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Sample records for human pex5p receptor

  1. Membrane association of the cycling peroxisome import receptor Pex5p.

    PubMed

    Kerssen, Daniela; Hambruch, Eva; Klaas, Wibke; Platta, Harald W; de Kruijff, Ben; Erdmann, Ralf; Kunau, Wolf-H; Schliebs, Wolfgang

    2006-09-15

    Peroxisomal proteins carrying a peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) are recognized in the cytosol by the cycling import receptor Pex5p. The receptor-cargo complex docks at the peroxisomal membrane where it associates with multimeric protein complexes, referred to as the docking and RING finger complexes. Here we have identified regions within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pex5p sequence that interconnect the receptor-cargo complex with the docking complex. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved tryptophan residue within a reverse WXXXF motif abolished two-hybrid binding with the N-terminal half of Pex14p. In combination with an additional mutation introduced into the Pex13p-binding site, we generated a Pex5p mutant defective in a stable association not only with the docking complex but also with the RING finger peroxins at the membrane. Surprisingly, PTS1 proteins are still imported into peroxisomes in these mutant cells. Because these mutations had no significant effect on the membrane binding properties of Pex5p, we examined yeast and human Pex5p for intrinsic lipid binding activity. In vitro analyses demonstrated that both proteins have the potential to insert spontaneously into phospholipid membranes. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that a translocation-competent state of the PTS1 receptor enters the membrane via protein-lipid interactions before it tightly associates with other peroxins. PMID:16849337

  2. Cysteine-specific ubiquitination protects the peroxisomal import receptor Pex5p against proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzkopff, Benjamin; Platta, Harald W.; Hasan, Sohel; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import is mediated by dynamic import receptors, which cycle between the peroxisomal membrane and the cytosol. Proteins with a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) are bound by the import receptor Pex5p in the cytosol and guided to the peroxisomal membrane. After cargo translocation into the peroxisomal matrix, the receptor is released from the membrane back to the cytosol in an ATP-dependent manner by the AAA-type ATPases Pex1p and Pex6p. These mechanoenzymes recognize ubiquitinated Pex5p-species as substrates for membrane extraction. The PTS1-receptor is either polyubiquitinated via peptide bonds at two certain lysines and results in proteasomal degradation or monoubiquitinated via a thioester-bond at a conserved cysteine, which enables the recycling of Pex5p and further rounds of matrix protein import. To investigate the physiological relevance of the conserved N-terminal cysteine of Pex5p, the known target amino acids for ubiquitination were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis. In contrast with Pex5pC6A, Pex5pC6K turned out to be functional in PTS1 import and utilization of oleic acid, independent of the lysines at position 18 and 24. In contrast with wild-type Pex5p, Pex5pC6K displays an ubiquitination pattern, similar to the polyubiquitination pattern of Pex4p or Pex22p mutant strains. Moreover, Pex5pC6K displays a significantly reduced steady-state level when the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp15p is missing. Thus, our results indicate that not the cysteine residue but the position of ubiquitination is important for Pex5p function. The presence of the cysteine prevents polyubiquitination and rapid degradation of Pex5p. PMID:26182377

  3. Molecular Recognition of PTS-1 Cargo Proteins by Pex5p: Implications for Protein Mistargeting in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3–4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state. PMID:25689234

  4. The cytosolic domain of Pex22p stimulates the Pex4p-dependent ubiquitination of the PTS1-receptor.

    PubMed

    El Magraoui, Fouzi; Schrötter, Andreas; Brinkmeier, Rebecca; Kunst, Lena; Mastalski, Thomas; Müller, Thorsten; Marcus, Katrin; Meyer, Helmut E; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Platta, Harald W

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis is an ubiquitin-dependent process because the receptors required for the import of peroxisomal matrix proteins are controlled via their ubiquitination status. A key step is the monoubiquitination of the import receptor Pex5p by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) Pex4p. This monoubiquitination is supposed to take place after Pex5p has released the cargo into the peroxisomal matrix and primes Pex5p for the extraction from the membrane by the mechano-enzymes Pex1p/Pex6p. These two AAA-type ATPases export Pex5p back to the cytosol for further rounds of matrix protein import. Recently, it has been reported that the soluble Pex4p requires the interaction to its peroxisomal membrane-anchor Pex22p to display full activity. Here we demonstrate that the soluble C-terminal domain of Pex22p harbours its biological activity and that this activity is independent from its function as membrane-anchor of Pex4p. We show that Pex4p can be functionally fused to the trans-membrane segment of the membrane protein Pex3p, which is not directly involved in Pex5p-ubiquitination and matrix protein import. However, this Pex3(N)-Pex4p chimera can only complement the double-deletion strain pex4Δ/pex22Δ and ensure optimal Pex5p-ubiquitination when the C-terminal part of Pex22p is additionally expressed in the cell. Thus, while the membrane-bound portion Pex22(N)p is not required when Pex4p is fused to Pex3(N)p, the soluble Pex22(C)p is essential for peroxisomal biogenesis and efficient monoubiquitination of the import receptor Pex5p by the E3-ligase Pex12p in vivo and in vitro. The results merge into a picture of an ubiquitin-conjugating complex at the peroxisomal membrane consisting of three domains: the ubiquitin-conjugating domain (Pex4p), a membrane-anchor domain (Pex22(N)p) and an enhancing domain (Pex22(C)p), with the membrane-anchor domain being mutually exchangeable, while the Ubc- and enhancer-domains are essential. PMID:25162638

  5. RNA interference of peroxisome-related genes in C. elegans: a new model for human peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Petriv, Oleh I; Pilgrim, David B; Rachubinski, Richard A; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2002-08-14

    RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) for the posttranscriptional silencing of genes was used to evaluate the importance of various peroxisomal enzymes and peroxins for the development of Caenorhabditis elegans and to compare the roles of these proteins in the nematode to their roles in yeasts and humans. The nematode counterparts of the human ATP-binding cassette half-transporters, the enzymes alkyldihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase and Delta(3,5)-Delta (2,4)-dienoyl-CoA isomerase, the receptors for peroxisomal membrane and matrix proteins (Pex19p and Pex5p), and components of the docking and translocation machineries for matrix proteins (Pex13p and Pex12p) are essential for the development of C. elegans. Unexpectedly, RNAi silencing of the acyl-CoA synthetase-mediated activation of fatty acids, the alpha- and beta-oxidation of fatty acids, the intraperoxisomal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, and the peroxins Pex1p, Pex2p, and Pex6p had no apparent effect on C. elegans development. The described analysis of functional gene knockouts through RNAi provides a basis for the use of C. elegans as a valuable model system with which to study the molecular and physiological defects underlying the human peroxisomal disorders. PMID:12181365

  6. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  7. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    DOEpatents

    Civelli, Olivier; Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  8. Human olfactory receptor responses to odorants

    PubMed Central

    Mainland, Joel D; Li, Yun R; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Wen Ling L; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the human olfactory system is capable of discriminating a vast number of odors, we do not currently understand what chemical features are encoded by olfactory receptors. In large part this is due to a paucity of data in a search space covering the interactions of hundreds of receptors with billions of odorous molecules. Of the approximately 400 intact human odorant receptors, only 10% have a published ligand. Here we used a heterologous luciferase assay to screen 73 odorants against a clone library of 511 human olfactory receptors. This dataset will allow other researchers to interrogate the combinatorial nature of olfactory coding. PMID:25977809

  9. Human neuroepithelial cells express NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christopher D; Fowler, M; Jackson, T H; Houghton, J; Warren, A; Nanda, A; Chandler, I; Cappell, B; Long, A; Minagar, A; Alexander, J S

    2003-11-13

    L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1) cerebral endothelial barrier and 2) cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells) have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR) expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1) were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease. PMID:14614784

  10. Ghrelin Receptor Mutations and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Tao, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) was originally identified as an orphan receptor in porcine and rat anterior pituitary membranes. In 1999, GHSR was deorphanized and shown to be a receptor for ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted from the stomach. Therefore, GHSR is also called ghrelin receptor. In addition to regulating growth hormone secretion, ghrelin receptor regulates various physiological processes, including food intake and energy expenditure, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular functions, gastric acid secretion and motility, and immune function. Several human genetic studies conducted in populations originated from Europe, Africa, South America, and East Asia identified rare mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that might be associated with human obesity and short stature. Functional analyses of mutant GHSRs reveal multiple defects, including cell surface expression, ligand binding, and basal and stimulated signaling. With growing understanding in the functionality of naturally occurring GHSR mutations, potential therapeutic strategies including pharmacological chaperones and novel ligands could be used to correct the GHSR mutants. PMID:27288828

  11. Systematic prediction of human membrane receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanjun; Dhiman, Harpreet K.; Bhola, Neil; Budyak, Ivan; Kar, Siddhartha; Man, David; Dutta, Arpana; Tirupula, Kalyan; Carr, Brian I.; Grandis, Jennifer; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane receptor-activated signal transduction pathways are integral to cellular functions and disease mechanisms in humans. Identification of the full set of proteins interacting with membrane receptors by high throughput experimental means is difficult because methods to directly identify protein interactions are largely not applicable to membrane proteins. Unlike prior approaches that attempted to predict the global human interactome we used a computational strategy that only focused on discovering the interacting partners of human membrane receptors leading to improved results for these proteins. We predict specific interactions based on statistical integration of biological data containing highly informative direct and indirect evidences together with feedback from experts. The predicted membrane receptor interactome provides a system-wide view, and generates new biological hypotheses regarding interactions between membrane receptors and other proteins. We have experimentally validated a number of these interactions. The results suggest that a framework of systematically integrating computational predictions, global analyses, biological experimentation and expert feedback is a feasible strategy to study the human membrane receptor interactome. PMID:19798668

  12. Structure of the human progesterone receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Misrahi, M; Venencie, P Y; Saugier-Veber, P; Sar, S; Dessen, P; Milgrom, E

    1993-11-16

    The complete organization of the human progesterone receptor (hPR) gene has been determined. It spans over 90 kbp and contains eight exons. The first exon encodes the N-terminal part of the receptor. The DNA binding domain is encoded by two exons, each exon corresponding to one zinc finger. The steroid binding domain is encoded by five exons. The nucleotide sequence of 1144 bp of the 5' flanking region has been determined. PMID:8241270

  13. Cannabinoid-receptor expression in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Bouaboula, M; Rinaldi, M; Carayon, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Shire, D; Le Fur, G; Casellas, P

    1993-05-15

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS), probably through the cannabinoid receptor, which has recently been cloned in rat and human. While numerous reports have also described effects of cannabinoids on the immune system, the observation of both mRNA and cannabinoid receptor has hitherto been exclusively confined to the brain, a reported detection in the testis being the sole example of its presence at the periphery. Here we report the expression of the cannabinoid receptor on human immune tissues using a highly sensitive polymerase-chain-reaction-based method for mRNA quantification. We show that, although present in a much lower abundance than in brain, cannabinoid receptor transcripts are found in human spleen, tonsils and peripheral blood leukocytes. The distribution pattern displays important variations of the mRNA level for the cannabinoid receptor among the main human blood cell subpopulations. The rank order of mRNA levels in these cells is B cells > natural killer cells > or = polymorphonuclear neutrophils > or = T8 cells > monocytes > T4 cells. Cannabinoid-receptor mRNA, which is also found in monocytic, as well as T and B leukemia cell lines but not in Jurkat cells, presents a great diversity of expression on these cells as well, B-cell lines expressing a much higher level than T-cell lines. The cannabinoid receptor PCR products from leukocytes and brain are identical both in size and sequence suggesting a strong similarity between central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors. The expression of this receptor was demonstrated on membranes of the myelomonocytic U937 cells using the synthetic cannabinoid [3H]CP-55940 as ligand. The Kd determined from Scatchard analysis was 0.1 nM and the Bmax for membranes was 525 fmol/mg protein. The demonstration of cannabinoid-receptor expression at both mRNA and protein levels on human leukocytes provides a molecular basis for cannabinoid action on these cells. PMID

  14. Imaging dopamine receptors in the human brain by position tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstrom, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors may be involved in a number of neuropsychiatric disease states. The ligand 3-N-(/sup 11/C)methylspiperone, which preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, was used to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and in humans. This technique holds promise for noninvasive clinical studies of dopamine receptors in humans.

  15. Cellular receptors for human enterovirus species a.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Human enterovirus species A (HEV-A) is one of the four species of HEV in the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae. Among HEV-A, coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) are the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Some other types of HEV-A are commonly associated with herpangina. Although HFMD and herpangina due to HEV-A are common febrile diseases among infants and children, EV71 can cause various neurological diseases, such as aseptic meningitis and fatal encephalitis. Recently, two human transmembrane proteins, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2), were identified as functional receptors for EV71 and CVA16. In in vitro infection experiments using the prototype HEV-A strains, PSGL-1 and SCARB2 could be responsible for the specific receptors for EV71 and CVA16. However, the involvement of both receptors in the in vitro and in vivo infections of clinical isolates of HEV-A has not been clarified yet. To elucidate a diverse array of the clinical outcome of HEV-A-associated diseases, the identification and characterization of HEV-A receptors may provide useful information in understanding the HEV-A pathogenesis at a molecular level. PMID:22470371

  16. Solubilization of human platelet vasopressin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.

    1987-02-02

    The human platelet membrane receptor for vasopressin (AVP) has been solubilized with the cholic acid derivative detergent 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate. Rapid and simple separation of free tritiated AVP ((/sup 3/H)AVP) from the solubilized receptor-hormone complex was done by filtration through polyethylenimine-treated filters. (/sup 3/H)AVP binds to this soluble receptor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 11.03 +/- 1.86 nM and a maximal number of binding sites = 288 +/- 66 fmol/mg protein while the corresponding values of the membrane-bound receptor are 1.62 +/- 0.21 nM and 237 +/- 38 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The Ki value for native AVP derived from competition experiments is 11.02 +/- 20.5 nM for the soluble receptor. Competition experiments with specific vascular and renal antagonists confirm that the solubilized receptor belongs to the V1-vascular subtype. 10 references, 5 figures.

  17. Crystal structures of the human adiponectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Motoyama, Kanna; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Terada, Takaho; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Murata, Takeshi; Iwata, So; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-04-16

    Adiponectin stimulation of its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, increases the activities of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), respectively, thereby contributing to healthy longevity as key anti-diabetic molecules. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were predicted to contain seven transmembrane helices with the opposite topology to G-protein-coupled receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of human AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 at 2.9 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively, which represent a novel class of receptor structure. The seven-transmembrane helices, conformationally distinct from those of G-protein-coupled receptors, enclose a large cavity where three conserved histidine residues coordinate a zinc ion. The zinc-binding structure may have a role in the adiponectin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and UCP2 upregulation. Adiponectin may broadly interact with the extracellular face, rather than the carboxy-terminal tail, of the receptors. The present information will facilitate the understanding of novel structure-function relationships and the development and optimization of AdipoR agonists for the treatment of obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:25855295

  18. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  19. Adrenergic receptors in human fetal liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Falkay, G.; Kovacs, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptor binding capacities in human fetal and adult livers were measured to investigate the mechanism of the reduced alpha-1 adrenoreceptor response of the liver associated with a reciprocal increase in beta-adrenoreceptor activity in a number of conditions. Alpha-1 and beta-adrenoreceptor density were determined using {sup 3}H-prazosin and {sup 3}H-dihydroalprenolol, respectively, as radioligand. Heterogeneous populations of beta-adrenoreceptors were found in fetal liver contrast to adult. Decreased alpha-1 and increased beta-receptor density were found which may relate to a decreased level in cellular differentiation. These findings may be important for the investigation of perinatal hypoglycemia of newborns after treatment of premature labor with beta-mimetics. This is the first demonstration of differences in the ratio of alpha-1 and beta-adrenoceptors in human fetal liver.

  20. IL-21 Receptor Expression in Human Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Abigail L.; Smith, Nicola C.; Reilly, James H.; Kerr, Shauna C.; Leach, William J.; Fazzi, Umberto G.; Rooney, Brian P.; Murrell, George A. C.; Millar, Neal L.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tendinopathy remain unclear, with much debate as to whether inflammation or degradation has the prominent role. Increasing evidence points toward an early inflammatory infiltrate and associated inflammatory cytokine production in human and animal models of tendon disease. The IL-21/IL-21R axis is a proinflammatory cytokine complex that has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. This project aimed to investigate the role and expression of the cytokine/receptor pair IL-21/IL-21R in human tendinopathy. We found significantly elevated expression of IL-21 receptor message and protein in human tendon samples but found no convincing evidence of the presence of IL-21 at message or protein level. The level of expression of IL-21R message/protein in human tenocytes was significantly upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα/IL-1β) in vitro. These findings demonstrate that IL-21R is present in early human tendinopathy mainly expressed by tenocytes and macrophages. Despite a lack of IL-21 expression, these data again suggest that early tendinopathy has an inflammatory/cytokine phenotype, which may provide novel translational targets in the treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:24757284

  1. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  2. Enhanced human receptor binding by H5 haemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Xiao, Haixia; Martin, Stephen R; Coombs, Peter J; Liu, Junfeng; Collins, Patrick J; Vachieri, Sebastien G; Walker, Philip A; Lin, Yi Pu; McCauley, John W; Gamblin, Steven J; Skehel, John J

    2014-05-01

    Mutant H5N1 influenza viruses have been isolated from humans that have increased human receptor avidity. We have compared the receptor binding properties of these mutants with those of wild-type viruses, and determined the structures of their haemagglutinins in complex with receptor analogues. Mutants from Vietnam bind tighter to human receptor by acquiring basic residues near the receptor binding site. They bind more weakly to avian receptor because they lack specific interactions between Asn-186 and Gln-226. In contrast, a double mutant, Δ133/Ile155Thr, isolated in Egypt has greater avidity for human receptor while retaining wild-type avidity for avian receptor. Despite these increases in human receptor binding, none of the mutants prefers human receptor, unlike aerosol transmissible H5N1 viruses. Nevertheless, mutants with high avidity for both human and avian receptors may be intermediates in the evolution of H5N1 viruses that could infect both humans and poultry. PMID:24889237

  3. Enhanced human receptor binding by H5 haemagglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Xiao, Haixia; Martin, Stephen R.; Coombs, Peter J.; Liu, Junfeng; Collins, Patrick J.; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Walker, Philip A.; Lin, Yi Pu; McCauley, John W.; Gamblin, Steven J.; Skehel, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutant H5N1 influenza viruses have been isolated from humans that have increased human receptor avidity. We have compared the receptor binding properties of these mutants with those of wild-type viruses, and determined the structures of their haemagglutinins in complex with receptor analogues. Mutants from Vietnam bind tighter to human receptor by acquiring basic residues near the receptor binding site. They bind more weakly to avian receptor because they lack specific interactions between Asn-186 and Gln-226. In contrast, a double mutant, Δ133/Ile155Thr, isolated in Egypt has greater avidity for human receptor while retaining wild-type avidity for avian receptor. Despite these increases in human receptor binding, none of the mutants prefers human receptor, unlike aerosol transmissible H5N1 viruses. Nevertheless, mutants with high avidity for both human and avian receptors may be intermediates in the evolution of H5N1 viruses that could infect both humans and poultry. PMID:24889237

  4. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  5. Estrogen receptors and human disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    A myriad of physiological processes in mammals are influenced by estrogens and the estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ. As we reviewed previously, given the widespread role for estrogen in normal human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen is implicated in the development or progression of a number of diseases. In this review, we are giving a 5-year update of the literature regarding the influence of estrogens on a number of human cancers (breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate, and endometrial), endometriosis, fibroids, and cardiovascular disease. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into human disease, but for this review, the literature citations were limited to articles published after our previous review (Deroo and Korach in J Clin Invest 116(3):561–570, 2006) and will focus in most cases on human data and clinical trials. We will describe the influence in which estrogen’s action, through one of or both of the ERs, mediates the aforementioned human disease states. PMID:22648069

  6. Bitter Taste Receptor Polymorphisms and Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carrai, Maura; Crocco, Paolina; Montesanto, Alberto; Canzian, Federico; Rose, Giuseppina; Rizzato, Cosmeri

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that genetic factors account for 25% of the variation in human life span. On the basis of published molecular, genetic and epidemiological data, we hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms of taste receptors, which modulate food preferences but are also expressed in a number of organs and regulate food absorption processing and metabolism, could modulate the aging process. Using a tagging approach, we investigated the possible associations between longevity and the common genetic variation at the three bitter taste receptor gene clusters on chromosomes 5, 7 and 12 in a population of 941 individuals ranging in age from 20 to 106 years from the South of Italy. We found that one polymorphism, rs978739, situated 212 bp upstream of the TAS2R16 gene, shows a statistically significant association (p = 0.001) with longevity. In particular, the frequency of A/A homozygotes increases gradually from 35% in subjects aged 20 to 70 up to 55% in centenarians. These data provide suggestive evidence on the possible correlation between human longevity and taste genetics. PMID:23133589

  7. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W S; Hicks, Gareth A; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R; Kenakin, Terrence P; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  8. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  9. The human serotonin-7 receptor pseudogene: variation and chromosome location.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, D; Qian, I H; Kusumi, I; Ulpian, C; Tallerico, T; Liu, I S; Seeman, P

    1998-01-01

    We report a variation of the pseudogene for the serotonin-7 receptor in human DNA. Human genomic DNA was amplified, using the polymerase chain reaction method and degenerate oligonucleotide primers for serotonin receptor-like genes. A novel gene DNA sequence of 1325 bp was found. Based on nucleotides, this gene is 88% identical to the serotonin-7 receptor coding sequence. Compared with the previously known serotonin-7 receptor pseudogene, this pseudogene has 1 nucleotide deletion and 4 nucleotide mutations. The gene is located on human chromosome 12 at 12p12.3-p13.2. Images Fig. 1A PMID:9785699

  10. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  11. Riluzole blocks human muscle acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Deflorio, Cristina; Palma, Eleonora; Conti, Luca; Roseti, Cristina; Manteca, Alessia; Giacomelli, Elena; Catalano, Myriam; Limatola, Cristina; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Grassi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Riluzole, the only drug available against amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), has recently been shown to block muscle ACh receptors (AChRs), raising concerns about possible negative side-effects on neuromuscular transmission in treated patients. In this work we studied riluzole's impact on the function of muscle AChRs in vitro and on neuromuscular transmission in ALS patients, using electrophysiological techniques. Human recombinant AChRs composed of α1β1δ subunits plus the γ or ɛ subunit (γ- or ɛ-AChR) were expressed in HEK cells or Xenopus oocytes. In both preparations, riluzole at 0.5 μm, a clinically relevant concentration, reversibly reduced the amplitude and accelerated the decay of ACh-evoked current if applied before coapplication with ACh. The action on γ-AChRs was more potent and faster than on ɛ-AChRs. In HEK outside-out patches, riluzole-induced block of macroscopic ACh-evoked current gradually developed during the initial milliseconds of ACh presence. Single channel recordings in HEK cells and in human myotubes from ALS patients showed that riluzole prolongs channel closed time, but has no effect on channel conductance and open duration. Finally, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) evoked by nerve stimulation in ALS patients remained unaltered after a 1 week suspension of riluzole treatment. These data indicate that riluzole, while apparently safe with regard to synaptic transmission, may affect the function of AChRs expressed in denervated muscle fibres of ALS patients, with biological consequences that remain to be investigated. PMID:22431338

  12. Crystal structure of the human σ1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hayden R; Zheng, Sanduo; Gurpinar, Esin; Koehl, Antoine; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C

    2016-04-28

    The human σ1 receptor is an enigmatic endoplasmic-reticulum-resident transmembrane protein implicated in a variety of disorders including depression, drug addiction, and neuropathic pain. Recently, an additional connection to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has emerged from studies of human genetics and mouse models. Unlike many transmembrane receptors that belong to large, extensively studied families such as G-protein-coupled receptors or ligand-gated ion channels, the σ1 receptor is an evolutionary isolate with no discernible similarity to any other human protein. Despite its increasingly clear importance in human physiology and disease, the molecular architecture of the σ1 receptor and its regulation by drug-like compounds remain poorly defined. Here we report crystal structures of the human σ1 receptor in complex with two chemically divergent ligands, PD144418 and 4-IBP. The structures reveal a trimeric architecture with a single transmembrane domain in each protomer. The carboxy-terminal domain of the receptor shows an extensive flat, hydrophobic membrane-proximal surface, suggesting an intimate association with the cytosolic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in cells. This domain includes a cupin-like β-barrel with the ligand-binding site buried at its centre. This large, hydrophobic ligand-binding cavity shows remarkable plasticity in ligand recognition, binding the two ligands in similar positions despite dissimilar chemical structures. Taken together, these results reveal the overall architecture, oligomerization state, and molecular basis for ligand recognition by this important but poorly understood protein. PMID:27042935

  13. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  14. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  15. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue.

    PubMed

    Fede, C; Albertin, G; Petrelli, L; Sfriso, M M; Biz, C; De Caro, R; Stecco, C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  16. The peroxisomal receptor Pex19p forms a helical mPTS recognition domain

    PubMed Central

    Schueller, Nicole; Holton, Simon J; Fodor, Krisztian; Milewski, Morlin; Konarev, Petr; Stanley, Will A; Wolf, Janina; Erdmann, Ralf; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Song, Young-Hwa; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The protein Pex19p functions as a receptor and chaperone of peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs). The crystal structure of the folded C-terminal part of the receptor reveals a globular domain that displays a bundle of three long helices in an antiparallel arrangement. Complementary functional experiments, using a range of truncated Pex19p constructs, show that the structured α-helical domain binds PMP-targeting signal (mPTS) sequences with about 10 μM affinity. Removal of a conserved N-terminal helical segment from the mPTS recognition domain impairs the ability for mPTS binding, indicating that it forms part of the mPTS-binding site. Pex19p variants with mutations in the same sequence segment abolish correct cargo import. Our data indicate a divided N-terminal and C-terminal structural arrangement in Pex19p, which is reminiscent of a similar division in the Pex5p receptor, to allow separation of cargo-targeting signal recognition and additional functions. PMID:20531392

  17. Multiple human D sub 5 dopamine receptor genes: A functional receptor and two pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, D.K.; Yuan Zhang; Bouvier, C.; Qunyong Zhou; Johnson, R.A.; Allen, L.; Buck, K.; Bunzow, J.R.; Salon, J.; Civelli, O. )

    1991-10-15

    Three genes closely related to the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor were identified in the human genome. One of the genes lacks introns and encodes a functional human dopamine receptor, D{sub 5}, whose deduced amino acid sequence is 49% identical to that of the human D{sub 1} receptor. Compared with the human D{sub 1} dopamine receptor, the D{sub 5} receptor displayed a higher affinity for dopamine and was able to stimulate a biphasic rather than a monophasic intracellular accumulation of cAMP. Neither of the other two genes was able to direct the synthesis of a receptor. nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that these two genes are 98% identical to each other and 95% identical to the D{sub 5} sequence. Relative to the D{sub 5} sequence, both contain insertions and deletions that result in several in-frame termination codons. Premature termination of translation is the most likely explanation for the failure of these genes to produce receptors in COS-7 and 293 cells even though their messages are transcribed. The authors conclude that the two are pseudogenes. Blot hybridization experiments performed on rat genomic DNA suggest that there is one D{sub 5} gene in this species and that the pseudogenes may be the result of a relatively recent evolutionary event.

  18. Human receptor activation by aroclor 1260, a polychlorinated biphenyl mixture.

    PubMed

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K Cameron; Clair, Heather B; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A; States, J Christopher; Coslo, Denise M; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Cave, Matthew C

    2014-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  19. Human Receptor Activation by Aroclor 1260, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Clair, Heather B.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A.; States, J. Christopher; Coslo, Denise M.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  20. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    An immunohistochemical and western blot expression analysis of human ureters was performed in order to characterize the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor distribution along the length of the human ureteral wall. Mapping the distribution will assist in understanding the potential role alpha -1-adrenergic receptors and their subtype density might have in the pathophysiology of ureteral colic and stone passage. Patients diagnosed with renal cancer or bladder cancer undergoing nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy, or cystectomy had ureteral specimens taken from the proximal, mid, distal and tunneled ureter. Tissues were processed for fresh frozen examination and fixed in formalin. None of the ureteral specimens were involved with cancer. Serial histologic sections and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies specific for alpha-1-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha 1a, alpha 1b, alpha 1d). The sections were examined under a light microscope and scored as positive or negative. In order to validate and quantify the alpha receptor subtypes along the human ureter. Western blotting techniques were applied. Human ureter stained positively for alpha -1-adrenergic receptors. Immunostaining appeared red, with intense reaction in the smooth muscle of the ureter and endothelium of the neighboring blood vessels. There was differential expression between all the receptors with the highest staining for alpha-1D subtype. The highest protein expression for all three subtypes was in the renal pelvis and decreased with advancement along the ureter to the distal ureter. At the distal ureter, there was marked increase in expression as one progressed towards the ureteral orifice. The same pattern of protein expression was exhibited for all three alpha -1-adrenergic receptor subtypes. We provide preliminary evidence for the ability to detect and quantify the alpha-1-receptor subtypes along the human ureter which to the best of our knowledge has never been done with

  1. Targeting xenobiotic receptors PXR and CAR in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Robbins, Delira; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors such as the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are xenobiotic receptors regulating not only drug metabolism and disposition but also various human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, metabolic disease and liver diseases, suggesting that PXR and CAR are promising targets for drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need to discover and develop small molecules that target these PXR- and/or CAR-mediated human-disease-related pathways for relevant therapeutic applications. This review proposes approaches to target PXR and CAR, either individually or simultaneously, in the context of various human diseases, taking into consideration the structural differences between PXR and CAR. PMID:25463033

  2. Dopamine D2-like receptor signaling suppresses human osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hanami, Kentaro; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Kondo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine, a major neurotransmitter, transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1 to D5. Although the relevance of neuroendocrine system to bone metabolism has been emerging, the precise effects of dopaminergic signaling upon osteoclastogenesis remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human monocyte-derived osteoclast precursor cells express all dopamine-receptor subtypes. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists such as pramipexole and quinpirole reduced the formation of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells, cathepsin K mRNA expression, and pit formation area in vitro. These inhibitory effects were reversed by pre-treatment with a D2-like receptor antagonist haloperidol or a Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin, but not with the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists, but not a D1-like receptor agonist, suppressed intracellular cAMP concentration as well as RANKL-meditated induction of c-Fos and NFATc1 mRNA expression in human osteoclast precursor cells. Finally, the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation in murine bone marrow culture ex vivo. These findings indicate that dopaminergic signaling plays an important role in bone homeostasis via direct effects upon osteoclast differentiation and further suggest that the clinical use of neuroleptics is likely to affect bone mass. PMID:23631878

  3. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  4. Characterization and solubilization of the human platelet vasopressin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.; Hinko, A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors recently showed that human platelets bear specific vasopressin (AVP) V1-vascular receptors. They now present the identification of AVP intra-platelet messenger and solubilization of AVP receptors. AVP binding to its platelet receptors is modulated by divalent cations but not TP or Gpp(NH)p, (10 /sup 3/M). AVP-induced reduction of adenylate cyclase activity is blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In the presence of calcium (1 mM), AVP stimulates the phosphorylation of two endogenous proteins (M.W. = 40,000 and 20,000 daltons) which are substrates for protein kinase C and calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase, respectively. Phosphorylation is also stimulated by a V1-vascular agonist but not V2-renal agonists and is more potently blocked by a V1-vascular antagonist than by a V2-renal antagonist. AVP platelet membrane receptor is solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate. Separation of free (/sub 3/H)AVP from solubilized receptor-hormone complexes is done by filtration through polyethylenimine-treated filters. The solubilized receptor retains its binding characteristics (Kd = 11.03 +/- 1.86 nM, Bmax 288 +/- 66 fmol/mg protein, n = 6). In human platelets, AVP intra-cellular messengers are diacylglycerol and calcium, not adenylate cyclase. Solubilization of AVP human receptor opens the way to its purification.

  5. Expression of prostanoid receptors in human ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Andreas; Glaser, Alexander; Wegmann, Markus; Schranz, Dietmar; Seyberth, Hannsjörg; Nüsing, Rolf

    2003-02-01

    1. Prostaglandins play a major role in maintaining ductal patency in utero. Ductal tone is regulated by both locally released and circulating vasodilatory prostaglandins. In infants with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease, ductal patency is maintained by intravenous administration of prostaglandin (PG) E(1). Little information is available regarding the expression of prostaglandin receptors in man. 2. By means of RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we studied the expression of the PGI(2) receptor (IP), the four different PGE(2) receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4), and the receptors for thromboxane (Tx) A(2) (TP), PGD(2) (DP) and PGF(2alpha) (FP) in the ductus arteriosus of three newborn infants with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease and intravenous infusion of PGE(1) and of one 8 month old child with a patent ductus arteriosus. 3. The EP3, EP4, FP, IP and TP receptor were markedly expressed at the mRNA and protein level, whereas the EP2 receptor was weakly expressed and the EP1 receptor was detected in two out of four tissue specimens only. The DP receptor was not detected in any of the samples. The most pronounced expression, which was located in the media of the ductus arteriosus, was observed for the EP4 and TP receptors followed by IP and FP receptor protein. 4. These data indicate that ductal patency during the infusion of PGE(1) in infants with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease might be mediated by the EP4 and IP receptor. The data further suggest that a heterogeneous population of prostanoid receptors may contribute to the regulation of ductus arteriosus tone in humans. PMID:12598419

  6. Fluorescent ligand for human progesterone receptor imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Weinstain, Roy; Kanter, Joan; Friedman, Beth; Ellies, Lesley G; Baker, Michael E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-05-15

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of (18)F into the BODIPY core. PMID:23600997

  7. The biology of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Penuel, E; Sliwkowski, M X

    1999-09-01

    Our understanding of the normal signaling mechanisms and functions of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and other members of the HER family, namely epidermal growth factor receptor, HER3, and HER4, is growing rapidly. Activation of these receptors results in a diverse array of signals through the formation of homodimeric and heterodimeric receptor complexes; HER2 is the preferred dimerization partner for the other HERs. These oligomeric receptor complexes activate distinct signaling pathways, such as the Ras-MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways. These, in turn, affect various cellular processes. Recent gene deletion experiments in mice point to an important role for HER2 in cardiac and neural development, and evidence from other studies indicates that HER2 is involved in normal breast growth and development. Thus, HER2 is a key component of a complex signaling network that plays a critical role in the regulation of tissue development, growth, and differentiation. PMID:11122793

  8. Expression of prostanoid receptors in human lower segment pregnant myometrium.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Andreas; Glaser, Alexander; Wegmann, Markus; Hackenberg, Reinhard; Nüsing, Rolf M

    2003-11-01

    Prostanoids, especially prostaglandin (PG) E(2), are important mediators of uterine relaxation and contractions during gestation and parturition. Inhibitors of PG formation as well as PG analogues are used to modulate uterine tonus. So far, only limited data are available regarding the expression of prostanoid receptors in human pregnant myometrium. In the present study, the expression of the receptors for PGE(2) (EP1, EP2, EP3, EP4), PGF(2alpha) (FP), prostacyclin (IP), and thromboxane A(2) (TP) in human pregnant myometrium was studied by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Myometrial tissue was obtained from five women at term and not in labour and from two women who delivered preterm. Tissue specimens were excised from the upper edge of the transverse lower uterine segment incision. In all tissues analysed, EP1, EP2, EP3, EP4, FP, TP and IP receptor mRNA and protein was detected. mRNA expression for PGD(2) (DP) receptor was not detected in the majority of tissue specimens. EP1, EP2, EP4, IP, TP and FP receptor protein was detected on myometrial smooth muscle cells, whereas EP3 receptor protein was only expressed by stromal and endothelial cells. In situ hybridization experiments yielded similar results. The expression of the EP2 receptor mRNA was inversely related to gestational age. We suggest that the contractile effect of PGE(2) at term is probably mediated directly by the EP1 receptor expressed in myometrial smooth muscle cells and indirectly by the EP3 receptor expressed in stromal cells and a decrease in EP2 receptor expression. PMID:14580364

  9. Imaging receptor changes in human drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Kelly P

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will review the literature on differences in the brain chemistry of alcohol- and drug-dependent individuals compared to healthy controls as measured with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. Specifically, alterations in dopamine, serotonin, opioid, and GABA systems in cocaine, alcohol, nicotine, and heroin dependence have been examined. These neurochemical systems are integrated and play significant roles in a final common pathway mediating addiction in the brain. One recurrent finding is that dopaminergic dysfunction is prevalent in both alcohol and drug dependent populations, and specifically there is a lower availability of dopamine type 2/3 receptors in cocaine-, alcohol-, nicotine-, and heroin-dependent individuals compared to healthy controls. The development of novel radiotracers that target additional receptor systems will further our understanding of the neurochemical basis of addiction. PMID:21161754

  10. Imaging Receptor Changes in Human Drug Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Kelly P.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter will review the literature on differences in the brain chemistry of alcohol- and drug-dependent individuals compared to healthy controls as measured with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. Specifically, alterations in dopamine, serotonin, opioid, and GABA systems in cocaine, alcohol, nicotine, and heroin dependence have been examined. These neurochemical systems are integrated and play significant roles in a final common pathway mediating addiction in the brain. One recurrent finding is that dopaminergic dysfunction is prevalent in both alcohol and drug dependent populations, and specifically there is a lower availability of dopamine type 2/3 receptors in cocaine-, alcohol-, nicotine-, and heroin-dependent individuals compared to healthy controls. The development of novel radiotracers that target additional receptor systems will further our understanding of the neurochemical basis of addiction. PMID:21161754

  11. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  12. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  14. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined. PMID:18852693

  15. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  16. Mu opioid receptor binding sites in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pilapil, C.; Welner, S.; Magnan, J.; Zamir, N.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our experiments focused on the examination of the distribution of mu opioid receptor binding sites in normal human brain using the highly selective ligand (/sup 3/H)DAGO, in both membrane binding assay and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Mu opioid binding sites are very discretely distributed in human brain with high densities of sites found in the posterior amygdala, caudate, putamen, hypothalamus and certain cortical areas. Moreover the autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding sites clearly reveals the discrete lamination (layers I and III-IV) of mu sites in cortical areas.

  17. Transgenic silkworms expressing human insulin receptors for evaluation of therapeutically active insulin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Ishii, Kenichi; Miyaguchi, Wataru; Horie, Ryo; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-12-12

    We established a transgenic silkworm strain expressing the human insulin receptor (hIR) using the GAL4/UAS system. Administration of human insulin to transgenic silkworms expressing hIR decreased hemolymph sugar levels and facilitated Akt phosphorylation in the fat body. The decrease in hemolymph sugar levels induced by injection of human insulin in the transgenic silkworms expressing hIR was blocked by co-injection of wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. Administration of bovine insulin, an hIR ligand, also effectively decreased sugar levels in the transgenic silkworms. These findings indicate that functional hIRs that respond to human insulin were successfully induced in the transgenic silkworms. We propose that the humanized silkworm expressing hIR is useful for in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic activities of insulin receptor agonists. PMID:25449269

  18. Mu opioid receptors in developing human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    RAY, SUBRATA BASU; WADHWA, SHASHI

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of mu opioid receptors was studied in human fetal spinal cords between 12–13 and 24–25 wk gestational ages. Autoradiographic localisation using [3H] DAMGO revealed the presence of mu receptors in the dorsal horn at all age groups with a higher density in the superficial laminae (I–II). A biphasic expression was noted. Receptor density increased in the dorsal horn, including the superficial laminae, between 12–13 and 16–17 wk. This could be associated with a spurt in neurogenesis. The density increased again at 24–25 wk in laminae I–II which resembled the adult pattern of distribution. A dramatic proliferation of cells was noted from the region of the ventricular zone between 16–17 and 24–25 wk. These were considered to be glial cells from their histological features. Mu receptor expression was noted over a large area of the spinal cord including the lateral funiculus at 24–25 wk. This may be due to receptor expression by glial cells. The study presents evidence of mu receptor expression by both neurons and glia during early development of human spinal cord. PMID:10473288

  19. Role of Dopamine D2 Receptors in Human Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Naef, Michael; Linssen, Anke; Clark, Luke; Gandamaneni, Praveen K; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor W

    2014-01-01

    Influential neurocomputational models emphasize dopamine (DA) as an electrophysiological and neurochemical correlate of reinforcement learning. However, evidence of a specific causal role of DA receptors in learning has been less forthcoming, especially in humans. Here we combine, in a between-subjects design, administration of a high dose of the selective DA D2/3-receptor antagonist sulpiride with genetic analysis of the DA D2 receptor in a behavioral study of reinforcement learning in a sample of 78 healthy male volunteers. In contrast to predictions of prevailing models emphasizing DA's pivotal role in learning via prediction errors, we found that sulpiride did not disrupt learning, but rather induced profound impairments in choice performance. The disruption was selective for stimuli indicating reward, whereas loss avoidance performance was unaffected. Effects were driven by volunteers with higher serum levels of the drug, and in those with genetically determined lower density of striatal DA D2 receptors. This is the clearest demonstration to date for a causal modulatory role of the DA D2 receptor in choice performance that might be distinct from learning. Our findings challenge current reward prediction error models of reinforcement learning, and suggest that classical animal models emphasizing a role of postsynaptic DA D2 receptors in motivational aspects of reinforcement learning may apply to humans as well. PMID:24713613

  20. Chromosomal localization of the human retinoid X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Almasan, A.; Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Ong, E.S.; Wahl, G.M.; Evans, R.M. )

    1994-04-01

    The recently described retinoid X receptors (RXRs) respond to the novel retinoid 9-cis-retinoic acid and also serve as heterodimeric partners for the vitamin D, thyroid hormone, and retinoic acid receptors (VDR, TR, and RAR, respectively). In this work, the authors report high-resolution localization of the human RXR genes within cytogenetic bands and also within a standard reference map of cosmid DNA markers on human chromosomes. They have determined the location of the human RXR genes by pairwise hybridization of the RXR cosmids and reference markers, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. They localized (i) RXR[alpha] (RXRA) to chromosome 9 band q34.3; (ii) RXR[beta] (RXRB) to chromosome 6 band 21.3; and (iii) RXR[gamma] (RXRG) to chromosome 1 band q22-q23. Six retinoid-responsive transcription factors have been identified so far, including three retinoic acid receptors in addition to the three RXRs. Interestingly, each of these receptors in human and mouse is encoded by genes located at distinct chromosomal loci and on separate chromosomes. The proximity of RXR genes to loci known to be associated with genetic disorders suggests that their location may be useful in establishing a link between RXRs and certain human diseases. 62 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Identification of progesterone receptor in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S N; Welter, B H; Mantzke, K A; Price, T M

    1998-02-01

    Sex steroids are postulated to play a role in adipose tissue regulation and distribution, because the amount and location of adipose tissue changes during puberty and menopause. Because of the nature of adipose tissue, receptors for the female sex steroids have been difficult to demonstrate. To date, estrogen receptor messenger RNA and protein have been identified in human subcutaneous adipose tissue, but the presence of progesterone receptor (PR) has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrate PR message by Northern blot analysis in RNA isolated from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of premenopausal women. These preliminary studies revealed that PR messenger RNA levels are higher in the stromal-vascular fraction as opposed to the adipocyte fraction. Western blot analysis demonstrates both PR protein isoforms (human PR-A and human PR-B) in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, total PR could be quantitated. These studies substantiate that sex steroid receptors are present in human adipose tissue, thereby providing a direct route for regulation of adipose tissue by female sex steroids. PMID:9467566

  2. Biotinylated human. beta. -endorphins as probes for the opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hochhaus, G.; Gibson, B.W.; Sadee, W.

    1988-01-05

    The reaction of human ..beta..-endorphin and biotinyl N-hydroxysuccinimide with or without spacer arm, afforded a series of products that were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry of the biotinylated products and their tryptic digests produced abundant protonated molecular ions (MH/sup +/), which specified the number and location of biotinylation. Between 1 and 4 biotinyl residues were incorporated per human ..beta..-endorphin molecule, at Lys-9, -19, -24, -28, and -29, but not at the amino-terminal Try-1. Three HPLC fractions were isolated for receptor binding studies monobiotinylation of Lys-9, Lys-19, and a mixture of Lys-24, Lys-28, and Lys-29 derivatives. IC/sub 50/ values for binding to ..mu.. and delta opioid receptor sites were 3-8 times higher for monobiotinylated derivatives than for the parent human ..beta..-endorphin. Association with avidin decreased opioid receptor affinities for the C/sub 6/ spacer derivative biotinylated at position Lys-9, which is close to the (1-5) enkephalin receptor region. In contrast, avidin did not affect or even increased apparent affinities to ..mu.. and delta sites for derivatives biotinylated at the ..cap alpha..-helical part of the molecule (Lys-19, -24, -28, and -29). Biotinylated human ..beta..-endorphins also bound to low affinity nonopioid binding sites on NG-108-15 cells; however, affinities to these sites were considerably reduced when derivatives were bound to avidin. The ability of biotinylated human ..beta..-endorphin to cross-link the ..mu.. and delta opioid receptors to avidin allows application of the biotin-avidin system as a molecular probe of the opioid receptor.

  3. The human fibroblast receptor for gp86 of human cytomegalovirus is a phosphorylated glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Keay, S; Baldwin, B

    1992-01-01

    A human embryonic lung (HEL) cell receptor for gp86 of human cytomegalovirus that functions in virus-cell fusion was further characterized. Anti-idiotype antibodies that mimic gp86 were used to immunoprecipitate the 92.5-kDa fibroblast membrane receptor for gp86, which was preincubated with various endoglycosidases. The receptor, which has a pI ranging from 5.3 to 5.6, appears to be a glycoprotein with primarily N-linked sugar residues, some of which have high concentrations of mannose and some of which are complex oligosaccharides. Western blots (immunoblots) of electrophoretically transferred receptor incubated with various biotinylated lectins confirmed the presence of sugar moieties, including N-acetylglucosamine, glucose or mannose, and galactose, but not fucose or N-acetylgalactosamine. This gp86 receptor from uninfected HEL cells also incorporated radiolabeled phosphate from orthophosphoric acid, indicating that it is a constitutively phosphorylated receptor. Images PMID:1321272

  4. Galectins are human milk glycan receptors.

    PubMed

    Noll, Alexander J; Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The biological recognition of human milk glycans (HMGs) is poorly understood. Because HMGs are rich in galactose we explored whether they might interact with human galectins, which bind galactose-containing glycans and are highly expressed in epithelial cells and other cell types. We screened a number of human galectins for their binding to HMGs on a shotgun glycan microarray consisting of 247 HMGs derived from human milk, as well as to a defined HMG microarray. Recombinant human galectins (hGal)-1, -3, -4, -7, -8 and -9 bound selectively to glycans, with each galectin recognizing a relatively unique binding motif; by contrast hGal-2 did not recognize HMGs, but did bind to the human blood group A Type 2 determinants on other microarrays. Unlike other galectins, hGal-7 preferentially bound to glycans expressing a terminal Type 1 (Galβ1-3GlcNAc) sequence, a motif that had eluded detection on non-HMG glycan microarrays. Interactions with HMGs were confirmed in a solution setting by isothermal titration microcalorimetry and hapten inhibition experiments. These results demonstrate that galectins selectively bind to HMGs and suggest the possibility that galectin-HMG interactions may play a role in infant immunity. PMID:26747425

  5. P2Y Receptors Sensitize Mouse and Human Colonic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hockley, James R. F.; Tranter, Michael M.; McGuire, Cian; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Thaha, Mohamed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Knowles, Charles H.; Winchester, Wendy J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of visceral nociceptors by inflammatory mediators contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain associated with many gastrointestinal disorders. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotides (e.g., ATP and UTP) are strongly implicated in this process following their release from epithelial cells during mechanical stimulation of the gut, and from immune cells during inflammation. Actions of ATP are mediated through both ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. P2X receptor activation causes excitation of visceral afferents; however, the impact of P2Y receptor activation on visceral afferents innervating the gut is unclear. Here we investigate the effects of stimulating P2Y receptors in isolated mouse colonic sensory neurons, and visceral nociceptor fibers in mouse and human nerve-gut preparations. Additionally, we investigate the role of Nav1.9 in mediating murine responses. The application of UTP (P2Y2 and P2Y4 agonist) sensitized colonic sensory neurons by increasing action potential firing to current injection and depolarizing the membrane potential. The application of ADP (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13 agonist) also increased action potential firing, an effect blocked by the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500. UTP or ADP stimulated afferents, including mouse and human visceral nociceptors, in nerve-gut preparations. P2Y1 and P2Y2 transcripts were detected in 80% and 56% of retrogradely labeled colonic neurons, respectively. Nav1.9 transcripts colocalized in 86% of P2Y1-positive and 100% of P2Y2-positive colonic neurons, consistent with reduced afferent fiber responses to UTP and ADP in Nav1.9−/− mice. These data demonstrate that P2Y receptor activation stimulates mouse and human visceral nociceptors, highlighting P2Y-dependent mechanisms in the generation of visceral pain during gastrointestinal disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic visceral pain is a debilitating symptom of many gastrointestinal disorders. The activation of

  6. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-18 activity. PMID:25500532

  7. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; et al

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is uniquemore » among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.« less

  8. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.

  9. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π-cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG-W-NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78-85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  10. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A.; Pearson, Joanna F.; Appleby, Peter A.; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca2+. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca2+ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y4 receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X1, P2X3, P2X6, P2Y6, P2Y11, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X2, P2X4, P2Y1, P2Y2, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca2+ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting. PMID:23720349

  11. No evidence for histamine H4 receptor in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Werner, Kristin; Neumann, Detlef; Buschauer, Armin; Seifert, Roland

    2014-12-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a classic pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi protein-coupled receptor that mediates increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The presence of H4R in human eosinophils has been rigorously documented by several independent groups. It has also been suggested that H4R is expressed in human monocytes, but this suggestion hinges in part on H4R antibodies with questionable specificity. This situation prompted us to reinvestigate H4R expression in human monocytes. As positive control, we studied human embryonic kidney 293T cells stably expressing the human H4R (hH4R). In these cells, histamine (HA) and the H4R agonist UR-PI376 (2-cyano-1-[4-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)butyl]-3-[(2-phenylthio)ethyl]guanidine) induced pertussis toxin-sensitive [Ca(2+)]i increases. However, in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies we failed to detect hH4R mRNA in human monocytes and U937 promonocytes. In human monocytes, ATP and N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine increased [Ca(2+)]i, but HA, UR-PI376, and 5-methylhistamine (a dual H4R/H2 receptor agonist) did not. In U937 promonocytes and differentiated U937 cells, HA increased [Ca(2+)]i, but this increase was mediated via HA H1 receptor. In conclusion, there is no evidence for the presence of H4R in human monocytes. PMID:25273276

  12. Crystal Structure of the Human Laminin Receptor Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson,K.; Wu, J.; Hubbard, S.; Meruelo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The human laminin receptor (LamR) interacts with many ligands, including laminin, prions, Sindbis virus, and the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and has been implicated in a number of diseases. LamR is overexpressed on tumor cells, and targeting LamR elicits anti-cancer effects. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LamR, which provides insights into its function and should facilitate the design of novel therapeutics targeting LamR.

  13. Activation of human bitter taste receptors by polymethoxylated flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yuki; Ikeda, Riko; Yamazaki, Toyomi; Ito, Keisuke; Uda, Kazunari; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    Tangeretin and nobiletin are polymethoxylated flavonoids in citrus peel. Both tangeretin and nobiletin are bitter; however, their bitterness has not been evaluated using human bitter taste receptors (hTAS2Rs). We screened 25 kinds of hTAS2Rs and found that hTAS2R14 and hTAS2R46 received both compounds. PMID:27379685

  14. Characterization of the human platelet Fc sub. gamma. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is often associated with immune complex disease and may in part be due to the interaction of circulating (IgG) immune complexes with an Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor on the platelet surface. Characterization of the immune complex-platelet interaction should provide for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of immune thrombocytpenia. To this end, a ligand binding assay, employing {sup 125}I-IgG trimer, was established. Receptor expression was determined by measuring the saturable binding of radiolabeled trimer to platelets at equilibrium. Normal human platelets were observed to express 8559 {plus minus} 852 binding sites for IgG trimer with a Kd of 12.5 {plus minus} 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} M. Binding of IgG trimer to human platelets was blocked following preincubation of the cells with an anti-Fc{sub {gamma}}RII monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, this binding was ionic-strength dependent but was unaffected by the presence of Mg{sup ++} or cytochalasin B. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor modulation was examined by assessing the effects of various physiologic and pharmacologic on the ability of platelets to bind IgG trimer. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor expression was not affected by thrombin, ADP, or {gamma}-interferon. However, in 7/12 normal donors, treatment of platelets with dexamethasone resulted in a decrease in the number of Fc{sub {gamma}} receptors expressed.

  15. Fluorescent Human EP3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, Miriam; Schwed, J Stephan; Kuczka, Karina; Meyer Dos Santos, Sascha; Harder, Sebastian; Nüsing, Rolf M; Paulke, Alexander; Stark, Holger

    2012-09-13

    Exchange of the lipophilc part of ortho-substituted cinnamic acid lead structures with different small molecule fluorophoric moieties via a dimethylene spacer resulted in hEP3R ligands with affinities in the nanomolar concentration range. Synthesized compounds emit fluorescence in the blue, green, and red range of light and have been tested concerning their potential as a pharmacological tool. hEP3Rs were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy on HT-29 cells, on murine kidney tissues, and on human brain tissues and functionally were characterized as antagonists on human platelets. Inhibition of PGE2 and collagen-induced platelet aggregation was measured after preincubation with novel hEP3R ligands. The pyryllium-labeled ligand 8 has been shown as one of the most promising structures, displaying a useful fluorescence and highly affine hEP3R antagonists. PMID:24900547

  16. Functional expression of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan; Jiang, Ji-Hong; Li, Shi-Tong

    2016-09-01

    The functional expression of recombinant α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells has presented a challenge. Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 3 (RIC‑3) has been confirmed to act as a molecular chaperone of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The primary objectives of the present study were to investigate whether the co‑expression of human (h)RIC‑3 with human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in HEK 293 cells facilitates functional expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Subsequent to transfection, western blotting and polymerase chain reaction were used to test the expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and RIC-3. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was expressed alone or co‑expressed with hRIC‑3 in the HEK 293 cells. Drug‑containing solution was then applied to the cells via a gravity‑driven perfusion system. Calcium influx in the cells was analyzed using calcium imaging. Nicotine did not induce calcium influx in the HEK 293 cells expressing human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor only. However, in the cells co‑expressing human RIC‑3 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, nicotine induced calcium influx via the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a concentration‑dependent manner (concentration required to elicit 50% of the maximal effect=29.21 µM). Taken together, the results of the present study suggested that the co‑expression of RIC‑3 in HEK 293 cells facilitated the functional expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. PMID:27430244

  17. Linking Functional Domains of the Human Insulin Receptor with the Bacterial Aspartate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Leland; Morgan, David O.; Koshland, Daniel E.; Clauser, Eric; Moe, Gregory R.; Bollag, Gideon; Roth, Richard A.; Rutter, William J.

    1986-11-01

    A hybrid receptor has been constructed that is composed of the extracellular domain of the human insulin receptor fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the bacterial aspartate chemoreceptor. This hybrid protein can be expressed in rodent (CHO) cells and displays several functional features comparable to wild-type insulin receptor. It is localized to the cell surface, binds insulin with high affinity, forms oligomers, and is recognized by conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies. Although most of the expressed protein accumulates as a 180-kDa proreceptor, some processed 135-kDa receptor can be detected on the cell surface by covalent cross-linking. Expression of the hybrid receptor inhibits the insulin-activated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose by CHO cells. Thus, this hybrid is partially functional and can be processed; however, it is incapable of native transmembrane signaling. The results indicate that the intact domains of different types of receptors can retain some of the native features in a hybrid molecule but specific requirements will need to be satisfied for transmembrane signaling.

  18. Human Polyomavirus Receptor Distribution in Brain Parenchyma Contrasts with Receptor Distribution in Kidney and Choroid Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Sheila A.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Brittingham, Frances L.P.; Henriksen, Kammi J.; Stopa, Edward G.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCPyV, is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, a rare demyelinating disease that occurs in the setting of prolonged immunosuppression. After initial asymptomatic infection, the virus establishes lifelong persistence in the kidney and possibly other extraneural sites. In rare instances, the virus traffics to the central nervous system, where oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and glial precursors are susceptible to lytic infection, resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The mechanisms by which the virus traffics to the central nervous system from peripheral sites remain unknown. Lactoseries tetrasaccharide c (LSTc), a pentasaccharide containing a terminal α2,6–linked sialic acid, is the major attachment receptor for polyomavirus. In addition to LSTc, type 2 serotonin receptors are required for facilitating virus entry into susceptible cells. We studied the distribution of virus receptors in kidney and brain using lectins, antibodies, and labeled virus. The distribution of LSTc, serotonin receptors, and virus binding sites overlapped in kidney and in the choroid plexus. In brain parenchyma, serotonin receptors were expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but these cells were negative for LSTc and did not bind virus. LSTc was instead found on microglia and vascular endothelium, to which virus bound abundantly. Receptor distribution was not changed in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Virus infection of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during disease progression is LSTc independent. PMID:26056932

  19. Human polyomavirus receptor distribution in brain parenchyma contrasts with receptor distribution in kidney and choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Haley, Sheila A; O'Hara, Bethany A; Nelson, Christian D S; Brittingham, Frances L P; Henriksen, Kammi J; Stopa, Edward G; Atwood, Walter J

    2015-08-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCPyV, is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, a rare demyelinating disease that occurs in the setting of prolonged immunosuppression. After initial asymptomatic infection, the virus establishes lifelong persistence in the kidney and possibly other extraneural sites. In rare instances, the virus traffics to the central nervous system, where oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and glial precursors are susceptible to lytic infection, resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The mechanisms by which the virus traffics to the central nervous system from peripheral sites remain unknown. Lactoseries tetrasaccharide c (LSTc), a pentasaccharide containing a terminal α2,6-linked sialic acid, is the major attachment receptor for polyomavirus. In addition to LSTc, type 2 serotonin receptors are required for facilitating virus entry into susceptible cells. We studied the distribution of virus receptors in kidney and brain using lectins, antibodies, and labeled virus. The distribution of LSTc, serotonin receptors, and virus binding sites overlapped in kidney and in the choroid plexus. In brain parenchyma, serotonin receptors were expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but these cells were negative for LSTc and did not bind virus. LSTc was instead found on microglia and vascular endothelium, to which virus bound abundantly. Receptor distribution was not changed in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Virus infection of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during disease progression is LSTc independent. PMID:26056932

  20. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  1. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  2. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Samadi-Bahrami, Zahra; Pavlov, Vlady; Stys, Peter K; Moore, G R Wayne

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate is the key excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS). Its role in human grey matter transmission is well understood, but this is less clear in white matter (WM). Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR) are found on both neuronal cell bodies and glia as well as on myelinated axons in rodents, and rodent WM tissue is capable of glutamate release. Thus, rodent WM expresses many of the components of the traditional grey matter neuron-to-neuron synapse, but to date this has not been shown for human WM. We demonstrate the presence of iGluRs in human WM by immunofluorescence employing high-resolution spectral confocal imaging. We found that the obligatory N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit GluN1 and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA4 co-localized with myelin, oligodendroglial cell bodies and processes. Additionally, GluA4 colocalized with axons, often in distinct clusters. These findings may explain why human WM is vulnerable to excitotoxic events following acute insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury and in more chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Further exploration of human WM glutamate signalling could pave the way for developing future therapies modulating the glutamate-mediated damage in these and other CNS disorders. PMID:27443784

  3. Cytochrome P450 and Xenobiotic Receptor Humanized Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Most xenobiotics that enter the body are subjected to metabolism that functions primarily to facilitate their elimination. Metabolism of certain xenobiotics can also result in the production of electrophilic derivatives that can cause cell toxicity and transformation. Many xenobiotics can also activate receptors that in turn induce the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. However, there are marked species differences in the way mammals respond to xenobiotics, which are due in large part to molecular differences in receptors and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. This presents a problem in extrapolating data obtained with rodent model systems to humans. There are also polymorphisms in xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that can impact drug therapy and cancer susceptibility. In an effort to generate more reliable in vivo systems to study and predict human response to xenobiotics, humanized mice are under development. PMID:16402898

  4. Radiosequence analysis of the human progestin receptor charged with ( sup 3 H)promegestone. A comparison with the glucocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Stroemstedt, P.E.B.; Berkenstam, A.; Joernvall, H.G.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Carlstedt-Duke, J. )

    1990-08-05

    Partially purified preparations of the human progestin receptor and the human and rat glucocorticoid receptor proteins were covalently charged with the synthetic progestin, ({sup 3}H)promegestone, by photoaffinity labeling. After labeling, the denaturated protein was cleaved and the mixture of peptides subjected to radiosequence analysis as previously described for the rat glucocorticoid receptor protein. The radioactivity labels identified, corresponded to Met-759 and Met-909 after photoaffinity labeling of the human progestin receptor, and Met-622 and Cys-754 after labeling of the rat glucocorticoid receptor. The residues labeled in the glucocorticoid receptor are the same as those previously reported to bind triamcinolone actonide. The corresponding residues were also labeled in the human glucocorticoid receptor. Met-759 of the progestin receptor and Met-622 of the rat glucocorticoid receptor are positioned within a segment with an overall high degree of sequence similarity and are equivalent. However, Met-909 (progestin receptor) and Cys-754 (glucocorticoid receptor) do not occur within equivalent segments of the two proteins. Thus, although the two classes of steroid hormone share a common structure within the A-ring, there are subtle differences in their interaction with the two separate receptor proteins.

  5. Human striatal dopamine receptors are organized in compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.N.; Sapp, D.W.; Marshall, J.F.

    1986-10-01

    Dopamine (D2) receptors visualized in postmortem human striatum by quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding are organized into circumscribed zones of low receptor density separated from other such zones by regions of higher D2 density. The D2-rich zones of the caudate nucleus and putamen contain twice the binding of D2-poor zones. The Hill coefficient, obtained from saturation analysis of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding to thin sections of human striatum, gave a value near unity, indicating the binding was occurring to a single type of site. The patchiness of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding was unaltered by postincubation removal of lipid from the tissue sections, indicating that a differential absorption of tritium in white and grey matter does not account for the heterogeneous distribution. The D2-rich and D2-poor regions appear to form labyrinths oriented in the anterior-posterior axis and are typically aligned with, respectively, acetylcholinesterase-rich and -poor compartments as visualized on stained adjacent sections. Thus, the distribution of dopamine D2 receptors conforms to the striosomal organization of the human caudate-putamen, a finding that suggests that this receptor subtype may mediate the influence of dopamine on distinct neurochemical compartments within the structure.

  6. Progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Stoichiometric translocation and nuclear receptor processing.

    PubMed

    Mockus, M B; Horwitz, K B

    1983-04-25

    In a subline of T47D human breast cancer cells, progesterone receptors (PR) are synthesized at very high levels, but their synthesis is not estrogen-dependent. Despite the unusual control of synthesis, the physicochemical properties of PR are normal. These are, therefore, ideal cells to study PR regulation by progesterone, free of estrogen effects. In this paper, we show that nuclear translocation of PR is stoichiometric, and that an unusual and very rapid nuclear turnover, or processing step, characterizes receptor-DNA interactions. In intact T47D cells, PR are translocated to the nucleus only by progestins; 70-90% of cytoplasmic receptors are depleted at 37 degrees C within 5 min of progestin addition. After PR are translocated by 0.1 muM progesterone, they can be quantitatively recovered from nuclei only in the first 5 min; thereafter, a rapid nuclear processing step results in loss of 50-80% of the newly translocated sites. Rapid processing may be inherent to PR; it also occurs in PR of MCF-7 cells. The extent of receptor translocation and of nuclear receptor processing is dependent on the progesterone concentration and on the treatment time, and can be masked by endogenous hormones. Proteolytic enzyme inhibitors (leupeptin, antipain) do not prevent nuclear PR loss. G-C specific DNA intercalators that prevent nuclear estrogen receptor processing (actinomycin D, chromomycin A3) also fail to prevent PR loss, but some A-T specific DNA-binding dyes (chloroquine, primaquine, quinacrine) protect 50-75% of nuclear PR. We conclude that translocated nuclear PR can be quantitatively measured only at early time points because the nuclear receptors are rapidly processed. Furthermore, the processing step may involve an interaction of receptors with DNA since it can be partially blocked by DNA-binding agents. PMID:6833276

  7. Toll-like receptor sensing of human herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    West, John A.; Gregory, Sean M.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved pathogen sensors that constitute the first line of defense in the human immune system. Herpesviruses are prevalent throughout the world and cause significant disease in the human population. Sensing of herpesviruses via TLRs has only been documented in the last 10 years and our understanding of the relationship between these sentinels of the immune system and herpesvirus infection has already provided great insight into how the host cell responds to viral infection. This report will summarize the activation and modulation of TLR signaling in the context of human herpesvirus infections. PMID:23061052

  8. Glycophorin and the concanavalin A receptor of human erythrocytes: their receptor function in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Sharom, F J; Barratt, D G; Grant, C W

    1977-01-01

    Two integral glycoproteins from the human erythrocyte have been studied after their incorporation into lipid bilayer systems. Glycophorin (which is the M/N blood group determinant) and the concanavalin A receptor were isolated and purified prior to incorporation into model membranes by dialytic removal of detergent from lipid/protein solutions. Under the conditions described, glycoprotein receptors maintain their function in that they bind external agents specific for them, such as concanavalin A and immunoglobulins. So-called intramembranous particles are a feature of freeze-fractured preparations of lipid bilayers containing either (or both) glycoprotein(s), and to some extent each has a characteristic particle appearance. Liposomes containing the concanavalin A receptor (with or without glycophorin) are agglutinable by concanavalin A, whereas human erythrocytes are normally considered to be nonagglutinable by this lectin. Liposomes containing glycophorin alone are readily agglutinable by the appropriate glycophorin-directed M/N antiserum, as are human erythrocytes. The added presence of concanavalin A receptor in the liposomes can markedly inhibit agglutination by M/N antiserum without preventing immunoglobulin binding. Images PMID:268624

  9. Human eosinophils - potential pharmacological model applied in human histamine H4 receptor research.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors are well known for their immunomodulatory role in inflammation. In this review we describe the role of histamine and histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils. In the first part of article we provide short summary of histamine and histamine receptors role in physiology and histamine related therapeutics used in clinics. We briefly describe the human histamine receptor H4 and its ligands, as well as human eosinophils. In the second part of the review we provide detailed description of known histamine effects on eosinophils including: intracellular calcium concentration flux, actin polymerization, cellular shape change, upregulation of adhesion proteins and cellular chemotaxis. We provide proofs that these effects are mainly connected with the activation of histamine H4 receptor. When examining experimental data we discuss the controversial results and limitations of the studies performed on isolated eosinophils. In conclusion we believe that studies on histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils can provide interesting new biomarkers that can be used in clinical studies of histamine receptors, that in future might result in the development of new strategies in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions like asthma or allergy, in which eosinophils are involved. PMID:25760088

  10. Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding of a Human Isolate of Influenza A(H10N8) Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Mena; Wohlbold, Teddy J.; Ermler, Megan E.; Hirsh, Ariana; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of influenza A(H10N8) virus infection in humans have been reported; 2 of these infected persons died. Characterization of the receptor binding pattern of H10 hemagglutinin from avian and human isolates showed that both interact weakly with human-like receptors and maintain strong affinity for avian-like receptors. PMID:26079843

  11. Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding of a Human Isolate of Influenza A(H10N8) Virus.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Irene; Mansour, Mena; Wohlbold, Teddy J; Ermler, Megan E; Hirsh, Ariana; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Krammer, Florian

    2015-07-01

    Three cases of influenza A(H10N8) virus infection in humans have been reported; 2 of these infected persons died. Characterization of the receptor binding pattern of H10 hemagglutinin from avian and human isolates showed that both interact weakly with human-like receptors and maintain strong affinity for avian-like receptors. PMID:26079843

  12. A third human retinoic acid receptor, hRAR-. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Krust, A.; Kastner, Ph.; Petkovich, M.; Zelent, A.; Chambon, P. )

    1989-07-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are retinoic acid (RA)-inducible enhancer factors belonging to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors. The authors have previously characterized two human RAR (hRAR-{alpha} and hRAR-{beta}) cDNAs and have recently cloned their murine cognates (mRAR-{alpha} and mRAR-{beta}) together with a third RAR (mRAR-{gamma}) whose RNA was detected predominantly in skin, a well-known target for RA. mRAR-{gamma} cDNA was used here to clone its human counterpart (hRAR-{gamma}) from a T47D breast cancer cell cDNA library. Using a transient transfection assay in HeLa cells and a reporter gene harboring a synthetic RA responsive element, they demonstrate that hRAR-{gamma} cDNA indeed encodes a RA-inducible transcriptional trans-activator. Interestingly, comparisons of the amino acid sequences of all six human and mouse RARs indicate that the interspecies conservation of a given member of the RAR subfamily (either {alpha}, {beta}, or {gamma}) is much higher than the conservation of all three receptors within a given species. These observations indicate that RAR-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} may perform specific functions. They show also that hRAR-{gamma} RNA is the predominant RAR RNA species in human skin, which suggests that hRAR-{gamma} mediates some of the retinoid effects in this tissue.

  13. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  14. Molecular characterization of human thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 4.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Futawaka, Kumi; Atake, Asami; Kasahara, Masato; Tagami, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts a pleiotropic effect on development, differentiation, and metabolism through thyroid hormone receptor (TR). A novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform (TRβ4) was cloned using PCR from a human pituitary cDNA library as a template. We report here the characterization of TRβ4 from a molecular basis. Temporal expression of TRβ4 during the fetal period is abundant in the brain and kidney, comparable with the adult pattern. Western blot analysis revealed that TRs are ubiquitination labile proteins, while TRβ1 is potentially stable. TRβ1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), which belong to class II transcription factors that function via the formation of heterodimeric complexes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), were suppressed by TRβ4 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, TRβ4 exhibits ligand-independent transcriptional silencing, possibly as a substitute for dimerized RXR. In this study, TRβ1 and TRβ4 transcripts were detected in several cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TRβ4 in human embryonic carcinoma cells of the testis was suppressed by sex hormone in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. In contrast, TRβ4 was expressed under a high dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. Finally, in transiently transfected NIH-3T3 cells, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TRβ4 was mostly nuclear in both the absence and the presence of T3. By mutating defined regions of both TRβs, we found that both TRβ1 and TRβ4 had altered nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution as compared with wild-type, and different to T3 and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Thus, site-specific DNA binding is not essential for maintaining TRβs within the nucleus. PMID:26513165

  15. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-05-05

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4/sup 0/C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37/sup 0/C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation.

  16. Alcohol- and alcohol antagonist-sensitive human GABAA receptors: tracking δ subunit incorporation into functional receptors.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2010-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn(2+) block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABA(A)Rs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. PMID:20699325

  17. Alcohol- and Alcohol Antagonist-Sensitive Human GABAA Receptors: Tracking δ Subunit Incorporation into Functional Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W.; Otis, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABAARs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn2+ block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABAARs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:20699325

  18. Mapping the calcitonin receptor in human brain stem.

    PubMed

    Bower, Rebekah L; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Tajti, János; Edvinsson, Lars; Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S

    2016-05-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) is relevant to three hormonal systems: amylin, calcitonin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Receptors for amylin and calcitonin are targets for treating obesity, diabetes, and bone disorders. CGRP receptors represent a target for pain and migraine. Amylin receptors (AMY) are a heterodimer formed by the coexpression of CTR with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). CTR with RAMP1 responds potently to both amylin and CGRP. The brain stem is a major site of action for circulating amylin and is a rich site of CGRP binding. This study aimed to enhance our understanding of these hormone systems by mapping CTR expression in the human brain stem, specifically the medulla oblongata. Widespread CTR-like immunoreactivity was observed throughout the medulla. Dense CTR staining was noted in several discrete nuclei, including the nucleus of the solitary tract, the hypoglossal nucleus, the cuneate nucleus, spinal trigeminal nucleus, the gracile nucleus, and the inferior olivary nucleus. CTR staining was also observed in the area postrema, the lateral reticular nucleus, and the pyramidal tract. The extensive expression of CTR in the medulla suggests that CTR may be involved in a wider range of functions than currently appreciated. PMID:26911465

  19. Beta-receptor-mediated increase in venous return in humans.

    PubMed

    Leenen, F H; Reeves, R A

    1987-08-01

    To assess the involvement of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors in the regulation of venous return in humans, changes in left ventricular end-diastolic (LVED) dimension were determined during beta-receptor stimulation either by exogenous catecholamines or by increased endogenous sympathetic activity after hydralazine, after placebo and during nonselective versus beta 1-selective blockade. Taking changes in heart rate and LV emptying into account, the three beta-agonists (isoproterenol, terbutaline, and epinephrine) as well as hydralazine increased venous return as inferred from LVED dimension. After hydralazine, nonselective and beta 1-selective blockade were equally effective in blunting the increases in venous return, in heart rate, and in positive inotropic response. Beta 1-Selective blockade did not affect the increase in heart rate caused by epinephrine and partially inhibited the positive inotropic effect and the increase in venous return. Nonselective blockade not only blocked the increase in venous return owing to epinephrine but actually led to a decrease, as evidenced by a decrease in LVED dimension despite the marked bradycardia and high afterload with this combination. The present findings in healthy humans indicate that stimulation of both beta 1- and beta 2-receptors increases venous return, heart rate, and myocardial contractility. Beta 1-Receptors appear to predominate in the response to neuronal sympathetic activity. PMID:2825941

  20. Molecular and cellular analysis of human histamine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Roland; Strasser, Andrea; Schneider, Erich H.; Neumann, Detlef; Dove, Stefan; Buschauer, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The human histamine receptors hH1R and hH2R constitute important drug targets, and hH3R and hH4R have substantial potential in this area. Considering the species-specificity of pharmacology of HxR orthologs, it is important to analyze hHxRs. Here,we summarize current knowledge of hHxRs endogenously expressed in human cells and hHxRs recombinantly expressed in mammalian and insect cells. We present the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems. We also discuss problems associated with the use of hHxR antibodies, an issue of general relevance for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). There is much greater overlap in activity of ‘selective’ ligands for other hHxRs than the cognate receptor subtype than generally appreciated. Studies with native and recombinant systems support the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations, encompassing agonists and antagonists. It is emerging that for characterization of hHxR ligands, one cannot rely on a single test system and a single parameter. Rather, multiple systems and parameters have to be studied. Although such studies are time-consuming and expensive, ultimately, they will increase drug safety and efficacy. PMID:23254267

  1. Bisphenol A and Its Analogues Activate Human Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Perkins, Jordan T.; Welsh, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a base chemical used extensively in many consumer products. BPA and its analogues are present in environmental and human samples. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including BPA, have been shown to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that functions as a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism. However, the detailed mechanism by which these chemicals activate PXR remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates PXR and examined selected BPA analogues to determine whether they bind to and activate PXR. Methods: Cell-based reporter assays, in silico ligand–PXR docking studies, and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to study the interaction between BPA and PXR. We also investigated the influence of BPA and its analogues on the regulation of PXR target genes in human LS180 cells. Results: We found that BPA and several of its analogues are potent agonists for human PXR (hPXR) but do not affect mouse PXR activity. We identified key residues within hPXR’s ligand-binding pocket that constitute points of interaction with BPA. We also deduced the structural requirements of BPA analogues that activate hPXR. BPA and its analogues can also induce PXR target gene expression in human LS180 cells. Conclusions: The present study advances our understanding of the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates human PXR. Activation of PXR by BPA may explain some of the adverse effects of BPA in humans. PMID:22214767

  2. Human Xenobiotic Nuclear Receptor PXR Augments Mycobacterium tuberculosis Survival.

    PubMed

    Bhagyaraj, Ella; Nanduri, Ravikanth; Saini, Ankita; Dkhar, Hedwin Kitdorlang; Ahuja, Nancy; Chandra, Vemika; Mahajan, Sahil; Kalra, Rashi; Tiwari, Drishti; Sharma, Charu; Janmeja, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can evade host defense processes, thereby ensuring its survival and pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the role of nuclear receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), in M. tuberculosis infection in human monocyte-derived macrophages. In this study, we demonstrate that PXR augments M. tuberculosis survival inside the host macrophages by promoting the foamy macrophage formation and abrogating phagolysosomal fusion, inflammation, and apoptosis. Additionally, M. tuberculosis cell wall lipids, particularly mycolic acids, crosstalk with human PXR (hPXR) by interacting with its promiscuous ligand binding domain. To confirm our in vitro findings and to avoid the reported species barrier in PXR function, we adopted an in vivo mouse model expressing hPXR, wherein expression of hPXR in mice promotes M. tuberculosis survival. Therefore, pharmacological intervention and designing antagonists to hPXR may prove to be a promising adjunct therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:27233963

  3. Dysregulation of Human Toll-like Receptor Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Albert C.; Panda, Alexander; Joshi, Samit R.; Qian, Feng; Allore, Heather G.; Montgomery, Ruth R.

    2010-01-01

    Studies addressing immunosenescence in the immune system have expanded to focus on the innate as well as the adaptive responses. In particular, aging results in alterations in the function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the first described pattern recognition receptor family of the innate immune system. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the consequences of aging on TLR function in human cohorts and add to existing findings performed in animal models. In general, these studies show that human TLR function is impaired in the context of aging, and in addition there is evidence for inappropriate persistence of TLR activation in specific systems. These findings are consistent with an overarching theme of age-associated dysregulation of TLR signaling that likely contributes to the increased morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases found in geriatric patients. PMID:21074638

  4. Receptor Coactivators: Master Regulators of Human Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Lonard, David M.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional coregulators (coactivators and corepressors) have emerged as the principal modulators of the functions of nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. During the decade since the discovery of steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), the first authentic coregulator, more than 400 coregulators have been identified and characterized, and deciphering their function has contributed significantly to our understanding of their role in human physiology. Deregulated expression of coregulators has been implicated in diverse disease states and related pathologies. The advancement of molecular technologies has enabled us to better characterize the molecular associations of the SRC family of coactivators with other protein complexes in the context of gene regulation. These continuing discoveries not only expand our knowledge of the roles of coactivators in various human diseases but allow us to discover novel coactivator-targeting strategies for therapeutic intervention in these diseases. PMID:24111892

  5. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  6. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  7. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  8. Characterization of the Human Platelet α-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. Wayne; Cooper, Barry; Handin, Robert I.

    1978-01-01

    Human platelets aggregate and undergo a release reaction when incubated with catecholamines. Indirect evidence indicates that these events are mediated through α-adrenergic receptors. We used [3H]dihydroergocryptine, an α-adrenergic antagonist, to identify binding sites on platelets that have the characteristics of α-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamines compete for the binding sites in a stereo-specific manner with the potency series of (−) epinephrine > (−) norepinephrine > (±) phenylephrine > (−) isoproterenol. The dissociation constant (Kd) of (−) epinephrine is 0.34 μM. Binding is saturable using a platelet particulate fraction but not with intact platelets. There are 0.130 pmol binding sites per milligram protein in fresh platelet membranes. This number represents approximately 100 binding sites per platelet. The Kd for [3H]-dihydroergocryptine was 0.003−0.01 μM. The α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (Kd = 0.0069 μM) was much more potent than the β-adrenergic antagonist (±) propranolol (Kd = 27 μM) in competing for the binding sites. The binding data were correlated with catecholamine-induced platelet aggregation and inhibition of basal and prostaglandin E1-stimulated adenylate cyclase. (−) Epinephrine was more potent than (−) norepinephrine in producing aggregation whereas (−) isoproterenol was ineffective. The threshold dose for inducing aggregation by (−) epinephrine was 0.46 μM. Phentolamine and dihydroergocyrptine blocked this response, whereas (±) propranolol had no effect. (−) Epinephrine and (−) norepinephrine inhibited basal and prostaglandin E1-stimulated adenylate cyclase in a dose-related manner. The concentration of (−) epinephrine inhibiting adenylate cyclase 50% was 0.7 μM. This inhibition was also blocked by phentolamine and dihydroergocryptine but not by (±) propranolol. The specificity of binding and the close correlation with α-adrenergic receptor-mediated biochemical and physiological responses

  9. Endocannabinoids Stimulate Human Melanogenesis via Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Pasquariello, Nicoletta; Battista, Natalia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Rapino, Cinzia; Fezza, Filomena; Zuccolo, Michela; Jourdain, Roland; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Breton, Lionel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We show that a fully functional endocannabinoid system is present in primary human melanocytes (normal human epidermal melanocyte cells), including anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the respective target receptors (CB1, CB2, and TRPV1), and their metabolic enzymes. We also show that at higher concentrations AEA induces normal human epidermal melanocyte apoptosis (∼3-fold over controls at 5 μm) through a TRPV1-mediated pathway that increases DNA fragmentation and p53 expression. However, at lower concentrations, AEA and other CB1-binding endocannabinoids dose-dependently stimulate melanin synthesis and enhance tyrosinase gene expression and activity (∼3- and ∼2-fold over controls at 1 μm). This CB1-dependent activity was fully abolished by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716 or by RNA interference of the receptor. CB1 signaling engaged p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which in turn activated the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Silencing of tyrosinase or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor further demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in AEA-induced melanogenesis. In addition, CB1 activation did not engage the key regulator of skin pigmentation, cyclic AMP, showing a major difference compared with the regulation of melanogenesis by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone through melanocortin 1 receptor. PMID:22431736

  10. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  11. Post-translational modifications of nuclear receptors and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Huderson, Brandy; Murphy, Leigh; Rowan, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) impact a myriad of physiological processes including homeostasis, reproduction, development, and metabolism. NRs are regulated by post-translational modifications (PTM) that markedly impact receptor function. Recent studies have identified NR PTMs that are involved in the onset and progression of human diseases, including cancer. The majority of evidence linking NR PTMs with disease has been demonstrated for phosphorylation, acetylation and sumoylation of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Phosphorylation of AR has been associated with hormone refractory prostate cancer and decreased disease-specific survival. AR acetylation and sumoylation increased growth of prostate cancer tumor models. AR phosphorylation reduced the toxicity of the expanded polyglutamine AR in Kennedy’s Disease as a consequence of reduced ligand binding. A comprehensive evaluation of ERα phosphorylation in breast cancer revealed several sites associated with better clinical outcome to tamoxifen therapy, whereas other phosphorylation sites were associated with poorer clinical outcome. ERα acetylation and sumoylation may also have predictive value for breast cancer. GR phosphorylation and acetylation impact GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids that are used as anti-inflammatory drugs. PPARγ phosphorylation can regulate the balance between growth and differentiation in adipose tissue that is linked to obesity and insulin resistance. Sumoylation of PPARγ is linked to repression of inflammatory genes important in patients with inflammatory diseases. NR PTMs provide an additional measure of NR function that can be used as both biomarkers of disease progression, and predictive markers for patient response to NR-directed treatments. PMID:22438791

  12. Expression and functional study of estrogen receptor-related receptors in human prostatic cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C P; Yu, Shan; Wong, K B; Chan, L W; Lai, Fernand M M; Wang, Xianghong; Suetsugi, Masatomo; Chen, Shiuan; Chan, Franky L

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs; alpha, beta, gamma) are orphan nuclear receptors and constitutively active without binding to estrogen. Like estrogen receptors (ERs), ERRs bind to estrogen receptor elements and estrogen receptor element-related repeats. Growing evidence suggests that ERRs can cross-talk with ERs in different cell types via competition for DNA sites and coactivators. We hypothesize that ERRs might play regulatory roles in normal and neoplastic prostatic cells by sharing similar ER-mediated pathways or acting independently. In this study, we investigated mRNA and protein expression patterns of three ERR members in normal human prostate epithelial cells, established cell lines, cancer xenografts, and prostatic tissues. Additionally, effects of transient transfection of ERRs on prostatic cell proliferation and ER expression were also examined. RT-PCR showed that ERRalpha and ERRgamma transcripts were detected in most cell lines and xenografts, whereas ERRbeta was detected in normal epithelial cells and few immortalized cell lines but not in most cancer lines. Similar results were demonstrated in clinical prostatic specimens. Western blottings and immunohistochemistry confirmed similar expression patterns that ERR proteins were detected as nuclear proteins in epithelial cells, whereas their expressions became reduced or undetected in neoplastic prostatic cells. Transient transfection confirmed that ERRs were expressed in prostatic cells as nuclear proteins and transcriptionally active in the absence of estradiol. Transfection results showed that overexpression of ERRs inhibited cell proliferation and repressed ERalpha transcription in PC-3 cells. Our study shows that ERRs, which are coexpressed with ERs in prostatic cells, could regulate cell growth and modulate ER-mediated pathways via interference on ERalpha transcription in prostatic cells. PMID:15598686

  13. The role of GABAB receptors in human reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Ort, Andres; Kometer, Michael; Rohde, Judith; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-10-01

    Behavioral evidence from human studies suggests that the γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABAB receptor) agonist baclofen modulates reinforcement learning and reduces craving in patients with addiction spectrum disorders. However, in contrast to the well established role of dopamine in reinforcement learning, the mechanisms by which the GABAB receptor influences reinforcement learning in humans remain completely unknown. To further elucidate this issue, a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in healthy human subjects (N=15) to test the effects of baclofen (20 and 50mg p.o.) on probabilistic reinforcement learning. Outcomes were the feedback-induced P2 component of the event-related potential, the feedback-related negativity, and the P300 component of the event-related potential. Baclofen produced a reduction of P2 amplitude over the course of the experiment, but did not modulate the feedback-related negativity. Furthermore, there was a trend towards increased learning after baclofen administration relative to placebo over the course of the experiment. The present results extend previous theories of reinforcement learning, which focus on the importance of mesolimbic dopamine signaling, and indicate that stimulation of cortical GABAB receptors in a fronto-parietal network leads to better attentional allocation in reinforcement learning. This observation is a first step in our understanding of how baclofen may improve reinforcement learning in healthy subjects. Further studies with bigger sample sizes are needed to corroborate this conclusion and furthermore, test this effect in patients with addiction spectrum disorder. PMID:25194227

  14. Differential effect of meclizine on the activity of human pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Lau, Aik Jiang; Yang, Guixiang; Rajaraman, Ganesh; Baucom, Christie C; Chang, Thomas K H

    2011-03-01

    Conflicting data exist as to whether meclizine is an activator of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR). Therefore, we conducted a detailed, systematic investigation to determine whether meclizine affects hPXR activity by performing a cell-based reporter gene assay, a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer competitive ligand-binding assay, a mammalian two-hybrid assay to assess coactivator recruitment, and a hPXR target gene expression assay. In pregnane X receptor (PXR)-transfected HepG2 cells, meclizine activated hPXR to a greater extent than rat PXR. It bound to hPXR ligand-binding domain and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 to the receptor. Consistent with its hPXR agonism, meclizine increased hPXR target gene expression (CYP3A4) in human hepatocytes. However, it did not increase but decreased testosterone 6β-hydroxylation, suggesting inhibition of CYP3A catalytic activity. Meclizine has also been reported to be an inverse agonist and antagonist of human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR). Therefore, given that certain tissues (e.g., liver) express both hPXR and hCAR and that various genes are cross-regulated by them, we quantified the expression of a hCAR- and hPXR-regulated gene (CYP2B6) in cultured human hepatocytes treated with meclizine. This drug did not decrease constitutive CYP2B6 mRNA expression or attenuate hCAR agonist-mediated increase in CYP2B6 mRNA and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylation levels. These observations reflect hPXR agonism and the lack of hCAR inverse agonism and antagonism by meclizine, which were assessed by a hCAR reporter gene assay and mammalian two-hybrid assay. In conclusion, meclizine is a hPXR agonist, and it does not act as a hCAR inverse agonist or antagonist in cultured human hepatocytes. PMID:21131266

  15. A human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor is a novel functional inhibitor of human pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Healan-Greenberg, Christine; Waring, Jeffrey F; Kempf, Dale J; Blomme, Eric A G; Tirona, Rommel G; Kim, Richard B

    2008-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions involving induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) can lead to loss of drug efficacy. Certain drugs, particularly those used to treat mycobacterial and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, are especially prone to induce P450s. During studies to examine drug-interaction potential of compounds in cultured human hepatocytes, exposure with (S)-1-[(1S,3S,4S)-4-[(S)-2-(3-benzyl-2-oxo-imidazolidin-1-yl)-3,3-dimethyl-butyrylamino]-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-1-(4-pyridin-2-yl-benzyl)-pentylcarbamoyl]-2,2-dimethyl-propyl-carbamic acid methyl ester (A-792611), a novel HIV protease inhibitor (PI) previously under investigation for the treatment of HIV infection, resulted in significant down-regulation of constitutive CYP3A4 expression. Furthermore, coadministration of A-792611 was found to attenuate CYP3A4 induction mediated by known inducers rifampin and efavirenz. A-792611 also attenuated the rifampin and ritonavir-mediated activation of the human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in luciferase reporter assays. Microarray analysis on cultured human hepatocytes revealed that A-792611 treatment down-regulated the expression of PXR target genes CYP3A4, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, and CYP2C9, whereas there was a lack of inductive effect observed in treated rat hepatocytes. A-792611 did not interact with other ligand-activated nuclear receptors that regulate P450 expression such as constitutive androstane receptor, farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. These data suggest that A-792611 is a functional and effective human PXR inhibitor. Among the class of HIV-PIs, which are typically PXR activators, A-792611 seems to have a unique property for PXR antagonism and could be a useful tool for studying nuclear receptor pathway regulation. PMID:18096673

  16. Regulation of the human thromboxane A2 receptor gene in human megakaryoblastic MEG-01 cells.

    PubMed

    Saffak, T; Schäfer, S; Haas, C; Nüsing, R M

    2003-11-01

    Thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) is an important mediator for platelet aggregation and blood vessel constriction. TXA(2) receptor (TP receptor) is expressed in different cell types including smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and platelets. Expression level of TP receptor may modulate the action of TXA(2) on target cells. In megakaryoblastic MEG-01 cells, a cell line representing a model for platelet precursor cells, addition of phorbolester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) caused an increase in transcriptional activity of TP receptor gene promoter. Within 20 h a rise in expression of TP receptor mRNA and protein was observed. The effect of TPA was concentration-dependent and was blocked by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the increase in TP receptor expression appeared to be one of the earliest events in the course of TPA-induced maturation of MEG-01 cells. Stimulation of the protein kinase A pathway by incubation with forskolin or IBMX caused a decrease in transcriptional activity. Promoter deletion experiments indicated that the responsive elements for protein kinase A and C are located upstream and downstream, respectively, of -700 bp of the TP receptor gene. These experiments indicate that the expression of the human thromboxane receptor is differently regulated in platelet precursor cells by the protein kinase A and C pathway. PMID:14580363

  17. Characterization of interleukin-8 receptors in non-human primates

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, V.; Coto, E.; Gonzalez-Roces, S.; Lopez-Larrea, C.

    1996-09-01

    Interleukin-8 is a chemokine with a potent neutrophil chemoatractant activity. In humans, two different cDNAs encoding human IL8 receptors designated IL8RA and IL8RB have been cloned. IL8RA binds IL8, while IL8RB binds IL8 as well as other {alpha}-chemokines. Both human IL8Rs are encoded by two genes physically linked on chromosome 2. The IL8RA and IL8RB genes have open reading frames (ORF) lacking introns. By direct sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction products, we sequenced the IL8R genes of cell lines from four non-human primates: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaca. The IL8RB encodes an ORF in the four non-human primates, showing 95%-99% similarity to the human IL8RB sequence. The IL8RA homologue in gorilla and chimpanzee consisted of two ORF 98%-99% identical to the human sequence. The macaca and orangutan IL8RA homologues are pseudogenes: a 2 base pair insertion generated a sequence with several stop codons. In addition, we describe the physical linkage of these genes in the four non-human primates and discuss the evolutionary implications of these findings. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Transferrin receptors of human fibroblasts. Analysis of receptor properties and regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J H; Kushner, J P; Kaplan, J

    1982-01-01

    Normal human skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro exhibit specific binding sites for 125I-labelled transferrin. Kinetic studies revealed a rate constant for association (Kon) at 37 degrees C of 1.03 X 10(7) M-1 X min-1. The rate constant for dissociation (Koff) at 37 degrees C was 7.9 X 10(-2) X min-1. The dissociation constant (KD) was 5.1 X 10(-9) M as determined by Scatchard analysis of binding and analysis of rate constants. Fibroblasts were capable of binding 3.9 X 10(5) molecules of transferrin per cell. Binding of 125I-labelled diferric transferrin to cells was inhibited equally by either apo-transferrin or diferric transferrin, but no inhibition was evident with apo-lactoferrin, iron-saturated lactoferrin, or albumin. Preincubation of cells with saturating levels of diferric transferrin or apo-transferrin produced no significant change in receptor number or affinity. Preincubation of cells with ferric ammonium citrate caused a time- and dose-dependent decrease in transferrin binding. After preincubation with ferric ammonium citrate for 72 h, diferric transferrin binding was 37.7% of control, but no change in receptor affinity was apparent by Scatchard analysis. These results suggest that fibroblast transferrin receptor number is modulated by intracellular iron content and not by ligand-receptor binding. PMID:6297460

  19. Human platelet vasopressin receptor identification by direct ultraviolet photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.

    1987-08-15

    Tritiated vasopressin ((/sup 3/H)AVP) was directly crosslinked to its human platelet receptor by using an ultraviolet irradiation procedure. After preincubation with (/sup 3/H)AVP, the hydrodynamic parameters of the hormone-receptor complexes solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate were derived from Sephacryl S-300 superfine gel filtration and from sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation experiments. The following values were obtained: Stoke's radius = 5.48 +/- 0.1 nm, apparent sedimentation coefficient = 5.55 +/- 0.1 S, and calculated molecular weight = 132,000. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-8% polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, (/sup 3/H)AVP preferentially and specifically labeled a 125,000-dalton protein. The labeling of this protein was suppressed by addition of excess cold vasopressin, whereas angiotensin II did not inhibit incorporation of tritiated vasopressin in this protein. These results suggest that direct UV-photoaffinity labelling with (/sup 3/H)AVP is a suitable tool for the purification of the human platelet vasopressin receptor.

  20. Distribution of adenosine receptors in human sclera fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongmei; Trier, Klaus; Chen, Xiang; Zeng, Junwen; Yang, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Systemic treatment with adenosine receptor antagonists has been reported to affect the biochemistry and ultrastructure of rabbit sclera. This study was conducted to determine whether adenosine receptors (ADORs) are present in human scleral fibroblasts (HSF). Methods Primary HSF were cultured in vitro and identified with anti-vimentin, anti-keratin, anti-desmin, and anti-S-100 antibodies. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study the distribution of ADORs in the HSF cell lines and in the frozen human scleral sections. ADOR protein expression in HSF and human sclera was confirmed by western blot analysis of cell lysates. Results ADORs were expressed in both HSF and human sclera. This was confirmed by western blot. ADORA1 expression was concentrated in the nucleus. ADORA2A was concentrated mainly in one side of the cytoplasm, and ADORA2B was found both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. ADORA3 was expressed weakly in the cytoplasm. Conclusions All four subtypes of ADOR were found in HSF and may play a role in scleral remodeling. PMID:18385786

  1. Endothelin ETA receptor expression in human cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J. C.; Pickard, J. D.; Davenport, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) has been implicated in cerebrovasospasm for example, following subarachnoid haemorrhage, and blocking the interaction of ET with its receptors on cerebral vessels, may be of therapeutic benefit. The aim of our study was to characterize endothelin receptor sub-types on medial smooth muscle cells of human cerebral vessels. Cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells were explanted from human cerebral resistance vessels and characterized as human brain smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). 2. Over a 48 h incubation period, HBSMC cultures secreted comparable levels of immunoreactive (IR) big endothelin-1 (big ET-1) and IR endothelin (ET): 12.7 +/- 10.3 and 8.3 +/- 5.6 pmol/10(6) cells, respectively (mean +/- s.e. mean from three different individuals), into the culture medium. 3. Total RNA was extracted from cultures of human brain smooth muscle cells. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RI-PCR) assays and subsequent product separation by agarose gel electrophoresis revealed single bands corresponding to the expected product sizes encoding cDNA for ETA (299 base pairs) and ETB (428 base pairs) (n = 3 different cultures). 4. Autoradiography demonstrated the presence of specific binding sites for [125I]-ET-1 which labels all ET receptors, and [125I]-PD151242, an ETA subtype-selective antagonist which exclusively labels ETA receptors, but no specific-binding was detected using ETB subtype-selective [125I]-BQ3020 (n = 3 different cultures, in duplicate). 5. In saturation binding assays, [123I]-ET-1 bound with high affinity: KD = 0.8 +/- 0.1 nM and Bmax = 690 +/- 108 fmol mg-1. A one-site fit was preferred and Hill slopes were close to unity over the concentration range (10(-12) to 10(-8) M). [125I]-PD151242 also bound with similar affinity: KD = 0.4 +/- 0.1 nM and Bmax = 388 +/- 68 fmol mg-1 (mean +/- s.e. mean, n = 3 different cultures). Again, a one-site fit was preferred and Hill slopes were close to unity over the concentration range. Unlabelled PD

  2. Human placental coated vesicles contain receptor-bound transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, A G; Wilson, M J

    1981-01-01

    Human placental coated vesicles have been purified by a method involving sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation and treatment with wheat-germ agglutinin. These preparations were free of contamination by placental microvillus fragments. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated that the coated vesicles contained a single serum protein, which was identified as transferrin. This transferrin was only observed after the vesicles were treated with a non-ionic detergent, and its behaviour during crossed hydrophobic-interaction immunoelectrophoresis suggested that a large proportion of it was receptor-bound. No other serum proteins, including immunoglobulin G, could be detected in these preparations. Receptor-bound transferrin was the only antigen common to placental coated vesicles and microvilli, implying that other plasma-membrane proteins are excluded from the region of membrane involved in coated-vesicle formation. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6272755

  3. Mutations in Melanocortin-3 Receptor Gene and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Tao, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity calls for novel therapeutic targets. The melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) has been increasingly recognized as an important regulator of energy homeostasis and MC3R has been intensively analyzed in molecular genetic studies for obesity-related traits. Twenty-seven MC3R mutations and two common polymorphic variants have been identified so far in different cohorts. The mutant MC3Rs demonstrate multiple defects in functional analysis and can be cataloged into different classes according to receptor life cycle based classification system. Although the pathogenic role of MC3R in human obesity remains controversial, recent findings in the noncanonical signaling pathway of MC3R mutants have provided new insights. Potential therapeutic strategies for obesity related to MC3R mutations are highlighted. PMID:27288827

  4. A humanized antibody that binds to the interleukin 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Queen, C; Schneider, W P; Selick, H E; Payne, P W; Landolfi, N F; Duncan, J F; Avdalovic, N M; Levitt, M; Junghans, R P; Waldmann, T A

    1989-01-01

    The anti-Tac monoclonal antibody is known to bind to the p55 chain of the human interleukin 2 receptor and to inhibit proliferation of T cells by blocking interleukin 2 binding. However, use of anti-Tac as an immunosuppressant drug would be impaired by the human immune response against this murine antibody. We have therefore constructed a "humanized" antibody by combining the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of the anti-Tac antibody with human framework and constant regions. The human framework regions were chosen to maximize homology with the anti-Tac antibody sequence. In addition, a computer model of murine anti-Tac was used to identify several amino acids which, while outside the CDRs, are likely to interact with the CDRs or antigen. These mouse amino acids were also retained in the humanized antibody. The humanized anti-Tac antibody has an affinity for p55 of 3 x 10(9) M-1, about 1/3 that of murine anti-Tac. Images PMID:2513570

  5. Characterization of the Olfactory Receptors Expressed in Human Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Osthold, Sandra; Veitinger, Sophie; Becker, Christian; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Muschol, Michael; Wennemuth, Gunther; Altmüller, Janine; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs) are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicates that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa. PMID:26779489

  6. Evidence for a second receptor binding site on human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Struman, I; Mainfroid, V; Kinet, S; Martial, J A

    1994-12-23

    The existence of a second receptor binding site on human prolactin (hPRL) was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. First, 12 residues of helices 1 and 3 were mutated to alanine. Since none of the resulting mutants exhibit reduced bioactivity in the Nb2 cell proliferation bioassay, the mutated residues do not appear to be functionally necessary. Next, small residues surrounding the helix 1-helix 3 interface were replaced with Arg and/or Trp, the aim being to sterically hinder the second binding site. Several of these mutants exhibit only weak agonistic properties, supporting our hypothesis that the channel between helices 1 and 3 is involved in a second receptor binding site. We then analyzed the antagonistic and self-antagonistic properties of native hPRL and of several hPRLs analogs altered at binding site 1 or 2. Even at high concentrations (approximately 10 microM), no self-inhibition was observed with native hPRL; site 2 hPRL mutants self-antagonized while site 1 mutants did not. From these data, we propose a model of hPRL-PRL receptor interaction which slightly differs from that proposed earlier for the homologous human growth hormone (hGH) (Fuh, G., Cunningham, B. C., Fukunaga, R., Nagata, S., and Goeddel, D. V., and Well, J. A. (1992) Science 256, 1677-1680). Like hGH, hPRL would bind sequentially to two receptor molecules, first through site 1, then through site 2, but we would expect the two sites of hPRL to display, unlike the two binding sites of hGH, about the same binding affinity, thus preventing self-antagonism at high concentrations. PMID:7798264

  7. Dopamine Receptors in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Neurodifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Glenn S.; Sirois, Carissa L.; Rich, Matthew T.; Short, Shaina M.; Moore, Anna R.; Gilbert, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    We tested whether dopaminergic drugs can improve the protocol for in vitro differentiation of H9 human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into dopaminergic neurons. The expression of 5 dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes (mRNA and protein) was analyzed at each protocol stage (1, undifferentiated hESCs; 2, embryoid bodies [EBs]; 3, neuroepithelial rosettes; 4, expanding neuroepithelium; and 5, differentiating neurons) and compared to human fetal brain (gestational week 17–19). D2-like DA receptors (D2, D3, and D4) predominate over the D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) during derivation of neurons from hESCs. D1 was the receptor subtype with the lowest representation in each protocol stage (Stages 1–5). D1/D5-agonist SKF38393 and D2/D3/D4-agonist quinpirole (either alone or combined) evoked Ca2+ responses, indicating functional receptors in hESCs. To identify when receptor activation causes a striking effect on hESC neurodifferentiation, and what ligands and endpoints are most interesting, we varied the timing, duration, and drug in the culture media. Dopaminergic agonists or antagonists were administered either early (Stages 1–3) or late (Stages 4–5). Early DA exposure resulted in more neuroepithelial colonies, more neuronal clusters, and more TH+ clusters. The D1/D5 antagonist SKF83566 had a strong effect on EB morphology and the expression of midbrain markers. Late exposure to DA resulted in a modest increase in TH+ neuron clusters (∼75%). The increase caused by DA did not occur in the presence of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), suggesting that DA acts through the cAMP pathway. However, a D2-antagonist (L741) decreased TH+ cluster counts. Electrophysiological parameters of the postmitotic neurons were not significantly affected by late DA treatment (Stages 4–5). The mRNA of mature neurons (VGLUT1 and GAD1) and the midbrain markers (GIRK2, LMX1A, and MSX1) were lower in hESCs treated by DA or a D2-antagonist. When hESCs were neurodifferentiated on PA6 stromal cells, DA also

  8. Deorphanization and characterization of human olfactory receptors in heterologous cells.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Pierre; Veithen, Alex; Wilkin, Françoise; Philippeau, Magali

    2014-11-01

    Olfaction plays an indispensable role in human and animals in self and environmental recognition, as well as intra- and interspecific communication. Following the discovery of a family of olfactory receptors (ORs) by Buck and Axel in 1991, it has been established that the sense of smell begins with the molecular recognition of a chemical odorant by one or more ORs expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons. Therefore, characterization of the molecular interactions between odorant molecules and ORs is a key step in the elucidation of the general properties of the olfactory system and in the development of applications, i.e., design of new odorants, search for blockers, etc. The process putted in place at ChemCom to improve the expression of ORs at the cytoplasmic membrane of the HEK293 cell and assays enabling large-scale deorphanization, and to characterize the interaction between chemical odorants and ORs is described. The family of human ORs includes ca. 400 putatively functional ORs which are GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors); to date over 100 human ORs have been deorphanized. PMID:25408322

  9. Recombinant human betacellulin. Molecular structure, biological activities, and receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Shintani, A; Nakata, M; Shing, Y; Folkman, J; Igarashi, K; Sasada, R

    1994-04-01

    Soluble forms of human betacellulin (BTC) were purified to homogeneity from the conditioned medium of mouse A9 cells transfected with the BTC precursor cDNA. Three types of soluble BTC, designated BTC-1a, BTC-1b and BTC-2, were resolved by cation-exchange and size-exclusion column chromatography. Physicochemical analysis has revealed that BTC-1a represents the glycosylated, intact molecule composed of 80 amino acid residues (Asp32 to Tyr111 of the precursor molecule). BTC-1b appears to be a truncated molecule lacking 12 amino acid residues from the amino terminus of BTC-1a. BTC-2 was found to be a 50-amino acid molecule (Arg62 to Tyr111) that corresponds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) structural unit. The biological activities of these BTC molecules were essentially identical as judged by their mitogenicity on Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts. BTC and EGF were equipotent in stimulating Balb/c 3T3 cell proliferation and rat mesangial cell Ca2+ mobilization as well as in inhibiting the growth of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. BTC and EGF antagonized each other with similar dose dependence for binding to A431 cells, indicating that these factors bind the same receptor molecules with equivalent avidity. The Kd value of EGF receptor (EGFR) and BTC is 0.5 nM as determined on Balb/c 3T3 cells. In addition, human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-453 cells, which express multiple members of the EGFR family, were found to possess 2.7 x 10(3) BTC binding sites/cell, and the binding was readily quenched by EGF. These results suggest that the primary receptor for BTC is EGFR. PMID:8144591

  10. Steroid specificity of the human sperm membrane progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Alexander, N J; Kim, H K; Blye, R R; Blackmore, P F

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of several abeopregnane, steroidal heterocycles (A/B-transandrostano [2,3-d]isoxazole, and 17-spiroandrostano[2,3-c]furazan), and 6 alpha, 11 beta, 16 alpha-trisubstituted 19-norpregnadienedione on the influx of extracellular Ca2+ in human sperm. These steroidal compounds had minimal genomic progestational, androgenic, or estrogenic activity with the exception of 16 alpha-ethyl-6 alpha-methyl-11 beta-(4-N,N-dimethylaminophenyl)-19- norpregna-4,9-diene-3,20-dione which was four times more progestational than progesterone. Some of the steroidal compounds, e.g., 16 alpha-ethyl-6 alpha-methyl-11 beta-(4-N,N-dimethylaminophenyl)-19-nor- pregna-4,9-diene-3,20-dione and 2',3',4',5'-tetrahydrospiro[furan-2' beta, 17-androstano] [2,3-c]furazan produced an influx of Ca2+ into human spermatozoa. These studies indicate that high (10 microM) concentrations of certain steroidal compounds are selective for the sperm membrane progesterone receptor, since most of them have minimal genomic activity. The steroidal compounds that elicited an influx of Ca2+ caused an initial high influx but were not as potent as progesterone, since no effects were observed below 1 microM, whereas progesterone at 1 microM produced a maximum effect. Progesterone as well as the steroidal compounds caused a modest increase in the number of acrosome-reacted spermatozoa. Molecular modeling revealed that 5 alpha-dihydro-2,3-fused and 4,4-dimethyl-5-ene-2,3-fused steroidal heterocycles possessing different conformations compared to that of progesterone are responsible for elevation of Ca2+. In conclusion, a unique non-genomic progesterone receptor is present on human spermatozoa and several steroidal compounds that do not have progestational effects may activate this sperm membrane receptor, resulting in Ca2+ influx. PMID:8852828

  11. Biotinylated recombinant human erythropoietins: Bioactivity and utility as receptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Wojchowski, D.M.; Caslake, L. )

    1989-08-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin labeled covalently with biotin at sialic acid moieties has been prepared, and has been shown to possess high biological activity plus utility as a receptor ligand. Initially, the effects on biological activity of covalently attaching biotin to erythropoietin alternatively at carboxylate, amino, or sialic acid groups were compared. Biotinylation of erythropoietin at carboxylate groups using biotin-amidocaproyl hydrazide plus 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide led to substantial biological inactivation, although biotinylated molecules retained detectable activity when prepared at low stoichiometries. Biotinylation at amino groups using sulfosuccinimidyl 6-(biotinamido) hexanoate resulted in a high level of biological inactivation with little, if any, retention of biological activity, regardless of labeling stoichiometries. Biotinylation at sialic acid moieties using periodate and biotinamidocaproyl hydrazide proceeded efficiently (greater than 95% and 80% labeling efficiencies for human urinary and recombinant erythropoietin, respectively) and yielded stably biotinylated erythropoietin molecules possessing comparably high biological activity (ie, 45% of the activity of unmodified hormone). Utility of recombinant biotin-(sialyl)-erythropoietin (in combination with 125I-streptavidin) in the assay of cell surface receptors was demonstrated using two distinct murine erythroleukemia cell lines, Friend 745 and Rauscher Red 1. The densities and affinities of specific hormone binding sites were 116 +/- 4 sites, 3.3 +/- 0.4 nmol/L kd and 164 +/- 5 sites, 2.7 +/- 0.4 nmol/L kd, respectively. It is predicted that the present development of biotin-(sialyl)-erythropoietin as a chemically and biologically stable, bioactive ligand will assist in advancing an understanding of the regulated expression and physicochemistry of the human and murine erythropoietin receptors.

  12. Liver X Receptor (LXR) Regulates Human Adipocyte Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Stenson, Britta M.; Rydén, Mikael; Venteclef, Nicolas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Pettersson, Annie M. L.; Mairal, Aline; Åström, Gaby; Blomqvist, Lennart; Wang, Victoria; Jocken, Johan W. E.; Clément, Karine; Langin, Dominique; Arner, Peter; Laurencikiene, Jurga

    2011-01-01

    The Liver X receptor (LXR) is an important regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in humans and mice. We have recently shown that activation of LXR regulates cellular fuel utilization in adipocytes. In contrast, the role of LXR in human adipocyte lipolysis, the major function of human white fat cells, is not clear. In the present study, we stimulated in vitro differentiated human and murine adipocytes with the LXR agonist GW3965 and observed an increase in basal lipolysis. Microarray analysis of human adipocyte mRNA following LXR activation revealed an altered gene expression of several lipolysis-regulating proteins, which was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. We show that expression and intracellular localization of perilipin1 (PLIN1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are affected by GW3965. Although LXR activation does not influence phosphorylation status of HSL, HSL activity is required for the lipolytic effect of GW3965. This effect is abolished by PLIN1 knockdown. In addition, we demonstrate that upon activation, LXR binds to the proximal regions of the PLIN1 and HSL promoters. By selective knock-down of either LXR isoform, we show that LXRα is the major isoform mediating the lipolysis-related effects of LXR. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that activation of LXRα up-regulates basal human adipocyte lipolysis. This is at least partially mediated through LXR binding to the PLIN1 promoter and down-regulation of PLIN1 expression. PMID:21030586

  13. Liver X receptor (LXR) regulates human adipocyte lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Britta M; Rydén, Mikael; Venteclef, Nicolas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Pettersson, Annie M L; Mairal, Aline; Aström, Gaby; Blomqvist, Lennart; Wang, Victoria; Jocken, Johan W E; Clément, Karine; Langin, Dominique; Arner, Peter; Laurencikiene, Jurga

    2011-01-01

    The Liver X receptor (LXR) is an important regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in humans and mice. We have recently shown that activation of LXR regulates cellular fuel utilization in adipocytes. In contrast, the role of LXR in human adipocyte lipolysis, the major function of human white fat cells, is not clear. In the present study, we stimulated in vitro differentiated human and murine adipocytes with the LXR agonist GW3965 and observed an increase in basal lipolysis. Microarray analysis of human adipocyte mRNA following LXR activation revealed an altered gene expression of several lipolysis-regulating proteins, which was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. We show that expression and intracellular localization of perilipin1 (PLIN1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are affected by GW3965. Although LXR activation does not influence phosphorylation status of HSL, HSL activity is required for the lipolytic effect of GW3965. This effect is abolished by PLIN1 knockdown. In addition, we demonstrate that upon activation, LXR binds to the proximal regions of the PLIN1 and HSL promoters. By selective knock-down of either LXR isoform, we show that LXRα is the major isoform mediating the lipolysis-related effects of LXR. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that activation of LXRα up-regulates basal human adipocyte lipolysis. This is at least partially mediated through LXR binding to the PLIN1 promoter and down-regulation of PLIN1 expression. PMID:21030586

  14. Human antibody-Fc receptor interactions illuminated by crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Burton, Dennis R

    2004-02-01

    Immunoglobulins couple the recognition of invading pathogens with the triggering of potent effector mechanisms for pathogen elimination. Different immunoglobulin classes trigger different effector mechanisms through interaction of immunoglobulin Fc regions with specific Fc receptors (FcRs) on immune cells. Here, we review the structural information that is emerging on three human immunoglobulin classes and their FcRs. New insights are provided, including an understanding of the antibody conformational adjustments that are required to bring effector cell and target cell membranes sufficiently close for efficient killing and signal transduction to occur. The results might also open up new possibilities for the design of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:15040582

  15. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay
    Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. Wilson
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  16. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY.
    MC Cardon, PC Hartig,LE Gray, Jr. and VS Wilson.
    U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Typically, in vitro hazard assessments for ...

  17. Results With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Terms of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and Human Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Curcio, Lisa D.; Khanijou, Rajesh K.; Eisner, Martin E.; Kakkis, Jane L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Mesa, Albert V.; Macedo, Jorge C.; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To report our results with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in terms of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) status. Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and June 2009, 209 women with early-stage breast carcinomas were treated with APBI using multicatheter, MammoSite, or Contura brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5-7 days. Three patient groups were defined by receptor status: Group 1: ER or PR (+) and HER-2/neu (-) (n = 180), Group 2: ER and PR (-) and HER-2/neu (+) (n = 10), and Group 3: ER, PR, and HER-2/neu (-) (triple negative breast cancer, n = 19). Median follow-up was 22 months. Results: Group 3 patients had significantly higher Scarff-Bloom-Richardson scores (p < 0.001). The 3-year ipsilateral breast tumor control rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 99%, 100%, and 100%, respectively (p = 0.15). Group 3 patients tended to experience relapse in distant sites earlier than did non-Group 3 patients. The 3-year relapse-free survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 81%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 3-year cause-specific and overall survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 89%, respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Triple negative breast cancer patients typically have high-grade tumors with significantly worse relapse-free, cause-specific, and overall survival. Longer follow-up will help to determine whether these patients also have a higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor relapse.

  18. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  19. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  20. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, S.M.; Weaver, D.R.; Rivkees, S.A.; Stopa, E.G.

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T; van der Horst, Geertje; Hemmer, Daniëlle M; Marijt, Koen A; Hwang, Ming S; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M; Meijer, Onno C; Culig, Zoran; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of the GR in docetaxel-resistant PCa in order to improve the current PCa therapies. GR expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of primary PCa specimens from chemonaive and docetaxel-treated patients, and in cultured PCa cell lines with an acquired docetaxel resistance (PC3-DR, DU145-DR, and 22Rv1-DR). We found a robust overexpression of the GR in primary PCa from docetaxel-treated patients and enhanced GR levels in cultured docetaxel-resistant human PCa cells, indicating a key role of the GR in docetaxel resistance. The capability of the GR antagonists (RU-486 and cyproterone acetate) to revert docetaxel resistance was investigated and revealed significant resensitization of docetaxel-resistant PCa cells for docetaxel treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in which a complete restoration of docetaxel sensitivity was achieved in both androgen receptor (AR)-negative and AR-positive cell lines. Mechanistically, we demonstrated down-regulation of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 upon GR antagonism, thereby defining potential treatment targets. In conclusion, we describe the involvement of the GR in the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in human PCa. Therapeutic targeting of the GR effectively resensitizes docetaxel-resistant PCa cells. These findings warrant further investigation of the clinical utility of the GR antagonists in the management of patients with advanced and docetaxel-resistant PCa. PMID:26483423

  2. Prostacyclin receptor/thromboxane receptor interactions and cellular responses in human atherothrombotic disease.

    PubMed

    Gleim, Scott; Kasza, Zsolt; Martin, Kathleen; Hwa, John

    2009-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since Vane and colleagues proposed a prostacyclin and thromboxane balance as critical to cardiovascular homeostasis. Prostacyclin prevents platelet aggregation and promotes vasodilatation, opposing the effects of thromboxane. Possible compensation by redundant functions, such as nitric oxide, long prevented appreciation of this balance. Effective use of low-dose aspirin in the secondary prevention of atherothrombosis suggested a clinical importance for the balance. However, it was not until the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib was withdrawn because of increased cardiovascular events that this critical balance was confirmed in humans. Moreover, clinical observations are supported by elegant animal receptor knockout experiments and subsequent human genetic variant studies. Combined, these findings provide valuable insight into the roles of these prostanoids in the development of atherothrombosis, emphasizing the need to reevaluate the use of selective prostacyclin- and thromboxane-based therapies in cardiovascular disease. PMID:19361355

  3. Insensitivity of Human Prolactin Receptors to Nonhuman Prolactins: Relevance for Experimental Modeling of Prolactin Receptor-Expressing Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Utama, Fransiscus E.; Tran, Thai H.; Ryder, Amy; LeBaron, Matthew J.; Parlow, Albert F.; Rui, Hallgeir

    2009-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) receptors are expressed in a broad range of human cell types and in a majority of human breast and prostate cancers. Experimentally, normal and malignant human cells are typically cultured in vitro in media containing bovine PRL (bPRL) from fetal bovine serum or as xenotransplants in vivo in the presence of murine PRL (mPRL). The biological efficacy of bPRL toward hPRL receptors (hPRLR) is controversial, and hPRLR are insensitive to mPRL, but the mechanism is not known. To clarify limitations of current in vitro and in vivo experimental model systems for studies of hPRLR-expressing cells, we tested human and relevant subprimate prolactins in multiple hPRLR bioassays. bPRL and ovine PRL were 10-fold less potent hPRLR agonists than hPRL, although maximal responses at high ligand concentrations (efficacies) equaled that of hPRL. mPRL and rat PRL had greater than 50-fold lower potencies toward hPRLR than hPRL and had 50% reduced efficacies. In fact, mPRL and rat PRL were less effective hPRLR agonists than murine GH. Unexpectedly, mPRL was an effective competitive inhibitor of hPRL binding to hPRLR with an inhibitory constant of 1.3 nm and showed partial antagonist activity, suggesting reduced site-2 binding. Collectively, low bioactivities of bPRL and mPRL toward hPRLR suggest that existing laboratory cancer cell lines grown in 10% bovine serum-supplemented media or in mice are selected for growth under lactogen-depleted conditions. The biology and drug responsiveness of existing human cell lines may therefore not be representative of clinical cancers that are sensitive to circulating PRL. PMID:19022890

  4. Expression of histamine H4 receptor in human epidermal tissues and attenuation of experimental pruritus using H4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Katsunori; Oda, Manabu; Suwa, Eriko; Suzuki, Masahiko; Sato, Hiromi; Ueno, Koichi

    2009-10-01

    Many medicines exist which can cause pruritus (itching) as "serious adverse events." Many severe pruritic conditions respond poorly to histamine H1 receptor antagonists; there is no generally accepted antipruritic treatment. Recently described histamine H4 receptors are expressed in haematopoietic cells and have been linked to the pathology of allergy and asthma. We previously reported their expression in human dermal fibroblasts; in this study we have investigated H4 receptor expression in human epidermal tissue and found it to be greater in keratinocytes in the epidermal upper layer than in the lower layer. We have also investigated the effect of histamine H4 receptor antagonists on histamine H1 receptor antagonist-resistant pruritus using a mouse model. Scratching behavior was induced by histamine (300 nmol) or substance P (100 nmol) injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back of each mouse. Fexofenadine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, reduced scratching induced by histamine but not by substance P, whereas JNJ7777120, a histamine H4 receptor antagonist, significantly reduced both histamine- and substance P-induced scratching. These results suggest that H4 receptor antagonists may be useful for treatment of H1 receptor antagonist-resistant pruritus. PMID:19652466

  5. Endothelin B receptors on human endothelial and smooth-muscle cells show equivalent binding pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M A; Haleen, S J; Welch, K M; Cheng, X M; Reynolds, E E

    1998-07-01

    We have described the pharmacologic profiles of endothelin B receptors in human endothelial cells and vascular and nonvascular smooth-muscle cells. First, by amplifying endothelin B receptor numbers through the use of phosphoramidon and intact cell-binding techniques, we demonstrated the presence of these receptors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (100% endothelin B receptors), human aortic smooth-muscle cells (22% endothelin B, 78% endothelin A receptors), and human bronchial smooth-muscle cells (55% endothelin B, 45% endothelin A receptors) by using [125I]-endothelin-1 radioligand binding. The typical binding profiles of the endothelin B receptors were established through competition binding curve analysis with endothelin-1, endothelin-3, sarafotoxin 6c, and the endothelin A receptor-selective antagonist BQ-123. In the presence of BQ-123, a diverse group of antagonists, including PD 142893, BQ-788, SB 209670, and Ro 47-0203, were used to probe for binding differences indicative of multiple endothelin B-receptor subtypes. The results indicate a rank order of potency for the antagonists of BQ-788 > SB 209670 > PD 142893 > Ro 47-0203 for each cell line, and that between any of these human cell lines, measurements of [125I]-endothelin-1-binding antagonism for each of the four test compounds differed by less than twofold. Although this study cannot discount the possibility of more than one endothelin B-receptor subtype in humans, it does indicate that these tissues express receptors that show equivalent binding pharmacology. PMID:9676729

  6. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  7. Inactivation of the human vitamin D receptor by caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Peter J; Feldman, David

    2009-02-01

    Calcitriol actions are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a nuclear transcription factor of the steroid-retinoid-thyroid nuclear receptor gene superfamily. Calcitriol inhibits the growth of many cells including cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest. In some cancer cell lines, calcitriol also induces apoptosis. In the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, induction of apoptosis and caspase-3/7 activities by staurosporine (STS) abolished [(3)H]1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D(3) binding and VDR protein, suggesting that the VDR may be targeted for inactivation by caspases during apoptosis. A potential caspase-3 site (D(195)MMD(198)S) was identified in the human VDR ligand-binding domain. Mutations D195A, D198A, and S199A were generated in the putative capase-3 cleavage site. In transfected COS-7 cells, STS treatment resulted in the cleavage of the wild-type (WT) VDR and S199A mutant VDR but not the D195A or D198A mutants. In in vitro assays, the WT VDR and S199A mutant VDR were cleaved by caspase-3, although the D195A and D198A mutants were resistant to caspase-3. In vitro, the WT VDR was also cleaved by caspase-6 and caspase-7 and in extracts of STS-treated LNCaP cells. In STS-treated LNCaP cells and human skin fibroblasts, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 protected the VDR caspase cleavage fragment from further degradation by the 26S proteasome. The rat VDR that does not contain the caspase-3 cleavage site was not cleaved in STS-treated COS-7 cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the human VDR is a target of caspase-3 and suggest that activation of caspase-3 may limit VDR activity. PMID:18832097

  8. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain. PMID:26636753

  9. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Maria H; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2014-03-01

    Human OX1 orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX1, OX2 and CB1 receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP(2) green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB1 receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP(2) to CB1 produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX1-OX2 interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB1 receptors, dimerization could be an effective way of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations available for cannabinoid receptors. PMID:24530395

  10. Functional characterization of the in vitro folded human y(1) receptor in lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, S; Lindner, D; Schmidt, P; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Huster, D; Rudolph, R

    2010-05-01

    We describe the recombinant production of the human Y(1) receptor from inclusion bodies of E. coli cultures. The in vitro refolding was carried out in the presence of lipids from bovine brain extracts. Y(1) receptors in brain lipids compete for cellular receptors in competitive binding experiments. PMID:19689227

  11. Human natural killer cells: origin, receptors, function, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Del Zotto, Genny; Moretta, Francesca; Merli, Pietro; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors playing a relevant role in innate immunity, primarily in tumor surveillance and in defenses against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA class I molecules through surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A) that inhibit NK cell function and kill target cells that have lost (or underexpress) HLA class I molecules as it occurs in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell activation is mediated by an array of activating receptors and co-receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. In vivo anti-tumor NK cell activity may be suppressed by tumor or tumor-associated cells. Alloreactive NK cells (i.e. those that are not inhibited by the HLA class I alleles of the patient) derived from HSC of haploidentical donors play a major role in the cure of high-risk leukemia, by killing leukemia blasts and patient's DC, thus preventing tumor relapses and graft-versus-host disease. The expression of the HLA-C2-specific activating KIR2DS1 may also contribute to NK alloreactivity in patients expressing C2 alleles. A clear correlation has been proven between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Recently, haplo-HSCT has been further improved with the direct infusion, together with HSC, of donor-derived, mature alloreactive NK cells and TCRγδ(+) T cells - both contributing to a prompt anti-leukemia effect together with an efficient defense against pathogens during the 6- to 8-week interval required for the generation of alloreactive NK cells from HSC. PMID:25323661

  12. Thermostabilization of the Human Endothelin Type B Receptor.

    PubMed

    Okuta, Akiko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Nishimura, Shoko; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Doi, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone endothelin, produced by the vascular endothelium, is involved in several physiological functions, including maintenance of vascular tone and humoral homeostasis. Endothelin transmits signals through the endothelin receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor. Structural studies of the endothelin type B receptor (ETBR) have been unsuccessful due to its structural flexibility and instability in detergent-solubilized solution. To overcome these problems, we explored thermostabilization of human ETBR by establishing an ETBR expression system in Escherichia coli, followed by systematic alanine scanning mutagenesis. Among 297 point mutations, 11 thermostabilizing residues were selected and further mutated to other amino acids. The thermostability indices of these residues, represented by the ratios of endothelin-1 (ET-1) binding activities with or without heat treatment at 27°C for 30min in a ligand-free form, were compared. The ligand affinity and apparent melting temperature (Tm) of the five most thermostable mutants, R124Y, D154A, K270A, S342A, and I381A, were then examined. The apparent Tm of three single mutants, R124Y, D154A, and K270A, was approximately 7°C higher than that of the wild type. The apparent Tm value of a combination of the five residues, named the Y5 ETBR mutant, was 17°C higher than that of the wild type. The Y5 ETBR mutant exhibited an affinity for ET-1 and activated Gq similar to the wild type. Further investigation of the pharmacological properties affected by combinatorial mutations of ET-1, ET-3, TxET-1, and K8794 suggested that Y5 ETBR is highly suitable for representing a ligand-free form of ETBR and is potentially applicable for studying an ET-1-bound form. PMID:27038509

  13. Structural Determinants Underlying Constitutive Dimerization of Unoccupied Human Follitropin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Rongbin; Wu, Xueqing; Feng, Xiuyan; Zhang, Meilin; Hébert, Terence E.; Segaloff, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    The human follitropin receptor (hFSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) central to reproductive physiology that is composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) fused to a serpentine region. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in living cells, we show that hFSHR dimers form constitutively during their biosynthesis. Mutations in TM1 and TM4 had no effect on hFSHR dimerization, alone or when combined with mutation of Tyr110 in the ECD, a residue predicted to mediate dimerization of the soluble hormone-binding portion of the ECD complexed with FSH (Q. Fan and W. Hendrickson, Nature 433:269–277, 2005). Expressed individually, the serpentine region and a membrane-anchored form of the hFSHR ECD each exhibited homodimerization, suggesting that both domains contribute to dimerization of the full-length receptor. However, even in the context of only the membrane-anchored ECD, mutation of Tyr110 to alanine did not inhibit dimerization. The full-length hFSHR and the membrane-anchored ECD were then each engineered to introduce a consensus site for N-linked glycosylation at residue 110. Despite experimental validation of the presence of carbohydrate on residue 110, we failed to observe disruption of dimerization of either the full-length hFSHR or membrane-anchored ECD containing the inserted glycan wedge. Taken altogether, our data suggest that both the serpentine region and the ECD contribute to hFSHR dimerization and that the dimerization interface of the unoccupied hFSHR does not involve Tyr110 of the ECD. PMID:19800402

  14. Functional associations among G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The activity of neurons is controlled by groups of neurotransmitter receptors rather than by individual receptors. Experimental studies have investigated some receptor interactions, but currently little information is available about transcriptional associations among receptors at the whole-brain level. Results A total of 4950 correlations between 100 G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors were examined across 169 brain regions in the human brain using expression data published in the Allen Human Brain Atlas. A large number of highly significant correlations were found, many of which have not been investigated in hypothesis-driven studies. The highest positive and negative correlations of each receptor are reported, which can facilitate the construction of receptor sets likely to be affected by altered transcription of one receptor (such sets always exist, but their members are difficult to predict). A graph analysis isolated two large receptor communities, within each of which receptor mRNA levels were strongly cross-correlated. Conclusions The presented systematic analysis shows that the mRNA levels of many G protein-coupled receptors are interdependent. This finding is not unexpected, since the brain is a highly integrated complex system. However, the analysis also revealed two novel properties of global brain structure. First, receptor correlations are described by a simple statistical distribution, which suggests that receptor interactions may be guided by qualitatively similar processes. Second, receptors appear to form two large functional communities, which might be differentially affected in brain disorders. PMID:24438157

  15. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 Expression in Human Cerebral Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rupal I.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Castellani, Rudy J.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In animal models of stroke, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), a member of the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter gene family, is transcriptionally upregulated in neural and vascular cells in which it plays a leading role in edema formation and necrotic cell death. To date, expression of Sur1 in the brains of humans with cerebral infarcts has not been systematically evaluated. We examined Sur1 expression in postmortem specimens obtained from 13 patients within the first 31 days after focal infarcts, 5 patients with lacunar infarcts, and 6 normal control brains using immunohistochemistry. Elevated immunoreactivity for Sur1 was detected in all cases of focal infarcts, with 3 distinct temporal patterns of expression: 1) neurons and endothelium showed the greatest elevation during the first week, after which levels declined; 2) astrocytes and microglia/macrophages showed progressive increases during the first 31 days; and 3) neutrophils near the infarct showed prominent immunoreactivity that did not change over time. Upregulation of Sur1 was corroborated using in situ hybridization for Abcc8 mRNA. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 immunoreactivity in lacunar infarcts was less prominent and more sporadic than in nonlacunar infarcts. In conjunction with previous studies, these data suggest that Sur1 may be a promising treatment target in patients with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:23965746

  16. Functions of NOD-Like Receptors in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yifei; Kinio, Anna; Saleh, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are highly conserved cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that perform critical functions in surveying the intracellular environment for the presence of infection, noxious substances, and metabolic perturbations. Sensing of these danger signals by NLRs leads to their oligomerization into large macromolecular scaffolds and the rapid deployment of effector signaling cascades to restore homeostasis. While some NLRs operate by recruiting and activating inflammatory caspases into inflammasomes, others trigger inflammation via alternative routes including the nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and regulatory factor pathways. The critical role of NLRs in development and physiology is demonstrated by their clear implications in human diseases. Mutations in the genes encoding NLRP3 or NLRP12 lead to hereditary periodic fever syndromes, while mutations in CARD15 that encodes NOD2 are linked to Crohn’s disease or Blau’s syndrome. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a number of risk alleles encompassing NLR genes in a host of diseases including allergic rhinitis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, multi-bacillary leprosy, vitiligo, early-onset menopause, and bone density loss in elderly women. Animal models have allowed the characterization of underlying effector mechanisms in a number of cases. In this review, we highlight the functions of NLRs in health and disease and discuss how the characterization of their molecular mechanisms provides new insights into therapeutic strategies for the management of inflammatory pathologies. PMID:24137163

  17. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 expression in human cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rupal I; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Castellani, Rudy J; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2013-09-01

    In animal models of stroke, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), a member of the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter gene family, is transcriptionally upregulated in neural and vascular cells in which it plays a leading role in edema formation and necrotic cell death. To date, expression of Sur1 in the brains of humans with cerebral infarcts has not been systematically evaluated. We examined Sur1 expression in postmortem specimens obtained from 13 patients within the first 31 days after focal infarcts, 5 patients with lacunar infarcts, and 6 normal control brains using immunohistochemistry. Elevated immunoreactivity for Sur1 was detected in all cases of focal infarcts, with 3 distinct temporal patterns of expression: 1) neurons and endothelium showed the greatest elevation during the first week, after which levels declined; 2) astrocytes and microglia/macrophages showed progressive increases during the first 31 days; and 3) neutrophils near the infarct showed prominent immunoreactivity that did not change over time. Upregulation of Sur1 was corroborated using in situ hybridization for Abcc8 mRNA. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 immunoreactivity in lacunar infarcts was less prominent and more sporadic than in nonlacunar infarcts. In conjunction with previous studies, these data suggest that Sur1 may be a promising treatment target in patients with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:23965746

  18. Internalization and molecular interactions of human CD21 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Jacques; Cuvillier, Armelle; Glaudet, Florence; Khamlichi, Ahmed Amine

    2007-03-01

    The human CD21 is a receptor for cleavage fragments of the third complement component and for Epstein-Barr virus. Previous mutational studies showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD21 is absolutely required for internalization of either ligand. With the exception of CD19, CD81, Leu-13 and CD35 that can form a complex with CD21 at the cell surface, no other partner that interacts with the hCD21 transmembrane or the cytoplasmic domain was identified. We investigated the internalization capacity of hCD21 tail mutants in the absence of B cell receptor cross-linking by using stable murine B cell transfectants. We provide evidence that at least two internalization motifs are activated when hCD21 binds a monoclonal antibody. In order to identify the cellular proteins that interact with the hCD21 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, we combined a mutational mapping with a two-hybrid system approach both in yeast and in mammalian cells. We identified four novel partners that are involved in intracellular trafficking, sorting or cytoskeleton remodeling and we mapped the hCD21 transmembrane and tail subdomains they interact with. We discuss the potential physiological significance of these findings in the context of hCD21 internalization and intracellular trafficking. PMID:17118449

  19. Evidence for the presence of a protease-activated receptor distinct from the thrombin receptor in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, R J; Derian, C K; Darrow, A L; Tomko, K A; Eckardt, A J; Seiberg, M; Scarborough, R M; Andrade-Gordon, P

    1995-01-01

    Thrombin receptor activation was explored in human epidermal keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts, cells that are actively involved in skin tissue repair. The effects of thrombin, trypsin, and the receptor agonist peptides SFLLRN and TFRIFD were assessed in inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization studies. Thrombin and SFLLRN stimulated fibroblasts in both assays to a similar extent, whereas TFRIFD was less potent. Trypsin demonstrated weak efficacy in these assays in comparison with thrombin. Results in fibroblasts were consistent with human platelet thrombin receptor activation. Keratinocytes, however, exhibited a distinct profile, with trypsin being a far better activator of inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization than thrombin. Furthermore, SFLLRN was more efficacious than thrombin, whereas no response was observed with TFRIFD. Since our data indicated that keratinocytes possess a trypsin-sensitive receptor, we addressed the possibility that these cells express the human homologue of the newly described murine protease-activated receptor, PAR-2 [Nystedt, S., Emilsson, K., Wahlestedt, C. & Sundelin, J. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 9208-9212]. PAR-2 is activated by nanomolar concentrations of trypsin and possesses the tethered ligand sequence SLIGRL. SLIGRL was found to be equipotent with SFLLRN in activating keratinocyte inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization. Desensitization studies indicated that SFLLRN, SLIGRL, and trypsin activate a common receptor, PAR-2. Northern blot analyses detected a transcript of PAR-2 in total RNA from keratinocytes but not fibroblasts. Levels of thrombin receptor message were equivalent in the two cell types. Our results indicate that human keratinocytes possess PAR-2, suggesting a potential role for this receptor in tissue repair and/or skin-related disorders. Images Fig. 6 PMID:7568091

  20. IL-6 functions in cynomolgus monkeys blocked by a humanized antibody to human IL-6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Imazeki, I; Saito, H; Hasegawa, M; Shinkura, H; Kishimoto, T; Ohsugi, Y

    1998-07-01

    A humanized antibody to the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R), hPM-1, blocked the interleukin-6 (IL-6) functions in normal cynomolgus monkey lymphocytes in vitro. The binding activity of hPM-1 to non-human primate IL-6R was examined in peripheral blood lymphocytes by flow cytometry. PM-1 recognized the IL-6R on T lymphocytes of cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys, but did not on those of marmosets. The homology between human IL-6R and its cynomolgus monkey counterpart was 97.3% in the extracellular domain of the amino acid sequence, as determined by DNA sequencing of the PCR product from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PM-1 inhibited two functional parameters in vitro in cynomolgus monkeys: (1), T-cell proliferation stimulated by phytohemaglutinin and human IL-6; (2), Immunoglobulin G-production evoked by Staphylococcus aureus Cowan-1- and human IL-6-stimulated B lymphocytes. These data show that hPM-1 binds to and functionally blocks the cynomolgus monkey IL-6 receptors. PMID:9756130

  1. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Katrine; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W.; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Robinson, Carol V.; Olsen, Johan G.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2016-01-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small-angle X-ray scattering, native mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Along with previously published data, these are integrated by molecular modelling to generate a full receptor structure. The result provides the first full view of a class I cytokine receptor, exemplifying the architecture of more than 40 different receptor chains, and reveals that the extracellular domain is merely the tip of a molecular iceberg. PMID:27174498

  2. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, Katrine; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W.; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Robinson, Carol V.; Olsen, Johan G.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2016-05-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small-angle X-ray scattering, native mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Along with previously published data, these are integrated by molecular modelling to generate a full receptor structure. The result provides the first full view of a class I cytokine receptor, exemplifying the architecture of more than 40 different receptor chains, and reveals that the extracellular domain is merely the tip of a molecular iceberg.

  3. Identification of microsatellite markers linked to the human leptin receptor gene on chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, J.D.; Friedman, J.M.; Stoffel, M.

    1996-08-15

    This report describes the localization of the human leptin receptor gene to human chromosome 1 using polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrids. Leptin is a secreted protein important in the regulation of body weight. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking of Human Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the defense against viral infections and tumor development. NK cell function is primarily regulated by the sum of signals from a broad array of activation and inhibitory receptors. Key to generating the input level of either activating or inhibitory signals is the maintenance of receptor expression levels on the cell surface. Although the mechanisms of endocytosis and trafficking for some cell surface receptors, such as transferrin receptor, and certain immune receptors, are very well known, that is not the situation for receptors expressed by NK cells. Recent studies have uncovered that endocytosis and trafficking routes characteristic for specific activation and inhibitory receptors can regulate the functional responses of NK cells. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of receptor endocytosis and trafficking, and integrate this with our current understanding of NK cell receptor trafficking. PMID:19719476

  5. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  6. Assessment of dopamine receptor densities in the human brain with carbon-11-labeled N-methylspiperone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstroem, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1984-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon-11-labeled 3-N-methylspiperone, a ligand that preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and, for the first time, in a human. The method has now been used in 58 humans for noninvasive assessment of the state of brain dopamine receptors under normal and pathological conditions.

  7. Sequence variation in the human T-cell receptor loci.

    PubMed

    Mackelprang, Rachel; Carlson, Christopher S; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Livingston, Robert J; Eberle, Michael A; Nickerson, Deborah A

    2002-12-01

    Identifying common sequence variations known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human populations is one of the current objectives of the human genome project. Nearly 3 million SNPs have been identified. Analysis of the relative allele frequency of these markers in human populations and the genetic associations between these markers, known as linkage disequilibrium, is now underway to generate a high-density genetic map. Because of the central role T cells play in immune reactivity, the T-cell receptor (TCR) loci have long been considered important candidates for common disease susceptibility within the immune system (e.g., asthma, atopy and autoimmunity). Over the past two decades, hundreds of SNPs in the TCR loci have been identified. Most studies have focused on defining SNPs in the variable gene segments which are involved in antigenic recognition. On average, the coding sequence of each TCR variable gene segment contains two SNPs, with many more found in the 5', 3' and intronic sequences of these segments. Therefore, a potentially large repertoire of functional variants exists in these loci. Association between SNPs (linkage disequilibrium) extends approximately 30 kb in the TCR loci, although a few larger regions of disequilibrium have been identified. Therefore, the SNPs found in one variable gene segment may or may not be associated with SNPs in other surrounding variable gene segments. This suggests that meaningful association studies in the TCR loci will require the analysis and typing of large marker sets to fully evaluate the role of TCR loci in common disease susceptibility in human populations. PMID:12493004

  8. His499 Regulates Dimerization and Prevents Oncogenic Activation by Asparagine Mutations of the Human Thrombopoietin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Emilie; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Sato, Takeshi; Dass, Sharmila; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Shwe, Myat M; Staerk, Judith; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2016-02-01

    Ligand binding to the extracellular domain of the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) imparts a specific orientation on the transmembrane (TM) and intracellular domains of the receptors that is required for physiologic activation via receptor dimerization. To map the inactive and active dimeric orientations of the TM helices, we performed asparagine (Asn)-scanning mutagenesis of the TM domains of the murine and human TpoR. Substitution of Asn at only one position (S505N) activated the human receptor, whereas Asn substitutions at several positions activated the murine receptor. Second site mutational studies indicate that His(499) near the N terminus of the TM domain is responsible for protecting the human receptor from activation by Asn mutations. Structural studies reveal that the sequence preceding His(499) is helical in the murine receptor but non-helical in peptides corresponding to the TM domain of the inactive human receptor. The activating S505N mutation and the small molecule agonist eltrombopag both induce helix in this region of the TM domain and are associated with dimerization and activation of the human receptor. Thus, His(499) regulates the activation of human TpoR and provides additional protection against activating mutations, such as oncogenic Asn mutations in the TM domain. PMID:26627830

  9. Bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human taste receptor for the discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Ahn, Sae Ryun; Kim, Daesan; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Un-Kyung; Simons, Christopher T; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2014-10-28

    The sense of taste helps humans to obtain information and form a picture of the world by recognizing chemicals in their environments. Over the past decade, large advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms of taste detection and mimicking its capability using artificial sensor devices. However, the detection capability of previous artificial taste sensors has been far inferior to that of animal tongues, in terms of its sensitivity and selectivity. Herein, we developed a bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human sweet taste receptors for the detection and discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance, where single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors were functionalized with nanovesicles containing human sweet taste receptors and used to detect the binding of sweeteners to the taste receptors. The receptors are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of human taste receptor type 1 member 2 (hTAS1R2) and human taste receptor type 1 member 3 (hTAS1R3), which have multiple binding sites and allow a human tongue-like broad selectivity for the detection of sweeteners. This nanovesicle-based bioelectronic tongue can be a powerful tool for the detection of sweeteners as an alternative to labor-intensive and time-consuming cell-based assays and the sensory evaluation panels used in the food and beverage industry. Furthermore, this study also allows the artificial sensor to exam the functional activity of dimeric GPCRs. PMID:25126667

  10. Targeting human melanoma neoantigens by T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Leisegang, Matthias; Kammertoens, Thomas; Uckert, Wolfgang; Blankenstein, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In successful cancer immunotherapy, T cell responses appear to be directed toward neoantigens created by somatic mutations; however, direct evidence that neoantigen-specific T cells cause regression of established cancer is lacking. Here, we generated T cells expressing a mutation-specific transgenic T cell receptor (TCR) to target different immunogenic mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) that naturally occur in human melanoma. Two mutant CDK4 isoforms (R24C, R24L) similarly stimulated T cell responses in vitro and were analyzed as therapeutic targets for TCR gene therapy. In a syngeneic HLA-A2-transgenic mouse model of large established tumors, we found that both mutations differed dramatically as targets for TCR-modified T cells in vivo. While T cells expanded efficiently and produced IFN-γ in response to R24L, R24C failed to induce an effective antitumor response. Such differences in neoantigen quality might explain why cancer immunotherapy induces tumor regression in some individuals, while others do not respond, despite similar mutational load. We confirmed the validity of the in vivo model by showing that the melan-A-specific (MART-1-specific) TCR DMF5 induces rejection of tumors expressing analog, but not native, MART-1 epitopes. The described model allows identification of those neoantigens in human cancer that serve as suitable T cell targets and may help to predict clinical efficacy. PMID:26808500

  11. Interleukin-4 receptors on human blood mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zuber, C.E.; Galizzi, J.P.; Harada, N.; Durand, I.; Banchereau, J. )

    1990-09-01

    We have studied regulation of the expression of the interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) on human blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using both 125I-IL-4 binding assay and flow cytometric analysis of biotinylated IL-4 (B-IL-4) binding. PBMC express approximately 300 high-affinity IL-4R per cell (Kd = 25-100 pM). Activation of PBMC for 60-80 hr by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin A (Con A) results in a 2- to 4.5-fold increase of IL-4R number without alteration of IL-4R affinity for IL-4. Binding of B-IL-4 showed that IL-4R expression is upregulated on virtually all PHA-stimulated PBMC, whereas it mostly concerns larger cells among Con A-activated PBMC. Reculture of PHA-blasts with 1 nM IL-4 further upregulates IL-4R expression to a level approximately 10-fold higher than observed on freshly isolated PBMC. Interestingly, IL-4 is able to reinduce high IL-4R levels on cells that have been deprived of IL-4 for 20 hr and IL-2 is almost as efficient. Finally, SDS-PAGE analysis of IL-4-binding molecules on unstimulated, PHA- and PHA/IL-4-activated PBMC revealed the same three peptides of MW 140-130, 80-75, and 70-65 kDa, as shown on human cell lines.

  12. Identification of the mineralocorticoid receptor in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Sticchi, Daniele; Pellati, Donatella; Forzan, Sante; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Massironi, Michele; Calò, Lorenzo; Fassina, Ambrogio; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Armanini, Decio

    2006-10-01

    Aldosterone seems to play a role in the regulation of the electrolyte content of sperm and in the motility of spermatozoa. The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in human ejaculated spermatozoa. We have assayed MR on spermatozoa of freshly ejaculated sperm from healthy donors. The identification of MR was made by using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses, while MR mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR assay. The immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses showed positive staining both in the midpiece and in the tail of the spermatozoa. Relative quantification of MR by using real-time PCR shows that the mRNA expression of MR in spermatozoa is lower than in mononuclear leukocytes (positive controls). Sequencing showed complete identity between the sequence obtained from spermatozoa and the human MR cDNA sequence. Further studies should be performed in order to elucidate a possible physiological role of aldosterone in regulating electrolyte concentration, and the pro-oxidant effect of excess aldosterone in this new target tissue. PMID:16964418

  13. Selective Toll-Like Receptor Expression in Human Fetal Lung

    PubMed Central

    Petrikin, Joshua E; Gaedigk, Roger; Leeder, J Steven; Truog, William E

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical components of the innate immune system, acting as pattern recognition molecules and triggering an inflammatory response. TLR associated gene products are of interest in modulating inflammatory related pulmonary diseases of the neonate. The ontogeny of TLR related genes in human fetal lung has not been previously described and could elucidate additional functions and identify strategies for attenuating the effects of fetal inflammation. We examined the expression of 84 TLR related genes on 23 human fetal lung samples from three groups with estimated ages of 60 (57-59d), 90 (89-91d), and 130 (117-154d) days. Using a false detection rate algorithm, we identified 32 genes displaying developmental regulation with TLR2 having the greatest up-regulation of TLR genes (9.2 fold increase) and TLR4 unchanged. We confirmed the TLR2 up-regulation by examining an additional 133 fetal lung tissue samples with a fluorogenic polymerase chain reaction assay (TaqMan®) and found an exponential best-fit curve over the time studied. The best-fit curve predicts a 6.1 fold increase from 60d to 130d. We conclude that TLR2 is developmentally expressed from the early pseudoglandular stage of lung development to the canalicular stage. PMID:20581745

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of the progesterone receptor from human endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.L.; Satyaswaroop, P.G.

    1985-11-01

    A nude mouse model for the growth of human endometrial carcinoma and hormonal modulation of the progesterone receptor (PR) was established previously. This study describes the effect of 17 beta-estradiol and tamoxifen (TAM) on growth rate and PR concentration in a hormonally responsive human endometrial tumor (EnCa 101) grown in this experimental system and presents the first characterization of human endometrial carcinoma PR. EnCa 101 was transplanted subcutaneously into ovariectomized, BALB/c, nu/nu athymic mice and grown under 17 beta-estradiol-stimulated, TAM-stimulated, and control conditions. Both 17 beta-estradiol and TAM increased the growth rate of EnCa 101 in nude mice, and a parallel increase in the cytosol PR concentration was observed. PR was partially purified by phosphocellulose and DEAE cellulose chromatography, and the DEAE eluate was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and photoaffinity labeling with (17 alpha-methyl-TH)promegestone ((TH)R5020). Two PR-negative tumors (EnCa K and EnCa V) were also examined in parallel. Photolabeling and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of EnCa 101 grown in the presence of 17 beta-estradiol or TAM revealed incorporation of (3H)R5020 into proteins of molecular weight approximately 116,000 and 85,000. Labeled proteins of molecular weight 66,000, 45,000, and 35,000 were also observed. No incorporation of (TH)R5020 was observed in EnCa 101 grown in the absence of estrogen, nor was any observed in EnCa K or EnCa V.

  15. Isolation of human beta-interferon receptor by wheat germ lectin affinity and immunosorbent column chromatographies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.Q.; Fournier, A.; Tan, Y.H.

    1986-06-15

    Radioiodinated human beta-interferon-Ser 17 (Betaseron) was reversibly cross-linked to Daudi cells by dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate). The radioactive ligand was cross-linked to three macromolecules forming labeled complexes of apparent Mr values of 130,000, 220,000, and 320,000. Betaseron, human alpha-interferon, human interleukin 2 but not recombinant human gamma-interferon competed with the labeled ligand for binding to these putative receptor(s). Human leukocyte-produced gamma-interferon competed weakly with /sup 125/I-Betaseron for binding to Daudi cells. The Betaseron-receptor complex(es) was purified by passage through a wheat germ lectin column followed by chromatography on an anti-interferon immunosorbent column and semipreparative gel electrophoresis. The cross-linked ligand-receptor complex was shown to be highly purified by sodium dodecyl sulfate and acetic acid:urea:Triton X-100 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It can be dissociated into the labeled Betaseron (Mr = 17,000) ligand and a receptor moiety which has an apparent molecular weight of 110,000. The chromatographic behavior of the ligand-receptor complex on wheat germ lectin column suggests that the receptor is a glycoprotein. The described procedure yielded about 1 microgram of Betaseron receptor from 10(10) Daudi cells, estimated to contain a maximum of about 15 micrograms of the receptor.

  16. Structural requirements for the interaction of human IgA with the human polymeric Ig receptor.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Melanie J; Pleass, Richard J; Batten, Margaret R; Atkin, Julie D; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-11-15

    Transport of polymeric IgA onto mucosal surfaces to become secretory IgA is mediated by the polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR). To study the interaction of human dimeric IgA (dIgA) (the predominant form of IgA polymer) with the human pIgR (hpIgR), we generated recombinant wild-type dIgA1 and dIgA2m(1) and various mutant dIgA1 and analyzed their interaction with a recombinant human secretory component and membrane-expressed hpIgR. We found that wild-type dIgA1 and dIgA2m(1) bound to recombinant human secretory component with similar affinity and were transcytosed by the hpIgR to the same extent. Mutation of the IgA Calpha2 domain residue Cys311 to Ser reduced binding to hpIgR, possibly through disruption of noncovalent interactions between the Calpha2 domain and domain 5 of the receptor. Within the Calpha3 domain of IgA1, we found that combined mutation of residues Phe411, Val413, and Thr414, which lie close to residues previously implicated in hpIgR binding, abolished interaction with the receptor. Mutation of residue Lys377, located very close to this same region, perturbed receptor interaction. In addition, 4 aa (Pro440-Phe443), which lie on a loop at the domain interface and form part of the binding site for human FcalphaRI, appear to contribute to hpIgR binding. Lastly, use of a monomeric IgA1 mutant lacking the tailpiece revealed that the tailpiece does not occlude hpIgR-binding residues in IgA1 monomers. This directed mutagenesis approach has thus identified motifs lying principally across the upper surface of the Calpha3 domain (i.e., that closest to Calpha2) critical for human pIgR binding and transcytosis. PMID:16272325

  17. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  18. Nicotinic receptors in non-human primates: analysis of genetic and functional conservation with humans

    PubMed Central

    Shorey-Kendrick, Lyndsey E.; Ford, Matthew M.; Allen, Daicia C.; Kuryatov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Jon; Wilhelm, Larry; Grant, Kathleen A.; Spindel, Eliot R.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are highly conserved between humans and non-human primates. Conservation exists at the level of genomic structure, protein structure and epigenetics. Overall homology of nAChRs at the protein level is 98% in macaques versus 89% in mice, which is highly relevant for evaluating subtype-specific ligands that have different affinities in humans versus rodents. In addition to conservation at the protein level, there is high conservation of genomic structure in terms of intron and exon size and placement of CpG sites that play a key role in epigenetic regulation. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shows that while the majority of SNPs are not conserved between humans and macaques, some functional polymorphisms are. Most significantly, cynomolgus monkeys express a similar α5 nAChR Asp398Asn polymorphism to the human α5 Asp398Asn polymorphism that has been linked to greater nicotine addiction and smoking related disease. Monkeys can be trained to readily self-administer nicotine, and in an initial study we have demonstrated that cynomolgus monkeys bearing the α5 D398N polymorphism show a reduced behavioral sensitivity to oral nicotine and tend to consume it in a different pattern when compared to wild-type monkeys. Thus the combination of highly homologous nAChR, higher cortical functions and capacity for complex training makes non-human primates a unique model to study in vivo functions of nicotinic receptors. In particular, primate studies on nicotine addiction and evaluation of therapies to prevent or overcome nicotine addiction are likely to be highly predictive of treatment outcomes in humans. PMID:25661700

  19. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Voith, G.; Dingermann, T.

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I{gamma} promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I{gamma} promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Voith, G; Dingermann, T

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I gamma promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I gamma promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. PMID:9636297

  1. Neurotrophic factors and their receptors in human sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors may play key roles in pathophysiological mechanisms of human neuropathies. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small-diameter sensory fibers and regulates nociception. This review focuses on sensory dysfunction and the potential of neurotrophic treatments. Genetic neuropathy. Mutations of the NGF high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A (Trk A) have been found in congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis; these are likely to be partial loss-of-function mutations, as axon-reflex vasodilatation and sweating can be elicited albeit reduced, suggesting rhNGF could restore nociception in some patients. Leprous neuropathy. Decreased NGF in leprosy skin may explain cutaneous hypoalgesia even with inflammation and rhNGF may restore sensation, as spared nerve fibers show Trk A-staining. Diabetic neuropathy. NGF is depleted in early human diabetic neuropathy skin, in correlation with dysfunction of nociceptor fibers. We proposed rhNGF prophylaxis may prevent diabetic foot ulceration. Clinical trials have been disappointed, probably related to difficulty delivering adequate doses and need for multiple trophic factors. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are both produced by basal keratinocytes and neurotrophin (NT-3) by suprabasal keratinocytes: relative mRNA expression was significantly lower in early diabetic neuropathy skin compared to controls, for NGF (P < 0.02), BDNF (P < 0.05), NT-3 (P < 0.05), GDNF (< 0.02), but not NT4/5, Trk A or p75 neurotrophin receptor (all P > 0.05). Posttranslational modifications of mature and pro-NGF may also affect bioactivity and immunoreactivity. A 53 kD band that could correspond to a prepro-NGF-like molecule was reduced in diabetic skin. Traumatic neuropathy and pain. While NGF levels are acutely reduced in injured nerve trunks, neuropathic patients with chronic skin hyperalgesia and allodynia show marked local increases of NGF levels; here anti-NGF agents may provide analgesia

  2. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  3. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  4. Cloning of the cDNA and gene for a human D sub 2 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.K.; Makam, H.; Stofko, R.E.; Bunzow, J.R.; Civelli, O. ); Marchionni, M.A.; Alfano, M.; Frothingham, L.; Fischer, J.B.; Burke-Howie, K.J.; Server, A.C. )

    1989-12-01

    A clone encoding a human D{sub 2} dopamine receptor was isolated from a pituitary cDNA library and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence is 96% identical with that of the cloned rat receptor with one major difference: the human receptor contains an additional 29 amino acids in its putative third cytoplasmic loop. Southern blotting demonstrated the presence of only one human D{sub 2} receptor gene. Two overlapping phage containing the gene were isolated and characterized. DNA sequence analysis of these clones showed that the coding sequence is interrupted by six introns and that the additional amino acids present in the human pituitary receptor are encoded by a single exon of 87 base pairs. The involvement of this sequence in alternative splicing and its biological significance are discussed.

  5. (-) Arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β.

    PubMed

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-11-24

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (-) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  6. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  7. Roles of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β subunits in function of human α4-containing nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Yu, Kewei; Hu, Jun; Kuo, Yen-Ping; Segerberg, Marsha; St John, Paul A; Lukas, Ronald J

    2006-01-01

    Naturally expressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) containing α4 subunits (α4*-nAChR) in combination with β2 subunits (α4β2-nAChR) are among the most abundant, high-affinity nicotine binding sites in the mammalian brain. β4 subunits are also richly expressed and colocalize with α4 subunits in several brain regions implicated in behavioural responses to nicotine and nicotine dependence. Thus, α4β4-nAChR also may exist and play important functional roles. In this study, properties were determined of human α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR heterologously expressed de novo in human SH-EP1 epithelial cells. Whole-cell currents mediated via human α4β4-nAChR have ∼4-fold higher amplitude than those mediated via human α4β2-nAChR and exhibit much slower acute desensitization and functional rundown. Nicotinic agonists induce peak whole-cell current responses typically with higher functional potency at α4β4-nAChR than at α4β2-nAChR. Cytisine and lobeline serve as full agonists at α4β4-nAChR but are only partial agonists at α4β2-nAChR. However, nicotinic antagonists, except hexamethonium, have comparable affinities for functional α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR. Whole-cell current responses show stronger inward rectification for α4β2-nAChR than for α4β4-nAChR at a positive holding potential. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that human nAChR β2 or β4 subunits can combine with α4 subunits to generate two forms of α4*-nAChR with distinctive physiological and pharmacological features. Diversity in α4*-nAChR is of potential relevance to nervous system function, disease, and nicotine dependence. PMID:16825297

  8. Binding of serotonin and N1-benzenesulfonyltryptamine-related analogs at human 5-HT6 serotonin receptors: receptor modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Dukat, Małgorzata; Mosier, Philip D; Kolanos, Renata; Roth, Bryan L; Glennon, Richard A

    2008-02-14

    A population of 100 graphics models of the human 5-HT6 serotonin receptor was constructed based on the structure of bovine rhodopsin. The endogenous tryptamine-based agonist serotonin (5-HT; 1) and the benzenesulfonyl-containing tryptamine-derived 5-HT6 receptor antagonist MS-245 (4a) were automatically docked with each of the 100 receptor models using a genetic algorithm approach. Similar studies were conducted with the more selective 5-HT6 receptor agonist EMDT (5) and optical isomers of EMDT-related analog 8, as well as with optical isomers of MS-245 (4a)-related and benzenesulfonyl-containing pyrrolidine 6 and aminotetralin 7. Although associated with the same general aromatic/hydrophobic binding cluster, 5-HT (1) and MS-245 (4a) were found to preferentially bind with distinct receptor conformations, and did so with different binding orientations (i.e., poses). A 5-HT pose/model was found to be common to EMDT (5) and its analogs, whereas that identified for MS-245 (4a) was found common to benzenesulfonyl-containing compounds. Specific amino acid residues were identified that can participate in binding, and evaluation of a sulfenamide analog of MS-245 indicates for the first time that the presence of the sulfonyl oxygen atoms enhances receptor affinity. The results indicate that the presence or absence of an N1-benzenesulfonyl group is a major determinant of the manner in which tryptamine-related agents bind at 5-HT6 serotonin receptors. PMID:18201064

  9. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRalpha and ERRgamma proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC(50) and IC(50) values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRalpha and ERRgamma are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity. PMID:19822186

  10. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRα and ERRγ proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC50 and IC50 values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRα and ERRγ are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity. PMID:19822186

  11. Human myometrial adrenergic receptors during pregnancy: identification of the alpha-adrenergic receptor by (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, M.M.; Hayashida, D.; Roberts, J.M.

    1985-07-15

    The radioactive alpha-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binds to particulate preparations of term pregnant human myometrium in a manner compatible with binding to the alpha-adrenergic receptor (alpha-receptor). (/sup 3/H) Dihydroergocryptine binds with high affinity (KD = 2 nmol/L and low capacity (receptor concentration = 100 fmol/mg of protein). Adrenergic agonists compete for (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding sites stereo-selectively ((-)-norepinephrine is 100 times as potent as (+)-norepinephrine) and in a manner compatible with alpha-adrenergic potencies (epinephrine approximately equal to norepinephrine much greater than isoproterenol). Studies in which prazosin, an alpha 1-antagonist, and yohimbine, and alpha 2-antagonist, competed for (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding sites in human myometrium indicated that approximately 70% are alpha 2-receptors and that 30% are alpha 1-receptors. (/sup 3/H) dihydroergocryptine binding to human myometrial membrane particulate provides an important tool with which to study the molecular mechanisms of uterine alpha-adrenergic response.

  12. A search for functional histamine H4 receptors in the human, guinea pig and mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Feliszek, Monika; Speckmann, Valerie; Schacht, Daniel; von Lehe, Marec; Stark, Holger; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Histamine H4 receptors are expressed in immune cells, but their potential role in the brain is less clear. Although H4 transcripts have been identified in human and rat brain, the presence of H4 receptors on the protein level has so far not been proven since appropriate antibodies fulfilling the strict criteria for G protein-coupled receptors are missing. Here, we searched for functional H4 receptors in human, guinea pig and mouse cortex. We studied whether H4 receptor activation is associated with increased GTPγS binding and reduced noradrenaline release. The latter two effects have been previously shown for H3 receptors, which, like the H4 receptors, are coupled to G i/o protein. G protein activation was studied using (35)S-GTPγS binding in cortical membranes. The electrically induced (3)H-noradrenaline release was determined in superfused cortical slices. The H4 agonist 4-methylhistamine failed to affect (35)S-GTPγS binding and/or noradrenaline release in human, guinea pig and mouse cortex although an H 3 receptor-mediated increase in (35)S-GTPγS binding and inhibition of noradrenaline release occurred in parallel experiments. In conclusion, functional H4 receptors increasing (35)S-GTPγS binding and/or decreasing noradrenaline release are not found in human, guinea pig and mouse cortex. PMID:25300787

  13. Structure and receptor binding of the hemagglutinin from a human H6N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Tzarum, Netanel; de Vries, Robert P; Zhu, Xueyong; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-03-11

    Avian influenza viruses that cause infection and are transmissible in humans involve changes in the receptor binding site (RBS) of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) that alter receptor preference from α2-3-linked (avian-like) to α2-6-linked (human-like) sialosides. A human case of avian-origin H6N1 influenza virus was recently reported, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to it crossing the species barrier are unknown. We find that, although the H6 HA RBS contains D190V and G228S substitutions that potentially promote human receptor binding, recombinant H6 HA preferentially binds α2-3-linked sialosides, indicating no adaptation to human receptors. Crystal structures of H6 HA with avian and human receptor analogs reveal that H6 HA preferentially interacts with avian receptor analogs. This binding mechanism differs from other HA subtypes due to a unique combination of RBS residues, highlighting additional variation in HA-receptor interactions and the challenges in predicting which influenza strains and subtypes can infect humans and cause pandemics. PMID:25766295

  14. Human macrophage scavenger receptors: primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, A; Naito, M; Itakura, H; Ikemoto, S; Asaoka, H; Hayakawa, I; Kanamori, H; Aburatani, H; Takaku, F; Suzuki, H

    1990-01-01

    Two types of cDNAs for human macrophage scavenger receptors were cloned from a cDNA library derived from the phorbol ester-treated human monocytic cell line THP-1. The type I and type II human scavenger receptors encoded by these cDNAs are homologous (73% and 71% amino acid identity) to their previously characterized bovine counterparts and consist of six domains: cytoplasmic (I), membrane-spanning (II), spacer (III), alpha-helical coiled-coil (IV), collagen-like (V), and a type-specific C-terminal (VI). The receptor gene is located on human chromosome 8. The human receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells mediated endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins. Two mRNAs, 4.0 and 3.2 kilobases, have been detected in human liver, placenta, and brain. Immunohistochemical studies using an anti-peptide antibody which recognizes human scavenger receptors indicated the presence of the scavenger receptors in the macrophages of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of scavenger receptors in atherogenesis. Images PMID:2251254

  15. Chemokine receptor CXCR3 agonist prevents human T-cell migration in a humanized model of arthritic inflammation.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Graeme; Fox, Christopher R J; Walden, Hannah R; Willet, Joseph D P; Mavin, Emily R; Hine, Dominic W; Palmer, Jeremy M; Barker, Catriona E; Lamb, Christopher A; Ali, Simi; Kirby, John A

    2012-03-20

    The recruitment of T lymphocytes during diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis is regulated by stimulation of the chemokine receptors expressed by these cells. This study was designed to assess the potential of a CXCR3-specific small-molecule agonist to inhibit the migration of activated human T cells toward multiple chemokines. Further experiments defined the molecular mechanism for this anti-inflammatory activity. Analysis in vitro demonstrated agonist induced internalization of both CXCR3 and other chemokine receptors coexpressed by CXCR3(+) T cells. Unlike chemokine receptor-specific antagonists, the CXCR3 agonist inhibited migration of activated T cells toward the chemokine mixture in synovial fluid from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. A humanized mouse air-pouch model showed that intravenous treatment with the CXCR3 agonist prevented inflammatory migration of activated human T cells toward this synovial fluid. A potential mechanism for this action was defined by demonstration that the CXCR3 agonist induces receptor cross-phosphorylation within CXCR3-CCR5 heterodimers on the surface of activated T cells. This study shows that generalized chemokine receptor desensitization can be induced by specific stimulation of a single chemokine receptor on the surface of activated human T cells. A humanized mouse model was used to demonstrate that this receptor desensitization inhibits the inflammatory response that is normally produced by the chemokines present in synovial fluid from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22392992

  16. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  17. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Suszynska, Malwina; Sun, Wenyue; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Schneider, Gabriela; Barr, Frederic G; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-11-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  18. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  19. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  20. Human T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Multiple DNA and protein sequence alignments have been constructed for the human T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} (TCRA/D, B, and G) variable (V) gene segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was confirmed using a much larger pool of sequences. For each sequence, a name was derived which complies with the standard nomenclature. The traditional numbering of V gene segments in the order of their discovery was continued and changed when in conflict with names of other segments. By discriminating between alleles at the same locus versus genes from different loci, we were able to reduce the number of more than 150 different TCRBV sequences in the database to a repertoire of only 47 functional TCRBV gene segments. An extension of this analysis to the over 100 TCRAV sequences results in a predicted repertoire of 42 functional TCRAV gene segments. Our alignment revealed two residues that distinguish between the highly homologous V{delta} and V{alpha}, one at a site that in V{sub H} contacts the constant region, the other at the interface between immunoglobulin V{sub H} and V{sub L}. This site may be responsible for restricted pairing between certain V{delta} and V{gamma} chains. On the other hand, V{beta} and V{gamma} appear to be related by the fact that their CDR2 length is increased by four residues as compared with that of V{alpha}/{delta} peptides. 150 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. An Oestrogen Receptor α-bound Human Chromatin Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Fullwood, Melissa J.; Liu, Mei Hui; Pan, You Fu; Liu, Jun; Han, Xu; Mohamed, Yusoff Bin; Orlov, Yuriy L.; Velkov, Stoyan; Ho, Andrea; Mei, Poh Huay; Chew, Elaine G. Y.; Huang, Phillips Yao Hui; Welboren, Willem-Jan; Han, Yuyuan; Ooi, Hong-Sain; Ariyaratne, Pramila N.; Vega, Vinsensius B.; Luo, Yanquan; Tan, Peck Yean; Choy, Pei Ye; Wansa, K. D. Senali Abayratna; Zhao, Bing; Lim, Kar Sian; Leow, Shi Chi; Yow, Jit Sin; Joseph, Roy; Li, Haixia; Desai, Kartiki V.; Thomsen, Jane S.; Lee, Yew Kok; Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Herve, Thoreau; Bourque, Guillaume; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Ruan, Xiaoan; Cacheux-Rataboul, Valere; Sung, Wing-Kin; Liu, Edison T.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Cheung, Edwin; Ruan, Yijun

    2009-01-01

    Genomes are organized into high-level 3-dimensional structures, and DNA elements separated by long genomic distances could functionally interact. Many transcription factors bind to regulatory DNA elements distant from gene promoters. While distal binding sites have been shown to regulate transcription by long-range chromatin interactions at a few loci, chromatin interactions and their impact on transcription regulation have not been investigated in a genome-wide manner. Therefore, we developed Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) for de novo detection of global chromatin interactions, and comprehensively mapped the chromatin interaction network bound by oestrogen receptor α (ERα) in the human genome. We found that most high-confidence remote ERα binding sites are anchored at gene promoters through long-range chromatin interactions, suggesting that ERα functions by extensive chromatin looping to bring genes together for coordinated transcriptional regulation. We propose that chromatin interactions constitute a primary mechanism for regulating transcription in mammalian genomes. PMID:19890323

  2. T cell receptor diversity in the human thymus.

    PubMed

    Vanhanen, Reetta; Heikkilä, Nelli; Aggarwal, Kunal; Hamm, David; Tarkkila, Heikki; Pätilä, Tommi; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Saramäki, Jari; Arstila, T Petteri

    2016-08-01

    A diverse T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is essential for adaptive immune responses and is generated by somatic recombination of TCRα and TCRβ gene segments in the thymus. Previous estimates of the total TCR diversity have studied the circulating mature repertoire, identifying 1 to 3×10(6) unique TCRβ and 0.5×10(6) TCRα sequences. Here we provide the first estimate of the total TCR diversity generated in the human thymus, an organ which in principle can be sampled in its entirety. High-throughput sequencing of samples from four pediatric donors detected up to 10.3×10(6) unique TCRβ sequences and 3.7×10(6) TCRα sequences, the highest directly observed diversity so far for either chain. To obtain an estimate of the total diversity we then used three different estimators, preseq and DivE, which measure the saturation of rarefaction curves, and Chao2, which measures the size of the overlap between samples. Our results provide an estimate of a thymic repertoire consisting of 40 to 70×10(6) unique TCRβ sequences and 60 to 100×10(6) TCRα sequences. The thymic repertoire is thus extremely diverse. Moreover, extrapolation of the data and comparison with earlier estimates of peripheral diversity also suggest that the thymic repertoire is transient, with different clones produced at different times. PMID:27442982

  3. Kinesin molecular motors: Transport pathways, receptors, and human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2001-06-01

    Kinesin molecular motor proteins are responsible for many of the major microtubule-dependent transport pathways in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identity of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. Kinesin-II recently was found to be required for transport in motile and nonmotile cilia and flagella where it is essential for proper left-right determination in mammalian development, sensory function in ciliated neurons, and opsin transport and viability in photoreceptors. Thus, these pathways and proteins may be prominent contributors to several human diseases including ciliary dyskinesias, situs inversus, and retinitis pigmentosa. Kinesin-I is needed to move many different types of cargoes in neuronal axons. Two candidates for receptor proteins that attach kinesin-I to vesicular cargoes were recently found. One candidate, sunday driver, is proposed to both link kinesin-I to an unknown vesicular cargo and to bind and organize the mitogen-activated protein kinase components of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling module. A second candidate, amyloid precursor protein, is proposed to link kinesin-I to a different, also unknown, class of axonal vesicles. The finding of a possible functional interaction between kinesin-I and amyloid precursor protein may implicate kinesin-I based transport in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Structural basis of transcobalamin recognition by human CD320 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Amer; Woo, Jae-Sung; Schmitz, Jennifer; Prinz, Bernadette; Root, Katharina; Chen, Fan; Bloch, Joël S.; Zenobi, Renato; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) requires capture of transcobalamin (TC) from the plasma by CD320, a ubiquitous cell surface receptor of the LDLR family. Here we present the crystal structure of human holo-TC in complex with the extracellular domain of CD320, visualizing the structural basis of the TC-CD320 interaction. The observed interaction chemistry can rationalize the high affinity of CD320 for TC and lack of haptocorrin binding. The in vitro affinity and complex stability of TC-CD320 were quantitated using a solid-phase binding assay and thermostability analysis. Stable complexes with TC were also observed for the disease-causing CD320ΔE88 mutant and for the isolated LDLR-A2 domain. We also determined the structure of the TC-CD320ΔE88 complex, which revealed only minor changes compared with the wild-type complex. Finally, we demonstrate significantly reduced in vitro affinity of TC for CD320 at low pH, recapitulating the proposed ligand release during the endocytic pathway. PMID:27411955

  5. Structural basis of transcobalamin recognition by human CD320 receptor.

    PubMed

    Alam, Amer; Woo, Jae-Sung; Schmitz, Jennifer; Prinz, Bernadette; Root, Katharina; Chen, Fan; Bloch, Joël S; Zenobi, Renato; Locher, Kaspar P

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) requires capture of transcobalamin (TC) from the plasma by CD320, a ubiquitous cell surface receptor of the LDLR family. Here we present the crystal structure of human holo-TC in complex with the extracellular domain of CD320, visualizing the structural basis of the TC-CD320 interaction. The observed interaction chemistry can rationalize the high affinity of CD320 for TC and lack of haptocorrin binding. The in vitro affinity and complex stability of TC-CD320 were quantitated using a solid-phase binding assay and thermostability analysis. Stable complexes with TC were also observed for the disease-causing CD320ΔE88 mutant and for the isolated LDLR-A2 domain. We also determined the structure of the TC-CD320ΔE88 complex, which revealed only minor changes compared with the wild-type complex. Finally, we demonstrate significantly reduced in vitro affinity of TC for CD320 at low pH, recapitulating the proposed ligand release during the endocytic pathway. PMID:27411955

  6. Structural basis of transcobalamin recognition by human CD320 receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Amer; Woo, Jae-Sung; Schmitz, Jennifer; Prinz, Bernadette; Root, Katharina; Chen, Fan; Bloch, Joël S.; Zenobi, Renato; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2016-07-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) requires capture of transcobalamin (TC) from the plasma by CD320, a ubiquitous cell surface receptor of the LDLR family. Here we present the crystal structure of human holo-TC in complex with the extracellular domain of CD320, visualizing the structural basis of the TC-CD320 interaction. The observed interaction chemistry can rationalize the high affinity of CD320 for TC and lack of haptocorrin binding. The in vitro affinity and complex stability of TC-CD320 were quantitated using a solid-phase binding assay and thermostability analysis. Stable complexes with TC were also observed for the disease-causing CD320ΔE88 mutant and for the isolated LDLR-A2 domain. We also determined the structure of the TC-CD320ΔE88 complex, which revealed only minor changes compared with the wild-type complex. Finally, we demonstrate significantly reduced in vitro affinity of TC for CD320 at low pH, recapitulating the proposed ligand release during the endocytic pathway.

  7. Dopamine Receptor Gene Expression in Human Amygdaloid Nuclei: Elevated D4 Receptor mRNAs in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lianbin; Szebeni, Katalin; Szebeni, Attila; Klimek, Violetta; Stockmeier, Craig A; Karolewicz, Beata; Kalbfleisch, John; Ordway, Gregory A

    2008-01-01

    Previous findings from this laboratory demonstrating changes in dopamine (DA) transporter and D2 receptors in the amygdaloid complex of subjects with major depression indicate that disruption of dopamine neurotransmission to the amygdala may contribute to behavioral symptoms associated with depression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate the regional distribution of gene expression of DA receptors in the human amygdala. In addition, relative levels of mRNA of DA receptors in the basal amygdaloid nucleus were measured postmortem in subjects with major depression and normal control subjects. All five subtypes of DA receptor mRNA were detected in all amygdaloid subnuclei, although D1, D2, and D4 receptor mRNAs were more abundant than D3 and D5 mRNAs by an order of magnitude. The highest level of D1 mRNA was found in the central nucleus, whereas D2 mRNA was the most abundant in the basal nucleus. Levels of D4 mRNA were highest in the basal and central nuclei. In the basal nucleus, amounts of D4, but not D1 or D2, mRNAs were significantly higher in subjects with major depression and depressed suicide victims, as compared to control subjects. These findings demonstrate that the D1, D2 and D4 receptors are the major subtypes of DA receptors in the human amygdala. Elevated DA receptor gene expression in depressive subjects further implicates altered dopaminergic transmission in the amygdala in depression. PMID:18371940

  8. Activity of pramlintide, rat and human amylin but not Aβ1-42 at human amylin receptors.

    PubMed

    Gingell, Joseph J; Burns, Erica R; Hay, Debbie L

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a neuroendocrine hormone involved in glucose regulation. An amylin analog, pramlintide, is used to treat insulin-requiring diabetes. Its anorexigenic actions give it potential as an obesity treatment. There are 3 amylin receptors (AMY1, AMY2, AMY3), comprising the calcitonin receptor and receptor activity-modifying proteins 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The pharmacology of pramlintide at each subtype has not been determined whereas the unrelated peptide β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ1-42) has recently been proposed to be a specific agonist of the AMY3 receptor. We investigated the actions of Aβ1-42 and pramlintide, compared with human and rat amylin at the calcitonin receptor, AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3 receptors, measuring the cAMP response in human embryonic kidney 293S and Cos 7 cells. Pramlintide activated all receptors with a slight preference for AMY1. No cAMP response was detected with Aβ1-42 at any receptor, suggesting that it may not be a genuine agonist of AMY receptors. PMID:24169554

  9. Growth-stimulatory monoclonal antibodies against human insulin-like growth factor I receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiong, L; Kasuya, J; Li, S L; Kato, J; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y

    1992-06-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against purified human placental insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors were prepared and characterized. Three IgG mAbs were specific for the human IGF-I receptor and displayed negligible crossreactivity with the human insulin receptor. They stimulated 125I-labeled IGF-I (125I-IGF-I) or 125I-IGF-II binding to purified human placental IGF-I receptors and to IGF-I receptors expressed in NIH 3T3 cells in contrast to the well-studied mAb alpha IR-3, which inhibits 125I-IGF-I or 125I-IGF-II binding to both forms of IGF-I receptors. The mAbs introduced in this study stimulated DNA synthesis in NIH 3T3 cells expressing human IGF-I receptors approximately 1.5-fold above the basal level and the IGF-I- or IGF-II-stimulated level. In contrast, alpha IR-3 inhibited both basal and IGF-I or IGF-II-stimulated DNA synthesis by approximately 30%. Inhibition of IGF-II-stimulated DNA synthesis by alpha IR-3 was as potent as its inhibition of IGF-I-stimulated DNA synthesis, although IGF-II binding to the IGF-I receptors was not inhibited by IGF-II as potently as was IGF-I. With the purified IGF-I receptors, both inhibitory and stimulatory mAbs were shown to activate autophosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor beta subunit and to induce microaggregation of the receptors. These results suggest that conformational changes resulting from receptor dimerization in the presence of either type of mAb may affect the signal-transducing function of the IGF-I receptor differently. These additional mAbs and alpha IR-3 immunoprecipitated nearly 90% of IGF-I binding activity from Triton X-100-solubilized human placental membranes, indicating that IGF-I receptor reactive with these mAbs is the major form of the IGF-I receptor in human placenta. PMID:1319060

  10. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a novel human P2 nucleotide receptor.

    PubMed

    Southey, M C; Hammet, F; Hutchins, A M; Paidhungat, M; Somers, G R; Venter, D J

    1996-11-11

    A novel human P2 nucleotide receptor has been cloned from a T-cell cDNA library. The predicted amino acid sequence shows characteristics of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and shares 88% homology with a recently characterised rat P2 nucleotide receptor sequence. Distinctive features include an extremely short cytoplasmic tail with only one putative protein kinase C phosphorylation site. Northern blot analysis revealed a 1.9 kb transcript expressed in the placenta. PMID:8950181

  11. Expression and purification of an engineered human endothelin receptor B in a monomeric form.

    PubMed

    Mishin, A V; Luginina, A P; Potapenko, A P; Borshchevskiy, V I; Katritch, V; Edelweiss, E; Okhrimenko, I S; Gordeliy, V I; Cherezov, V G

    2016-03-01

    In humans, two endothelin receptors, ETa and ETb, are activated by three endogenous 21-mer cyclic peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, which control various physiological processes, including vasoconstriction, vasodilation, and stimulation of cell proliferation. The first stage of this study it to produce a stable solubilized and purified receptor in a monodisperse state. This article is focused on the engineering, expression, purification, and characterization of the endothelin receptor B for subsequent structural and functional studies. PMID:27193723

  12. Elevated insulin receptor content in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Papa, V; Pezzino, V; Costantino, A; Belfiore, A; Giuffrida, D; Frittitta, L; Vannelli, G B; Brand, R; Goldfine, I D; Vigneri, R

    1990-01-01

    The growth of breast cancer cells is under the regulation of hormones, growth factors, and their receptors. In the present study, we have employed a new, sensitive, and specific radioimmunoassay for the direct measurement of insulin receptors in surgical specimens of breast cancers. In 159 specimens the insulin receptor content was 6.15 +/- 3.69 ng/0.1 mg protein. This value was more than sixfold higher than the mean value found in both 27 normal breast tissues obtained at total mastectomy (0.95 + 0.68, P less than 0.001) and in six normal specimens obtained from reduction mammoplasty (0.84 +/- 0.78, P less than 0.001). The insulin receptor content in breast cancer tissues was also higher than in any normal tissue investigated including liver (Pezzino, V., V. Papa, V. Trischitta, A. Brunetti, P.A. Goodman, M.K. Treutelaar, J.A. Williams, B.A. Maddux, R. Vigneri, and I.D. Goldfine, 1989. Am. J. Physiol. 257:E451-457). The insulin receptor in breast cancer retained its ability to both bind insulin and undergo insulin-induced tyrosine kinase activation. Immunostaining of the specimens revealed that the insulin receptor was present in malignant epithelial cells, but was not detected in stromal and inflammatory cells. Univariant analysis revealed that the insulin receptor content of the tumors correlated positively with tumor size (P = 0.014), histological grading (P = 0.030), and the estrogen receptor content (P = 0.035). There were no significant correlations between insulin receptor content and the age, body weight, menopausal status, and nodal involvement of the patients. These studies indicate, therefore, that the insulin receptor content is increased in breast cancers and raise the possibility that the insulin receptor may have a role in the biology of these tumors. Images PMID:2243127

  13. Contractile effects and receptor analysis of adenosine-receptors in human detrusor muscle from stable and neuropathic bladders.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Mahreen; Ikeda, Youko; McCarthy, Carly; Kitney, Darryl G; Jabr, Rita I; Fry, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    To measure the relative transcription of adenosine receptor subtypes and the contractile effects of adenosine and selective receptor-subtype ligands on detrusor smooth muscle from patients with neuropathic overactive (NDO) and stable bladders and also from guinea-pigs. Contractile function was measured at 37°C in vitro from detrusor smooth muscle strips. Contractions were elicited by superfusate agonists or by electrical field stimulation. Adenosine-receptor (A1, A2A, A2B, A3) transcription was measured by RT-PCR. Adenosine attenuated nerve-mediated responses with equivalent efficacy in human and guinea-pig tissue (pIC50 3.65-3.86); the action was more effective at low (1-8 Hz) compared to high (20-40 Hz) stimulation frequencies in human NDO and guinea-pig tissue. With guinea-pig detrusor the action of adenosine was mirrored by the A1/A2-agonist N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), partly abolished in turn by the A2B-selectve antagonist alloxazine, as well as the A1-selective agonist N6- cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). With detrusor from stable human bladders the effects of NECA and CPA were much smaller than that of adenosine. Adenosine also attenuated carbachol contractures, but mirrored by NECA (in turn blocked by alloxazine) only in guinea-pig tissue. Adenosine receptor subtype transcription was measured in human detrusor and was similar in both groups, except reduced A2A levels in overactive bladder. Suppression of the carbachol contracture in human detrusor is independent of A-receptor activation, in contrast to an A2B-dependent action with guinea-pig tissue. Adenosine also reduced nerve-mediated contractions, by an A1- dependent action suppressing ATP neurotransmitter action. PMID:27185496

  14. Effects of antihistamines on the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Khanian, Seyedeh Soha; Ashoor, Abrar; Prytkova, Tatiana; Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Nurulain, Syed M; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) antagonists (antihistamines), promethazine (PMZ), orphenadrine (ORP), chlorpheniramine (CLP), pyrilamine (PYR), diphenhydramine (DPH), citerizine (CTZ), and triprolidine (TRP) on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were investigated. Antihistamines inhibited the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order PYR>CLP>TRP>PMZ>ORP≥DPH≥CTZ. Among the antihistamines, PYR showed the highest reversible inhibition of acetylcholine (100 µM)-induced responses with IC₅₀ of 6.2 µM. PYR-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. Specific binding of [¹²⁵I] α-bungarotoxin, a selective antagonist for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was not changed in the presence of PYR suggesting a non-competitive inhibition of nicotinic receptors. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that PYR can potentially bind allosterically with the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that the H₂-H₄ receptor antagonists tested in this study (10 µM) showed negligible inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, H₁ receptor antagonists inhibited the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, with varying potencies. These results emphasize the importance of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for future pharmacological/toxicological profiling. PMID:25445036

  15. Evidence for 5-HT7 receptors mediating relaxation of human colonic circular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Nicolaas H; Briejer, Michel R; Van Bergen, Patrick J E; Akkermans, Louis M A; Schuurkes, Jan A J

    1999-01-01

    5-HT4 receptors mediate relaxation of human colon circular muscle. However, after 5-HT4 receptor blockade (SB 204070 10 nM), 5-HT still induced a relaxation (pEC50 6.3). 5-HT4 receptors were sufficiently blocked, as the curves to 5-HT obtained in the presence of 10 and 100 nM SB 204070 were indistinguishable. This 5-HT-induced relaxation was tetrodotoxin-insensitive, indicative of a smooth muscle relaxant 5-HT receptor. This, and the rank order of potency (5-CT=5-MeOT=5-HT) suggested involvement of 5-HT1 or 5-HT7 receptors. Mesulergine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist at nanomolar concentrations, and a 5-HT1 receptor antagonist at micromolar concentrations, competitively antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pKB 8.3) and antagonized the relaxation to 5-CT. Methysergide antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pA2 7.6). It is concluded that the profile of the smooth muscle inhibitory 5-HT receptor resembles that of the 5-HT7 receptor. These data provide the first evidence for functional human 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:10556917

  16. Recombinant saphenous vein 5-HT1B receptors of the rabbit: comparative pharmacology with human 5-HT1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Wurch, T; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C; Pauwels, P J

    1997-01-01

    1. The rabbit recombinant saphenous vein 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (r 5-HT1B) receptor stably transfected in rat C6-glial cells was characterized by measuring adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cycle AMP) formation upon exposure to various 5-HT receptor ligands. The effects of agonists and antagonists were compared with their effects determined previously at the human cloned 5-HT1B (h 5-HT1B) receptor under similar experimental conditions. 2. Intact C6-glial cells expressing rb HT1B receptors exhibited [3H]-5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) binding sites with a Kd of 0.80 +/- 0.13 nM and a Bmax between 225 to 570 fmol mg-1 protein. The binding affinities of a series of 5-HT receptor ligands determined in a membrane preparation with [3H]-5-CT or [3H]-N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]-3-methyl-4-(-4 -pyridyl) benzamide (GR 125,743) were similar. With the exception of ketanserin, ligand affinities were comparable to those determined at the clones h 5-HT1B receptor site. 3. rb 5-HT1B receptors were negatively coupled to cyclic AMP formation upon stimulation with 5-HT agonists. Of the several 5-HT agonists tested, 5-CT was the most potent, the potency rank order being: 5-CT > 5-HT > zolmitriptan > naratriptan > rizatriptan > sumatriptan > R (+)-8-(hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). The maximal responses of these agonists were similar to those induced by 5-HT. The potency of these agonists showed a positive correlation (r2 = 0.87; P < 0.002) with their potency at the cloned h 5-HT1B receptor subtype. 4. 2'-Methyl-4-(5-methyl-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)-biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-e-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-phenyl]-amide (GR 127,935), methiothepin and ketanserin each behaved as silent, competitive antagonists at rb 5HT1B receptors; pKB values were 8.41, 8.32 and 7.05, respectively when naratriptan was used as an agonist. These estimates accorded with their binding affinities and the potencies found on 5-HT and/or sumatriptan

  17. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.; Schaer, J. C.; Markwalder, R.; Waser, B.; Horisberger, U.; Laissue, J.

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9825475

  18. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  19. The interleukin-1 type I receptor is expressed in human hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Hammond, E A; Smart, D; Toulmond, S; Suman-Chauhan, N; Hughes, J; Hall, M D

    1999-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that interleukin-1 (IL-1) acts directly on the central nervous system, probably within the hypothalamus, causing effects such as fever, activation of the immune response and sickness behaviour. IL-1 has also been shown to be involved in the aetiology of several neuronal diseases, including neurodegeneration, stroke and Alzheimer's disease. However, the question as to whether the full-length type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI) is expressed in the human hypothalamus has yet to be addressed. Using the polymerase chain reaction, we cloned a full-length cDNA encoding the human hypothalamic IL-1RI from human hypothalamic cDNA. The DNA sequence of the human hypothalamic receptor was identical to that of the human fibroblast IL-1RI. The IL-1RI receptor protein was detected in astrocytes of normal human hypothalamic brain sections using immunocytochemical techniques. To ascertain that the cloned receptor was functional, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were transfected with a plasmid vector containing the IL-1RI coding region. IL-1RI-mediated-signal transduction was assessed by microphysiometry and activation of p38 MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase. We report the first demonstration that both the type I IL-1 transcript and the protein are expressed in the human hypothalamus. The receptor was expressed in a stable CHO cell line, providing a tool with which to embark on a thorough analysis of the signalling mechanisms mediated by IL-1 via this receptor. PMID:10468509

  20. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Verbeurgt, Christophe; Wilkin, Françoise; Tarabichi, Maxime; Gregoire, Françoise; Dumont, Jacques E; Chatelain, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems), containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men). Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose) were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were found in the

  1. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Sakurai, A.; Szilak, I.; Bell, G.I.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1988-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 (hTR..cap alpha..2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha.. described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type ..beta.. (formerly referred to as c-erbA..beta..) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes.

  2. Profiling of Olfactory Receptor Gene Expression in Whole Human Olfactory Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Tarabichi, Maxime; Gregoire, Françoise; Dumont, Jacques E.; Chatelain, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems), containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men). Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose) were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were found in the

  3. Physiological characterization of human muscle acetylcholine receptors from ALS patients

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Eleonora; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Conti, Luca; Deflorio, Cristina; Frasca, Vittorio; Manteca, Alessia; Pichiorri, Floriana; Roseti, Cristina; Torchia, Gregorio; Limatola, Cristina; Grassi, Francesca; Miledi, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to muscle paralysis. Research in transgenic mice suggests that the muscle actively contributes to the disease onset, but such studies are difficult to pursue in humans and in vitro models would represent a good starting point. In this work we show that tiny amounts of muscle from ALS or from control denervated muscle, obtained by needle biopsy, are amenable to functional characterization by two different technical approaches: “microtransplantation” of muscle membranes into Xenopus oocytes and culture of myogenic satellite cells. Acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents and unitary events were characterized in oocytes and multinucleated myotubes. We found that ALS acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) retain their native physiological characteristics, being activated by ACh and nicotine and blocked by α-bungarotoxin (α-BuTX), d-tubocurarine (dTC), and galantamine. The reversal potential of ACh-evoked currents and the unitary channel behavior were also typical of normal muscle AChRs. Interestingly, in oocytes injected with muscle membranes derived from ALS patients, the AChRs showed a significant decrease in ACh affinity, compared with denervated controls. Finally, riluzole, the only drug currently used against ALS, reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the ACh-evoked currents, indicating that its action remains to be fully characterized. The two methods described here will be important tools for elucidating the role of muscle in ALS pathogenesis and for developing drugs to counter the effects of this disease. PMID:22128328

  4. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  5. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  6. Atypical signaling of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gelb, Tara; Pshenichkin, Sergey; Hathaway, Hannah A; Grajkowska, Ewa; Dalley, Carrie Bowman; Wolfe, Barry B; Wroblewski, Jarda T

    2015-11-01

    The metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptor has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of metastatic melanoma and various other cancers. Our laboratory has demonstrated that a selective, non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist slows human melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we sought to determine if the activation of a canonical G protein-dependent signal transduction cascade, which is often used as an output of mGlu1 receptor activity in neuronal cells, correlated with mGlu1 receptor-mediated melanoma cell viability. Glutamate, the endogenous ligand of mGlu1 receptors, significantly increased melanoma cell viability, but did not stimulate phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in several human melanoma cell lines. In contrast, melanoma cell viability was not increased by quisqualate, a highly potent mGlu1 receptor agonist, or DHPG, a selective group I mGlu receptor agonist. Similarly to glutamate, quisqualate also failed to stimulate PI hydrolysis in mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanoma cells. These results suggest that the canonical G protein-dependent signal transduction cascade is not coupled to mGlu1 receptors in all human melanoma cells. On the other hand, dynamin inhibition selectively decreased viability of mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanoma cells, suggesting that a mechanism requiring internalization may control melanoma cell viability. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the approaches commonly used to study mGlu1 receptor function and signaling in other systems may be inappropriate for studying mGlu1 receptor-mediated melanoma cell viability. PMID:26291396

  7. Analysis of Human Dopamine D3 Receptor Quaternary Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Marsango, Sara; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pou, Chantevy; Varela Liste, María José; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is a class A, rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that can form dimers and/or higher order oligomers. However, the molecular basis for production of these complexes is not well defined. Using combinations of molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and homogenous time-resolved FRET, the interfaces that allow dopamine D3 receptor monomers to interact were defined and used to describe likely quaternary arrangements of the receptor. These were then compared with published crystal structures of dimeric β1-adrenoreceptor, μ-opioid, and CXCR4 receptors. The data indicate important contributions of residues from within each of transmembrane domains I, II, IV, V, VI, and VII as well as the intracellular helix VIII in the formation of D3-D3 receptor interfaces within homo-oligomers and are consistent with the D3 receptor adopting a β1-adrenoreceptor-like quaternary arrangement. Specifically, results suggest that D3 protomers can interact with each other via at least two distinct interfaces: the first one comprising residues from transmembrane domains I and II along with those from helix VIII and a second one involving transmembrane domains IV and V. Moreover, rather than existing only as distinct dimeric species, the results are consistent with the D3 receptor also assuming a quaternary structure in which two transmembrane domain I-II-helix VIII dimers interact to form a ”rhombic” tetramer via an interface involving residues from transmembrane domains VI and VII. In addition, the results also provide insights into the potential contribution of molecules of cholesterol to the overall organization and potential stability of the D3 receptor and possibly other GPCR quaternary structures. PMID:25931118

  8. Arginine (CGC) codon targeting in the human prostacyclin receptor gene (PTGIR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR)

    PubMed Central

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Arehart, Eric J.; Gleim, Scott; Douville, Karen L.; MacKenzie, Todd; Hwa, John

    2007-01-01

    The human prostacyclin receptor (hIP) has recently been recognized as an important seven transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor that plays critical roles in a theroprevention and cardioprotection. To date, four non-synonymous genetic variants have been identified, two of which occur at the same Arg amino acid position (R212H, R212C). This observation instigated further genetic screening for prostacyclin receptor variants on 1,455 human genomic samples. A total of 31 distinct genetic variants were detected, with 6 (19%) involving Arg residues. Distinct differences in location and frequencies of genetic variants were noted between Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic and African Americans, with the most changes noted in the Asian cohort._From the sequencing results, three Arg-targeted changes at the same 212 position within the third cytoplasmic loop of the human prostacyclin (hIP) receptor were detected: 1) R212C (CGC→TGC), 2) R212H (CGC→CAC), and 3) R212R (CGC→CGT). Three additional Arg codon variants (all exhibiting the same CGC to TGC change) were also detected, R77C, R215C, and R279C. Analysis (GPCR and SNP databases) of 200 other GPCRs, with recorded non-synonymous mutations, confirmed a high frequency of Arg-targeted missense mutations, particularly within the important cytoplasmic domain. Preferential nucleotide changes (at Arg codons), were observed involving cytosine (C) to thymine (T) (pyrimidine to pyrimidine), as well as guanine (G) to adenine (A) (purine to purine) (p<0.001, Pearson’s goodness-of-fit test). Such targeting of Arg residues, leading to significant changes in coding amino acid size and/or charge, may have potentially-important structural and evolutionary implications on the hIP and GPCRs in general. In the case of the human prostacyclin receptor, such alterations may reduce the cardio-, vasculo-, and cytoprotective effects of prostacyclin. PMID:17481829

  9. Arginine (CGC) codon targeting in the human prostacyclin receptor gene (PTGIR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR).

    PubMed

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Arehart, Eric J; Gleim, Scott; Douville, Karen; MacKenzie, Todd; Hwa, John

    2007-07-01

    The human prostacyclin receptor (hIP) has recently been recognized as an important seven transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor that plays critical roles in atheroprevention and cardioprotection. To date, four non-synonymous genetic variants have been identified, two of which occur at the same Arg amino acid position (R212H, R212C). This observation instigated further genetic screening for prostacyclin receptor variants on 1455 human genomic samples. A total of 31 distinct genetic variants were detected, with 6 (19%) involving Arg residues. Distinct differences in location and frequencies of genetic variants were noted between Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic and African Americans, with the most changes noted in the Asian cohort. From the sequencing results, three Arg-targeted changes at the same 212 position within the third cytoplasmic loop of the human prostacyclin (hIP) receptor were detected: 1) R212C (CGC-->TGC), 2) R212H (CGC-->CAC), and 3) R212R (CGC-->CGT). Three additional Arg codon variants (all exhibiting the same CGC to TGC change) were also detected, R77C, R215C, and R279C. Analysis (GPCR and SNP databases) of 200 other GPCRs, with recorded non-synonymous mutations, confirmed a high frequency of Arg-targeted missense mutations, particularly within the important cytoplasmic domain. Preferential nucleotide changes (at Arg codons), were observed involving cytosine (C) to thymine (T) (pyrimidine to pyrimidine), as well as guanine (G) to adenine (A) (purine to purine) (p<0.001, Pearson's goodness-of-fit test). Such targeting of Arg residues, leading to significant changes in coding amino acid size and/or charge, may have potentially-important structural and evolutionary implications on the hIP and GPCRs in general. In the case of the human prostacyclin receptor, such alterations may reduce the cardio-, vasculo-, and cytoprotective effects of prostacyclin. PMID:17481829

  10. Selective phthalate activation of naturally occurring human constitutive androstane receptor splice variants and the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Joshua G; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Peterson, Eric C; Chen, Tao; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2011-04-01

    Phthalates and other endocrine-disruptive chemicals are manufactured in large quantities for use as plasticizers and other commercial applications, resulting in ubiquitous human exposure and thus, concern regarding their toxicity. Innate defense against small molecule exposures is controlled in large part by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The human CAR gene undergoes multiple alternative splicing events resulting in the CAR2 and CAR3 variant receptors. Recent studies from our laboratory show that CAR2 is potently and specifically activated by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We hypothesized that alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing CAR's functional diversity, broadening the human receptors' repertoire of response to environmental xenobiotics. In these studies, we examine the interaction of alternatively spliced CARs and PXR with a range of suspected endocrine disruptors, including phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and 4-N-nonylphenol (NP). Transactivation and two-hybrid studies in COS-1 cells revealed differential selectivity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals for the variant CAR and PXR. Ex vivo studies showed DEHP and di-isononyl phthalate potently induced CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. Mutation analysis of CAR2, in silico modeling, and ligand docking studies suggested that the SPTV amino acid insertion of CAR2 creates a unique ligand-binding pocket. Alternative gene splicing results in variant CAR receptors that selectively recognize phthalates and BPA. The interaction of phthalates with CAR and PXR suggests a xenobiotic response that is complex and biologically redundant. PMID:21227907

  11. Isolation and partial characterization of cDNA clone of human ceruloplasmin receptor.

    PubMed

    Sasina, L K; Tsymbalenko, N V; Platonova, N A; Puchkova, L V; Voronina, O V; Gyulikhandanova, N E; Gaitskhoki, V S

    2000-05-01

    An individual clone, presumably carrying a 3 bp fragment of ceruloplasmin receptor cDNA was isolated from the expression library of human placenta cDNA using polyclonal specific antibodies to ceruloplasmin receptors. EcoR1-hydrolysate of isolated DNA was cloned in a pTZ19 bacterial vector and sequenced in the forward and reverse direction. The comparison of the revealed sequence with known sequences of human genome revealed its high similarity to ceruloplasmin cDNA. PMID:10977961

  12. In silico binding characteristics between human histamine H1 receptor and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Yang, Qian; Li, Minyong; Yin, Dali; You, Qidong

    2010-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the H(1) receptor antagonists have important therapeutic significance in the treatment of various allergic disorders, but little was known about the binding mode between the receptor and antagonists since the crystal structure of G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs) were hard to obtain. In this paper, a theoretical three-dimensional model of human histamine H(1) receptor (HHR1) was developed on the basis of recently reported high resolution structures of human A(2A) adenosine receptor, human beta(2)-adrenoceptor and turkey beta(1)-adrenoceptor. Furthermore, three representative H(1) receptor antagonists were chosen for docking studies. Subsequently, a qualitative pharmacophore model was developed by Hiphop algorithm based on the docking conformations of these three antagonists. In this paper, active environment, certain key residues, and the corresponding pharmacophore features of H(1) receptor were identified by such combinations of receptor-based and ligand-based approaches, which would give sufficient guidance for the rational design of novel antihistamine agents. PMID:20179978

  13. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  14. Purification and characterization of the human interferon-. gamma. receptor from placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, J.; Sheehan, K.C.F.; Chance, C.; Thomas, M.L.; Schreiber, R.D. )

    1988-07-01

    Purification of the human interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) receptor was facilitated by identification of human placenta as a large-scale receptor source. When analyzed in radioligand binding experiments, intact placental membranes and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins expressed 1.3 and 5.9 {times} 10{sup 12} receptors per mg of protein, respectively, values that were 13-163 times greater than that observed for U937 membranes. Two protocols were followed to purify the IFN-{gamma} receptor from octyl glucoside-solubilized membranes: (i) sequential affinity chromatography over wheat germ agglutinin- and INF-{gamma}-Sepharose and (ii) affinity chromatography over columns containing receptor-specific monoclonal antibody and wheat germ agglutinin. Both procedures resulted in fully active preparations that were 70-90% pure. Purified receptor migrated as a single molecular species of 90 kDa either when analyzed on silver-stained NaDodSO{sub 4}/polyacrylamide gels or when subjected to electrophoretic transfer blot analysis using a labeled IFN-{gamma} receptor-specific monoclonal antibody. The identity of the 90-kDa component as the receptor was confirmed by demonstrating its ability to specifically bind {sup 125}I-labeled IFN-{gamma} following NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. The ligand binding site, the epitope for the receptor-specific monoclonal antibody, and all of the N-linked carbohydrate could be localized to the 55-kDa domain of the molecule.

  15. Receptor-purified, Bolton-Hunter radioiodinated, recombinant, human epidermal growth factor: An improved radioligand for receptor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kermode, J.C.; Tritton, T.R. )

    1990-01-01

    We report an assessment of the applicability of the Bolton-Hunter method to the radioiodination of epidermal growth factor (EGF). Recombinant human EGF (hEGF) could be radioiodinated successfully by this method, whereas murine EGF could not. Bolton-Hunter {sup 125}I-labeled hEGF was compared with commercial 125I-labeled hEGF prepared by the chloramine-T radioiodination method. Neither radioligand was sufficiently pure for a detailed characterization of the purportedly heterogeneous pattern of binding of EGF to its receptors. A procedure based on receptor adsorption was thus developed for repurification of the Bolton-Hunter 125I-labeled hEGF. This provided a much purer radioligand suitable for detailed studies of receptor-binding heterogeneity.

  16. Dopamine D2 receptors are organized in bands in normal human temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, S K; Joyce, J N

    1996-09-01

    Previous studies have documented a highly compartmentalized and laminar organization of dopamine D2 receptors in human hippocampus, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices. These areas receive input from regions of polysensory association cortices of the superior and inferior temporal sulci that evidence functional modules identified by other techniques. We examined the isocortical regions of temporal lobe for an equally well-differentiated pattern of D2 receptor expression as observed in their paleocortical temporal lobe targets. Using quantitative autoradiography we identified an organization of three-dimensional bands of high concentrations of dopamine D2 receptors throughout the rostral-caudal extent of the normal human temporal cortex. In the coronal plane, these D2 receptor-enriched bands had a columnar appearance with the concentration of D2 receptors almost two-fold higher within the bands than in the immediately adjacent cortex. These D2 receptor-enriched bands had a distinct laminar appearance with a paucity of [125I]epidepride binding to D2 receptors over the granule cell layer and higher concentrations of D2 receptors in laminae III and V than in the immediately adjacent cortex. They had a consistent width (mean width of 2.83 +/- 0.62 mm) in the coronal plane, but had their long axes in the rostrocaudal plane (some were at least 2500 microns in length). Hence, they exist as three-dimensional D2 receptor-enriched and receptor-poor modules with their long axes in the rostrocaudal plane. Tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive fibers were observed to cross orthogonally to the long axes of the D2 receptor enriched bands. Other monoamine receptors (beta-adrenergic, 5-hydroxytryptamine2), and markers for myelin (anti-myelin basic protein immunohistochemistry), glia (5'-nucleotidase), and energy metabolism (cytochrome oxidase) showed a laminar organization but failed to demarcate the D2 receptor-enriched bands. The majority of these D2 receptor-enriched bands were

  17. Kallikrein Promotes Inflammation in Human Dental Pulp Cells Via Protease-Activated Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tomomi; Kamio, Naoto; Okabe, Tatsu; Muromachi, Koichiro; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Plasma kallikrein (KLKB1), a serine protease, cleaves high-molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and pro-inflammatory peptide. In addition, KLKB1 activates plasminogen and other leukocyte and blood coagulation factors and processes pro-enkephalin, prorenin, and C3. KLKB1 has also been shown to cleave protease-activated receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor. In this study, we investigated KLKB1-dependent inflammation and activation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human dental pulp cells. These cells responded to KLKB1 stimulation by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) , upregulating cyclooxygenase-2, and secreting prostaglandin E2 . Remarkably, SCH79797, an antagonist of protease-activated receptor-1, blocked these effects. Thus, these data indicate that KLKB1 induces inflammatory reactions in human dental tissues via protease-activated receptor 1. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1522-1528, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566265

  18. A Novel Humanized GLP-1 Receptor Model Enables Both Affinity Purification and Cre-LoxP Deletion of the Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Lucy S.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Ali, Nosher; Dai, Feihan; Ma, Wenzhen; Coskun, Tamer; Ficorilli, James V.; Wheeler, Michael B.; Michael, M. Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W.

    2014-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators of endocrine physiology, and peptide-based therapeutics targeting some of these receptors have proven effective at treating disorders such as hypercalcemia, osteoporosis, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). As next generation efforts attempt to develop novel non-peptide, orally available molecules for these GPCRs, new animal models expressing human receptor orthologs may be required because small molecule ligands make fewer receptor contacts, and thus, the impact of amino acid differences across species may be substantially greater. The objective of this report was to generate and characterize a new mouse model of the human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (hGLP-1R), a class B GPCR for which established peptide therapeutics exist for the treatment of T2DM. hGLP-1R knock-in mice express the receptor from the murine Glp-1r locus. Glucose tolerance tests and gastric emptying studies show hGLP-1R mice and their wild-type littermates display similar physiological responses for glucose metabolism, insulin secretion, and gastric transit, and treatment with the GLP-1R agonist, exendin-4, elicits similar responses in both groups. Further, ex vivo assays show insulin secretion from humanized islets is glucose-dependent and enhanced by GLP-1R agonists. To enable additional utility, the targeting construct of the knock-in line was engineered to contain both flanking LoxP sites and a C-terminal FLAG epitope. Anti-FLAG affinity purification shows strong expression of hGLP-1R in islets, lung, and stomach. We crossed the hGLP-1R line with Rosa26Cre mice and generated global Glp-1r−/− animals. Immunohistochemistry of pancreas from humanized and knock-out mice identified a human GLP-1R-specific antibody that detects the GLP-1R in human pancreas as well as in the pancreas of hGLP-1r knock-in mice. This new hGLP-1R model will allow tissue-specific deletion of the GLP-1R, purification of potential GLP-1R partner

  19. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  20. Localization of dopamine D3 receptors to mesolimbic and D2 receptors to mesostriatal regions of human forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, A M; Ryoo, H L; Gurevich, E; Joyce, J N

    1994-01-01

    We characterized the binding of [125I]epidepride to dopamine D2-like and D3-like receptors in tissue sections of human striatum. The competition for binding of [125I]epidepride by domperidone, quinpirole, and 7-hydroxy-N,N-di(1-propyl)-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) was best fit by assuming one site in the caudate but two sites in nucleus accumbens. Guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate showed a large modulatory influence in agonist inhibition of [125I]epidepride binding in caudate but not in nucleus accumbens. The binding of [125I]epidepride in the presence of 7-OH-DPAT (1000-fold selective for D3-like versus D2-like sites) and domperidone (20-fold selective for D2-like versus D3-like sites) was used to quantify the numbers of D2-like and D3-like receptors in areas of human brain. The distribution of D2-like and D3-like receptors was largely nonoverlapping. Binding of [125I]epidepride to D3-like receptors was negligible in the dorsal striatum but was concentrated in islands of dense binding in the nucleus accumbens and ventral putamen that aligned with acetylcholinesterase-poor striosomes. Binding to D3-like receptors was also enriched in the internal globus pallidus, ventral pallidum, septum, islands of Calleja, nucleus basalis, amygdalostriatal transition nucleus of the amygdala, central nucleus of the amygdala, and ventral tegmental area. Binding of [125I]epidepride to D2 but not D3 receptors was detected in cortex and hippocampus. Images PMID:7972046

  1. Localization of dopamine D3 receptors to mesolimbic and D2 receptors to mesostriatal regions of human forebrain.

    PubMed

    Murray, A M; Ryoo, H L; Gurevich, E; Joyce, J N

    1994-11-01

    We characterized the binding of [125I]epidepride to dopamine D2-like and D3-like receptors in tissue sections of human striatum. The competition for binding of [125I]epidepride by domperidone, quinpirole, and 7-hydroxy-N,N-di(1-propyl)-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) was best fit by assuming one site in the caudate but two sites in nucleus accumbens. Guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate showed a large modulatory influence in agonist inhibition of [125I]epidepride binding in caudate but not in nucleus accumbens. The binding of [125I]epidepride in the presence of 7-OH-DPAT (1000-fold selective for D3-like versus D2-like sites) and domperidone (20-fold selective for D2-like versus D3-like sites) was used to quantify the numbers of D2-like and D3-like receptors in areas of human brain. The distribution of D2-like and D3-like receptors was largely nonoverlapping. Binding of [125I]epidepride to D3-like receptors was negligible in the dorsal striatum but was concentrated in islands of dense binding in the nucleus accumbens and ventral putamen that aligned with acetylcholinesterase-poor striosomes. Binding to D3-like receptors was also enriched in the internal globus pallidus, ventral pallidum, septum, islands of Calleja, nucleus basalis, amygdalostriatal transition nucleus of the amygdala, central nucleus of the amygdala, and ventral tegmental area. Binding of [125I]epidepride to D2 but not D3 receptors was detected in cortex and hippocampus. PMID:7972046

  2. Profiling of histamine H4 receptor agonists in native human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gschwandtner, M; Koether, B; Werfel, T; Stark, H; Gutzmer, R

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Since the identification of the histamine H4 receptor, several ligands activating this receptor have been described and more compounds are in development. These ligands are well characterized in pharmacological assays, including radioligand competition binding studies, GTPγS and GTPase assays. In most cases, these experiments are performed in transfected cell lines, expressing unnaturally high levels of target receptors and G-protein signalling components. In this study we investigated the specific properties of H4 receptor ligands in native cells. Experimental Approach Histamine and five different H4 receptor agonists – 4-methylhistamine, UR-PI376, clobenpropit, VUF8430 and ST-1006 – were characterized in freshly isolated human monocytes. The ligands (10 nM–10 μM) were tested as inhibitors of IL-12p70 secretion from human monocytes and the effects of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine and the H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 on their action was investigated. Key Results Histamine and all the tested agonists reduced IL-12p70 secretion into monocyte supernatants by 40–70%. The potencies varied with pEC50 values ranging from 5.7 to 6.9, depending on the agonist used. All potencies were lower than those determined in the original investigations of the compounds. Pretreatment of monocytes with H2 or H4 receptor antagonists showed that some H4 receptor ligands also had low activity at the H2 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Our study demonstrates discrepancies between the potencies obtained from assays in transfected cell lines and assays in native human cells, indicating the importance of evaluating H4 receptor ligands in native cells. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23638754

  3. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Kato, Johji

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  4. Molecular size of the canine and human brain D2 dopamine receptor as determined by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, L.; Fraser, C.M.; Jung, C.Y.; Seeman, P.; Venter, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    Target-size analysis (radiation inactivation) has been utilized for determination of the molecular size of the striatal D2 dopamine receptor of both canine and human membranes. The dog and human receptors were found to have a molecular size of 123,000 daltons. The identity of molecular size values is consistent with available pharmacological and biochemical evidence supporting D2 dopamine receptor identity in canine and human tissues. These data suggest that the canine receptor may be a valid model for molecular and structural investigation of the human D2 dopamine receptor.

  5. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  6. Rational Design of Potent Antagonists to the Human Growth Hormone Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Germaine; Cunningham, Brian C.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Nagata, Shigekazu; Goeddel, David V.; Wells, James A.

    1992-06-01

    A hybrid receptor was constructed that contained the extracellular binding domain of the human growth hormone (hGH) receptor linked to the transmembrane and intracellular domains of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. Addition of hGH to a myeloid leukemia cell line (FDC-P1) that expressed the hybrid receptor caused proliferation of these cells. The mechanism for signal transduction of the hybrid receptor required dimerization because monoclonal antibodies to the hGH receptor were agonists whereas their monovalent fragments were not. Receptor dimerization occurs sequentially-a receptor binds to site 1 on hGH, and then a second receptor molecule binds to site 2 on hGH. On the basis of this sequential mechanism, which may occur in many other cytokine receptors, inactive hGH analogs were designed that were potent antagonists to hGH-induced cell proliferation. Such antagonists could be useful for treating clinical conditions of hGH excess, such as acromegaly.

  7. Assessment of angiotensin II receptor blockade in humans using a standardized angiotensin II receptor-binding assay.

    PubMed

    Maillard, M P; Mazzolai, L; Daven, V; Centeno, C; Nussberger, J; Brunner, H R; Burnier, M

    1999-12-01

    An in vitro angiotensin II (AngII) receptor-binding assay was developed to monitor the degree of receptor blockade in standardized conditions. This in vitro method was validated by comparing its results with those obtained in vivo with the injection of exogenous AngII and the measurement of the AngII-induced changes in systolic blood pressure. For this purpose, 12 normotensive subjects were enrolled in a double-blind, four-way cross-over study comparing the AngII receptor blockade induced by a single oral dose of losartan (50 mg), valsartan (80 mg), irbesartan (150 mg), and placebo. A significant linear relationship between the two methods was found (r = 0.723, n = 191, P<.001). However, there exists a wide scatter of the in vivo data in the absence of active AngII receptor blockade. Thus, the relationship between the two methods is markedly improved (r = 0.87, n = 47, P<.001) when only measurements done 4 h after administration of the drugs are considered (maximal antagonist activity observed in vivo) suggesting that the two methods are equally effective in assessing the degree of AT-1 receptor blockade, but with a greatly reduced variability in the in vitro assay. In addition, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis performed with the three antagonists suggest that the AT-1 receptor-binding assay works as a bioassay that integrates the antagonistic property of all active drug components of the plasma. This standardized in vitro-binding assay represents a simple, reproducible, and precise tool to characterize the pharmacodynamic profile of AngII receptor antagonists in humans. PMID:10619583

  8. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%-25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  9. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%–25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  10. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - G sub i complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K{sub d} of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of G{sub i}, respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects.

  11. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  12. Variable NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands in immunity, reproduction and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, in which they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of the MHC-C gene in hominids drove the evolution of a system of NK cell receptors for MHC-C molecules that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. By contrast, the human system of MHC-C receptors seems to have been subject to different selection pressures that have acted in competition on the immunological and reproductive functions of MHC class I molecules. We suggest that this compromise facilitated the development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out of Africa and populate other continents. PMID:23334245

  13. Expression of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) in human skin.

    PubMed

    Krahn-Bertil, Elodie; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Andre, Valérie; Orly, Isabelle; Kanitakis, Jean; Rousselle, Patricia; Damour, Odile

    2008-01-01

    Skin is a non-classical target for estrogens. Despite evidence showing that estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in skin, there are still extensive gaps in our understanding of how estrogens exert their action in non-reproductive tissues. Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma), an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, shows a strong sequence homology with estrogen receptor alpha but it does not bind estradiol. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate the expression of ERRgamma in adult human skin. ERRgamma mRNA was detected in the keratinocytes and fibroblasts of 8 female donor skins using RT-PCR. The presence of the protein was confirmed using immunohistochemistry on 11 adult human skins and Western Blotting on monolayer-cultures of fibroblasts and keratinocytes from respectively 4 and 2 donors. This study shows that ERRgamma is expressed in human skin and could intervene in a potentially new estrogen signaling pathway in the skin. PMID:18573717

  14. Different subcellular localization of muscarinic and serotonin (S2) receptors in human, dog, and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luabeya, M K; Maloteaux, J M; De Roe, C; Trouet, A; Laduron, P M

    1986-02-01

    Cortex from rat, dog, and human brain was submitted to subcellular fractionation using an analytical approach consisting of a two-step procedure. First, fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation and were analyzed for their content of serotonin S2 and muscarinic receptors, serotonin uptake, and marker enzymes. Second, the cytoplasmic extracts were subfractionated by equilibration in sucrose density gradient. In human brain, serotonin and muscarinic receptors were found associated mostly with mitochondrial fractions which contain synaptosomes, whereas in rat brain they were concentrated mainly in the microsomal fractions. Density gradient centrifugation confirmed a more marked synaptosomal localization of receptors in human than in rat brain, the dog displaying an intermediate profile. In human brain, indeed, more receptor sites were found to be associated with the second peak characterized in electron microscopy by the largest number of nerve terminals. In addition, synaptosomes from human brain are denser than those from rat brain and some marker enzymes reveal different subcellular distribution in the three species. These data indicate that more receptors are of synaptosomal nature in human brain than in other species and this finding is compatible with a larger amount of synaptic contacts in human brain. PMID:2934515

  15. Human GluR6 kainate receptor (GRIK2): Molecular cloning, expression, polymorphism, and chromosomal assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Paschen, W.; Blackstone, C.D.; Huganir, R.L. ); Ross, C.A. Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Koeln )

    1994-04-01

    Glutamate receptors mediate the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain, and molecular cloning studies have revealed several distinct families. Because neuropathological states and possibly human disorders may involve kainate-preferring glutamate receptors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone for the human GluR6 kainate-preferring receptor. This clone shows a very high sequence similarity with that of the rat, except for a part of the 3[prime] untranslated region in which there is a TAA triplet repeat. When the protein was overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, it had a molecular weight, an antibody recognition, and a glutamate ligand-binding profile similar to those of the rate GluR6 receptor. Northern analysis showed expression in both human cerebral and cerebellar cortices. By PCR analysis of rodent-human monochromosomal cell lines, the human GluR6 could be assigned to chromosome 6. The length of the TAA triplet repeat was polymorphic in the normal population, with at least four alleles and an observed heterozygosity of about 45%. These studies should provide the basis for expression or linkage studies of the GluR6 kainate receptor in human disease or neuropathologic states. 53 refs., 7 figs.

  16. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Characterization of urokinase receptor expression by human placental trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zini, J M; Murray, S C; Graham, C H; Lala, P K; Karikó, K; Barnathan, E S; Mazar, A; Henkin, J; Cines, D B; McCrae, K R

    1992-06-01

    The processes of implantation and placentation are both dependent on the invasion and remodeling of the uterine endometrium and vasculature by trophoblasts. Because the secretion and autocrine binding of urokinase (uPA) appears to be a common mechanism used by cells to facilitate plasmin-dependent tissue invasion, we measured the production of uPA and expression of uPA receptors by trophoblasts. Prourokinase bound specifically, reversibly, and with high affinity to cultured trophoblasts, via the uPA epidermal growth factor-like domain. Trophoblasts derived from two first-trimester placentae bound more prourokinase than cells isolated from term placentae. Furthermore, in vitro differentiation of cultured cytotrophoblasts into syncytiotrophoblasts was associated with diminished expression of urokinase receptors and a parallel decrease in the cellular content of uPA receptor mRNA. Trophoblasts also secreted prourokinase and plasminogen activator inhibitors types 1 and 2 (PAI-1 and PAI-2). Although prourokinase was secreted in amounts sufficient to endogenously saturate trophoblast uPA receptors, trophoblasts secreted greater amounts of PAI-1 and PAI-2 than uPA, and no net plasminogen activator activity was detected in trophoblast conditioned medium. In contrast, plasminogen added directly to cultured trophoblasts was readily converted to plasmin. Although the invasion and remodeling of uterine tissues by trophoblasts is a complex process dependent on several proteases of varying specificity, our findings suggest that the expression and modulation of urokinase receptors on the trophoblast cell surface may play an important role in this process. PMID:1316787

  18. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol /sup 125/I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function.

  19. kappa opioid receptors in human microglia downregulate human immunodeficiency virus 1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, C C; Gekker, G; Hu, S; Sheng, W S; Shark, K B; Bu, D F; Archer, S; Bidlack, J M; Peterson, P K

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells, the resident macrophages of the brain, play an important role in the neuropathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and recent studies suggest that opioid peptides regulate the function of macrophages from somatic tissues. We report herein the presence of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in human fetal microglia and inhibition of HIV-1 expression in acutely infected microglial cell cultures treated with KOR ligands. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analyses, we found that mRNA for the KOR was constitutively expressed in microglia and determined that the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame was identical to that of the human brain KOR gene. The expression of KOR in microglial cells was confirmed by membrane binding of [3H]U69,593, a kappa-selective ligand, and by indirect immunofluorescence. Treatment of microglial cell cultures with U50,488 or U69,593 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of expression of the monocytotropic HIV-1 SF162 strain. This antiviral effect of the kappa ligands was blocked by the specific KOR antagonist, nor-binaltrophimine. These findings suggest that kappa opioid agonists have immunomodulatory activity in the brain, and that these compounds could have potential in the treatment of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8755601

  20. Selective Phthalate Activation of Naturally Occurring Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor Splice Variants and the Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    DeKeyser, Joshua G.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Peterson, Eric C.; Chen, Tao; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2011-01-01

    Phthalates and other endocrine-disruptive chemicals are manufactured in large quantities for use as plasticizers and other commercial applications, resulting in ubiquitous human exposure and thus, concern regarding their toxicity. Innate defense against small molecule exposures is controlled in large part by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The human CAR gene undergoes multiple alternative splicing events resulting in the CAR2 and CAR3 variant receptors. Recent studies from our laboratory show that CAR2 is potently and specifically activated by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We hypothesized that alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing CAR’s functional diversity, broadening the human receptors’ repertoire of response to environmental xenobiotics. In these studies, we examine the interaction of alternatively spliced CARs and PXR with a range of suspected endocrine disruptors, including phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and 4-N-nonylphenol (NP). Transactivation and two-hybrid studies in COS-1 cells revealed differential selectivity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals for the variant CAR and PXR. Ex vivo studies showed DEHP and di-isononyl phthalate potently induced CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. Mutation analysis of CAR2, in silico modeling, and ligand docking studies suggested that the SPTV amino acid insertion of CAR2 creates a unique ligand-binding pocket. Alternative gene splicing results in variant CAR receptors that selectively recognize phthalates and BPA. The interaction of phthalates with CAR and PXR suggests a xenobiotic response that is complex and biologically redundant. PMID:21227907

  1. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  2. The human prostacyclin receptor from structure function to disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen A; Gleim, Scott; Elderon, Larkin; Fetalvero, Kristina; Hwa, John

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years have passed since Vane and colleagues first described a substance, prostanoid X, from microsomal fractions (later called prostacyclin) that relaxed rather than contracted mesenteric arteries. The critical role of prostacyclin in many pathophysiological conditions, such as atherothrombosis, has only recently become appreciated (through receptor knockout mice studies, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition clinical trials, and the discovery of dysfunctional prostacyclin receptor genetic variants). Additionally, important roles in such diverse areas as pain and inflammation, and parturition are being uncovered. Prostacyclin-based therapies, currently used for pulmonary hypertension, are accordingly emerging as possible treatments for such diseases, fueling interests in structure function studies for the receptor and signal transduction pathways in native cells. The coming decade is likely to yield many further exciting advances. PMID:20374736

  3. G-1-activated membrane estrogen receptors mediate increased contractility of the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Maiti, K; Paul, J W; Read, M; Chan, E C; Riley, S C; Nahar, P; Smith, R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogens are key mediators of increased uterine contractility at labor. We sought to determine whether membrane-associated estrogen receptors, such as the recently described seven-transmembrane receptor G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), mediated some of this effect. Using human myometrium obtained at term cesarean section before or after the onset of labor, we demonstrated the presence of GPR30 mRNA and protein using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. GPR30 receptor was localized to the cell membrane and often colocalized with calveolin-1. Using the specific estrogen membrane receptor agonist G-1 and myometrial explants, we showed that membrane receptor activation led to phosphorylation of MAPK and the actin-modifying small heat shock protein 27. Using myometrial strips incubated with G-1 or vehicle we demonstrated that estrogen membrane receptor activation increased the myometrial contractile response to oxytocin. These data suggest that activation of the plasma membrane estrogen receptor GPR30 likely participates in the physiology of the human myometrium during pregnancy and identifies it as a potential target to modify uterine activity. PMID:21427217

  4. Dopamine D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of prefrontal signals in humans.

    PubMed

    Kahnt, Thorsten; Weber, Susanna C; Haker, Helene; Robbins, Trevor W; Tobler, Philippe N

    2015-03-01

    The prefrontal cortex houses representations critical for ongoing and future behavior expressed in the form of patterns of neural activity. Dopamine has long been suggested to play a key role in the integrity of such representations, with D2-receptor activation rendering them flexible but weak. However, it is currently unknown whether and how D2-receptor activation affects prefrontal representations in humans. In the current study, we use dopamine receptor-specific pharmacology and multivoxel pattern-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis that blocking D2-receptor activation enhances prefrontal representations. Human subjects performed a simple reward prediction task after double-blind and placebo controlled administration of the D2-receptor antagonist amisulpride. Using a whole-brain searchlight decoding approach we show that D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of reward signals in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. Examination of activity patterns suggests that amisulpride increases the separation of activity patterns related to reward versus no reward. Moreover, consistent with the cortical distribution of D2 receptors, post hoc analyses showed enhanced decoding of motor signals in motor cortex, but not of visual signals in visual cortex. These results suggest that D2-receptor blockade enhances content-specific representations in frontal cortex, presumably by a dopamine-mediated increase in pattern separation. These findings are in line with a dual-state model of prefrontal dopamine, and provide new insights into the potential mechanism of action of dopaminergic drugs. PMID:25740537

  5. Cellular analysis of the histamine H4 receptor in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Capelo, Ricardo; Lehmann, Christoph; Ahmad, Khalil; Snodgrass, Ryan; Diehl, Olaf; Ringleb, Julia; Flamand, Nicolas; Weigert, Andreas; Stark, Holger; Steinhilber, Dieter; Kahnt, Astrid S

    2016-03-01

    The human histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a Gαi/o-coupled receptor which is mainly expressed on hematopoietic cells. Accordingly, the receptor is implicated in the pathology of various diseases such as autoimmune disorders, bronchial asthma and pruritus. Due to complicated receptor pharmacology, the lack of a reliable antibody and limited availability of primary cells expressing the receptor the physiology of this receptor is still poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to assess absolute receptor mRNA expression and functionality (intracellular Ca(2+) release) in various human myeloid cell types such as granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). This was put into context with the expression of the H1R and H2R. In addition, the influence of various inflammatory stimuli on H4R expression was investigated in macrophages and monocyte-derived DCs. We found that classically activated macrophages treated with pro-inflammatory stimuli down-regulated histamine receptor mRNA expression as did LPS and zymosan A matured monocyte-derived DCs. In contrast, alternatively activated macrophages (IL-4 or IL-13) upregulated H2R and H4R expression compared to controls. Consistent with existing literature, we found eosinophils to be the major source of the H4R. Since availability of primary eosinophils is limited, we developed a cell model based on the differentiated eosinophilic cell line EOL-1, in which H4R pharmacology and physiology may be studied. PMID:26774453

  6. Immune receptors and adhesion molecules in human pulmonary leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Del Carlo Bernardi, Fabiola; Ctenas, Bruno; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Mauad, Thais

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis has been increasingly reported in the last 20 years, being related to the severity and mortality of the disease. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis is not understood. Lung endothelial cells have been proposed as targets in the pathogenesis of lung involvement in leptospirosis through the activation of Toll-like receptor 2 or the complement system, which stimulates the release of cytokines that lead to the activation of adhesion molecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of immune pathways and of the intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule and vascular cell adhesion molecule, respectively) in the lungs of patients with pulmonary involvement of leptospirosis. We studied the lungs of 18 patients who died of leptospirosis and compared them with 2 groups of controls: normal and noninfectious hemorrhagic lungs. Using immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we quantified the expression of the C3a anaphylatoxin receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, and Toll-like receptor 2 in small pulmonary vessels and in the alveolar septa. There was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P < .03) and C3a anaphylatoxin receptor (P < .008) in alveolar septa in the leptospirosis group compared with the normal and hemorrhagic controls. In the vessels of the leptospirosis group, there was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P = .004), vascular cell adhesion molecule (P = .030), and Toll-like receptor 2 (P = .042) compared with the normal group. Vascular cell adhesion molecule expression in vessels was higher in the leptospirosis group compared with the hemorrhagic group (P = .015). Our results indicate that immune receptors and adhesion molecules participate in the phenomena leading to pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis. PMID:22436623

  7. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  8. Localization of the receptor gene for type D simian retroviruses on human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, M A; Williams, B P; McKnight, A; Goodfellow, P N; Weiss, R A

    1990-01-01

    Simian retrovirus (SRV) serotypes 1 to 5 are exogenous type D viruses causing immune suppression in macaque monkeys. These viruses exhibit receptor interference with each other, with two endogenous type D viruses of the langur (PO-1-Lu) and squirrel monkey, and with two type C retroviruses, feline endogenous virus (RD114/CCC) and baboon endogenous virus (BaEV), indicating that each utilizes the same cell surface receptor (M. A. Sommerfelt and R. A. Weiss, Virology 176:58-69, 1990). Vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotype particles bearing envelope glycoproteins of RD114, BaEV, and the seven SRV strains were employed to detect receptors expressed in human-rodent somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes. The only human chromosome common to all the susceptible hybrids was chromosome 19. By using hybrids retaining different fragments of chromosome 19, a provisional subchromosomal localization of the receptor gene was made to 19q13.1-13.2. Antibodies previously reported to be specific to a BaEV receptor (L. Thiry, J. Cogniaux-Leclerc, R. Olislager, S. Sprecher-Goldberger, and P. Burkens, J. Virol. 48:697-708, 1983) did not block BaEV, RD114, or SRV pseudotypes or syncytia. Antibodies to known surface markers determined by genes mapped to chromosome 19 did not block virus-receptor interaction. The identity of the receptor remains to be determined. PMID:2173788

  9. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors. PMID:25871974

  10. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  11. Analysis of photoaffinity label derivatives to probe thyroid hormone receptor in human fibroblasts, GH1 cells, and soluble receptor preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Z.D.; Sahnoun, H.; Pascual, A.; Casanova, J.; Samuels, H.H.

    1988-05-15

    The regulation of growth hormone gene expression by thyroid hormone in cultured GH1 cells is mediated by a chromatin-associated receptor. We have previously described a photoaffinity label derivative of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-T3) in which the alanine side chain was modified to form N-2-diazo-3,3,3-trifluoropropionyl-L-T3 (L-(125I)T3-PAL). On exposure to 254 nm UV light, L-(125I)T3-PAL generates a carbene which covalently modifies two thyroid hormone receptor forms in intact GH1 cells; an abundant 47,000 Mr species and a less abundant 57,000 Mr form. We have now synthesized similar photoaffinity label derivatives of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (L-T4) and 3,3',5'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-rT3). Both compounds identify the same receptor forms in intact cells and in nuclear extracts in vitro as L-(125I)T3-PAL. Labeling by L-(125I)rT3-PAL was low and consistent with the very low occupancy of receptor by L-rT3. Underivatized L-(125I)T3 and L-(125I)T4 labeled the same receptor forms at 254 nm but at a markedly lower efficiency than their PAL derivatives. In contrast, N-bromoacetyl-L-(125I)T3, a chemical affinity labeling agent, did not derivatize either receptor form in vitro. The relative efficiency of coupling to receptor at 254 nm was L-(125I)T4-PAL greater than L-(125I)T3-PAL greater than L-(125I)T4 greater than L-(125I)T3. Although L-(125I)T4-PAL has a lower affinity for receptor than L-(125I)T3-PAL, its coupling efficiency was 5-10-fold higher. This suggests that the alanine side chain of L-(125I)T4-PAL is positioned in the ligand binding region near a residue which is efficiently modified by photoactivation. With L-(125I)T4-PAL we were able to identify three different molecular weight receptor species in human fibroblast nuclei.

  12. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Saita, Y; Koizumi, T; Yazawa, H; Morita, T; Takenaka, T; Honda, K

    1997-06-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). 2. [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. 3. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. 4. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. 5. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. 6. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  13. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Yuji; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Yazawa, Hidenori; Morita, Takashi; Takenaka, Toichi; Honda, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  14. Binding studies using Pichia pastoris expressed human aryl hydrocarbon receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yujuan; Xie, Jinghang; Huang, Xin; Dong, Jin; Park, Miki S; Chan, William K

    2016-06-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor which activates gene transcription by binding to its corresponding enhancer as the heterodimer, which is consisted of AHR and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT). Human AHR can be rather difficult to study, when compared among the AHR of other species, since it is relatively unstable and less sensitive to some ligands in vitro. Overexpression of human AHR has been limited to the baculovirus expression, which is costly and tedious due to the need of repetitive baculovirus production. Here we explored whether we could generate abundant amounts of human AHR and ARNT in a better overexpression system for functional study. We observed that human AHR and ARNT can be expressed in Pichia pastoris with yields that are comparable to the baculovirus system only if their cDNAs are optimized for Pichia expression. Fusion with a c-myc tag at their C-termini seems to increase the expression yield. These Pichia expressed proteins can effectively heterodimerize and form the ternary AHR/ARNT/enhancer complex in the presence of β-naphthoflavone or kynurenine. Limited proteolysis using thermolysin can be used to study the heterodimerization of these human AHR and ARNT proteins. PMID:26923060

  15. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding mechanisms underlying muscarinic receptor agonist-induced promotion of colon cancer and, more importantly, indicates that blocking MMP1 expression and activation has therapeutic promise to stop or retard colon cancer invasion and dissemination. PMID:22027145

  16. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, binds to the cloned human cannabinoid receptor and stimulates receptor-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Felder, C C; Briley, E M; Axelrod, J; Simpson, J T; Mackie, K; Devane, W A

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide), a candidate endogenous cannabinoid ligand, has recently been isolated from porcine brain and displayed cannabinoid-like binding activity to synaptosomal membrane preparations and mimicked cannabinoid-induced inhibition of the twitch response in isolated murine vas deferens. In this study, anandamide and several congeners were evaluated as cannabinoid agonists by examining their ability to bind to the cloned cannabinoid receptor, inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, inhibit N-type calcium channels, and stimulate one or more functional second messenger responses. Synthetic anandamide, and all but one congener, competed for [3H]CP55,940 binding to plasma membranes prepared from L cells expressing the rat cannabinoid receptor. The ability of anandamide to activate receptor-mediated signal transduction was evaluated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human cannabinoid receptor (HCR, termed CHO-HCR cells) and compared to control CHO cells expressing the muscarinic m5 receptor (CHOm5 cells). Anandamide inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in CHO-HCR cells, but not in CHOm5 cells, and this response was blocked with pertussis toxin. N-type calcium channels were inhibited by anandamide and several active congeners in N18 neuroblastoma cells. Anandamide stimulated arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release in both CHOm5 and CHO-HCR cells and had no effect on the release of inositol phosphates or phosphatidylethanol, generated after activation of phospholipase C and D, respectively. Anandamide appears to exhibit the essential criteria required to be classified as a cannabinoid/anandamide receptor agonist and shares similar nonreceptor effects on arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release as other cannabinoid agonists. PMID:8395053

  17. Adaptation of avian influenza A (H6N1) virus from avian to human receptor-binding preference.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Jianxun; Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Baorong; Wang, Ming; Liu, Jinhua; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2015-06-12

    The receptor-binding specificity of influenza A viruses is a major determinant for the host tropism of the virus, which enables interspecies transmission. In 2013, the first human case of infection with avian influenza A (H6N1) virus was reported in Taiwan. To gather evidence concerning the epidemic potential of H6 subtype viruses, we performed comprehensive analysis of receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs from 1972 to 2013. We propose that the receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs have undergone three major stages: initially avian receptor-binding preference, secondarily obtaining human receptor-binding capacity, and recently human receptor-binding preference, which has been confirmed by receptor-binding assessment of three representative virus isolates. Mutagenesis work revealed that E190V and G228S substitutions are important to acquire the human receptor-binding capacity, and the P186L substitution could reduce the binding to avian receptor. Further structural analysis revealed how the P186L substitution in the receptor-binding site of HA determines the receptor-binding preference change. We conclude that the human-infecting H6N1 evolved into a human receptor preference. PMID:25940072

  18. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  19. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  20. Ivermectin binding sites in human and invertebrate Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Lynagh, Timothy; Lynch, Joseph W

    2012-08-01

    Ivermectin is a gold standard antiparasitic drug that has been used successfully to treat billions of humans, livestock and pets. Until recently, the binding site on its Cys-loop receptor target had been a mystery. Recent protein crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis data and molecular modelling now explain how ivermectin binds to these receptors and reveal why it is selective for invertebrate members of the Cys-loop receptor family. Combining this with emerging genomic information, we are now in a position to predict species sensitivity to ivermectin and better understand the molecular basis of ivermectin resistance. An understanding of the molecular structure of the ivermectin binding site, which is formed at the interface of two adjacent subunits in the transmembrane domain of the receptor, should also aid the development of new lead compounds both as anthelmintics and as therapies for a wide variety of human neurological disorders. PMID:22677714

  1. Receptors for sensory neuropeptides in human inflammatory diseases: Implications for the effector role of sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, P.W.; Catton, M.D.; Boehmer, C.G.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Maggio, J.E.; Vigna, S.R. )

    1989-05-01

    Glutamate and several neuropeptides are synthesized and released by subpopulations of primary afferent neurons. These sensory neurons play a role in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography we have explored what changes occur in the location and concentration of receptor binding sites for sensory neurotransmitters in the colon in two human inflammatory diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The sensory neurotransmitter receptors examined included bombesin, calcitonin gene related peptide-alpha, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, neurokinin A (substance K), substance P, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Of the nine receptor binding sites examined only substance P binding sites associated with arterioles, venules and lymph nodules were dramatically up-regulated in the inflamed tissue. These data suggest that substance P is involved in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in human inflammatory diseases and indicate a specificity of efferent action for each sensory neurotransmitter in peripheral tissues.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus receptor of human B lymphocytes is the C3d receptor CR2.

    PubMed Central

    Fingeroth, J D; Weis, J J; Tedder, T F; Strominger, J L; Biro, P A; Fearon, D T

    1984-01-01

    Identity of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) receptor with the complement receptor type 2 (CR2) was established in three sets of experiments using the monoclonal antibodies, HB-5 and anti-B2, which recognize a Mr 145,000 B-lymphocyte membrane protein that is CR2. First, the rank order for binding of fluoresceinated EBV to four lymphoblastoid cell lines (SB, JY, Raji, and Molt-4) was identical to the rank order for binding of HB-5 and anti-B2 by analytical flow cytometry. Second, pretreatment of cells with HB-5 followed by treatment with goat F(ab')2 fragments to mouse IgG blocked binding of fluoresceinated EBV on SB, a B-lymphoblastoid cell line. Virus attachment was not inhibited by HB-5 alone, second antibody alone, rabbit anti-C3b receptor, or UPC10 (an irrelevant monoclonal antibody). Third, transfer of CR2 from SB to protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus particles, to which HB-5 had been absorbed, conferred on them the specific ability to bind 125I-labeled EBV. We conclude that CR2 is the EBV receptor of human B lymphocytes. Images PMID:6087328

  3. Crystal structure of the human OX2 orexin receptor bound to the insomnia drug suvorexant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jie; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Kolb, Peter; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The orexin (also known as hypocretin) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to orexin neuropeptides in the central nervous system to regulate sleep and other behavioural functions in humans. Defects in orexin signalling are responsible for the human diseases of narcolepsy and cataplexy; inhibition of orexin receptors is an effective therapy for insomnia. The human OX2 receptor (OX2R) belongs to the β branch of the rhodopsin family of GPCRs, and can bind to diverse compounds including the native agonist peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and the potent therapeutic inhibitor suvorexant. Here, using lipid-mediated crystallization and protein engineering with a novel fusion chimaera, we solved the structure of the human OX2R bound to suvorexant at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals how suvorexant adopts a π-stacked horseshoe-like conformation and binds to the receptor deep in the orthosteric pocket, stabilizing a network of extracellular salt bridges and blocking transmembrane helix motions necessary for activation. Computational docking suggests how other classes of synthetic antagonists may interact with the receptor at a similar position in an analogous π-stacked fashion. Elucidation of the molecular architecture of the human OX2R expands our understanding of peptidergic GPCR ligand recognition and will aid further efforts to modulate orexin signalling for therapeutic ends.

  4. Human bradykinin B2 receptor: Nucleotide sequence analysis and assignment to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, S.J.; Slynn, G.; Thomas, C.; Hopkins, B.; Briggs, I.; Graham, A. )

    1993-02-01

    Functional cDNA clones for human bradykinin B2 receptor were isolated from uterus RNA by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method and by screening a human cosmid library with rat bradykinin B2 receptor probe. We isolated several overlapping clones from the cosmid library, each of which encodes the entire protein-coding sequence. The human bradykinin B2 receptor gene codes for a 364-amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 41,442 Da that is highly homologous to rat bradykinin B2 receptor cDNA (81%). The entire human cDNA sequence was cloned into an expression vector and mRNA was synthesised by in vitro transcription. Applications of bradykinin caused membrane current responses in Xenopus oocytes injected with the in vitro-synthesized mRNA. Preincubation with the potent B2 antagonist, HOE140, prevented this response. The genomic clone is intronless, and we have identified an upstream promoter region and a downstream polyadenylation signal. The human bradykinin B2 receptor gene has been mapped to chromosome 14 using PCR to specifically amplify DNA from somatic cell hybrids. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Receptor-mediated uptake of remnant lipoproteins by cholesterol-loaded human monocyte-macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lenten, B.J.; Fogelman, A.M.; Jackson, R.L.; Shapiro, S.; Haberland, M.E.; Edwards, P.A.

    1985-07-25

    Normal human monocyte-macrophages were cholesterol-loaded, and the rates of uptake and degradation of several lipoproteins were measured and compared to rates in control cells. Receptor activities for SVI-rabbit beta-very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL), SVI-human low density lipoprotein, and SVI-human chylomicrons were down-regulated in cholesterol-loaded cells; however, the rate of uptake and degradation of SVI-human chylomicron remnants was unchanged from control cells. Cholesterol-loaded alveolar macrophages from a Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit, which lack low density lipoprotein receptors, showed receptor down-regulation for SVI-beta-VLDL but not for SVI-human chylomicron remnants. In addition to chylomicron remnants, apo-E-phospholipid complexes competed for SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake, but apo-A-I-phospholipid complexes did not. Chylomicron remnants and beta-VLDL were equally effective in competing for SVI-beta-VLDL and SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake in cholesterol-loaded macrophages. The authors conclude: 1) specific lipoprotein receptor activity persists in cholesterol-loaded cells; 2) this receptor activity recognizes lipo-proteins (at least in part) by their apo-E content; and 3) cholesteryl ester accumulation can occur in monocyte-macrophages incubated with chylomicron remnants.

  6. Dysfunction of GABAA receptor glycolysis-dependent modulation in human partial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Laschet, Jacques J.; Kurcewicz, Irène; Minier, Frédéric; Trottier, Suzanne; Khallou-Laschet, Jamila; Louvel, Jacques; Gigout, Sylvain; Turak, Baris; Biraben, Arnaud; Scarabin, Jean-Marie; Devaux, Bertrand; Chauvel, Patrick; Pumain, René

    2007-01-01

    A reduction in GABAergic neurotransmission has been put forward as a pathophysiological mechanism for human epilepsy. However, in slices of human epileptogenic neocortex, GABAergic inhibition can be clearly demonstrated. In this article we present data showing an increase in the functional lability of GABAergic inhibition in epileptogenic tissue compared with nonepileptogenic human tissue. We have previously shown that the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH is the kinase involved in the glycolysis-dependent endogenous phosphorylation of the α1-subunit of GABAA receptor, a mechanism necessary for maintaining GABAA function. In human epileptogenic cortex obtained during curative surgery of patients with partial seizures, we demonstrate an intrinsic deficiency of GABAA receptor endogenous phosphorylation resulting in an increased lability of GABAergic currents in neurons isolated from this tissue when compared with neurons from nonepileptogenic human tissue. This feature was not related to a reduction in the number of GABAA receptor α1-subunits in the epileptogenic tissue as measured by [3H]flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeling. Maintaining the receptor in a phosphorylated state either by favoring the endogenous phosphorylation or by inhibiting a membrane-associated phosphatase is needed to sustain GABAA receptor responses in epileptogenic cortex. The increased functional lability induced by the deficiency in phosphorylation can account for transient GABAergic disinhibition favoring seizure initiation and propagation. These findings imply new therapeutic approaches and suggest a functional link to the regional cerebral glucose hypometabolism observed in patients with partial epilepsy, because the dysfunctional GABAergic mechanism depends on the locally produced glycolytic ATP. PMID:17360668

  7. Evidence for 5-HT1-like receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; Clayton, R. A.; Templeton, A. G.; Morecroft, I.

    1996-01-01

    1. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating contraction of human isolated pulmonary artery rings were investigated. Responses to the agonists 5-carboximidotryptamine (5-CT, non-selective 5-HT1 agonist), sumatriptan (5-HT1D-like receptor agonist), 5-HT and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 5-HT1A receptor agonist) were studied. Responses to 5-HT and sumatriptan in the presence of the antagonists, methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT1+2-receptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist) and the novel antagonist, GR55562 (5-HT1D receptor antagonist) were also studied. 2. All agonists contracted human pulmonary artery ring preparations in the following order of potency 5-CT > 5-HT = sumatriptan > 8-OH-DPAT. Maximum responses to 5-HT, 5-CT and sumatriptan were not significantly different. 3. Methiothepin 1 nM and 10 nM, but not 0.1 nM reduced the maximum contractile responses to 5-HT but did not alter tissue sensitivity to 5-HT. Methiothepin 0.1 nM, 1 nM and 10 nM had a similar effect on responses to sumatriptan. 4. The 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 nM, 100 nM and 1 microM) also reduced the maximum contractile response to both 5-HT and sumatriptan without affecting tissue sensitivity to these agonists. 5. The novel 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, GR55562, inhibited responses to 5-HT and sumatriptan in a true competitive fashion. 6. The results suggest that the human pulmonary artery has a functional population of 5-HT1D-like receptors which are involved in the contractile response to 5-HT. PMID:8886409

  8. Neuronal-type alpha-bungarotoxin receptors and the alpha 5-nicotinic receptor subunit gene are expressed in neuronal and nonneuronal human cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Chini, B; Clementi, F; Hukovic, N; Sher, E

    1992-01-01

    alpha-Bungarotoxin (alpha Bgtx) is a toxin known to interact with muscle nicotinic receptors and with some neuronal nicotinic receptors. We show that alpha Bgtx binding sites are also expressed in nonmuscle and nonneuronal human cells, including small cell lung carcinoma and several epithelial cell lines. These receptors are immunologically related to the alpha Bgtx receptors of unknown function described in the nervous system and in the IMR32 neuroblastoma cell line and are distinct from muscle nicotinic receptors. We have also cloned from IMR32 cells the human alpha 5-nicotinic receptor subunit, which is supposed to participate in the formation of alpha Bgtx receptors. Transcripts corresponding to the alpha 5-subunit gene were found not only in neuroblastoma cells but also in all the cell lines expressing alpha Bgtx receptors, with the exception of the TE671 cell line, whose nicotinic receptor subunits are of the muscle type. We conclude that both alpha Bgtx receptors and the alpha 5-nicotinic subunit gene are not neuron-specific, as previously thought, but are expressed in a number of human cell lines of various origin. Images PMID:1542648

  9. Characterization of the single transmembrane domain of human receptor activity-modifying protein 3 in adrenomedullin receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Nozaki, Naomi; Kato, Johji

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less effectively than does RAMP2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new strategy of promoting internalization and resensitization of the receptor was found. -- Abstract: Two receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP2 and RAMP3) enable calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) to function as two heterodimeric receptors (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3) for adrenomedullin (AM), a potent cardiovascular protective peptide. Following AM stimulation, both receptors undergo rapid internalization through a clathrin-dependent pathway, after which CLR/RAMP3, but not CLR/RAMP2, can be recycled to the cell surface for resensitization. However, human (h)RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less efficiently than does hRAMP2. Therefore, the molecular basis of the single transmembrane domain (TMD) and the intracellular domain of hRAMP3 during AM receptor internalization was investigated by transiently transfecting various RAMP chimeras and mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hCLR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that substituting the RAMP3 TMD with that of RAMP2 markedly enhanced AM-induced internalization of CLR. However, this replacement did not enhance the cell surface expression of CLR, [{sup 125}I]AM binding affinity or AM-induced cAMP response. More detailed analyses showed that substituting the Thr{sup 130}-Val{sup 131} sequence in the RAMP3 TMD with the corresponding sequence (Ile{sup 157}-Pro{sup 158}) from RAMP2 significantly enhanced AM-mediated CLR internalization. In contrast, substituting the RAMP3 target sequence with Ala{sup 130}-Ala{sup 131} did not significantly affect CLR internalization. Thus, the RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization, and the aforementioned introduction of the Ile-Pro sequence into the RAMP3 TMD may be a

  10. The human D2 dopamine receptor synergizes with the A2A adenosine receptor to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kudlacek, Oliver; Just, Herwig; Korkhov, Vladimir M; Vartian, Nina; Klinger, Markus; Pankevych, Halyna; Yang, Qiong; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor and the dopamine D(2) receptor are prototypically coupled to G(s) and G(i)/G(o), respectively. In striatal intermediate spiny neurons, these receptors are colocalized in dendritic spines and act as mutual antagonists. This antagonism has been proposed to occur at the level of the receptors or of receptor-G protein coupling. We tested this model in PC12 cells which endogenously express A(2A) receptors. The human D(2) receptor was introduced into PC12 cells by stable transfection. A(2A)-agonist-mediated inhibition of D(2) agonist binding was absent in PC12 cell membranes but present in HEK293 cells transfected as a control. However, in the resulting PC12 cell lines, the action of the D(2) agonist quinpirole depended on the expression level of the D(2) receptor: at low and high receptor levels, the A(2A)-agonist-induced elevation of cAMP was enhanced and inhibited, respectively. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was invariably inhibited by quinpirole. The effects of quinpirole were abolished by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. A(2A)-receptor-mediated cAMP formation was inhibited by other G(i)/G(o)-coupled receptors that were either endogenously present (P(2y12)-like receptor for ADP) or stably expressed after transfection (A(1) adenosine, metabotropic glutamate receptor-7A). Similarly, voltage activated Ca(2+) channels were inhibited by the endogenous P(2Y) receptor and by the heterologously expressed A(1) receptor but not by the D(2) receptor. These data indicate functional segregation of signaling components. Our observations are thus compatible with the proposed model that D(2) and A(2A) receptors are closely associated, but they highlight the fact that this interaction can also support synergism. PMID:12784121

  11. Olfactory receptor-like genes are located in the human major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.; Liu, Y.C.; Parimoo, S.

    1995-05-01

    The murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) includes sequences that are responsible for haplotype-specific odor types that, in turn, influence mating preference. The authors report that there are several olfactory receptor genes or pseudogenes in the Class I region of the human MHC. At least one of these genes is intact, appears to encode an mRNA, and is quite homologous to a previously reported murine olfactory receptor. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  12. The expression of tachykinin receptors in the human lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Chen, Que T; Li, Jing H; Geng, Xian; Liu, Jun F; Li, He F; Feng, Yong; Li, Jia L; Drew, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides which are potent modulators of smooth muscle function with a significant contractile effect on human smooth muscle preparations. Tachykinins act via three distinct G protein-coupled neurokinin (NK) receptors, NK1, NK2 and NK3, coded by the genes TACR1, TACR2 and TACR3 respectively. The purpose of this paper was to measure the mRNA and protein expression of these receptors and their isoforms in the clasp and sling fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex and circular muscle from the adjacent distal esophagus and proximal stomach. We found differences in expression between the different receptors within these muscle types, but the rank order of the receptor expression did not differ between the different muscle types. The rank order of the mRNA expression was TACR2 (α isoform)>TACR2 (β isoform)>TACR1 (short isoform)>TACR1 (long isoform)>TACR3. The rank order of the protein expression was NK2>NK1>NK3. This is the first report of the measurement of the transcript and protein expression of the tachykinin receptors and their isoforms in the muscles of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex. The results provide evidence that the tachykinin receptors could contribute to the regulation of the human lower esophageal sphincter, particularly the TACR2 α isoform which encodes the functional isoform of the tachykinin NK2 receptor was the most highly expressed of the tachykinin receptors in the muscles associated with the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:26852958

  13. Safety and kinetic properties of a humanized antibody to human interleukin-6 receptor in healthy non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Shinkura, H; Imazeki, I; Fukushima, N; Chiba, N; Takahashi, F; Aikawa, H; Kitamura, H; Furuichi, T; Horiba, N; Ohsugi, Y

    1997-10-19

    A monoclonal antibody, hPM-1, was constructed by grafting the complementarity determining regions to human interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor, raised in mouse, onto a human antibody backbone (humanized antibody). It is expected to be useful as a therapeutic agent for IL-6-related diseases such as multiple myeloma. To investigate the toxicological and kinetic properties of hPM-1 preliminarily, normal cynomolgus monkeys, which showed cross-reactivity with hPM-1, were intravenously administered with hPM-1 at doses of 0 (vehicle), 4 or 40 mg/kg once a week for 13 weeks. Upon toxicological examination, there were no changes in clinical signs, food consumption, body weights, urinalyses, body temperatures, electrocardiograms, hematological and biochemical parameters including blood platelet counts, serum levels of immunoglobulin G and C-reactive protein, and pathological findings. In a kinetic study, serum concentrations of hPM-1 showed a linearity between doses of 4 and 40 mg/kg. The serum concentrations, even at a dose of 4 mg/kg, were maintained at a high enough level to inhibit the IL-6 functions throughout the period of the study. Concentrations of hPM-1 in bone marrow were almost equal to those in serum. The antibodies against hPM-1 were detected only in one of four monkeys receiving hPM-1. This study suggests that blockage of the IL-6 receptor by hPM-1 does not induce any influence on a healthy living body, and hPM-1 is not toxic under the conditions of this investigation. PMID:9328216

  14. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  15. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  16. Spatial localization of ryanodine receptors in human cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Vallmitjana, A; Nolla, C; Herraiz-Martínez, A; Hove-Madsen, L; Benítez, R

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel image processing method to determine the location of ryanodine receptors in cardiac cells. A semi-automatic manual validation by an expert has been used in order to establish the performance of the segmentation method. The approach provides high accuracy under different experimental conditions and it is robust to common sources of noise including experimental, molecular and biological fluctuations. PMID:26737732

  17. Estrogen-related receptor α is required for efficient human cytomegalovirus replication

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jesse; Purdy, John G.; Wu, Kai; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Shenk, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An shRNA-mediated screen of the 48 human nuclear receptor genes identified multiple candidates likely to influence the production of human cytomegalovirus in cultured human fibroblasts, including the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor. The 50-kDa receptor and a 76-kDa variant were induced posttranscriptionally following infection. Genetic and pharmacological suppression of the receptor reduced viral RNA, protein, and DNA accumulation, as well as the yield of infectious progeny. In addition, RNAs encoding multiple metabolic enzymes, including enzymes sponsoring glycolysis (enolase 1, triosephosphate isomerase 1, and hexokinase 2), were reduced when the function of ERRα was inhibited in infected cells. Consistent with the effect on RNAs, a substantial number of metabolites, which are normally induced by infection, were either not increased or were increased to a reduced extent in the absence of normal ERRα activity. We conclude that ERRα is needed for the efficient production of cytomegalovirus progeny, and we propose that the nuclear receptor contributes importantly to the induction of a metabolic environment that supports optimal cytomegalovirus replication. PMID:25512541

  18. Mechanism of dimerization of the human melanocortin 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zanna, Paola T.; Sanchez-Laorden, Berta L.; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Turpin, Maria C.; Herraiz, Cecilia; Jimenez-Cervantes, Celia; Garcia-Borron, Jose C.

    2008-04-04

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a dimeric G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, where it regulates the amount and type of melanins produced and determines the tanning response to ultraviolet radiation. We have studied the mechanisms of MC1R dimerization. Normal dimerization of a deleted mutant lacking the seventh transmembrane fragment and the C-terminal cytosolic extension excluded coiled-coil interactions as the basis of dimerization. Conversely, the electrophoretic pattern of wild type receptor and several Cys {yields} Ala mutants showed that four disulfide bonds are established between the monomers. Disruption of any of these bonds abolished MC1R function, but only the one involving Cys35 was essential for traffic to the plasma membrane. A quadruple Cys35-267-273-275Ala mutant migrating as a monomer in SDS-PAGE in the absence of reducing agents was able to dimerize with WT, suggesting that in addition to disulfide bond formation, dimerization involves non-covalent interactions, likely of domain swap type.

  19. Identification of a null mutation in the human dopamine D4 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Hebebrand, J.

    1994-09-01

    Dopamine receptors belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. Five different dopamine receptor genes have thus far been identified. These receptors are classified into two main subfamilies: D1, which includes the D1 and D5 receptors, and D2, which includes the D2, D3, and D4 receptors. The dopamine D4 receptor is of great interest for research into neuropsychiatric disorders and psychopharmacology in light of the fact that it binds the antipsychotic medication clozapine with higher affinity than does any other dopamine receptor. In addition, among the dopamine receptors, the D4 receptor shows a uniquely high degree of genetic variation in the human population. We identified a new 13 bp deletion in exon 1 of the D4 gene. This frameshift creates a terminator codon at amino acid position 98. mRNA isolated from brain tissue of two heterozygous persons showed both alleles to be expressed. The deletion occurs with a frequency of 2% in the German population. One person was identified to be homozygous for the deletion. Interestingly, he has a normal intelligence and did not exhibit a major psychiatric disorder as defined by DSM III-R. The 13 bp deletion is the first mutation resulting in premature translation termination reported for a dopamine receptor gene so far. This mutation is a good candidate to test for potential effects on disease and/or individual response to pharmacotherapy. Association studies in patients with various psychiatric illnesses and differences in response to clozapine are underway.

  20. Solubilization and characterization of the VIP receptor on a human lymphoblastic cell line

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dorisio, M.S.; Compolito, L.B.; Vassalo, L.M.

    1986-03-01

    The neuropeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), has been shown to modulate several immune functions including lymphocyte trafficking, lymphoblastic transformation and natural killer cell activity. These actions of VIP appear to be mediated via specific, VIP preferring, receptors. Functional VIP receptors have been demonstrated on human T lymphocytes, pre B cell (CALLA+) leukemia cells and a Molt 4b lymphoblastic cell line. In this study, plasma membranes were prepared from Molt 4b lymphoblasts. The membrane fraction contained a function VIP receptor as determined by activation of adenylate cyclase which was potentiated by both guanine nucleotide and forskolin. /sup 125/I-VIP was covalently crosslinked to its receptor in membranes using the bifunctional reagent disuccinimidyl suberate. A 50,000 M/sub r/ protein comprising or associated with the VIP receptor was identified. Treatment of crosslinked membranes with endo-..beta..-N-acetylglucosaminidase F did not alter the mobility of the putative VIP receptor indicating no significant high mannose or complex glycosyl residues on the receptor molecule. Similarly, treatment of crosslinked membranes with neuroaminidase resulted in no change in mobility suggesting the absence of sialic acid residues on the putative receptor molecule. The VIP receptor was solubilized by treatment of membranes with 50 mM (3-((3-Cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate) CHAPS followed by centrifugation at 48,000 g. The crosslinked solubilized receptor again migrated at M/sur r/ = 50,000 indicating a 47K (50,000 - MW of VIP) protein. Further characterization of this receptor will allow for development of therapeutic modalities to modulate lymphocyte proliferation and function in vivo.

  1. Functions of human bitter taste receptors depend on N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Reichling, Claudia; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Behrens, Maik

    2008-08-01

    Human bitter taste receptors of the TAS2R gene family play a crucial role as warning sensors against the ingestion of toxic food compounds. Moreover, the genetically highly polymorphic hTAS2Rs recognize an enormous number of structurally diverse toxic and non-toxic bitter substances, and hence, may substantially influence our individual eating habits. Heterologous expression in mammalian cells is a useful tool to investigate interactions between these receptors and their agonists. However, many bitter taste receptors are poorly expressed at the cell surface of heterologous cells requiring the addition of plasma membrane export promoting epitopes to the native receptor proteins. Currently, nothing is known about amino acid motifs or other receptor-intrinsic features of TAS2Rs affecting plasma membrane association. In the present study, we analyzed the Asn-linked glycosylation of hTAS2Rs at a consensus sequence in the second extracellular loop, which is conserved among all 25 hTAS2Rs. Non-glycosylated receptors exhibit substantially lower cell surface localization and reduced association with the cellular chaperone calnexin. As the auxiliary factors receptor transporting proteins 3 and 4 are able to restore the function of non-glycosylated hTAS2R16 partially, we conclude that glycosylation is important for receptor maturation but not for its function per se. PMID:18466324

  2. Distribution of dopamine D2-like receptors in the human thalamus: autoradiographic and PET studies.

    PubMed

    Rieck, Richard W; Ansari, M S; Whetsell, William O; Deutch, Ariel Y; Kessler, Robert M

    2004-02-01

    The distribution of dopamine (DA) D(2)-like receptors in the human thalamus was studied using in vitro autoradiographic techniques and in vivo positron emission tomography in normal control subjects. [(125)I]Epidepride, which binds with high affinity to DA D(2) and D(3) receptors, was used in autoradiographic studies to determine the distribution and density of D(2)-like receptors, and the epidepride analogue [(18)F]fallypride positron was used for positron emission tomography studies to delineate D(2)-like receptors in vivo. Both approaches revealed a heterogeneous distribution of thalamic D(2/3) receptors, with relatively high densities in the intralaminar and midline thalamic nuclei, including the paraventricular, parataenial, paracentral, centrolateral, and centromedian/parafascicular nuclei. Moderate densities of D(2/3) sites were seen in the mediodorsal and anterior nuclei, while other thalamic nuclei expressed lower levels of D(2)-like receptors. Most thalamic nuclei that express high densities of D(2)-like receptors project to forebrain DA terminal fields, suggesting that both the thalamic neurons expressing D(2)-like receptors and the projection targets of these neurons are regulated by DA. Because the midline/intralaminar nuclei receive prominent projections from both the ascending reticular activating core and the hypothalamus, these thalamic nuclei may integrate activity conveying both interoceptive and exteroceptive information to telencephalic DA systems involved in reward and cognition. PMID:14627996

  3. Distribution of dopamine D1-D4 receptor subtypes in human dorsal vagal complex.

    PubMed

    Hyde, T M; Knable, M B; Murray, A M

    1996-11-01

    The distribution of D1/D5, D2/D3, D2/D3/D4, and individually, putative D2-D4 receptors across the dorsal vagal complex of the human medulla was assessed with quantitative receptor autoradiography. D1/D5 receptors were found in very low levels. D2 receptors were concentrated in the intermediate and medial subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMN), while D3 receptors were more homogeneous across the entire NTS, area postrema (AP), and DMN. In contrast, D4 receptors were found almost exclusively in the intermediate and medial subnuclei of the NTS, and in the DMN. These findings suggest that the "D2 family" of receptors is an important component of brain stem mechanisms regulating visceral function, including gastrointestinal systems, such as emesis, along with cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Compounds with individual selectivity for D2, D3, or D4 receptors may be useful in the manipulation of neural networks regulating these visceral systems. PMID:8923662

  4. The Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR56/ADGRG1 Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gin-Wen; Hsiao, Cheng-Chih; Peng, Yen-Ming; Vieira Braga, Felipe A; Kragten, Natasja A M; Remmerswaal, Ester B M; van de Garde, Martijn D B; Straussberg, Rachel; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Knäuper, Vera; Meyaard, Linde; van Lier, René A W; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Hamann, Jörg

    2016-05-24

    Natural killer (NK) cells possess potent cytotoxic mechanisms that need to be tightly controlled. Here, we explored the regulation and function of GPR56/ADGRG1, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor implicated in developmental processes and expressed distinctively in mature NK cells. Expression of GPR56 was triggered by Hobit (a homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells) and declined upon cell activation. Through studying NK cells from polymicrogyria patients with disease-causing mutations in ADGRG1, encoding GPR56, and NK-92 cells ectopically expressing the receptor, we found that GPR56 negatively regulates immediate effector functions, including production of inflammatory cytokines and cytolytic proteins, degranulation, and target cell killing. GPR56 pursues this activity by associating with the tetraspanin CD81. We conclude that GPR56 inhibits natural cytotoxicity of human NK cells. PMID:27184850

  5. The liver X receptor agonist T0901317 acts as androgen receptor antagonist in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chuu, Chih-pin; Chen, Rou-Yu; Hiipakka, Richard A.; Kokontis, John M.; Warner, Karen V.; Xiang, Jialing; Liao, Shutsung . E-mail: sliao@uchicago.edu

    2007-06-01

    T0901317 is a potent non-steroidal synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. T0901317 blocked androgenic stimulation of the proliferation of androgen-dependent LNCaP 104-S cells and androgenic suppression of the proliferation of androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, inhibited the transcriptional activation of an androgen-dependent reporter gene by androgen, and suppressed gene and protein expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a target gene of androgen receptor (AR) without affecting gene and protein expression of AR. T0901317 also inhibited binding of a radiolabeled androgen to AR, but inhibition was much weaker compared to the effect of the antiandrogens, bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide. The LXR agonist T0901317, therefore, acts as an antiandrogen in human prostate cancer cells.

  6. Identification of the phorbol ester receptor in human and avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, C.M.; Sando, J.J.; Speizer, L.A.

    1986-05-01

    The ability of phorbol esters to inhibit the uptake of a fluorescent glucose analogue in goose but not human erythrocytes is consistent with earlier reports that the human red blood cell lacks the phorbol ester receptor. However, they have located specific phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding sites in both human and goose erythrocytes. Human and goose red blood cells contain 2 classes of phorbol ester receptors with similar affinities, however the human erythrocyte contains 1/3 as many phorbol ester receptors as does the goose red blood cell. An additional contrast in the binding of phorbol esters to human and goose red blood cells is the temperature-induced enhancement of binding to goose, but not human erythrocytes. Equilibrium phorbol ester binding to goose red blood cells at 37/sup 0/C is enhanced 3.3 +/- 0.4 times that amount bound at 4/sup 0/C. Equilibrium binding of phorbol esters to human erythrocytes is identical at both temperatures. In vivo and in vitro phosphorylation profiles of C-kinase substrates also differ between the human and goose erythrocyte.

  7. Dynamic correlation networks in human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Fidelak, Jeremy; Ferrer, Silvia; Oberlin, Michael; Moras, Dino; Dejaegere, Annick; Stote, Roland H

    2010-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor (PPAR-γ) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptor proteins that function as ligand-dependent transcription factors and plays a specific physiological role as a regulator of lipid metabolism. A number of experimental studies have suggested that allostery plays an important role in the functioning of PPAR-γ. Here we use normal-mode analysis of PPAR-γ to characterize a network of dynamically coupled amino acids that link physiologically relevant binding surfaces such as the ligand-dependent activation domain AF-2 with the ligand binding site and the heterodimer interface. Multiple calculations were done in both the presence and absence of the agonist rosiglitazone, and the differences in dynamics were characterized. The global dynamics of the ligand binding domain were affected by the ligand, and in particular, changes to the network of dynamically correlated amino acids were observed with only small changes in conformation. These results suggest that changes in dynamic couplings can be functionally significant with respect to the transmission of allosteric signals. PMID:20496064

  8. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model. PMID:27062579

  9. GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells: Anatomical localization and characterization by autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Latouche, J.; Crumeyrolle-Arias, M.; Jordan, D.; Kopp, N.; Augendre-Ferrante, B.; Cedard, L.; Haour, F. )

    1989-09-01

    The presence of receptors for GnRH in human ovary has been investigated by quantitative autoradiography. Simultaneous visualization and characterization of specific receptors on frozen sections were obtained on six pairs of human ovaries. Among them only one exhibited a large preovulatory follicle. This dominant follicle exhibited a specific and high affinity binding capacity for {sup 125}I-GnRHa exclusively localized on the granulosa cell layer. Analysis of saturation curve indicates a Kd value of 0.22 nM and Bmax of 9.6 fmol/mg protein. In contrast LH-hCG binding sites were present in all antral follicles. These data demonstrate for the first time the presence of high affinity GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells at a late stage of follicular maturation.

  10. Cocaine exposure impairs multineage hematopoiesis of human hematopoietic progenitor cells mediated by the sigma-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Christopher C.; Schwartz, Brandon H.; Dixit, Dhaval; Zack, Jerome A.; Vatakis, Dimitrios N.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to cocaine is a significant source of fetal and neonatal developmental defects. While cocaine associated neurological and cardiac pathologies are well-documented, it is apparent that cocaine use has far more diverse physiological effects. It is known that in some cell types, the sigma-1 receptor mediates many of cocaine's cellular effects. Here we present a novel and concise investigation into the mechanism that underlies cocaine associated hematopoietic pathology. Indeed, this is the first examination of the effects of cocaine on hematopoiesis. We show that cocaine impairs multilineage hematopoiesis from human progenitors from multiple donors and tissue types. We go on to present the first demonstration of the expression of the sigma-1 receptor in human CD34 + human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these cocaine-induced hematopoietic defects can be reversed through sigma-1 receptor blockade. PMID:25728014

  11. Receptor specificity in human, avian, and equine H2 and H3 influenza virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Connor, R J; Kawaoka, Y; Webster, R G; Paulson, J C

    1994-11-15

    The receptor specificity of 56 H2 and H3 influenza virus isolates from various animal species has been determined to test the relevance of receptor specificity to the ecology of influenza virus. The results show that the receptor specificity of both H2 and H3 isolates evaluated for sialic acid linkage specificity and inhibition of hemagglutination by horse serum correlates with the species of origin, as postulated earlier for H3 strains based on a limited survey of five human, three avian, and one equine strain. Elucidation of the amino acid sequence of several human H2 receptor variants and analysis of known sequences of H2 and H3 isolates revealed that receptor specificity varies in association with an amino acid change at residues 228 in addition to the change at residue 226 previously documented to affect receptor specificity of H3 but not H1 isolates. Residues 226 and 228 are leucine and serine in human isolates, which preferentially bind sialic acid alpha 2,6-galactose beta 1,4-N-acetyl glucosamine (SA alpha 2,6Gal), and glutamine and glycine in avian and equine isolates, which exhibit specificity for sialic acid alpha-2,3-galactose beta-1,3-N-acetyl galactosamine (SA alpha 2,3Gal). The results demonstrate that the correlation of receptor specificity and species of origin is maintained across both H2 and H3 influenza virus serotypes and provide compelling evidence that influenza virus hosts exert selective pressure to maintain the receptor specificity characteristics of strains isolated from that species. PMID:7975212

  12. Cell-free protein synthesis and purification of human dopamine D2 receptor long isoform.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dipannita; Castellano, Jessica M; Thomas, Nancy; Mishra, Ram K

    2013-01-01

    The human dopamine D2 receptor long isoform (D2L) has significant implications in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Detailed structural knowledge of this receptor is limited owing to its highly hydrophobic nature, which leads to protein aggregation and host toxicity when expressed in cellular systems. The newly emerging field of cell-free protein expression presents numerous advantages to overcome these challenges. This system utilizes protein synthesis machinery and exogenous DNA to synthesize functional proteins outside of intact cells. This study utilizes two different cell-free systems for the synthesis of human dopamine D2L receptor. These include the Escherichia coli lysate-based system and the wheat-germ lysate-based system. The bacterial cell-free method used pET 100/D-TOPO vector to synthesize hexa-histidine-tagged D2L receptor using a dialysis bag system; the resulting protein was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity resin. The wheat germ system used pEU-glutathione-S-transferase (GST) vector to synthesize GST-tagged D2L receptor using a bilayer translation method; the resulting protein was purified using a GST affinity resin. The presence and binding capacity of the synthesized D2L receptor was confirmed by immunoblotting and radioligand competition assays, respectively. Additionally, in-gel protein sequencing via Nano LC-MS/MS was used to confirm protein synthesis via the wheat germ system. The results showed both systems to synthesize microgram quantities of the receptor. Improved expression of this highly challenging protein can improve research and understanding of the human dopamine D2L receptor. PMID:23424095

  13. Quail carry sialic acid receptors compatible with binding of avian and human influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Perez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that some terrestrial avian species may play a role in the genesis of influenza viruses with pandemic potential. In the present investigation, we examined whether quail, a widespread-farmed poultry, possess the proper characteristics for serving as an intermediate host for the zoonotic transmission of influenza viruses. Using a lectin-based staining based on specific agglutinins, we found that, in addition to the presence of sialic acid α2,3-galactose (SAα2,3-gal) linked receptors, there are abundant sialic acid α2,6-galactose (SAα2,6-gal) linked receptors in quail trachea and intestine. The presence of abundant SAα2,6-gal-linked receptors explains, at least in part, the circulation of avian influenza viruses with human-like receptor specificity in quail. In quail trachea, SAα2,3-gal linked receptors are present primarily in non-ciliated cells, while SAα2,6-gal linked receptors are localized predominantly on the surface of ciliated cells. In quail intestine, both types of receptors were found on epithelial cells as well as in crypts. In a solid-phase overlay binding assay, both avian and human influenza viruses bind to plasma membranes prepared from epithelial cells of quail trachea and intestine, strongly suggesting that these receptors are functional for binding of influenza viruses from different species. Together with previous observations, these results are consistent with the notion that quail could provide an environment for the spread of reassortants between avian and human influenza viruses, thus acting as a potential intermediate host. PMID:16325879

  14. BDNF modulates GABAA receptors microtransplanted from the human epileptic brain to Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Palma, E.; Torchia, G.; Limatola, C.; Trettel, F.; Arcella, A.; Cantore, G.; Di Gennaro, G.; Manfredi, M.; Esposito, V.; Quarato, P. P.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Cell membranes isolated from brain tissues, obtained surgically from six patients afflicted with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and from one nonepileptic patient afflicted with a cerebral oligodendroglioma, were injected into frog oocytes. By using this approach, the oocytes acquire human GABAA receptors, and we have shown previously that the “epileptic receptors” (receptors transplanted from epileptic brains) display a marked run-down during repetitive applications of GABA. It was found that exposure to the neurotrophin BDNF increased the amplitude of the “GABA currents” (currents elicited by GABA) generated by the epileptic receptors and decreased their run-down; both events being blocked by K252A, a neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor B inhibitor. These effects of BDNF were not mimicked by nerve growth factor. In contrast, the GABAA receptors transplanted from the nonepileptic human hippocampal uncus (obtained during surgical resection as part of the nontumoral tissue from the oligodendroglioma margins) or receptors expressed by injecting rat recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor subunit cDNAs generated GABA currents whose time-course and run-down were not altered by BDNF. Loading the oocytes with the Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetate-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), or treating them with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent PKA, did not alter the GABA currents. However, staurosporine (a broad spectrum PK inhibitor), bisindolylmaleimide I (a PKC inhibitor), and U73122 (a phospholipase C inhibitor) blocked the BDNF-induced effects on the epileptic GABA currents. Our results indicate that BDNF potentiates the epileptic GABAA currents and antagonizes their use-dependent run-down, thus strengthening GABAergic inhibition, probably by means of activation of tyrosine kinase receptor B receptors and of both PLC and PKC. PMID:15665077

  15. A human-infecting H10N8 influenza virus retains a strong preference for avian-type receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; de Vries, Robert P; Tzarum, Netanel; Zhu, Xueyong; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-03-11

    Recent avian-origin H10N8 influenza A viruses that have infected humans pose a potential pandemic threat. Alterations in the viral surface glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), typically are required for influenza A viruses to cross the species barrier for adaptation to a new host, but whether H10N8 contains adaptations supporting human infection remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether H10N8 HA can bind human receptors. Sialoside glycan microarray analysis showed that the H10 HA retains a strong preference for avian receptor analogs and negligible binding to human receptor analogs. Crystal structures of H10 HA with avian and human receptor analogs revealed the basis for preferential recognition of avian-like receptors. Furthermore, introduction of mutations into the H10 receptor-binding site (RBS) known to convert other HA subtypes from avian to human receptor specificity failed to switch preference to human receptors. Collectively, these findings suggest that the current H10N8 human isolates are poorly adapted for efficient human-to-human transmission. PMID:25766296

  16. A human-infecting H10N8 influenza virus retains a strong preference for avian-type receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xueyong; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent avian-origin H10N8 influenza A viruses that have infected humans pose a potential pandemic threat. Alterations in the viral surface glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), typically allow influenza A viruses to cross the species barrier for adaptation to a new host, but whether H10N8 contains adaptations supporting human infection remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether the H10N8 HA can bind human receptors. Sialoside glycan microarray analysis showed that the H10 HA retains a strong preference for avian receptor analogs and negligible binding to human receptor analogs. Crystal structures of H10 HA with avian and human receptor analogs revealed the basis for preferential recognition of avian-like receptors. Furthermore, introduction of mutations into the H10 receptor-binding site (RBS) known to convert other HA subtypes from avian to human receptor specificity failed to switch the preference to human receptors. Collectively, these findings suggest the current H10N8 human isolates are poorly adapted for efficient human-to-human transmission. PMID:25766296

  17. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. (/sup 3/H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate ((/sup 3/H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of (/sup 3/H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells.

  18. Localization and synthesis of the hormone-binding regions of the human thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Atassi, M.Z.; Manshouri, T. ); Sakata, Shigeki )

    1991-05-01

    Two regions of human thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor (TSHR) were selected on the basis that they exhibit no sequence resemblance to luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor. Five synthetic overlapping peptides (12-30, 24-44, 308-328, 324-344, and 339-364) were studied for their ability to bind {sup 125}I-labeled human TSH (hTSH), its isolated {alpha} and {beta} subunits, bovine TSH, ovine TSH, human luteinizing hormone, and human follicle-stimulating hormone. The human TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 exhibited remarkable binding activity to human, bovine, and ovine TSH and to the {beta} chain of hTSH. Lower binding activity resided in the adjacent overlapping peptides, probably due to the contribution of the shared overlap to the binding. The specificity of TSH binding to these peptides was confirmed by their inability to bind human luteinizing hormone, human follicle-stimulating hormone, and the {alpha} chain of hTSH. Thyrotropins did not bind to bovine serum albumin or to peptide controls unrelated to the TSHR system. It is concluded that the binding of TSH to its receptor involves extensive contacts and that the TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 contain specific binding regions for TSH that might be either independent sites or two faces (subsites) within a large binding site.

  19. High yield and efficient expression and purification of the human 5-HT3A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhong-shan; Cui, Zhi-cheng; Cheng, Hao; Fan, Chen; Melcher, Karsten; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Cheng-hai; Jiang, Hua-liang; Cong, Yao; Liu, Qian; Xu, H Eric

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To establish a method for efficient expression and purification of the human serotonin type 3A receptor (5-HT3A) that is suitable for structural studies. Methods: Codon-optimized cDNA of human 5-HT3A was inserted into a modified BacMam vector, which contained an IgG leader sequence, an 8×His tag linked with two-Maltose Binding Proteins (MBP), and a TEV protease cleavage site. The BacMam construct was used to generate baculoviruses for expression of 5-HT3A in HEK293F cells. The proteins were solubilized from the membrane with the detergent C12E 9, and purified using MBP affinity chromatography. The affinity tag was removed by TEV protease treatment and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. The receptors were further purified by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Western blot and SDS-PAGE were used to detect 5-HT3A during purification. The purified receptor was used in crystallization and analyzed with negative stain electron microscopy (EM). Results: The BacMam system yielded 0.5 milligram of the human 5-HT3A receptor per liter of cells. MBP affinity purification resulted in good yields with high purity and homogeneity. SEC profiles indicated that the purified receptors were pentameric. No protein crystals were obtained; however, a reconstructed 3D density map generated from the negative stain EM data fitted well with the mouse 5-HT3A structure. Conclusion: With the BacMam system, robust expression of the human 5-HT3A receptor is obtained, which is monodisperse, therefore enabling 3D reconstruction of an EM map. This method is suitable for high-throughput screening of different constructs, thus facilitating structural and biochemical studies of the 5-HT3A receptor. PMID:26073329

  20. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Jillian H; Mumaw, Jennifer; Machacek, David W; Sturkie, Carla; Callihan, Phillip; Stice, Steve L; Hooks, Shelley B

    2008-01-01

    Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP) cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors. PMID:19077254

  1. Coregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) Levels and Locations: Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Overexpression Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-03-01

    Elevated expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is know to alter cell signalilng and behavioral responses implicated in tumor progression. However, multiple diverse mechanisms may be involved in these overall effects, including signaling by HER2 itself, modulation of signalilng by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and modification of trafficking dynamics for both EGFR and HER2. Continued....

  2. Cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor: Evidence for more than one receptor class

    SciTech Connect

    Gronwald, R.G.K.; Grant, F.J.; Haldeman, B.A.; Hart, C.E.; O'Hara, P.J.; Hagen, F.S.; Ross, R.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Murray, M.J. )

    1988-05-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a cDNA encoding the human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor is presented. The cDNA contains an open reading frame that codes for a protein of 1106 amino acids. Comparison to the mouse PDGF receptor reveals an overall amino acid sequence identity of 86%. This sequence identity rises to 98% in the cytoplasmic split tyrosine kinase domain. RNA blot hybridization analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA from human dermal fibroblasts detects a major and a minor transcript using the cDNA as a probe. Baby hamster kidney cells, transfected with an expression vector containing the receptor cDNA, express an {approx} 190-kDa cell surface protein that is recognized by an anti-human PDGF receptor antibody. The recombinant PDGF receptor is functional in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells as demonstrated by ligand-induced phosphorylation of the receptor. Binding properties of the recombinant PDGF receptor were also assessed with pure preparations of BB and AB isoforms of PDGF. Unlike human dermal fibroblasts, which bind both isoforms with high affinity, the transfected baby hamster kidney cells bind only the BB isoform of PDGF with high affinity. This observation is consistent with the existence of more than one PDGF receptor class.

  3. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  4. Quantitative evaluation of human delta opioid receptor desensitization using the operational model of drug action.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Edita; Waite, Sue; Stropova, Dagmar; Eaton, Miriam C; Alves, Isabel D; Hruby, Victor J; Roeske, William R; Yamamura, Henry I; Varga, Eva V

    2007-05-01

    Agonist-mediated desensitization of the opioid receptors is thought to function as a protective mechanism against sustained opioid signaling and therefore may prevent the development of opioid tolerance. However, the exact molecular mechanism of opioid receptor desensitization remains unresolved because of difficulties in measuring and interpreting receptor desensitization. In the present study, we investigated deltorphin II-mediated rapid desensitization of the human delta opioid receptors (hDOR) by measuring guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)-triphosphate binding and inhibition of cAMP accumulation. We developed a mathematical analysis based on the operational model of agonist action (Black et al., 1985) to calculate the proportion of desensitized receptors. This approach permits a correct analysis of the complex process of functional desensitization by taking into account receptor-effector coupling and the time dependence of agonist pretreatment. Finally, we compared hDOR desensitization with receptor phosphorylation at Ser363, the translocation of beta-arrestin2, and hDOR internalization. We found that in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the hDOR, deltorphin II treatment leads to phosphorylation of Ser363, translocation of beta-arrestin2 to the plasma membrane, receptor internalization, and uncoupling from G proteins. It is noteworthy that mutation of the primary phosphorylation site Ser363 to alanine had virtually no effect on agonist-induced beta-arrestin2 translocation and receptor internalization yet significantly attenuated receptor desensitization. These results strongly indicate that phosphorylation of Ser363 is the primary mechanism of hDOR desensitization. PMID:17322005

  5. Structure of human Aichi virus and implications for receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiangxi; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S; Yuan, Shuai; Yamashita, Teruo; Tuthill, Tobias J; Fry, Elizabeth E; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I

    2016-01-01

    Aichi virus (AiV), an unusual and poorly characterized picornavirus, classified in the genus Kobuvirus, can cause severe gastroenteritis and deaths in children below the age of five years, especially in developing countries(1,2). The seroprevalence of AiV is approximately 60% in children under the age of ten years and reaches 90% later in life(3,4). There is no available vaccine or effective antiviral treatment. Here, we describe the structure of AiV at 3.7 Å. This first high-resolution structure for a kobuvirus is intermediate between those of the enteroviruses and cardioviruses, with a shallow, narrow depression bounded by the prominent VP0 CD loops (linking the C and D strands of the β-barrel), replacing the depression known as the canyon, frequently the site of receptor attachment in enteroviruses. VP0 is not cleaved to form VP2 and VP4, so the 'VP2' β-barrel structure is complemented with a unique extended structure on the inside of the capsid. On the outer surface, a polyproline helix structure, not seen previously in picornaviruses is present at the C terminus of VP1, a position where integrin binding motifs are found in some other picornaviruses. A peptide corresponding to this polyproline motif somewhat attenuates virus infectivity, presumably blocking host-cell attachment. This may guide cellular receptor identification. PMID:27595320

  6. Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide is a functional receptor for human hepatitis B and D virus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Zhong, Guocai; Xu, Guangwei; He, Wenhui; Jing, Zhiyi; Gao, Zhenchao; Huang, Yi; Qi, Yonghe; Peng, Bo; Wang, Haimin; Fu, Liran; Song, Mei; Chen, Pan; Gao, Wenqing; Ren, Bijie; Sun, Yinyan; Cai, Tao; Feng, Xiaofeng; Sui, Jianhua; Li, Wenhui

    2014-01-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and HBV-related diseases remain a major public health problem. Individuals coinfected with its satellite hepatitis D virus (HDV) have more severe disease. Cellular entry of both viruses is mediated by HBV envelope proteins. The pre-S1 domain of the large envelope protein is a key determinant for receptor(s) binding. However, the identity of the receptor(s) is unknown. Here, by using near zero distance photo-cross-linking and tandem affinity purification, we revealed that the receptor-binding region of pre-S1 specifically interacts with sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), a multiple transmembrane transporter predominantly expressed in the liver. Silencing NTCP inhibited HBV and HDV infection, while exogenous NTCP expression rendered nonsusceptible hepatocarcinoma cells susceptible to these viral infections. Moreover, replacing amino acids 157-165 of nonfunctional monkey NTCP with the human counterpart conferred its ability in supporting both viral infections. Our results demonstrate that NTCP is a functional receptor for HBV and HDV. PMID:25409679

  7. Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide is a functional receptor for human hepatitis B and D virus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Zhong, Guocai; Xu, Guangwei; He, Wenhui; Jing, Zhiyi; Gao, Zhenchao; Huang, Yi; Qi, Yonghe; Peng, Bo; Wang, Haimin; Fu, Liran; Song, Mei; Chen, Pan; Gao, Wenqing; Ren, Bijie; Sun, Yinyan; Cai, Tao; Feng, Xiaofeng; Sui, Jianhua; Li, Wenhui

    2012-01-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and HBV-related diseases remain a major public health problem. Individuals coinfected with its satellite hepatitis D virus (HDV) have more severe disease. Cellular entry of both viruses is mediated by HBV envelope proteins. The pre-S1 domain of the large envelope protein is a key determinant for receptor(s) binding. However, the identity of the receptor(s) is unknown. Here, by using near zero distance photo-cross-linking and tandem affinity purification, we revealed that the receptor-binding region of pre-S1 specifically interacts with sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), a multiple transmembrane transporter predominantly expressed in the liver. Silencing NTCP inhibited HBV and HDV infection, while exogenous NTCP expression rendered nonsusceptible hepatocarcinoma cells susceptible to these viral infections. Moreover, replacing amino acids 157-165 of nonfunctional monkey NTCP with the human counterpart conferred its ability in supporting both viral infections. Our results demonstrate that NTCP is a functional receptor for HBV and HDV.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00049.001. PMID:23150796

  8. Distinctive Recognition of Flagellin by Human and Mouse Toll-Like Receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Forstnerič, Vida; Ivičak-Kocjan, Karolina; Ljubetič, Ajasja; Jerala, Roman; Benčina, Mojca

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) is a receptor of the innate immune system that recognizes flagellin from certain bacterial species and triggers an inflammatory response. The Salmonella dublin flagellin in complex with zebrafish TLR5 has been crystallized previously. In the present study, we extrapolate the structure of this complex using structure-guided mutagenesis to determine the recognition modes of human and mouse TLR5 receptors and demonstrate species-specific differences in flagellin recognition. In general, the recognition mode of the mouse receptor can be said to be more robust in comparison to that of the human receptor. All-atom molecular dynamics simulation showed differences between the two receptors within the primary binding region. Using a functional motility assay, we show that although the highly conserved area of the flagellin analyzed in this study encompasses key structural requirements for flagella formation, a direct correlation between immune recognition and structure on the level of amino acid residues is not observed. PMID:27391968

  9. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Identification of androgen receptors in normal human osteoblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Colvard, D.S.; Eriksen, E.F.; Keeting, P.E.; Riggs, B.L.; Spelsberg, T.C. ); Wilson, E.M.; Lubahn, D.B.; French, F.S. )

    1989-02-01

    The sex steroids, androgens and estrogens, are major regulators of bone metabolism. However, whether these hormones act on bone cells through direct or indirect mechanisms has remained unclear. A nuclear binding assay recently used to demonstrate estrogen receptors in bone was used to identify specific nuclear binding of a tritiated synthetic androgen, ({sup 3}H)R1881 (methyltrienolone), in 21 of 25 (84%) human osteoblast-like cell strains and a concentration of bound steroid receptors of 821 {plus minus} 140 molecules per cell nucleus. Binding was saturable and steroid-specific. Androgen receptor gene expression in osteoblasts was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Relative concentrations of androgen and estrogen receptors were compared by measuring specific nuclear estrogen binding. Nuclear binding of ({sup 3}H)estradiol was observed in 27 of 30 (90%) cell strains; the concentration of bound estradiol receptor was 1537 {plus minus} 221 molecules per cell nucleus. The concentrations of nuclear binding sites were similar in males and females for both ({sup 3}H)R1881 and ({sup 3}H)estradiol. The authors conclude that both androgens and estrogens act directly on human bone cells through their respective receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  11. Reduction of EGF receptor levels in human tumor cells transfected with an antisense RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Hirotomo; Koizumi, Shinji; Kimura, Masami ); Shimizu, Nobuyoshi )

    1989-09-01

    An expression vector was constructed from part of pSV2neo with the 3{prime}-ClaI fragment of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor cDNA inserted in an inverted orientation downstream from the human metallothionein (MT) IIa promoter. The human squamous carcinoma cell line NA, which overproduces EGF receptor, was transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418. One of the stable transfectants had a 90% reduction cell-surface EGF receptor in response to ZnSO{sub 4}. The nascent EGF receptor peptide was also decreased with concurrent induction of MT mRNA. These data suggest that the antisense transcript regulated by the MT promoter inhibits the expression of the endogenous EGF receptor genes. Although no transcripts from the antisense gene were detected, the results indicate that transfection with the antisense vector provides a technique by which to modulate the number of EGF receptors on the cell surface of squamous cell carcinomas.

  12. Light chain editors of anti-DNA receptors in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalinina, Olga; Wang, Yue; Sia, Kevin; Radic, Marko; Cazenave, Pierre-André

    2014-01-01

    Receptor editing is a mechanism of self-tolerance used in newly generated B cells. The expressed heavy (H) or light (L) chain of an autoreactive receptor is replaced by upstream V genes which eliminate or modify autoreactivity. Editing of anti-DNA receptors has been characterized in anti-DNA transgenic mouse models including 3H9, 3H9/56R, and their revertant 3H9GL. Certain L chains, termed editors, rescue anti-DNA B cells by neutralizing or modifying DNA binding of the H chain. This editing mechanism acts on the natural H chain repertoire; endogenous H chains with anti-DNA features are expressed primarily in combination with editor L chains. We ask whether a similar set of L chains exists in the human repertoire, and if so, do they edit H chains with anti-DNA signatures? We compared the protein sequences of mouse editors to all human L chains and found several human L chains similar to mouse editors. These L chains diminish or veto anti-DNA binding when expressed with anti-DNA H chains. The human H chains expressed with these L chains also have relatively high arginine (Arg) content in the H chain complementarity determining region (H3), suggesting that receptor editing plays a role in establishing tolerance to DNA in humans. PMID:24470445

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Expresses a Functional Human Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Ortholog: Involvement in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rosay, Thibaut; Bazire, Alexis; Diaz, Suraya; Clamens, Thomas; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Mijouin, Lily; Hoffmann, Brice; Sergent, Jacques-Aurélien; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Boireau, Wilfrid; Vieillard, Julien; Hulen, Christian; Dufour, Alain; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Considerable evidence exists that bacteria detect eukaryotic communication molecules and modify their virulence accordingly. In previous studies, it has been demonstrated that the increasingly antibiotic-resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can detect the human hormones brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) at micromolar concentrations. In response, the bacterium modifies its behavior to adapt to the host physiology, increasing its overall virulence. The possibility of identifying the bacterial sensor for these hormones and interfering with this sensing mechanism offers an exciting opportunity to directly affect the infection process. Here, we show that BNP and CNP strongly decrease P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Isatin, an antagonist of human natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR), prevents this effect. Furthermore, the human NPR-C receptor agonist cANF4-23 mimics the effects of natriuretic peptides on P. aeruginosa, while sANP, the NPR-A receptor agonist, appears to be weakly active. We show in silico that NPR-C, a preferential CNP receptor, and the P. aeruginosa protein AmiC have similar three-dimensional (3D) structures and that both CNP and isatin bind to AmiC. We demonstrate that CNP acts as an AmiC agonist, enhancing the expression of the ami operon in P. aeruginosa. Binding of CNP and NPR-C agonists to AmiC was confirmed by microscale thermophoresis. Finally, using an amiC mutant strain, we demonstrated that AmiC is essential for CNP effects on biofilm formation. In conclusion, the AmiC bacterial sensor possesses structural and pharmacological profiles similar to those of the human NPR-C receptor and appears to be a bacterial receptor for human hormones that enables P. aeruginosa to modulate biofilm expression. PMID:26307165

  14. Evidence for impaired retinoic acid receptor-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2 cofactor activity in human lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moghal, N; Neel, B G

    1995-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is required for normal airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. One of the earliest events following the exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to RA is the strong induction of RA receptor beta (RAR beta) mRNA. Previous work established that many lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors display abnormal RAR beta mRNA expression, most often absence or weak expression of the RAR beta 2 isoform, even after RA treatment. Restoration of RAR beta 2 into RAR beta-negative lung cancer cell lines has been reported to inhibit tumorigenicity. Since RAR beta 2 inactivation may contribute to lung cancer, we have investigated the molecular mechanism of defective RAR beta 2 expression. Nuclear run-on assays and transient transfections with RAR beta 2 promoter constructs indicate the presence of trans-acting transcriptional defects in most lung cancer cell lines, which map to the RA response element (RARE). These defects cannot be complemented by RAR-retinoid X receptor cotransfection and can be separated into two types: (i) one affecting transcription from direct repeat RAREs, but not palindromic RAREs, and (ii) another affecting transcription from both types of RARE. Studies using chimeras between RAR alpha, TR alpha, and other transcription factors suggest the existence of novel RAR-thyroid hormone receptor AF-2-specific cofactors, which are necessary for high levels of transcription. Furthermore, these factors may be frequently inactivated in human lung cancer. PMID:7791800

  15. Study of intracellular localization and traffic of newly synthesized ceruloplasmin receptor in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sasina, L K; Puchkova, L V; Gaitskhoki, V S

    1998-10-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) receptor in cells of non-hepatocyte lineage (human HT-1080 fibroblasts) is synthesized by membrane-bound polyribosomes and then becomes a resident of the plasma membrane. The intracellular traffic of [14C]Cp receptor was followed in pulse-chase experiments using specific antibodies. It was shown that pulse-labeled Cp receptor, after reaching the place of its residence in the plasma membrane, is retained there for 90 min and then appears in the cytosol. Immunoactive 20-kD fragments of Cp receptor were found in the culture medium 1.5 h later. The intracellular traffic of 125I-labeled Cp bound to the fibroblast cell surface was traced in parallel chase experiments. It was shown that the internalized Cp receptor was recovered from the floating fraction of the cytosol. Comparison of the dynamics of the retention of internalized [14C]Cp receptor and 125I-labeled Cp in the subcellular compartments demonstrated that the traffic of both proteins within the fibroblasts is coordinated in time and proceeds via a common route. The role of Cp receptor in copper uptake by non-hepatocyte cells is discussed. PMID:9864451

  16. Effects of halothane on the human beta-adrenergic receptor of lymphocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, J.; Nivoche, Y.; Nimier, M.; Rocchiccioli, C.; Luscombe, F.; Henzel, D.; Loiseau, A.; Desmonts, J.M.

    1987-12-01

    The effects of halothane on beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist interaction were studied using the membranes of human lymphocytes as a model. Membrane preparations of lymphocytes were obtained from blood samples withdrawn from seven healthy young volunteers. Beta-receptor studies were performed using (-)/sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol (/sup 125/ICP) binding. Non-specific binding was determined in the presence of (-)isoproterenol. Beta-receptor density (Bmax) and the dissociation constant (KD) for /sup 125/ICP were determined from saturation curves. Beta-receptor affinity for agonists evaluated by the IC50 (the concentration of isoproterenol required to inhibit 50% of specific /sup 125/ICP binding) and the dissociation constant (KL) for isoproterenol was established from competition curves. The effect of halothane 1%, in an air oxygen mixture (oxygen fraction: 0.3) administered by tonometry during ligand membrane incubation, on beta-adrenergic receptor, was compared to that of control experiments not exposed to halothane. Halothane produced a moderate but significant decrease of Bmax (-10%) and a significant increase in non-specific binding (+30%), while KD, IC50, and KL were unchanged. The authors conclude that halothane, in vitro, decreases beta-adrenergic receptor density. This effect could be mediated by an alteration of the receptor in the membrane due to action of halothane on the lipid phase of the membrane.

  17. Expression of IL-4/IL-13 receptors in differentiating human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    White, Steven R; Martin, Linda D; Stern, Randi; Laxman, Bharathi; Marroquin, Bertha A

    2010-11-01

    IL-4 and IL-13 elicit several important responses in airway epithelium including chemokine secretion and mucous secretion that may contribute to airway inflammation, cell migration, and differentiation. These cytokines have overlapping but not identical effector profiles likely due to shared subunits in their receptor complexes. These receptors are variably described in epithelial cells, and the relative expression, localization, and function of these receptors in differentiated and repairing epithelial cells are not clear. We examined IL-4/IL-13 receptor expression and localization in primary airway epithelial cells collected from normal human lungs and grown under conditions yielding both undifferentiated and differentiated cells inclusive of basal, goblet, and ciliated cell phenotypes. Gene expression of the IL-4Rα, IL-2Rγc, IL-13Rα1, and IL-13Rα2 receptor subunits increased with differentiation, but different patterns of localization and protein abundance were seen for each subunit based on both differentiation and the cell subtypes present. Increased expression of receptor subunits observed in more differentiated cells was associated with more substantial functional responses to IL-4 stimulation including increased eotaxin-3 expression and accelerated migration after injury. We demonstrate substantial differences in IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunit expression and responsiveness to IL-4 based on the extent of airway epithelial cell differentiation and suggest that these differences may have functional consequences in airway inflammation. PMID:20729386

  18. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  19. Allelic association of human dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K.; Sheridan, P.J.; Montgomery, A.; Jagadeeswaran, P.; Nogami, H.; Briggs, A.H. ); Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; Cohn, J.B. )

    1990-04-18

    In a blinded experiment, the authors report the first allelic association of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in alcoholism. From 70 brain samples of alcoholics and nonalcoholics, DNA was digested with restriction endonucleases and probed with a clone that contained the entire 3{prime} coding exon, the polyadenylation signal, and approximately 16.4 kilobases of noncoding 3{prime} sequence of the human dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene ({lambda}hD2G1). In the present samples, the presence of A1 allele of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene correctly classified 77% of alcoholics, and its absence classified 72% of nonalcoholics. The polymorphic pattern of this receptor gene suggests that a gene that confers susceptibility to at least one form of alcoholism is located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11.

  20. Expression of the human ABCC6 gene is induced by retinoids through the retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ratajewski, Marcin; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Pulaski, Lukasz . E-mail: lpulaski@cbm.pan.pl

    2006-12-01

    Mutations in the human ABCC6 gene are responsible for the disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum, although Physiological function or substrate of the gene product (an ABC transporter known also as MRP6) is not known. We found that the expression of this gene in cells of hepatic origin (where this gene is predominantly expressed in the body) is significantly upregulated by retinoids, acting as agonists of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) rather than the retinoid A receptor (RAR). The direct involvement of this nuclear receptor in the transcriptional regulation of ABCC6 gene expression was confirmed by transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This constitutes the first direct proof of previously suggested involvement of nuclear hormone receptors in ABCC6 gene expression and the first identification of a transcription factor which may be relevant to regulation of ABCC6 level in tissues and in some PXE patients.

  1. Measles virus modulates human T-cell somatostatin receptors and their coupling to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Krantic, S; Enjalbert, A; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1997-01-01

    The possible role of immunomodulatory peptide somatostatin (SRIF) in measles virus (MV)-induced immunopathology was addressed by analysis of SRIF receptors and their coupling to adenylyl cyclase in mitogen-stimulated Jurkat T cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). SRIF-specific receptors were assayed in semipurified membrane preparations by using SRIF14 containing iodinated tyrosine at the first position in the amino acid chain ([125I]Tyr1) as a radioligand. A determination of receptor number by saturation of radioligand binding at equilibrium showed that in Jurkat cells, MV infection led to a dramatic decrease in the total receptor number. The virus-associated disappearance of one (Ki2 = 12 +/- 4 nM [mean +/- standard error of the mean [SEM

  2. Comparative study of histamine H4 receptor expression in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Yoshiko; Shiba, Kayoko; Ohki, Emi; Mutoh, Nanami; Suzuki, Masahiko; Sato, Hiromi; Ueno, Koichi

    2008-10-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is the newest receptor identified of four histamine receptors. Its expression in numerous immune and inflammatory organs has been implicated in relation to immune systems and allergic diseases. In the present study, we demonstrate the expression of H4R in human dermal fibroblasts and investigate changes in its expression level when stimulated by histamine, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), dexamethasone and indomethacin. Histamine and PMA showed no effects on H4R expression. LPS and indomethacin up-regulated H4R mRNA expression, and 20 microM dexamethasone increased H4R protein levels. These results indicate a good prospective for this new receptor in the development of effective treatments of inflammatory diseases and pruritus or for the appropriate prevention of toxicities. PMID:18827451

  3. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) in Cancers: Overexpression and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nida; Iqbal, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family having tyrosine kinase activity. Dimerization of the receptor results in the autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues within the cytoplasmic domain of the receptors and initiates a variety of signaling pathways leading to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Amplification or overexpression of HER2 occurs in approximately 15–30% of breast cancers and 10–30% of gastric/gastroesophageal cancers and serves as a prognostic and predictive biomarker. HER2 overexpression has also been seen in other cancers like ovary, endometrium, bladder, lung, colon, and head and neck. The introduction of HER2 directed therapies has dramatically influenced the outcome of patients with HER2 positive breast and gastric/gastroesophageal cancers; however, the results have been proved disappointing in other HER2 overexpressing cancers. This review discusses the role of HER2 in various cancers and therapeutic modalities available targeting HER2. PMID:25276427

  4. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human skin: the relationship with epidermal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, P E; Carayon, P; Penarier, G; Fréchin, N; Barnéon, G; Casellas, P; Cano, J P; Meynadier, J; Meunier, L

    1999-06-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands. PBR is part of a heteromeric receptor complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and in the early events of apoptosis. PBR may function as an oxygen-dependent signal generator; recent data indicate that these receptors may preserve the mitochondria of haematopoietic cell lines from damage caused by oxygen radicals. To identify PBRs in human skin, we used a specific monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus fragment of the human receptor. PBR immunoreactivity was found in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, hair follicles and dermal vascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, confocal microscopic examination of skin sections revealed that PBR expression was strongly upregulated in the superficial differentiated layers of the epidermis. Ultrastructurally, PBRs were distributed throughout the cytoplasm but were selectively expressed on the mitochondrial membranes of epidermal cells. The elevated level of PBRs in the spinous layer was not associated with an increased number of mitochondria nor with an increased amount of mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization on microautoradiographed skin sections. The present work provides, for the first time, evidence of PBR immunoreactivity in human skin. This mitochondrial receptor may modulate apoptosis in the epidermis; its increased expression in differentiated epidermal layers may represent a novel mechanism of natural skin protection against free radical damage generated by ultraviolet exposure. PMID:10354064

  5. Expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes after injection of human brain membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia

    2002-10-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is a very powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins, e.g., messenger RNA extracted from the brain and injected into oocytes leads to the synthesis and membrane incorporation of many types of functional receptors and ion channels, and membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques injected into oocytes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and Cl channels. This approach was developed further to transplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from human brain cells to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membranes isolated from the temporal neocortex of a patient, operated for intractable epilepsy, were injected into oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired functional neurotransmitter receptors to -aminobutyric acid, -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, and glycine. These receptors were also expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the temporal neocortex of the same patient. All of this makes the Xenopus oocyte a more useful model than it already is for studies of the structure and function of many human membrane proteins and opens the way to novel pathophysiological investigations of some human brain disorders.

  6. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1) or P2Y(12) purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  7. ARF6-Dependent Regulation of P2Y Receptor Traffic and Function in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E.; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J.; Mundell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y1 or P2Y12 purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  8. Human microvascular endothelial cells express receptors for platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.G.; Kim, Insoon; Calabresi, P.; Frackelton, A.R. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Endothelial cells have been widely thought to be unresponsive to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, a major growth factor released from stimulated platelets at the sites of vascular insults) and devoid of PDGF receptors. Nevertheless, in examining the growth-factor responses of microvascular endothelial cells isolated from human omental adipose tissue, the authors were surprised to detect PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180-kDa glycoprotein, subsequently identified as the cellular receptor for PDGF by specific immunoprecipitation. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF binding to human microvascular endothelial cells revealed 30,000 PDGF receptors per cell with a K{sub d} of 0.14 nM. Normal cellular consequences of receptor activation were also observed, including tyrosine phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein and serine phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Furthermore, PDGF was mitogenic for these cells. Microvascular endothelial cells play a central role in neovascularization required for wound healing and solid tumor growth. Thus, the discovery of functional PFDG receptors on human microvascular endothelial cells suggests a direct role for PDGF in this process.

  9. EP4 prostanoid receptor-mediated vasodilatation of human middle cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Richard J; Murdoch, Colin E; Ali, Mozam; Purbrick, Stuart; Ravid, Rivka; Baxter, Gordon S; Tilford, Nick; Sheldrick, Robert L G; Clark, Kenneth L; Coleman, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    Dilatation of the cerebral vasculature is recognised to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Furthermore, elevated levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) occur in the blood, plasma and saliva of migraineurs during an attack, suggestive of a contributory role. In the present study, we have characterised the prostanoid receptors involved in the relaxation and contraction of human middle cerebral arteries in vitro. In the presence of indomethacin (3 μM) and the TP receptor antagonist GR32191 (1 μM), PGE2 was found to relax phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings in a concentration-dependent manner (mean pEC50 8.0±0.1, n=5). Establishment of a rank order of potency using the EP4>EP2 agonist 11-deoxy PGE1, and the EP2>EP4 agonist PGE1-OH (mean pEC50 of 7.6±0.1 (n=6) and 6.4±0.1 (n=4), respectively), suggested the presence of functional EP4 receptors. Furthermore, the selective EP2 receptor agonist butaprost at concentrations <1 μM failed to relax the tissues. Blockade of EP4 receptors with the EP4 receptor antagonists AH23848 and EP4A caused significant rightward displacements in PGE2 concentration–response curves, exhibiting pA2 and pKB values of 5.7±0.1, n=3, and 8.4, n=3, respectively. The IP receptor agonists iloprost and cicaprost relaxed phenylephrine precontracted cerebral arterial rings (mean pEC50 values 8.3±0.1 (n=4) and 8.1±0.1 (n=9), respectively). In contrast, the DP and FP receptor agonists PGD2 and PGF2α failed to cause appreciable relaxation or contraction at concentrations of up to 30 μM. In the absence of phenylephrine contraction and GR32191, the TP receptor agonist U46619 caused concentration-dependent contraction of cerebral artery (mean pEC50 7.4±0.3, n=3). These data demonstrate the presence of prostanoid EP4 receptors mediating PGE2 vasodilatation of human middle cerebral artery. IP receptors mediating relaxation and TP receptors mediating contraction were also functionally demonstrated. PMID:14744815

  10. RECOMBINANT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR (AR) BINDING ACROSS VERTEBRATE SPECIES: COMPARISON OF BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPOUNDS TO HUMAN, RAINBOW TROUT AND FATHEAD MINNOW AR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify androgen mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) androgen receptors (AR). Although the amino acid sequences of receptors from nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the mammalian receptors, it is uncertain ...

  11. Characterization and distribution of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the human intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Valet, P; Senard, J M; Devedjian, J C; Planat, V; Salomon, R; Voisin, T; Drean, G; Couvineau, A; Daviaud, D; Denis, C

    1993-01-01

    The subtype and the expression of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor were investigated in the normal mucosa from human intestine by means of radioligand binding, RNase mapping, and measurement of adenylate cyclase activity. The study of the binding of the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist, [3H]RX821002, to epithelial cell membranes indicated the existence of a single class of noninteracting sites displaying a high affinity for the radioligand (Kd = 1.1 +/- 0.5 nM). The rank order of potency of antagonists to inhibit [3H]RX821002 binding (RX821002 > yohimbine = rauwolscine > phentolamine approximately idazoxan >> chlorpromazine > prazosin) suggested that the receptor is of the alpha 2A subtype. A conclusion which is confirmed by the fact that only alpha 2C10 transcripts were found in the human intestine mucosa. Competition curves with (-)-norepinephrine demonstrated that 60% of the receptor population exhibited high affinity for agonists. This high-affinity state was abolished by the addition of GTP plus Na+ or by prior treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin indicating it corresponded to G protein-coupled receptors. [32P]ADP-ribosylation and immunoblotting experiments identified two pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins corresponding to Gi2 and Gi3. The study of the distribution of the receptor indicated that (a) the proximal colon is the intestine segment exhibiting the highest receptor density and (b) the receptor is predominantly expressed in crypts and is preferentially located in the basolateral membrane of the polarized cell. The distribution of the receptor along the crypt-surface axis of the colon mucosa can be correlated with a higher level of alpha 2C10-specific mRNA and a higher efficiency of UK14304 to inhibit adenylate cyclase in crypt cells. Images PMID:8098045

  12. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. PMID:26930564

  13. Pet imaging of human pituitary 5-HT2 receptors with F-18 setoperone

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Bonab, A.A.; Babich, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors play an important role in the regulation of pituitary function. In particular, 5HT agonists stimulate ACTH, {beta}-endorphin, prolactin and growth hormone secretion but inhibit TSH release. 5-HT binding sites have been identified by autoradiographic studies of rat and human pituitary. In the present investigation, we used PET with F-18 setoperone to image 5-HT2 receptors in normal humans. Setoperone, a piperidine derivative with potent 5-HT2 receptor blocking properties was labelled with F-18 by nucleophilic substitution on the nitro derivative. After HPLC purification, specific activity was between 10,000 and 15,000 mCi/{mu} mole and radiochemical purity was >98%. Six healthy male volunteers were injected with 5-7 mCi of F-18. Setoperone and serial PET images and arterial blood samples were collected over 2 hrs. Specific binding to 5-HT2 receptors in the frontal cortex (FC), striatum (ST) and pituitary (P) was quantitated using the cerebellum (C) as reference. The tracer showed clear retention in FC, ST and P (known to contain a high density of 5-HT2 receptors) relative to C (known to be devoid of 5-HT2 receptors). In all subjects, FC/C, ST/C and P/C ratios increased during the first hr. and remained stable thereafter. For FC and ST, the ratios reached similar values; 3.92{plus_minus}0.73 and 3.53{plus_minus}0.32. For pituitary, a significantly higher ratio, was measured at all times; 6.53{plus_minus}1.82 (p<0.01). These results indicate that F-18 setoperone is an effective PET radiopharmaceutical for imaging 5-HT2 receptors in the human pituitary. Future applications of this agent could provide important new insights into neuroendocrine function.

  14. Dopamine Receptors in Human Lymphocytes: Radioligand Binding and Quantitative RT-PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kirillova, Galina P.; Hrutkay, Rebecca J.; Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.; Tourkova, Irina L.; Vanyukov, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of dopamine receptors (DR) in lymphocytes of the human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction is an attractive tool for evaluation of functional properties of dopaminergic function underlying variation in complex psychological/psychopathological traits. Receptor binding assays (RBA) with selective radioligands, which are widely used in CNS studies, have not produced consistent results when applied to isolated PBMC. We tested the assay conditions that could be essential for detection of DR in human PBMC and their membrane preparations. Using [3H]SCH23390, a dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist, we demonstrated the presence of two binding sites in PBMC-derived membrane fraction. One of them is characterized by the Kd value consistent with that reported for D5 dopamine receptors in human lymphocytes, whereas the other Kd value possibly corresponds to serotonin receptor(s). Although D5 receptor binding sites in PBMC membranes could be characterized by binding assays, the low protein expression and the large volume of blood needed for membrane preparation render the binding method impracticable for individual phenotyping. In contrast, real-time RT-PCR may be used for this purpose, contingent on the relationship between DR expression in the brain and in lymphocytes. The expression of the DRD2-DRD5 genes, as detected by this method, varied widely among samples, whereas the DRD1 expression was not detected. The expression levels were comparable with those in the brain for DRD3 and DRD4, and were significantly lower for DRD2 and DRD5. PMID:18721826

  15. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Highly chlorinated PCBs inhibit the human xenobiotic response mediated by the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR).

    PubMed Central

    Tabb, Michelle M; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Grün, Felix; Zhou, Changcheng; Welsh, William J; Blumberg, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a family of persistent organic contaminants suspected to cause adverse effects in wildlife and humans. In rodents, PCBs bind to the aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) and pregnane X receptors (PXR) inducing the expression of catabolic cytochrome p450 enzymes of the CYP1A and 3A families. We found that certain highly chlorinated PCBs are potent activators of rodent PXR but antagonize its human ortholog, the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR), inhibiting target gene induction. Thus, exposure to PCBs may blunt the human xenobiotic response, inhibiting the detoxification of steroids, bioactive dietary compounds, and xenobiotics normally mediated by SXR. The antagonistic PCBs are among the most stable and abundant in human tissues. These findings have important implications for understanding the biologic effects of PCB exposure and the use of animal models to predict the attendant risk. PMID:14754570

  17. Modulation of human GABAA receptor function: a novel mode of action of drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Hondebrink, L; Meulenbelt, J; van Kleef, R G D M; van den Berg, M; Westerink, R H S

    2011-12-01

    Drugs of abuse are known to mainly affect the dopaminergic and serotonergic system, although behavioral studies indicated that the GABA-ergic system also plays a role. We therefore investigated the acute effects of several commonly used drugs of abuse (methamphetamine, amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP)) on the function of the human α(1)β(2)γ(2) GABA(A) receptor (hGABA(A)-R), expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Although none of the tested drugs acted as full agonist on the hGABA(A)-R, some drugs induced differential modulation of hGABA(A)-R function, depending on the degree of receptor occupancy. Methamphetamine did not affect the GABA-evoked current at high receptor occupancy, but induced a minor inhibition at low receptor occupancy. Its metabolite amphetamine slightly potentiated the GABA-evoked current. MDMA and its metabolite MDA both inhibited the current at low receptor occupancy. However, MDMA did not affect the current at high occupancy, whereas MDA induced a potentiation. mCPP induced a strong inhibition (max. ∼ 80%) at low receptor occupancy, but ∼ 25% potentiation at high receptor occupancy. Competitive binding to one of the GABA-binding sites could explain the drug-induced inhibitions observed at low receptor occupancy, whereas an additional interaction with a positive allosteric binding site may play a role in the observed potentiations at high receptor occupancy. This is the first study to identify direct modulation of hGABA(A)-Rs as a novel mode of action for several drugs of abuse. Consequently, hGABA(A)-Rs should be considered as target for psychiatric pharmaceuticals and in developing treatment for drug intoxications. PMID:21729720

  18. gp140, the C3d receptor of human B lymphocytes, is also the Epstein-Barr virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Frade, R; Barel, M; Ehlin-Henriksson, B; Klein, G

    1985-03-01

    The relationship between gp140, the membrane C3d receptor (CR2) of human B lymphocytes, and the Epstein-Barr virus receptor (EBVR) was analyzed by using the polyclonal anti-gp140, previously prepared by immunizing rabbits with highly purified gp140 (isolated by some of us) from CR2/EBVR-positive Raji cells. Polyclonal anti-gp72, a C3-binding membrane component, not related to the EBVR but also expressed on the Raji cell surface, was used as a control. Binding of rabbit IgG and EBV on cells was assessed by using immunofluorescence techniques with analysis by flow cytofluorometry. A semiquantitative bioassay was also used to measure the EBV binding. Polyclonal monospecific anti-gp140 IgG inhibits directly the binding of EBV to Raji cells at the same concentration that inhibits the binding of EC3d on cells, whereas a 35 times higher concentration of anti-gp72 IgG or preimmune serum IgG does not. Anti-gp140 IgG treatment also inhibits the induction of EBV-determined nuclear antigen in normal tonsil B lymphocytes or in EBV-negative Ramos cells, whereas high concentrations of anti-gp72 IgG or preimmune serum IgG have no effect. These data strongly suggest that gp140, the CR2 of human B lymphocytes, is also the EBVR. PMID:2983347

  19. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2013-05-15

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine in guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-PIPAT evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell-stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, are mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor. Association of 5-HT with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature. PMID:23518679

  20. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine in guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-PIPAT evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell-stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, are mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor. Association of 5-HT with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature. PMID:23518679

  1. Site-specific circadian expression of leptin and its receptor in human adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian variability of circulating leptin levels has been well established over the last decade. However, the circadian behavior of leptin in human adipose tissue remains unknown. This also applies to the soluble leptin receptor. We investigated the ex vivo circadian behavior of leptin and its rec...

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  3. Circadian expression of adiponectin and its receptors in human adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adiponectin is one of the most clinically relevant cytokines associated with obesity. However, circadian rhythmicity of adiponectin in human adipose tissue (AT) has not been analyzed. To assess whether the mRNA levels of adiponectin and its receptors (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2) might show daily circadian ...

  4. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  5. Possible differences in modes of agonist and antagonist binding at human 5-HT6 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pullagurla, Manik R; Westkaemper, Richard B; Glennon, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A graphics model of the human 5-HT6 receptor was constructed and automated docking studies were performed. The model suggests that 5-HT6 antagonist arylsulfonyltryptamines might bind differently than that of the agonist serotonin. Furthermore, the model explains many of the empirical results from our previous structure-affinity studies. PMID:15357994

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus Up-Regulates Endothelin Receptor Type B: Implication for Vasculopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Yaiw, Koon-Chu; Mohammad, Abdul-Aleem; Costa, Helena; Taher, Chato; Badrnya, Sigrun; Assinger, Alice; Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Ananthaseshan, Sharan; Estekizadeh, Atosa; Davoudi, Belghis; Ovchinnikova, Olga; Shlyakhto, Eugene; Rafnsson, Arnar; Khan, Zahidul; Butler, Lynn; Rahbar, Afsar; Pernow, John; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Both endothelin receptor type B ([ETBR], a G protein-coupled receptor that mediates the vascular effects of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1) and human cytomegalovirus ([HCMV], a ubiquitous herpesvirus) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The effects of HCMV infection on ETBR expression are unknown. We hypothesized that HCMV may contribute to the pathogenesis of CVD via ETBR modulation. Methods. Human CMV effects on ETBR were studied in vitro in endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and ex vivo in human carotid plaque tissue specimens. Expression of ETBR and viral immediate-early were quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Functional consequences after ETBR blockade in ECs were examined by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide proliferation, wound healing, tube formation, and flow adhesion assays. Results. Human CMV is capable of upregulating both ETBR mRNA and protein expression in ECs and SMCs. The ETBR was also abundantly expressed in ECs, foam cells, and SMCs, and, more importantly, in HCMV-positive cells in human carotid plaques. Endothelin receptor type B blockade led to decreased proliferation and reduced tumor necrosis factor α-mediated leukocyte recruitment in both uninfected and HCMV-infected ECs. Direct HCMV infection was antimigratory and antiangiogenic in ECs. Conclusions. Human CMV may contribute to CVD via ETBR induction. PMID:26719843

  7. Steroid receptors in canine and human female genital tract tumours with smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Millán, Y; Gordon, A; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Reymundo, C; de las Mulas, J Martín

    2007-01-01

    The expression of oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and progesterone receptor (PR) was examined in 32 canine genital tract tumours diagnosed as smooth muscle tumours (benign or malignant, pure or mixed). The immunohistochemical expression of calponin was used to assess the smooth muscle differentiation of the tumours. Nineteen human uterine leiomyomas were also examined. Calponin expression was detected in 89.3% of canine and 100% of human genital tract tumours diagnosed as leiomyomas, as well as in the majority of other tumours examined (canine or human, genital or extragenital, benign or malignant) with the exception of canine negative control tumours (cutaneous fibroma and hepatoid gland adenoma). ERalpha was found in 56.3% of canine and 52.6% of human leiomyomas, while PR was found in 84.4% of canine and 94.7% of human tumours. These results indicate that calponin is a good marker for differentiating neoplasia of the canine genital system of uncertain origin, as in human patients. They also show that canine tumours with smooth muscle differentiation of the genital tract of the bitch express steroid hormone receptors, a finding that opens up the possibility of hormone therapy. PMID:17362977

  8. Inhibitory effects of two G protein-coupled receptor kinases on the cell surface expression and signaling of the human adrenomedullin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Nagata, Sayaka; Jiang, Danfeng; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Murakami, Manabu; Hattori, Yuichi; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kato, Johji

    2016-02-19

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, a family B GPCR) to form the type 1 adrenomedullin receptor (AM1 receptor). Here, we investigated the effects of the five non-visual GPCR kinases (GRKs 2 through 6) on the cell surface expression of the human (h)AM1 receptor by cotransfecting each of these GRKs into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed hRAMP2. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that when coexpressed with GRK4 or GRK5, the cell surface expression of the AM1 receptor was markedly decreased prior to stimulation with AM, thereby attenuating both the specific [(125)I]AM binding and AM-induced cAMP production. These inhibitory effects of both GRKs were abolished by the replacement of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR with that of the calcitonin receptor (a family B GPCR) or β2-adrenergic receptor (a family A GPCR). Among the sequentially truncated CLR C-tail mutants, those lacking the five residues 449-453 (Ser-Phe-Ser-Asn-Ser) abolished the inhibition of the cell surface expression of CLR via the overexpression of GRK4 or GRK5. Thus, we provided new insight into the function of GRKs in agonist-unstimulated GPCR trafficking using a recombinant AM1 receptor and further determined the region of the CLR C-tail responsible for this GRK function. PMID:26820533

  9. Evolution of mosquito preference for humans linked to an odorant receptor

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Carolyn S.; Baier, Felix; Omondi, Aman B.; Spitzer, Sarabeth A.; Lutomiah, Joel; Sang, Rosemary; Ignell, Rickard; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    Female mosquitoes are major vectors of human disease and the most dangerous are those that preferentially bite humans. A ‘domestic’ form of the mosquito Aedes aegypti has evolved to specialize in biting humans and is the major worldwide vector of dengue, yellow fever, and Chikungunya viruses. The domestic form coexists with an ancestral, animal-biting ‘forest’ form along the coast of Kenya. We collected the two forms, established laboratory colonies, and document striking divergence in preference for human versus animal odour. We further show that the evolution of preference for human odour in domestic mosquitoes is tightly linked to increases in the expression and ligand-sensitivity of the odorant receptor AaegOr4, which we found recognises a compound present at high levels in human odour. Our results provide a rare example of a gene contributing to behavioural evolution and provide insight into how disease-vectoring mosquitoes came to specialise on humans. PMID:25391959

  10. Activated Human Mast Cells Induce LOX-1-Specific Scavenger Receptor Expression in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Alanne-Kinnunen, Mervi; Lappalainen, Jani; Öörni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). Results Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1) mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1), which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell –induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages. Conclusions Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis. PMID:25250731

  11. Retinoids increase human apolipoprotein A-11 expression through activation of the retinoid X receptor but not the retinoic acid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Vu-Dac, N; Schoonjans, K; Kosykh, V; Dallongeville, J; Heyman, R A; Staels, B; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    Considering the link between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and a protective effect against coronary artery disease as well as the suggested beneficial effects of retinoids on the production of the major HDL apolipoprotein (apo), apo A-I, the goal of this study was to analyze the influence of retinoids on the expression of apo A-II, the other major HDL protein. Retinoic acid (RA) derivatives have a direct effect on hepatic apo A-II production, since all-trans (at) RA induces apo A-II mRNA levels and apo A-II secretion in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. In the HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cell line, both at-RA and 9-cis RA as well as the retinoid X receptor (RXR)-specific agonist LGD 1069, but not the RA receptor (RAR) agonist ethyl-p-[(E)-2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthyl)-l-pro penyl]-benzoic acid (TTNPB), induce apo A-II mRNA levels. Transient-transfection experiments with a reporter construct driven by the human apo A-II gene promoter indicated that 9-cis RA and at-RA, as well as the RXR agonists LGD 1069 and LG 100268, induced apo A-II gene expression at the transcriptional level. Only minimal effects of the RAR agonist TTNPB were observed on the apo A-II promoter reporter construct. Unilateral deletions and site-directed mutagenesis identified the J site of the apo A-II promoter mediating the responsiveness to RA. This element contains two imperfect half-sites spaced by 1 oligonucleotide. Cotransfection assays in combination with the use of RXR or RAR agonists showed that RXR but not RAR transactivates the apo A-II promoter through this element. By contrast, RAR inhibits the inductive effects of RXR on the apo A-II J site in a dose-dependent fashion. Gel retardation assays demonstrated that RXR homodimers bind, although with a lower affinity than RAR-RXR heterodimers, to the AH-RXR response element. In conclusion, retinoids induce hepatic apo A-II production at the transcriptional level via the interaction of

  12. Characterization of a receptor for human monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8

    SciTech Connect

    Grob, P.M.; David, E.; Warren, T.C.; DeLeon, R.P.; Farina, P.R.; Homon, C.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8 (MDNCF/IL-8) is an 8,000-dalton protein produced by monocytes which exhibits activity as a chemoattractant for neutrophils with maximal activity achieved at a concentration of 50 ng/ml. This polypeptide has been iodinated by chloramine-T methodology (350 Ci/mM), and specific receptors for MDNCF/IL-8 have been detected on human neutrophils, U937 cells, THP-1 cells, and dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells. The binding of MDNCF/IL-8 to human neutrophils is not inhibited by interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. In addition, chemoattractants such as C5a, fMet-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, and platelet-activating factor fail to inhibit binding, suggesting that MDNCF/IL-8 utilizes a unique receptor. The receptor for MDNCF/IL-8 is apparently glycosylated since ligand binding is inhibited by the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin with a binding specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid. Steady state binding experiments indicate Kd values of 4 and 0.5 nM and receptor numbers of 75,000 and 7,400 for human neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells, respectively. 125I-MDNCF/IL-8 bound to human neutrophils is rapidly internalized and subsequently released from cells as trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity. Affinity labeling experiments suggest that the human neutrophil MDNCF/IL-8 receptor exhibits a mass of approximately 58,000 daltons.

  13. Genetic Variations in the Human Cannabinoid Receptor Gene Are Associated with Happiness

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  14. Coordinated regulation of natural killer receptor expression in the maturing human immune system

    PubMed Central

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Horowitz, Amir; Parham, Peter; Blish, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are responsible for recognizing and killing transformed, stressed, and infected cells. They recognize a set of non-antigen-specific features termed “altered self” through combinatorial signals from activating and inhibitory receptors. These natural killer cell receptors (NKR) are also expressed on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, and monocytes, though a comprehensive inventory of NKR expression patterns across leukocyte lineages has never been performed. Using mass cytometry, we found that NKR expression patterns distinguish cell lineages in human peripheral blood. In individuals with high levels of CD57, indicative of a mature immune repertoire, NKR are more likely to be expressed on non-NK cells, especially CD8+ T cells. Mature NK and CD8+ T cell populations show increased diversity of NKR surface expression patterns, but with distinct determinants: mature NK cells acquire primarily inhibitory receptors, while CD8+ T cells attain a specific subset of both activating and inhibitory receptors, potentially imbuing them with a distinct functional role. Concurrently, monocytes show decreased expression of the generalized inhibitory receptor LILRB1, consistent with an increased activation threshold. Therefore, NKR expression is coordinately regulated as the immune system matures, resulting in the transfer of “altered self” recognition potential among leukocyte lineages. This likely reduces antigen specificity in the mature human immune system, and implies that vaccines and therapeutics that engage both its innate and adaptive branches may be more effective in the settings of aging and chronic infection. PMID:25288567

  15. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    SciTech Connect

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  16. A novel mosaic protein containing LDL receptor elements is highly conserved in humans and chickens.

    PubMed

    Mörwald, S; Yamazaki, H; Bujo, H; Kusunoki, J; Kanaki, T; Seimiya, K; Morisaki, N; Nimpf, J; Schneider, W J; Saito, Y

    1997-05-01

    Certain receptors belonging to the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene family appear to constitute a newly identified branch whose members are expressed in brain, in addition to other tissues. In support of this concept, we have now discovered the expression and delineated the molecular structures of a representative of this emerging branch from two such diverse species as human and chicken. This membrane receptor, called LR11 and thus far only known to exist in the rabbit, is a complex seven-domain mosaic protein containing, among other structural elements, a cluster of 11 LDLR ligand-binding repeats and a domain with homology to VPS10, a yeast receptor for vacuolar protein sorting. Cytoplasmic signature sequences define the receptor as competent for endocytosis. The most striking properties of LR11s are their (1) high degree of structural conservation (>80% identity among mammals and birds), with 100% identity in the membrane-spanning and cytoplasmic domains of rabbit and human; (2) lack of regulation by cholesterol and estrogen; and (3) expression in brain. The features of LR11 suggest important roles in intercellular and intracellular ligand transport processes, some of which it may share with other brain-specific LDLR family members. PMID:9157966

  17. Opioid binding properties of the purified kappa receptor from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.S.; Zhou, D.; Cavinato, A.G.; Maulik, D.

    1989-01-01

    A glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 63,000 has been purified, in an active form, from human placental villus tissue membranes. The binding properties of this glycoprotein to opioid alkaloids and peptides indicates that it is the kappa opiate receptor of human placenta. The receptor binds the tritiated ligands etorphine, bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine and naloxone specifically and reversibly with Kd values of 3.3, 4.4, 5.1 and 7.0nM, respectively. The binding of /sup 3/H-Bremazocine to the purified receptor is inhibited by the following compounds with the corresponding Ki values EKC, 1.3 x 10/sup -8/M; Dynorphin 1-8, 3.03 x 10/sup -7/; U50,488H, 4.48 x 10/sup -9/; U69-593,2.28 x 10/sup -8/, morphine, 4.05 x 10/sup -6/ DADLE, 6.47 x 10/sup -6/ and naloxone, 2.64 x 10/sup -8/. The purified receptor binds 8 nmole of /sup 3/H-Etorphine and 1.7 nmole /sup 3/H-BZC per mg protein. The theoretical binding capacity of a protein of this molecular weight is 15.8. Although the iodinated purified receptor appears by autoradiography as one band on SDS-PAGE, yet homogeneity of the preparation is not claimed.

  18. Inhibitory activity of antibodies against the human atrial 5-HT(4)receptor.

    PubMed

    Sallé, L; Eftekhari, P; Aupart, M; Cosnay, P; Hoebeke, J; Argibay, J A

    2001-03-01

    Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop of G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to exert "agonist-like" activities. In order to test the hypothesis that this is a general phenomenon, antibodies were raised in rabbits against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the newly sequenced human cardiac 5-HT(4)receptor. The antibodies were affinity-purified and shown to recognize the 5-HT(4)receptor in immunoblots of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the receptor. The antibodies had no intrinsic effect but could depress the activation of L -type calcium channel induced by serotonin in human atrial cells. This antagonist-like effect was exerted both by intact IgG and by Fab fragments. These results are physiologically important since it has been shown that the 5-HT(4)receptor could be a target for autoantibodies in mothers at risk of giving birth to children with neonatal atrio-ventricular block. PMID:11181010

  19. Human brain receptor autoradiography using whole hemisphere sections: a general method that minimizes tissue artefacts

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Robitaille, Y.; Martial, J.; Chabot, J.G.; Lemoine, P.; Pilapil, C.; Dalpe, M.

    1987-01-01

    A general method for the preparation of high-quality, mostly ice-crystal-artefact-free whole human brain hemisphere sections is described. Upon receipt, hemispheres are divided; one is then fixed in buffered 10% formalin for neuropathological analysis while the other is cut in 8-10-mm-thick coronal slices that are then rapidly frozen in 2-methylbutane at -40 degrees C (10-15 sec) before being placed in the brain bank at -80 degrees C. Such rapid freezing markedly decreases the formation of ice-crystal artefacts. Whole-hemisphere 20-micron thick sections are then cut and mounted onto lantern-type gelatin-coated slides. These sections are subsequently used for both qualitative and quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Examples of data obtained are given by using various radioligands labelling classical neutrotransmitter, neuropeptide, enzyme, and ion channel receptor binding sites. This method should be useful for the obtention of various receptor maps in human brain. Such information could be most useful for in vivo receptor visualization studies using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. It could also indicate if a given receptor population is specifically and selectively altered in certain brain diseases, eventually leading to the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  20. Platelet receptor interplay regulates collagen-induced thrombus formation in flowing human blood.

    PubMed

    Siljander, Pia R-M; Munnix, Imke C A; Smethurst, Peter A; Deckmyn, Hans; Lindhout, Theo; Ouwehand, Willem H; Farndale, Richard W; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-02-15

    The platelet glycoproteins (GPs) Ib, integrin alpha(2)beta(1), and GPVI are considered central to thrombus formation. Recently, their relative importance has been re-evaluated based on data from murine knockout models. To examine their relationship during human thrombus formation on collagen type I fibers at high shear (1000 s(-1)), we tested a novel antibody against GPVI, an immunoglobulin single-chain variable fragment, 10B12, together with specific antagonists for GPIb alpha (12G1 Fab(2)) and alpha(2)beta(1) (6F1 mAb or GFOGER-GPP peptide). GPVI was found to be crucial for aggregate formation, Ca(2+) signaling, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, but not for primary adhesion, even with more than 97% receptor blockade. Inhibiting alpha(2)beta(1) revealed its involvement in regulating Ca(2+) signaling, PS exposure, and aggregate size. Both GPIb alpha and alpha(2)beta(1) contributed to primary adhesion, showing overlapping function. The coinhibition of receptors revealed synergism in thrombus formation: the coinhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors with collagen receptors further decreased adhesion and aggregation, and, crucially, the complete eradication of thrombus formation required the coinhibition of GPVI with either GPIb alpha or alpha(2)beta(1). In summary, human platelet deposition on collagen depends on the concerted interplay of several receptors: GPIb in synergy with alpha(2)beta(1) mediating primary adhesion, reinforced by activation through GPVI, which further regulates the thrombus formation. PMID:14563646

  1. H/sub 1/-histamine receptors regulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahata, N.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-03-05

    Activation of H/sub 1/-histamine receptors on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells resulted in a rapid formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), IP/sub 3/, IP/sub 2/, and IP/sub 1/. Histamine-induced mobilization of Ca/sup + +/ and stimulated of a Ca/sup + +/ calmodulin-regulated phosphodiesterase occurred concurrently with histamine-stimulated InsP formation. The K/sub 0.5/ values for histamine for activation of phosphodiesterase, mobilization of Ca/sup + +/, and stimulation of InsP formation were 3,4, and 10 ..mu..M, respectively. The K/sub i/ for histamine determined in competition binding experiments with the H/sub 1/-receptor antagonist, /sup 3/H-mepyramine, was 11 ..mu..M. As with muscarinic receptor-mediated effects in these cells, inactivation of G/sub i/ with pertussis toxin had no effect on H/sub 1/-receptor mediated responses. Both histamine and muscarinic receptor stimulation resulted in the formation of Ins 1,4,5P/sub 3/ and Ins 1,3,4P/sub 3/. In contrast to muscarinic receptor stimulation, which results in a linear accumulation of InsP for greater than 30 min, histamine-stimulated formation of InsP rapidly desensitized.

  2. Discovery of selective hexapeptide agonists to human neuromedin U receptors types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kentaro; Mori, Kenji; Taketa, Koji; Taguchi, Akihiro; Yakushiji, Fumika; Minamino, Naoto; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2014-08-14

    Neuromedin U (NMU) are bioactive peptides with a common C-terminal heptapeptide sequence (FLFRPRN-amide, 1a) among mammals, which is responsible for receptor activation, namely NMU receptor types 1 (NMUR1) and 2 (NMUR2). Among the various physiological actions of NMU, the anorexigenic effect has recently attracted attention in drug discovery efforts for treating obesity. Although several structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been reported, receptor-selective small peptide agonists have yet to be disclosed. Herein a SAR study of 1a-derived peptide derivatives is described. We initially screened both human NMUR1- and NMUR2-selective peptides in calcium-mobilization assays with cells transiently expressing receptors. Then we performed a precise assay with a stable expression system of receptors and consequently discovered hexapeptides 8d and 6b possessing selective agonist activity toward each respective receptor. Hexapeptide 6b, which selectively activates NMUR2 without significant NMUR1 activation, should aid in the development of anorexigenic drugs as well as advance NMU-related endocrinological research. PMID:24999562

  3. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  4. Human prostacyclin receptor structure and function from naturally-occurring and synthetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Arehart, Eric J; Gleim, Scott R; Douville, Karen L; Hwa, John

    2007-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is released by vascular endothelial cells and serves as a potent vasodilator, inhibitor of platelet aggregation (anti-thrombotic), and moderator of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation-migration-differentiation (anti-atherosclerotic). These actions are mediated via a seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), known as the human prostacyclin receptor or hIP. Animal studies using prostacyclin receptor knock-out (IP-/-) mice have revealed increased propensities towards thrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis, restenosis, as well as reperfusion injury. Of further importance has been the world-wide withdrawal of selective COX-2 inhibitors, due to their discriminating suppression of COX-2-derived PGI2 and its cardioprotective effects, leading to increased cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and thrombotic stroke. Over the last decade, mutagenesis studies of the IP receptor, in conjunction with in vitro functional assays and molecular modeling, have provided critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of both agonist binding and receptor activation. Most recently, the discovery of naturally-occurring and dysfunctional mutations within the hIP has provided additional insights into the proposed cardioprotective role of prostacyclin. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings regarding hIP receptor structure-function that have developed through the study of both synthetic and naturally-occurring mutations. PMID:17164137

  5. Functional Characterization of the Odorant Receptor 51E2 in Human Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Gelis, Lian; Jovancevic, Nikolina; Veitinger, Sophie; Mandal, Bhubaneswar; Arndt, Hans-Dieter; Neuhaus, Eva M; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-08-19

    Olfactory receptors, which belong to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors, are found to be ectopically expressed in non-sensory tissues mediating a variety of cellular functions. In this study we detected the olfactory receptor OR51E2 at the transcript and the protein level in human epidermal melanocytes. Stimulation of primary melanocytes with the OR51E2 ligand β-ionone significantly inhibited melanocyte proliferation. Our results further showed that β-ionone stimulates melanogenesis and dendritogenesis. Using RNA silencing and receptor antagonists, we demonstrated that OR51E2 activation elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) and cAMP, which could mediate the observed increase in melanin synthesis. Co-immunocytochemical stainings using a specific OR51E2 antibody revealed subcellular localization of the receptor in early endosomes associated with EEA-1 (early endosome antigen 1). Plasma membrane preparations showed that OR51E2 protein is present at the melanocyte cell surface. Our findings thus suggest that activation of olfactory receptor signaling by external compounds can influence melanocyte homeostasis. PMID:27226631

  6. Molecular and Functional Analysis of Human β-Defensin 3 Action at Melanocortin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Matthew A.; Kaelin, Christopher B.; Ta, Tina; Weis, Allison; Morton, Gregory J.; Barsh, Gregory S.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The β-defensins are a class of small, cationic proteins first recognized as antimicrobial components of the innate and adaptive immune system. More recently, one of the major β-defensins produced in skin, β-defensin 3, has been discovered to function as a melanocortin receptor ligand in vivo and in vitro, but its biophysical and pharmacological basis of action has been enigmatic. Here we report functional and biochemical studies focused on human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) and melanocortin receptors 1 and 4. Genetic and pharmacologic studies indicate that HBD3 acts as a neutral melanocortin receptor antagonist, capable of blocking the action of either stimulatory agonists, such as α-melanocyte stimulating hormone, or inhibitory inverse agonists such as Agouti signaling protein (Asip) and Agouti-related protein (Agrp). A comprehensive structure-function analysis demonstrates that two patches of positively charged residues, located on opposite poles of HBD3 and spatially organized by the compact β-defensin fold, are primarily responsible for high affinity binding to melanocortin receptors. These findings identify a distinct mode of melanocortin receptor-ligand interactions based primarily on electrostatic complementarity, with implications for designing ligands that target melanocortin and potentially other seven transmembrane receptors. PMID:23790489

  7. Expression of leptin and leptin receptor isoforms in the rat and human carotid body.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Rucinski, Marcin; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-04-18

    Leptin is known to play a role in the modulation of metabolism and control of breathing acting mainly on central nervous structures, although additional actions on peripheral arterial chemoreceptors have also been suggested in the literature. We therefore examined by means of immunohistochemistry the expression of leptin and leptin receptors in the carotid bodies of rats and humans. Leptin expression and relative expression of leptin receptor isoforms were also studied in rats by real-time PCR. No leptin or leptin receptor immunoreactivities were visible in the type II cells of either series. In rat carotid bodies, diffuse positive stainings for leptin and leptin receptors (both with antibody recognizing all receptor isoforms and antibody specific for Ob-Rb) were observed in type I cells. In human carotid bodies, the mean percentage (±standard error) of leptin immunoreactive type I cells was 39.4%±5.1% and the percentages of leptin receptor immunoreactive type I cells were 57.3%±3.9% with antibody recognizing all receptor isoforms and 33.3%±4.2% with antibody specific for isoform Ob-Rb. Double immunofluorescences with anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (type I cell marker) and anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (type II cell markers) confirmed the selective location of leptin and Ob-Rb in type I cells. Real-time PCR showed the expression of leptin and Ob-Ra, Ob-Rb, Ob-Rc and Ob-Rf isoform mRNA in the rat carotid body, levels of expression being Ob-Rf>Ob-Rc>Ob-Ra>Ob-Rb. Ob-Re mRNA was not detected. The above findings suggest a role of circulating or locally produced leptin in the regulation of chemoreceptor discharge and/or metabolic sensing function, by means of direct action on type I cells. PMID:21334312

  8. α1-adrenergic receptors positively regulate Toll-like receptor cytokine production from human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Laurel A; Woster, Andrew P; Dahlman, Julie; Sauter, Edward R; Combs, Colin K; Porter, James E

    2011-08-01

    Catecholamines released from the sympathetic nervous system in response to stress or injury affect expression of inflammatory cytokines generated by immune cells. α(1)-Adrenergic receptors (ARs) are expressed on innate immune cell populations, but their subtype expression patterns and signaling characteristics are not well characterized. Primary human monocytes, a human monocytic cell line, and monocyte-derived macrophage cells were used to measure expression of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β responding to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of α(1)-AR activation. Based on our previous findings, we hypothesized that α(1)-AR stimulation on innate immune cells positively regulates LPS-initiated IL-1β production. IL-1β production in response to LPS was synergistically higher for both monocytes and macrophages in the presence of the selective α(1)-AR agonist (R)-(-)-phenylephrine hydrochloride (PE). This synergistic IL-1β response could be blocked with a selective α(1)-AR antagonist as well as inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC). Radioligand binding studies characterized a homogenous α(1B)-AR subtype population on monocytes, which changed to a heterogeneous receptor subtype expression pattern when differentiated to macrophages. Furthermore, increased p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was observed only with concurrent PE and LPS stimulation, peaking after 120 and 30 min in monocytes and macrophages, respectively. Blocking the PKC/p38 MAPK signaling pathway in both innate immune cell types inhibited the synergistic IL-1β increase observed with concurrent PE and LPS treatments. This study characterizes α(1)-AR subtype expression on both human monocyte and macrophage cells and illustrates a mechanism by which increased IL-1β production can be modulated by α(1)-AR input. PMID:21571945

  9. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Experimental Approach Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2-receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Key Results Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Conclusions and Implications Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. PMID:24467410

  10. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  11. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  12. Antibody protection reveals extended epitopes on the human TSH receptor.

    PubMed

    Latif, Rauf; Teixeira, Avelino; Michalek, Krzysztof; Ali, M Rejwan; Schlesinger, Max; Baliram, Ramkumarie; Morshed, Syed A; Davies, Terry F

    2012-01-01

    Stimulating, and some blocking, antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) have conformation-dependent epitopes reported to involve primarily the leucine rich repeat region of the ectodomain (LRD). However, successful crystallization of TSHR residues 22-260 has omitted important extracellular non-LRD residues including the hinge region which connects the TSHR ectodomain to the transmembrane domain and which is involved in ligand induced signal transduction. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine if TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs) have non-LRD binding sites outside the LRD. To obtain this information we employed the method of epitope protection in which we first protected TSHR residues 1-412 with intact TSHR antibodies and then enzymatically digested the unprotected residues. Those peptides remaining were subsequently delineated by mass spectrometry. Fourteen out of 23 of the reported stimulating monoclonal TSHR-Ab crystal contact residues were protected by this technique which may reflect the higher binding energies of certain residues detected in this approach. Comparing the protected epitopes of two stimulating TSHR-Abs we found both similarities and differences but both antibodies also contacted the hinge region and the amino terminus of the TSHR following the signal peptide and encompassing cysteine box 1 which has previously been shown to be important for TSH binding and activation. A monoclonal blocking TSHR antibody revealed a similar pattern of binding regions but the residues that it contacted on the LRD were again distinct. These data demonstrated that conformationally dependent TSHR-Abs had epitopes not confined to the LRDs but also incorporated epitopes not revealed in the available crystal structure. Furthermore, the data also indicated that in addition to overlapping contact regions within the LRD, there are unique epitope patterns for each of the antibodies which may contribute to their functional heterogeneity. PMID:22957097

  13. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-09-01

    An /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic ligand (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the /alpha//sub 2/B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (/alpha//sub 2/A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective /alpha/-adrenergic ligands.

  14. Human cerebrovascular contractile receptors are upregulated via a B-Raf/MEK/ERK-sensitive signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cerebral ischemia results in a rapid increase in contractile cerebrovascular receptors, such as the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 1B (5-HT1B), angiotensin II type 1 (AT1), and endothelin type B (ETB) receptors, in the vessel walls within the ischemic region, which further impairs local blood flow and aggravates tissue damage. This receptor upregulation occurs via activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. We therefore hypothesized an important role for B-Raf, the first signaling molecule in the pathway. To test our hypothesis, human cerebral arteries were incubated at 37°C for 48 h in the absence or presence of a B-Raf inhibitor: SB-386023 or SB-590885. Contractile properties were evaluated in a myograph and protein expression of the individual receptors and activated phosphorylated B-Raf (p-B-Raf) was evaluated immunohistochemically. Results 5-HT1B, AT1, and ETB receptor-mediated contractions were significantly reduced by application of SB-590885, and to a smaller extent by SB-386023. A marked reduction in AT1 receptor immunoreactivity was observed after treatment with SB-590885. Treatment with SB-590885 and SB-386023 diminished the culture-induced increase of p-B-Raf immunoreactivity. Conclusions B-Raf signaling has a key function in the altered expression of vascular contractile receptors observed after organ culture. Therefore, specific targeting of B-Raf might be a novel approach to reduce tissue damage after cerebral ischemia by preventing the previously observed upregulation of contractile receptors in smooth muscle cells. PMID:21223556

  15. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 participates in human apolipoprotein A5 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kwang-Hoon

    2010-01-29

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) has been reported to play a crucial role in the modulation of diverse metabolic processes in liver. Here, we reported the identification of human apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5), which implicated in lowering plasma triglyceride levels, as a novel target gene of Nur77. Nur77 induced the human ApoA5 promoter activity. Using 5'-deletion and mutagenesis of human ApoA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, it was shown that Nur77 directly regulated human ApoA5 gene expression by binding to a Nur77 response element (AAAGGTCA) located in the proximal human ApoA5 promoter region. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking of Nur77 transcriptional activity via overexpression of dominant negative Nur77 suppressed human ApoA5 promoter activity and mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Nur77 is a novel regulator of human ApoA5 gene expression and provide a new insight into the role of this orphan nuclear receptor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  16. Dopamine D2 receptor bands in normal human temporal cortex are absent in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Joyce, J N; Myers, A J; Gurevich, E

    1998-02-16

    A modular organization of bands enriched in high concentrations of D2 receptors are observed throughout the rostral to caudal aspects of the temporal cortex of the normal human at postmortem, but are most frequently observed in the inferior and superior temporal cortices [S. Goldsmith, J.N. Joyce, Dopamine D2 receptors are organized in bands in normal human temporal cortex, Neuroscience 74 (1996) 435-451]. In the tissue derived at postmortem from Alzheimer's disease cases (AD), these D2 receptor-enriched modules were found to be largely absent at rostral and mid-levels of the temporal cortex. Regions exhibiting this loss of receptor binding also showed a marked reduction in the number of pyramidal neurons stained for D2 mRNA. In addition, the AD material exhibited numerous thioflavin-positive plaques and tangle-filled extraneuronal (ghost) pyramidal neurons that were D2 mRNA-negative. Regions that are the earliest affected and most susceptible to classical AD pathology are also most sensitive to the loss of D2 receptors. These results, along with our previous data [J.N. Joyce, C. Kaeger, H. Ryoo, S. Goldsmith, Dopamine D2 receptors in the hippocampus and amygdala in Alzheimer's disease, Neurosci. Lett. 154 (1993) 171-174; H. Ryoo, J. N. Joyce, The loss of dopamine D2 receptors varies along the rostrocaudal axis of the hippocampal complex in Alzheimer's disease, J. Comp. Neurol. 348 (1994) 94-110], indicate that specific pathways enriched with D2 receptors, including that within modules of higher order association cortices of the temporal lobe and continued through segregated pathways within the parahippocampus and hippocampus, are particularly susceptible to the loss in AD. These dopamine D2 receptor-enriched modules may play an important role in the reciprocal activity of large groups of neurons in these high-order association cortical regions. Hence, the loss of the D2 receptor-enriched modules in Alzheimer's disease contributes to disturbances in information

  17. Changes in H3 influenza A virus receptor specificity during replication in humans.

    PubMed

    Ryan-Poirier, K; Suzuki, Y; Bean, W J; Kobasa, D; Takada, A; Ito, T; Kawaoka, Y

    1998-08-01

    Influenza A viruses of the H3 subtype caused the 1968 Hong Kong pandemic, the hemagglutinin (HA) gene being introduced into humans following a reassortment event with an avian virus. Receptor specificity and serum inhibitor sensitivity of the HA of influenza A viruses are linked to the host species. Human H3 viruses preferentially recognize N-acetyl sialic acid linked to galactose by alpha2,6 linkages (Neu5Acalpha2,6Gal) and are sensitive to serum inhibitors, whereas avian and equine viruses preferentially recognize Neu5Acalpha2,3Gal linkages and are resistant to serum inhibitors. We have examined the receptor specificity and serum inhibitor sensitivity of H3 human influenza A viruses from the time they were introduced into the human population to gain insight into the mechanism of viral molecular evolution and host tropism. All of the viruses were sensitive to neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition by horse serum. Early H3 viruses were resistant to pig and rabbit serum inhibitors. Viruses isolated after 1977 were uniformly sensitive to inhibition by pig and rabbit sera. The recognition of Neu5Acalpha2,3Gal or Neu5Acalpha2,6Gal linkages was not correlated with the serum sensitivity. These data showed that the receptor specificity of HA, measured as inhibitor sensitivity, has changed during replication in humans since its introduction from an avian virus. PMID:9783465

  18. Activation status of the Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) influences Vemurafenib availability in humanized mouse models

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, A. Kenneth; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Wolf, C. Roland

    2015-01-01

    Vemurafenib is a revolutionary treatment for melanoma, but the magnitude of therapeutic response is highly variable and the rapid acquisition of resistance is frequent. Here, we examined how vemurafenib disposition, particularly through cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation pathways, could potentially influence these outcomes using a panel of knockout and transgenic humanized mouse models. We identified CYP3A4 as the major enzyme involved in the metabolism of vemurafenib in in vitro assays with human liver microsomes. However, mice expressing human CYP3A4 did not process vemurafenib to a greater extent than CYP3A4 null animals, suggesting that other pregnane X receptor (PXR)-regulated pathways may contribute more significantly to vemurafenib metabolism in vivo. Activation of PXR, but not of the closely related constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), profoundly reduced circulating levels of vemurafenib in humanized mice. This effect was independent of CYP3A4 and was negated by co-treatment with the drug efflux transporter inhibitor, elacridar. Finally, vemurafenib strongly induced PXR activity in vitro, but only weakly induced PXR in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that vemurafenib is unlikely to exhibit a clinically significant interaction with CYP3A4, but that modulation of bioavailability through PXR-mediated regulation of drug transporters (for example by other drugs) has the potential to markedly influence systemic exposure and thereby therapeutic outcomes. Activation status of the Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) influences Vemurafenib availability in humanized mouse models. PMID:26363009

  19. Ferrets exclusively synthesize Neu5Ac and express naturally humanized influenza A virus receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Preston S.K.; Böhm, Raphael; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Steen, Jason A.; Wang, Hui; Lukowski, Samuel W.; Hawthorne, Paula L.; Trezise, Ann E.O.; Coloe, Peter J.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Haselhorst, Thomas; von Itzstein, Mark; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals express the sialic acids N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) on cell surfaces, where they act as receptors for pathogens, including influenza A virus (IAV). Neu5Gc is synthesized from Neu5Ac by the enzyme cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH). In humans, this enzyme is inactive and only Neu5Ac is produced. Ferrets are susceptible to human-adapted IAV strains and have been the dominant animal model for IAV studies. Here we show that ferrets, like humans, do not synthesize Neu5Gc. Genomic analysis reveals an ancient, nine-exon deletion in the ferret CMAH gene that is shared by the Pinnipedia and Musteloidia members of the Carnivora. Interactions between two human strains of IAV with the sialyllactose receptor (sialic acid—α2,6Gal) confirm that the type of terminal sialic acid contributes significantly to IAV receptor specificity. Our results indicate that exclusive expression of Neu5Ac contributes to the susceptibility of ferrets to human-adapted IAV strains. PMID:25517696

  20. Characterization of solubilized human and rat brain US -endorphin-receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Helmeste, D.M.; Li, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been solubilized from human striatal and rat whole-brain membranes by use of 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Tritiated human US -endorphin (TH-US /sub h/-EP) binding revealed high-affinity competition by morphine, naloxone, and various US -EP analogues. Lack of high-affinity competition by (+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (U50-488, Upjohn) indicated that k sites were not labeled by TH-US -/sub h/-EP under these conditions. Affinities were similar in both soluble and membrane preparations except for (Met)enkephalin, which appears to be rapidly degraded by the solubilized extract. Size differences between human and rat solubilized TH-US /sub h/-EP-receptor complexes were revealed by exclusion chromatography.

  1. Estrogen-related receptor gamma modulates energy metabolism target genes in human trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Poidatz, D; Dos Santos, E; Brulé, A; De Mazancourt, P; Dieudonné, M N

    2012-09-01

    Placenta growth and functions depend on correct trophoblast migration, proliferation, and differentiation. The placenta has a critical role in gas and nutrient transport. To accomplish these numerous functions, the placenta depends on a highly efficient energy metabolism control. Recent studies showed that the orphan nuclear receptor Estrogen-Related Receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in human placentas. As ERRγ has been described as a major energy metabolism regulator, we investigated ERRγ expression and putative roles on energy homeostasis in human trophoblast from first trimester placentas. First, we showed that ERRγ expression level increased during pregnancy and that ERRγ was more abundant in villous than in extravillous trophoblasts. We also observed that ERRγ expression increased during trophoblast differentiation. Second, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of some energy metabolism target genes decreased when ERRγ expression was impaired. Altogether, these results suggest that ERRγ could be implicated in the energy metabolism regulation of human trophoblasts. PMID:22763271

  2. Structural Stereochemistry of Androstene Hormones Determines Interactions with Human Androgen, Estrogen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shaak, Thomas L.; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Diegelmann, Robert F.; Ward, Kevin R.; Loria, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET exhibit strong biological activity that has been attributed to androgenic, estrogenic, or antiglucocorticoid activity in vivo and in vitro. This study compared DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET for their ability to activate the human AR, ER, and GR and determine the relative androgenicity, estrogenicity, and glucocorticoid activity. The results show that, at the receptor level, these androstene hormones are weak AR and even weaker ER activators. Direct androstene hormone activation of the human AR, ERα, and ERβ may not be essential for their biological function. Similarly, these hormones indirectly activated the human GR, only in the presence of high dexamethasone concentrations. These results underscore the major difference between androstene hormone interactions with these nuclear receptors and their biological effects. PMID:24729874

  3. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Blakely, B.T.; Pavlath, G.K.; Travis, M.; Blau, H.M. )

    1990-10-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications.

  4. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C H; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; White, Thomas A; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W; Roth, Bryan L; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-03-01

    Bifunctional μ- and δ-opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives, with diminished side effects, to alkaloid opiate analgesics. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bifunctional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical for understanding of the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides and for development of improved analgesics. PMID:25686086

  5. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; et al

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  6. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C. H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  7. The human poliovirus receptor. Receptor-virus interaction and parameters of disease specificity.

    PubMed

    Gromeier, M; Lu, H H; Bernhardt, G; Harber, J J; Bibb, J A; Wimmer, E

    1995-05-25

    The host range of poliovirus is determined by the expression of the hPVR, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We characterized hPVR proteins biochemically and found them to be complex-type glycoproteins. The outermost V-like domain of three extracellular domains harbors the PVR function. A panel of single or multiple amino acid exchanges were introduced throughout this domain in order to localize regions involved in virus-receptor interactions. Putative contact amino acids were found to reside in the C'C"D and DE regions. Binding and uptake of poliovirus paralleled virus replication in all mutants tested suggesting that virus binding was affected without abrogating the ability to mediate subsequent events in the infection. Although the primate PVR is essential in conferring susceptibility to poliovirus infection, certain strains can induce neurological disease in rodents. Mouse neurovirulent PV isolates of divergent serotypical origin each provoked a distinctive, characteristic neurological syndrome upon intracerebral infection of wild-type mice. We analyzed clinical and histopathological features of diffuse encephalomyelitis caused by these PV strains and compared the condition with poliomyelitis in mice transgenic for the hPVR. Diffuse PV encephalomyelitis in wild-type mice could be distinguished clinically and histopathologically from hPVR-mediated poliomyelitis in trangenic mice. We localized the determinants of mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a), a derivative of PV1 (Mahoney), in a portion of the viral genome encompassing parts of the capsid protein VP1 as well as the nonstructural protein 2A. Mouse neuropathogenicity could possibly be conferred by reduced particle stability of PV1(LS-a) inasmuch as we found particles to be thermolabile. PMID:7611627

  8. Biotinylated human beta-endorphins as probes for the opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, G; Gibson, B W; Sadée, W

    1988-01-01

    The reaction of human beta-endorphin and biotinyl N-hydroxysuccinimide with or without spacer arm, afforded a series of products that were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry of the biotinylated products and their tryptic digests produced abundant protonated molecular ions (MH+), which specified the number and location of biotinylation. Between 1 and 4 biotinyl residues were incorporated per human beta-endorphin molecule, at Lys-9, -19, -24, -28, and -29, but not at the amino-terminal Tyr-1. Three HPLC fractions were isolated for receptor binding studies with monobiotinylation of Lys-9 (B1 beta and B1X beta; X = C6 spacer arm), Lys-19 (B1 gamma), and a mixture of Lys-24, Lys-28, and Lys-29 derivatives (B1 alpha, BX1 alpha). All derivatives displayed tight binding to avidin, and no dissociation from avidin was detectable over several hours at 0 degrees C for the derivatives (BX1 alpha) tested. IC50 values for binding to mu and delta opioid receptor sites were 3-8 times higher for monobiotinylated derivatives than for the parent human beta-endorphin (IC50,mu = 1.5 nM, IC50,delta = 1.3 nM). Association with avidin decreased opioid receptor affinities for the C6 spacer derivative biotinylated at position Lys-9, which is close to the (1-5) enkephalin receptor region. In contrast, avidin did not affect or even increased apparent affinities to mu and delta sites for derivatives biotinylated at the alpha-helical part of the molecule (Lys-19, -24, -28, and -29). Thus, when bound to avidin, the biotinylated human beta-endorphin derivatives with spacer arm (BX1 alpha), substituted near the carboxyl terminal (Lys-24, -28, and -29), displayed mu binding affinities equal to and delta binding affinities only four times lower than underivatized human beta-endorphin. Biotinylated human beta-endorphins also bound to low affinity nonopioid binding sites on NG-108-15 cells; however, affinities to these sites were

  9. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  10. Staphylococci-induced Human Platelet Injury Mediated by Protein A and Immunoglobulin G Fc Fragment Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hawiger, Jack; Steckley, Sylvia; Hammond, Dianne; Cheng, Charles; Timmons, Sheila; Glick, Alan D.; Des Prez, Roger M.

    1979-01-01

    Bloodstream infections with staphylococci are accompanied by thromboembolic complications. We have studied the mechanism of the interaction of staphylococci with human blood platelets. Staphylococci that possess protein A, a bacterial receptor for the Fc fragment of immunoglobulin G (IgG), caused aggregation of human platelets in whole plasma accompanied by release of [3H]serotonin. These reactions were time and concentration dependent, requiring two or more staphylococci per platelet to give maximal response within 5 min. The interaction between staphylococci and platelets required the presence of cell wall-bound protein A and of IgG with an intact Fc fragment. It did not require an intact complement system. Cell wall-bound protein A (solid phase) was capable of aggregating human platelets in whole plasma. In contrast, free, solubilized protein A (fluid phase) did not cause measurable aggregation, and release of [3H]serotonin was reduced. An excess of free, solubilized protein A blocked aggregation of human platelets induced by staphylococci in whole plasma. The role of the Fc fragment of IgG in the staphylococci-human platelet interaction was demonstrated by an experiment in which free, isolated Fc fragment blocked aggregation of platelets in whole plasma induced by staphylococci. Furthermore, binding of 125I-protein A to human platelets was demonstrated in the presence of complete IgG with intact Fc fragment but not in the presence of the F(ab)2 fragment. Binding of the protein A-IgG complex to the human platelet Fc receptor was paralleled by the release of [3H]serotonin. These results represent a novel example of the interaction of two phylogenetically different Fc receptors, one on prokaryotic staphylococci and the other on human platelets. Their common ligand, IgG, is amplified by one Fc receptor (protein A) to react with another Fc receptor present on human platelets, which results in membrane-mediated aggregation and release reaction occurring in whole

  11. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection – Influence on receptor binding☆

    PubMed Central

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S.; Childs, Robert A.; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A.; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J.; Martin, Stephen R.; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J.; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H.Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S.; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J.; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J.; Hay, Alan J.; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.; Feizi, Ten

    2013-01-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of the virus hemagglutinin from preferential binding to avian receptors for the recognition of human receptors present in the upper airway. We have identified receptor-binding changes which emerged during H5N1 infection of humans, due to single amino acid substitutions, Ala134Val and Ile151Phe, in the hemagglutinin. Detailed biological, receptor-binding, and structural analyses revealed reduced binding of the mutated viruses to avian-like receptors, but without commensurate increased binding to the human-like receptors investigated, possibly reflecting a receptor-binding phenotype intermediate in adaptation to more human-like characteristics. These observations emphasize that evolution in nature of avian H5N1 viruses to efficient binding of human receptors is a complex multistep process. PMID:24050651

  12. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection--influence on receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J; Martin, Stephen R; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J; Hay, Alan J; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D; Feizi, Ten

    2013-12-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of the virus hemagglutinin from preferential binding to avian receptors for the recognition of human receptors present in the upper airway. We have identified receptor-binding changes which emerged during H5N1 infection of humans, due to single amino acid substitutions, Ala134Val and Ile151Phe, in the hemagglutinin. Detailed biological, receptor-binding, and structural analyses revealed reduced binding of the mutated viruses to avian-like receptors, but without commensurate increased binding to the human-like receptors investigated, possibly reflecting a receptor-binding phenotype intermediate in adaptation to more human-like characteristics. These observations emphasize that evolution in nature of avian H5N1 viruses to efficient binding of human receptors is a complex multistep process. PMID:24050651

  13. Conformational state of human cardiac 5-HT(4(g)) receptors influences the functional effects of polyclonal anti-5-HT(4) receptor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Emmanuella; Rose, Stéphanie; Hérault, Olivier; Argibay, Jorge; Cosnay, Pierre; Bozon, Véronique

    2007-04-01

    The functional effects of the anti-G21V antibody directed against the second extracellular loop of human heart 5-HT(4) receptors can differ when the receptors are expressed in different cell lines. Here, we extend these studies to show variation in the responses of 5-HT(4(g)) receptors to the antibody within the same expression system. In a previous report no effect of the anti-G21V antibodies had been shown upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in CHO cells. Here the same antibodies alone or when added before 5-HT had a functional "inverse-agonist like" effect upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in a separate line of CHO cells. Although these CHO cells showed a lower efficacy of cAMP production evoked by 5-HT than the previous report they express a similar h5-HT(4(g)) receptor density. Inhibition of either phosphodiesterases or Gi proteins had no effect upon the action of the antibody. Conformational states of the 5-HT(4) receptor and/or equilibrium between different states of receptors may then determine the functional effect of antibodies against this receptor. PMID:17222392

  14. A new variant in signal peptide of the human luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) affects receptor biogenesis causing leydig cell hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Valeria; Duminuco, Paolo; Vottero, Alessandra; Kleinau, Gunnar; Schülein, Ralf; Minari, Roberta; Bassi, Ivan; Bernasconi, Sergio; Persani, Luca; Bonomi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The human luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) plays a fundamental role in male and female reproduction. In males, loss-of-function mutations in LHCGR have been associated with distinct degrees of impairment in pre- and postnatal testosterone secretion resulting in a variable phenotypic spectrum, classified as Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH) type 1 (complete LH resistance and disorder of sex differentiation) and type 2 (partial LH resistance with impaired masculinization and fertility). Here, we report the case of an adolescent who came to the pediatric endocrinologist at the age of 12 years old for micropenis and cryptorchidism. Testis biopsy showed profound LCH and absent germinal line elements (Sertoli-only syndrome). The sequence analysis of the LHCGR gene showed the presence of a compound heterozygosity, being one variation, c.1847C>A p.S616Y, already described in association to Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism, and the other, c.29 C>T p.L10P, a new identified variant in the putative signal peptide (SP) of LHCGR. Functional and structural studies provide first evidence that LHCGR have a functional and cleavable SP required for receptor biogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate the pathogenic role of the novel p.L10P allelic variant, which has to be considered a loss-of-function mutation significantly contributing, in compound heterozygosity with p.S616Y, to the LCH type 2 observed in our patient. PMID:26246498

  15. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with human directed social behavior in dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Kis, Anna; Bence, Melinda; Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Adám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (-212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5' and 3' UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3' and 5' UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene-behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system. PMID:24454713

  16. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human Pregnane X-Receptor in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Emma Jane; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shen, Danny D.; Tracy, Julia; Shuhart, Margaret C.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Eaton, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand – rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 µmoles SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. PMID:23153560

  17. Oxytocin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Human Directed Social Behavior in Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Ádám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (−212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5′ and 3′ UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3′ and 5′ UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene–behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system. PMID:24454713

  18. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Kriti; Gupta, Deepali; Saini, Ekta; Choudhary, Shilpa; Jamwal, Abhishek; Alam, Mohd. Shoeb; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K.; Sharma, Yagya D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs) to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites. Methods Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively. Results Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1) showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3) showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1) utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s) as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite. Conclusions Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s) by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host. PMID:26393350

  19. Use of Murine CXCR-4 as a Second Receptor by Some T-Cell-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Cristina; Borsetti, Alessandra; Choe, Hyeryun; Farzan, Michael; Kolchinsky, Peter; Heesen, Michael; Ma, Qing; Gerard, Craig; Palú, Giorgio; Dorf, Martin E.; Springer, Timothy; Sodroski, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    The human CXCR-4 molecule serves as a second receptor for primary, T-cell-tropic, and laboratory-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. Here we show that murine CXCR-4 can support the entry of some of these HIV-1 isolates. Differences between mouse and human CXCR-4 in the ability to function as an HIV-1 receptor are determined by sequences in the second extracellular loop of the CXCR-4 protein. PMID:9445072

  20. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  1. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  2. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  3. Identification and optimization of small-molecule agonists of the human relaxin hormone receptor RXFP1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jingbo; Huang, Zaohua; Chen, Catherine Z; Agoulnik, Irina U; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E; Ferrer, Marc; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I; Marugan, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    The anti-fibrotic, vasodilatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutic properties of recombinant relaxin peptide hormone have been investigated in several diseases, and recent clinical trial data has shown benefit in treating acute heart failure. However, the remodelling capacity of these peptide hormones is difficult to study in chronic settings because of their short half-life and the need for intravenous administration. Here we present the first small-molecule series of human relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 agonists. These molecules display similar efficacy as the natural hormone in several functional assays. Mutagenesis studies indicate that the small molecules activate relaxin receptor through an allosteric site. These compounds have excellent physical and in vivo pharmacokinetic properties to support further investigation of relaxin biology and animal efficacy studies of the therapeutic benefits of relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 activation. PMID:23764525

  4. A human embryonic lung fibroblast with a high density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    André, C; Marullo, S; Convents, A; Lü, B Z; Guillet, J G; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, D A

    1988-01-15

    Binding studies with the radiolabeled muscarinic antagonists dexetimide, quinuclidinyl benzilate and N-methylscopolamine showed that the human embryonic lung fibroblast CCL137 possesses approximately 2 X 10(5) muscarinic receptors/cell, i.e. 2.1 pmol/mg membrane protein. These receptors showed a marked stereoselectivity towards dexetimide and levetimide and only low affinity for another antagonist, pirenzepine. The muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase and induced phosphatidylinositide turnover in the intact cells. Both effects were inhibited by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Affinity labeling with tritiated propylbenzylcholine mustard revealed a protein of 72 kDa. Finally, down-regulation of the membrane receptors following prolonged treatment with the agonist carbamylcholine was assessed by means of the hydrophilic antagonist N-methylscopolamine. PMID:2828056

  5. Regulation of AMPA Receptor Function by the Human Memory-Associated Gene KIBRA

    PubMed Central

    Makuch, Lauren; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Johnson, Richard C.; Yu, Yilin; Duning, Kerstin; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Xia, Jun; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    KIBRA has recently been identified as a gene associated with human memory performance. Despite the elucidation of the role of KIBRA in several diverse processes in non-neuronal cells, the molecular function of KIBRA in neurons is unknown. We found that KIBRA directly binds to the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) and forms a complex with α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs), the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. KIBRA knockdown accelerates the rate of AMPAR recycling following N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor induced internalization. Genetic deletion of KIBRA in mice impairs both long-term depression and long-term potentiation at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Moreover, KIBRA knockout mice have severe deficits in contextual fear learning and memory. These results indicate that KIBRA regulates higher brain function by regulating AMPAR trafficking and synaptic plasticity. PMID:21943600

  6. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Mouse and Human Fcγ Receptors.

    PubMed

    Tutt, Alison L; James, Sonya; Laversin, Stéphanie A; Tipton, Thomas R W; Ashton-Key, Margaret; French, Ruth R; Hussain, Khiyam; Vaughan, Andrew T; Dou, Lang; Earley, Alexander; Dahal, Lekh N; Lu, Chen; Dunscombe, Melanie; Chan, H T Claude; Penfold, Christine A; Kim, Jinny H; Potter, Elizabeth A; Mockridge, C Ian; Roghanian, Ali; Oldham, Robert J; Cox, Kerry L; Lim, Sean H; Teige, Ingrid; Frendéus, Bjorn; Glennie, Martin J; Beers, Stephen A; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    FcγRs are key regulators of the immune response, capable of binding to the Fc portion of IgG Abs and manipulating the behavior of numerous cell types. Through a variety of receptors, isoforms, and cellular expression patterns, they are able to fine-tune and direct appropriate responses. Furthermore, they are key determinants of mAb immunotherapy, with mAb isotype and FcγR interaction governing therapeutic efficacy. Critical to understanding the biology of this complex family of receptors are reagents that are robust and highly specific for each receptor. In this study, we describe the development and characterization of mAb panels specific for both mouse and human FcγR for use in flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and immunocytochemistry. We highlight key differences in expression between the two species and also patterns of expression that will likely impact on immunotherapeutic efficacy and translation of therapeutic agents from mouse to clinic. PMID:26512139

  7. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Drapkin, Paola T.; O’Riordan, Catherine R.; Yi, Su Min; Chiorini, John A.; Cardella, Jonathan; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  8. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, P T; O'Riordan, C R; Yi, S M; Chiorini, J A; Cardella, J; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    2000-03-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  9. Three radioligands compared for determining cytoplasmic estrogen-receptor content of human breast carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pieslor, P.C.; Gibson, R.E.; Eckelman, W.C.; Oates, K.K.; Cook, B.; Reba, R.C.

    1982-03-01

    Three radioligands were compared for use in a cytoplasmic estrogen-receptor assay, using pooled cytosol from human breast adenocarcinomas. The estrogen receptor content was determined in vitro by a dextran-coated charcoal method involving a 4-h incubation with and without diethylstilbestrol. Tritiated moxestrol failed to come to equilibrium in 4 h, thereby preventing the use of conventional one-component Scatchard analysis. The use of /sup 125/I-labeled estradiol resulted in a higher estimate of estrogen-receptor concentration than that obtained with use of tritiated estradiol. This overestimation was not corrected by Scatchard, double-reciprocal, or Woolf plots, or by two different methods of data analysis: least squares and ''robust.'' An underestimation of the specific activity of iodoestradiol with respect to that of tritiated estradiol and an unrecognized second component of nonreceptor binding could explain this disparity.

  10. Differentiated Human Midbrain-Derived Neural Progenitor Cells Express Excitatory Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors Containing α2β Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Florian; Kraft, Robert; Busse, Kathy; Härtig, Wolfgang; Ahrens, Jörg; Leffler, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Schwarz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Background Human fetal midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) may deliver a tissue source for drug screening and regenerative cell therapy to treat Parkinson’s disease. While glutamate and GABAA receptors play an important role in neurogenesis, the involvement of glycine receptors during human neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation as well as their molecular and functional characteristics in NPCs are largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigated NPCs in respect to their glycine receptor function and subunit expression using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate the ability of NPCs to express functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors after differentiation for 3 weeks in vitro. Pharmacological and molecular analyses indicate a predominance of glycine receptor heteromers containing α2β subunits. Intracellular calcium measurements of differentiated NPCs suggest that glycine evokes depolarisations mediated by strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and not by D-serine-sensitive excitatory glycine receptors. Culturing NPCs with additional glycine, the glycine-receptor antagonist strychnine, or the Na+-K+-Cl− co-transporter 1 (NKCC1)-inhibitor bumetanide did not significantly influence cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that NPCs derived from human fetal midbrain tissue acquire essential glycine receptor properties during neuronal maturation. However, glycine receptors seem to have a limited functional impact on neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation of NPCs in vitro. PMID:22606311

  11. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  12. [Rhabdomyosarcoma lysis by T cells expressing a human autoantibody based chimeric receptor targeting the fetal acetylcholine receptors].

    PubMed

    Gattenlöhner, S

    2006-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMSs) are the most frequent malignant soft tissue tumors of childhood. Since even aggressive multimodality treatments including autologous stem cell rescue have failed to improve the < 20 % overall survival rate of children with metastatic RMS, novel treatment approaches are urgently needed. Looking for potential targets for immunotherapies, we identified the gamma subunit of the fetal acetylcholine receptor (fAChR) as a specific and overexpressed membrane antigen in RMS. Additionally we established a duplex RT-PCR with simultaneous amplification of alpha and gamma subunit message of the fAChR and the quantification of both transcripts resulting in alpha/gammaAChR ratio > 1 was 100% sensitive in alveolar and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Since the fAChR was the first extracellular tumor marker that can distinguish rhabdomyosarcomas from nonrhabdomyomatous tumors and from normal muscle and therefore implies, that the fAChR may be a target for immunotherapeutic strategies, we synthesized a scFv antibody fragment directed against the fAChR and enigineered both a Pseudomonas exotoxin A based immunotoxin as well as a chimeric T cell receptor composed of the antigen-binding domain of the scFv fragment joined to the signaling domain of the T cell receptor zeta chain. The interaction of fAChzeta-transduced T cells with several RMS cell lines but not with fAChR-negative controls induced strong T cell activation, characterized by secretion of high amounts of interferon-gamma. Moreover after co-incubations with RMS cell lines fAChRzeta-transduced T cells as well fAChR specific immunotoxin induced specific receptor-concentration dependent tumor cell lysis. Therefore, fAChRzeta-transduced T cells and the fAChR specific immunotoxin respectively are promising new tools for the immunotherapy of rhabdomyosarcomas and may provide an effective complementary approach to eradicate residual or metastatic RMS cells in patients, since 1. RMS-direceted chemotherapies

  13. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Poulton, Emma Jane; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shen, Danny D.; Tracy, Julia; Shuhart, Margaret C.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Eaton, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  14. The overexpressed human 46-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor mediates endocytosis and sorting of. beta. -glucuronidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Grubb, J.H.; Sly, W.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The authors studied the function of the human small (46-kDa) mannose 6-phosphate receptor (SMPR) in transfected mouse L cells that do not express the larger insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor. Cells overexpressing human SMPR were studied for enzyme binding to cell surface receptors, for binding to intracellular receptors in permeabilized cells, and for receptor-mediated endocytosis of recombinant human {beta}-glucuronidase. Specific binding to human SMPR in permeabilized cells showed a pH optimum between pH 6.0 and pH 6.5. Binding was significant in the present of EDTA but was enhanced by added divalent cations. Up to 2.3{percent} of the total functional receptor could be detected on the cell surface by enzyme binding. They present experiments showing that at very high levels of overexpression, and at pH 6.5, human SMPR mediated the endocytosis of {beta}-glucuronidase. At pH 7.5, the rate of endocytosis was only 14{percent} the rate seen at pH 6.5. Cells overexpressing human SMPR also showed reduced secretion of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase when compared to cells transfected with vector only, suggesting that overexpressed human SMPR can participate in sorting of newly synthesized {beta}-glucuronidase and partially correct the sorting defect in mouse L cells that do not express the insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

  15. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  16. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for /sup 125/I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells.

  17. Identification of Odorant-Receptor Interactions by Global Mapping of the Human Odorome

    PubMed Central

    Audouze, Karine; Tromelin, Anne; Le Bon, Anne Marie; Belloir, Christine; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Kristiansen, Karsten; Brunak, Søren; Taboureau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The human olfactory system recognizes a broad spectrum of odorants using approximately 400 different olfactory receptors (hORs). Although significant improvements of heterologous expression systems used to study interactions between ORs and odorant molecules have been made, screening the olfactory repertoire of hORs remains a tremendous challenge. We therefore developed a chemical systems level approach based on protein-protein association network to investigate novel hOR-odorant relationships. Using this new approach, we proposed and validated new bioactivities for odorant molecules and OR2W1, OR51E1 and OR5P3. As it remains largely unknown how human perception of odorants influence or prevent diseases, we also developed an odorant-protein matrix to explore global relationships between chemicals, biological targets and disease susceptibilities. We successfully experimentally demonstrated interactions between odorants and the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Overall, these results illustrate the potential of integrative systems chemical biology to explore the impact of odorant molecules on human health, i.e. human odorome. PMID:24695519

  18. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  19. Structure and receptor binding preferences of recombinant human A(H3N2) virus hemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J; Chang, Jessie C; Guo, Zhu; Villanueva, Julie M; Stevens, James

    2015-03-01

    A(H3N2) influenza viruses have circulated in humans since 1968, and antigenic drift of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein continues to be a driving force that allows the virus to escape the human immune response. Since the major antigenic sites of the HA overlap into the receptor binding site (RBS) of the molecule, the virus constantly struggles to effectively adapt to host immune responses, without compromising its functionality. Here, we have structurally assessed the evolution of the A(H3N2) virus HA RBS, using an established recombinant expression system. Glycan binding specificities of nineteen A(H3N2) influenza virus HAs, each a component of the seasonal influenza vaccine between 1968 and 2012, were analyzed. Results suggest that while its receptor-binding site has evolved from one that can bind a broad range of human receptor analogs to one with a more restricted binding profile for longer glycans, the virus continues to circulate and transmit efficiently among humans. PMID:25617824

  20. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J.; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  1. Physicochemical characterization of C3b receptors isolated from human erythrocytes by immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Gerdes, J; Stein, H

    1980-01-01

    A high yield of active C3b receptors was obtained by solubilizing human erythrocyte membranes with 2 M KBr, whereas other solubilization agents yielded no, or significantly less activity. Gel filtration of the KBr lysates revealed that the apparent molecular wieght of biologically active C3b receptor molecules was greater than 1 x 10(6). Immunoprecipitates prepared with radio-iodinated KBr lysates and anti-C3 receptor sera (AC3RS) were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) or sodium dodecyl gel filtration. Unreduced SDS-PAGE and gel filtration profiles showed three predominant peaks with apparent mol. wts of 1--1.3 x 10(6), 80,000 and 60,000. Whereas the high mol. wt component decreased only slightly after reduction, the 80,000 and 60,000 mol. wt components disappeared and two new peaks with apparent mol. wts of 38,000 and 18,000 appeared in SDS-PAGE profiles. Although the high mol. wt component present in reduced SDS-PAGE profiles was detectable in some of the control experiments, none of the other peaks could be precipitated with control sera, and these components could be demonstrated only when KBr lysates of C3b receptor-positive erythrocytes and AC3RS that were able to inhibit ligand binding of the C3b receptors were used for precipitation. These findings suggest that (a) the C3b receptor of human erythrocytes in its biologically active state is a macromolecule with an apparent mol. wt higher than 1 x 10(6) and (b) the protein moiety consists predominantly of non-covalently linked protein molecules with apparent mol wts of 80,000 and 60,000. These protein molecules are composed of disulphide-bridged polypeptide chains with apparent mol. wts of 38,000 and 18,000. PMID:7461716

  2. Reporter Cell Lines for the Characterization of the Interactions between Human Nuclear Receptors and Endocrine Disruptors.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Delfosse, Vanessa; Thouennon, Erwan; Bourguet, William; Balaguer, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances interfering with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action, and consequently causing disturbances in the endocrine system. Various pathways are activated by EDCs, including interactions with nuclear receptors (NRs), which are primary targets of numerous environmental contaminants. The main NRs targeted by environmental contaminants are the estrogen (ER α, β) and the androgen (AR) receptors. ERs and AR have pleiotropic regulatory roles in a diverse range of tissues, notably in the mammary gland, the uterus, and the prostate. Thus, dysfunctional ERs and AR signaling due to inappropriate exposure to environmental pollutants may lead to hormonal cancers and infertility. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is also recognized by many environmental molecules. PXR has a protective role of the body through its ability to regulate proteins involved in the metabolism, the conjugation, and the transport of many exogenous and endogenous compounds. However, the permanent activation of this receptor by xenobiotics may lead to premature drug metabolism, the formation, and accumulation of toxic metabolites and defects in hormones homeostasis. The activity of other NRs can also be affected by environmental molecules. Compounds capable of inhibiting or activating the estrogen related (ERRγ), the thyroid hormone (TRα, β), the retinoid X receptors (RXRα, β, γ), and peroxisome proliferator-activated (PPAR α, γ) receptors have been identified and are highly suspected to promote developmental, reproductive, neurological, or metabolic diseases in humans and wildlife. In this review, we provide an overview of reporter cell lines established to characterize the human NR activities of a large panel of EDCs including natural as well as industrial compounds such as pesticides, plasticizers, surfactants, flame retardants, and cosmetics. PMID:26029163

  3. Reporter Cell Lines for the Characterization of the Interactions between Human Nuclear Receptors and Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Delfosse, Vanessa; Thouennon, Erwan; Bourguet, William; Balaguer, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances interfering with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action, and consequently causing disturbances in the endocrine system. Various pathways are activated by EDCs, including interactions with nuclear receptors (NRs), which are primary targets of numerous environmental contaminants. The main NRs targeted by environmental contaminants are the estrogen (ER α, β) and the androgen (AR) receptors. ERs and AR have pleiotropic regulatory roles in a diverse range of tissues, notably in the mammary gland, the uterus, and the prostate. Thus, dysfunctional ERs and AR signaling due to inappropriate exposure to environmental pollutants may lead to hormonal cancers and infertility. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is also recognized by many environmental molecules. PXR has a protective role of the body through its ability to regulate proteins involved in the metabolism, the conjugation, and the transport of many exogenous and endogenous compounds. However, the permanent activation of this receptor by xenobiotics may lead to premature drug metabolism, the formation, and accumulation of toxic metabolites and defects in hormones homeostasis. The activity of other NRs can also be affected by environmental molecules. Compounds capable of inhibiting or activating the estrogen related (ERRγ), the thyroid hormone (TRα, β), the retinoid X receptors (RXRα, β, γ), and peroxisome proliferator-activated (PPAR α, γ) receptors have been identified and are highly suspected to promote developmental, reproductive, neurological, or metabolic diseases in humans and wildlife. In this review, we provide an overview of reporter cell lines established to characterize the human NR activities of a large panel of EDCs including natural as well as industrial compounds such as pesticides, plasticizers, surfactants, flame retardants, and cosmetics. PMID:26029163

  4. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  5. Modulation of AP-1 activity by the human progesterone receptor in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, A M; Bamberger, C M; Gellersen, B; Schulte, H M

    1996-01-01

    The composite transcription factor activating protein 1 (AP-1) integrates various mitogenic signals in a large number of cell types, and is therefore a major regulator of cell proliferation. In the normal human endometrium, proliferation and differentiation alternate in a cyclic fashion, with progesterone being largely implicated in the latter process. However, the effects of progesterone and the progesterone receptor (hPR) on AP-1 activity in the human endometrium are not known. To address this issue, HEC-1-B endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, which are devoid of hPR, were transfected with luciferase reporter constructs driven by two different AP-1-dependent promoters. Unexpectedly, cotransfection of hPR caused a marked induction of luciferase activity in the absence of ligand on both promoters. The magnitude of this induction was similar to that observed in response to the phorbol ester TPA. Addition of ligand reversed the stimulating effect of the unliganded hPR on AM activity in these cells. These effects were specific for hPR, and were not observed with either human estrogen receptor or human glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore, they strictly depended on the presence of AP-1-responsive sequences within target promoters. Finally, the described effects of hPR on AP-1 activity were shown to be cell-type specific, because they could not be demonstrated in SKUT-1-B, JEG-3, and COS-7 cells. To our knowledge this is the first report of an unliganded steroid receptor stimulating AP-1 activity. This effect and its reversal in the presence of ligand suggest a novel mechanism, through which hPR can act as a key regulator of both proliferation and differentiation in the human endometrium. PMID:8650238

  6. Impact of gene polymorphisms of gonadotropins and their receptors on human reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Casarini, Livio; Santi, Daniele; Marino, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Gonadotropins and their receptors' genes carry several single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in endocrine genotypes modulating reproductive parameters, diseases, and lifespan leading to important implications for reproductive success and potential relevance during human evolution. Here we illustrate common genotypes of the gonadotropins and gonadotropin receptors' genes and their clinical implications in phenotypes relevant for reproduction such as ovarian cycle length, age of menopause, testosterone levels, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We then discuss their possible role in human reproduction and adaptation to the environment. Gonadotropins and their receptors' variants are differently distributed among human populations. Some hints suggest that they may be the result of natural selection that occurred in ancient times, increasing the individual chance of successful mating, pregnancy, and effective post-natal parental cares. The gender-related differences in the regulation of the reproductive endocrine systems imply that many of these genotypes may lead to sex-dependent effects, increasing the chance of mating and reproductive success in one sex at the expenses of the other sex. Also, we suggest that sexual conflicts within the FSH and LH-choriogonadotropin receptor genes contributed to maintain genotypes linked to subfertility among humans. Because the distribution of polymorphic markers results in a defined geographical pattern due to human migrations rather than natural selection, these polymorphisms may have had only a weak impact on reproductive success. On the contrary, such genotypes could acquire relevant consequences in the modern, developed societies in which parenthood attempts often occur at a later age, during a short, suboptimal reproductive window, making clinical fertility treatments necessary. PMID:26370242

  7. Functional Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Generated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Tommy S; Alvarez, Frances J D; Reinert, Nathan J; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Peijun; Tang, Pei

    2016-08-26

    Human Cys-loop receptors are important therapeutic targets. High-resolution structures are essential for rational drug design, but only a few are available due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of protein suitable for structural studies. Although expression of proteins in E. coli offers advantages of high yield, low cost, and fast turnover, this approach has not been thoroughly explored for full-length human Cys-loop receptors because of the conventional wisdom that E. coli lacks the specific chaperones and post-translational modifications potentially required for expression of human Cys-loop receptors. Here we report the successful production of full-length wild type human α7nAChR from E. coli Chemically induced chaperones promote high expression levels of well-folded proteins. The choice of detergents, lipids, and ligands during purification determines the final protein quality. The purified α7nAChR not only forms pentamers as imaged by negative-stain electron microscopy, but also retains pharmacological characteristics of native α7nAChR, including binding to bungarotoxin and positive allosteric modulators specific to α7nAChR. Moreover, the purified α7nAChR injected into Xenopus oocytes can be activated by acetylcholine, choline, and nicotine, inhibited by the channel blockers QX-222 and phencyclidine, and potentiated by the α7nAChR specific modulators PNU-120596 and TQS. The successful generation of functional human α7nAChR from E. coli opens a new avenue for producing mammalian Cys-loop receptors to facilitate structure-based rational drug design. PMID:27385587

  8. DIFFERENCES IN SENSITIVITY BUT NOT SELECTIVITY OF XENOESTROGEN BINDING TO ALLIGATOR VERSUS HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Cynthia V.; Hartig, Phillip C.; Cardon, Mary C.; Lambright, Christy R.; Bobseine, Kathy L.; Guillette, Louis J.; Gray, L. Earl; Wilson, Vickie S.

    2010-01-01

    Reproductive abnormalities in alligators exposed to contaminants in Lake Apopka, Florida, USA represent a clear example of endocrine disruption in wildlife. Several of these contaminants that are not able to bind to mammalian estrogen receptors (such as atrazine and cyanazine) have previously been reported to bind to the alligator estrogen receptor from oviductal tissue. Binding of known Lake Apopka contaminants to full length estrogen receptors alpha from human (hERα) and alligator (aERα) was assessed in a side-by-side comparison within the same assay system. Baculovirus-expressed recombinant hERα and aERα were used in a competitive binding assay. Atrazine and cyanazine were not able to bind to either receptor. p,p′-Dicofol was able to bind to aERα with a concentration inhibiting 50% of binding (IC50) of 4 μM, while only partially displacing 17β-estradiol (E2) from hERα and yielding a projected IC50 of 45 μM. Chemicals that only partially displaced E2 from either receptor, including some dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolites and trans-nonachlor, appeared to have higher affinity for aERα than hERα. p,p′-Dicofol-mediated transcriptional activation through aERα and hERα was assessed to further explore the preferential binding of p,p′-dicofol to aERα over hERα. p,p′-Dicofol was able to stimulate transcriptional activation in a similar manner with both receptors. However, the in vitro results obtained with p,p′-dicofol were not reflected in an in vivo mammalian model, where Kelthane™ (mixed o,p′-and p,p′-dicofol isomers) did not elicit estrogenic effects. In conclusion, although there was no evidence of exclusively species-specific estrogen receptor binders, some xenoestrogens, especially p,p′-dicofol, had a higher affinity for aERα than for hERα. PMID:20821664

  9. Human and Host Species Transferrin Receptor 1 Use by North American Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Min; Fofana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least five New World (NW) arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in South America. These pathogenic clade B viruses, as well as nonpathogenic arenaviruses of the same clade, use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) of their host species to enter cells. Pathogenic viruses are distinguished from closely related nonpathogenic ones by their additional ability to utilize human TfR1 (hTfR1). Here, we investigate the receptor usage of North American arenaviruses, whose entry proteins share greatest similarity with those of the clade B viruses. We show that all six North American arenaviruses investigated utilize host species TfR1 orthologs and present evidence consistent with arenavirus-mediated selection pressure on the TfR1 of the North American arenavirus host species. Notably, one of these viruses, AV96010151, closely related to the prototype Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV), entered cells using hTfR1, consistent with a role for a WWAV-like virus in three fatal human infections whose causative agent has not been identified. In addition, modest changes were sufficient to convert hTfR1 into a functional receptor for most of these viruses, suggesting that a minor alteration in virus entry protein may allow these viruses to use hTfR1. Our data establish TfR1 as a cellular receptor for North American arenaviruses, highlight an “arms race” between these viruses and their host species, support the association of North American arenavirus with fatal human infections, and suggest that these viruses have a higher potential to emerge and cause human diseases than has previously been appreciated. IMPORTANCE hTfR1 use is a key determinant for a NW arenavirus to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. All known pathogenic NW arenaviruses are transmitted in South America by their host rodents. North American arenaviruses are generally considered nonpathogenic, but some of these viruses have been tentatively implicated in human fatalities. We show that these North American

  10. Human type II receptor for bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs): extension of the two-kinase receptor model to the BMPs.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, F; Ventura, F; Doody, J; Massagué, J

    1995-01-01

    Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are universal regulators of animal development. We report the identification and cloning of the BMP type II receptor (BMPR-II), a missing component of this receptor system in vertebrates. BMPR-II is a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase that binds BMP-2 and BMP-7 in association with multiple type I receptors, including BMPR-IA/Brk1, BMPR-IB, and ActR-I, which is also an activin type I receptor. Cloning of BMPR-II resulted from a strong interaction of its cytoplasmic domain with diverse transforming growth factor beta family type I receptor cytoplasmic domains in a yeast two-hybrid system. In mammalian cells, however, the interaction of BMPR-II is restricted to BMP type I receptors and is ligand dependent. BMPR-II binds BMP-2 and -7 on its own, but binding is enhanced by coexpression of type I BMP receptors. BMP-2 and BMP-7 can induce a transcriptional response when added to cells coexpressing ActR-I and BMPR-II but not to cells expressing either receptor alone. The kinase activity of both receptors is essential for signaling. Thus, despite their ability to bind to type I and II receptors receptors separately, BMPs appear to require the cooperation of these two receptors for optimal binding and for signal transduction. The combinatorial nature of these receptors and their capacity to crosstalk with the activin receptor system may underlie the multifunctional nature of their ligands. PMID:7791754

  11. Expression of Tachykinins and Tachykinin Receptors and Interaction with Kisspeptin in Human Granulosa and Cumulus Cells.

    PubMed

    García-Ortega, Jordán; Pinto, Francisco M; Prados, Nicolás; Bello, Aixa R; Almeida, Teresa A; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Candenas, Luz

    2016-06-01

    The neurokinin B/NK3 receptor (NK3R) and kisspeptin/kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R), two systems which are essential for reproduction, are coexpressed in human mural granulosa (MGC) and cumulus cells (CCs). However, little is known about the presence of other members of the tachykinin family in the human ovary. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of substance P (SP), hemokinin-1 (HK-1), NK1 receptor (NK1R), and NK2 receptor (NK2R) in MGCs and CCs collected from preovulatory follicles of oocyte donors at the time of oocyte retrieval. RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blotting were used to investigate the patterns of expression of tachykinin and tachykinin receptor mRNAs and proteins and the possible interaction between the tachykinin family and kisspeptin. Intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in MGCs after exposure to SP or kisspeptin in the presence of SP were also measured. We found that SP, HK-1, the truncated NK1R isoform NK1R-Tr, and NK2R were all expressed in MGCs and CCs. NK1R-Tr mRNA and NK2R mRNA and protein levels were higher in MGCs than in CCs from the same patients. Treatment of cells with kisspeptin modulated the expression of HK-1, NK3R, and KISS1R mRNAs, whereas treatment with SP regulated kisspeptin mRNA levels and reduced the [Ca(2+)]i response produced by kisspeptin. These data demonstrate that the whole tachykinin system is expressed and acts in coordination with kisspeptin to regulate granulosa cell function in the human ovary. PMID:27146034

  12. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin receptors in various epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Venencie, P Y; Méduri, G; Pissard, S; Jolivet, A; Loosfelt, H; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1999-09-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes were used to study the localization of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin (LH/hCG) receptors in human skin. Immunolabelling was observed only in the epidermis and derived structures but not in the dermis. The basal, spinal and granular layers were stained, whereas no receptors were detected in the non-nucleated horny cells. In the growing (anagen) hair, immunostaining was found in the inner root sheath below the level of the sebaceous glands and in the outer root sheath above this level. In the resting (telogen) hair, only the latter staining was observed. In the sebaceous glands, only the thin cells close to the walls of the ducts were immunolabelled. In the eccrine sweat glands, the external clear cells were stained in the secretory portion of the gland, whereas only the cells close to the lumen were labelled in the ducts. The distribution of LH/hCG receptors was compared with that of steroidogenic enzymes (side chain cleavage cytochrome P450, adrenodoxin, 3-beta-hydroxy-5-ene steroid dehydrogenase Delta5-Delta4 isomerase, 17-hydroxylase cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 aromatase). Only partial overlaps were observed. The presence of LH receptor mRNA in the skin was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the human follicle-stimulating hormone