increased vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA production on endothelial cells. Eosinophils are able to induce angiogenesis and this effect is partially mediated by their pre-formed vascular endothelial growth factor. This strongly suggests an important role of eosinophils in angiogenesis-associated diseases such as asthma. PMID:15618019

  14. Increase in IL-6, IL-1 and TNF levels in rat brain following traumatic lesion. Influence of pre- and post-traumatic treatment with Ro5 4864, a peripheral-type (p site) benzodiazepine ligand.

    PubMed

    Taupin, V; Toulmond, S; Serrano, A; Benavides, J; Zavala, F

    1993-02-01

    The effects of fluid percussion trauma on brain interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels have been studied. In the cortex and hippocampus of control and sham-operated rats, the levels of these cytokines were very low (below 4 units/mg protein) and constant. IL-6 and IL-1 levels in the ipsilateral cortex increased rapidly following trauma to reach a maximum of 350 and 16 units/mg protein, respectively, 8 h after the lesion, remained elevated until 18 h and decreased thereafter to basal values. TNF-alpha levels were maximally elevated (12 units/mg protein) at 3 h and 8 h and returned to basal values by 18 h. Qualitatively similar changes, but with 25-80-fold smaller amplitude, were seen in the contralateral cortex and in the ipsi- and contralateral hippocampus. The levels of IL-6 in the plasma of sham-operated and lesioned rats were only slightly elevated, whereas IL-1 and TNF-alpha were undetectable. Histological studies of brain tissue at early stages after trauma demonstrated an acute hemorrhage associated with neutrophil invasion. The administration of Ro5 4864 (0.5 mg/kg i.p.), a specific ligand of p (peripheral-type benzodiazepine) binding sites, did not result in any significant effect on the levels of IL-6, IL-1 or TNF-alpha in the brain of control or sham-operated animals. However, when administered 24 h before or 15 min after trauma, this benzodiazepine enhanced the increase of these cytokines by 2-4-fold in the ipsilateral cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8429103

  15. Benzodiazepine antagonism by aminophylline.

    PubMed

    Høegholm, A; Steptoe, P; Fogh, B; Caldara, A; Pedersen, C

    1989-02-01

    A double-blind, randomised study was performed to investigate whether aminophylline could reverse the sedative effect of benzodiazepine and if it could shorten the observation time necessary after benzodiazepine sedation. Forty patients undergoing minor abdominal, urogenital or lower extremity surgery were given benzodiazepine to maintain a state of deep sedation after spinal or epidural analgesia was achieved. Postoperatively, the patients received either aminophylline, 110 mg, or physiological saline intravenously. The aminophylline-treated patients showed a significantly more rapid reversal of sedation, but after 30 min there was no difference between the two groups. It is concluded that aminophylline antagonizes the sedative effect of benzodiazepine, but in routine benzodiazepine sedation, aminophylline will not shorten the necessary observation period after sedation. PMID:2564243

  16. The history of benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2013-09-01

    After more than 50 years of experience with benzodiazepines, the American health care system has a love-hate relationship with them. In 1955, Hoffmann-La Roche chemist Leo Sternbach serendipitously identified the first benzodiazepine, chlordiazepoxide (Librium). By 1960, Hoffmann-La Roche marketed it as Librium, and it pursued molecular modifications for enhanced activity. Valium (diazepam) followed in 1963. Hoffmann-La Roche's competitors also began looking for analogues. Initially, benzodiazepines appeared to be less toxic and less likely to cause dependence than older drugs. A specific improvement was their lack of respiratory depression, a safety concern with barbiturates. Medical professionals greeted benzodiazepines enthusiastically at first, skyrocketing their popularity and patient demand. In the mid-to-late 1970s, benzodiazepines topped all "most frequently prescribed" lists. It took 15 years for researchers to associate benzodiazepines and their effect on gamma-aminobutyric acid as a mechanism of action. By the 1980s, clinicians' earlier enthusiasm and propensity to prescribe created a new concern: the specter of abuse and dependence. As information about benzodiazepines, both raising and damning, accumulated, medical leaders and legislators began to take action. The result: individual benzodiazepines and the entire class began to appear on guidelines and in legislation giving guidance on their use. Concurrently, clinicians began to raise concerns about benzodiazepine use by elderly patients, indicating that elders'lesser therapeutic response and heightened sensitivity to side effects demanded prescriber caution. The benzodiazepine story continues to evolve and includes modern-day issues and concerns beyond those ever anticipated. PMID:24007886

  17. The regulation of central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Boivin, D B

    2009-11-01

    Many circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as clocks located in other brain regions and most peripheral tissues. These central and peripheral clocks are based on clock genes and their protein products. In recent years, the expression of clock genes has started to be investigated in human samples, primarily white blood cells, but also skin, oral mucosa, colon cells, adipose tissue as well as post-mortem brain tissue. The expression of clock genes in those peripheral tissues offers a way to monitor human peripheral clocks and to compare their function and regulation with those of the central clock, which is followed by markers such as melatonin, cortisol and core body temperature. We have recently used such an approach to compare central and peripheral rhythms in subjects under different lighting conditions. In particular, we have monitored the entrainment of the clock of blood cells in subjects undergoing a simulated night shift protocol with bright light treatment, known to efficiently reset the central clock. This line of research will be helpful for learning more about the human circadian system and to find ways to alleviate health problems of shift workers, and other populations experiencing altered circadian rhythms. PMID:19849799

  18. A rapid ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous determination of seven benzodiazepines in human plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Purificación; González, Cristina; Pena, M Teresa; Carro, Antonia M; Lorenzo, Rosa A

    2013-03-12

    A simple and efficient ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) method has been developed for the determination of seven benzodiazepines (alprazolam, bromazepam, clonazepam, diazepam, lorazepam, lormetazepam and tetrazepam) in human plasma samples. Chloroform and methanol were used as extractant and disperser solvents, respectively. The influence of several variables (e.g., type and volume of dispersant and extraction solvents, pH, ultrasonic time and ionic strength) was carefully evaluated and optimized, using an asymmetric screening design 3(2)4(2)//16. Analysis of extracts was performed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection (UPLC-PDA). Under the optimum conditions, two reversed-phases, Shield RP18 and C18 columns were successfully tested, obtaining good linearity in a range of 0.01-5μgmL(-1), with correlation coefficients r>0.996. Quantification limits ranged between 4.3-13.2ngmL(-1) and 4.0-14.8ngmL(-1), were obtained for C18 and Shield RP18 columns, respectively. The optimized method exhibited a good precision level, with relative standard deviation values lower than 8%. The recoveries studied at two spiked levels, ranged from 71 to 102% for all considered compounds. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of seven benzodiazepines in real human plasma samples. PMID:23452791

  19. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely. PMID:27024905

  20. Benzodiazepine metabolism: an analytical perspective.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Mercolini, Laura; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are currently among the most frequently prescribed drugs all over the world. They act as anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics, amnesics, antiepileptics and muscle relaxants. Despite their common chemical scaffold, these drugs differ in their pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. In particular, they are biotransformed by different cytochrome P450 isoforms and also by different UDP-glucuronosyltransferase subtypes. The most important studies on the metabolic characteristics of several 1,4-benzodiazepines, carried out from 1998 onwards, are reported and briefly discussed in this review. Moreover, the analytical methods related to these studies are also described and commented upon and their most important characteristics are highlighted. Most methods are based on liquid chromatography, which provides wide applicability and good analytical performance granting high precision, accuracy and feasibility. Mass spectrometry is gaining widespread acceptance, particularly if the matrix is very complex and variable, such as human or animal blood. However, spectrophotometric detection is still used for this purpose and can grant sufficient selectivity and sensitivity when coupled to suitable sample pre-treatment procedures. A monograph is included for each of the following benzodiazepines: alprazolam, bromazepam, brotizolam, clotiazepam, diazepam, etizolam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, midazolam, oxazepam and triazolam. PMID:18855614

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. ); Nicoletti, G. ); Holan, G. )

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  2. The use of microcomputer-based psychomotor tests for the evaluation of benzodiazepine effects on human performance: a review with emphasis on temazepam.

    PubMed Central

    Kunsman, G W; Manno, J E; Manno, B R; Kunsman, C M; Przekop, M A

    1992-01-01

    1. The literature relating to the effects of benzodiazepines in general, and temazepam in particular, on human psychomotor performance as assessed using microcomputer-based testing batteries is surveyed. 2. The adverse effects of central nervous system depressants on performance is an important mediocolegal issue and frequently comes into question in on-the-road and on-the-job accidents. The use of microcomputer-based testing batteries allows for performance evaluation both in the laboratory and at-the-scene, as well as providing the opportunity to model a large number of different behaviours required in routine yet complex psychomotor tasks. 3. The conclusions in general are: (1) The benzodiazepines as a class of drugs impair both cognitive and motor performance. These effects are often subtle when low doses are involved or when testing occurs the morning following evening administration of the medication. (2) No single psychomotor task adequately simulates complex daily tasks such as automobile driving. A battery of tests that evaluates a number of the components of such tasks is necessary to determine adequately the full range of effects of these medications. PMID:1457261

  3. Gnathic and peripheral ameloblastomas lack human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Verduin, Lindsey; Bishop, Justin; Mills, Stacey E

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with a variety of head and neck neoplasms, including squamous cell carcinomas and Schneiderian papillomas. Ameloblastomas can arise from either the gnathic bones or peripheral soft tissues. Peripheral sinonasal ameloblastomas share clinical features with Schneiderian papillomas. A small number of reports have described detection of HPV DNA within ameloblastomas. However, Most of these cases was reported in the 1990s, used the polymerase chain reaction technique, and only examined gnathic tumors. The current study was designed to determine whether low- or high-risk HPV DNA could be detected in gnathic or peripheral ameloblastomas using in situ hybridization. Twenty-nine examples of gnathic osseous and peripheral head and neck ameloblastomas were obtained from the authors' archives (University of Virginia and the Johns Hopkins Hospital). High-risk HPV DNA was not detected in any of the 29 tumors analyzed. Low-risk HPV DNA was identified in only 1 tumor, which was peripheral in origin, and from an immunocompromised patient. We believe that the HPV in this case represents a background "passenger" infection. This study demonstrates that HPV of either high- or low-risk subtypes is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of sinonasal ameloblastomas. PMID:26190154

  4. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  5. Peripheral Fat Loss and Decline in Adipogenesis in Older Humans

    PubMed Central

    CASO, Giuseppe; MCNURLAN, Margaret A; MILEVA, Izolda; ZEMLYAK, Alla; MYNARCIK, Dennis C; GELATO, Marie C

    2012-01-01

    Objective Aging is associated with a redistribution of body fat including a relative loss of subcutaneous peripheral fat. These changes in body fat can have important clinical consequences since they are linked to increased risk of metabolic complications. The causes and mechanisms of loss of peripheral fat associated with aging are not clear. The aim of this study was to assess whether defects in adipogenesis contribute to fat loss in aging humans, as suggested from animal studies, and to evaluate the role of inflammation on pathogenesis of fat loss. Materials/Methods Preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous peripheral fat of healthy young and elderly subjects were compared in their ability to replicate and differentiate. Results The results show that both the rate of replication and differentiation of preadipocytes are reduced in older subjects. The reduction in adipogenesis is accompanied by a higher plasma level of the inflammatory marker, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, and greater release of tumor necrosis factor α from fat tissue. Conclusions Thus, the gradual relative loss of peripheral fat in aging humans may in part result from a defect in adipogenesis, which may be linked to inflammation and increased release of proinflammatory cytokines from fat tissue. PMID:22999012

  6. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; de Loyola, Antônio Ignácio; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population. PMID:26039388

  7. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the "signs, meanings, and actions" model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were "nervousness", "sleep problems", and "worry" due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life's problems in old age. Although it relieves the "nerves", the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population. PMID:26039388

  8. Activation of the Peripheral Endocannabinoid System in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C.; Sharma, Arya M.; Jordan, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by −34% for CB-1 and −59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity. PMID:16186383

  9. Activation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M; Jordan, Jens

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by -34% for CB-1 and -59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity. PMID:16186383

  10. Are human peripheral nerves sensitive to X-ray imaging?

    PubMed

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O'Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  11. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  12. [Benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of insomnia shows an age-associated increase. Especially, persons with age over 60 years frequently suffer from arousal during sleep and early-morning awakening. The reason of this phenomenon can be explained by age-related change in sleepwake regulation, comorbid diseases and psycho-social status. Benzodiazepine derivatives and benzodiazepine agonists have been widely used for treatment of insomnia. These GABA-A receptor agonist hypnotics have sedative effect, possibly causing various adverse events, i.e. falls and hip fracture, anterograde amnesia, next morning hangover especially in the elderly. When making a choice of treatment drugs for the elderly, low dose benzodiazepine hypnotics with relatively high Ω1-selectivity, and newer hypnotics including melatonic receptor agonist or orexin receptor antagonist can become important candidates considering their comorbid diseases or drug interaction with other medications. PMID:26065134

  13. A novel 2,3-benzodiazepine-4-one derivative AMPA antagonist inhibits G2/M transition and induces apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat T cell line.

    PubMed

    Parenti, S; Casagrande, G; Montanari, M; Espahbodinia, M; Ettari, R; Grande, A; Corsi, L

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown that the antagonism of glutamate receptors activity was able inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several neuronal and non-neuronal cancer cell lines. In addition, it has been shown that glutamate might facilitate the spread and growth of leukemia T cells through interactions with AMPA receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of cell cycle elicited by a novel 2,3-benzodiazepine-4-one non-competitive AMPA antagonist derivative in the human leukemia Jurkat T cells. Our results indicated that the 1-(4-amino-3,5-dimethylphenyl)-3,5-dihydro-7,8-ethylenedioxy-4h-2,3-benzodiazepin-4-one, named 1g, exerted a significant growth inhibition of leukemia Jurkat T cells in a time and dose dependent manner, arresting the transition of G2/M phase through activation of Myt-1. The molecule also induced apoptosis through the enhanced expression of the pro-apoptotic p53, and the inhibition of Bcl-2, and Bcl-xl, followed by the activation of caspase-3. The results suggested that compound 1g might act mostly as a cytostatic rather than cytotoxic compound. Although further studies are necessary, in order to identify others specific pathways involved in the activity of the present molecule, the presented results identified a novel molecule acting on specific G2/M checkpoint regulation pathway. Finally, our data suggest that compound 1g might be a good molecule for future development in the cancer research. PMID:27178220

  14. New tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione derivatives are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication and are synergistic with 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Debyser, Z; Kukla, M J; Schols, D; Breslin, H J; Woestenborghs, R; Desmyter, J; Janssen, M A; De Clercq, E

    1994-01-01

    Tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione (TIBO) derivatives were shown to specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication through a unique interaction with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Through further modification of the lead compounds and structure-activity relationship analysis several new TIBO derivatives that show high potency, selectivity, and specificity against HIV-1 have been obtained. A new TIBO derivative, R86183, inhibits the replication of HIV-1, but not HIV-2, in a variety of CD4+ T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes, at a concentration of 0.3 to 30 nM, which is at least 4 orders of magnitude lower than the 50% cytotoxic concentration. Whereas an HIV-1 strain containing the Leu-100-->Ile mutation in the RT gene is about 400-fold less susceptible, R86183 still inhibits the replication of an HIV-1 strain containing the Tyr-181-->Cys RT mutation by 50% at a concentration of 130 nM. R86183 inhibits the poly(C).oligo(dG)12-18-directed HIV-1 RT reaction by 50% at a concentration of 57 nM. The antiviral activity of 22 TIBO derivatives in cell culture correlated well with their activity against HIV-1 RT. No such correlation was found for their cytotoxicity. The combination of R86183 with either zidovudine or didanosine resulted in a synergistic inhibition of HIV-1 (strain IIIB) replication. Combination of R86183 with the protease inhibitor Ro31-8959 was found to be additive. Also described is a dilution protocol circumventing overestimation and underestimation of antiviral activity due to adherence to plastic surfaces. Images PMID:7535037

  15. Inorganic arsenite alters macrophage generation from human peripheral blood monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Teruaki . E-mail: sakurai@ls.toyaku.ac.jp; Ohta, Takami; Fujiwara, Kitao

    2005-03-01

    Inorganic arsenite has caused severe inflammatory chronic poisoning in humans through the consumption of contaminated well water. In this study, we examined the effects of arsenite at nanomolar concentrations on the in vitro differentiation of human macrophages from peripheral blood monocytes. While arsenite was found to induce cell death in a culture system containing macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), macrophages induced by granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) survived the treatment, but were morphologically, phenotypically, and functionally altered. In particular, arsenite-induced cells expressed higher levels of a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen, HLA-DR, and CD14. They were more effective at inducing allogeneic or autologous T cell responses and responded more strongly to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by inflammatory cytokine release as compared to cells induced by GM-CSF alone. On the other hand, arsenite-induced cells expressed lower levels of CD11b and CD54 and phagocytosed latex beads or zymosan particles less efficiently. We also demonstrated that the optimum amount of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by nM arsenite might play an important role in this abnormal monocyte differentiation. This work may have implications in chronic arsenic poisoning because the total peripheral blood arsenic concentrations of these patients are at nM levels.

  16. Myeloperoxidase in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: Production and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Okada, Sabrina Sayori; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; de Araújo, Tomaz Henrique; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Nakaya, Helder Imoto; Campa, Ana; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important enzyme in the front-line protection against microorganisms. In peripheral blood, it is accepted that MPO is only produced by myeloid-lineage cells. Thus, MPO presence is unexpected in lymphocytes. We showed recently that B1-lymphocytes from mice have MPO. Here, we showed that subsets of human peripheral B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes express MPO. The content of MPO in lymphocytes was very low compared to neutrophils/monocytes with a preferential distribution in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Also, we performed a MPO mRNA expression analysis from human blood cells derived from microarray raw data publicly available, showing that MPO is modulated in infectious disease. MPO was increased in CD4(+) T lymphocytes from HIV chronic infection and in CD8(+) T lymphocytes from HCV-positive patients. Our study points out MPO as a multifunctional protein due to its subcellular localization and expression modulation in lymphocytes indicating alternative unknown functions for MPO in lymphocytes. PMID:26632272

  17. Simultaneous Separation of Eight Benzodiazepines in Human Urine Using Field-Amplified Sample Stacking Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Oledzka, Ilona; Kulińska, Zofia; Prahl, Adam; Baczek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for the simultaneous quantification of eight benzodiazepines (BZDs) using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and field-amplified sample stacking (FASS) combined with micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was investigated and evaluated in the context of precision, accuracy, sensitivity, linearity, detection and limits of quantification (LOQ). The absolute recovery rates of BZDs were above 90.65%. The limits of detection (LOD) were 20 ng/mL for chlordiazepoxide, estazolam, temazepam and midazolam, and 30 ng/mL for clonazepam, lorazepam, lormetazepam and medazepam, while the LOQ was set at 50 ng/mL for chlordiazepoxide, estazolam, temazepam and midazolam, and 100 ng/mL for clonazepam, lorazepam, lormetazepam and medazepam. Linearity was confirmed in the range of 50-2,000 ng/mL for chlordiazepoxide, estazolam, temazepam and midazolam, and 100-2,000 ng/mL for clonazepam, lorazepam, lormetazepam and medazepam, with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9987 for all analytes. The elaborated procedure meets all the requirements of analytical methods. During the extraction procedure, a mixture of 1 mL of ethanol and 500 µL of dichloromethane, used as the disperser and extraction solvent, respectively, was rapidly injected into 3 mL of a urine sample. A significant improvement in sensitivity was achieved when DLLME was used to extract BZDs from the urine sample and FASS as an on-line preconcentration technique was developed. For the best separation of analytes, the running buffer was composed of 30 mM SDS, 10 mM sodium tetraborate and 15% methanol (pH 8.8), whereas a sample buffer was composed of 10 mM SDS and 2 mM sodium tetraborate. Moreover, a fused-silica capillary [inner diameter (i.d.) of 75 µm and length of 50 cm], photodiode array detection, pneumatic injection for 15 s and a voltage of 23 kV were applied. The applicability of the method has been confirmed for the analysis of BZD in urine samples collected from patients who

  18. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  19. Prokineticins in central and peripheral control of human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Wael; Brouillet, Sophie; Sergent, Frederic; Boufettal, Houssine; Samouh, Naima; Aboussaouira, Touria; Hoffmann, Pascale; Feige, Jean Jacques; Benharouga, Mohamed; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2015-11-01

    Prokineticin 1 (PROK1) and (PROK2), are two closely related proteins that were identified as the mammalian homologs of their two amphibian homologs, mamba intestinal toxin (MIT-1) and Bv8. PROKs activate two G-protein linked receptors (prokineticin receptor 1 and 2, PROKR1 and PROKR2). Both PROK1 and PROK2 have been found to regulate a stunning array of biological functions. In particular, PROKs stimulate gastrointestinal motility, thus accounting for their family name "prokineticins". PROK1 acts as a potent angiogenic mitogen, thus earning its other name, endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial factor. In contrast, PROK2 signaling pathway has been shown to be a critical regulator of olfactory bulb morphogenesis and sexual maturation. During the last decade, strong evidences established the key roles of prokineticins in the control of human central and peripheral reproductive processes. PROKs act as main regulators of the physiological functions of the ovary, uterus, placenta, and testis, with marked dysfunctions in various pathological conditions such as recurrent pregnancy loss, and preeclampsia. PROKs have also been associated to the tumor development of some of these organs. In the central system, prokineticins control the migration of GnRH neurons, a key process that controls reproductive functions. Importantly, mutations in PROK2 and PROKR2 are associated to the development of Kallmann syndrome, with direct consequences on the reproductive system. This review describes the finely tuned actions of prokineticins in the control of the central and peripheral reproductive processes. Also, it discusses future research directions for the use of these cytokines as diagnostic markers for several reproductive diseases. PMID:26574895

  20. Drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in the Madrid Region (Central Spain): seasonal variation in river waters, occurrence in tap water and potential environmental and human risk.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; Rodríguez-Gil, J L; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; López de Alda, M; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-09-01

    This work analyzes the seasonal variation (winter and summer) of ten drugs of abuse, six metabolites and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain. The occurrence of these compounds in tap water in this region is also investigated and a preliminary human health risk characterization performed for those substances found in tap water. Finally, a screening level risk assessment that combines the measured environmental concentrations (MECs) with dose-response data to estimate Hazard Quotients (HQs) for the compounds studied is also presented. The results of this study show the presence of fourteen out of the nineteen compounds analyzed in winter and twelve of them in summer. The most ubiquitous compounds, with a frequency of detection of 100% in both seasons, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) ephedrine (EPH), the opioid methadone (METH), the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three benzodiazepines investigated, namely alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). The highest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (1020ngL(-1) in winter and 250ngL(-1) in summer). The only compounds not detected in both seasons were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In terms of overall concentration, all sampling points presented higher concentrations in winter than in summer. Statistical analyses performed to gather evidence concerning occasional seasonal differences in the concentrations of individual substances between summer and winter showed statistically significantly higher concentrations (p<0.05) of BE, EPH and the opioid morphine (MOR) in winter than in summer. Two out of the nineteen compounds studied, namely cocaine (CO) and EPH

  1. Toward the Proteome of the Human Peripheral Blood Eosinophil

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Christof; Pazdrak, Konrad; Young, Travis W.; Stafford, Susan J.; Wu, Zheng; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Haag, Anthony M.; English, Robert D.; Soman, Kizhake V.; Kurosky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are granular leukocytes that have significant roles in many inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses, especially asthma and allergic diseases. We have undertaken a fairly comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified peripheral blood eosinophils from normal human donors primarily employing 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis with protein spot identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Protein subfractionation methods employed included isoelectric focusing (Zoom® Fractionator) and subcellular fractionation using differential protein solubilization. We have identified 3,141 proteins which had Mascot expectation scores of 10−3 or less. Of these 426 were unique and non-redundant of which 231 were novel proteins not previously reported to occur in eosinophils. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that some 70% of the non-redundant proteins could be subdivided into categories that are clearly related to currently known eosinophil biological activities. Cytoskeletal and associated proteins predominated among the proteins identified. Extensive protein posttranslational modifications were evident, many of which have not been previously reported that reflected the dynamic character of the eosinophil. This dataset of eosinophilic proteins will prove valuable in comparative studies of disease versus normal states and for studies of gender differences and polymorphic variation among individuals. PMID:21048890

  2. Discontinuing benzodiazepines: best practices.

    PubMed

    Guaiana, G; Barbui, C

    2016-06-01

    In July 2015, the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) released a Rapid Response report summary, with a critical appraisal, on discontinuation strategies for patients with long-term benzodiazepines (BDZ) use. The CADTH document is a review of the literature. It includes studies whose intervention is BDZ discontinuation. Also, clinical guidelines, systematic reviews and meta-analyses are included. What emerges from the CADTH guidelines is that the best strategy remains gradual tapering of BDZ with little evidence for the use of adjunctive medications. The results show that simple interventions such as discontinuation letters from clinicians, self-help information and support in general, added to gradual tapering may be associated with a two- to three-fold higher chance of successful withdrawal, compared with treatment as usual. We suggest possible implications for day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:26818890

  3. Acute overdosage with benzodiazepine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, D J; Allen, M D; Noel, B J; Shader, R I

    1977-04-01

    A total of 773 admissions to Massachusetts General Hospital between 1962 and 1975 were due to acute overdosage with one or more psychotropic drugs. Benzodiazepine overdosage, particularly with diazepam, increased relative to other psychotropic drugs over the years. Only 12 admissions were due to benzodiazepine overdosage alone, and none of these patients were seriously ill or had significant complications. Multiple drugs were ingested in the other 87 cases, and the frequency and severity of complications among these individuals depended upon the type and quantity of other nonbenzodiazepines taken. For example, 21 of 31 patients who ingested benzodiazepines together with barbiturates experienced severe central nervous system (CNS) depression, and 14 of 31 required assisted ventilation. However, the frequency of such complications was nearly identical in a group of patients who ingested barbiturates alone. This report and a review of the literature suggest that serious intoxication following overdosage with a benzodiazepine derivative alone is unusual. Ingestion of benzodiazepines together with other drugs appears to be considerably more common than benzodiazepine overdosage alone as a cause of intoxication. The severity of intoxication in such cases of multiple drug ingestion probably depends largely on the type and quantity of nonbenzodiazepines. PMID:14802

  4. Experimental Study on Effect of Simulated Microgravity on Structural Chromosome Instability of Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lijun; Liu, Chuanpeng; Kang, Li; Liu, Yufeng; Shi, Shuliang; Wu, Qiong; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study was made by keeping human peripheral blood lymphocytes under simulated microgravity in a Rotary Cell Culture System bioreactor to investigate the changes that occur in the number of chromosomes, the expression rate of chromosome fragile site, and the expressions of DNA replication- and repair-related genes. Experimental results indicate simulated microgravity has no effect on the numerical chromosome instability of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, but it enhances the structural chromosome instability of human peripheral blood lymphocytes through the inhibition of DNA replication and the reduction of DNA repair. So, the mechanism of chromosome fragile site induced by simulated microgravity can be explained using the changes that occur in the chromosome structure of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, the DNA replication and repair under the effect of simulated microgravity. PMID:24963972

  5. Experimental study on effect of simulated microgravity on structural chromosome instability of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lijun; Liu, Chuanpeng; Kang, Li; Liu, Yufeng; Shi, Shuliang; Wu, Qiong; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study was made by keeping human peripheral blood lymphocytes under simulated microgravity in a Rotary Cell Culture System bioreactor to investigate the changes that occur in the number of chromosomes, the expression rate of chromosome fragile site, and the expressions of DNA replication- and repair-related genes. Experimental results indicate simulated microgravity has no effect on the numerical chromosome instability of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, but it enhances the structural chromosome instability of human peripheral blood lymphocytes through the inhibition of DNA replication and the reduction of DNA repair. So, the mechanism of chromosome fragile site induced by simulated microgravity can be explained using the changes that occur in the chromosome structure of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, the DNA replication and repair under the effect of simulated microgravity. PMID:24963972

  6. Radioiodinated benzodiazepines: agents for mapping glial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dort, M.E.; Ciliax, B.J.; Gildersleeve, D.L.; Sherman, P.S.; Rosenspire, K.C.; Young, A.B.; Junck, L.; Wieland, D.M.

    1988-11-01

    Two isomeric iodinated analogues of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) ligand Ro5-4864 have been synthesized and labeled in high specific activity with iodine-125. Competitive binding assays conducted with the unlabeled analogues indicate high affinity for PBS. Tissue biodistribution studies in rats with these /sup 125/I-labeled ligands indicate high uptake of radioactivity in the adrenals, heart, and kidney--tissues known to have high concentrations of PBS. Preadministration of the potent PBS antagonist PK 11195 blocked in vivo uptake in adrenal tissue by over 75%, but to a lesser degree in other normal tissues. In vivo binding autoradiography in brain conducted in C6 glioma bearing rats showed dense, PBS-mediated accumulation of radioactivity in the tumor. Ligand 6 labeled with /sup 123/I may have potential for scintigraphic localization of intracranial glioma.

  7. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Sendai Virus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Filipa A C; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the efficient isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from circulating blood via density gradient centrifugation and subsequent generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured for 9 days to allow expansion of the erythroblast population. The erythroblasts are then used to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells using Sendai viral vectors, each expressing one of the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. PMID:25687300

  8. Use and abuse of benzodiazepines*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used for the treatment of anxiety, insomnia, and certain neuromuscular and convulsive disorders. However, their widespread availability has given rise to fears that they are over-prescribed. The problem is compounded by the fact that there is no universal agreement among medical practitioners as to the clinical indications warranting the use of these drugs. Although most industrialized countries exercise control over the sale and manufacture of benzodiazepines, many developing countries do not have sufficient control of these drugs. As a result, information on drug utilization and associated problems is difficult to obtain and there is a lack of comparative data on drug consumption in different countries. The present article describes the current knowledge on the pharmacological, clinical, and epidemiological characteristics of benzodiazepines, and the problems associated with their use, and indicates areas where more research is needed. Recommendations are made for future work. PMID:6605211

  9. RU 486 inhibits peripheral effects of glucocorticoids in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, R C; Poffet, D; Riondel, A M; Saurat, J H

    1985-12-01

    RU 486 [17 beta-hydroxy-11 beta-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)17 alpha-(prop-1-ynyl)estra-4,9-dien-3-one] is a synthetic steroid receptor antagonist. To evaluate the peripheral antiglucocorticoid action of this compound, we investigated its ability to antagonize cutaneous steroid-induced vasoconstriction. This phenomenon, produced by three different topical steroids in six normal men, was consistently and significantly attenuated or abolished by oral administration of 6 mg/kg RU 486. This demonstration of a peripheral action of RU 486 is important in relation to the potential therapeutic use of this well tolerated drug in states of hypercortisolism. It also indicates that the cutaneous vasoconstrictor effects of topical steroids are mediated by occupancy of glucocorticoid receptors. PMID:4055982

  10. Benzodiazepine binding to bovine retina.

    PubMed

    Osborne, N N

    1980-02-01

    [3H]Diazepam binds to membrane preparations of the retina, suggesting that benzodiazepine receptors exist in this tissue. The binding characteristics are similar to those known to occur in the brain, with affinity constants in the same range. Unlike the finding in the brain, [3H]diazepam binding in the retina is not stimulated by GABA and other GABA agonists. These findings indicate that benzodiazepine receptors may have a more general function and not only be associated with anxiety or emotional behaviour. PMID:6302572

  11. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  16. Fibromatous epulis in dogs and peripheral odontogenic fibroma in human beings: two equivalent lesions.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D G; Baker, D C

    1991-03-01

    This article compares the clinical and histopathologic features of the peripheral odontogenic fibroma in human beings and the fibromatous epulis in dogs. They are apparently equivalent lesions. Both are odontogenic tumors of limited growth potential that do not recur if adequately excised; both occur in middle and late adulthood of the species concerned. The one difference is that the peripheral odontogenic fibroma is a rare condition, whereas the canine fibromatous epulis is common. PMID:2011354

  17. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  18. Simultaneous determination of twelve benzodiazepines in human serum using a new reversed-phase chromatographic column on a 2-microns porous microspherical silica gel.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Terada, M; Misawa, S; Wakasugi, C

    1996-06-28

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of twelve frequently used benzodiazepines (BZPs) (bromazepam, clonazepam, chlordiazepoxide, estazolam, etizolam, flutazoram, haloxazolam, lorazepam, nitrazepam, oxazolam, triazolam and diazepam, internal standard) by using commercially available 2 or 5 microns particle size reversed-phase columns and a microflow cell-equipped ultraviolet detector. The separation was achieved using a C18 reversed-phase column (condition 1: 100 x 4.6 mm I.D., particle size 2 microns, TSK gel Super-ODS: conditon 2: 100 x 4.6 mm I.D., particle size 5 microns, Hypersil ODS-C18). The mobile phase was composed of methanol-5 mM NaH2PO4 (pH 6) (45:55, v/v), and the flow-rate was 0.65 ml/min (condition 1 and 2). The absorbance of the eluent was monitored at 254 nm. Retention times under condition 1 were shorter than those of condition 2. When the twelve benzodiazepines were determined, sensitivity and limits of quantification were about four to ten times better under condition 1 than under condition 2. The rate of recovery and linearity in condition 1 were approximately the same as those in condition 2. These results show that a new ODS filler with a particle size of 2 microns was more sensitive, provided better separation and was more rapid than that with conventional ODS filler. PMID:8832439

  19. Interactions of benzodiazepines on psychomotor skills.

    PubMed

    Mattila, M J

    1984-01-01

    Interactions of centrally active drugs are difficult to analyse in man due to methodological and ethical problems. Alcoholic and methylxanthine beverages are the most common centrally active agents that might modify the effects of benzodiazepines on performance. In sufficiently large doses ethanol enhances the effects of benzodiazepines, even those that are not metabolized by mixed function oxidases sensitive to blockade by ethanol. Consequently, the combined effect of ethanol and benzodiazepines may occur at the receptor level and/or result from altered binding of benzodiazepines to plasma proteins. Newer benzodiazepines may differ from the older in their interactions. Caffeine and theophylline counteract benzodiazepine effects on performance, resulting perhaps from the blockade of adenosine receptors which could be linked with the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor system. Central stimulants of the amphetamine type also counteract benzodiazepine effects in a somewhat selective way. New stimulant antidepressants rather counteract than increase benzodiazepine effects. Central antimuscarinics in combination with benzodiazepines are detrimental for memory. Specific benzodiazepine antagonists are effective also in man but without known clinical applications. PMID:6151848

  20. Withdrawing benzodiazepines in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lader, Malcolm; Tylee, Andre; Donoghue, John

    2009-01-01

    The use of benzodiazepine anxiolytics and hypnotics continues to excite controversy. Views differ from expert to expert and from country to country as to the extent of the problem, or even whether long-term benzodiazepine use actually constitutes a problem. The adverse effects of these drugs have been extensively documented and their effectiveness is being increasingly questioned. Discontinuation is usually beneficial as it is followed by improved psychomotor and cognitive functioning, particularly in the elderly. The potential for dependence and addiction have also become more apparent. The licensing of SSRIs for anxiety disorders has widened the prescribers' therapeutic choices (although this group of medications also have their own adverse effects). Melatonin agonists show promise in some forms of insomnia. Accordingly, it is now even more imperative that long-term benzodiazepine users be reviewed with respect to possible discontinuation. Strategies for discontinuation start with primary-care practitioners, who are still the main prescribers.This review sets out the stratagems that have been evaluated, concentrating on those of a pharmacological nature. Simple interventions include basic monitoring of repeat prescriptions and assessment by the doctor. Even a letter from the primary-care practitioner pointing out the continuing usage of benzodiazepines and questioning their need can result in reduction or cessation of use. Pharmacists also have a role to play in monitoring the use of benzodiazepines, although mobilizing their assistance is not yet routine. Such stratagems can avoid the use of specialist back-up services such as psychiatrists, home care, and addiction and alcohol misuse treatment facilities.Pharmacological interventions for benzodiazepine dependence have been reviewed in detail in a recent Cochrane review, but only eight studies proved adequate for analysis. Carbamazepine was the only drug that appeared to have any useful adjunctive properties for

  1. The human thymus. A chimeric organ comprised of central and peripheral lymphoid components.

    PubMed

    Haynes, B F; Hale, L P

    1998-01-01

    The human thymus is a lymphoepithelial organ in which T cells develop during fetal life. After maturation and selection in the fetal thymic microenvironment, T cells emigrate to peripheral lymphoid tissues such as the spleen, gut, and lymph nodes, and establish the peripheral T cell repertoire. Although the thymus has enormous regenerative capacity during fetal development, the regenerative capacity of the human postnatal thymus decreases over time. With the advent of intensive chemotherapy regimens for a variety of cancer syndromes, and the discovery that infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) leads to severe loss of CD4+ T cells, has come the need to understand the role of the human thymus in reconstitution of the immune system in adults. During a recent study of the thymus in HIV infection, we observed many CD8+ T cells in AIDS thymuses that had markers consistent with those of mature effector cytotoxic T cells usually found in peripheral immune tissues, and noted these CD8+ effector T cells were predominantly located in a thymic zone termed the thymic perivascular space. This article reviews our own work on the thymus in HIV-1 infection, and discusses the work of others that, taken together, suggest that the thymus contains peripheral immune cell components not only in the setting of HIV infection, but also in myasthenia gravis, as well as throughout normal life during the process of thymus involution. Thus, the human thymus can be thought of as a chimeric organ comprised of both central and peripheral lymphoid tissues. These observations have led us to postulate that the thymic epithelial atrophy and decrease in thymopoiesis that occurs in myasthenia gravis, HIV-1 infection, and thymic involution may in part derive from cytokines or other factors produced by peripheral immune cells within the thymic perivascular space. PMID:9951649

  2. [The addicted patient in anaesthesia - benzodiazepine dependence].

    PubMed

    Schneemilch, Christine; Brinkers, Michael

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the demographic change, the proportions of elderly patients undergoing operations and anesthesia are increasingly important. The consumption of benzodiazepines evidently rises with increasing age. Associated with the increasing consumption in the elderly is the risk of cognitive impairment, delirium, falls and fractures. Also long-term benzodiazepine use in low-dose may induce perioperative withdrawal syndrome. The following article will present characteristics and complications accompanied by critical benzodiazepine use especially in the elderly patients. PMID:26147413

  3. [The addicted patient in anaesthesia - benzodiazepine dependence].

    PubMed

    Tietz, Caren; Strang, Christof Maria

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the demographic change, the proportions of elderly patients undergoing operations and anesthesia are increasingly important. The consumption of benzodiazepines evidently rises with increasing age. Associated with the increasing consumption in the elderly is the risk of cognitive impairment, delirium, falls and fractures. Also long-term benzodiazepine use in low-dose may induce perioperative withdrawal syndrome. The following article will present characteristics and complications accompanied by critical benzodiazepine use especially in the elderly patients. PMID:26147414

  4. INDUCTION OF MICRONUCLEI BY X-RADIATION IN HUMAN, MOUSE, AND RAT PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared the radiosensitivity of human, rat, and mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) by analyzing micronuclei (MN) in cytochalasin B-induced binucleated (BN) cells. or each species and dose, 4 ml aliquots of whole blood were X-irradiated to obtain doses of 38, 75, 150, o...

  5. New method to differentiate human peripheral blood monocytes into insulin producing cells: Human hematosphere culture.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Yang, Ji Min; Choi, Jae-Il; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Jang, Jae Hee; Kim, Joonoh; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-02-24

    Strategy to differentiate stem cells into insulin producing cells (IPCs) in vitro has been a promising one to get cell source of β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. It has been suggested that islets and neurons share features and nestin-positive cells could differentiate into IPCs. We have recently developed a three-dimensional culture system using human peripheral blood cells named as blood-born hematosphere (BBHS). Here we showed that most of BBHS were composed of nestin-positive cells. Under the four-stage differentiation protocol for IPCs, we plated nestin-positive BBHS onto fibronectin-coated dish. These cells form islet-like clusters and most of them expressed insulin. Pancreatic specific genes were turned on, such as transcription factors (Pdx-1, Ngn3 and Nkx6.1), genes related to endocrine function (Glut-2 and PC2) or β cell function (Kir6.2, SUR1). Furthermore islet differentiation was confirmed by dithizone (DTZ) staining to detect zinc ion which binds insulin protein within the cells. Finally, IPCs derived from BBHS showed capability to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Taken together, our novel protocol successfully induced islet-like human insulin producing cells out of BBHS. This strategy of ex vivo expansion of IPCs using BBHS provides an autologous therapeutic cell source for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22310720

  6. Ex vivo expansion of human peripheral blood progenitors.

    PubMed

    Chabannon, C; Herrera-Rodriguez, D; Bardin, F; Mouren, M; Novakovitch, G; Blaise, D; Maraninchi, D; Mannoni, P

    1995-01-01

    Culture of human hematopoietic progenitors on a large scale could lead to several clinical applications within the near future, including the production of differentiated and functional cells, the increase in the number of early progenitors, especially stem cells, with such use as gene transfer, or the improvement of grafts used to limit the hematological toxicity associated with high-dose chemotherapy. In this case, one can still distinguish different objectives: improvement of grafts that contain low numbers of progenitors because of prior chemotherapies or because of marrow involvement for example, and qualitative changes in the graft content that would allow to envision the disappearance, or the further reduction, in the duration of absolute neutropenia that follows delivery of high dose chemotherapy ("nadir rescue"), despite substitution of mobilized blood cells to marrow cells and the in vivo use of hematopoietic growth factors. Additional advantages may be related to tumor purging in autologous expanded cells, and to the change in the ratio between hematopoietic progenitors and immunocompetent cells in allogeneic expanded populations. Therefore it appears that in vitro expansion currently raises two types of questions: the first ones are related to the definition of clinical or biological endpoints to be achieved, the second ones are related to "bioengineering", and deal with the efficiency and safety of progenitor cell cultures to be used for clinical applications. We here present preliminary results preparing future pilot clinical studies with ex vivo cultured human hematopoietic cells. PMID:8907631

  7. Expression of CD44v6 gene in normal human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jian; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Jie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if CD44v6 could be used as a molecular marker of cancer progression and metastasis through the detection of CD44v6 gene expression in normal human peripheral blood. METHODS: RNA was extracted from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 50 healthy donors, the expression of CD44v6 was investigated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: CD44v6 mRNA was detected in 58% of healthy volunteers under the proper controls. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the measurement of CD44v6 expression in peripheral blood by RT-PCR is not suitable for detection of circulating tumor cells. PMID:15962382

  8. Central and peripheral residual vision in humans with bilateral deprivation amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Mioche, L; Perenin, M T

    1986-01-01

    Residual visual capacities were investigated in the central and peripheral visual fields of 13 patients with bilateral deprivation amblyopia secondary to congenital cataracts removed at an early age. In comparison with a control group of normal subjects, spatial modulation sensitivity function of the amblyopes was markedly impaired in each experimental condition, i.e. both when the stimuli were stationary or drifting (8 Hz) gratings and both in central or peripheral visual field, at 10 and 20 degrees eccentricity. The sensitivity drop was observed over the whole spatial frequency range, although it was much more severe at high frequencies. Threshold elevation, with respect to controls, was very similar in conditions using stationary or drifting gratings, suggesting that both sustained and transient mechanisms are affected by stimulus deprivation amblyopia. Temporal modulation sensitivity function was uniformly impaired over the whole temporal frequency range. When compared with other types of amblyopia, this pattern of spatiotemporal sensitivity loss appeared characteristic of deprivation amblyopia. The peripheral deficit was particularly striking by its severity and extent, as ascertained by static perimetry and visual acuity measurements up to 50 degrees eccentricity. This finding emphasizes the susceptibility of peripheral as well as central human vision to early deprivation and suggests that peripheral visual functions are still immature in newborns. Finally, the overall deficit varied with the severity of the deprivation, in that patients with complete neonatal cataract performed much worse than those with incomplete cataract. PMID:3709711

  9. Structure and localization of the gene encoding human peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Takahashi, Ei-Ichi ); Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi )

    1993-11-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) is a small, basic, and cytoplasmic lipid-binding protein of peripheral myelin. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PMP2 gene. The gene is about 8 kb long and consists of four exons. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box) and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human PMP2 was assigned to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1 by spot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Thyroxine Differentially Modulates the Peripheral Clock: Lessons from the Human Hair Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Jonathan A.; Haslam, Iain S.; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Paus, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The human hair follicle (HF) exhibits peripheral clock activity, with knock-down of clock genes (BMAL1 and PER1) prolonging active hair growth (anagen) and increasing pigmentation. Similarly, thyroid hormones prolong anagen and stimulate pigmentation in cultured human HFs. In addition they are recognized as key regulators of the central clock that controls circadian rhythmicity. Therefore, we asked whether thyroxine (T4) also influences peripheral clock activity in the human HF. Over 24 hours we found a significant reduction in protein levels of BMAL1 and PER1, with their transcript levels also decreasing significantly. Furthermore, while all clock genes maintained their rhythmicity in both the control and T4 treated HFs, there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of BMAL1 and PER1 in T4 (100 nM) treated HFs. Accompanying this, cell-cycle progression marker Cyclin D1 was also assessed appearing to show an induced circadian rhythmicity by T4 however, this was not significant. Contrary to short term cultures, after 6 days, transcript and/or protein levels of all core clock genes (BMAL1, PER1, clock, CRY1, CRY2) were up-regulated in T4 treated HFs. BMAL1 and PER1 mRNA was also up-regulated in the HF bulge, the location of HF epithelial stem cells. Together this provides the first direct evidence that T4 modulates the expression of the peripheral molecular clock. Thus, patients with thyroid dysfunction may also show a disordered peripheral clock, which raises the possibility that short term, pulsatile treatment with T4 might permit one to modulate circadian activity in peripheral tissues as a target to treat clock-related disease. PMID:25822259

  11. Thyroxine differentially modulates the peripheral clock: lessons from the human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Paus, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The human hair follicle (HF) exhibits peripheral clock activity, with knock-down of clock genes (BMAL1 and PER1) prolonging active hair growth (anagen) and increasing pigmentation. Similarly, thyroid hormones prolong anagen and stimulate pigmentation in cultured human HFs. In addition they are recognized as key regulators of the central clock that controls circadian rhythmicity. Therefore, we asked whether thyroxine (T4) also influences peripheral clock activity in the human HF. Over 24 hours we found a significant reduction in protein levels of BMAL1 and PER1, with their transcript levels also decreasing significantly. Furthermore, while all clock genes maintained their rhythmicity in both the control and T4 treated HFs, there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of BMAL1 and PER1 in T4 (100 nM) treated HFs. Accompanying this, cell-cycle progression marker Cyclin D1 was also assessed appearing to show an induced circadian rhythmicity by T4 however, this was not significant. Contrary to short term cultures, after 6 days, transcript and/or protein levels of all core clock genes (BMAL1, PER1, clock, CRY1, CRY2) were up-regulated in T4 treated HFs. BMAL1 and PER1 mRNA was also up-regulated in the HF bulge, the location of HF epithelial stem cells. Together this provides the first direct evidence that T4 modulates the expression of the peripheral molecular clock. Thus, patients with thyroid dysfunction may also show a disordered peripheral clock, which raises the possibility that short term, pulsatile treatment with T4 might permit one to modulate circadian activity in peripheral tissues as a target to treat clock-related disease. PMID:25822259

  12. Gastrointestinal motor alterations induced by precipitated benzodiazepine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J; Fargeas, M J; Bueno, L

    1992-03-01

    The effects of benzodiazepine withdrawal on intestinal motor activity and propulsion were investigated in two groups of diazepam-dependent rats (15 mg/kg/day for 8 days). Withdrawal was precipitated by injection of two benzodiazepine antagonists (Ro 15.1788 and PK 11.95) acting on central and peripheral-type receptors, respectively. Intestinal motor activity was assessed by implanting electrodes for long-term electromyographic recordings. Gastrointestinal transit was evaluated after gavage by a marker (51CrO4Na2) and radioactivity counting. Both RO 15.1788 (15 mg/kg) and PK 11.195 (5 mg/kg) triggered an abstinence syndrome with behavioral and autonomic signs. At the intestinal level, Ro 15.1788 induced a phase of strong irregular spiking activity (173 +/- 63 min) which remained located in the duodenum. In contrast, PK 11.195 induced a period of propagated myoelectric complexes characterized by phases II and III of high amplitude. The cecal frequency was doubled during the 1st hr after withdrawal induced by the two antagonists. Both Ro 15.1788 and PK 11.195 at this dosage had no effect per se on intestinal motility in vehicle-treated rats. In the second group of rats, gastric emptying was enhanced by 49.4 and 45.6% by Ro 15.1788 and PK 11.195, respectively. In contrast, PK 11.195 was able to accelerate the intestinal transit more than did Ro 15.1788 (geometric center, 5.9 +/- 0.43 and 5.3 +/- 0.49, respectively, vs. 4.1 +/- 0.31 in control rats). Our study shows that precipitated benzodiazepine withdrawal in diazepam-dependent rats induces alterations of the intestinal myoelectrical activity leading to an increase of the gastrointestinal transit. Central and peripheral-type receptors are involved in these effects. PMID:1312156

  13. Ectopic lymphokine gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.A.; Kang, Joonsoo; Hozumi, Nobumichi Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario )

    1992-02-01

    An animal model to study the effects of ectopic expression of cytokines involved in cell growth and differentiation has been established. Retrovirus vectors containing the human interleukin 6 cDNA were used to produce high titer virus-producing lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) were successfully infected with the retrovirus and engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The majority of the animals were engrafted with hPBLs, as determined by the presence of human glucose phosphate isomerase. Furthermore, six of seven mice engrafted with hPBLs infected with high titer virus and detectable hPBLs present in the spleen expressed the retroviral human interleukin 6 gene. Importantly, human interleukin 6 protein was expressed at physiologically significant levels in these mice. These results demonstrate that models for human disease and immunotherapy involving retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human cells can be developed in mice.

  14. Management of benzodiazepine misuse and dependence

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Jonathan; Murnion, Bridin

    2015-01-01

    Summary There are well-recognised harms from long-term use of benzodiazepines. These include dependency, cognitive decline and falls. It is important to prevent and recognise benzodiazepine dependence. A thorough risk assessment guides optimal management and the necessity for referral. The management of dependence involves either gradual benzodiazepine withdrawal or maintenance treatment. Prescribing interventions, substitution, psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies can all contribute. Unless the patient is elderly, it is helpful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine in both withdrawal and maintenance therapy. The dose should be gradually reduced over weeks to lower the risk of seizures. Harms from drugs such as zopiclone and zolpidem are less well characterised. Dependence is managed in the same manner as benzodiazepine dependence. PMID:26648651

  15. Management of benzodiazepine misuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Brett, Jonathan; Murnion, Bridin

    2015-10-01

    There are well-recognised harms from long-term use of benzodiazepines. These include dependency, cognitive decline and falls. It is important to prevent and recognise benzodiazepine dependence. A thorough risk assessment guides optimal management and the necessity for referral. The management of dependence involves either gradual benzodiazepine withdrawal or maintenance treatment. Prescribing interventions, substitution, psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies can all contribute. Unless the patient is elderly, it is helpful to switch to a long-acting benzodiazepine in both withdrawal and maintenance therapy. The dose should be gradually reduced over weeks to lower the risk of seizures. Harms from drugs such as zopiclone and zolpidem are less well characterised. Dependence is managed in the same manner as benzodiazepine dependence. PMID:26648651

  16. Diminution by benzodiazepines of the chronotropic responses to noradrenaline in rat isolated atria.

    PubMed

    Elgoyhen, B; Adler-Graschinsky, E

    1989-05-30

    The effects of various benzodiazepines on chronotropic responses were assayed in spontaneously beating rat isolated atria. The increases in atrial rate obtained from concentration-response curves to noradrenaline were reduced dose dependently by both the peripheral agonist, Ro 5-4864 5 and 10 microM, and the mixed agonist, diazepam 5, 10 and 50 microM, but not by the central benzodiazepine agonist, clonazepam 10 and 30 microM. The inhibitory effects of the benzodiazepines on the atrial responses to noradrenaline were not counteracted by either the peripheral benzodiazepine antagonist, PK 11195 10 microM, or the central benzodiazepine antagonist, Ro 15-1788 10 and 100 microM. Both 10 microM Ro 5-4864 and 10 microM diazepam also reduced the increases in atrial rate produced by either the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, or the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin. On the contrary, diazepam and Ro 5-4864 did not modify the chronotropic responses of the atria either to direct exposure to CaCl2 or to the calcium agonist, BAY K 8644. The increases in the intracellular levels of cAMP induced by noradrenaline were not modified by Ro 5-4864 and were even increased by 50% in the presence of diazepam. It is concluded that benzodiazepines probably reduce the chronotropic responses to noradrenaline in rat isolated atria through the interaction with the cAMP-linked chain of events that follows the activation of beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:2475348

  17. The human peripheral lymph node vascular addressin. An inducible endothelial antigen involved in lymphocyte homing.

    PubMed Central

    Michie, S. A.; Streeter, P. R.; Bolt, P. A.; Butcher, E. C.; Picker, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    The extravasation of blood-borne lymphocytes into organized lymphoid tissues and sites of chronic inflammation is directed in part by interactions of lymphocyte surface adhesion molecules, known as homing receptors, with tissue-selective endothelial ligands called vascular addressins. In mice and humans, lymphocyte L-selectin and the peripheral lymph node addressin (PNAd) form a homing receptor-endothelial ligand pair involved in lymphocyte traffic to peripheral lymph node (PLN). We have examined the tissue distribution and function of human PNAd, using monoclonal antibody MECA-79 and in vitro assays of L-selectin-dependent lymphocyte binding. We demonstrate that PNAd is expressed by human high endothelial venules (HEV) in lymphoid tissues which support lymphocyte adhesion via a PLN-associated recognition system. MECA-79 inhibits adhesion to these HEV of a cell line that binds predominantly via the PLN-homing receptor, L-selectin, but has no effect on adhesion by a mucosal HEV-binding cell line. Furthermore, MECA-79 blocks binding of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to both PLN and tonsil HEV, but not significantly to HEV in the appendix. In addition, we demonstrate PNAd induction on venules at chronic inflammatory sites in humans, particularly sites with severe or long-standing chronic inflammatory involvement. These results confirm that PNAd functions as a PLN vascular addressin in humans, and that in addition to directing normal lymphocyte recirculation to lymph nodes and tonsils, this addressin likely participates in lymphocyte recruitment to sites of chronic inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:8256856

  18. mRNA distribution analysis of human TRPC family in CNS and peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Antonio; Medhurst, Andrew D; Mattei, Cesar; Kelsell, Rosemary E; Calver, Andrew R; Randall, Andrew D; Benham, Christopher D; Pangalos, Menelas N

    2002-12-30

    The mammalian homologues of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (TRP) channel are plasma membrane proteins involved in the regulation of cellular Ca(2+) influx. These ion channels can be activated subsequent to either depletion of Ca(2+) from internal stores or through receptor-mediated processes. The mRNA expression patterns of several individual mammalian short transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) have been described. Cross-comparisons between these data, however, are at best difficult predominantly due to the non-quantitative methods used. Furthermore there is limited data on the expression of TRPC family members in human tissues. In the present study we used a single technique, namely TaqMan real-time quantitative RT-PCR, to investigate the mRNA distribution of human TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6 and TRPC7 (hTRPCs) in discrete human brain areas, peripheral tissues as well as a panel of cell-lines. All hTRPCs studied were widely expressed within CNS and significant peripheral expression was often observed. Despite this, each channel exhibited a distinctive hallmark distribution profile. hTRPC1 was widely expressed in CNS and peripheral tissues, whereas hTRPC3 and hTRPC5 were predominantly expressed in tissues of CNS. hTRPC4 mRNA was detected in CNS and certain peripheral tissues such as bone, heart and prostate. hTRPC6 was homogeneously expressed throughout the CNS and peripheral tissues with the highest levels in placenta and lung. hTRPC7 mRNA was also broadly expressed in CNS as well as some peripheral tissues. The pattern of expression of the TRPCs was quite different in the various cell lines examined. TRPC3 and TRPC6 were selectively present in HEK-293 cells whilst TRPC1 was broadly distributed in the cell lines analyzed. In contrast TRPC4 and TRPC5 mRNAs were predominantly expressed in HK-2 and HEK-293 cell lines respectively. TRPC7 was selectively expressed in COS-1, COS-7 and HK-2 cell lines. These results show tissue- and cell

  19. An antiviral target on reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 revealed by tetrahydroimidazo-[4,5,1-jk] [1,4]benzodiazepin-2 (1H)-one and -thione derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Debyser, Z; Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Desmyter, J; Kukla, M; Janssen, P A; De Clercq, E

    1991-01-01

    Screening of pharmacologically acceptable prototype compounds has recently led to the discovery of a series of ultraselective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication, the tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk] [1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione (TIBO) derivatives. The TIBO compounds completely suppress the formation of proviral DNA in acutely infected cells, as revealed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. TIBO derivatives are inhibitory to the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 but not that of HIV-2 or other retroviruses. The inhibition is most effective with poly(C)-oligo(dG) as the template/primer, and it is selectively directed against the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity and not the accompanying DNA-dependent DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H activity of HIV-1 RT. Kinetic studies point to an uncompetitive inhibition with regard to the template/primer. TIBO compounds are active against HIV-1 replication through a unique interaction with HIV-1 RT. The experimental data indicate the existence of a target on HIV-1 RT that is responsible for the inhibition of replication and a mode of action unrelated to that of previously studied RT inhibitors. Images PMID:1705038

  20. Identification, characterization, and purification of a 65,000 dalton protein in rat brain is photolabeled by nitro-containing benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    Benzodiazepines bind to two well-characterized classes of nanomolar-affinity binding sites, the central and the peripheral types. Although these sites appear to mediate many of the effects of these compounds, they cannot account for all of the biochemical and physiologic effects of the benzodiazepines. In this investigation, a protein that is photolabeled by NO{sub 2}-containing benzodiazepines was identified and characterized in rat brain by performing photaffinity labeling experiments with ({sup 3}H)-clonazepam and ({sup 3}H)-flunitrazepam. These experiments demonstrate that this photolabeled protein has a molecular weight of 65,000 daltons. Photolabeling of the protein was saturable, inhibited in a stereoselective manner by benzodiazepine enantiomers, inhibited by therapeutically-relevant concentrations of many different NO{sub 2}-containing benzodiazepines, and was not inhibited by more than 70 non-benzodiazepine compounds. The photolabeled protein is distinct from the central and peripheral sites on the basis of molecular weight, benzodiazepine inhibitory potencies, subcellular localization, and tissue distribution.

  1. Long-Term Use of Benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Nicholas L.S.; Krishnan, K. Ranga R.

    1992-01-01

    Problems associated with physical dependence and abuse of benzodiazepines by a small percentage of patients have reduced their popularity from the most commonly prescribed psychoactive drug in the 1970s to being prescribed for mainly short periods. Patients who benefit from long-term benzodiazepine use are nearly ignored by the medical community as a whole. This article details what patient population can improve from long-term benzodiazepine therapy, the risks and benefits of treatment, and how to select appropriate candidates. PMID:21229127

  2. Benzodiazepines consumption: does dependence vary with age?

    PubMed

    Gérardin, Marie; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guerlais, Marylène; Guillou-Landreat, Morgane; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    We have compared two groups of chronic benzodiazepines (or zolpidem/zopiclone) users: "Seniors," aged 65 years or more, and "Adults," aged less than 65 years. The study took place in the Pays de Loire region. The questionnaire assesses dependence based on items from the DSM-IV. The analysis was based on 176 Senior questionnaires and 212 Adult questionnaires. Whereas Senior patients take benzodiazepines routinely with little negative consequences, Adults suffer from underlying psychological trouble, mention a higher consumption than planned, which causes negative consequences. 35.2% of Seniors are dependent on benzodiazepines versus 49.8% of Adults. PMID:24810390

  3. Benzodiazepine biosynthesis in Streptomyces refuineus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Phelan, Vanessa; Ntai, Ioanna; Farnet, Chris M; Zazopoulos, Emmanuel; Bachmann, Brian O

    2007-06-01

    Anthramycin is a benzodiazepine alkaloid with potent antitumor and antibiotic activity produced by the thermophilic actinomycete Streptomyces refuineus sbsp. thermotolerans. In this study, the complete 32.5 kb gene cluster for the biosynthesis of anthramycin was identified by using a genome-scanning approach, and cluster boundaries were estimated via comparative genomics. A lambda-RED-mediated gene-replacement system was developed to provide supporting evidence for critical biosynthetic genes and to validate the boundaries of the proposed anthramycin gene cluster. Sequence analysis reveals that the 25 open reading frame anthramycin cluster contains genes consistent with the biosynthesis of the two halves of anthramycin: 4 methyl-3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and a "dehydroproline acrylamide" moiety. These nonproteinogenic amino acid precursors are condensed by a two-module nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) terminated by a reductase domain, consistent with the final hemiaminal oxidation state of anthramycin. PMID:17584616

  4. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2015-07-15

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the "embodied" reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive. PMID:26180190

  5. Quantification of Collagen Organization in the Peripheral Human Cornea at Micron-Scale Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Boote, Craig; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Hayes, Sally; Harris, Jonathan; Burghammer, Manfred; Hiller, Jennifer; Terrill, Nicholas J.; Meek, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    The collagen microstructure of the peripheral cornea is important in stabilizing corneal curvature and refractive status. However, the manner in which the predominantly orthogonal collagen fibrils of the central cornea integrate with the circumferential limbal collagen is unknown. We used microfocus wide-angle x-ray scattering to quantify the relative proportion and orientation of collagen fibrils over the human corneolimbal interface at intervals of 50 μm. Orthogonal fibrils changed direction 1–1.5 mm before the limbus to integrate with the circumferential limbal fibrils. Outside the central 6 mm, additional preferentially aligned collagen was found to reinforce the cornea and limbus. The manner of integration and degree of reinforcement varied significantly depending on the direction along which the limbus was approached. We also employed small-angle x-ray scattering to measure the average collagen fibril diameter from central cornea to limbus at 0.5 mm intervals. Fibril diameter was constant across the central 6 mm. More peripherally, fibril diameter increased, indicative of a merging of corneal and scleral collagen. The point of increase varied with direction, consistent with a scheme in which the oblique corneal periphery is reinforced by chords of scleral collagen. The results have implications for the cornea's biomechanical response to ocular surgeries involving peripheral incision. PMID:21723812

  6. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N.; Greer, Stephanie M.; Saletin, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the “embodied” reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive. PMID:26180190

  7. BDNF promoter I methylation correlates between post-mortem human peripheral and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Stenz, Ludwig; Zewdie, Seblewongel; Laforge-Escarra, Térèse; Prados, Julien; La Harpe, Romano; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Perroud, Nader; Aubry, Jean-Michel

    2015-02-01

    Several psychiatric disorders have been associated with CpG methylation changes in CG rich promoters of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mainly by extracting DNA from peripheral blood cells. Whether changes in peripheral DNA methylation can be used as a proxy for brain-specific alterations remains an open question. In this study we aimed to compare DNA methylation levels in BDNF promoter regions in human blood cells, muscle and brain regions using bisulfite-pyrosequencing. We found a significant correlation between the levels of BDNF promoter I methylation measured in quadriceps and vPFC tissues extracted from the same individuals (n = 98, Pearson, r = 0.48, p = 4.5 × 10(-7)). In the hippocampus, BDNF promoter I and IV methylation levels were strongly correlated (Pearson, n = 37, r = 0.74, p = 1.4 × 10(-7)). We found evidence for sex-dependent effect on BDNF promoter methylation levels in the various tissues and blood samples. Taken together, these data indicate a strong intra-individual correlation between peripheral and brain tissue. They also suggest that sex determines methylation patterns in BDNF promoter region across different types of tissue, including muscle, brain, and blood. PMID:25450314

  8. Characterization of Endoneurial Fibroblast-like Cells from Human and Rat Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Laurence; Védrenne, Nicolas; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Endoneurial fibroblast-like cells (EFLCs) are one of the cell populations present in the peripheral nervous system. The role and immunophenotypic characteristics of EFLCs are not well known and led us to perform a histological and cytological study of EFLCs in normal human and rat peripheral nerves. We found that all EFLCs express CD34, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), and prolyl-4-hydrolase-beta. In addition, half of the EFLCs in normal peripheral nerves express platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) and some also express the intermediate filament nestin in vivo (at a lower level than Schwann cells, which express high levels of nestin). Using cell cultures of purified EFLCs, we characterized subpopulations of EFLCs expressing PDGFR-β alone or PDGFR-β and nestin. Experimental nerve lesions in rat resulted in an increase in nestin-positive EFLCs, which returned to normal levels after 8 days. This suggests that some EFLCs could have a different proliferative and/or regenerative potential than others, and these EFLCs may play a role in the initial phase of nerve repair. These “activated” EFLCs share some immunophenotypic similarities with pericytes and Interstitial cells of Cajal, which have progenitor cell potentials. This raises the questions as to whether a proportion of EFLCs have a possible role as endoneurial progenitor cells. PMID:24670794

  9. Differential MHC class II expression on human peripheral blood monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, C F; Moore, M

    1988-01-01

    Both monocytes (MO) and dendritic cells (DC) in human peripheral blood are of a plastic-adherent nature. The expression of the MHC class II sublocus products HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR on human peripheral blood transiently adherent cells (TA) was examined by an immunocytochemical staining technique. While most TA showed strong expression of molecules of the HLA-DR subtype, only a small proportion of cells (2-6%) showed strong HLA-DP or -DQ positivity. This strong expression of the HLA-DP and HLA-DQ sublocus products by a subset of TA was seen only after short-term culture; freshly isolated cells expressed comparatively low levels of these molecules. Enrichment for Fc receptor-negative or low-density cells from TA produced populations with strong HLA-DQ and -DP expression. Such co-enrichment of the strongly HLA-DQ+ and strongly HLA-DP+ cells suggests that the same cells express high levels of both types of MHC class II molecule. Immunocytochemical analysis of TA indicated that the strongly HLA-DQ+ cells, at least, were only weakly or non-reactive with the MO-specific monoclonal antibodies OKM1, UCHM1, MO2 and EB11. In addition, strongly HLA-DQ- or -DP-positive cells were poorly phagocytic in comparison with the majority of adherent cells. The apparent FcR-negative, low-density and weakly phagocytic nature of the strongly HLA-DQ/DP+ cells, combined with their lack of reactivity with several MO-specific antibodies, suggests that they may represent the DC component of TA. Such strong HLA-DQ/DP expression by DC may aid their positive identification in human peripheral blood and may be of relevance to DC function in antigen presentation. Images Figure 1 PMID:3350576

  10. The Presence of Select Tau Species in Human Peripheral Tissues and Their Relation to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dugger, Brittany N; Whiteside, Charisse M; Maarouf, Chera L; Walker, Douglas G; Beach, Thomas G; Sue, Lucia I; Garcia, Angelica; Dunckley, Travis; Meechoovet, Bessie; Reiman, Eric M; Roher, Alex E

    2016-01-01

    Tau becomes excessively phosphorylated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is widely studied within the brain. Further examination of the extent and types of tau present in peripheral tissues and their relation to AD is warranted given recent publications on pathologic spreading. Cases were selected based on the presence of pathological tau spinal cord deposits (n = 18). Tissue samples from sigmoid colon, scalp, abdominal skin, liver, and submandibular gland were analyzed by western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for certain tau species; frontal cortex gray matter was used for comparison. ELISAs revealed brain to have the highest total tau levels, followed by submandibular gland, sigmoid colon, liver, scalp, and abdominal skin. Western blots with antibodies recognizing tau phosphorylated at threonine 231(pT231), serine 396 and 404 (PHF-1), and an unmodified total human tau between residues 159 and 163 (HT7) revealed multiple banding patterns, some of which predominated in peripheral tissues. As submandibular gland had the highest levels of peripheral tau, a second set of submandibular gland samples were analyzed (n = 36; 19 AD, 17 non-demented controls). ELISAs revealed significantly lower levels of pS396 (p = 0.009) and pT231 (p = 0.005) in AD cases but not total tau (p = 0.18). Furthermore, pT231 levels in submandibular gland inversely correlated with Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage (p = 0.04), after adjusting for age at death, gender, and postmortem interval. These results provide evidence that certain tau species are present in peripheral tissues. Of potential importance, submandibular gland pT231 is progressively less abundant with increasing Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage. PMID:26890756

  11. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  12. Decreased chemotaxis of human peripheral phagocytes exposed to a strong static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sipka, S; Szöllosi, I; Batta, Gy; Szegedi, Gy; Illés, A; Bakó, Gy; Novák, D

    2004-01-01

    The chemotaxis of human peripheral phagocytes, neutrophils and monocytes was examined in a strong static magnetic field (0.317+/-0.012 Tesla). The chemotaxis of the suspension of purified neutrophils and monocytes was tested in the Boyden chamber using C5a as a chemotactic signal. The chambers were placed into a temperature regulated (36.6 degrees C) equipment producing a strong static magnetic field (0.317 Tesla) for 60 minutes. The movement of cells proceeded into a nitrocellulose membrane toward the north-pole of the magnet, i.e. in the direction of the Earth's gravitational pull. The C5a induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils decreased significantly in the strong static magnetic field. Monocytes were not significantly effected. The strong static magnetic field decreased the chemotactic movement of neutrophils and this phenomenon may have implications when humans are exposed to magnetic resonance imaging for extended periods of time. PMID:15334831

  13. Kinetic study of cytokines production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to Brucella DNA.

    PubMed

    Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Ardestani, Sussan K; Kariminia, Amina; Ziaee, Abed-Ali; Torkabadi, Ebrahim; Ebrahimi, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    In spite of reports on cytokines induction by the Brucella DNA in murine model, there is no comparison between pathogenic and appropriate vaccine strains in human. We investigated the cytokines profile of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) induced by DNA extracted from pathogenic isolates of Brucella melitensis and B. abortus as well as Rev1 and S19; the appropriate vaccine strains. It was observed that despite differential induction of Interleukin(IL)-12 and IL-10 production, identical IL-12/IL-10 concentration ratio was obtained by all Brucella strains DNAs that was 2 after 24 h and 4 after 5 days of incubation. In addition, IL-2 and Interferon(IFN)-gamma production were profoundly increased compared to the medium at day 3 and 5 respectively but IFN-alpha was not induced. Therefore, Brucella strains DNAs are Th1 inducing component with similar pattern in human PBMCs. PMID:17008080

  14. Glycoantigens Induce Human Peripheral Tr1 Cell Differentiation with Gut-homing Specialization*

    PubMed Central

    Kreisman, Lori S. C.; Cobb, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The carbohydrate antigen (glycoantigen) PSA from an intestinal commensal bacteria is able to down-regulate inflammatory bowel disease in model mice, suggesting that stimulation with PSA results in regulatory T cell (Treg) generation. However, mechanisms of how peripheral human T cells respond and home in response to commensal antigens are still not understood. Here, we demonstrate that a single exposure to PSA induces differentiation of human peripheral CD4+ T cells into type-Tr1 Tregs. This is in contrast to mouse models where PSA induced the production of Foxp3+ iTregs. The human PSA-induced Tr1 cells are profoundly anergic and exhibit nonspecific bystander suppression mediated by IL-10 secretion. Most surprisingly, glycoantigen exposure provoked expression of gut homing receptors on their surface. These findings reveal a mechanism for immune homeostasis in the gut whereby exposure to commensal glycoantigens provides the requisite information to responding T cells for proper tissue localization (gut) and function (anti-inflammatory/regulatory). PMID:21228275

  15. The effects of lipid A on gamma-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubničková, M.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Ravnachka, I.; Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The modulatory effects of lipid A (diphosphoryl lipid A (DLA) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA)) on apoptosis induction and DNA structure damage (single and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs, respectively)) in peripheral human blood lymphocytes are studied for 60Co gamma-irradiation. It is shown that in the presence of these agents the amount of apoptotic cells increases compared with the irradiated control samples. The effect is most strongly pronounced for DLA. In its presence, a significant increase is observed in the number of radiation-induced DNA SSBs and DSBs. Possible mechanisms are discussed of the modifying influence of the used agents on radiation-induced cell reactions

  16. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Bilateral Peripheral Facial Palsy in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Su; Yoon, Hee Jung; Kim, Hai Jin; Nam, Ji Sun; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, June Myung

    2006-01-01

    Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported. In this paper, we present the first case in Korea, of a bilateral facial palsy occurring as the first clinical manifestation of HIV infection. PMID:17066521

  18. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  19. Norwalk Virus Does Not Replicate in Human Macrophages or Dendritic Cells Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Susceptible Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Margarita K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Guix, Susana; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; He, Hong; Neill, Frederick H.; Sastry, Jagannadha K.; Yao, Qizhi; Estes, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Human noroviruses are difficult to study due to the lack of an efficient in vitro cell culture system or small animal model. Murine norovirus replicates in murine macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DCs), raising the possibility that human NoVs might replicate in such human cell types. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated DCs and MΦ derived from monocyte subsets and CD11c+ DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals susceptible to Norwalk virus (NV) infection. These cells were exposed to NV and replication was evaluated by immunofluorescence and by quantitative RT-PCR. A few PBMC-derived DCs expressed NV proteins. However, NV RNA did not increase in any of the cells tested. These results demonstrate that NV does not replicate in human CD11c+ DCs, monocyte-derived DCs and MΦ, but abortive infection may occur in a few DCs. These results suggest that NV tropism is distinct from that of murine noroviruses. PMID:20667573

  20. Bacillus anthracis’ lethal toxin induces broad transcriptional responses in human peripheral monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthrax lethal toxin (LT), produced by the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a highly effective zinc dependent metalloprotease that cleaves the N-terminus of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK or MEKs) and is known to play a role in impairing the host immune system during an inhalation anthrax infection. Here, we present the transcriptional responses of LT treated human monocytes in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of LT inhibition on the host immune system. Results Western Blot analysis demonstrated cleavage of endogenous MEK1 and MEK3 when human monocytes were treated with 500 ng/mL LT for four hours, proving their susceptibility to anthrax lethal toxin. Furthermore, staining with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that LT treatment did not induce human peripheral monocyte apoptosis or necrosis. Using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays, we identified over 820 probe sets differentially regulated after LT treatment at the p <0.001 significance level, interrupting the normal transduction of over 60 known pathways. As expected, the MAPKK signaling pathway was most drastically affected by LT, but numerous genes outside the well-recognized pathways were also influenced by LT including the IL-18 signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor pathway and the IFN alpha signaling pathway. Multiple genes involved in actin regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and cytokine signaling were identified after treatment with anthrax LT. Conclusion We conclude LT directly targets human peripheral monocytes and causes multiple aberrant gene responses that would be expected to be associated with defects in human monocyte’s normal signaling transduction pathways and function. This study provides further insights into the mechanisms associated with the host immune system collapse during an anthrax infection, and suggests that anthrax LT may have additional downstream targets outside the well-known MAPK

  1. Perceptions of Benzodiazepine Dependence Among Women Age 65 and Older

    PubMed Central

    Canham, Sarah L.; Gallo, Joseph; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological study explored whether older women who are chronic benzodiazepine users identified themselves as dependent, how dependence was perceived, and how meanings and understandings shaped experiences of benzodiazepine use. Self-reported benzodiazepine dependence was associated with being unable to reduce use or a desire to discontinue use and reliance on benzodiazepines to remain comfortable and able to handle daily life. Themes included: 1) benzodiazepine dependence is similar to dependence to diabetes or blood pressure medications; 2) dependence is distinctive from addiction/abuse; 3) addiction/abuse is perceived as worse than dependence; and 4) concerns of addiction/abuse result in low-dose benzodiazepine use. PMID:24918963

  2. Perceptions of benzodiazepine dependence among women age 65 and older.

    PubMed

    Canham, Sarah L; Gallo, Joseph; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A phenomenological study explored whether older women who are chronic benzodiazepine users identified themselves as dependent, how dependence was perceived, and how meanings and understandings shaped experiences of benzodiazepine use. Self-reported benzodiazepine dependence was associated with being unable to reduce use or a desire to discontinue use and reliance on benzodiazepines to remain comfortable and able to handle daily life. Themes included: (a) benzodiazepine dependence is similar to dependence to diabetes or blood pressure medications; (b) dependence is distinctive from addiction/abuse; (c) addiction/abuse is perceived as worse than dependence; and (d) concerns of addiction/abuse result in low-dose benzodiazepine use. PMID:24918963

  3. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Benzodiazepines and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Chandra, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is an increasing and pervasive problem. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms are a part of alcohol dependence syndrome and are commonly encountered in general hospital settings, in most of the departments. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome ranges from mild to severe. The severe complicated alcohol withdrawal may present with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the largest and the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and are considered the gold standard. Others, such as anticonvulsants, barbiturates, adrenergic drugs, and GABA agonists have been tried and have evidence. Supportive care and use of vitamins is essential in the management. Symptom triggered regime is favoured over fixed tapering dose regime, although monitoring through scales is cumbersome. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on ‘Alcohol withdrawal syndrome’ in humans during the last 10 years. A total of 1182 articles came up. Articles not relevant to clinical utility and management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full text articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials were obtained from this list and were considered for review. PMID:26500991

  4. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Benzodiazepines and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Choudhary, Mona; Chandra, Mina

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dependence is an increasing and pervasive problem. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms are a part of alcohol dependence syndrome and are commonly encountered in general hospital settings, in most of the departments. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome ranges from mild to severe. The severe complicated alcohol withdrawal may present with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the largest and the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and are considered the gold standard. Others, such as anticonvulsants, barbiturates, adrenergic drugs, and GABA agonists have been tried and have evidence. Supportive care and use of vitamins is essential in the management. Symptom triggered regime is favoured over fixed tapering dose regime, although monitoring through scales is cumbersome. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on 'Alcohol withdrawal syndrome' in humans during the last 10 years. A total of 1182 articles came up. Articles not relevant to clinical utility and management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full text articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials were obtained from this list and were considered for review. PMID:26500991

  5. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-dependent activation of translation in Xenopus oocytes by the benzodiazepine Ro24-7429 requires trans-activation response element loop sequences.

    PubMed

    Braddock, M; Cannon, P; Muckenthaler, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-01-01

    Two benzodiazepine compounds, [7-chloro-5-(2-pyrryl)-3H-1,4 benzodiazapin-2-(H)-one] (Ro5-3335) and [7-chloro-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-3H-benzo[e] [1,4] diazepin-2-yl]- methylamine (Ro24-7429), inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication via a specific effect on the function of the transactivator protein, Tat. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of these compounds, we have tested their effects in an alternative assay for Tat activation in Xenopus oocytes. In this system, translation of trans-activation response element (TAR)-containing RNA is activated by Tat. Both compounds specifically blocked activation of translation in a dose-dependent fashion, with Ro24-7429 showing the greater potency. In the Xenopus oocyte system, as in mammalian cells, mutation of the TAR loop sequences abolishes Tat action. However, it is possible to obtain TAR-specific, Tat-dependent activation of a target RNA with a mutation in the loop provided that this target is in large excess. This result has been interpreted as indicating that a negative factor has been titrated (M. Braddock, R. Powell, A.D. Blanchard, A.J. Kingsman, and S.M. Kingsman, FASEB J. 7:214-222, 1993). Interestingly Ro24-7429 was unable to inhibit the TAR-specific but loop sequence-independent mode of translational activation. This finding suggests that a specific loop-binding cellular factor may mediate the effects of this inhibitor of Tat action. Consistent with this notion, we could not detect any effect of Ro24-7429 on the efficiency of specific Tat binding to TAR in vitro. PMID:8254735

  6. Synergistic effect of DHT and IGF-1 hyperstimulation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Imperlini, Esther; Spaziani, Sara; Mancini, Annamaria; Caterino, Marianna; Buono, Pasqualina; Orrù, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    The abuse of mixed or combined performance-enhancing drugs is widespread among athletes and amateurs, adults and adolescents. Clinical studies demonstrated that misuse of these doping agents is associated with serious adverse effects to many organs in human. Previously, we demonstrated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes that high doses of anabolic androgenic steroids, such as dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), have effects at gene and protein levels. Supraphysiological treatments of DHT and IGF-1 affected the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle disorders as well as in cell-mediated immunological response. At protein level, DHT hyperdosage affects cell motility and apoptosis; IGF-1 hyperstimulation triggers an active cytoskeletal reorganization and an overproduction of immune response- and inflammation-related cytokines. In this study, we investigate the combined effects of DHT and IGF-1 hyperdosage in peripheral blood lymphocytes using a differential proteomic approach. DHT and IGF-1 combined treatment affects cell adhesion, migration, and survival through modulation of expression levels of cytokines and paxillin-signaling-related proteins, and activation of several pathways downstream focal adhesion kinase. Our results indicate a synergistic effect of DHT and IGF-1 which has potential implications for health risk factors. PMID:25669835

  7. Cytogenetic response to coffee in Chinese hamster ovary AUXB1 cells and human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J D; Taylor, R T; Christensen, M L; Strout, C L; Hanna, M L

    1989-09-01

    We have investigated the genotoxic effects of three different brands and three types of coffee (freshly brewed regular, instant regular and freshly brewed decaffeinated) in two mammalian systems: the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) AUXB1 cell line and human peripheral lymphocytes. Sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and endoreduplicated cells (ERCs) were used as the endpoints. Coffee was prepared according to the manufacturer's suggestions, and after cooling, administered to cultured cells at dilutions ranging up to 11% that of full-strength coffee. Each brand and type of coffee induced significant levels of SCEs and ERCs in AUXB1 cells. SCEs, but not ERCs, were induced in human peripheral lymphocytes. Bisulfite, which complexes with carbonyls and reduces their genotoxicity, significantly diminished the number of SCEs and ERCs found after administration of coffee. Catalase and peroxidase, enzymes that destroy hydrogen peroxide activity, had no significant effect upon the SCE and ERC frequencies in AUXB1 cultures treated with freshly brewed regular coffee. These experiments indicate that different brands and types of coffee have sufficient genotoxic activity to increase SCEs and ERCs at levels only a fraction of those normally consumed. 1,2-Dicarbonyls alone and peroxides alone do not appear to be responsible for the majority of SCEs and ERCs that were observed to be induced by dilute coffee. PMID:2687627

  8. Role of HO/CO in the Control of Peripheral Circulation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sacerdoti, David; Mania, Despina; Pesce, Paola; Gaiani, Silvia; Gatta, Angelo; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies show that the heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide system (HO/CO) plays an important role in the homeostasis of circulation and in the pathophysiology of hypertension. No data are available on its role in the control of peripheral circulation in humans. We evaluated the effects of inhibition of HO with stannous mesoporphyrin IX (SnMP) (200 μM) locally administered by iontophoresis, on human skin blood flow, evaluated by laser-Doppler flowmetry, in the presence and absence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition with L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (100 μM). We also evaluated the effect of HO inhibition on vasodilatation induced by acetylcholine (ACh) and vasoconstriction caused by noradrenaline (NA). SnMP and L-NAME caused a similar 20-25% decrease in skin flow. After nitric oxide (NO) inhibition with L-NAME, HO inhibition with SnMP caused a further 20% decrease in skin perfusion. SnMP decreased vasodilatation induced by ACh by about 70%, while it did not affect vasoconstriction to NA. In conclusion, HO/CO participates in the control of peripheral circulation, independently from NO, and is involved in vasodilatation to ACh. PMID:22500215

  9. Novel neutrophil chemotactic factor derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kownatzki, E; Kapp, A; Uhrich, S

    1986-01-01

    Human mononuclear leucocytes isolated from the peripheral blood by centrifugation on Ficoll-Hypaque cushions and adherent on plastic petri dishes, produced a chemotactic factor that attracted human neutrophilic granulocytes to the same extent as did optimal concentrations of the complement split product C5a and the leukotriene B4. The active component eluted from a Sephadex G-50 gel filtration column as a single peak with an apparent molecular weight of 10,000. The chemotactic activity was resistant to reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds and heating at 100 degrees C for 30 min but was lost when reduction and heating were combined. Digestion with a proteolytic enzyme eliminated the attractive potential. The data suggest that this is a novel chemotactic peptide. It is conceivable that it has been seen previously and was mistaken for a lymphokine or interleukin 1. PMID:3731527

  10. High-resolution analysis of human peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Young, B D; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Sillar, R; Boyd, E

    1981-01-01

    A method for high-resolution analysis of the human karyotype by flow cytometry has been developed. Metaphase chromosomes are prepared from short-term peripheral blood cultures, stained with ethidium bromide, and analyzed on a standard fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS-II). Flow karyotypes with up to 20 peaks can be obtained with coefficients of variation in the range 1-2%. At this level of resolution the contribution of many of the human chromosomes can be evaluated separately. Significant and reproducible differences between normal individuals have been detected and have been correlated with differences in the centric heterochromatin of certain chromosomes as revealed in their C-banded karyotypes. Images PMID:6950411

  11. Proteome Mapping of Adult Zebrafish Marrow Neutrophils Reveals Partial Cross Species Conservation to Human Peripheral Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sethi, Sachin; Aravamudhan, Sriram; Krüger, Marcus; Grabher, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes are pivotal cells within the first line of host defense of the innate immune system. In this study, we have used a gel-based LC-MS/MS approach to explore the proteome of primary marrow neutrophils from adult zebrafish. The identified proteins originated from all major cellular compartments. Gene ontology analysis revealed significant association of proteins with different immune-related network and pathway maps. 75% of proteins identified in neutrophils were identified in neutrophils only when compared to neutrophil-free brain tissue. Moreover, cross-species comparison with human peripheral blood neutrophils showed partial conservation of immune-related proteins between human and zebrafish. This study provides the first zebrafish neutrophil proteome and may serve as a valuable resource for an understanding of neutrophil biology and innate immunity. PMID:24019943

  12. Neural bases for addictive properties of benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kelly R; Brown, Matthew; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Yvon, Cédric; Creton, Cyril; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Rudolph, Uwe; Lüscher, Christian

    2010-02-11

    Benzodiazepines are widely used in clinics and for recreational purposes, but will lead to addiction in vulnerable individuals. Addictive drugs increase the levels of dopamine and also trigger long-lasting synaptic adaptations in the mesolimbic reward system that ultimately may induce the pathological behaviour. The neural basis for the addictive nature of benzodiazepines, however, remains elusive. Here we show that benzodiazepines increase firing of dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area through the positive modulation of GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid type A) receptors in nearby interneurons. Such disinhibition, which relies on alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptors expressed in these cells, triggers drug-evoked synaptic plasticity in excitatory afferents onto dopamine neurons and underlies drug reinforcement. Taken together, our data provide evidence that benzodiazepines share defining pharmacological features of addictive drugs through cell-type-specific expression of alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptors in the ventral tegmental area. The data also indicate that subunit-selective benzodiazepines sparing alpha1 may be devoid of addiction liability. PMID:20148031

  13. Characterization of peripheral-compartment kinetics of antibiotics by in vivo microdialysis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, M; Haag, O; Burgdorff, T; Georgopoulos, A; Weninger, W; Jansen, B; Stanek, G; Pehamberger, H; Agneter, E; Eichler, H G

    1996-01-01

    The calculation of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic surrogates from concentrations in serum has been shown to yield important information for the evaluation of antibiotic regimens. Calculations based on concentrations in serum, however, may not necessarily be appropriate for peripheral-compartment infections. The aim of the present study was to apply the microdialysis technique for the study of the peripheral-compartment pharmacokinetics of select antibiotics in humans. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of healthy volunteers and into inflamed and noninflamed dermis of patients with cellulitis. Thereafter, volunteers received either cefodizime (2,000 mg as an intravenous bolus; n = 6), cefpirome (2,000 mg as an intravenous bolus; n = 6), fleroxacin (400 mg orally n = 6), or dirithromycin (250 mg orally; n = 4); the patients received phenoxymethylpenicillin (4.5 x 10(6) U orally; n = 3). Complete concentration-versus-time profiles for serum and tissues could be obtained for all compounds. Major pharmacokinetic parameters (elimination half-life, peak concentration in serum, time to peak concentration, area under the concentration-time curve [AUC], and AUC/MIC ratio) were calculated for tissues. For cefodizime and cefpirome, the AUCtissue/AUCserum ratios were 0.12 to 0.35 and 1.20 to 1.79, respectively. The AUCtissue/AUCserum ratios were 0.34 to 0.38 for fleroxacin and 0.42 to 0.49 for dirithromycin. There was no visible difference in the time course of phenoxymethylpenicillin in inflamed and noninflamed dermis. We demonstrated, by means of microdialysis, that the concept of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic surrogate markers for evaluation of antibiotic regimens originally developed for serum pharmacokinetics can be extended to peripheral-tissue pharmacokinetics. This novel information may be useful for the rational development of dosage schedules and may improve predictions regarding therapeutic outcome. PMID:9124826

  14. Peripheral inflammatory disease associated with centrally activated IL-1 system in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lampa, Jon; Westman, Marie; Kadetoff, Diana; Agréus, Anna Nordenstedt; Le Maître, Erwan; Gillis-Haegerstrand, Caroline; Andersson, Magnus; Khademi, Mohsen; Corr, Maripat; Christianson, Christina A; Delaney, Ada; Yaksh, Tony L; Kosek, Eva; Svensson, Camilla I

    2012-07-31

    During peripheral immune activation caused by an infection or an inflammatory condition, the innate immune response signals to the brain and causes an up-regulation of central nervous system (CNS) cytokine production. Central actions of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-1β, are pivotal for the induction of fever and fatigue. In the present study, the influence of peripheral chronic joint inflammatory disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on CNS inflammation was investigated. Intrathecal interleukin (IL)-1β concentrations were markedly elevated in RA patients compared with controls or with patients with multiple sclerosis. Conversely, the anti-inflammatory IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-4 were decreased in RA cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 levels in the CSF did not differ between patients and controls. Concerning IL-1β, CSF concentrations in RA patients were higher than in serum, indicating local production in the CNS, and there was a positive correlation between CSF IL-1β and fatigue assessments. Next, spinal inflammation in experimental arthritis was investigated. A marked increase of IL-1β, IL-18, and tumor necrosis factor, but not IL-6 mRNA production, in the spinal cord was observed, coinciding with increased arthritis scores in the KBxN serum transfer model. These data provide evidence that peripheral inflammation such as arthritis is associated with an immunological activation in the CNS in both humans and mice, suggesting a possible therapeutic target for centrally affecting conditions as fatigue in chronic inflammatory diseases, for which to date there are no specific treatments. PMID:22802629

  15. Views of general practitioners and benzodiazepine users on benzodiazepines: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Parr, Jannette M; Kavanagh, David J; Young, Ross McD; McCafferty, Kelly

    2006-03-01

    Effectively assisting benzodiazepine users to cease use requires a greater understanding of general practitioners' (GPs) and benzodiazepine users' views on using and ceasing benzodiazepines. This paper reports the findings from a qualitative study that examined the views of 28 GPs and 23 benzodiazepine users (BUs) in Cairns, Australia. A semi-structured interview was conducted with all participants and the information gained was analysed using the Consensual Qualitative Research Approach, which allowed comparisons to be made between the views of the two groups of interviewees. There was commonality between GPs and BUs on reasons for commencing benzodiazepines, the role of dependence in continued use, and the importance of lifestyle change in its cessation. However, several differences emerged regarding commencement of use and processes of cessation. In particular, users felt there was greater need for GPs to routinely advise patients about non-pharmacological management of their problems and potential adverse consequences of long-term use before commencing benzodiazepines. Cessation could be discussed with all patients who use benzodiazepines for longer than 3 months, strategies offered to assist in management of withdrawal and anxiety, and referral to other health service providers for additional support. Lifestyle change could receive greater focus at all stages of treatment. PMID:16143440

  16. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Isheeta; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  17. Neural signal processing: the underestimated contribution of peripheral human C-fibers.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Schmidt, Roland; Hammarberg, Björn; Orstavik, Kristin; Hilliges, Marita; Torebjörk, H Erik; Handwerker, Hermann O

    2002-08-01

    The microneurography technique was used to analyze use-dependent frequency modulation of action potential (AP) trains in human nociceptive peripheral nerves. Fifty-one single C-afferent units (31 mechano-responsive, 20 mechano-insensitive) were recorded from cutaneous fascicles of the peroneal nerve in awake human subjects. Trains of two and four suprathreshold electrical stimuli at interstimulus intervals of 20 and 50 msec were applied to the receptive fields of single identified nociceptive units at varying repetition rates. The output frequency (interspike interval) recorded at knee level was compared with the input frequency (interstimulus interval) at different levels of accumulated neural accommodation. At low levels of use-dependent accommodation (measured as conduction velocity slowing of the first action potential in a train), intervals between spikes increased during conduction along the nerve. At increasing levels of neural accommodation, intervals decreased because of a relative supernormal period (SNP) and asymptotically approached the minimum "entrainment" interval of the nerve fiber (11 +/- 1.4 msec) corresponding to a maximum instantaneous discharge frequency (up to 190 Hz). For neural coding, this pattern of frequency decrease at low activity levels and frequency increase at high levels serves as a mechanism of peripheral contrast enhancement. The entrainment interval is a good minimum estimate for the duration of the refractory period of human C-fibers. At a given degree of neural accommodation, all afferent C-units exhibit a uniform pattern of aftereffects, independent of fiber class. The receptive class of a fiber only determines its susceptibility to accommodate. Thus, the time course of aftereffects and existence or absence of an SNP is fully explained by the amount of preexisting accommodation. PMID:12151549

  18. The effect of stress on core and peripheral body temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Penning, Renske; Hellhammer, Juliane; Verster, Joris C; Klaessens, John H G M; Olivier, Berend; Kalkman, Cor J

    2013-09-01

    Even though there are indications that stress influences body temperature in humans, no study has systematically investigated the effects of stress on core and peripheral body temperature. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on body temperature using different readout measurements. In two independent studies, male and female participants were exposed to a standardized laboratory stress task (the Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) or a non-stressful control task. Core temperature (intestinal and temporal artery) and peripheral temperature (facial and body skin temperature) were measured. Compared to the control condition, stress exposure decreased intestinal temperature but did not affect temporal artery temperature. Stress exposure resulted in changes in skin temperature that followed a gradient-like pattern, with decreases at distal skin locations such as the fingertip and finger base and unchanged skin temperature at proximal regions such as the infra-clavicular area. Stress-induced effects on facial temperature displayed a sex-specific pattern, with decreased nasal skin temperature in females and increased cheek temperature in males. In conclusion, the amplitude and direction of stress-induced temperature changes depend on the site of temperature measurement in humans. This precludes a direct translation of the preclinical stress-induced hyperthermia paradigm, in which core temperature uniformly rises in response to stress to the human situation. Nevertheless, the effects of stress result in consistent temperature changes. Therefore, the present study supports the inclusion of body temperature as a physiological readout parameter of stress in future studies. PMID:23790072

  19. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  20. Consequences of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine in humans

    PubMed Central

    Niewinski, Piotr; Tubek, Stanislaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose dopamine inhibits peripheral chemoreceptors and attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in humans. However, it is unknown: (1) whether it also modulates the haemodynamic reactions to acute hypoxia, (2) whether it also modulates cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and (3) if there is any effect of dopamine withdrawal. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 healthy male volunteers. At sea level over 2 days every subject was administered low-dose dopamine (2 μg kg–1 min–1) or saline infusion, during which we assessed both ventilatory and haemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia. Separately, we evaluated effects of initiation and withdrawal of each infusion and BRS. The initiation of dopamine infusion did not affect minute ventilation (MV) or mean blood pressure (MAP), but increased both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output. Concomitantly, it decreased systemic vascular resistance. Dopamine blunted the ventilatory, MAP and HR reactions (hypertension, tachycardia) to acute hypoxia. Dopamine attenuated cardiac BRS to falling blood pressure. Dopamine withdrawal evoked an increase in MV. The magnitude of the increment in MV due to dopamine withdrawal correlated with the size of the HVR and depended on the duration of dopamine administration. The ventilatory reaction to dopamine withdrawal constitutes a novel index of peripheral chemoreceptor function. PMID:24396060

  1. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Nidus Vespae on Human Peripheral Blood Immune Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ming; Ling, Yang; Qi, Qiufeng; Zhang, Yaping; Bao, Yanqing; Liu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Nidus Vespae has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat various cancers, but the underlying mechanisms were not yet clarified. This study was to investigate the effect of Nidus Vespae decoction (NVD) on tumor cell viability and immunoregulating functions of human peripheral blood immune cells. The effects on tumor cell viability, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation activity, and the tumor cell phagocytosis of monocytes were evaluated by cell counting kit-8. Tumor-killing activity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) was analyzed by 51Cr releasing assay. IgG production of B cells and cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6) secretion of monocytes were determined by ELISA method. Data showed that NVD has no significant inhibiting effects on gastric cancer cells growth. Nevertheless, it could obviously promote PBMC proliferation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. After treatment with NVD, the CTL cytotoxicity against SGC-7901 was significantly greater than control. The TNF-α and IL-6 secretion of monocytes and the IgG production of B cells also increased remarkably. Furthermore, NVD could significantly promote the phagocytosis of monocytes on tumor cells. These results suggest that NVD appears to have an immunoenhancing effect on immune cells, indicating that Nidus Vespae is worth exploring for immunomodulatory effects in tumor treatment. PMID:26339270

  2. An infrared spectral signature of human lymphocyte subpopulations from peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Wald, N; Legat, A; Meyer, C; Speiser, D E; Goormaghtigh, E

    2015-04-01

    Metastatic melanomas are frequently refractory to most adjuvant therapies such as chemotherapies and radiotherapies. Recently, immunotherapies have shown good results in the treatment of some metastatic melanomas. Immune cell infiltration in the tumor has been associated with successful immunotherapy. More generally, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the primary tumor and in metastases of melanoma patients have been demonstrated to correlate positively with favorable clinical outcomes. Altogether, these findings suggest the importance of being able to identify, quantify and characterize immune infiltration at the tumor site for a better diagnostic and treatment choice. In this paper, we used Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) imaging to identify and quantify different subpopulations of T cells: the cytotoxic T cells (CD8+), the helper T cells (CD4+) and the regulatory T cells (T reg). As a proof of concept, we investigated pure populations isolated from human peripheral blood from 6 healthy donors. These subpopulations were isolated from blood samples by magnetic labeling and purities were assessed by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). The results presented here show that Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) imaging followed by supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) allows an accurate identification of CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells (>86%). We then developed a PLS regression allowing the quantification of T reg in a different mix of immune cells (e.g. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs)). Altogether, these results demonstrate the sensitivity of infrared imaging to detect the low biological variability observed in T cell subpopulations. PMID:25553786

  3. Putative Epimutagens in Maternal Peripheral and Cord Blood Samples Identified Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshikazu; Hayakawa, Koji; Arai, Daisuke; Ito, Rie; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Saito, Koichi; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Takatori, Satoshi; Ishii, Rie; Hayashi, Rumiko; Izumi, Shun-Ichiro; Sugino, Norihiro; Kondo, Fumio; Horie, Masakazu; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Makino, Tsunehisa; Hirosawa, Mitsuko; Shiota, Kunio; Ohgane, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of transcription and genome stability by epigenetic systems are crucial for the proper development of mammalian embryos. Chemicals that disturb epigenetic systems are termed epimutagens. We previously performed chemical screening that focused on heterochromatin formation and DNA methylation status in mouse embryonic stem cells and identified five epimutagens: diethyl phosphate (DEP), mercury (Hg), cotinine, selenium (Se), and octachlorodipropyl ether (S-421). Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to confirm the effects of 20 chemicals, including the five epimutagens, detected at low concentrations in maternal peripheral and cord blood samples. Of note, these individual chemicals did not exhibit epimutagenic activity in hiPSCs. However, because the fetal environment contains various chemicals, we evaluated the effects of combined exposure to chemicals (DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421) on hiPSCs. The combined exposure caused a decrease in the number of heterochromatin signals and aberrant DNA methylation status at multiple gene loci in hiPSCs. The combined exposure also affected embryoid body formation and neural differentiation from hiPSCs. Therefore, DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421 were defined as an “epimutagen combination” that is effective at low concentrations as detected in maternal peripheral and cord blood. PMID:26339649

  4. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  5. CD5 monoclonal antibodies react with human peripheral blood dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Freudenthal, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    CD5 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) define a 67,000 kd monomeric glycoprotein expressed predominantly by thymocytes, mature T cells and a subpopulation of B cells. CD5 is believed to be an alternative signaling molecules capable of increasing the supply of second messengers and thereby altering the cellular response threshold to other activation stimuli. Human peripheral blood dendritic cells (PBDC) are a circulating component of the immune dendritic cell family, which also includes Langerhans' cells in epithelia and interdigitating cells in the T-cell domains of lymphoid tissues. PBDC comprise less than 1% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction. They are morphologically, immunophenotypically, and functionally distinct from monocytes. In this study, we report that at least a subpopulation of PBDC react with the anti-CD5 MAbs Leu-1 and UCHT2, which define the two major non-crossblocking CD5 epitopes. In contrast, Langerhans' cells, interdigitating cells, monocytes, and macrophages were uniformly CD5-. These findings suggest that PBDC can express the CD5 molecule. Furthermore, they define an additional feature of many enriched PBDC that distinguishes them from monocytes and certain other mononuclear leukocytes, and may provide insights into their activation pathways. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1384337

  6. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  7. Nitinol Stent Fatigue in a Peripheral Human Artery Subjected to Pulsatile and Articulation Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Sean Michael

    2011-07-01

    Nitinol self-expanding stents are used to treat peripheral occluded vessels such as the superficial femoral artery or the carotid. The complex vessel articulation requires a stent device that is flexible and kink resistant yet durable. The present study shows how the latest advances in commercially available engineering software tools permit engineering simulations of the many aspects of the Nitinol stent design and analysis. Two stent geometries are evaluated: a helical type stent design, and a more traditional straight strut, with multiple crowns design. The fatigue performance of the two stents is compared. The results show that advanced nonlinear finite element simulations and fatigue predictions of the Nitinol stent are possible today inside realistic simulated human arteries. The finite element analysis software used in this study is SimXpert, Marc, and Mentat (MSC Software, Santa Ana, CA).

  8. Clastogenic effects of food additive citric acid in human peripheral lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Fatma; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Aksoy, Hüseyin

    2008-01-01

    Clastogenic properties of the food additive citric acid, commonly used as an antioxidant, were analysed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Citric acid induced a significant increase of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) at all the concentrations and treatment periods tested. Citric acid significantly decreased mitotic index (MI) at 100 and 200 μg ml−1 concentrations at 24 h, and in all concentrations at 48 h. However, it did not decrease the replication index (RI) significantly. Citric acid also significantly increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) at 100 and 200 μg ml−1 concentrations at 24 h, and in all concentrations at 48 h. This chemical significantly increased the micronuclei frequency (MN) compared to the negative control. It also decreased the cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI), but this result was not statistically significant. PMID:19002851

  9. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  10. Altered Distribution of Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Humans Chronically Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Esteban R.; Olivera, Gabriela C.; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P.; González, Mariela N.; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L.; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S.; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans. PMID:25111833

  11. [Comparative transcriptome analysis of human aorta atherosclerotic lesions and peripheral blood leukocytes from essential hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A V; Goriunova, L E; Khaspekov, G L; Il'inskaia, O P; Sirotkin, V N; Andreeva, E R; Tararak, E M; Bulkina, O S; Buza, V V; Britareva, V V; Karpov, Iu A; Bibilashvili, R Sh

    2009-01-01

    One of the major cardiovascular risk factor which predisposes to and accelerates atherosclerosis is arterial hypertension (AH). To determine the molecular basis of the crosslink between AH and atherosclerosis for the development of new treatment strategies large-scale transcriptome analysis of the cells implicated in atherogenesis is needed. We used cDNA microarray technique for simultaneous analysis of gene expression in human abdominal aorta normal sites and atherosclerotic lesions of different histological types, as well as in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with essential hypertension (EH) and donors. The microarray data were verified by quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemical analysis. Differential expression of 40 genes has been found, among which twenty two genes demonstrated up-regulation and 18 genes demonstrated down-regulation in atherosclerotic aorta compared with normal vessel. New gene-candidates, implicated in atherogenesis, have been identified - FPRL2, CD37, CD53, RGS1, LCP1, SPI1, CTSA, EPAS1, FHL1, GEM, RHOB, SPARCL1, ITGA8, PLN, and COL14A1. These genes participate in cell migration and adhesion, phenotypic changes of smooth muscle cells, immune and inflammatory reactions, oxidative processes and extracellular matrix remodeling. We have found increased expression levels of CD53, SPI1, FPRL2, SPP1, CTSD, ACP5, LCP1, CTSA and LIPA genes in peripheral blood leukocytes from EH patients and in atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta. The majority of these genes significantly (p<0.005) positively (r>0.5) correlated with AH stage as well as with histological grading of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:19772500

  12. A link between oxytocin and serotonin in humans: supporting evidence from peripheral markers.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Giannaccini, Gino; Betti, Laura; Massimetti, Gabriele; Carmassi, Claudia; Catena-Dell'Osso, Mario

    2012-08-01

    Pharmacological studies indicate a functional interaction between the serotonergic and oxytocinergic systems. In particular, some selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors, such as citalopram and fluvoxamine, seem to exert part of their antidepressant effects through oxytocin (OT) release. Further, the administration of fenfluramine, a serotonergic agonist, to healthy subjects increases plasma OT levels. Interestingly, immunocytochemical and double-immunofluorescent techniques revealed a high degree of overlap between 5-HT transporter (SERT)-labeled fibers and OT-containing cells in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of primate hypothalamus. These findings suggest that the influence of 5-HT on OT system might be mediated by SERT. In this study, we explored the possible existence of a link between OT and SERT in human subjects, by means of two peripheral markers, the platelet SERT, as measured by [³H]-paroxetine ([³H]-Par) binding, and plasma OT levels. As far as [³H]-Par binding parameters are concerned, the Bmax (mean ± SD, fmol/mg protein) was 1155 + 130 and the Kd (mean ± SD, nM) was 1.31 ± 0.61. The OT plasma levels (mean ± SD, pg/ml) were 1.14 ± 1.07. A significant and positive correlation was found between plasma OT levels and Kd values (correlation coefficient: r: 0.466, p = .038). This result represents the first evidence of an interaction between OT and SERT, as measured by [³H]-Par binding, at peripheral levels in humans. Given the several activities mediated by both OT and 5-HT, such a relationship might provide new perspectives and insights into psychiatric disorders and/or social relationship disturbances, as well as novel treatment strategies overcoming and/or integrating the serotonergic paradigm. PMID:22297159

  13. Matrix-free analysis of selected benzodiazepines in human serum samples using alternating trilinear decomposition modeling of fast liquid chromatography diode array detection data.

    PubMed

    Vosough, Maryam; Iravani, Negar J

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a simple and efficient bioanalytical procedure for simultaneous determination of alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam in human serum samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection, regarding a fast elution methodology in 4 min. Briefly, this method consists of a simple liquid extraction step of serum samples followed by HPLC analysis on a C18 column. After confirming the absence of matrix effect, an external standard methodology has been applied for quantification purposes. Due to the presence of serum endogenous components as uncalibrated components in the sample, the second-order calibration based on alternating trilinear decomposition has been applied on a set of absorbance matrices collected as a function of retention time and wavelengths. Acceptable resolution and quantification results were achieved in the presence of matrix interferences and the second-order advantage was fully exploited. The average recoveries for alprazolam, clonazepam and diazepam were 89.1%, 96.3% and 94.7% and relative standard deviation values for intra- and inter-day precision were equal or lower than 8.1% and 9.4%, respectively. The developed method enabled us to determine the analytes in the various serum samples in the presence of overlapped profiles, while keeping experimental time and extraction step at the minimum. PMID:26653472

  14. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  15. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Wei; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lin, Wen-Chang; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Po-Hua; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2016-08-15

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. PMID:27321975

  16. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging. PMID:26879629

  17. TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material stimulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kathrin; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Geisler, Simon; Carriere, Marie; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Herlin, Nathalie; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly produced and used throughout recent years. Consequently the probability of exposure to nanoparticles has risen. Because of their small 1–100 nm size, the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials may differ from standard bulk materials and may pose a threat to human health. Only little is known about the effects of nanoparticles on the human immune system. In this study, we investigated the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material in the in vitro model of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cytokine-induced neopterin formation and tryptophan breakdown was monitored. Both biochemical processes are closely related to the course of diseases like infections, atherogenesis and neurodegeneration. OCTi60 (25 nm diameter) TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material increased neopterin production in unstimulated PBMC and stimulated cells significantly, the effects were stronger for OCTi60 compared to bulk material, while P25 TiO2 (25 nm diameter) nanoparticles had only little influence. No effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on tryptophan breakdown was detected in unstimulated cells, whereas in stimulated cells, IDO activity and IFN-γ production were suppressed but only at the highest concentrations tested. Because neopterin was stimulated and tryptophan breakdown was suppressed in parallel, data suggests that the total effect of particles would be strongly pro-inflammatory. PMID:24361406

  18. Inter-Individual Differences in RNA Levels in Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Chomczynski, Piotr; Wilfinger, William W.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Kennedy, Amy; Rymaszewski, Michal; Mackey, Karol

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the range of RNA levels in human blood. This report provides assessment of peripheral blood RNA level and its inter-individual differences in a group of 35 healthy humans consisting of 25 females and 10 males ranging in age from 50 to 89 years. In this group, the average total RNA level was 14.59 μg/ml of blood, with no statistically significant difference between females and males. The individual RNA level ranged from 6.7 to 22.7 μg/ml of blood. In healthy subjects, the repeated sampling of an individual’s blood showed that RNA level, whether high or low, was stable. The inter-individual differences in RNA level in blood can be attributed to both, differences in cell number and the amount of RNA per cell. The 3.4-fold range of inter-individual differences in total RNA levels, documented herein, should be taken into account when evaluating the results of quantitative RT-PCR and/or RNA sequencing studies of human blood. Based on the presented results, a comprehensive assessment of gene expression in blood should involve determination of both the amount of mRNA per unit of total RNA (U / ng RNA) and the amount of mRNA per unit of blood (U / ml blood) to assure a thorough interpretation of physiological or pathological relevance of study results. PMID:26863434

  19. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair. PMID:24355168

  20. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptor downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tietz, E.I.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Chiu, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    Regional differences in downregulation of brain benzodiazepine receptors were studied using a quantitative autoradiographic method. Rats were given a 4-week flurazepam treatment known to cause tolerance and receptor downregulation. A second group of rats was given a similar treatment, but for only 1 week. A third group was given a single acute dose of diazepam to produce a brain benzodiazepine-like activity equivalent to that found after the chronic treatment. Areas studied included hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, superior colliculus, substantia nigra, dorsal geniculate nucleus, lateral amygdala and lateral hypothalamus. There was a regional variation in the degree of downregulation after 1 week of flurazepam treatment, ranging from 12% to 25%. Extending the flurazepam treatment to 4 weeks caused little further downregulation in those areas studied, except for the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, which showed a 13% reduction in (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding after 1 week and a 40% reduction after 4 weeks of treatment. In a few areas, such as the lateral hypothalamus, no significant change in binding was found after 4 weeks. Acute diazepam treatment caused no change in binding. This latter finding as well as results obtained during the development of the methodology show that downregulation was not an artifact due to residual drug content of brain slices. The regional variations in degree and rate of downregulation suggest areas that may be most important for benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence and may be related to the varying time courses for tolerance to different benzodiazepine actions.

  1. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  2. Serial monitoring of sedation scores in benzodiazepine overdose.

    PubMed

    Kyong, Yeon Young; Park, Jeng Tak; Choi, Kyoung Ho

    2014-11-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used for many diseases, and benzodiazepine overdose is globally increasing in proportion to its prescriptions. Although most benzodiazepine overdoses are known to be safe and nonfatal without coingestions, morbidity or mortality after benzodiazepine overdose is closely related with the duration of unconsciousness or depth of compromised airway. Proper use of flumazenil, a potent antidote of benzodiazepine, seems to accelerate the recovery from the toxicity after benzodiazepine overdose.However, as the case we present demonstrates, careful attention and repetitive evaluations before and after use of flumazenil may be needed in benzodiazepine overdose because resedation occurs in approximately 30% of total flumazenil-treated cases, which suggests that the risk of aspiration or incidental death after administrating flumazenil might be significant without careful monitoring. PMID:24908447

  3. Chrysin induces apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from human chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Milan; Mitrovic, Marina; Nikolic, Ivana; Baskic, Dejan; Popovic, Suzana; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Milosavljevic, Zoran; Zelen, Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develops due to an imbalance between apoptosis and proliferation of B lymphocytes. Chrysin induced apoptosis in leukemia cell lines such as U937, MO7e, THP-1 and HL-60, but there has not yet been data demonstrating the apoptotic effect of chrysin on CLL cells. Therefore, in our investigation we examined the cytotoxicity of chrysin against two leukemia cell lines, MOLT-4 and JVM-13, peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from B-CLL patients and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals in vitro. The effect of chrysin on viability of MOLT-4 and JVM-13 cell lines, B-CLL cells derived from 28 patients and PBMC from 16 healthy subjects was determined by MTT assay. The type of cell death induced by chrysin was verified by Annexin V/7AAD assay and acridine orange and ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining assay. Intracellular localisation and endogenic expression of apoptotic proteins including Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c and caspase-3 were determined by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Our results demonstrated that exposure of MOLT-4, JVM-13 cell lines and B-CLL cells to the concentration of chrysin of 10μM and higher selectively decreased viability of cells in this cell population, but not in the PBMC derived from healthy subjects; LC50 values of chrysin for B-CLL cells were 51μM for 24 hours and 32μM for 48 hours of incubation, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that chrysin induces the activation of proapoptotic Bax and decreases the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein, releases cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol and cleavages/activates caspase-3, subsequently leading to the activation of apoptosis of B-CLL cells. Together, these findings suggest that chrysin selectively induces apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from human chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients via mitochondrial pathway in vitro and that it might have a promising role as a potential future antileukemic

  4. CYTOGENETIC COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSES OF MOUSE AND HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES TO 60CO GAMMA RADIATION (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of (60)Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a (60)Co unit to yield exposures ...

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  6. Diurnal Preference Predicts Phase Differences in Expression of Human Peripheral Circadian Clock Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Andrew; Gellerman, David; Ay, Ahmet; Woods, Kerri Pruitt; Filipowicz, Allan Michael; Jain, Kriti; Bearden, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Circadian rhythms play an integral role in human behavior, physiology and health. Individual differences in daily rhythms (chronotypes) can affect individual sleep-wake cycles, activity patterns and behavioral choices. Diurnal preference, the tendency towards morningness or eveningness among individuals, has been associated with interpersonal variation in circadian clock-related output measures, including body temperature, melatonin levels and clock gene mRNA in blood, oral mucosa, and dermal fibroblast cell cultures. Methods: Here we report gene expression data from two principal clock genes sampled from hair follicle cells, a peripheral circadian clock. Hair follicle cells from fourteen individuals of extreme morning or evening chronotype were sampled at three time points. RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR assays were used to measure mRNA expression patterns of two clock genes, Per3 and Nr1d2. Results: We found significant differences in clock gene expression over time between chronotype groups, independent of gender or age of participants. Extreme evening chronotypes have a delay in phase of circadian clock gene oscillation relative to extreme morning types. Variation in the molecular clockwork of chronotype groups represents nearly three-hour phase differences (Per3: 2.61 hours; Nr1d2: 3.08 hours, both: 2.86) in circadian oscillations of these clock genes. Conclusions: The measurement of gene expression from hair follicles at three time points allows for a direct, efficient method of estimating phase shifts of a peripheral circadian clock in real-life conditions. The robust phase differences in temporal expression of clock genes associated with diurnal preferences provide the framework for further studies of the molecular mechanisms and gene-by-environment interactions underlying chronotype-specific behavioral phenomena, including social jetlag. PMID:27103930

  7. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  8. Widespread Decreased Expression of Immune Function Genes in Human Peripheral Blood Following Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a large-scale reduced expression of genes in pathways related to cell-type specific immunity functions that emerges from microarray analysis 48 h after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 8 Gy) of human peripheral blood from five donors. This response is similar to that seen in patients at 24 h after the start of total-body irradiation and strengthens the rationale for the ex vivo model as an adjunct to human in vivo studies. The most marked response was in genes associated with natural killer (NK) cell immune functions, reflecting a relative loss of NK cells from the population. T- and B-cell mediated immunity genes were also significantly represented in the radiation response. Combined with our previous studies, a single gene expression signature was able to predict radiation dose range with 97% accuracy at times from 6–48 h after exposure. Gene expression signatures that may report on the loss or functional deactivation of blood cell subpopulations after radiation exposure may be particularly useful both for triage biodosimetry and for monitoring the effect of radiation mitigating treatments. PMID:24168352

  9. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry; Genestier, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  10. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:27170256

  11. Visualization of peripheral vasodilative indices in human skin by use of red, green, blue images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Kawase, Tatsuya; Maeda, Takaaki; Yuasa, Tomonori; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2013-06-01

    We propose a method to visualize the arterial inflow, the vascular resistance, and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue from red, green, blue (RGB) digital color images. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue are visualized based on an increase in the rate of change in the total blood concentration and the change of the total blood concentration during upper limb occlusion at a pressure of 50 mmHg. The resultant arterial inflow with the measured mean arterial pressure also provides an image of the vascular resistance in human skin. The arterial inflow, the vascular resistance, and the venous capacitance acquired by the method are well correlated with those obtained from the conventional strain-gauge plethysmograph. The correlation coefficients R between the estimated values by the method and the measurements by the SPG are calculated to be 0.83 (P<0.001) for the arterial inflow, 0.77 (P<0.01) for the vascular resistance, and 0.77 (P<0.01) for the venous capacitance. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue are significantly higher in active subjects compared with the sedentary subjects, whereas the vascular resistance was significantly lower in the active subjects compared with the sedentary subjects. The results of the present study indicate the possibility of using the proposed method for evaluating the peripheral vascular functions in human skin.

  12. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells.

    PubMed

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Seko, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:27170256

  13. Proteome signatures of inflammatory activated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Haudek-Prinz, Verena J.; Klepeisz, Philip; Slany, Astrid; Griss, Johannes; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Paulitschke, Verena; Mitulovic, Goran; Stöckl, Johannes; Gerner, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Proteome profiling is the method of choice to identify marker proteins whose expression may be characteristic for certain diseases. The formation of such marker proteins results from disease-related pathophysiologic processes. In healthy individuals, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) circulate in a quiescent cell state monitoring potential immune-relevant events, but have the competence to respond quickly and efficiently in an inflammatory manner to any invasion of potential pathogens. Activation of these cells is most plausibly accompanied by characteristic proteome alterations. Therefore we investigated untreated and inflammatory activated primary human PBMCs by proteome profiling using a ‘top down’ 2D-PAGE approach in addition to a ‘bottom up’ LC–MS/MS-based shotgun approach. Furthermore, we purified primary human T-cells and monocytes and activated them separately. Comparative analysis allowed us to characterize a robust proteome signature including NAMPT and PAI2 which indicates the activation of PBMCs. The T-cell specific inflammation signature included IRF-4, GBP1and the previously uncharacterized translation product of GBP5; the corresponding monocyte signature included PDCD5, IL1RN and IL1B. The involvement of inflammatory activated PBMCs in certain diseases as well as the responsiveness of these cells to anti-inflammatory drugs may be evaluated by quantification of these marker proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. PMID:22813876

  14. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  15. Cytotoxic and inflammatory responses of TiO2 nanoparticles on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kongseng, Supunsa; Yoovathaworn, Krongtong; Wongprasert, Kanokpan; Chunhabundit, Rodjana; Sukwong, Patinya; Pissuwan, Dakrong

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 -NPs) have been widely used in many applications. Owing to their nanoscale size, interactions between cells and NPs have been expansively investigated. With the health concerns raised regarding the adverse effects of these interactions, closer examination of whether TiO2 -NPs can induce toxicity towards human cells is greatly needed. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of TiO2 -NPs towards human blood cells (peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) in serum-free medium, for which there is little information regarding the cytotoxic effects of TiO2 -NPs. Our results provide evidence that PBMCs treated with TiO2 -NPs (at concentrations ≥25 μg ml(-1) ) for 24 h significantly reduced cell viability and significantly increased production of toxic mediators such as reactive oxygen species and inflammatory response cytokines such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (P < 0.05). Cell apoptosis induction also occurred at these concentrations. Significant expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 and interleukin-1β were also observed in PBMCs treated with TiO2 -NPs at concentrations ≥125 μg ml(-1) . Our data presented here clearly indicate that the concentration of TiO2 -NPs (at size ~26.4 ± 1.2 nm) applied to human blood cells has a strong impact on cytotoxic induction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27225715

  16. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo–secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion. PMID:26087261

  17. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of the Human Cornea in the Assessment of Peripheral Neuropathy and Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ellen F.; Misra, Stuti L.; Patel, Dipika V.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the living human cornea offers the ability to perform repeated imaging without tissue damage. Studies using corneal IVCM have led to significant contributions to scientific and clinical knowledge of the living cornea in health and pathological states. Recently the application of corneal IVCM beyond ophthalmology to wider clinical and research fields has been demonstrated. Abnormalities of the corneal subbasal nerve plexus have been associated with many forms of peripheral neuropathy and Langerhans cells correlate with systemic inflammatory states. There is a rapidly growing evidence base investigating the use of corneal IVCM in many systemic conditions and a well-established evidence base for IVCM imaging of the corneal subbasal plexus in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This paper reviews the potential use of corneal IVCM in general clinical practice as a noninvasive method of assessing peripheral neuropathies, monitoring inflammatory states and clinical therapeutic response. PMID:26770980

  18. Human herpesvirus 6 DNA in peripheral blood cells and saliva from immunocompetent individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, R W; Huang, M L; Ashley, R; Corey, L

    1993-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) genome equivalents were quantitated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and saliva from 20 healthy individuals by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Nineteen of 20 subjects (95%) harbored HHV-6 DNA: 18 (90%) had HHV-6 in their PBMCs and 18 had HHV-6 in their saliva. Quantitative PCR revealed HHV-6 DNA levels ranging from negative to 4,000 HHV-6 genome equivalents per 10(6) PBMCs and from negative to 200,000 HHV-6 genome equivalents per ml of saliva. Longitudinal saliva samples from 15 HHV-6-seropositive subjects revealed salivary HHV-6 DNA persistence in 13 subjects. HHV-6 antibodies were detected in 17 of 19 subjects, with titers ranging from 1:400 to 1:51,200 (geometric mean titer, 1:2,500). Antibody titers did not correlate with HHV-6 DNA levels in PBMCs or saliva (P = 0.27 and P = 0.44, respectively). One subject with persistent HHV-6 DNA lacked detectable HHV-6 antibodies. The high prevalence of HHV-6 DNA in PBMCs and saliva supports the concept that HHV-6 exists at these sites in normal individuals. Images PMID:8388889

  19. Bisphenol A suppresses Th1-type immune response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Raggl, Emanuel; Becker, Kathrin; Überall, Florian; Schennach, Harald; Pease, James E; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used plasticizer, which came into focus because of its genotoxic and sensitizing potential. Besides its toxic properties, BPA is also well-known for its antioxidant chemical properties. This in vitro study investigated the interference of BPA with interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced tryptophan breakdown and neopterin production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ induces the conversion of the essential amino acid tryptophan into kynurenine via the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1). In parallel, GTP-cyclohydrolase produces neopterin, a marker of immune activation. A model system of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC was used to assess potential immunomodulatory properties of BPA. Treatment of cells with BPA [12.5-200μM] resulted in a significant and dose-dependent suppression of mitogen-induced tryptophan breakdown and neopterin formation along with a decrease of IFN-γ levels. Similar but less pronounced effects were observed in unstimulated cells. We postulate that the inhibitory effects of BPA on both T-cell activation and IDO-1 activity that we describe here may be critical for immune surveillance and is likely to influence T helper (Th) type 1/Th2 balance. Such immunosuppressive effects likely contribute to counteract inflammation. Further studies are required to address the in vivo relevance our in vitro findings. PMID:26475400

  20. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by coal dust and tobacco snuff extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Ong, T.

    1985-01-01

    The organic solvent extracts of sub-bituminous coal dust and tobacco snuff, both together and separately, were tested for the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results indicate that these extracts induced SCEs, and that when tested together synergistically induced SCEs in two of three donors. Studies with the organic solvent extracts of all five ranks of coal indicate that the extracts of bituminous, lignite, and peat, but not anthracite, induced SCEs. Similar experiments conducted with water extracts, induced SCEs, and that anthracite was equivocal. To determine whether individuals differed in their SCE responses to coal dust extracts, lymphocytes from five donors were tested with organic solvent extracts of bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. An analysis of variance indicates that the SCE response was significantly influenced by the donor and each of the two coal extracts. The findings presented here suggest that coal dust, with or without tobacco snuff, may play a role in the elevated incidence of gastric cancer in coal miners. Because water extracts of some ranks of coal induced SCEs, there exists the possibility of adverse environmental effects due to coal leachates.

  1. [Method for determining dopamine and morphine binding sites in lymphocytes from human peripheral blood].

    PubMed

    Gamaleia, N B; Kuz'mina, T I; Shostak, O A; Gamaleia, A A; Dmitrieva, I G

    2003-12-01

    A histochemical method was designed to detect the regions of binding the dopamine and morphine in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. It is based on incubating the suspension of lymphocytes and conjugated dopamine or morphine with bull serum albumin (BSA) marked by horse-radish peroxidase. After incubation, smears are prepared from the lymphocyte suspension, which are stained by diaminobenzidine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide for peroxidase. The light microscope with oil immersion is used to count the number of lymphocytes (from among 100 hundred of them), which contain the peroxidase granules. Smears from the lymphocyte suspension, which were incubated with the BSA-peroxidase conjugate, were controls. The binding of peroxidase-marked ligands of dopamine and mu-opioid receptors with lymphocytes was oppressed by the dose-dependant preliminary incubation with antagonists (haloperidol, naloxone), on the basis of which the presence of the ligand-receptor interaction can be suggested. The number of bindings of dopamine and morphine in lymphocytes was shown to be reliably higher in the alcoholic-intoxication state versus the healthy subjects without any signs of alcohol consumption. The designed method is simple enough in use and does not require any special equipment for the receptor detection in a moderate blood quantity. PMID:14971325

  2. Multiparameter analysis of stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: A comparison of mass and fluorescence cytometry.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Katherine J; Greenplate, Allison R; Flaherty, David K; Matlock, Brittany K; Juan, Juan San; Smith, Rita M; Irish, Jonathan M; Kalams, Spyros A

    2016-03-01

    Mass and fluorescence cytometry are quantitative single cell flow cytometry approaches that are powerful tools for characterizing diverse tissues and cellular systems. Here mass cytometry was directly compared with fluorescence cytometry by studying phenotypes of healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the context of superantigen stimulation. One mass cytometry panel and five fluorescence cytometry panels were used to measure 20 well-established lymphocyte markers of memory and activation. Comparable frequencies of both common and rare cell subpopulations were observed with fluorescence and mass cytometry using biaxial gating. The unsupervised high-dimensional analysis tool viSNE was then used to analyze data sets generated from both mass and fluorescence cytometry. viSNE analysis effectively characterized PBMC using eight features per cell and identified similar frequencies of activated CD4+ T cells with both technologies. These results suggest combinations of unsupervised analysis programs and extended multiparameter cytometry will be indispensable tools for detecting perturbations in protein expression in both health and disease. PMID:26599989

  3. Analysis of cytotoxic effects of silver nanoclusters on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells 'in vitro'.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ochoa-Martínez, Angeles Catalina; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Yacamán, Miguel José; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo Ricardo; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-10-01

    The antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have made these particles one of the most used nanomaterials in consumer products. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions (unwanted toxicity) between nanoparticles and human cells is of significant interest. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity effects of silver nanoclusters (AgNC, < 2 nm diameter) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Using flow cytometry and comet assay methods, we demonstrate that exposure of PBMC to AgNC induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis at 3, 6 and 12 h, with a dose-dependent response (0.1, 1, 3, 5 and 30 µg ml(-1)). Advanced electron microscopy imaging of complete and ultrathin-sections of PBMC confirmed the cytotoxic effects and cell damage caused by AgNC. The present study showed that AgNC produced without coating agents induced significant cytotoxic effects on PBMC owing to their high aspect ratio and active surface area, even at much lower concentrations (<1 µg ml(-1)) than those applied in previous studies, resembling what would occur under real exposure conditions to nanosilver-functionalized consumer products. PMID:26281020

  4. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-11-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating (/sup 3/H)thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase.

  5. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  6. Dose rate effect of pulsed electron beam on micronucleus frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Santhosh; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Bhat, Nagesh N; Narayana, Yerol

    2010-03-01

    The micronucleus assay in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage and could serve as a biological dosimeter in evaluating suspected overexposure to ionising radiation. Micronucleus (MN) frequency as a measure of chromosomal damage has also extensively been employed to quantify the effects of radiation dose rate on biological systems. Here we studied the effects of 8 MeV pulsed electron beam emitted by Microtron electron accelerator on MN induction at dose rates between 35 Gy min-1 and 352.5 Gy min-1. These dose rates were achieved by varying the pulse repetition rate (PRR). Fricke dosimeter was employed to measure the absorbed dose at different PRR and to ensure uniform dose distribution of the electron beam. To study the dose rate effect, blood samples were irradiated to an absorbed dose of (4.7+/-0.2) Gy at different rates and cytogenetic damage was quantified using the micronucleus assay. The obtained MN frequency showed no dose rate dependence within the studied dose rate range. Our earlier dose effect study using 8 MeV electrons revealed that the response of MN was linear-quadratic. Therefore, in the event of an accident, dose estimation can be made using linear-quadratic dose response parameters, without adding dose rate as a correction factor. PMID:20338871

  7. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Aleksandar; Živković, Lada; Stajić, Mirjana; Vukojević, Jelena; Milovanović, Ivan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0 mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0 mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  8. Reduction of chrysotile asbestos-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by garlic extract.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Yadava, Santosh; Papp, Thilo; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Rahman, Qamar

    2004-11-28

    Asbestos fibers are well known environmental carcinogen, however, the underlying mechanisms of their action have still not clearly been identified. Asbestos is capable of depleting glutathione and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators of damage in biological system. Asbestos-induced mutagenecity, may be mediated by the generation. It is known that a number of scavengers and antioxidants attenuate asbestos-induced ROS release. Furthermore, it is known that garlic, contains numerous sulfur compounds and glutathione precursors which act as antioxidants and also demonstrate anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether garlic extract has any influence on asbestos-mediated genotoxicity. As an assay system, we applied the micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchanges, and chromosomal aberrations with human peripheral blood lymphocytes, which has already been used to analyze the genotoxicity of asbestos fibers. Our results indicate that garlic extract, when administered to the lymphocytes cell culture simultaneously with chrysotile reduced the rates of micronucleus formation, sister chromatid exchanges, and chromosomal aberrations significantly. We conclude that garlic extract may be an efficient, physiologically tolerable quencher of asbestos-mediated genotoxicity. PMID:15454308

  9. A method for production and determination of histamine releasing activity from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kampen, G T; Poulsen, L K; Reimert, C M; Skov, P S

    1997-12-29

    Histamine releasing factors, i.e. cytokines capable of inducing histamine release from basophils or mast cells, have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of, for example, allergic late-phase reactions. Here we describe a controlled method for production and determination of histamine releasing activity (HRA) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC). MNC were incubated with concanavalin A (Con A) for 2 h and cultured for another 40 h in fresh serum free medium. The culture supernatants were concentrated 19-25 fold by ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off: 3000 Da). The preparations of HRA induced dose- and Ca2+-dependent histamine release from leukocytes. Supernatants of parallel cultures of unstimulated MNC did not induce histamine release. The HRA was neither due to exogenous histamine releasing compounds (e.g. Con A) nor to residual histamine in the preparations of HRA. The kinetics of HRA induced histamine release (half-maximal release after > 40 min) were slower and more protracted than those of anti-IgE induced histamine release. However, based on a comparison between HRA induced histamine release from leukocytes and purified (97%) basophils, this did not appear to be due to an indirect effect on the basophils. Finally, neither the production of nor the response to HRA was dependent on the allergic status of the donor. PMID:9520301

  10. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  11. Withdrawal from long-term benzodiazepine treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Petursson, H; Lader, M H

    1981-01-01

    Long-term, normal-dose benzodiazepine treatment was discontinued in 16 patients who were suspected of being dependent on their medication. The withdrawal was gradual, placebo-controlled, and double-blind. All the patients experienced some form of withdrawal reaction, which ranged from anxiety and dysphoria to moderate affective and perceptual changes. Symptom ratings rose as the drugs were discontinued, but usually subsided to prewithdrawal levels over the next two to four weeks. Other features of the withdrawal included disturbance of sleep and appetite and noticeable weight loss. Electroencephalography showed appreciable reduction in fast-wave activity as the drugs were withdrawn, and an improvement in psychological performance was recorded by the Digit Symbol Substitution Test. Because of the risk of dependence on benzodiazepines these agents should probably not be given as regular daily treatment for chronic anxiety. PMID:6114776

  12. Incomplete activation of peripheral blood dendritic cells during healthy human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, S; Giannelli, S; Cozzi, V; Signorelli, V; Cappelletti, M; Cetin, I; Villa, M L

    2011-05-01

    Successful pregnancy relies on the adaptation of immune responses that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central to the control of immune tolerance, and their state of activation at the maternal-decidual interface is critical to the feto-maternal immunological equilibrium. So far, the involvement of circulating DCs has been investigated poorly. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether, during healthy human pregnancy, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) undergo changes that may be relevant to the adaptation of maternal immune responses that allow fetal tolerance. In a cross-sectional study, we analysed PBDCs by six-colour flow cytometry on whole blood samples from 47 women during healthy pregnancy progression and 24 non-pregnant controls. We demonstrated that both myeloid and plasmacytoid PBDCs undergo a state of incomplete activation, more evident in the third trimester, characterized by increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production but lacking human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR up-regulation. To investigate the contribution of soluble circulating factors to this phenomenon, we also performed culture experiments showing that sera from pregnant women added to control DCs conditioned a similar incomplete activation that was associated with reduced DC allostimulatory capacity, supporting the in vivo relevance of our findings. We also obtained evidence that the glycoprotein hormone activin-A may contribute to DC incomplete activation. We suggest that the changes of PBDCs occurring during late pregnancy may aid the comprehension of the immune mechanisms operated by the maternal immune system to maintain fetal tolerance. PMID:21352205

  13. The effect of catechol on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Catechol also known as pyrocatechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene is formed endogenously in the organism from neurotransmitters including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. It is also a metabolite of many drugs like DOPA, isoproterenol or aspirin and it is also formed in the environment during transformation of various xenobiotics. We evaluated in vitro the effect of catechol on the structure and function of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cells were incubated with xenobiotic at concentration range from 2 to 500μg/mL for 1h. Human blood mononuclear cells were obtained from leucocyte-platelet buffy coat taken from healthy donors in the Blood Bank of Łódź, Poland. Using flow cytometry we have evaluated necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in PBMCs incubated with catechol. Moreover, we have estimated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation in the cells studied. The compound studied provoked necrotic (from 250μg/mL), apoptotic (from 100μg/mL), and morphological changes (from 250μg/mL) in the incubated cells. We have also noted that catechol decreased H2DCF oxidation at 2 and 10μg/mL but at higher concentrations of 250 and 500μg/mL it caused statistically significant increase in the oxidation of this probe. We also observed an increase in lipid peroxidation (from 250μg/mL) and protein carbonylation (from 50μg/mL) of PBMCs. It was observed that catechol only at high concentrations was capable of inducing changes in PBMCs. The obtained results clearly showed that catechol may induce change in PBMCs only in the caste of poisoning with this compound. PMID:25528409

  14. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood. PMID:25403468

  15. The Use of Benzodiazepines to Facilitate Sexual Assault.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, M A

    2010-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are one of the classes of drugs most commonly associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault. As a widely prescribed class of medications and abused drugs, benzodiazepines are extensively available. Their sedating and amnesic effects make them effective candidates for use in drug-facilitated assaults. Detection methods for benzodiazepines and their metabolites in biological fluids are plentiful, but methods must be tailored to the low concentrations of drugs and metabolites expected to be encountered in these cases. PMID:26242454

  16. Alprazolam is relatively more toxic than other benzodiazepines in overdose

    PubMed Central

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; O'Regan, Luke; Sibbritt, David; Whyte, Ian M

    2004-01-01

    Aims To describe alprazolam poisoning and the relative toxicity of alprazolam compared with other benzodiazepines. Methods A database of consecutive poisoning admissions to a regional toxicology service was searched to identify consecutive benzodiazepine deliberate self poisonings, which were coded as alprazolam, diazepam or other benzodiazepine. Major outcomes used were length of stay (LOS), intensive care (ICU) admission, coma (GCS < 9), flumazenil administration and requirement for mechanical ventilation. Prescription data were obtained for benzodiazepines for the study period. Results There were 2063 single benzodiazepine overdose admissions: 131 alprazolam overdoses, 823 diazepam overdoses and 1109 other benzodiazepine overdoses. The median LOS for alprazolam overdoses was 19 h which was 1.27 (95% CI 1.04, 1.54) times longer compared with other benzodiazepines by multiple linear regression. For patients with alprazolam overdoses, 22% were admitted to ICU which was 2.06 (95% CI 1.27, 3.33) times more likely compared with other benzodiazepines after multivariate analysis adjusting for age, dose, gender, time to ingestion and co-ingested drugs. Flumazenil was administered to 14% of alprazolam patients and 16% were ventilated, which was significantly more than for other benzodiazepine overdoses (8% and 11%, respectively). Twelve percent of alprazolam overdoses had a GCS < 9 compared with 10% for other benzodiazepines. From benzodiazepine prescription data, total alprazolam prescriptions in Australia increased from 0.13 million in 1992 to 0.41 million in 2001. Eighty five percent of prescriptions were for panic disorder, anxiety, depression or mixed anxiety/depression. Conclusions Alprazolam was significantly more toxic than other benzodiazepines. The increased prescription of alprazolam to groups with an increased risk of deliberate self poisoning is concerning and needs review. PMID:15206998

  17. Imaging benzodiazepine receptors in man with C-11-suriclone and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Links, J.M.; Trifiletti, R.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    Suriclone is a potent cyclopyrrolone, anti-anxiety drug which binds to the benzodiazepine receptor complex (BZR) with high affinity. Suriclone binds to a site on the BZR distinct from the site where benzodiazepines bind. The K/sub D/ of suriclone at 37oC is 0.03 nM. C-11-suriclone (SUR) was synthesized by reacting C-CH3I with the appropriate amine precursor. SUR (1 ..mu..g/kg) was injected IV into a baboon alone or with 1 mg/kg of Ro-151788, a benzodiazepine antagonist, and serial PET scans of the brain were obtained. High radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum which contain high densities of BZR, intermediate concentrations in thalamus and low concentrations in the striatum. When Ro-151788 was given a uniform distribution of radioactivity was observed; the radioactivity was reduced to ca. 25% of control values in the brain which was contained within the PET slice. SUR (0.2 ..mu..g/kg) was next administered to a human subject. From 30-60 minutes after injection high radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, intermediate concentrations in the thalamus and a low concentration in the caudate. Radioactivity in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum decreased slowly with time, implying that binding of SUR to a high affinity site had occurred. These results demonstrate utility of SUR for measuring binding to the benzodiazepine receptor complex non-invasively in man.

  18. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

    SciTech Connect

    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  19. Is there still a role for benzodiazepines in general practice?

    PubMed Central

    King, M B

    1992-01-01

    Opinion on benzodiazepines has moved from optimism after their entry onto the market to disillusionment over their potential for dependence. Legal proceedings against manufacturers of benzodiazepines, health authorities and doctors will be taking place this year. Nonetheless, just over 18 million prescriptions for benzodiazepines were issued in 1990, most of which came from general practice. Is there any role left for this group of drugs? This review addresses the issues of dependence on an withdrawal from benzodiazepines and weighs up the evidence for their present vilification. PMID:1389432

  20. Sensitivity of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Lima, Manoel Sebastião; Zorzenon, Denielly Christina Rodrigues; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Cavalheiros; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; Cunha, Rodrigo; Andreotti, Renato; Matos, Maria de Fatima Cepa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood samples. Methods DNA extraction was performed using Promega Wizard® Genomic kits. PCR employing RV1/RV2 primers yielded 145-bp amplicons. Real-time PCR was performed with the same primers and SYBR Green ROX Plus mix. These techniques were used to analyze 100 peripheral blood samples from patients with clinical signs of the disease. Results The sensitivity and specificity levels were 91,3%% and 29,6%, respectively, for real-time PCR and 97.78% and 61.82%, respectively, for PCR. Conclusions Real-time PCR proved to be a satisfactory method for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis.

  1. Change in peripheral refraction and curvature of field of the human eye with accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Arthur; Zimmermann, Frederik; Whatham, Andrew; Martinez, Aldo; Delgado, Stephanie; Lazon de la Jara, Percy; Sankaridurg, Padmaja

    2009-02-01

    Recent research showed that the peripheral refractive state is a sufficient stimulus for myopia progression. This finding led to the suggestion that devices that control peripheral refraction may be efficacious in controlling myopia progression. This study aims to understand whether the optical effect of such devices may be affected by near focus. In particular, we seek to understand the influence of accommodation on peripheral refraction and curvature of field of the eye. Refraction was measured in twenty young subjects using an autorefractor at 0° (i.e. along visual axis), and 20°, 30° and 40° field angles both nasal and temporal to the visual axis. All measurements were conducted at 2.5 m, 40 cm and 30 cm viewing distances. Refractive errors were corrected using a soft contact lens during all measurements. As field angle increased, refraction became less hyperopic. Peripheral refraction also became less hyperopic at nearer viewing distances (i.e. with increasing accommodation). Astigmatism (J180) increased with field angle as well as with accommodation. Adopting a third-order aberration theory approach, the position of the Petzval surface relative to the retinal surface was estimated by considering the relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) and J180 terms of peripheral refraction. Results for the estimated dioptric position of the Petzval surface relative to the retina showed substantial asymmetry. While temporal field tended to agree with theoretical predictions, nasal response departed dramatically from the model eye predictions. With increasing accommodation, peripheral refraction becomes less hyperopic while the Petzval surface showed asymmetry in its change in position. The change in the optical components (i.e. cornea and/or lens as opposed to retinal shape or position) is implicated as at least one of the contributors of this shift in peripheral refraction during accommodation.

  2. Presence of human herpesvirus 6 variants A and B in saliva and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy adults.

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, S W; Mandl, C W; Kunz, C; Popow-Kraupp, T

    1996-01-01

    Saliva and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 44 healthy young adults were tested for human herpesvirus 6 variants A and B (HHV-6A and -6B) DNA by a sensitive nested PCR. HHV-6B infection was ascertained in 98% of the subjects, and 95% were found to excrete variant B in their saliva. HHV-6A was found in the PBMCs of 16%, but was not detected in saliva samples. PMID:8940478

  3. In vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of a particular combination of pemetrexed and cefixime in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Istifli, Erman Salih; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to find the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of a particular combination of pemetrexed (PMX) and cefixime (CFX) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Chromosome aberration (CA), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and micronucleus (MN) tests were used to assess genotoxicity. Whereas, the cytotoxicity was evaluated by using mitotic index (MI), proliferation index (PI), and nuclear division index (NDI). Our tests were proceeded with concentrations of 12.5 + 450, 25 + 800, 37.5 + 1150, and 50 + 1500 μg/mL of a mixture of PMX and CFX separately for 24 hr and 48 hr. The combination of PMX + CFX did not induce the CA or SCE in human peripheral blood lymphocytes when compared with both the control and the solvent control. MN in human peripheral blood lymphocytes was not significantly increased after treatment with a particular combination of PMX + CFX. However, PMX + CFX significantly decreased the MI, PI and NDI at all concentrations for 24- and 48-hr treatment periods when compared with both controls. Generally, PMX + CFX inhibited cell proliferation more than positive control (MMC) and showed a higher cytotoxic effect than MMC at both treatment periods. These results were compared with individual effects of PMX and CFX. As a result, it was observed that a particular combination of PMX + CFX was not genotoxic. However, the combination synergistically increase cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:25653913

  4. Dysregulation of the Peripheral and Adipose Tissue Endocannabinoid System in Human Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blüher, Matthias; Engeli, Stefan; Klöting, Nora; Berndt, Janin; Fasshauer, Mathias; Bátkai, Sádor; Pacher, Pál; Schön, Michael R.; Jordan, Jens; Stumvoll, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been suspected to contribute to the association of visceral fat accumulation with metabolic diseases. We determined whether circulating endocannabinoids are related to visceral adipose tissue mass in lean, subcutaneous obese, and visceral obese subjects (10 men and 10 women in each group). We further measured expression of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes in paired samples of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in all 60 subjects. Circulating 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) was significantly correlated with body fat (r = 0.45, P = 0.03), visceral fat mass (r = 0.44, P = 0.003), and fasting plasma insulin concentrations (r = 0.41, P = 0.001) but negatively correlated to glucose infusion rate during clamp (r = 0.39, P = 0.009). In visceral adipose tissue, CB1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.32, P = 0.01), fasting insulin (r = 0.48, P < 0.001), and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.5, P < 0.001), whereas FAAH gene expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that abdominal fat accumulation is a critical correlate of the dysregulation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity. Thus, the endocannabinoid system may represent a primary target for the treatment of abdominal obesity and associated metabolic changes. PMID:17065342

  5. Immunomodulatory capacity of fungal proteins on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jeurink, Prescilla V; Noguera, Cristina Lull; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wichers, Harry J

    2008-08-01

    Immunomodulation by fungal compounds can be determined by the capacity of the compounds to influence the cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC). These activities include mitogenicity, stimulation and activation of immune effector cells. Eight mushroom strains (Agaricus blazei, Coprinus comatus, Flammulina velutipes, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa, Volvariella volvacea, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus ostreatus) were tested for the immunomodulating activity of the isolated protein fractions and polysaccharides fractions present in mycelia and culture liquid. The fungal proteins and polysaccharides have been investigated for their in vitro effect on the cytokine profile (IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-alpha) of unstimulated or hPBMC stimulated with the polyclonal stimulations PMA/Ca-I, ConA or LPS. In addition to their influence on the cytokine profile, the hemagglutination activity of the fungal proteins on rabbit red blood cells was determined. Proteins from V. volvacea and G. lucidum showed immunomodulating activity without the presence of any mitogen, however, neither of them decreased the production of IL-4 and IFN-gamma in combination with a stimulus. All used stimuli resulted in an induction of IL-12 in the presence of the protein extracts, suggesting a direct effect on monocytes. This effect might lead to the indirect immunomodulation of T cell activation and cytokine production. In addition, both protein extracts showed more hemagglutination activity after trypsin treatment of the rabbit red blood cells, indicating the presence of carbohydrate-binding proteins, like lectins and FIPs. In conclusion, the protein extracts of V. volvacea and G. lucidum contain immunomodulating activity by acting directly on monocytes and thereby modulating T cell activation. Further purification of the fungal extracts is needed to clarify whether there are FIPs or lectins present that are responsible for this immunomodulating activity

  6. Immunological effects of the anti-programmed death-1 antibody on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Nonomura, Chizu; Kondou, Ryota; Miyata, Haruo; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Chie; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint antibody-mediated blockade has gained attention as a new cancer immunotherapy strategy. Accumulating evidence suggests that this therapy imparts a survival benefit to metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer patients. A substantial amount of data on immune checkpoint antibodies has been collected from clinical trials; however, the direct effect of the antibodies on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has not been exclusively investigated. In this study, we developed an anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibody (with biosimilarity to nivolumab) and examined the effects of the antibody on PBMCs derived from cancer patients. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the anti-PD-1 antibody on proliferation, cytokine production, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and regulatory T cells. These investigations yielded several important results. First, the anti-PD-1 antibody had no obvious effect on resting PBMCs; however, high levels of the anti-PD-1 antibody partly stimulated PBMC proliferation when accompanied by an anti-CD3 antibody. Second, the anti-PD-1 antibody restored the growth inhibition of anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated PBMCs mediated by PD-L1. Third, the anti-PD-1 antibody exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect on the induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) by anti-CD3 antibody stimulation. Additionally, the presence of the anti-PD-1 antibody promoted antigen-specific CTL induction, which suggests that combining anti-PD-1 antibody and conventional immunotherapy treatments may have beneficial effects. These results indicate that specific cellular immunological mechanisms are partly responsible for the antitumor effect exhibited by the anti-PD-1 antibody against advanced cancers in clinical trials. PMID:27573705

  7. Evolution of peripheral nerve function in humans: novel insights from motor nerve excitability

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Michelle A; Park, Susanna B; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    While substantial alterations in myelination and axonal growth have been described during maturation, their interactions with the configuration and activity of axonal membrane ion channels to achieve impulse conduction have not been fully elucidated. The present study utilized axonal excitability techniques to compare the changes in nerve function across healthy infants, children, adolescents and adults. Multiple excitability indices (stimulus–response curve, strength–duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, current–threshold relationship and recovery cycle) combined with conventional neurophysiological measures were investigated in 57 subjects (22 males, 35 females; age range 0.46–24 years), stimulating the median motor nerve at the wrist. Maturational changes in conduction velocity were paralleled by significant alterations in multiple excitability parameters, similarly reaching steady values in adolescence. Maturation was accompanied by reductions in threshold (P < 0.005) and rheobase (P= 0.001); depolarizing and hyperpolarizing electrotonus progressively reduced (P < 0.001), or ‘fanned-in’; resting current–threshold slope increased (P < 0.0001); accommodation to depolarizing currents prolonged (P < 0.0001); while greater threshold changes in refractoriness (P= 0.001) and subexcitability (P < 0.01) emerged. Taken together, the present findings suggest that passive membrane conductances and the activity of K+ conductances decrease with formation of the axo-glial junction and myelination. In turn, these functional alterations serve to enhance the efficiency and speed of impulse conduction concurrent with the acquisition of motor skills during childhood, and provide unique insight into the evolution of postnatal human peripheral nerve function. Significantly, these findings bring the dynamics of axonal development to the clinical domain and serve to further illuminate pathophysiological mechanisms that occur during development. PMID:23006483

  8. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caldefie-Chézet, F; Fusillier, C; Jarde, T; Laroye, H; Damez, M; Vasson, M-P; Guillot, J

    2006-05-01

    The fungicidal and bactericidal actions of the essential oil (EO) of Melaleuca alternifolia seem well established, but their anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects remain unclear. This study investigated in vitro the possible role of whole Melaleuca alternifolia EO as a modulator of the inflammatory/non-specific immune response by exploring the chemotaxis and kinetic radical oxygen species (ROS) production of leukocytes and cytokine secretion in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in humans. The influence of Melaleuca alternifolia EO on the chemotaxis under agarose of isolated neutrophils (PMNs) was evaluated. The kinetics of ROS production by stimulated total circulating leukocytes was followed over 2 h by recording the fluorescence intensity of oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123. The effects of this EO on pro-(interleukin IL-2) and anti-(IL-4 and IL10) inflammatory cytokine secretions were determined by ELISA following incubation of PBMCs with the EO for 24 h. Melaleuca alternifolia EO was inefficient on the chemotaxis of PMNs. It exerted an antioxidant effect, reducing ROS production throughout the kinetic study. Melaleuca alternifolia EO inhibited PBMC proliferation, as revealed by a reduction in IL-2 secretion by stimulated lymphocytes. This EO at 0.1% directly increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 compared with IL-4 secretion without EO (18.5 +/- 10.0 vs 3.3 +/- 1, p < 0.05), and also increased IL-10 secretion at 0.01% (94.9 +/- 38.7 vs 44.1 +/- 18, ns). Melaleuca alternifolia EO may not only act as an anti-inflammatory mediator through its antioxidant activity but may also efficiently protect the organism by reducing the proliferation of inflammatory cells without affecting their capacity to secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16619364

  9. Melittin induced cytogenetic damage, oxidative stress and changes in gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gajski, Goran; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Žegura, Bojana; Štern, Alja; Gerić, Marko; Novak Jovanović, Ivana; Vrhovac, Ivana; Madunić, Josip; Breljak, Davorka; Filipič, Metka; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2016-02-01

    Melittin (MEL) is the main constituent and principal toxin of bee venom. It is a small basic peptide, consisting of a known amino acid sequence, with powerful haemolytic activity. Since MEL is a nonspecific cytolytic peptide that attacks lipid membranes thus leading to toxicity, the presumption is that it could have significant therapeutic benefits. The aim was to evaluate the cyto/genotoxic effects of MEL in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) and the molecular mechanisms involved using a multi-biomarker approach. We found that MEL was cytotoxic for HPBLs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also induced morphological changes in the cell membrane, granulation and lysis of exposed cells. After treating HPBLs with non-cytotoxic concentrations of MEL, we observed increased DNA damage including oxidative DNA damage as well as increased formation of micronuclei and nuclear buds, and decreased lymphocyte proliferation determined by comet and micronucleus assays. The observed genotoxicity coincided with increased formation of reactive oxygen species, reduction of glutathione level, increased lipid peroxidation and phospholipase C activity, showing the induction of oxidative stress. MEL also modulated the expression of selected genes involved in DNA damage response (TP53, CDKN1A, GADD45α, MDM), oxidative stress (CAT, SOD1, GPX1, GSR and GCLC) and apoptosis (BAX, BCL-2, CAS-3 and CAS-7). Results indicate that MEL is genotoxic to HPBLs and provide evidence that oxidative stress is involved in its DNA damaging effects. MEL toxicity towards normal cells has to be considered if used for potential therapeutic purposes. PMID:26704293

  10. Prevention of organophosphate-induced chronic epilepsy by early benzodiazepine treatment.

    PubMed

    Shrot, Shai; Ramaty, Erez; Biala, Yoav; Bar-Klein, Guy; Daninos, Moshe; Kamintsky, Lyn; Makarovsky, Igor; Statlender, Liran; Rosman, Yossi; Krivoy, Amir; Lavon, Ophir; Kassirer, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Yaari, Yoel

    2014-09-01

    Poisoning with organophosphates (OPs) may induce status epilepticus (SE), leading to severe brain damage. Our objectives were to investigate whether OP-induced SE leads to the emergence of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs), the hallmark of chronic epilepsy, and if so, to assess the efficacy of benzodiazepine therapy following SE onset in preventing the epileptogenesis. We also explored early changes in hippocampal pyramidal cells excitability in this model. Adult rats were poisoned with the paraoxon (450μg/kg) and immediately treated with atropine (3mg/kg) and obidoxime (20mg/kg) to reduce acute mortality due to peripheral acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Electrical brain activity was assessed for two weeks during weeks 4-6 after poisoning using telemetric electrocorticographic intracranial recordings. All OP-poisoned animals developed SE, which could be suppressed by midazolam. Most (88%) rats which were not treated with midazolam developed SRSs, indicating that they have become chronically epileptic. Application of midazolam 1min following SE onset had a significant antiepileptogenic effect (only 11% of the rats became epileptic; p=0.001 compared to non-midazolam-treated rats). Applying midazolam 30min after SE onset did not significantly prevent chronic epilepsy. The electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal cells, assessed electrophysiologically in hippocampal slices, were not altered by OP-induced SE. Thus we show for the first time that a single episode of OP-induced SE in rats leads to the acquisition of chronic epilepsy, and that this epileptogenic outcome can be largely prevented by immediate, but not delayed, administration of midazolam. Extrapolating these results to humans would suggest that midazolam should be provided together with atropine and an oxime in the immediate pharmacological treatment of OP poisoning. PMID:24881594

  11. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Nina S; Lapteva, Nellya Sh; Rubanovich, Alexander V

    2016-04-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24-77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19-77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2-51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62-11.76, p=3.9×10(-7)). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10(-5)). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10(-7)). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with the development

  12. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results/Methodology We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Conclusion Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease. PMID:25826140

  13. Appetite Enhancement and Weight Gain by Peripheral Administration of TrkB Agonists in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lin, John C.; Tsao, David; Barras, Paul; Bastarrachea, Raul A.; Boyd, Bob; Chou, Joyce; Rosete, Rodnie; Long, Hua; Forgie, Alison; Abdiche, Yasmina; Dilley, Jeanette; Stratton, Jennifer; Garcia, Carlos; Sloane, David L.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Rosenthal, Arnon

    2008-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB pathway resulted in hyperphagia and morbid obesity in human and rodents. Conversely, peripheral or central stimulation of TrkB by its natural ligands BDNF or NT4 reduced body weight and food intake in mice, supporting the idea that TrkB is a key anorexigenic signal downstream of the melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r) system. Here we show that in non-human primates TrkB agonists were anorexigenic when applied centrally, but surprisingly orexigenic, leading to gain in appetite, body weight, fat deposits and serum leptin levels, when given peripherally. The orexigenic and pro-obesity effects of peripherally administered TrkB agonists appear to be dose dependent, not associated with fluid retention nor with evidence of receptor down regulation. Our findings revealed that TrkB signaling exerts dual control on energy homeostasis in the primates that could be targeted for the treatment of either wasting disorders or obesity. PMID:18382675

  14. Development of a chemically defined serum- and protein-free medium for growth of human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Shive, W; Pinkerton, F; Humphreys, J; Johnson, M M; Hamilton, W G; Matthews, K S

    1986-01-01

    A chemically defined, protein-free medium (designated CFBI 1000, where CFBI = Clayton Foundation Biochemical Institute) that supports human peripheral lymphocyte proliferation has been developed. This medium allows exploration of individual metabolic differences by varying the medium composition as well as providing a base to explore further the mechanisms of lymphocyte activation in a system initially free of added macromolecular species other than mitogen. The peripheral blood lymphocyte is an ideal system for metabolic studies because it is easily obtained, is a primary resting cell that can be activated to proliferate, and presumably reflects both the genetic makeup and biochemical environmental history of the individual at the time the cells were formed. Examination of the role of various factors in lymphocyte activation and subsequent events may be simplified by the utilization of a medium that is protein-free and chemically defined. The CFBI 1000 medium supports the growth response of human peripheral lymphocytes to mitogen as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation to an extent comparable to other media used widely in assessment of lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:3079905

  15. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  16. Fluorous synthesis of sclerotigenin-type benzodiazepine-quinazolinones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Williams, John P.; Lu, Yimin; Nagashima, Tadamichi; Chu, Qainli

    2007-01-01

    A new synthetic protocol for sclerotigenin-type benzodiazepine-quinazolinone library scaffold is introduced. A fluorous benzyl protecting group is used for synthesis of 4-benzodiazepine-2,5-dione intermediate and also as a phase tag for fluorous solid-phase extraction (F-SPE). PMID:17479166

  17. Fluorous synthesis of sclerotigenin-type benzodiazepine-quinazolinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Williams, John P; Lu, Yimin; Nagashima, Tadamichi; Chu, Qainli

    2007-01-22

    A new synthetic protocol for sclerotigenin-type benzodiazepine-quinazolinone library scaffold is introduced. A fluorous benzyl protecting group is used for synthesis of 4-benzodiazepine-2,5-dione intermediate and also as a phase tag for fluorous solid-phase extraction (F-SPE). PMID:17479166

  18. Employing mirtazapine to aid benzodiazepine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, P K

    2008-06-01

    Insomnia and depression are frequently encountered in patients during withdrawal from substances. While there are no approved medications for treating them, off-label attempts to address these phenomena with mirtazapine have shown some promising results. This case describes the use of mirtazapine as an aid in benzodiazepine withdrawal and its potential benefits in alleviating insomnia and depression in a 32-year-old man. It was found to ameliorate sleep myoclonus that was thought to be associated with his withdrawal syndrome. It is hoped this report will generate interest and stimulate further research in this area of psychopharmacology. PMID:18581012

  19. Periodic dip of lipidperoxidation in humans: a redox signal to synchronize peripheral circadian clocks?

    PubMed

    Cardona, F

    2004-01-01

    The output generated by the endogenous circadian clock to control circadian functions and temporal organization in metazoans is unknown. Redox state perturbations generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants are known to influence the expression of a number of genes and signal transduction pathways. Evidence has been recently provided that the reduced redox cofactors NAD and NADP both regulate clock gene activity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and are induced by it. Significant periodic variations of lipidperoxidation in human blood with a dip at 04.00 h have been previously reported. Such variations could be expected to alter the cellular redox state, thus possibly functioning as periodic redox signals from the master clock. To verify the existence of the mentioned variations the serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipidperoxidation, were monitored by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography in 39 healthy subjects at 3-h intervals over a 24-h period. Throughout the test period, only biological noise could be detected in all test persons. However, the normalized MDA levels at 03.00 h were significantly lower (p < 0.05 to < 0.00005) in 38 (97%) of the cases and showed a significantly lower standard deviation (p < 0.004) than at any of the other 3-h intervals, indicating a periodic dip of lipidperoxidation (PDL) in diurnal active subjects. We hypothesize that the PDL, on the basis of its time of appearance, its frequency and its potential influence on cellular redox state, represents a periodic systemic redox output of the SCN, in terms of a relatively short and sudden interruption of the daily oxidative noise. According to recent research, it could be the result of redox alterations induced by the SCN activity and at the same time the pathway by which the master clock resets and synchronizes peripheral oscillators to the light/dark cycle. Additionally, the antioxidative function of the pineal gland activity postulated elsewhere

  20. Using Tutte polynomials to analyze the structure of the benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadavid Muñoz, Juan José

    2014-05-01

    Graph theory in general and Tutte polynomials in particular, are implemented for analyzing the chemical structure of the benzodiazepines. Similarity analysis are used with the Tutte polynomials for finding other molecules that are similar to the benzodiazepines and therefore that might show similar psycho-active actions for medical purpose, in order to evade the drawbacks associated to the benzodiazepines based medicine. For each type of benzodiazepines, Tutte polynomials are computed and some numeric characteristics are obtained, such as the number of spanning trees and the number of spanning forests. Computations are done using the computer algebra Maple's GraphTheory package. The obtained analytical results are of great importance in pharmaceutical engineering. As a future research line, the usage of the chemistry computational program named Spartan, will be used to extent and compare it with the obtained results from the Tutte polynomials of benzodiazepines.

  1. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sulfamide and Triazole Benzodiazepines as Novel p53-MDM2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Zhuang, Chunlin; Wu, Yuelin; Guo, Zizhao; Li, Jin; Dong, Guoqiang; Yao, Jianzhong; Sheng, Chunquan; Miao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    A series of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines were obtained with the principle of bioisosterism. The p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) inhibitory activity and in vitro antitumor activity were evaluated. Most of the novel benzodiazepines exhibited moderate protein binding inhibitory activity. Particularly, triazole benzodiazepines showed good inhibitory activity and antitumor potency. Compound 16 had promising antitumor activity against the U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cell line with an IC50 value of 4.17 μM, which was much better than that of nutlin-3. The molecular docking model also successfully predicted that this class of compounds mimicked the three critical residues of p53 binding to MDM2. PMID:25198897

  2. Allelic Exclusion and Peripheral Reconstitution by TCR Transgenic T Cells Arising From Transduced Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Wherley, Jennifer; Gschweng, Eric; Senadheera, Shantha; Kaufman, Michael L; Chan, Rebecca; Bahner, Ingrid; Gersuk, Vivian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Baltimore, David; Witte, Owen N; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    Transduction and transplantation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) with the genes for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a tumor-associated antigen may lead to sustained long-term production of T cells expressing the TCR and confer specific antitumor activity. We evaluated this using a lentiviral vector (CCLc-MND-F5) carrying cDNA for a human TCR specific for an HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide of Melanoma Antigen Recognized by T cells (MART-1). CD34+ HSPC were transduced with the F5 TCR lentiviral vector or mock transduced and transplanted into neonatal NSG mice or NSG mice transgenic for human HLA-A*0201 (NSG-A2). Human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the human F5 TCR were present in the thymus, spleen, and peripheral blood after 4–5 months. Expression of human HLA-A*0201 in NSG-A2 recipient mice led to significantly increased numbers of human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the F5 TCR, compared with control NSG recipients. Transduction of the human CD34+ HSPC by the F5 TCR transgene caused a high degree of allelic exclusion, potently suppressing rearrangement of endogenous human TCR-β genes during thymopoiesis. In summary, we demonstrated the feasibility of engineering human HSPC to express a tumor-specific TCR to serve as a long-term source of tumor-targeted mature T cells for immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:23380815

  3. Cyclodextrin solubilization of benzodiazepines: formulation of midazolam nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Loftsson, T; Gudmundsdóttir, H; Sigurjónsdóttir, J F; Sigurdsson, H H; Sigfússon, S D; Másson, M; Stefánsson, E

    2001-01-01

    The cyclodextrin solubilization of three benzodiazepines, i.e. alprazolam, midazolam and triazolam, was investigated. The cyclodextrin solubilization was enhanced through ring-opening of the benzodiazepine rings and ionization of the ring-open forms. Additional enhancement was obtained through interaction of a water-soluble polymer with the cyclodextrin complexes. The ring-opening was pH-dependent and completely reversible, the ring-open forms dominating at low pH but the ring-closed forms at physiologic pH. The ring-closed forms were rapidly regenerated upon elevation of pH. In freshly collected human serum in vitro at 37 degrees C, the half-life for the first-order rate constant for the ring-closing reaction was estimated to be less than 2 min for both alprazolam and midazolam. Midazolam (17 mg/ml) was solubilized in aqueous pH 4.3 nasal formulation containing 14% (w/v) sulfobutylether beta-cyclodextrin, 0.1% (w/v) hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, preservatives and buffer salts. Six healthy volunteers received 0.06 mg/kg midazolam intranasally and 2 mg intravenously, and blood samples were collected up to 360 min after the administration. Midazolam was absorbed rapidly reaching maximum serum concentrations of 54.3+/-5.0 ng/ml at 15+/-2 min. The elimination half-life of midazolam was 2.2+/-0.3 h and the absolute availability was 73+/-7%. All mean values+/-SEM. PMID:11165818

  4. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  5. Withdrawing Benzodiazepines in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lader, Malcolm; Kyriacou, Andri

    2016-01-01

    The large class of CNS-depressant medications-the benzodiazepines-have been extensively used for over 50 years, anxiety disorders being one of the main indications. A substantial proportion (perhaps up to 20-30 %) of long-term users becomes physically dependent on them. Problems with their use became manifest, and dependence, withdrawal difficulties and abuse were documented by the 1980s. Many such users experience physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms on attempted cessation and may develop clinically troublesome syndromes even during slow tapering. Few studies have been conducted to establish the optimal withdrawal schedules. The usual management comprises slow withdrawal over weeks or months together with psychotherapy of various modalities. Pharmacological aids include antidepressants such as the SSRIs especially if depressive symptoms supervene. Other pharmacological agents such as the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, and the hormonal agent, melatonin, remain largely experimental. The purpose of this review is to analyse the evidence for the efficacy of the usual withdrawal regimes and the newer agents. It is concluded that little evidence exists outside the usual principles of drug withdrawal but there are some promising leads. PMID:26733324

  6. Extracellular matrix from human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Rao, Feng; Guo, Zhi-yuan; Sun, Xun; Wang, Yi-guo; Liu, Shu-yun; Wang, Ai-yuan; Guo, Quan-yi; Meng, Hao-ye; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi-bi

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix, which includes collagens, laminin, or fibronectin, plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Recently, a Schwann cell-derived extracellular matrix with classical biomaterial was used to mimic the neural niche. However, extensive clinical use of Schwann cells remains limited because of the limited origin, loss of an autologous nerve, and extended in vitro culture times. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), which are easily accessible and more proliferative than Schwann cells, were used to prepare an extracellular matrix. We identified the morphology and function of hUCMSCs and investigated their effect on peripheral nerve regeneration. Compared with a non-coated dish tissue culture, the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, upregulated gene and protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion neurons. These findings suggest that the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve repair and can be used as a basis for the rational design of engineered neural niches.

  7. Human peripheral blood CD34-positive cells enhance therapeutic regeneration of chronically injured liver in nude rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Tsutsumi, Victor; Torimura, Takuji; Naitou, Masako; Iwamoto, Hideki; Masuda, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Osamu; Koga, Hironori; Abe, Mitsuhiko; Ii, Masaaki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Asahara, Takayuki; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio

    2012-04-01

    We investigated whether transplantation of purified human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells could reduce established liver fibrosis and up-regulate therapeutic regeneration. Human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells were isolated from total mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers by magnetic cell sorting. Recipient nude rats were injected intraperitoneally with carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) twice weekly for 3 weeks before single administration of CD34(+) cells. CCl(4) was then re-administered twice weekly for 3 more weeks, and the nude rats were sacrificed. Saline (control group), 1 × 10(5) (low-dose group), 5 × 10(5) (middle-dose group), or 2 × 10(6) (high-dose group) CD34(+) cells/kg body weight were intrasplenically transplanted after CCl(4) treatment for 3 weeks. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the freshly isolated CD34(+) cells revealed the expression of CD31, keratin19, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and epithelial growth factor, but not other liver related markers. The transplanted cells differentiated into vascular and sinusoidal endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. CD34(+) cell transplantation reduced liver fibrosis in a dose-dependent fashion, with decreased collagen type-I and α-SMA-positive cells after 6 weeks of CCl(4) treatment by Mallory's Azan and immunohistochemical staining. Gelatin zymography showed that the expression levels of active matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in CD34(+) cell transplanted livers were significantly stronger than those in saline-infused livers. In recipients of high-doses of CD34(+) cells, the number of PCNA-positive hepatocyte increased 6 weeks after CCl(4) treatment compared with saline-infused livers. We conclude that human peripheral blood CD34(+) cell transplantation halts established liver fibrosis and promotes hepatic regeneration in CCl(4)-induced chronic liver injury. PMID:21678408

  8. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Peripheral T Cells Using Sendai Virus in Feeder-free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kishino, Yoshikazu; Seki, Tomohisa; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Fujita, Jun; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, iPSCs have attracted attention as a new source of cells for regenerative therapies. Although the initial method for generating iPSCs relied on dermal fibroblasts obtained by invasive biopsy and retroviral genomic insertion of transgenes, there have been many efforts to avoid these disadvantages. Human peripheral T cells are a unique cell source for generating iPSCs. iPSCs derived from T cells contain rearrangements of the T cell receptor (TCR) genes and are a source of antigen-specific T cells. Additionally, T cell receptor rearrangement in the genome has the potential to label individual cell lines and distinguish between transplanted and donor cells. For safe clinical application of iPSCs, it is important to minimize the risk of exposing newly generated iPSCs to harmful agents. Although fetal bovine serum and feeder cells have been essential for pluripotent stem cell culture, it is preferable to remove them from the culture system to reduce the risk of unpredictable pathogenicity. To address this, we have established a protocol for generating iPSCs from human peripheral T cells using Sendai virus to reduce the risk of exposing iPSCs to undefined pathogens. Although handling Sendai virus requires equipment with the appropriate biosafety level, Sendai virus infects activated T cells without genome insertion, yet with high efficiency. In this protocol, we demonstrate the generation of iPSCs from human peripheral T cells in feeder-free conditions using a combination of activated T cell culture and Sendai virus. PMID:26650709

  9. Derivation of Neural Stem Cells from Human Adult Peripheral CD34+ Cells for an Autologous Model of Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongguang; Choi, Elliot; Monaco, Maria Chiara G.; Campanac, Emilie; Medynets, Marie; Do, Thao; Rao, Prashant; Johnson, Kory R.; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Von Geldern, Gloria; Johnson, Tory; Subramaniam, Sriram; Hoffman, Dax; Major, Eugene; Nath, Avindra

    2013-01-01

    Proinflammatory factors from activated T cells inhibit neurogenesis in adult animal brain and cultured human fetal neural stem cells (NSC). However, the role of inhibition of neurogenesis in human neuroinflammatory diseases is still uncertain because of the difficulty in obtaining adult NSC from patients. Recent developments in cell reprogramming suggest that NSC may be derived directly from adult fibroblasts. We generated NSC from adult human peripheral CD34+ cells by transfecting the cells with Sendai virus constructs containing Sox2, Oct3/4, c-Myc and Klf4. The derived NSC could be differentiated to glial cells and action potential firing neurons. Co-culturing NSC with activated autologous T cells or treatment with recombinant granzyme B caused inhibition of neurogenesis as indicated by decreased NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Thus, we have established a unique autologous in vitro model to study the pathophysiology of neuroinflammatory diseases that has potential for usage in personalized medicine. PMID:24303066

  10. Peripheral Inflammation is Associated with Altered Substantia Nigra Activity and Psychomotor Slowing in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Brydon, Lena; Harrison, Neil A.; Walker, Cicely; Steptoe, Andrew; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic infections commonly cause sickness symptoms including psychomotor retardation. Inflammatory cytokines released during the innate immune response are implicated in the communication of peripheral inflammatory signals to the brain. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural effects of peripheral inflammation following typhoid vaccination in 16 healthy men, using a double-blind, randomized, crossover-controlled design. Results Vaccination had no global effect on neurovascular coupling but markedly perturbed neural reactivity within substantia nigra during low-level visual stimulation. During a cognitive task, individuals in whom typhoid vaccination engendered higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 had significantly slower reaction time responses. Prolonged reaction times and larger interleukin-6 responses were associated with evoked neural activity within substantia nigra. Conclusions Our findings provide mechanistic insights into the interaction between inflammation and neurocognitive performance, specifically implicating circulating cytokines and midbrain dopaminergic nuclei in mediating the psychomotor consequences of systemic infection. PMID:18242584